Science.gov

Sample records for additional die casting

  1. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  2. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C. Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    This investigation determined whether selected ion beam sputtered coatings on H-13 die steel would have the potential of improving the thermal fatigue behavior of the steel used as a die in aluminum die casting. The coatings were selected to test candidate insulators and metals capable of providing protection of the die surface. The studies indicate that 1 micrometer thick W and Pt coatings reduced the thermal fatigue more than any other coating tested and are candidates to be used on a die surface to increase die life.

  3. On the performance of low pressure die-cast Al-Cu based automotive alloys: Role of additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Gergis Adel

    The present study focuses on the effect of alloying elements, namely, strontium (Sr), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), scandium (Sc) and silver(Ag) individually or in combination, on the performance of a newly developed Al-2%Cu based alloy. A total of thirteen alloy compositions were used in the study. Tensile test bar castings were prepared employing the low pressure die casting (LPDC) technique. The test bars were solution heat treated at 495°C for 8 hours, followed by quenching in warm water, and then subjected to different isochronal aging treatments using an aging time of 5 hours and aging temperatures of 155°C, 180°C, 200°C, 240°C and 300°C. Tensile testing of as-cast and heat-treated test bars was carried out at room temperature using a strain rate of 4 x 10-4s-1. Five test bars were used per alloy composition/condition. Hardness measurements were also carried out on these alloys using a Brinell hardness tester. The microstructures of selected samples were examined using optical microscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The results showed that adding Ti in the amount of 0.15 wt% in the form of Al-5%Ti-1%B master alloy is sufficient to refine the grains in the cast structure in the presence of 200 ppm Sr (0.02 wt%). Addition of Zr and Sc did not contribute further to the grain refining effect. The main role of addition of these two elements appeared in the formation of complex compounds with Al and Ti. Their presence resulted in extending the aging temperature range before the onset of softening. Mathematical analysis of the hardness and tensile data was carried out using the Minitab statistical software program. It was determined that the alloy containing (0.5wt% Zr + 0.15wt% Ti) is the most effective in maximizing the alloy tensile strength over the range of aging temperatures, from 155°C to 300°C. Addition of Ag is beneficial at high aging temperatures, in the range of 240°C-300°C. However, it is less effective compared to the (Zr + Ti

  4. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  5. Die Soldering in Aluminium Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Kenik, E.A.; Viswanathan, S.

    2000-03-15

    Two types of tests, dipping tests and dip-coating tests were carried out on small steel cylinders using pure aluminum and 380 alloy to investigate the mechanism of die soldering during aluminum die casting. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology and composition of the phases formed during soldering. A soldering mechanism is postulated based on experimental observations. A soldering critical temperature is postulated at which iron begins to react with aluminum to form an aluminum-rich liquid phase and solid intermetallic compounds. When the temperature at the die surface is higher than this critical temperature, the aluminum-rich phase is liquid and joins the die with the casting during the subsequent solidification. The paper discusses the mechanism of soldering for the case of pure aluminum and 380 alloy casting in a steel mold, the factors that promote soldering, and the strength of the bond formed when soldering occurs. conditions, an aluminum-rich soldering layer may also form over the intermetallic layer. Although a significant amount of research has been conducted on the nature of these intermetallics, little is known about the conditions under which soldering occurs.

  6. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  7. Modeling the Mechanical Performance of Die Casting Dies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller

    2004-02-27

    The following report covers work performed at Ohio State on modeling the mechanical performance of dies. The focus of the project was development and particularly verification of finite element techniques used to model and predict displacements and stresses in die casting dies. The work entails a major case study performed with and industrial partner on a production die and laboratory experiments performed at Ohio State.

  8. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C.-Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental research designs investigating candidate materials and processes involved in protective die surface coating procedures by sputter deposition, using ion beam technologies, are discussed. Various pre-test results show that none of the coatings remained completely intact for 15,000 test cycles. The longest lifetime was observed for coatings such as tungsten, platinum, and molybdenum which reduced thermal fatigue, but exhibited oxidation and suppressed crack initiation only as long as the coating did not fracture. Final test results confirmed earlier findings and coatings with Pt and W proved to be the candidate materials to be used on a die surface to increase die life. In the W-coated specimens, which remained intact on the surface after thermal fatigue testing, no oxidation was found under the coating, although a few cracks formed on the surface where the coating broke down. Further research is planned.

  9. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    % in AM50 to over 9% in AZ91, more of the intermetallic Mg17Al12 is formed in the microstructure. For instance, for 15 increase in the aluminum content from AM50 to AM60, the volume fraction of eutectic present in the microstructure increases by 35%! Eventually, the brittle Mg17Al12 compound forms an interconnected network that reduces ductility and impact resistance. The lower aluminum in AM50 and AM60 are therefore a desirable feature in applications that call for higher impact resistance. Further improvement in impact resistance depends on the processing condition of the casting. Sound castings without porosity and impurities will have better mechanical properties. Since magnesium oxidizes readily, good melting and metal transfer practices are essential. The liquid metal has to be protected from oxidation at all times and entrainment of oxide films in the casting needs to be prevented. In this regard, there is evidence that us of vacuum to evacuate air from the die casting cavity can improve the quality of the castings. Fast cooling rates, leading to smaller grain size are beneficial and promote superior mechanical properties. Micro-segregation and banding are two additional defect types often encountered in magnesium alloys, in particular in AZ91D. While difficult to eliminate, segregation can be minimized by careful thermal management of the dies and the shot sleeve. A major source of segregation is the premature solidification in the shot sleeve. The primary solid dendrites are carried into the casting and form a heterogeneous structure. Furthermore, during the shot, segregation banding can occur. The remedies for this kind of defects include a hotter shot sleeve, use of insulating coatings on the shot sleeve and a short lag time between pouring into the shot sleeve and the shot.

  10. Solvent casting flow from slot die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Semi; Nam, Jaewook

    2015-11-01

    A continuous solvent casting method using a slot die can precisely control the film thickness by adjusting the operating conditions, such as the belt speed and pumping rate, not the liquid property. Therefore, it is a suitable method for high precision continuous film production. In this particular method, the dope, or casting solution, is pumped through the feed slot to form a short curtain between the die and the moving belt. Although this method is widely used in producing films for various applications, it is difficult to find indepth analyses of such flow. In this study, we developed a finite element computational model for the steady-state two-dimensional sovent casting flow from the slot die. The effect of die configurations, rheological properties and operating conditions on the behavior and shape of the gas/liquid interfaces and the location of the dynamic contact line, which is the place where the dope meets the moving belt, were investigated.

  11. Fatigue of die cast zinc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, O.N.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2006-04-01

    The rotating bending fatigue limit of die cast zinc alloy 2, alloy 3, alloy 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined as a part of an on-going program by ILZRO into the mechanical properties of die cast zinc. The stress-life (S-N) curves of alloys 3, 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined previously. This presentation reports the results of the S-N curve for Alloy 2 and the calculated fatigue limits for all five alloys. During the previous stress-life testing, the samples were stopped at 10 million cycles and the fatigue limit for alloy 3, alloy 5, and AcuZinc 5 appeared to be higher and the fatigue limit for ZA-8 appeared to be lower than the values reported in the literature. This was further investigated in alloy 5 and ZA-8 by testing continuous cast bulk alloy 5 and ZA-8.

  12. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 2, Die casting research

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, D.

    1994-06-01

    Four subprojects were completed: development and evaluation of die coatings, accelerated die life characterization of die materials, evaluation of fluid flow and solidification modeling programs, selection and characterization of Al-based die casting alloys, and influence of die materials and coatings on die casting quality.

  13. Use of RSP Tooling to Manufacture Die Casting Dies

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin McHugh

    2004-07-01

    The technology and art used to construct die casting dies has seen many improvements over the years. However, the time lag from when a design is finalized to the time a tool is in production has remained essentially the same. The two main causes for the bottleneck are the need to qualify a part design by making prototypes (usually from an alternative process), and the production tooling lead time after the prototypes are approved. Production tooling costs are high due to the labor and equipment costs associated with transforming a forged block of tool steel into a finished tool. CNC machining, sink EDM, benching, engraving and heat treatment unit operations are typically involved. As a result, there is increasing interest in rapid tooling (RT) technologies that shorten the design-to-part cycle and reduce the cost of dies. There are currently more than 20 RT methods being developed and refined around the world (1). The "rapid" in rapid tooling suggests time compression for tool delivery, but does not address robustness as nearly all RT approaches are intended for low-volume prototype work, primarily for molding plastics. Few options exist for die casting. An RT technology suitable for production-quality tooling in the time it normally takes for prototype tooling is highly desirable. In fact, there would be no need for a distinction between prototype and production tooling. True prototype parts could be made using the same processing conditions and materials intended for production. Qualification of the prototype part would allow the manufacturer to go directly into production with the same tool. A relatively new RT technology, Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling, is capable of making production-quality tooling in an RT timeframe for die casting applications. RSP Tooling, was developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and commercialized with the formation of RSP Tooling, LLC (2). This paper describes the process, and

  14. Characterization of Spray Lubricants for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-01-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. The cooling effects of the die lubricant were investigated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), heat flux sensors (HFS), and infrared imaging. The evolution of the heat flux and pictures taken using a high speed infrared camera revealed that lubricant application was a transient process. The short time response of the HFS allows the monitoring and data acquisition of the surface temperature and heat flux without additional data processing. A similar set of experiments was performed with deionized water in order to assess the lubricant effect. The high heat flux obtained at 300 C was attributed to the wetting and absorbant properties of the lubricant. Pictures of the spray cone and lubricant flow on the die were also used to explain the heat flux evolution.

  15. Die Casting Part Distortion: Prediction and Attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Dr, R. Allen Miller

    2002-02-12

    The goal of this research was to predict the part deformation and residual stresses after ejection from the die and cooling to room temperature. A finite element model was built to achieve this goal and several modeling techniques were investigated throughout this research. Die-casting is a very complex process and the researchers are faced with a large number of hard to solve physical problems when modeling the process. Several assumptions are made in our simulation model. The first significant assumption is the instantaneous cavity filling. This means that the cavity filling stage is not considered in our model. Considering the cavity filling stage increases the modeling complexity as a result of different flow patterns. expected in the shot sleeve, gate, runner and different cavity features. The flow of gas from the cavity through the vents is another problem that is ignored in our model as a result of this assumption. Our second assumption is that the cast metal has uniform temperature distribution inside the cavity, at the starting point of simulation. This temperature is assumed to be over liquidus limit, i.e. the solid fraction is 0.0% of the cast metal. The third assumption is due to ABAQUS (commercial software used in this research) limitations. ABAQUS cannot deal with multi-phase models; therefore we use solid elements to define the casting instead of multi-phase (liquid/solid) elements. Liquid elements can carry the hydrostatic pressure from the shot sleeve and apply it on the cavity surfaces, while the solid elements do not have this capability. To compensate for this assumption we add the cavity pressure as a boundary condition and apply it on the cavity surface separately from the part. Another issue with this assumption is that, liquid casting can follow the cavity shape when it distorts. With the use of solid elements to represent the casting during its liquid state, it loses this capability to follow the cavity. Several techniques were tested to

  16. Effect of Some Parameters on the Cast Component Properties in Hot Chamber Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rupinder; Singh, Harvir

    2016-04-01

    Hot chamber die casting process is designed to achieve high dimensional accuracy for small products by forcing molten metal under high pressure into reusable moulds, called dies. The present research work is aimed at study of some parameters (as a case study of spring adjuster) on cast component properties in hot chamber die casting process. Three controllable factors of the hot chamber die casting process (namely: pressure at second phase, metal pouring temperature and die opening time) were studied at three levels each by Taguchi's parametric approach and single-response optimization was conducted to identify the main factors controlling surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the casting. Castings were produced using aluminium alloy, at recommended parameters through hot chamber die casting process. Analysis shows that in hot chamber die casting process the percentage contribution of second phase pressure, die opening time, metal pouring temperature for surface hardness is 82.48, 9.24 and 6.78 % respectively. While in the case of weight of cast component the contribution of second phase pressure is 94.03 %, followed by metal pouring temperature and die opening time (4.58 and 0.35 % respectively). Further for dimensional accuracy contribution of die opening time is 76.97 %, metal pouring temperature is 20.05 % and second phase pressure is 1.56 %. Confirmation experiments were conducted at an optimal condition showed that the surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the castings were improved significantly.

  17. Investigation of the interface phenomena and its effect on erosion and corrosion in aluminum die casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yeou-Li

    When performing an aluminum die casting operation, hot molten metal is injected into the die cavity. The die locks for part solidification. After the part solidifies, the casting will eject from the die. During this operation, the die surface experiences thermal cycling, high velocity impingement, chemical attack and interface friction. Thermal cycling leads to heat checking wear, high velocity impingement to erosive wear, chemical attack to soldering, and interface friction to the part bending and/or galling during ejection. The die casting process is a very capital intensive operation. All the above problems result in down time of the die casting shop. This down time results in loss of production and ultimately loss of capital. The purpose of this study is to (a) investigate the physical and chemical phenomena active at the die-cast aluminum metal interface, and (b) understand the performance of selected die surface treatments in protecting the interface from aluminum foundry alloy. Four laboratory tests were selected to study the aluminum die casting stages: (a) molten metal injection stage (erosive test), (b) filling and solidification (dissolution and wettability tests), and (c) parts ejection stage (friction test). Both qualitative and quantitative results were generated. This research produced many interesting discussions. In erosive testing, in addition to impingement velocity, the melt superheat and alloy types also found to play an important role in the erosion of the die steel. In the past, die casters believed that the higher molten aluminum temperature would cause higher erosive wear loss. However, this study found lower melt temperatures to result in greater erosive wear. In dissolution testing, the alloy elements were found to play an important role. In the past, die casters thought that Fe (Iron) was the main element which affects the dissolution of the die steel into the molten aluminum. This was found not to be necessary true. The Mn and Si

  18. Microstructures and properties of aluminum die casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M. M. Makhlouf; D. Apelian; L. Wang

    1998-10-01

    This document provides descriptions of the microstructure of different aluminum die casting alloys and to relate the various microstructures to the alloy chemistry. It relates the microstructures of the alloys to their main engineering properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, fatigue life, impact resistance, wear resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Finally, it serves as a reference source for aluminum die casting alloys.

  19. Casting defects in low-pressure die-cast aluminum alloy wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Cockcroft, S. L.; Maijer, D. M.; Zhu, J. D.; Phillion, A. B.

    2005-11-01

    Defects in automotive aluminum alloy casting continue to challenge metallurgists and production engineers as greater emphasis is placed on product quality and production cost. A range of casting-related defects found in low-pressure die-cast aluminum wheels were examined metallographically in samples taken from several industrial wheel-casting facilities. The defects examined include macro- and micro- porosity, entrained oxide films, and exogenous oxide inclusions. Particular emphasis is placed on the impact of these defects with respect to the three main casting-related criteria by which automotive wheel quality are judged: wheel cosmetics, air-tightness, and wheel mechanical performance.

  20. The thermal fatigue resistance of H-13 Die Steel for aluminum die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The effects of welding, five selected surface coatings, and stress relieving on the thermal fatigue resistance of H-13 Die Steel for aluminum die casting dies were studied using eleven thermal fatigue specimens. Stress relieving was conducted after each 5,000 cycle interval at 1050 F for three hours. Four thermal fatigue specimens were welded with H-13 or maraging steel welding rods at ambient and elevated temperatures and subsequently, subjected to different post-weld heat treatments. Crack patterns were examined at 5,000, 10,000, and 15,000 cycles. The thermal fatigue resistance is expressed by two crack parameters which are the average maximum crack and the average cracked area. The results indicate that a significant improvement in thermal fatigue resistance over the control was obtained from the stress-relieving treatment. Small improvements were obtained from the H-13 welded specimens and from a salt bath nitrogen and carbon-surface treatment. The other surface treatments and welded specimens either did not affect or had a detrimental influence on the thermal fatigue properties of the H-13 die steel.

  1. An indicator for fitting castings to a die.

    PubMed

    Troendle, G R; Troendle, K B

    1992-10-01

    This article describes a procedure for making an indicator to be used in fitting a casting to a die. It also describes how to use the indicator in the laboratory. The materials for making the indicator are inexpensive, present no health hazard, and are readily available at any arts and crafts store. PMID:1403953

  2. Evaluation of permanent die coatings to improve the wear resistance of die casting dies. Final project report, January 1, 1995--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Shivpuri, R.

    1997-09-18

    Die Casting dies are subject to severe service conditions during the die casting operation. While these severe conditions are necessary to achieve high production rates, they cause the dies which are commonly made of H13 die steel, to suffer frequent failures. The major die failure mechanisms are erosion or washout, Heat checking, soldering and corrosion. Due to their geometrical complexity, die casting dies are very expensive (some dies cost over a million dollars), and thus a large number of parts have to be produced by a die, to justify this cost and leverage the advantages of the die casting process (high production rates, low manpower costs). A potential increase in the die service life, thus has a significant impact on the economics of the die; casting operation. There are many ways to extend die life: developing new wear resistant die materials, developing new surface treatments including coatings, improving heat treatment of existing H13 dies, using better lubricants that can protect the die material, or modifying the die geometry and process parameters to reduce the intensity of wear. Of these the use of coatings to improve the wear resistance of the die surface has shown a lot of promise. Consequently, use of coatings in the die casting industry and their wide use to decrease die wear can improve significantly the productivity of shop operations resulting in large savings in material and energy usage.

  3. Qualitative Reasoning for Additional Die Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller; Dehua Cui; Yuming Ma

    2003-05-28

    If manufacturing incompatibility of a product can be evaluated at the early product design stage, the designers can modify their design to reduce the effect of potential manufacturing problems. This will result in fewer manufacturing problems, less redsign, less expensive tooling, lower cost, better quality, and shorter development time. For a given design, geometric reasoning can predict qualitatively the behaviors of a physical manufacturing process by representing and reasoning with incomplete knowledge of the physical phenomena. It integrates a design with manufacturing processes to help designers simultaneously consider design goals and manufacturing constraints during the early design stage. The geometric reasoning approach can encourage design engineers to qualitatively evaluate the compatibility of their design with manufacturing limitations and requirements.

  4. Die casting die deflections: Prediction and attenuation. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Ahuett-Garza, H.; Choudhury, A.K.; Dedhia, S.

    1998-05-01

    This report summarizes two years of research intended to develop methods to model and predict the deflection patterns in die casting dies. No comprehensive analysis of this type had previously been completed. The die casting process is complex and involves numerous mechanical and thermal phenomena that effect the mechanical behavior of the die. A critical activity in this work was sorting out and evaluating the relative contributions of the various mechanisms to die deflections. This evaluation was accomplished through a series of simple engineering analyses based primarily on the order of magnitude of the influence of each load considered on die deflections. A modeling approach incorporating commercially available finite element analysis software was developed and tested. The model evolved by testing simple models against more comprehensive models and against the limited experimental data that is available. The development of the modeling approach lead to consideration of the die casting machine in more detail than was originally anticipated. The machine is critical and cannot be ignored. A simplified model described as a spring/platen model was developed to account for the machine platens, tie bars, and toggles. The characteristics of this model are described and predictions based on this model are compared against full machine models and measured deflections of machine platens. Details of the modeling approach and the various case studies are provided in the report and in several publications that have resulted from the work.

  5. A study of erosion in die casting dies by a multiple pin accelerated erosion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivpuri, R.; Yu, M.; Venkatesan, K.; Chu, Y.-L.

    1995-04-01

    An accelerated erosion test was developed to evaluate the erosion resistance of die materials and coatings for die casting application. An acceleration in wear was achieved by selecting pyramid-shaped core pins, hypereutectic aluminum silicon casting alloy, high melt temperatures and high gate velocities. Multiple pin design was selected to enable multiple test sites for comparative evaluation. Apilot run was conducted on a 300 ton commercial die casting machine at various sites (pins) to verify the thermal and flow similarities. Subsequently, campaigns were run on two different 300 ton commercial die casting machines to evaluate H13 die material and different coatings for erosive resistance. Coatings and surface treatments evaluated included surface micropeening, titanium nitride, boron carbide, vanadium carbide, and metallic coatings—tungsten, molybdenum, and platinum. Recent campaigns with different melt temperatures have indicated a possible link between soldering phenomena and erosive wear. This paper presents the details of the test set up and the results of the pilot and evaluation tests.

  6. Manufacture of die casting dies by hot isostatic pressing. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Luk, K.; Brucher, H.G.

    1998-09-01

    The reason for this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Doehler-Jarvis was to investigate the manufacture die-casting dies with internal water-cooling lines by hot-isostatic pressing (HIPing) of H13 tool steel powder. The use of HIPing will allow the near-net-shape manufacture of dies and the strategic placement of water-cooling lines during manufacture. The production of near-net-shape dies by HIPing involves the generation of HIPing diagrams, the design of the can that can be used for HIPing a die with complex details, strategic placement of water-cooling lines in the die, computer modeling to predict movement of the water lines during HIPing, and the development of strategies for placing water lines in the appropriate locations. The results presented include a literature review, particle analysis and characterization of H13 tool steel powder, and modeling of the HIPing process.

  7. Deburring die-castings by wet vibratory plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeschbart, H. M.

    1980-02-01

    A wet vibratory procedure for the removal of burrs from die castings is described. In this process synthetic abrasive chips and detergent solutions are agitated with the work in such a way as to produce a spiral circulatory movement. Details of various forms of vibrator basin and shapes of abrasive are illustrated. The automation of deburring is illustrated through the application of vibrators of spiral design in combination with transport and drying devices.

  8. Deburring die-castings by wet vibratory plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeschbart, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A wet vibratory procedure for the removal of burrs from die castings is described. In this process synthetic abrasive chips and detergent solutions are agitated with the work in such a way as to produce a spiral circulatory movement. Details of various forms of vibrator basin and shapes of abrasive are illustrated. The automation of deburring is illustrated through the application of vibrators of spiral design in combination with transport and drying devices.

  9. Impact properties of zinc die cast alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Manahan, M.P.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2005-01-01

    Alloys 3, 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were tested at five temperatures between -40 C and room temperature to determine impact properties. Izod impact energy data was obtained in accordance with ASTM D256. Unlike ASTM E23, these samples were tested with a milled notch in order to compare with plastic samples. In addition, flexural data was obtained for design use.

  10. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Improved Die Casting Process to Preserve the Life of the Inserts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam, PI; Xuejun Zhu, Sr. Research Associate

    2012-09-30

    The goal of this project was to study the combined effects of die design, proper internal cooling and efficient die lubricants on die life. The project targeted improvements in die casting insert life by: Optomized Die Design for Reduced Surface Temperature: The life of die casting dies is significantly shorter when the die is exposed to elevated temperature for significant periods of time. Any die operated under conditions leading to surface temperature in excess of 1050oF undergoes structural changes that reduce its strength. Optimized die design can improve die life significantly. This improvement can be accomplished by means of cooling lines, baffles and bubblers in the die. A key objective of the project was to establish criteria for the minimal distance of the cooling lines from the surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. The Uddeholm Dievar steel evaluated in this program showed superior resistance to thermal fatigue resistance. Based on the experimental evidence, cooling lines could be placed as close as 0.5" from the surface. Die Life Extension by Optimized Die Lubrication: The life of die casting dies is affected by additions made to its surface with the proper lubricants. These lubricants will protect the surface from the considerable temperature peaks that occur when the molten melt enters the die. Dies will reach a significantly higher temperature without this lubricant being applied. The amount and type of the lubricant are critical variables in the die casting process. However, these lubricants must not corrode the die surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. Chem- Trend participated in the program with die

  11. Determination of the metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient of high pressure die cast B390 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongyou; Guo, Zhipeng; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    High-pressure die cast B390 alloy was prepared on a 350 ton cold chamber die casting machine. The metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient of the alloy was investigated. Considering the filling process, a "finger"-shaped casting was designed for the experiments. This casting consisted of five plates with different thicknesses (0.05 inch or 1.27 mm to 0.25 inch or 6.35 mm) as well as individual ingates and overflows. Experiments under various operation conditions were conducted, and temperatures were measured at various specific locations inside the die. Based on the results, the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and heat flux were determined by solving the inverse heat transfer problem. The influence of the mold-filling sequence, sensor locations, as well as processing parameters including the casting pressure, die temperature, and fast/slow shot speeds on the heat transfer coefficient were discussed.

  12. Notched bar Izod impact properties of zinc die castings

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, O.N.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2007-03-01

    Notched bar Izod impact testing of zinc die cast Alloy 3, Alloy 5, ZA-8, and AcuZinc 5 was performed at five temperatures between -40\\mDC and room temperature in accordance with ASTM E23 for impact testing of metallic materials. A direct comparison between ASTM D256 for impact testing of plastics and ASTM E23 was performed using continuously cast zinc specimens of Alloy 5 and ZA-8 at -40\\mDC and room temperature. There are differences in sample sizes, impact velocity, and striker geometry between the two tests. Bulk zinc tested according to ASTM E23 resulted in higher impact energies at -40\\mDC and lower impact energies at room temperature then did the same alloys when tested according to ASTM D256.

  13. High-Pressure Die-Casting: Contradictions and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonollo, Franco; Gramegna, Nicola; Timelli, Giulio

    2015-05-01

    High-pressure die casting (HPDC) is particularly suitable for high production rates and it is applied in several industrial fields; actually, approximately half of the world production of light metal castings is obtained by this technology. An overview of the actual status of HPDC technology is described in the current work, where both critical aspects and potential advantages are evidenced. Specific attention is paid to the quality requirements from the end users, as well as to the achievable production rate, the process monitoring and control, and the European and worldwide scenario. This overview leads to individuate the most relevant challenges for HPDC industry: "zero-defect" production, real-time process control, understanding the role of the process variables, process optimization, introduction of research and development activities, and disseminating the knowledge about HPDC technology. Performing these actions, HPDC foundries could achieve a more mature and efficient approach to large end users and exploit their really relevant potential.

  14. Development of Thin Section Zinc Die Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Frank

    2013-10-31

    A new high fluidity zinc high pressure die casting alloy, termed the HF alloy, was developed during laboratory trials and proven in industrial production. The HF alloy permits castings to be achieved with section thicknesses of 0.3 mm or less. Technology transfer activities were conducted to develop usage of the HF high fluidity alloy. These included production of a brochure and a one-hour webinar on the HF alloy. The brochure was then sent to 1,184 product designers in the Interzinc database. There was excellent reception to this mailing, and from this initial contact 5 technology transfer seminars were conducted for 81 participants from 30 companies across a wide range of business sectors. Many of the successful applications to date involve high quality surface finishes. Design and manufacturing assistance was given for development of selected applications.

  15. Vacuum Die Casting of Silicon Sheet for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of a vacuum die-casting process for producing silicon sheet suitable for photovoltaic cells with a terrestrial efficiency greater than 12 percent and having the potential to be scaled for large quantity production is considered. The initial approach includes: (1) obtaining mechanical design parameters by using boron nitride, which has been shown to non-wetting to silicon; (2) optimizing silicon nitride material composition and coatings by sessile drop experiments; (3) testing effectiveness of fluoride salt interfacial media with a graphite mold; and (4) testing the effect of surface finish using both boron nitride and graphite. When the material and mechanical boundary conditions are established, a finalized version of the prototype assembly will be constructed and the casting variables determined.

  16. The Effects of Externally Solidified Product on Wave Celerity and Quality of Die Cast Products

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll Mobley; Yogeshwar Sahai; Jerry Brevick

    2003-10-10

    The cold chamber die casting process is used to produce essentially all the die cast aluminum products and about 50% of the die cast magnesium products made today. Modeling of the cold chamber die casting process and metallographic observations of cold chamber die cast products indicate that typically 5 to 20% of the shot weight is solidified in the shot sleeve before or during cavity filling. The protion of the resulting die casting which is solidified in the shot sleeve is referred to as externally solidified product, or, when identified as a casting defect, as cold flakes. This project was directed to extending the understanding of the effects of externally solidified product on the cold chamber die casting process and products to enable the production of defect-free die castings and reduce the energy associated with these products. The projected energy savings from controlling the fraction of externally solidified product in die cast components is 40 x 10 Btu through the year 2025.

  17. Microstructural analysis of aluminum high pressure die castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Maria Diana

    Microstructural analysis of aluminum high pressure die castings (HPDC) is challenging and time consuming. Automating the stereology method is an efficient way in obtaining quantitative data; however, validating the accuracy of this technique can also pose some challenges. In this research, a semi-automated algorithm to quantify microstructural features in aluminum HPDC was developed. Analysis was done near the casting surface where it exhibited fine microstructure. Optical and Secondary electron (SE) and backscatter electron (BSE) SEM images were taken to characterize the features in the casting. Image processing steps applied on SEM and optical micrographs included median and range filters, dilation, erosion, and a hole-closing function. Measurements were done on different image pixel resolutions that ranged from 3 to 35 pixel/μm. Pixel resolutions below 6 px/μm were too low for the algorithm to distinguish the phases from each other. At resolutions higher than 6 px/μm, the volume fraction of primary α-Al and the line intercept count curves plateaued. Within this range, comparable results were obtained validating the assumption that there is a range of image pixel resolution relative to the size of the casting features at which stereology measurements become independent of the image resolution. Volume fraction within this curve plateau was consistent with the manual measurements while the line intercept count was significantly higher using the computerized technique for all resolutions. This was attributed to the ragged edges of some primary α-Al; hence, the algorithm still needs some improvements. Further validation of the code using other castings or alloys with known phase amount and size may also be beneficial.

  18. Interfacial Heat Transfer during Die Casting of an Al-Si-Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasaiid, A.; Wang, G.; Davidson, C.; Dour, G.; Dargusch, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between in-cavity pressure, heat flux, and heat-transfer coefficient during high-pressure die casting of an Al-9 pct Si-3 pct Cu alloy was investigated. Detailed measurements were performed using infrared probes and thermocouple arrays that accurately determine both casting and die surface temperatures during the pressure die casting of an aluminum A380 alloy. Concurrent in-cavity pressure measurements were also performed. These measurements enabled the correlation between in-cavity pressure and accurate heat-transfer coefficients in high-pressure die-casting operations.

  19. Die casting die deflections: Prediction and attenuation. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.Allen; Ahuett-Garza, Horacio; Choudhury, Aswin K.; Dedhia, Sanjay

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects or problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information from the voxel model for display to the user.

  20. Microstructure and Elevated Temperature Properties of Die-cast AZ91- xNd Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; An, Jian; Liu, Yongbing

    2008-10-01

    The effect of Nd addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a die-cast AZ91 alloy was investigated in the present work. The results show that the die-cast AZ91 alloy is composed of α-Mg matrix and γ-Mg17Al12 phase. Nd addition into the AZ91 alloy leads to the formation of rare earth containing intermetallic phase. Al4Nd phase forms when Nd content is less than or equal to 1.0 wt.%. Al2Nd phase appears simultaneously when Nd content reaches to 3.0 wt.%. The size and volume fraction of γ-Mg17Al12 phase decrease, because of the newly formed Al-Nd phase. And the γ-Mg17Al12 phase distributes from reticular to dispersive. Nd addition has a little effect on the room temperature properties of the die-cast AZ91 alloy, but greatly improves the elevated temperature properties. The tensile strength of AZ91-0.5Nd and AZ91-1.0Nd alloy tested at 150 °C is even close to the room temperature strength. The AZ91-1.0Nd alloy has the optimal properties.

  1. Development of materials for the rapid manufacture of die cast tooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardro, Peter Jason

    The focus of this research is to develop a material composition that can be processed by rapid prototyping (RP) in order to produce tooling for the die casting process. Where these rapidly produced tools will be superior to traditional tooling production methods by offering one or more of the following advantages: reduced tooling cost, shortened tooling creation time, reduced man-hours for tool creation, increased tool life, and shortened die casting cycle time. By utilizing RP's additive build process and vast material selection, there was a prospect that die cast tooling may be produced quicker and with superior material properties. To this end, the material properties that influence die life and cycle time were determined, and a list of materials that fulfill these "optimal" properties were highlighted. Physical testing was conducted in order to grade the processability of each of the material systems and to optimize the manufacturing process for the downselected material system. Sample specimens were produced and microscopy techniques were utilized to determine a number of physical properties of the material system. Additionally, a benchmark geometry was selected and die casting dies were produced from traditional tool materials (H13 steel) and techniques (machining) and from the newly developed materials and RP techniques (selective laser sintering (SLS) and laser engineered net shaping (LENS)). Once the tools were created, a die cast alloy was selected and a preset number of parts were shot into each tool. During tool creation, the manufacturing time and cost was closely monitored and an economic model was developed to compare traditional tooling to RP tooling. This model allows one to determine, in the early design stages, when it is advantageous to implement RP tooling and when traditional tooling would be best. The results of the physical testing and economic analysis has shown that RP tooling is able to achieve a number of the research objectives, namely

  2. WARM WATER SCALE MODEL EXPERIMENTS FOR MAGNESIUM DIE CASTING

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2006-01-01

    High-pressure die casting (HPDC) involves the filling of a cavity with the molten metal through a thin gate. High gate velocities yield jet break-up and atomization phenomena. In order to improve the quality of magnesium parts, the mold filling pattern, including atomization phenomena, needs to be understood. The goal of this study was to obtain experimental data on jet break-up characteristics for conditions similar to that of magnesium HPDC, and measure the droplet velocity and size distribution. A scale analysis is first presented in order to identify appropriate analogue for liquid magnesium alloys. Based on the scale analysis warm water was chosen as a suitable analogue and different nozzles were manufactured. A 2-D component phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) and 2-D component particle image velocimetry (PIV) were then used to obtain fine particle diameter and velocity distributions in 2-D plane.

  3. The Effects of Microstructure Heterogeneities and Casting Defects on the Mechanical Properties of High-Pressure Die-Cast AlSi9Cu3(Fe) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timelli, Giulio; Fabrizi, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Detailed investigations of the salient microstructural features and casting defects of the high-pressure die-cast (HPDC) AlSi9Cu3(Fe) alloy are reported. These characteristics are addressed to the mechanical properties and reliability of separate HPDC tensile bars. Metallographic and image analysis techniques have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructural changes throughout the tensile specimen. The results indicate that the die-cast microstructure consists of several microstructural heterogeneities such as positive eutectic segregation bands, externally solidified crystals (ESCs), cold flakes, primary Fe-rich intermetallics (sludge), and porosities. In addition, it results that sludge particles, gas porosity, as well as ESCs, and cold flakes are concentrated toward the casting center while low porosity and fine-grained structure is observed on the surface layer of the castings bars. The local variation of the hardness along the cross section as well as the change of tensile test results as a function of gage diameter of the tensile bars seem to be ascribed to the change of porosity content, eutectic fraction, and amount of sludge. Further, this behavior reflects upon the reliability of the die-cast alloy, as evidenced by the Weibull statistics.

  4. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V.; Parappagoudar, M. B.

    2010-10-26

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  5. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Die-Cast Magnesium Alloy MRI 230D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghion, Eli; Moscovitch, Nir; Arnon, Amir

    2009-10-01

    MRI 230D was specially developed to overcome the high-temperature limitations of conventionally die-cast magnesium alloys. This innovative alloy was primarily developed for the automotive industry, mainly for power-train applications operating under high-temperature conditions. The present article aims at evaluating the die-casting characteristics of MRI 230D in comparison with conventional AZ91D Mg alloy. These characteristics are used to evaluate the applicability of this alloy for die-casting operations which are essential for mass production.

  7. Application of High-Temperature Mold Materials to Die Cast Copper Motor Rotor for Improved Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    John G. Cowie; Edwin F. Brush, Jr.; Dale T. Peters; Stephen P. Midson; Darryl J. Van Son

    2003-05-01

    The objective of the study, Application of High-Temperature Mold Materials to Die Cast Copper Motor Rotor for Improved Efficiency, was to support the Copper Development Association (CDA) in its effort to design, fabricate and demonstrate mold technologies designed to withstand the copper motor rotor die casting environment for an economically acceptable life. The anticipated result from the compiled data and tests were to: (1) identify materials suitable for die casting copper, (2) fabricate motor rotor molds and (3) supply copper rotor motors for testing in actual compressor systems. Compressor manufacturers can apply the results to assess the technical and economical viability of copper rotor motors.

  8. A method for surface quality assessment of die-castings based on laser triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bračun, Drago; Gruden, Valter; Možina, Janez

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a new method for the surface quality assessment of safety-critical die-castings. We have developed a measurement system that measures the surface of a die-casting and provides quantitative surface quality assessment within a die-casting cycle of 70 s. The measurement system, based on the laser triangulation principle, has an asymmetrical measuring range and is capable of high-resolution measurements of the casting surface (0.02 mm). Geometry specific parameters (flatness of the particular surface region, average deviation of the measured points and height of the surface defects) are calculated from the acquired surface data and then checked whether/how they fit within the tolerances specified in a technical documentation. The method has been tested in the laboratory by examination of a sample of castings taken randomly from the production process. A comparison of the results obtained by this method and by a qualified operator has shown good agreement.

  9. Effect of Process Parameters, Casting Thickness, and Alloys on the Interfacial Heat-Transfer Coefficient in the High-Pressure Die-Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Shou-Mei; Liu, Bai-Cheng; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2008-12-01

    The heat transfer at the metal-die interface is believed to have great influence on the solidification process and cast structure of the high-pressure die-casting (HPDC) process. The present article focused on the effects of process parameters, casting thickness, and alloys on the metal-die interfacial heat-transfer coefficient (IHTC) in the HPDC process. Experiment was carried out on a cold-chamber die-casting machine with two casting alloys AM50 and ADC12. A special casting, namely, “step-shape” casting, was used and cast against a H13 steel die. The IHTC was determined using an inverse approach based on the temperature measurements inside the die. Results show that the IHTC is different at different steps and changes as the solidification of the casting proceeds. Process parameters only influence the IHTC in its peak value, and for both AM50 and ADC12 alloys, a greater fast shot velocity leads to a greater IHTC peak value at steps 1 and 2. The initial die surface temperature has a more prominent influence on the IHTC peak values at the thicker steps, especially step 5. Results also show that a closer contact between the casting and die could be achieved when the casting alloy is ADC12 instead of AM50, which consequently leads to a higher IHTC.

  10. Secondary Al-Si-Mg High-pressure Die Casting Alloys with Enhanced Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bösch, Dominik; Pogatscher, Stefan; Hummel, Marc; Fragner, Werner; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Göken, Mathias; Höppel, Heinz Werner

    2015-03-01

    Al-Si-Mg-based secondary cast alloys are attractive candidates for thin-walled high-pressure die castings for applications in the transport industry. The present study investigates the effect of manganese additions at high cooling rates on microstructure, mechanical properties, and on the dominating fracture mechanisms of alloy AlSi10Mg with an elevated iron concentration. Systematic variations of the Mn content from 0.20 to 0.85 wt pct at a constant Fe content of 0.55 wt pct illustrate the key changes in type, phase fraction, and shape of the Fe-containing intermetallic phases, and the corresponding influence on the alloy's ductility. For high-pressure die casting (HPDC), an optimal range of the Mn content between 0.40 and 0.60 wt pct, equivalent to a Mn/Fe ratio of approximately 1, has been identified. At these Mn and Fe contents, the high cooling rates obtained in HPDC result in the formation of fine and homogeneously distributed α-Al15(Fe,Mn)3Si2 phase, and crack initiation is transferred from AlFeSi intermetallics to eutectic silicon. The study interprets the microstructure-property relationship in the light of thermodynamic calculations which reveal a significant increase in undercooling of the α-Al15(Fe,Mn)3Si2 phase with increased Mn content. It concludes that the interdependence of the well-defined Mn/Fe ratio and the high cooling rate in HPDC can generate superior ductility in secondary AlSi10Mg cast alloys.

  11. Evaluation of a Heat Flux Sensor for Spray Cooling for the Die Casting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wu, Zhuoxi

    2007-02-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. In this paper, a new technique for measuring the heat flux during lubricant application is evaluated. Data from experiments conducted using water spray are first presented. Water spray experiments were conducted for different initial plate temperatures. Measurements were conducted for the application of two different lubricants, of dilution ratios of 1/15 and 1/50 of lubricant in water. The measurement uncertainties were documented. The results show that the surface temperature decreases initially very fast. Numerical simulation results confirmed that the abrupt temperature drop is not an artifact but illustrates the thermal shock experienced by the dies during the initial stages of lubricant application. The lubricant experiments show that the sensor can be successfully used for testing die lubricants with typical dilution ratios encountered in the die casting process.

  12. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Surface Engineered Coating Systems for Aluminum Pressure Die Casting Dies: Towards a 'Smart' Die Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John J. Moore; Dr. Jianliang Lin,

    2012-07-31

    The main objective of this research program was to design and develop an optimal coating system that extends die life by minimizing premature die failure. In high-pressure aluminum die-casting, the die, core pins and inserts must withstand severe processing conditions. Many of the dies and tools in the industry are being coated to improve wear-resistance and decrease down-time for maintenance. However, thermal fatigue in metal itself can still be a major problem, especially since it often leads to catastrophic failure (i.e. die breakage) as opposed to a wear-based failure (parts begin to go out of tolerance). Tooling costs remain the largest portion of production costs for many of these parts, so the ability prevent catastrophic failures would be transformative for the manufacturing industry.The technology offers energy savings through reduced energy use in the die casting process from several factors, including increased life of the tools and dies, reuse of the dies and die components, reduction/elimination of lubricants, and reduced machine down time, and reduction of Al solder sticking on the die. The use of the optimized die coating system will also reduce environmental wastes and scrap parts. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on initial dissemination to the casting industry in 2010 and market penetration of 80% by 2020, is 3.1 trillion BTU's/year. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.63 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  13. Development of an Innovative Laser-Assisted Coating Process for Extending Lifetime of Metal Casting Dies. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Madhav Rao Gonvindaraju

    1999-10-18

    Die casting dies used in the metal casting industry fail due to thermal fatigue cracking accompanied by the presence of residual tensile stresses, corrosion, erosion and wear of die surfaces. This phase 1 SBIR Final Report summarize Karta Technologies research involving the development of an innovative laser coating technology for metal casting dies. The process involves depositing complex protective coatings of nanocrystalline powders of TiC followed by a laser shot peening. The results indicate a significant improvement in corrosion and erosion resistance in molten aluminum for H13 die casting die steels. The laser-coated samples also showed improved surface finish, a homogeneous and uniform coating mircrostructure. The technology developed in this research can have a significant impact on the casting industry by saving the material costs involved in replacing dies, reducing downtime and improving the quality.

  14. High Density Die Casting (HDDC): new frontiers in the manufacturing of heat sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sce, Andrea; Caporale, Lorenzo

    2014-07-01

    Finding a good solution for thermal management problems is every day more complex. due to the power density and the required performances. When a solution suitable for high volumes is needed. die-casting and extrusion are the most convenient technologies. However designers have to face the well-known limitations for those processes. High Density Die Casting (HDDC) is a process under advanced development. in order to overcome the extrusion and traditional die casting limits by working with alloys having much better thermal performances than the traditional die-casting process. while keeping the advantages of a flexible 3D design and a low cost for high volumes. HDDC offers the opportunity to design combining different materials (aluminium and copper. aluminium and stainless steel) obtaining a structure with zero porosity and overcoming some of die-casting limits. as shown in this paper. A dedicated process involving embedded heat pipes is currently under development in order to offer the possibility to dramatically improve the heat spreading.

  15. Recycling of Al-Si die casting scraps for solar Si feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Kum-Hee; Jeon, Je-Beom; Youn, Ji-Won; Kim, Suk Jun; Kim, Ki-Young

    2016-05-01

    Recycling of aluminum die-casting scraps for solar-grade silicon (SOG-Si) feedstock was performed successfully. 3 N purity Si was extracted from A383 die-casting scrap by using the combined process of solvent refining and an advanced centrifugal separation technique. The efficiency of separating Si from scrap alloys depended on both impurity level of scraps and the starting temperature of centrifugation. Impurities in melt and processing temperature governed the microstructure of the primary Si. The purity of Si extracted from the scrap melt was 99.963%, which was comparable to that of Si extracted from a commercial Al-30 wt% Si alloy, 99.980%. The initial purity of the scrap was 2.2% lower than that of the commercial alloy. This result confirmed that die-casting scrap is a potential source of high-purity Si for solar cells.

  16. The effect of process parameters on the internal quality of an aluminum die casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewit, M. C. A. J.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of process parameters on the porosity of an aluminum die casting was investigated. Two types of die one of which had an interchangeable gate and two alloys, AlSi8Cu3 and AlSi7, were used. During the solidification phase of a die casting, air entrapment can occur; the air remains in the die casting under high pressure after solidification. The Rayleigh number which contains the velocity in the gate, the gate diameter, and the liquid metal surface tension, determines the air entrapment. It appears that there are two types of filling: solid front filling at low velocities, and standard spray filling at high velocities. With the former type, the castings contain no air, but the shrinkage is concentrated in big holes; with the latter type the castings contain much air, and the shrinkage is distributed over fine holes. The first phase velocity has no significant influence on the porosity; a decrease of the third phase velocity increases the porosity. Variations of the changeover point between the first and second phase have little influence.

  17. Evolution of Intermetallic Phases in Soldering of the Die Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Wang, Xiaoming; DenOuden, Tony; Han, Qingyou

    2016-06-01

    Most die failures are resulted from chemical reactions of dies and molten aluminum in the die casting of aluminum. The formation of intermetallic phases between a steel die and molten aluminum is investigated by stationary immersion tests and compared to a real die casting process. Three intermetallic phases are identified in the stationary immersion tests: a composite layer and two compact layers. The composite layer is a mixture of α bcc, Al, and Si phases. The α bcc phase changes in morphology from rod-like to spherical shape, while the growth rate of the layer changes from parabolic to linear pattern with immersion time. The first compact layer forms rapidly after immersion and maintains a relatively constant thickness. The second compact layer forms after 4 hours of immersion and exhibits parabolic growth with immersion time. In comparison, only a composite layer and the first compact layer are observed in a real die casting process. The fresh molten aluminum of high growth rate washes away the second intermetallic layer easily.

  18. Simple visualization techniques for die casting part and die design. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Lu, S.C.; Rebello, A.B.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects of problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information from the voxel model for display to the user.

  19. Simple visualization techniques for die casting part and die design. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Lu, S.C.; Rebello, A.B.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects of problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information form the voxel model for display to the user.

  20. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  1. The effect of Sr and Fe additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a direct squeeze cast Al-7Si-0.3Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.X.; Karnezis, P.A.; Durrant, G.; Cantor, B.

    1999-05-01

    This article describes the results of an investigation into the microstructure and mechanical properties of a gravity die cast and direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-0.3Fe). The direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy has superior mechanical properties compared to the gravity die cast LM25 alloy, especially with regard to ductility, which is increased from {approximately}1.7 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 alloy to {approximately}8.0 pct for the direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy in the T6 heat-treated conditions. This increase in ductility is due to (1) the removal of porosity, (2) a decrease in Si particle size, and (3) a refinement of the Fe-Si-aluminide particles. High cooling rates in direct squeeze casting result in quench modification of the Si particles, such that chemical modification with Sr or Na may not be required. In addition, direct squeeze casting is more tolerant of Fe impurities in the alloy, due to the formation of smaller Fe-Si-aluminide particles than those in gravity die cast material. The direct squeeze cast LM25 + Fe alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-1.0Fe) has a ductility of {approximately}6.5 pct, compared to that of {approximately}0.5 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 + Fe alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in tolerance to Fe impurities can lead to a substantial reduction in manufacturing costs due to (1) reduced raw-material costs, (2) reduced die sticking, and (3) improved die life.

  2. The effect of Sr and Fe additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a direct squeeze cast Al-7Si-0.3Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. X.; Karnezis, P. A.; Durrant, G.; Cantor, B.

    1999-05-01

    This article describes the results of an investigation into the microstructure and mechanical properties of a gravity die cast and direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-0.3Fe). The direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy has superior mechanical properties compared to the gravity die cast LM25 alloy, especially with regard to ductility, which is increased from ˜1.7 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 alloy to ˜8.0 pct for the direct squeeze cast LM25 alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in ductility is due to (1) the removal of porosity, (2) a decrease in Si particle size, and (3) a refinement of the Fe-Si-aluminide particles. High cooling rates in direct squeeze casting result in quench modification of the Si particles, such that chemical modification with Sr or Na may not be required. In addition, direct squeeze casting is more tolerant of Fe impurities in the alloy, due to the formation of smaller Fe-Si-aluminide particles than those in gravity die cast material. The direct squeeze cast LM25+Fe alloy (Al-7Si-0.3Mg-1.0Fe) has a ductility of ˜6.5 pct, compared to that of ˜0.5 pct for the gravity die cast LM25 + Fe alloy in the T6 heat-treated condition. This increase in tolerance to Fe impurities can lead to a substantial reduction in manufacturing costs due to (1) reduced raw-material costs, (2) reduced die sticking, and (3) improved die life.

  3. Influence of Sludge Particles on the Tensile Properties of Die-Cast Secondary Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Stefano; Timelli, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    The effects of sludge intermetallic particles on the mechanical properties of a secondary AlSi9Cu3(Fe) die-casting alloy have been studied. Different alloys have been produced by systematically varying the Fe, Mn, and Cr contents within the composition tolerance limits of the standard EN AC-46000 alloy. The microstructure shows primary α-Al x (Fe,Mn,Cr) y Si z sludge particles, with polyhedral and star-like morphologies, although the presence of primary β-Al5FeSi phase is also observed at the highest Fe:Mn ratio. The volume fraction of primary compounds increases as the Fe, Mn, and Cr contents increase and this can be accurately predicts from the Sludge Factor by a linear relationship. The sludge amount seems to not influence the size and the content of porosity in the die-cast material. Furthermore, the sludge factor is not a reliable parameter to describe the mechanical properties of the die-cast AlSi9Cu3(Fe) alloy, because this value does not consider the mutual interaction between the elements. In the analyzed range of composition, the design of experiment methodology and the analysis of variance have been used in order to develop a semi-empirical model that accurately predicts the mechanical properties of the die-cast AlSi9Cu3(Fe) alloys as function of Fe, Mn, and Cr concentrations.

  4. Modeling of microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during the high pressure die casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengwu; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    Two important microstructure characteristics of high pressure die cast magnesium alloy are the externally solidified crystals (ESCs) and the fully divorced eutectic which form at the filling stage of the shot sleeve and at the last stage of solidification in the die cavity, respectively. Both of them have a significant influence on the mechanical properties and performance of magnesium alloy die castings. In the present paper, a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method was developed to simulate the microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Modeling of dendritic growth of magnesium alloy with six-fold symmetry was achieved by defining a special neighbourhood configuration and calculating of the growth kinetics from complete solution of the transport equations. Special attention was paid to establish a nucleation model considering both of the nucleation of externally solidified crystals in the shot sleeve and the massive nucleation in the die cavity. Meanwhile, simulation of the formation of fully divorced eutectic was also taken into account in the present CA model. Validation was performed and the capability of the present model was addressed by comparing the simulated results with those obtained by experiments.

  5. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam

    2012-12-15

    This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

  6. Assessment of Computer Simulation Software and Process Data for High Pressure Die Casting of Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Hatfield, Edward C; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Kuwana, Kazunori; Viti, Valerio; Hassan, Mohamed I; Saito, Kozo

    2007-09-01

    Computer software for the numerical simulation of solidification and mold filling is an effective design tool for cast structural automotive magnesium components. A review of commercial software capabilities and their validation procedures was conducted. Aside form the software assessment, the program addressed five main areas: lubricant degradation, lubricant application, gate atomization, and heat transfer at metal mold interfaces. A test stand for lubricant application was designed. A sensor was used for the direct measurement of heat fluxes during lubricant application and casting solidification in graphite molds. Spray experiments were conducted using pure deionized water and commercial die lubricants. The results show that the sensor can be used with confidence for measuring heat fluxes under conditions specific to the die lube application. The data on heat flux was presented in forms suitable for use in HPDC simulation software. Severe jet breakup and atomization phenomena are likely to occur due to high gate velocities in HPDC. As a result of gate atomization, droplet flow affects the mold filling pattern, air entrapment, skin formation, and ensuing defects. Warm water analogue dies were designed for obtaining experimental data on mold filling phenomena. Data on break-up jet length, break-up pattern, velocities, and droplet size distribution were obtained experimentally and was used to develop correlations for jet break-up phenomena specific to die casting gate configurations.

  7. Characterization of pores in high pressure die cast aluminum using active thermography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Myrach, Philipp; Röllig, Mathias; Jonietz, Florian; Illerhaus, Bernhard; Meinel, Dietmar; Richter, Uwe; Miksche, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Larger high pressure die castings (HPDC) and decreasing wall thicknesses are raising the issue of casting defects like pores in aluminum structures. Properties of components are often strongly influenced by inner porosity. As these products are being established more and more in lightweight construction (e.g. automotive and other transport areas), non-destructive testing methods, which can be applied fast and on-site, are required for quality assurance. In this contribution, the application of active thermography for the direct detection of larger pores is demonstrated. The analysis of limits and accuracy of the method are completed by numerical simulation and the method is validated using computed tomography.

  8. Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms in High-Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadiri, Haitham; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Jordon, J. B.; Xue, Yibin

    2008-01-01

    Microstructure-affected micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth operating near the limit plasticity regime were experimentally identified for the four main commercial high-pressure die-cast (HPDC) magnesium alloys: AM50, AM60, AZ91, and AE44. These fatigue micromechanisms manifested by the concomitant effects of casting pores, interdendritic Al-rich solid solution layer, β-phase particles, Mn-rich inclusions, rare earth-rich intermetallics, dendrite cell size, and surface segregation phenomena. These concomitant mechanisms clearly delineated the fatigue durability observed for the AM50, AM60, AZ91, and AE44 Mg alloys in both the low- and high-cycle fatigue regimes.

  9. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  10. Prediction of Thermal Fatigue in Tooling for Die-casting Copper via Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhuja, Amit; Brevick, Jerald R.

    2004-06-01

    Recent research by the Copper Development Association (CDA) has demonstrated the feasibility of die-casting electric motor rotors using copper. Electric motors using copper rotors are significantly more energy efficient relative to motors using aluminum rotors. However, one of the challenges in copper rotor die-casting is low tool life. Experiments have shown that the higher molten metal temperature of copper (1085 °C), as compared to aluminum (660 °C) accelerates the onset of thermal fatigue or heat checking in traditional H-13 tool steel. This happens primarily because the mechanical properties of H-13 tool steel decrease significantly above 650 °C. Potential approaches to mitigate the heat checking problem include: 1) identification of potential tool materials having better high temperature mechanical properties than H-13, and 2) reduction of the magnitude of cyclic thermal excursions experienced by the tooling by increasing the bulk die temperature. A preliminary assessment of alternative tool materials has led to the selection of nickel-based alloys Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 as potential candidates. These alloys were selected based on their elevated temperature physical and mechanical properties. Therefore, the overall objective of this research work was to predict the number of copper rotor die-casting cycles to the onset of heat checking (tool life) as a function of bulk die temperature (up to 650 °C) for Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 alloys. To achieve these goals, a 2D thermo-mechanical FEA was performed to evaluate strain ranges on selected die surfaces. The method of Universal Slopes (Strain Life Method) was then employed for thermal fatigue life predictions.

  11. Microstructural stability and creep properties of die casting Mg-4Al-4RE magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Rzychon, Tomasz; Kielbus, Andrzej; Cwajna, Jan; Mizera, Jaroslaw

    2009-10-15

    The AE44 (Mg-4Al-4RE) alloy was prepared by a hot-chamber die casting method. The microstructure, microstructural stability and creep properties at 175 deg. C were investigated. The microstructure was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Rietveld method. The results show that die cast AE44 magnesium alloy consists of {alpha}-Mg, Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}RE and Al{sub 2.12}RE{sub 0.88} phases. The Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3} phase is thermally stable at 175 deg. C whereas the metastable Al{sub 2.12}RE{sub 0.88} phase undergoes a transition into the equilibrium Al{sub 2}RE phase. The alloy investigated is characterized by good creep properties at temperatures of 175 deg. C and 200 {sup o}C.

  12. Fabrication of glass photonic crystal fibers with a die-cast process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiyao, Zhou; Zhiyun, Hou; Shuguang, Li; Lantian, Hou

    2006-06-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for the fabrication of glass photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with a die-cast process. SF6 glass is used as the material for PCFs, and the die is made of heat-resisting alloy steel, whose inner structure matches the PCF's structure. The die is put vertically in the vessel with SF6 glass, and the vacuum hose is attached to the top of the die. The die and glass are put in the furnace to heat at 870 K. The die is slowly filled with the softening glass under vacuum conduction until it is full. It is kept in the furnace to anneal at a rate of 20 K/h to remove the thermal stress that could lead to cracks. The outer tube of the die is taken apart when its temperature is close to room temperature, and the fused glass bundle is etched in an acidic solution to remove the heat-resisting alloy steel rods. Thus, the etched bundle is ready to use as a PCF preform. The PCF is observed in the generation of a supercontinuum, with the flat plateau in the spectrum of the output emission stretching from 400 to 1400 nm by experimental measurement. The transmission loss is 0.2-0.3 dB/m at wavelengths of 420-900 nm.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Aluminum Manufactured by High-Pressure Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachold, Franziska; Singer, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced aluminum was produced by a specially adapted high-pressure die casting process. The MMC has a fiber volume fraction of 27%. Complete infiltration was achieved by preheating the bidirectional, PAN-based carbon fiber body with IR-emitters to temperatures of around 750 °C. The degradation of the fibers, due to attack of atmospheric oxygen at temperatures above 600 °C, was limited by heating them in argon-rich atmosphere. Additionally, the optimization of heating time and temperature prevented fiber degradation. Only the strength of the outer fibers is reduced by 40% at the most. The fibers in core of fiber body are nearly undamaged. In spite of successful manufacturing, the tensile strength of the MMC is below strength of the matrix material. Also unidirectional MMCs with a fiber volume fraction of 8% produced under the same conditions, lack of the reinforcing effect. Two main reasons for the unsatisfactory mechanical properties were identified: First, the fiber-free matrix, which covers the reinforced core, prevents effective load transfer from the matrix to the fibers. And second, the residual stresses in the fiber-free zones are as high as 100 MPa. This causes premature failure in the matrix. From this, it follows that the local reinforcement of an actual part is limited. The stress distribution caused by residual stresses and by loading needs to be known. In this way, the reinforcing phase can be placed and aligned accordingly. Otherwise delamination and premature failure might occur.

  14. Fatigue behaviour of friction stir processed AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; De Marco, P.P.

    2007-03-15

    The room temperature fatigue properties of AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting (HPDC) as cast, heat treated, friction stir processed (FSP) and FSP and heat treated were studied. The fatigue properties of the material were evaluated for the HPDC magnesium alloy in the as-received state and after a solution treatment at 415 deg. C for 2 h and an ageing treatment at 220 deg. C for 4 h. The heat treatment resulted in a significant increase in the fatigue properties of the HPDC material, while no significance influence of heat treatment was recorded in the FSP condition. The morphology of fracture surfaces was examined by employing a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM)

  15. Flow analysis and validation of numerical modelling for a thin walled high pressure die casting using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Savage, Gary; Ha, Joseph; Prakash, Mahesh

    2014-09-01

    High pressure die casting (HPDC) is an important process for high throughput manufacturing of complex shaped metallic components. The flow involves significant fragmentation and spray formation as the high pressure liquid jets into the die from the gate system. An important class of die cast components is one with large areas of thin walls. An example of this is the chassis of the laptop computer. Computational modelling provides an opportunity to both better understand the filling process and to optimize the runner, gates, flash overs and venting systems for the die. SPH has previously been found to be very suitable for predicting HPDC for bulkier automotive components. The modelling challenges arising from the very thin sections and the many flow paths in a laptop chassis require careful validation. A water analogue experiment is used to validate the predictions of the SPH model for this representative thin walled casting. SPH predictions are used to understand and characterise the filling process. Finally, comparison of flow lines visible in an etched finished casting with the high speed flow paths in the final filled SPH model show very strong agreement. Together these demonstrate that such an SPH model is able to capture substantial detail from both the water analogue system and the actual casting process and is very suitable for simulating these types of complex thin walled castings.

  16. Strategies to reduce the environmental impact of an aluminium pressure die casting plant: a scenario analysis.

    PubMed

    Neto, Belmira; Kroeze, Carolien; Hordijk, Leen; Costa, Carlos; Pulles, Tinus

    2009-02-01

    This study explores a model (MIKADO) to analyse scenarios for the reduction of the environmental impact of an aluminium die casting plant. Our model calculates the potential to reduce emissions, and the costs associated with implementation of reduction options. In an earlier paper [Neto, B., Kroeze, C., Hordijk, L., Costa, C., 2008. Modelling the environmental impact of an aluminium pressure die casting company and options for control. Environmental Modelling & Software 23 (2) 147-168] we included the model description and explored the model by applying it to a plant in which no reduction options are assumed to be implemented (so-called zero case, reflecting the current practice in the plant). Here, we perform a systematic analysis of reduction options. We analysed seven types of reduction strategies, assuming the simultaneous implementation of different reduction options. These strategies are analysed with respect to their potential to reduce emissions, environmental impact and costs associated with the implementation of options. These strategies were found to differ largely in their potential to reduce the environmental impact of the plant (10-87%), as well as in the costs associated with the implementation of options (-268 to +277keuro/year). We were able to define 11 strategies, reducing the overall environmental impact by more than 50%. Of these, two have net negative costs, indicating that the company may in fact earn money through their implementation. PMID:18342428

  17. Annealing of chromium oxycarbide coatings deposited by plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) for aluminum die casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, A. M.; He, X. M.; Trkula, M.; Nastasi, M.

    2001-04-01

    Chromium oxycarbide coatings have been investigated for use as non-wetting coatings for aluminum die casting. This paper examines Cr-C-O coating stability and non-wetability at elevated temperatures for extended periods. Coatings were deposited onto 304 stainless steel from chromium carbonyl [Cr(CO) 6] by plasma immersion ion processing. The coatings were annealed in air at an aluminum die casting temperature of 700°C up to 8 h. Coatings were analyzed using resonant ion backscattering spectroscopy, nanoindentation and pin-on-disk tribometry. Molten aluminum was used to determine coating wetting and contact angle. Results indicate that the surface oxide layer reaches a maximum thickness of 900 nm. Oxygen concentrations in the coatings increased from 24% to 34%, while the surface concentration rose to almost 45%. Hardness values ranged from 22.1 to 6.7 GPa, wear coefficients ranged from 21 to 8×10 -6 mm3/ Nm and contact angles ranged from 156° to 127°.

  18. An evaluation of direct pressure sensors for monitoring the aluminum die casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project Die Cavity Instrumentation. One objective of that project was to evaluate thermal, pressure, and gas flow process monitoring sensors in or near the die cavity as a means of securing improved process monitoring and control and better resultant part quality. The objectives of this thesis are to (1) evaluate a direct cavity pressure sensor in a controlled production campaign at the GM Casting Advanced Development Center (CADC) at Bedford, Indiana; and (2) develop correlations between sensor responses and product quality in terms of the casting weight, volume, and density. A direct quartz-based pressure sensor developed and marked by Kistler Instrument Corp. was acquired for evaluating as an in-cavity liquid metal pressure sensor. This pressure sensor is designed for use up to 700 C and 2,000 bars (29,000 psi). It has a pressure overload capacity up to 2,500 bars (36,250 psi).

  19. Plunger Kinematic Parameters Affecting Quality of High-Pressure Die-Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorese, Elena; Bonollo, Franco

    2016-07-01

    The selection of the optimal process parameters in high-pressure die casting has been long recognized as a complex problem due to the involvement of a large number of interconnected variables. Among these variables, the effect of the plunger motion has been proved to play a prominent role, even if a thorough and exhaustive study is still missing in the literature. To overcome this gap, this work aims at identifying the most relevant plunger kinematic parameters and estimates their correlation with the casting quality, by means of a statistically significant sample manufactured with different plunger motion profiles. In particular, slow and fast shot velocities and switching position between two stages have been varied randomly in accordance with design of experiment methodology. The quality has been assessed through the static mechanical properties and porosity percentage. As a further proof, the percentage of oxides has been estimated on the fracture surfaces. These measurements have been correlated to novel parameters, representing the mechanical energy and the inertial force related to the plunger motion, that have been extracted from the time-history of the displacement curves. The application of statistical methods demonstrates that these novel parameters accurately explain and predict the overall quality of castings.

  20. Modifying AM60B Magnesium Alloy Die Cast Surfaces by Friction Stir Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Feng, Zhili; Degen, Cassandra; Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu

    2006-01-01

    These experiments were done to evaluate the feasibility of locally modifying the surface properties of magnesium alloys with friction-stir processing. The magnesium alloy used for the study was high-pressure die-cast AM60B, nominally Mg-6Al-0.13 Mn (wt. %). Friction-stir passes were made with a translation speed of 1.7 mm/s using tool-rotation speeds of 1,250 rpm or 2,500 rpm. Stir passes with good appearance were obtained under both conditions. In some cases up to five passes were overlapped on a single bar to produce stir zones with cross-sectional dimensions of about 1.5 mm x 10 mm. Metallographic examinations indicated that the stir zones were largely comprised of a magnesium solid solution with equiaxed grains on the order of 5-10 {micro}m in size. Hardness mapping showed that the stir zones experienced increases of 16-25% compared to the as-cast metal. Room-temperature testing showed that, compared to the cast metal, the stir zones had flow stresses nearly 20% higher with about twice the tensile elongation.

  1. Plunger Kinematic Parameters Affecting Quality of High-Pressure Die-Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorese, Elena; Bonollo, Franco

    2016-04-01

    The selection of the optimal process parameters in high-pressure die casting has been long recognized as a complex problem due to the involvement of a large number of interconnected variables. Among these variables, the effect of the plunger motion has been proved to play a prominent role, even if a thorough and exhaustive study is still missing in the literature. To overcome this gap, this work aims at identifying the most relevant plunger kinematic parameters and estimates their correlation with the casting quality, by means of a statistically significant sample manufactured with different plunger motion profiles. In particular, slow and fast shot velocities and switching position between two stages have been varied randomly in accordance with design of experiment methodology. The quality has been assessed through the static mechanical properties and porosity percentage. As a further proof, the percentage of oxides has been estimated on the fracture surfaces. These measurements have been correlated to novel parameters, representing the mechanical energy and the inertial force related to the plunger motion, that have been extracted from the time-history of the displacement curves. The application of statistical methods demonstrates that these novel parameters accurately explain and predict the overall quality of castings.

  2. Effect of strontium modification on near-threshold fatigue crack growth in an Al-Si-Cu die cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, M.; Fournelle, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of strontium modification on microstructure and fatigue properties in a die cast commercial aluminum-silicon alloy are demonstrated. Strontium additions of 0.010 and 0.018 wt pct drastically change the morphology of the eutectic silicon. The influence of these microstructural changes on fatigue properties is evaluated through fatigue crack growth testing. Examination of the fracture surfaces and the crack path establish distinct fatigue fracture modes for the modified and unmodified eutectic structures. Changes in fracture mode and crack path are correlated to the microstructure changes. A higher energy fracture mode and increased crack path tortuosity explain the observed improvement in fatigue properties for the modified alloys. Strontium modified alloys exhibit a 10 to 20 pct higher fatigue crack growth threshold compared to an unmodified alloy for testing at a load ratio of 0.5. No difference was observed for testing at a load ratio of 0.1.

  3. Improved design and durability of aluminum die casting horizontal shot sleeves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birceanu, Sebastian

    The design and performance of shot sleeves is critical in meeting the engineering requirements of aluminum die cast parts. Improvement in shot sleeve materials have a major impact on dimensional stability, reproducibility and quality of the product. This investigation was undertaken in order to improve the life of aluminum die casting horizontal shot sleeves. Preliminary pin tests were run to evaluate the soldering, wash-out and thermal fatigue behavior of commercially available materials and coatings. An experimental rig was designed and constructed for shot sleeve configuration evaluation. Fabrication and testing of experimental shot sleeves was based upon preliminary results and manufacturing costs. Three shot sleeve designs and materials were compared to a reference nitrided H13 sleeve. Nitrided H13 is the preferred material for aluminum die casting shot sleeves because of wear resistance, strength and relative good soldering and wash-out resistance. The study was directed towards damage evaluation on the area under the pouring hole. This area is the most susceptible to damage because of high temperatures and impingement of molten aluminum. The results of this study showed that tungsten and molybdenum had the least amount of soldering and wash-out damage, and the best thermal fatigue resistance. Low solubility in molten aluminum and stability of intermetallic layers are main factors that determine the soldering and wash-out behavior. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient directly influence thermal fatigue behavior. TiAlN nanolayered coating was chosen as the material with the best damage resistance among several commercial PVD coatings, because of relatively large thickness and simple deposition conditions. The results show that molybdenum thermal sprayed coating provided the best protection against damage under the pouring hole. Improved bonding is however required for life extension of the coating. TiAlN PVD coating applied on H13 nitrided

  4. Case study of lean manufacturing application in a die casting manufacturing company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Ng Tan; Hoe, Clarence Chan Kok; Hong, Tang Sai; Ghobakhloo, Morteza; Pin, Chen Kah

    2015-05-01

    The case study of lean manufacturing aims to study the application of lean manufacturing in a die casting manufacturing company located in Pulau Penang, Malaysia. This case study describes mainly about the important concepts and applications of lean manufacturing which could gradually help the company in increasing the profit by studying and analyzing their current manufacturing process and company culture. Many approaches of lean manufacturing are studied in this project which includes: 5S housekeeping, Kaizen, and Takt Time. Besides, the lean tools mentioned, quality tool such as the House of Quality is being used as an analysis tool to continuously improve the product quality. In short, the existing lean culture in the company is studied and analyzed, with recommendations written at the end of this paper.

  5. The Effect of Porosity on Fatigue of Die Cast AM60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhuofei; Kang, Jidong; Wilkinson, David S.

    2016-07-01

    AM60 high-pressure die castings are known to contain significant porosity which can affect fatigue life. We have studied this using samples drawn from prototype AM60 shock towers by conducting strain-controlled fatigue tests accompanied by X-ray computed tomography analysis. The results show that the machined surface is the preferential location for fatigue crack development, with pores close to these surfaces serving as initiation sites. Fatigue life shows a strong inverse correlation with the size of the fatigue-crack-initiating pore. Pore shape and pore orientation also influence the response. A supplemental study on surface roughness shows that porosity is the dominant factor in fatigue. Tomography enables the link between porosity and fatigue crack initiation to be clearly identified. These data are complemented by SEM observations of the fracture surfaces which are generally flat and full of randomly oriented serration patterns but without long-range fatigue striations.

  6. The Effect of Porosity on Fatigue of Die Cast AM60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhuofei; Kang, Jidong; Wilkinson, David S.

    2016-04-01

    AM60 high-pressure die castings are known to contain significant porosity which can affect fatigue life. We have studied this using samples drawn from prototype AM60 shock towers by conducting strain-controlled fatigue tests accompanied by X-ray computed tomography analysis. The results show that the machined surface is the preferential location for fatigue crack development, with pores close to these surfaces serving as initiation sites. Fatigue life shows a strong inverse correlation with the size of the fatigue-crack-initiating pore. Pore shape and pore orientation also influence the response. A supplemental study on surface roughness shows that porosity is the dominant factor in fatigue. Tomography enables the link between porosity and fatigue crack initiation to be clearly identified. These data are complemented by SEM observations of the fracture surfaces which are generally flat and full of randomly oriented serration patterns but without long-range fatigue striations.

  7. Effect of Viscosity Measurement Method to Simulate High Pressure Die Casting of Thin-Wall AlSi10MnMg Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B. W.; Li, L. X.; Liu, X.; Zhang, L. Q.; Xu, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, a rotating cylinder viscometer (RCV) was adopted to measure the viscosity of AlSi10MnMg aluminum alloy. The results show that the measured viscosity is much higher than previously reported viscosity of aluminum alloys measured by oscillation vessel viscometer. The viscosity measured by RCV was introduced into the simulation of the filling progress of high pressure die casting (HPDC) for thin-walled castings of aluminum alloy (TWCA). The simulated results match well with the experimental results indicating that the RCV is the most appropriate to use for simulations of HPDC for TWCA.

  8. Quantitative characterization of processing-microstructure-properties relationships in pressure die-cast magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soon Gi

    The central goal of this research is to quantitatively characterize the relationships between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of important high-pressure die-cast (HPDC) Mg-alloys. For this purpose, a new digital image processing technique for automatic detection and segmentation of gas and shrinkage pores in the cast microstructure is developed and it is applied to quantitatively characterize the effects of HPDC process parameters on the size distribution and spatial arrangement of porosity. To get better insights into detailed geometry and distribution of porosity and other microstructural features, an efficient and unbiased montage based serial sectioning technique is applied for reconstruction of three-dimensional microstructures. The quantitative microstructural data have been correlated to the HPDC process parameters and the mechanical properties. The analysis has led to hypothesis of formation of new type of shrinkage porosity called, "gas induced shrinkage porosity" that has been substantiated via simple heat transfer simulations. The presence of inverse surface macrosegregation has been also shown for the first time in the HPDC Mg-alloys. An image analysis based technique has been proposed for simulations of realistic virtual microstructures that have realistic complex pore morphologies. These virtual microstructures can be implemented in the object oriented finite elements framework to model the variability in the fracture sensitive mechanical properties of the HPDC alloys.

  9. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  10. A three-die cast technique for duplicating free gingival form in zirconia crowns: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Koji; Tsurumaki, Shunzo; Ookame, Yasuhisa; Enomoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Koichi

    2012-08-01

    This report describes a duplication technique of free gingival form from a provisional restoration to a zirconia crown. Three die casts were manufactured from a silicone impression with an acrylic resin ring tray. The first die cast was for the zirconia framework, the second for the provisionalized transfer coping, and the third for relining the provisional restoration. A free gingival impression was taken using a provisionalized transfer coping, and a soft gingival cast was manufactured. The depth of free gingival transparency was measured using a zirconia shade plate. Then, the zirconia framework was customized to allow for subgingival porcelain space. This technique seems to contribute to the clinical-laboratory interface in computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture restorations. PMID:22577656

  11. Final report to USAMP on the use of EBPVD in the light metal die casting industry

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, G.M.

    1996-02-02

    This is the final report to the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) on the use of Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) to make rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes. Historically this process has been successfully applied to the production of mold inserts for the plastics injection mold industry. Our approach for this project was to use the same technique to produce dies which could be used to make a few thousand light metal (aluminum and magnesium) prototype parts. The difficulty encountered in this project was that the requirements for the die casting industry, both in size and material requirements, were considerably more stringent than those encountered in the plastics injection industry. Consequently our technique, within the allotted time and budget constraints, was not able to meet the requirements set forth by USAMP. The remainder of this report is organized into five sections. The first discusses the technique in some detail while the second discusses a successful application. The third section discusses issues with this process while the fourth specifically discusses the work done in this project. The last is a short summary and conclusion section.

  12. The study of flow pattern and phase-change problem in die casting process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Wei, H.; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    The flow pattern and solidification phenomena in die casting process have been investigated in the first phase study. The flow pattern in filling process is predicted by using a VOF (volume of fluid) method. A good agreement with experimental observation is obtained for filling the water into a die cavity with different gate geometry and with an obstacle in the cavity. An enthalpy method has been applied to solve the solidification problem. By treating the latent heat implicitly into the enthalpy instead of explicitly into the source term, the CPU time can be reduced at least 20 times. The effect of material properties on solidification fronts is tested. It concludes that the dependence of properties on temperature is significant. The influence of the natural convection over the diffusion has also been studied. The result shows that the liquid metal solidification phenomena is diffusion dominant, and the natural convection can affect the shape of the interface. In the second phase study, the filling and solidification processes will be considered simultaneously.

  13. Casting dimensional control and fatigue life prediction for permanent mold casting dies. Technical progress report, September 29, 1993-- September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    First year efforts as part of a three year program to address metal casting dimensional control and fatigue life prediction for permanent mold casting dies are described. Procedures have been developed and implemented to collect dimensional variability data from production steel castings. The influence of process variation and casting geometry variables on dimensional tolerances have been investigated. Preliminary results have shown that these factors have a significant influence on dimensional variability, although this variability is considerably less than the variability indicated in current tolerance standards. Gage repeatability and reproducibility testing must precede dimensional studies to insure that measurement system errors are acceptably small. Also initial efforts leading to the development and validation of a CAD/CAE model to predict the thermal fatigue life of permanent molds for aluminum castings are described. An appropriate thermomechanical property database for metal, mold and coating materials has been constructed. A finite element model has been developed to simulate the mold temperature distribution during repeated casting cycles. Initial validation trials have indicated the validity of the temperature distribution model developed.

  14. Measurement of Heat Flux and Heat Transfer Coefficient Due to Spray Application for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant spray application experiments were conducted for the die casting process. The heat flux was measured in situ using a differential thermopile sensor for three application techniques. First, the lubricant was applied under a constant flowrate while the nozzle was held in the same position. Second, the lubricant was applied in a pulsed, static manner, in which the nozzle was held over the same surface while it was turned on and off several times. Third, the lubricant was applied in a sweeping manner, in which the nozzle was moved along the die surface while it was held open. The experiments were conducted at several die temperatures and at sweep speeds of 20, 23, and 68 cm/s. The heat flux data, which were obtained with a sensor that was located in the centre of the test plate, were presented and discussed. The sensor can be used to evaluate lubricants, monitor the consistency of die lubrication process, and obtain useful process data, such as surface temperature, heat flux, and heat transfer coefficients. The heat removed from the die surface during lubricant application is necessary for (a) designing the cooling channels in the die, i.e. their size and placement, and (b) performing accurate numerical simulations of the die casting process.

  15. Influence of the fabrication process on the functionality of piezoceramic patch transducers embedded in aluminum die castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Alexander; Rübner, Matthias; Ilg, Jürgen; Rupitsch, Stefan J.; Lerch, Reinhard; Singer, Robert F.; Körner, Carolin

    2012-11-01

    Piezoceramic patch transducers are integrated into aluminum components using high-pressure die casting. Expanded metal has proven suitable as a supporting structure for placing the patch transducers inside the die cavity and for stabilization during the injection of molten metal. However, difficulties arise when the transducers are positioned off the neutral axis within the wall of the casting. Numerical simulations of the die filling are performed to analyse the evolution of the integration process. The asymmetric infiltration of the supporting structure is identified as the major factor contributing to the formation of cracks and perforations inside the piezoceramic transducer. By means of measurements and numerical calculations of the electrical impedance of the transducer, a close relation is established between mechanical damage patterns observed in radiographs of the patch transducers and loss of performance.

  16. Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Die-Cast Mg Alloys AZ91 and AM60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Luke H.; Jordon, J. Brian; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Jones, J. Wayne

    2012-07-01

    The influence of microstructure and artificial aging response (T6) on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AZ91 and AM60 has been investigated. Fatigue lifetimes were determined from the total strain-controlled fatigue tests for strain amplitudes of 0.2 pct, 0.4 pct, 0.6 pct, 0.8 pct, and 1.0 pct under fully reversed loading at a frequency of 5 Hz. Cyclic stress-strain behavior was determined using an incremental step test (IST) and compared with the more traditional constant amplitude test. Two locations in a prototype casting were investigated to examine the role of microstructure and porosity on fatigue behavior. At all total strain amplitudes microstructure refinement had a negligible impact on fatigue life because of significant levels of porosity. AM60 showed an improvement in fatigue life at higher strain amplitudes when compared with AZ91 because of higher ductility. T6 heat treatment had no impact on fatigue life. Cyclic stress-strain behavior obtained via the incremental step test varied from constant amplitude test results due to load history effects. The constant amplitude test is believed to be the more accurate test method. In general, larger initiation pores led to shorter fatigue life. The fatigue life of AZ91 was more sensitive to initiation pore size and pore location than AM60 at the lowest tested strain amplitude of 0.2 pct. Fatigue crack paths did not favor any specific phase, interdentritic structure or eutectic structure. A multistage fatigue (MSF) model showed good correlation to the experimental strain-life results. The MSF model reinforced the dominant role of inclusion (pore) size on the scatter in fatigue life.

  17. Improved Life of Die Casting Dies of H13 Steel by Attaining Improved Mechanical Properties and Distortion Control During Heat Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    J. F. Wallace; D. Schwam

    1998-10-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to increase die casting die life by using fast enough quenching rates to obtain good toughness and fatigue resistance in premium grade H-13 steel dies. The main tasks of the project were to compile a database on physical and mechanical properties of H-13; conduct gas quenching experiments to determine cooling rates of dies in difference vacuum furnaces; measure the as-quenched distortion of dies and the residual stresses; generate finite element analysis models to predict cooling rates, distortion, and residual stress of gas quenched dies; and establish rules and create PC-based expert system for prediction of cooling rates, distortion, and residual stress in vacuum/gas quenched H-13 dies. Cooling curves during gas quenching of H-13 blocks and die shapes have been measured under a variety of gas pressure. Dimensional changes caused by the gas quenching processes have been determined by accurate mapping of all surfaces with coordinate measuring machines before and after the quench. Residual stresses were determined by the ASTM E837 hole-drilling strain gage method. To facilitate the computer modeling work, a comprehensive database of H-13 mechanical and physical properties has been compiled. Finite element analysis of the heat treated shapes has been conducted using the TRAST/ABAQUS codes. There is a good fit between the predicted and measured distortion contours. However, the magnitude of the predicted distortion and residual stresses does not match well the measured values. Further fine tuning of the model is required before it can be used to predict distortion and residual stress in a quantitative manner. This last step is a prerequisite to generating rules for a reliable expert system.

  18. Cradle-to-Gate Impact Assessment of a High-Pressure Die-Casting Safety-Relevant Automotive Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchel, Silvia; Cornacchia, Giovanna; Panvini, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The mass of automotive components has a direct influence on several aspects of vehicle performance, including both fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions, but the real environmental benefit has to be evaluated considering the entire life of the products with a proper life cycle assessment. In this context, the present paper analyzes the environmental burden connected to the production of a safety-relevant aluminum high-pressure die-casting component for commercial vehicles (a suspension cross-beam) considering all the phases connected to its manufacture. The focus on aluminum high-pressure die casting reflects the current trend of the industry and its high energy consumption. This work shows a new method that deeply analyzes every single step of the component's production through the implementation of a wide database of primary data collected thanks to collaborations of some automotive supplier companies. This energy analysis shows significant environmental benefits of aluminum recycling.

  19. The effects of intensification pressure, gate velocity, and intermediate shot velocity on the internal quality of aluminum die castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karban, Robert, Jr.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intensification pressure, gate velocity, and intermediate shot velocity on the internal quality of aluminum die castings. An experimental design was developed to analyze two levels of intensification pressure, two levels of gate velocity, and four levels of intermediate shot velocity. These parameters were chosen because of the ease of their manipulation on the manufacturing floor in an effort to develop an optimum process for a given die design. Internal casting quality is measured by the density of the casting produced as compared to the theoretical density of the alloy being molded. The study also included monitoring of the biscuit length of the samples collected. A statistical analysis was conducted to determine any correlation between or among any of the independent variables or the other parameter monitored. The results of this study indicate that there is a statistical significance among and between the independent variables that were controlled in this experiment. The results also indicated a significant positive relationship between biscuit length and the density of the resultant castings.

  20. Wear Properties of Thixoformed and High Pressure Die Cast Aluminium Alloys for Connecting Rod Applications in Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yücel; Birol, Feriha

    2007-04-01

    Hypereutectic aluminium casting alloys are attractive candidates for connecting rod applications in compressors. The wear properties of these alloys are largely controlled by their microstructural features which in turn are affected by the processing route. Several hypo- and hypereutectic Al-Si alloys were produced by high pressure die casting and thixoforming in the present work. The former route produced a very fine microstructure while relatively coarser, globular α-Al matrix dominated in thixoformed grades. A modified Falex Block on Ring equipment was employed to investigate the wear properties of these alloys. Wear tests were carried out under service conditions in the lubricated state at 75°C. The superior wear properties of hypereutectic alloys produced by high pressure die casting with respect to the thixoformed variety is accounted for by the very fine microstructure with a fine dispersion of primary Si particles in the former. Of the two production routes employed, thixoforming had a favorable effect on wear properties at equal Si levels.

  1. Development of a 3D Filling Model of Low-Pressure Die-Cast Aluminum Alloy Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianglan; Maijer, Daan; Cockcroft, Steve; Reilly, Carl

    2013-12-01

    A two-phase computational fluid dynamics model of the low-pressure die-cast process for the production of A356 aluminum alloy wheels has been developed to predict the flow conditions during die filling. The filling model represents a 36-deg section of a production wheel, and was developed within the commercial finite-volume package, ANSYS CFX, assuming isothermal conditions. To fully understand the behavior of the free surface, a novel technique was developed to approximate the vent resistances as they impact on the development of a backpressure within the die cavity. The filling model was first validated against experimental data, and then was used to investigate the effects of venting conditions and pressure curves during die filling. It was found that vent resistance and vent location strongly affected die filling time, free surface topography, and air entrainment for a given pressure fill-curve. With regard to the pressure curve, the model revealed a strong relation between the pressure curve and the flow behavior in the hub, which is an area prone to defect formation.

  2. The corrosion performance of die-cast magnesium alloy MRI230D in 3.5% NaCl solution saturated with Mg(OH){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Aghion, E. Lulu, N.

    2010-11-15

    The environmental behavior of die-cast magnesium alloy MRI230D designated for high-temperature applications was evaluated in comparison with regular AZ91D alloy. The microstructure examination was carried out using SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis; the corrosion performance in 3.5% NaCl solution was evaluated by immersion test, salt spray testing, potentiodynamic polarization analysis, and stress corrosion behavior by Slow Strain Rate Testing (SSRT). Although the general corrosion resistance of MRI230D was slightly improved compared to that of AZ91D alloy its stress corrosion resistance was relatively reduced. The variations in the environmental behavior of the two alloys were mainly due to the differences in their chemical composition and microstructure after die casting. In particular, the differences were related to the reduced Al content in MRI230D and the addition of Ca to this alloy, which consequently affected its relative microstructure and electrochemical characteristics. - Research Highlights: {yields}Corrosion and SCC resistance of a new Mg alloy MRI230D was evaluated vs. regular AZ91D. {yields}MRI230D has a minor advantage in corrosion performance compared with AZ91D. {yields}The SCC resistance of MRI230D by SSRT analysis was relatively reduced. {yields}The reduced SCC resistance of MRI230D was due to the detrimental effect of Ca on ductility.

  3. Slip casting and extruding shapes of rhenium with metal oxide additives. 1: Feasibility demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, F. A.; Page, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating small rhenium parts with metal oxide additives by means of slip casting and extrusion techniques is described. The metal oxides, ZrO2 and HfO2 were stabilized into the cubic phase with Y2O3. Additions of metal oxide to the rhenium of up to 15 weight percent were used. Tubes of 17 mm diameter with 0.5 mm walls were slip cast by adapting current ceramic oxide techniques. A complete cast double conical nozzle demonstrated the ability to meet shapes and tolerances. Extrusion of meter long tubing lengths of 3.9 mm o.d. x 2.3 mm i.d. final dimension is documented. Sintering schedules are presented to produce better than 95% of theoretical density parts. Finished machining was found possible were requried by electric discharge machining and diamond grinding.

  4. Thermal fatigue behavior of H-13 die steel for aluminum die casting with various ion sputtered coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieh, C. Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Sputtered coatings of Mo, W, Pt, Ag, Au, Co, Cr, Ni, Ag + Cu, Mo + Pt, Si3N4, A1N, Cr3C2, Ta5Si3, and ZrO2 were applied to a 2-inch-square, 7-inch-long thermal fatigue test specimen which was then internally water cooled and alternately immersed in molten aluminum and cooled in air. After 15,000 cycles the thermal fatigue cracks at the specimen corners were measured. Results indicate that a significant improvement in thermal fatigue resistance was obtained with platinum, molybdenum, and tungsten coatings. Metallographic examination indicates that the improvement in thermal fatigue resistance resulted from protection of the surface of the die steel from oxidation. The high yield strength and ductility of molybdenum and tungsten contributed to the better thermal fatigue resistance.

  5. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  6. Characterization of Pore Defects and Fatigue Cracks in Die Cast AM60 Using 3D X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhuofei; Kang, Jidong; Wilkinson, David S.

    2015-08-01

    AM60 high pressure die castings have been used in automobile applications to reduce the weight of vehicles. However, the pore defects that are inherent in die casting may negatively affect mechanical properties, especially the fatigue properties. Here we have studied damage ( e.g., pore defects, fatigue cracks) during strained-controlled fatigue using 3-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (XCT). The fatigue test was interrupted every 2000 cycles and the specimen was removed to be scanned using a desktop micro-CT system. XCT reveals pore defects, cracks, and fracture surfaces. The results show that pores can be accurately measured and modeled in 3D. Defect bands are found to be made of pores under 50 µm (based on volume-equivalent sphere diameter). Larger pores are randomly distributed in the region between the defect bands. Observation of fatigue cracks by XCT is performed in three ways such that the 3D model gives the best illustration of crack-porosity interaction while the other two methods, with the cracks being viewed on transverse or longitudinal cross sections, have better detectability on crack initiation and crack tip observation. XCT is also of value in failure analysis on fracture surfaces. By assessing XCT data during fatigue testing and observing fracture surfaces on a 3D model, a better understanding on the crack initiation, crack-porosity interaction, and the morphology of fracture surface is achieved.

  7. Process Modeling of Low-Pressure Die Casting of Aluminum Alloy Automotive Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, C.; Duan, J.; Yao, L.; Maijer, D. M.; Cockcroft, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    Although on initial inspection, the aluminum alloy automotive wheel seems to be a relatively simple component to cast based on its shape, further insight reveals that this is not the case. Automotive wheels are in a select group of cast components that have strict specifications for both mechanical and aesthetic characteristics due to their important structural requirements and their visibility on a vehicle. The modern aluminum alloy automotive wheel continues to experience tightened tolerances relating to defects to improve mechanical performance and/or the physical appearance. Automotive aluminum alloy wheels are assessed against three main criteria: wheel cosmetics, mechanical performance, and air tightness. Failure to achieve the required standards in any one of these categories will lead to the wheel either requiring costly repair or being rejected and remelted. Manufacturers are becoming more reliant on computational process modeling as a design tool for the wheel casting process. This article discusses and details examples of the use of computational process modeling as a predictive tool to optimize the casting process from the standpoint of defect minimization with the emphasis on those defects that lead to failure of aluminum automotive wheels, namely, macroporosity, microporosity, and oxide films. The current state of applied computational process modeling and its limitations with regard to wheel casting are discussed.

  8. Application of TPM indicators for analyzing work time of machines used in the pressure die casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Stanisław; Czajkowska, Agnieszka; Stasiak-Betlejewska, Renata; Borade, Atul B.

    2014-05-01

    The article presents the application of total productive maintenance (TPM) to analyze the working time indicators of casting machines with particular emphasis on failures and unplanned downtime to reduce the proportion of emergency operation for preventive maintenance and diagnostics. The article presents that the influence of individual factors of complex machinery maintenance (TPM) is different and depends on the machines' modernity level. In an original way, by using correlation graphs, research findings on the impact of individual TPM factors on the castings quality were presented and interpreted. The examination results conducted for machines with varying modernity degrees allowed to determine changes within the impact of individual TPM factors depending on machine parameters. These results provide a rich source of information for the improvement processes on casting quality of the foundry industry that satisfies the automotive industry demand.

  9. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA. PMID:27023546

  10. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA. PMID:27023546

  11. The effects of latex additions on centrifugally cast concrete for internal pipeline protection

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Hinkebein, T.E.; Hlava, P.F.; Melton, D.G.

    1993-07-01

    Centrifugally-cast concrete liners applied to the interiors of plain steel pipe sections were tested for corrosion performance in brine solutions. An American Petroleum Institute (API) standard concrete, with and without additions of a styrene-butadiene copolymer latex, was subjected to simulated service and laboratory tests. Simulated service tests used a mechanically pumped test manifold containing sections of concrete-lined pipe. Linear polarization probes embedded at steel-concrete interfaces tracked corrosion rates of these samples as a function of exposure time. Laboratory tests used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study corrosion occurring at the steel-concrete interfaces. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) determined ingress and distribution of damaging species, such as Cl, in concrete liners periodically returned from the field. Observations of concrete-liner fabrication indicate that latex loading levels were difficult to control in the centrifugal-casting process. Overall, test results indicate that latex additions do not impart significant improvements to the performance of centrifugally cast liners and may even be detrimental. Corrosion at steel-concrete interfaces appears to be localized and the area fraction of corroding interfaces can be greater in latex-modified concretes than in API baseline material. EPMA shows higher interfacial Cl concentration in the latex-modified concretes than in the API standard due to rapid brine transport through cracks to the steel surface.

  12. Heat transfer during quenching of modified and unmodified gravity die-cast A357 cylindrical bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, K. N.; Hemanna, P.

    2006-06-01

    Heat transfer during quenching of chill-cast modified and unmodified A357 Al-Si alloy was examined using a computer-aided cooling curve analysis. Water at 60 °C and a vegetable oil (palm oil) were used as quench media. The measured temperatures inside cylindrical probes of the A357 alloy were used as inputs in an inverse heat-conduction model to estimate heat flux transients at the probe/quenchant interface and the surface temperature of the probe in contact with the quench medium. It was observed that modified alloy probes yielded higher cooling rates and heat flux transients. The investigation clearly showed that the heat transfer during quenching depends on the casting history. The increase in the cooling rate and peak heat flux was attributed to the increase in the thermal conductivity of the material on modification melt treatment owing to the change in silicon morphology. Fine and fibrous silicon particles in modified A357 probes increase the conductance of the probe resulting in higher heat transfer rates. This was confirmed by measuring the electrical conductivity of modified samples, which were found to be higher than those of unmodified samples. The ultrasound velocity in the probes decreased on modification.

  13. Analysis of chill-cast NiAl intermetallic compound with copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, J.; Gonzalez, C.; Herrera, R.; Juarez-Islas, J. A.

    2002-10-01

    This study carried out a characterization of chill-cast NiAl alloys with copper additions, which were added to NiAl, such that the resulting alloy composition occurred in the β-field of the ternary NiAlCu phase diagram. The alloys were vacuum induction melted and casted in copper chill molds to produce ingots 0.002 m thick, 0.020 m wide, and 0.050 m long. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) performed in chill-cast ingots identified mainly the presence of the β-(Ni,Cu)Al phase. As-cast ingots showed essentially no ductility at room temperature except for the Ni50Al40Cu10 alloy, which showed 1.79% of elongation at room temperature. Ingots with this alloy composition were then heat treated under a high-purity argon atmosphere at 550 °C (24 h) and cooled either in the furnace or in air, until room temperature was reached. β-(Ni,Cu)Al and γ'(Ni,Cu)3Al were present in specimens cooled in the furnace and β-(Ni,Cu)Al, γ'(Ni,Cu)3Al plus martensite-(Ni,Cu)Al were present in specimens cooled in air. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that martensite transformation was the result of a solid-state reaction with M s ˜ 470 and M f ˜ 430 °C. Tensile tests performed on bulk heat-treated ingots showed room-temperature ductility between 3 and 6%, depending on the cooling media.

  14. Spray-formed tooling for injection molding and die casting applications

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. McHugh; B. R. Wickham

    2000-06-26

    Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling{trademark} is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The ability of the sprayed deposit to capture features of the tool pattern eliminates costly machining operations in conventional mold making and reduces turnaround time. Moreover, rapid solidification suppresses carbide precipitation and growth, allowing many ferritic tool steels to be artificially aged, an alternative to conventional heat treatment that offers unique benefits. Material properties and microstructure transformation during heat treatment of spray-formed H13 tool steel are described.

  15. Spray-formed Tooling for Injection Molding and Die Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Hugh, Kevin Matthew

    2000-06-01

    Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) ToolingTM is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The ability of the sprayed deposit to capture features of the tool pattern eliminates costly machining operations in conventional mold making and reduces turnaround time. Moreover, rapid solidification suppresses carbide precipitation and growth, allowing many ferritic tool steels to be artificially aged, an alternative to conventional heat treatment that offers unique benefits. Material properties and microstructure transformation during heat treatment of spray-formed H13 tool steel are described.

  16. The effect of microstructure on the thermal fatigue resistance of investment cast and wrought AISI H13 hot work die steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.

    1995-07-01

    Variable thickness plate investment castings of AISI H13 hot work die steel were pour and characterized in the as-cast and heat treated conditions. The characterization included light microscopy and mechanical testing. Wrought samples of standard and premium grade H13 steel were heat treated and characterized similarly for comparison. Microstructural differences were observed in as-cast samples poured to different section thicknesses. Dendrite cell size and carbide morphology constituted the most prominent microstructural differences observed. After a full heat treatment, however, Microstructural differences between the wrought material and cast materials were slight regardless of section thickness. The mechanical properties of the cast and heat treated material proved similar to the properties of the standard heat treated wrought material. A thermal fatigue testing unit was designed and built to correlate the heat checking susceptibility of AISI H13 steel to its processing and consequent microstructural condition. Surface hardness decreased significantly with thermal cycling, and heat checking was noticed in as few as 50 cycles. Thermal softening and thermal fatigue susceptibility were quantified and discussed relative to the microstructural conditions created by processing and heat treatment. It was found that the premium grade wrought H13 steel provided the best overall resistance to heat checking; however, the heat-treat cast and as-cast H13 tool steel (made from standard grade wrought H13 tool steel) provided comparable resistance to heat checking in terms Of area fraction of heat checking and maximum crack length.

  17. Predicting the Influence of Pore Characteristics on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Casting Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die casting Mg materials on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM50 and AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope to obtain the overall information on the pore characteristics. The experimentally quantified pore characteristics are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructures with different pore sizes, pore volume fractions and pore size distributions. Pores are explicitly represented in the synthetic microstructures and meshed out for the subsequent finite element analysis. In the finite element analysis, an intrinsic critical strain value is used for the Mg matrix material, beyond which work-hardening is no longer permissible. With no artificial failure criterion prescribed, ductility levels are predicted for the various microstructures in the form of strain localization. Mesh size effect study is also conducted, from which a mesh size dependent critical strain curve is determined. A concept of scalability of pore size effects is then presented and examined with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve. The results in this study show that, for the regions with lower pore size and lower volume fraction, the ductility generally decreases as the pore size and pore volume fraction increase whereas, for the regions with larger pore size and larger pore volume fraction, other factors such as the mean distance between the pores begin to have some substantial influence on the ductility. The results also indicate that the pore size effects may be scalable for the models with good-representative pore shape and distribution with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve.

  18. Micro-Plasma Transferred Arc Additive Manufacturing for Die and Mold Surface Remanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhavar, Suyog; Paul, Christ Prakash; Jain, Neelesh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Micro-plasma transferred arc (µPTA) additive manufacturing is one of the newest options for remanufacturing of dies and molds surfaces in the near-millimeter range leading to extended usage of the same. We deployed an automatic micro-plasma deposition setup to deposit a wire of 300 µm of AISI P20 tool steel on the substrate of same material for the potential application in remanufacturing of the die and mold surface. Our present research effort is to establish µPTA additive manufacturing as a viable economical and cleaner methodology for potential industrial applications. We undertook the optimization of single weld bead geometry as the first step in our present study. Bead-on-plate trials were conducted to deposit single bead geometry at various processing parameters. The bead geometry (shape and size) and dilution were measured and the parametric dependence was derived. A set of parameters leading to reproducible regular and smooth single bead geometry were identified and used to prepare a thin wall for mechanical testing. The deposits were subjected to material characterization such as microscopic studies, micro-hardness measurements and tensile testing. The process was compared qualitatively with other deposition processes involving high-energy density beams and was found to be advantageous in terms of low initial and running costs with comparable properties. The outcome of the study confirmed the process capability of µPTA deposition leading to deployment of cost-effective and environmentally friendlier technology for die and mold remanufacturing.

  19. Micro-Plasma Transferred Arc Additive Manufacturing for Die and Mold Surface Remanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhavar, Suyog; Paul, Christ Prakash; Jain, Neelesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Micro-plasma transferred arc ( µPTA) additive manufacturing is one of the newest options for remanufacturing of dies and molds surfaces in the near-millimeter range leading to extended usage of the same. We deployed an automatic micro-plasma deposition setup to deposit a wire of 300 µm of AISI P20 tool steel on the substrate of same material for the potential application in remanufacturing of the die and mold surface. Our present research effort is to establish µPTA additive manufacturing as a viable economical and cleaner methodology for potential industrial applications. We undertook the optimization of single weld bead geometry as the first step in our present study. Bead-on-plate trials were conducted to deposit single bead geometry at various processing parameters. The bead geometry (shape and size) and dilution were measured and the parametric dependence was derived. A set of parameters leading to reproducible regular and smooth single bead geometry were identified and used to prepare a thin wall for mechanical testing. The deposits were subjected to material characterization such as microscopic studies, micro-hardness measurements and tensile testing. The process was compared qualitatively with other deposition processes involving high-energy density beams and was found to be advantageous in terms of low initial and running costs with comparable properties. The outcome of the study confirmed the process capability of µPTA deposition leading to deployment of cost-effective and environmentally friendlier technology for die and mold remanufacturing.

  20. Neurobehavioral testing of subjects exposed residentially to groundwater contaminated from an aluminum die-casting plant and local referents.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, K H; Warshaw, R H

    1993-08-01

    Residents adjoining a die-casting plant had excessive headaches, numbness of hands and feet, dizziness, blurred vision, staggering, sweating, abnormal heart rhythm, and depression, which led to measurements of neurobehavioral performance, affective status, and the frequency of symptoms. They had all been exposed via well water and proximity to the plant to volatile organic chemicals (VOC) and to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The 117 exposed women and men and 46 unexposed referents were studied together for simple and choice visual reaction time, body sway speed, blink reflex latency, color discrimination, Culture Fair (a nonverbal nonarithmetic intelligence test), recall of stories, figures, and numbers, cognitive and psychomotor control (slotted pegboard and trail making A and B), long-term memory, profile of mood states (POMS), and scores and frequencies of 34 symptoms. Choice reaction time, sway speed, and blink latency were impaired in both sexes of the exposed group and trail making B was impaired in exposed women. The POMS scores and frequencies of 30 of 34 symptoms were elevated in both sexes, compared to referents. Recall, long-term memory, psychomotor speed, and other cognitive function tests were reduced in exposed subjects and in the referents as compared to national referents. Neurophysiological impairment, and cognitive and psychomotor dysfunction and affective disorders, especially depression and excessive frequency of symptoms, were associated with the use of wells contaminated with VOCs, TCE and PCBs. PMID:8345533

  1. Fatigue characterization of high pressure die-cast magnesium AM60B alloy using experimental and computational investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, You

    The object of the current dissertation is to foster fundamental advances in microstructure-fatigue characteristics of a high pressure die cast magnesium AM60B alloy. First, high cycle fatigue staircase experiments were conducted on specimens extracted from automobile instrument panels. The resulting fracture surfaces were then examined with scanning electron microscopic imaging to elucidate the fatigue crack initiation sites and propagation paths at different stages of the fatigue life. Due to the fact that the qualification of the crack initiation and propagation mechanisms through experiment alone is difficult, complementary micromechanical finite element simulations were conducted. Particularly, the effects of different applied loading conditions and the porosity morphology (e.g. pore shape, pore size, pore spacing, proximity to the free surface) on the maximum plastic shear strain range, as a driving force for crack initiation, were analyzed. Moreover, at the microstructually small crack (MSC) propagation stage, the shielding effects of beta-phase Mg17Al12 particles were systematically studied. Based on the distribution of the maximum principal stress within the particles and the maximum hydrostatic stress along the particle/matrix interfaces, the relative influence of the pre-damaged (fractured or debonded) particles and various particle cluster morphologies were carefully investigated. In the finite element simulations, the constitutive behaviours of AM60B alloy and the alpha-matrix were simulated by the advanced kinematic hardening law tuned with experimentally determined material parameters under cyclic loading.

  2. Influence of Electrolytic Plasma Oxidation Coating on Tensile Behavior of Die-Cast AM50 Alloy Subjected to Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lihong; Nie, Xueyuan; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Henry

    Three different thickness ceramic coatings were deposited on die-cast AM50 magnesium alloy in KOH and NaAlO2 solution using electrolytic plasma oxidation (EPO) technology for corrosion prevention. Immersion corrosion tests were carried out in 3.5% NaCl solution for 336 hours to investigate the effect of coating thicknesses on tensile and fracture behaviors of the coated AM50 alloys. The results show that the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the coated AM50 alloy subjected to immersion corrosion increase with an increase in coating thicknesses. Further analyses on stress and strain curves indicate that the coating enhances the strain-hardening rates of the corroded alloy during its plastic deformation. SEM examination on the fractured surface manifests that the substrate AM50 alloys exhibit characteristics of ductile deformation with deep dimples. However, brittle features prevail on the fractured surface of the mixed layer of coating plus oxidation corrosion product. Micro cracks were observed between the mixed layer and the AM50 alloy substrate induced by corrosion and within the mixed layer induced by EPO process, which could be responsible for the brittle fracture.

  3. Neurobehavioral testing of subjects exposed residentially to groundwater contaminated from an aluminum die-casting plant and local referents

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.H. )

    1993-08-01

    Residents adjoining a die-casting plant had excessive headaches, numbness of hands and feet, dizziness, blurred vision, staggering, sweating, abnormal heart rhythm, and depression, which led to measurements of neurobehavioral performance, affective status, and the frequency of symptoms. They had all been exposed via well water and proximity to the plant to volatile organic chemicals (VOC) and to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The 117 exposed women and men and 46 unexposed referents were studied together for simple and choice visual reaction time, body sway speed, blink reflex latency, color discrimination, Culture Fair (a nonverbal nonarithmetic intelligence test), recall of stories, figures, and numbers, cognitive and psychomotor control (slotted pegboard and trail making A and B), long-term memory, profile of mood states (POMS), and scores and frequencies of 34 symptoms. Choice reaction time, sway speed, and blink latency were impaired in both sexes of the exposed group and trail making B was impaired in exposed women. The POMS scores and frequencies of 30 of 34 symptoms were elevated in both sexes, compared to referents. Recall, long-term memory, psychomotor speed, and other cognitive function tests were reduced in exposed subjects and in the referents as compared to national referents. Neurophysiological impairment, and cognitive and psychomotor dysfunction and affective disorders, especially depression and excessive frequency of symptoms, were associated with the use of wells contaminated with VOCs, TCE and PCBs.

  4. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of die-cast AM60B magnesium alloys in a complex salt solution. A slow positron beam study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. F.; Yang, W.; Qin, Q. L.; Wen, W.; Zhai, T.; Yu, B.; Liu, D. Y.; Luo, A.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-12-15

    The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.

  5. Social Organization in Parasitic Flatworms--Four Additional Echinostomoid Trematodes Have a Soldier Caste and One Does Not.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vedrenne, Ana E; Quintana, Anastasia C E; DeRogatis, Andrea M; Martyn, Kayla; Kuris, Armand M; Hechinger, Ryan F

    2016-02-01

    Complex societies where individuals exhibit division of labor with physical polymorphism, behavioral specialization, and caste formation have evolved several times throughout the animal kingdom. Recently, such complex sociality has been recognized in digenean trematodes; evidence is limited to 6 marine species. Hence, the extent to which a soldier caste is present throughout the Trematoda is sparsely documented, and there are no studies detailing the structure of a species lacking such a social structure. Here we examine colony structure for an additional 5 echinostomoid species, 4 of which infect the marine snail Cerithidea californica and 1 (Echinostoma liei) that infects the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata . For all species, we present redia morphology (pharynx and body size) and the distribution of individuals of different castes throughout the snail body. When morphological evidence indicated the presence of a soldier caste, we assessed behavior by measuring attack rates of the different morphs toward heterospecific trematodes. Our findings indicate that each of the 4 species from C. californica have a permanent soldier caste while E. liei does not. The observed intra- and inter-specific variation of caste structure for those species with soldiers, and the documentation of colony structure for a species explicitly lacking permanent soldiers, emphasizes the diverse nature of trematode sociality and the promise of the group to permit comparative investigations of the evolution and ecology of sociality. PMID:26560890

  6. Advances in aluminum casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tiryakioglu, M.; Campbell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This symposium focuses on the improvements of aluminum casting quality and reliability through a better understanding of processes and process variables, and explores the latest innovations in casting-process design that allow increasing use of the castings to replace complex assemblies and heavy steel and cast-iron components in aerospace and automotive applications. Presented are 35 papers by international experts in the various aspects of the subject. The contents include: Semisolid casting; Computer-aided designing of molds and castings; Casting-process modeling; Aluminum-matrix composite castings; HIPing of castings; Progress in the US car project; Die casting and die design; and Solidification and properties.

  7. Development of a Fluid-Particle Model in Simulating the Motion of External Solidified Crystals and the Evolution of Defect Bands in High-Pressure Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Cheng; Xiong, Shoumei; Li, Xiaobo; Guo, Zhipeng

    2016-04-01

    A numerical fluid-particle model was developed to simulate the motion of external solidified crystals (ESCs) in the melt during the filling process of high-pressure die casting (HPDC). Simulation results on a tensile bar casting with two types of ingates (semi-circle and circle) revealed that for a long time scale the ESCs tended to distribute in a ring pattern around the specimen center, whereas for a short time scale the ESC distribution changed constantly from the ring pattern to either the center pattern or the ring-center pattern. It was proposed that the defect bands would form at these areas where two solidification fronts met (where solidification shrinkage occurred), including one originating from the skin layer of the specimen and the other from the ESC region. Accordingly, three types of defect band patterns, which were commonly observed in HPDC experiment, could be successfully simulated and explained using this model.

  8. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2016-05-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  9. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 200 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single NbN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (<7.6 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiostat and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 13.9 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering. PMID:27433719

  10. Improved life of die casting dies of H13 steel by attaining improved mechanical properties and distortion control during heat treatment. Year 1 report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.F.; Schwam, D.

    1995-03-01

    Optimum heat treatment of dies (quenching) is critical in ensuring satisfactory service performance: rapid cooling rates increase the thermal fatigue/heat checking resistance of the steel, although very fast cooling rates can also lead to distortion and lower fracture toughness, increasing the danger of catastrophic fracture. Goal of this project is to increase die life by using fast enough quenching rates (> 30 F/min ave cooling rate from 1750 to 550 F, 1/2 in. below working surfaces) to obtain good toughness and fatigue resistance in Premium grade H-13 steel dies. An iterative approach of computer modeling validated by experiment was taken. Cooling curves during gas quenching of H-13 blocks and die shapes were measured under 2, 5, and 7.5 bar N2 and 4 bar Ar. Resulting dimensional changes and residual stresses were determined. To facilitate the computer modeling work, a database of H-13 mechanical and physical properties was compiled. Finite element analysis of the heat treated shapes was conducted. Good fit of modeled vs measured quenched rates was demonstrated for simple die shapes. The models predict well the phase transformation products from the quench. There is good fit between predicted and measured distortion contours; however magnitude of predicted distortion and residual stresses does not match well the measured values. Further fine tuning of the model is required.

  11. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  12. As-cast uranium-molybdenum based metallic fuel candidates and the effects of carbon addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwood, Van Stephen

    The objective of this research was to develop and recommend a metallic nuclear fuel candidate that lowered the onset temperature of gamma phase formation comparable or better than the uranium-10 wt. pct. molybdenum alloy, offered a solidus temperature as high or higher than uranium-10 wt. pct. zirconium (1250°C), and stabilized the fuel phase against interaction with iron and steel at least as much as uranium-10 wt. pct. zirconium stabilized the fuel phase. Two new as-cast alloy compositions were characterized to assess thermal equilibrium boundaries of the gamma phase field and the effect of carbon addition up to 0.22 wt. pct. The first system investigated was uranium- x wt. pct. M where x ranged between 5-20 wt. pct. M was held at a constant ratio of 50 wt. pct. molybdenum, 43 wt. pct. titanium, and 7 wt. pct. zirconium. The second system investigated was the uranium-molybdenum-tungsten system in the range 90 wt. pct. uranium - 10 wt. pct. molybdenum - 0 wt. pct. tungsten to 80 wt. pct. uranium - 10 wt. pct. molybdenum - 10 wt. pct. tungsten. The results showed that the solidus temperature increased with increased addition of M up to 12.5 wt. pct. for the uranium-M system. Alloy additions of titanium and zirconium were removed from uranium-molybdenum solid solution by carbide formation and segregation. The uranium-molybdenum-tungsten system solidus temperature increased to 1218°C at 2.5 wt. pct. with no significant change in temperature up to 5 wt. pct. tungsten suggesting the solubility limit of tungsten had been reached. Carbides were observed with surrounding areas enriched in both molybdenum and tungsten. The peak solidus temperatures for the alloy systems were roughly the same at 1226°C for the uranium-M system and 1218°C for the uranium-molybdenum-tungsten system. The uranium-molybdenum-tungsten system required less alloy addition to achieve similar solidus temperatures as the uranium-M system.

  13. Tensile and Fracture Properties of Cast and Forged Composite Synthesized by Addition of Al-Si Alloy to Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanjunda Swamy, H. M.; Nath, S. K.; Ray, S.

    2009-12-01

    Cast Mg-Al-Si composites synthesized by addition of Al-Si alloy containing 10, 15, and 20 wt pct of Si, in molten magnesium, to generate particles of Mg2Si by reaction between silicon and magnesium during stir casting has opened up the possibility to control the size of these particles. The microstructure of the cast composite consists of relatively dark polyhedral phase of Mg2Si and bright phase of β-Al12Mg17 along the boundary between dendrites of α-Mg solid solution. After hot forging at 350 °C, the microstructure has changed to relatively smaller sizes of β-Al12Mg17 and Mg2Si particles apart from larger grains surrounded by smaller grains due to dynamic recovery and recrystallization. Some of the Mg2Si particles crack during forging. In both the cast and forged composite, the Brinell hardness increases rapidly with increasing volume fraction of Mg2Si, but the hardness is higher in forged composites by about 100 BHN. Yield strength in cast composites improves over that of the cast alloy, but there is a marginal increase in yield strength with increasing Mg2Si content. In forged composites, there is significant improvement in yield strength with increasing Mg2Si particles and also over those observed in their cast counterpart. In cast composites, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) decreases with increasing Mg2Si content possibly due to increased casting defects such as porosity and segregation, which increases with increasing Mg2Si content and may counteract the strengthening effect of Mg2Si content. However, in forged composite, UTS increases with increasing Mg2Si content until 5.25 vol pct due to elimination of segregation and lowering of porosity, but at higher Mg2Si content of 7 vol pct, UTS decreases, possibly due to extensive cracking of Mg2Si particles. On forging, the ductility decreases in forged alloy and composites possibly due to the remaining strain and the forged microstructure. The initiation fracture toughness, J IC , decreases drastically in

  14. Effect of Ca addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast Mg-Sm alloys.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Fang, Daqing; Chai, Yuesheng; Yang, Bin

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of Ca addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast Mg-4Sm alloys. The addition of 1.0 wt% Ca led to a significant grain refinement of Mg-4.0Sm alloys owing to the formation of rod-like Mg2Ca phases that acted as active nucleates for the Mg matrix. The as-cast Mg-4.0Sm-1.0Ca alloy showed the smallest grain size at 45 μm. Furthermore, the Mg-4.0Sm-1.0Ca alloy exhibited greater hardness, higher tensile strength, and higher yield tensile strength and elongation than the other two alloys with different Ca contents. These results were attributed to the grain refinement and precipitation strengthening of the Mg2Ca and Mg41Sm5 phases. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:707-711, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27311709

  15. Effect of N addition on tensile and corrosion behaviors of CD4MCU cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jinil; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Choi, Byunghak

    2003-08-01

    The effect of N addition on the microstructure, tensile, and corrosion behaviors of CD4MCU (Fe-25Cr-5Ni-2.8Cu-2Mo) cast duplex stainless steel was examined in the present study. The slow strain rate tests were also conducted at a nominal strain rate of 1 × 10-6/s in air and 3.5 pct NaCl+5 pct H2SO4 solution for studying the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior. It was observed that the volume fraction of austenitic phase in CD4MCU alloy varied from 38 to 59 pct with increasing nitrogen content from 0 to 0.27 wt. pct. The tensile behavior of CD4MCU cast duplex stainless steels, which tended to vary significantly with different N contents, appeared to be strongly related to the volume changes in ferritic and austenitic phases, rather than the intrinsic N effect. The improvement in the resistance to general corrosion in 3.5 pct NaCl+5 pct H2SO4 aqueous solution was notable with 0.13 pct N addition. The further improvement was not significant with further N addition. The resistance to SCC of CD4MCU cast duplex stainless steels in 3.5 pct NaCl+5 pct H2SO4 aqueous solution, however, increased continuously with increasing N content. The enhancement in the SCC resistance was believed to be related to the volume fraction of globular austenitic colonies, which tended to act as barriers for the development of initial pitting cracks in the ferritic phase into the sharp ones.

  16. Formulation, Casting, and Evaluation of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic and Novel Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Desain, John D.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs, Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Borduin, Russell; Koo, Joseph H.; Brady, Brian B.; Curtiss, Thomas J.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    This investigation studied the inclusion of various additives to paraffin wax for use in a hybrid rocket motor. Some of the paraffin-based fuels were doped with various percentages of LiAlH4 (up to 10%). Addition of LiAlH4 at 10% was found to increase regression rates between 7 - 10% over baseline paraffin through tests in a gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor. Mass burn rates for paraffin grains with 10% LiAlH4 were also higher than those of the baseline paraffin. RDX was also cast into a paraffin sample via a novel casting process which involved dissolving RDX into dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent and then drawing a vacuum on the mixture of paraffin and RDX/DMF in order to evaporate out the DMF. It was found that although all DMF was removed, the process was not conducive to generating small RDX particles. The slow boiling generated an inhomogeneous mixture of paraffin and RDX. It is likely that superheating the DMF to cause rapid boiling would likely reduce RDX particle sizes. In addition to paraffin/LiAlH4 grains, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were cast in paraffin for testing in a hybrid rocket motor, and assorted samples containing a range of MWNT percentages in paraffin were imaged using SEM. The fuel samples showed good distribution of MWNT in the paraffin matrix, but the MWNT were often agglomerated, indicating that a change to the sonication and mixing processes were required to achieve better uniformity and debundled MWNT. Fuel grains with MWNT fuel grains had slightly lower regression rate, likely due to the increased thermal conductivity to the fuel subsurface, reducing the burning surface temperature.

  17. Influence of strontium addition on the mechanical properties of gravity cast Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Germen, Gülşah Şevik, Hüseyin; Kurnaz, S. Can

    2013-12-16

    In this study, the effect of strontium (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1 wt%) addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the gravity cast Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy were investigated. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the main phases are α−Mg, β−Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and Mg{sub 2}Sn in the Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy. With addition The tensile testing results showed that the yield and ultimate tensile strength and elongation of Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy increased by adding Sr up to 0.1 wt.% and then is gradually decreased with the addition of more alloying element.

  18. Effect of Ti addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a cast Fe-Ni-Mo-Mn maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, S. Hossein; Nili Ahmadabadi, M.

    2003-10-01

    To study the effect of Ti on the age hardening behavior of Fe-Ni-Mn maraging steels, a Fe-Ni-Mo-Mn steel was alloyed with Ti then mechanical properties and aging behavior of two cast steels were investigated. In this regard, two heats of nominal compositions of Fe-10Ni-6Mo-3Mn and Fe-lONi-6Mo-3Mn-0. 7Ti were induction melted in air and vacuum respectively and cast in iron mold. After homogenizing at 1473K for 21.6ks and water quenching, solution annealing was performed at 1223K for 3.6ks followed by air cooling. Age hardening behavior at 773Kin the range of 0.36-172. 8 ks was determined. Tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were measured in the solution annealed and peak-aged conditions. Fractographic features were studied by scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX microanalyses. Tensile properties of the alloys in the peakaged condition were in the range of grade 200 standard maraging steel. It has been found that Ti addition resulted in increasing of hardness and strength in aged condition and decreasing of Charpy impact toughness in both solution annealed and aged conditions. Ti addition also changes type and morphology of inclusions and fracture mechanism from semi-ductile intergranular mode to semi-ductile transgranular one.

  19. Using special additions to preparation of the moulding mixture for casting steel parts of drive wheel type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josan, A.; Pinca Bretotean, C.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the possibility of using special additions to the execution of moulding mixtures for steel castings, drive wheel type. Critical analysis of moulding technology leads to the idea that most defects appear due to using improper moulding mixture. Using a improper moulding mixture leads to penetration of steel in moulding mixture, resulting in the formation of adherences, due to inadequate refractarity of the mould and core mixtures. Using only the unique mixture to the moulding leads to increasing consumption of new sand, respectively to the increase of price of piece. Acording to the dates registered in the industrial practice is necessary to use the special additions to obtain the moulding mixtures, carbonaceous materials respectively.

  20. The Effect of Li Additions on Wear Properties of Al-Mg{sub 2}Si Cast In-situ Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, M. R.; Emamy, M.; Ghiasinejad, J.; Malekan, A.

    2010-06-15

    Wear rate of a modified Al-Mg{sub 2}Si composite was studied by the use of a conventional pin-on-disc technique. In-situ Al-Mg{sub 2}Si composites (15, 20, 25 wt.%) were cast in a simple cylindrical mold. 0.3 wt.% Li was added into the molten composite to modify its microstructure. It has been found that Li addition decreases the mean size of primary Mg{sub 2}Si particles. The wear behavior of different composites at different rates revealed that Li addition increases the wear properties of Al-15%Mg{sub 2}Si to some extent but it did not have any significant influence on wear properties of two other composites.

  1. Effects of La addition on the microstructure and tensile properties of Al-Si-Cu-Mg casting alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Pan, Ye; Wu, Ji-li; Tao, Shi-wen; Chen, Yu

    2015-04-01

    The effects of La addition on the microstructure and tensile properties of B-refined and Sr-modified Al-11Si-1.5Cu-0.3Mg casting alloys were investigated. With a trace addition of La (0.05wt%-0.1wt%), the mutual poisoning effect between B and Sr can be neutralized by the formation of LaB6 rather than SrB6. By employing a La/B weight ratio of 2:1, uniform microstructures, which are characterized by well refined α-Al grains and adequately modified eutectic Si particles as well as the incorporation of precipitated strengthening intermetallics, are obtained and lead to appreciable tensile properties with an ultimate tensile strength of 270 MPa and elongation of 5.8%.

  2. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with advanced kidney disease and chronic kidney failure . White blood cell (WBC) casts are more common ... Hyaline casts; Granular casts; Renal tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the ...

  3. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Casts in the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood cell casts ... The absence of cellular casts or presence of a few hyaline casts is normal. The examples above are common measurements for results of ...

  4. Comment on the reported fiber attenuations in the visible regime in 'Fabrication of glass photonic crystal fibers with a die-cast process'

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xian; Loh, Wei H.; Richardson, David J

    2008-10-01

    We comment on the recent paper by Zhou et al. [Appl. Opt.45, 4433 (2006)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.45.004433], in which transmission losses of 0.2-0.3 dB/m were claimed across the wavelength range 420-900 nm in a high-index (nd=1.80518 at 587.6 nm) SF6 glass-based photonic crystal fiber fabricated by novel die-cast technique. If confirmed, these losses are at least 1 order of magnitude lower than previous reported losses of SF6 photonic crystal fibers from other fabrication approaches. Here we present a statistic survey on the relationship between the refractive index and the bulk material attenuation, based on a large number of commercial Schott optical glasses with the nd ranging between 1.40 and 2.05. It shows that the loss of a high-index (nd=1.80) glass optical fiber should be at the levels of 10-50 dB/m at 420 nm and 1-10 dB/m at 500 nm, respectively. Moreover, the material attenuation of such a high-index glass fiber should intrinsically show a large decay, from 10-50 dB/m at 420 nm to the level of 1 dB/m at 700 nm, which arises from the tail on the UV absorption edge of the high-index glass extending to the visible region. Therefore, we conclude that: (1) the low loss of 0.2-0.3 dB/m reported in the cited paper is abnormally one or two magnitudes lower than the material attenuation that a high-index (nd=1.80) glass optical fiber should have in the range between 420 and 500 nm and that (2) the flat loss curve between 420 and 700 nm in the cited paper deviates greatly from the intrinsic behavior of a high-index (nd=1.80) glass fiber.

  5. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important since it must

  6. Slip casting and extruding shapes of rhemium with metal oxide additives. Part 2: Development of grain stabilized rhenium parts for resistojets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Francis A.; Page, Russell J.

    1987-01-01

    The adaptation of the powdered particle process used for pure metal oxides to the coprocessing of rhenium oxides suitable to produce pure miniature resistojet hardware has been successful. Both slip casting and extrusion processes were used. The metal oxide ZrO2 was stabilized into the cubic phase with Y2O3, for use as a potentially grain stabilizing additive to rhenium. Straight meter long tubing in two sizes are reported. Tubing suitable for resistojet ohmic heater use of fully fired dimensions of nominally 3.8 mm o.d. x 2.2 mm i.d.. and 1.26 mm o.d. x .45 mm i.d. with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0% zirconia additives were produced for further study. Photomicrographs of these are discussed. The addition of the metal oxide zirconia to rhenium resulted in more dense and less porous parts. The additions of phase stabilized zirconia most likely act as a sintering aid. Tubes of varying diameter were slip cast which were representative of miniature pressure cases.

  7. 75 FR 20387 - Contech Castings, LLC, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Reported...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... workers are engaged in activities related to the production of aluminum and magnesium die casted component... who were adversely affected by increased imports of aluminum and magnesium die casted component...

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. Modeling and control of casting and welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, S.; Mehrabian, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sections: process monitor and control in welding; plasma processing and refining; strip casting; modelling of welding processes; CAD/CAM in casting; investment and die casting; ingot, continuous and other shape casting; and rapid solidification and microstructural evolution.

  10. EFFECT OF Sn AND Pb ADDITIONS ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF Mg-6Al-1Zn AS-CAST MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haibo; Zhu, Tianping; Wang, Yuxin; Gao, Wei

    2013-07-01

    Much attention has been paid to Mg alloys given that Mg alloys are the most promising lightweight metallic material. They have found applications in automobile and other fields where weight saving is of great significance. Mg-Al-Zn alloy system (AZ series), including AZ91 and AZ61 Mg alloys, is widely used in industry. We have studied the enhancement of mechanical properties by adding alloying elements Sn and Pb. This paper reports our study on the microstructure and element distribution of the alloys with small amounts of tin (Sn) and lead (Pb) additions.

  11. Effect of Y, Sr, and Nd additions on the microstructure and microfracture mechanism of squeeze-cast AZ91-X magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Lee, S.H.; Kim, D.H.

    1998-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of Y, Sr, and Nd additions on the microstructure and microfracture mechanism of the four squeeze-cast magnesium alloys based on the commercial AZ91 alloy. Microstructural observation, in situ fracture tests, fractographic observation were conducted on the alloys to clarify the microfracture process. Microstructural analyses indicated that grain refinement could be achieved by small additions of alloying elements, although the discontinuously precipitated Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phases still existed on grain boundaries. From in situ fracture observation of an AZ91-Sr alloy, it was seen that coarse needle-shaped compound particles and Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phases located on the grain boundary provided easy intergranular fracture sites under low stress intensity factor levels, resulting in the drop in toughness. On the other hand, the AZ91-Y and AZ91-Nd alloys showed improved fracture toughness, since deformation and fracture paths proceeded into grains rather than to grain boundaries, as the planar slip bands and twinnings actively developed inside the grains. These findings suggested, on the basis of the well-developed planar slip bands and twinnings, that the small addition of Y or Nd was very effective in improving fracture toughness.

  12. Effect of Cr, Ti, V, and Zr Micro-additions on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of the Al-Si-Cu-Mg Cast Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, S. K.; Czerwinski, F.; Kasprzak, W.; Friedman, J.; Chen, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    Uniaxial static and cyclic tests were used to assess the role of Cr, Ti, V, and Zr additions on properties of the Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg (wt pct) alloy in as-cast and T6 heat-treated conditions. The microstructure of the as-cast alloy consisted of α-Al, eutectic Si, and Cu-, Mg-, and Fe-rich phases Al2.1Cu, Al8.5Si2.4Cu, Al5.2CuMg4Si5.1, and Al14Si7.1FeMg3.3. In addition, the micro-sized Cr/Zr/Ti/V-rich phases Al10.7SiTi3.6, Al6.7Si1.2TiZr1.8, Al21.4Si3.4Ti4.7VZr1.8, Al18.5Si7.3Cr2.6V, Al7.9Si8.5Cr6.8V4.1Ti, Al6.3Si23.2FeCr9.2V1.6Ti1.3, Al92.2Si16.7Fe7.6Cr8.3V1.8, and Al8.2Si30.1Fe1.6Cr18.8V3.3Ti2.9Zr were present. During solution treatment, Cu-rich phases were completely dissolved, while the eutectic silicon, Fe-, and Cr/Zr/Ti/V-rich intermetallics experienced only partial dissolution. Micro-additions of Cr, Zr, Ti, and V positively affected the alloy strength. The modified alloy in the T6 temper during uniaxial tensile tests exhibited yield strength of 289 MPa and ultimate tensile strength of 342 MPa, being significantly higher than that for the Al-Si-Cu-Mg base. Besides, the cyclic yield stress of the modified alloy in the T6 state increased by 23 pct over that of the base alloy. The fatigue life of the modified alloy was substantially longer than that of the base alloy tested using the same parameters. The role of Cr, Ti, V, and Zr containing phases in controlling the alloy fracture during static and cyclic loading is discussed.

  13. Packaged die heater

    SciTech Connect

    Spielberger, Richard; Ohme, Bruce Walker; Jensen, Ronald J.

    2011-06-21

    A heater for heating packaged die for burn-in and heat testing is described. The heater may be a ceramic-type heater with a metal filament. The heater may be incorporated into the integrated circuit package as an additional ceramic layer of the package, or may be an external heater placed in contact with the package to heat the die. Many different types of integrated circuit packages may be accommodated. The method provides increased energy efficiency for heating the die while reducing temperature stresses on testing equipment. The method allows the use of multiple heaters to heat die to different temperatures. Faulty die may be heated to weaken die attach material to facilitate removal of the die. The heater filament or a separate temperature thermistor located in the package may be used to accurately measure die temperature.

  14. Effects of V Addition on Microstructure and Hardness of Fe-C-B-Ni-V Hardfacing Alloys Cast on Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovatti, L.; Lemke, J. N.; Emami, A.; Stejskal, O.; Vedani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Fe-based hardfacing alloys containing high volume fraction of hard phases are a suitable material to be deposited as wear resistant thick coatings. In the case of alloys containing high amount of interstitial alloying elements, a key factor affecting the performance is dilution with the substrate induced by the coating process. The present research was focused on the analysis of V-bearing Fe-based alloys after calibrated carbon and vanadium additions (in the range from 3 to 5 wt.%) to a commercial Fe-C-B-Ni hardfacing alloy. Vanadium carbides with a petal-like morphology were observed in the high-V hypereutectic alloys allowing to reach hardness values above 700 HV. The solidification range shifted to higher temperatures with increasing amount of vanadium addition and in the case of hypereutectic alloys, the gap remains close to that of the original alloy. In the last step of the research, the microstructural evolution after dilution was analyzed by casting the V-rich alloys on a steel substrate. The dilution, caused by the alloying element diffusion and the local melting of the substrate, modified the microstructure and the hardness for a relevant volume fraction of the hardfacing alloys. In particular, the drop of interstitial elements induced the transition from the hypereutectic to the hypoeutectic microstructure and the formation of near-spherical V-rich carbides. Even after dilution, the hardness of the new alloys remained higher than that measured in the original Fe-C-B-Ni alloy.

  15. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems. PMID:22367933

  16. Effect of tungsten addition on the toughness and hardness of Fe{sub 2}B in wear-resistant Fe-B-C cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhifu Xing, Jiandong; Lv, Liangliang

    2013-01-15

    The effects of tungsten additions of 0%, 1.12%, 2.04%, and 3.17% (in wt.%) on the morphology, fracture toughness and micro-hardness of Fe{sub 2}B in Fe-B-C cast alloy were investigated. The results indicate that, with the increase of tungsten addition, the morphology and distribution of Fe{sub 2}B have no change and a new W-containing phase, except the (Fe, W){sub 2}B with a certain tungsten solution, does not form, and that the fracture toughness of Fe{sub 2}B increases first and then decreases, while the hardness increases first and then has a little change. Compared with the fracture toughness (3.8 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}) of Fe{sub 2}B without tungsten addition, the toughness at 2.04 wt.% tungsten can be improved by about above 80% and achieves about 6.9 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, and variation characteristics of hardness and toughness of Fe{sub 2}B were also testified by viewing the indentation marks and cracks on the Fe{sub 2}B, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Poor toughness of Fe2B decreases obviously the wear resistance of the alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As W content increases, Fe2B's toughness increases first and then decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As W content increases, Fe2B's hardness first increases and then has little change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The toughness at 2.04 % W can be improved by above 80% more than that at 0% W.

  17. First Results of Energy Saving at Process Redesign of Die Forging Al-Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pepelnjak, Tomaz; Kuzman, Karl; Kokol, Anton

    2011-05-04

    The contribution deals with eco-friendly solutions for shortened production chains of forging light alloys. During the die forging operations a remarkable amount of material goes into the flash and later on into chips during finish machining. These low value side products are rich with embedded energy therefore recycling or reprocessing could be very energy saving procedure.In cooperation with a die forging company a shortened reprocessing cycle has been studied starting from re-melting the forging flash and without additional heating to cast preforms for subsequent die forging. As such preforms have not as good formability characteristics as those done from extruded billets the isothermal forging process has been adopted. First results showed that without cracks and other defects the formability is sufficient for a broad spectrum of forgings.To improve the formability a homogenization process of cast preforms has been implemented. As the process started immediately after casting, amount of additional energy for heating was minimized. To reduce voids forging process was redesigned in a way to assure greater hydrostatic pressures in parts during forging. First results were promising therefore research is going towards improving processes without adding significantly more energy as it is needed for casting with homogenization and die forging.

  18. Exploratory study on H13 steel dies

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.

    1994-04-01

    Ultrahigh-strength H13 steel is a recommended die material for aluminum die casting; dies made from H13 steel can be safely water- cooled during hot working operations without cracking. However, after time the dies exhibited surface cracking and excessive wear. Erosive wear also occurs owing to high pressure injection of molten Al. An exploratory study was made of the causes for surface cracking of H13 dies. Results suggest that surface cracking is caused by interrelated factors, internal to the die material as well as externally induced conditions.

  19. Enhanced alignment and magnetic properties of die-upset nano-crystal Nd2Fe14B magnets with Nb addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yilong; Chen, Dengming; Zhou, Anruo; Sun, Jianchun; Cao, Pengjun

    2012-12-01

    It is difficult to obtain the crystallographic alignment for stoichiometric Nd2Fe14B alloys by applying the melt-spun and subsequent hot-pressing and hot-deformation techniques. However, the enhanced alignment and magnetic properties of die-upset nano-crystal Nd2Fe14B magnets have been obtained by Nb addition in the present paper. The magnetic properties studies show that Nb addition leads to the remarkable increase of remanence Br and intrinsic coercivity Hci, which is due to the improvement of c-axis texture and refinement of microstructure. Microstructure studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal that Nb atoms are enriched at grain boundary and the NbFeB phase is observed with increasing Nb content. Since some Fe atoms in the Nd2Fe14B phase participate in the formation of NbFeB phase, the excessive Nd atoms may be enriched at grain boundary, which may improve the physical property of grain boundary and provide a mass transport pass for preferential growth of oriented Nd2Fe14B grains, thus leading to the enhanced alignment and magnetic properties.

  20. Optimization of Composition and Heat Treating of Die Steels for Extended Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Quanyou Zhou

    2002-01-30

    An ''average'' die casting die costs fifty thousand dollars. A die used in making die cast aluminum engine blocks can cost well over one million dollars. These costs provide a strong incentive for extension of die life. While vacuum quenched Premium Grade H13 dies have become the most widely used in the United States, tool makers and die casters are constantly searching for new steels and heat treating procedures to extend die life. This project was undertaken to investigate the effects of composition and heat treating on die life and optimize these parameters.

  1. Casting in Sport

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Mark; Malone, Kathy; Darmelio, John; Rettig, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Attempts by sports medicine professionals to return high school athletes with hand and wrist injuries to competition quickly and safely have been the source of confusion and debate on many playing fields around the country. In addition to the differing views regarding the appropriateness of playing cast usage in high school football, a debate exists among sports medicine professionals as to which material is best suited for playing cast construction. Materials used in playing cast construction should be hard enough to provide sufficient stabilization to the injured area and include adequate padding to absorb blunt impact forces. The purpose of the biomechanical portion of this investigation was to attempt to determine the most appropriate materials for use in constructing playing casts for the hand and wrist by assessing different materials for: 1) hardness using a Shore durometer, and 2) ability to absorb impact using a force platform. Results revealed that RTV11 and Scotchcast were the “least hard” of the underlying casting materials and that Temper Stick foam greatly increased the ability of RTV11 to absorb impact. Assessment of the mechanical properties of playing cast materials and review of current developments in high school football rules are used to aid practitioners in choosing the most appropriate materials for playing cast construction. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558257

  2. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Cannell; Adrian S. Sabau

    2005-09-30

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The first part of the project involved preparation of reports on the state of the art at that time for all the areas under consideration (die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy). The primary R&D focus during Phase I was on the wax material since the least was known about it. The main R&D accomplishments during this phase were determination of procedures for obtaining the thermal conductivity and viscoelastic properties of an unfilled wax and validating those procedures. Phase II focused on die-wax and shell-alloy systems. A wax material model was developed based on results obtained during the previous R&D phase, and a die-wax model was successfully incorporated into and used in commercial computer programs. Current computer simulation programs have complementary features. A viscoelastic module was available in ABAQUS but unavailable in ProCAST, while the mold-filling module was available in ProCAST but unavailable in ABAQUS. Thus, the numerical simulation results were only in good qualitative agreement with experimental results, the predicted shrinkage factors being approximately 2.5 times larger than those measured. Significant progress was made, and results showed that the testing and modeling of wax material had great potential for industrial applications. Additional R&D focus was placed on one shell-alloy system. The fused-silica shell mold and A356 aluminum alloy were considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. It was very important to obtain accurate temperature data from actual castings, and significant effort was made to obtain temperature profiles in

  3. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Wilkening, D.; Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B.

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  4. SPHERICAL DIE

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, J.P.

    1959-01-27

    A die is presented for pressing powdered materials into a hemispherical shape of uniforin density and wall thickness comprising a fcmale and male die element held in a stationary spaced relation with the space being equivalent to the wall thickness and defining the hemispherical shape, a pressing ring linearly moveable along the male die element, an inlet to fill the space with powdered materials, a guiding system for moving the pressing ring along the male die element so as to press the powdered material and a heating system for heating the male element so that the powdered material is heated while being pressed.

  5. Rapid Tooling via Investment Casting and Rapid Prototype Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael D.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this work to develop the materials processing and design technologies required to reduce the die development time for metal mold processes from 12 months to 3 months, using die casting of Al and Mg as the example process. Sandia demonstrated that investment casting, using rapid prototype patterns produced from Stereo lithography or Selective laser Sintering, was a viable alternative/supplement to the current technology of machining form wrought stock. A demonstration die insert (ejector halt) was investment cast and subsequently tested in the die casting environment. The stationary half of the die insert was machined from wrought material to benchmark the cast half. The two inserts were run in a die casting machine for 3,100 shots of aluminum and at the end of the run no visible difference could be detected between the cast and machined inserts. Inspection concluded that the cast insert performed identically to the machined insert. Both inserts had no indications of heat checking or degradation.

  6. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  7. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2005-09-01

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to

  8. Laser-Ultrasonic Inspection of MG/AL Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, Alain; Levesque, Daniel; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Baril, Eric; Fischersworring-Bunk, Andreas

    2005-04-09

    Laser-ultrasonics is used to assess the metallurgical bond between Mg/Al materials in die-cast Magnesium/Aluminum composite. The acoustic impedances of Mg, Al and air are such that the amplitude of ultrasonic echoes reflected back from a void is many times larger than the amplitude of those reflected back from a well-bonded interface. In addition, the polarity of echoes from a void is inverted compared to that from a well-bonded interface. Laser-ultrasonic F-SAFT is also used for imaging tilted Mg/Al interfaces. Experimental setup, signal processing and results for detecting voids in the Mg/Al interface of cast parts are presented.

  9. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  10. A comparative study of the centrifugal and vacuum-pressure techniques of casting removable partial denture frameworks.

    PubMed

    Shanley, J J; Ancowitz, S J; Fenster, R K; Pelleu, G B

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate two techniques for casting accuracy on removable partial denture frameworks: centrifugal casting and vacuum-pressure casting. A standard metal die with predetermined reference points in a horizontal plane was duplicated in refractory investment. The casts were waxed, and castings of nickel-chrome alloy were fabricated by the two techniques. Both the casts and the castings were measured between the reference points with a measuring microscope. With both casting methods, the differences between the casts and the castings were significant, but no significant differences were found between castings produced by the two techniques. Vertical measurements at three designated points also showed no significant differences between the castings. Our findings indicate that dental laboratories should be able to use the vacuum-pressure method of casting removable partial denture frameworks and achieve accuracy similar to that obtained by the centrifugal method of casting. PMID:7007622

  11. Energy and Technolgy Assessment of Zinc and Magnesium Casting Plants, Technical Report Close-out, August 25,2006

    SciTech Connect

    Twin City Die Castings Company; Tom Heider; North American Die Castings Association

    2006-08-25

    Twin City Die Castings Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Twin City Die Castings Company was awarded project No. DE-FG36-05GO15097 to perform plant wide assessments of ten (10) die casting facilities that produce zinc and magnesium alloy castings in order to determine improvements and potential cost savings in energy use. Mr. Heider filled the role of team leader for the project and utilized the North American Die Casting Association (NADCA) to conduct audits at team participant plants so as to hold findings specific to each plant proprietary. The intended benefits of the project were to improve energy use through higher operational and process efficiency for the plants assessed. An improvement in energy efficiency of 5 – 15% was targeted. The primary objectives of the project was to: 1) Expand an energy and technology tool developed by the NADCA under a previous DOE project titled, “Energy and Technology Assessment for Die Casting Plants” for assessing aluminum die casting plants to be more specifically applicable to zinc and magnesium die casting facilities. 2) Conduct ten (10) assessments of zinc and magnesium die casting plants, within eight (8) companies, utilizing the assessment tool to identify, evaluate and recommend opportunities to enhance energy efficiency, minimize waste, and improve productivity. 3) Transfer the assessment tool to the die casting industry at large.

  12. A comparison of dimensional accuracy between three different addition cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Forrester-Baker, L; Seymour, K G; Samarawickrama, D; Zou, L; Cherukara, G; Patel, M

    2005-06-01

    Ten impressions of a metal implant abutment were made with each of three addition-cured silicone impression materials. Using the technique of co-ordinate metrology, the shoulder region of the abutment and corresponding regions of both impressions and dies made from these impressions were scanned and measured. Comparison of these measurements indicated that the mean dimension measured from the shoulder region for each group of impression materials was significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. However, when these impressions were cast in a gypsum based die material, none of the measured dimensions taken from the casts were significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. Thus, any change in measured dimensions occurring during impression making, was compensated for in some way by the casting process. PMID:16011234

  13. Casting methods

    DOEpatents

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  14. Simulating the deformation of dies in the foundry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabod, A.; Longa, Y.; Dracon, J. M.; Chailler, K.; Hairy, P.; Da Silva, A.

    2012-07-01

    Digital simulation (QuikCAST, ProCAST) is already used extensively when designing metallic dies for founding, in particular to design filling and gating systems. Simulation of the steady-state temperature cycles of dies has also been mastered. With large castings, the temperature gradient induced between the moulding surface and the rear surfaces of the die leads to deformations that may be large enough to measure, and incompatible with the required dimensional accuracy. The temperature gradient also creates thermal fatigue stresses that cause crazing of the die surface. In the study conducted by CTIF, aimed at measuring tooling deformations, various ways of measuring displacements at high temperatures (with and without contact) were investigated in order to evaluate their capabilities and limitations. An experimental device was designed - a test bench combining a metallic die having a simple geometry, in which an aluminium part could be cast, and instrumentation (temperature and displacement sensors). The deformations of the die were measured during first cycles of temperature homogenization. Concurrently, thermomechanical calculations were carried out on the same geometry using PROCAST. The calculation results are well correlated with the experimental measurements and validate the tools and the calculation methods. This thermomechanical approach makes it possible to optimize die design in the foundry and to predict high-temperature deformations as early as the design stage. Knowledge of these deformations makes it possible in turn to anticipate the geometrical and dimensional variations undergone by the castings themselves and so to improve their accuracy. The designer can act on the temperature of the die or the design of the casting, or create a die in which the expected thermal deformation is reversed so as to produce a casting having the correct dimensions. In short, thermomechanical simulation can be applied to this problem to achieve a better understanding

  15. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  16. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Mechanical Performance of Dies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller, Principal Investigator; Kabiri-Bamoradian, Contributors: Khalil; Delgado-Garza, Abelardo; Murugesan, Karthik; Ragab, Adham

    2011-09-13

    provided to NADCA for distribution to the industry. Power law based meta-models for predicting machine tie bar loading and for predicting maximum parting surface separation were successfully developed and tested against simulation results for a wide range of machines and experimental data. The models proved to be remarkably accurate, certainly well within the requirements for practical application. In addition to making die structural modeling more accessible, the work advanced the state-of-the-art by developing improved modeling of cavity pressure effects, which is typically modeled as a hydrostatic boundary condition, and performing a systematic analysis of the influence of ejector die design variables on die deflection and parting plane separation. This cavity pressure modeling objective met with less than complete success due to the limits of current finite element based fluid structure interaction analysis methods, but an improved representation of the casting/die interface was accomplished using a combination of solid and shell elements in the finite element model. This approximation enabled good prediction of final part distortion verified with a comprehensive evaluation of the dimensions of test castings produced with a design experiment. An extra deliverable of the experimental work was development of high temperature mechanical properties for the A380 die casting alloy. The ejector side design objective was met and the results were incorporated into the metamodels described above. This new technology was predicted to result in an average energy savings of 2.03 trillion BTU's/year over a 10 year period. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates over a ten year period, based on commercial introduction in 2009, a market penetration of 70% by 2014 is 4.26 trillion BTU's/year by 2019. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring

  17. Investment cast AISI H13 tooling for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R.

    1995-07-01

    While many techniques exist for production of soft tooling, for die casting there is limited recent experience with cast tooling. The most common US alloy used for manufacture of die casting tooling is wrought AISI H13. If the performance of the cast material is comparable to the wrought counterpart, the use of investment cast HI 3 tooling directly from patterns made via rapid prototyping is of considerable interest. A metallurgical study of investment cast H13 was conducted to evaluate the mechanical behavior in simulated die casting applications. Variable thickness plate investment castings of AISI H13 hot work die steel were produced and characterized in the as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The characterization included light microscopy and mechanical testing. Wrought samples of standard and premium grade H13 were heat-treated and characterized similarly for comparison. Microstructural differences were observed in as-cast samples produced in different section thicknesses. Dendrite cell size and carbide morphology constituted the most prominent microstructural differences observed. After a full heat-treatment, microstructural differences between the wrought material and cast materials were slight regardless of section thickness.The mechanical properties of the cast and heat-treated material proved similar to the properties of the standard heat-treated wrought material. A thermal fatigue testing unit was to con-elate the heat checking susceptibility of H13 steel to its processing and consequent microstructural condition. Surface hardness decreased significantly with thermal cycling, and heat checking was observed in as few as 50 cycles. Thermal softening and thermal fatigue susceptibility were quantified and discussed relative to the microstructural conditions created by processing and heat-treatment. It was found that the premium grade wrought H13 steel provided the best overall resistance to heat checking.

  18. Addition of SiC Particles to Ag Die-Attach Paste to Improve High-Temperature Stability; Grain Growth Kinetics of Sintered Porous Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-10-01

    To improve the high-temperature reliability of sintered Ag joints, three types of silicon carbide particle (SiCp) of different size and morphology were added to Ag micron-flake paste. Quality sintered joints between Cu dummy chips and Cu substrate were obtained at a relatively low temperature (250°C), in air, under low load (0.4 MPa), and 35 MPa die-shear strength was achieved. High-temperature stability was investigated by means of aging tests at 150, 200, and 250°C for 500 h, and by thermal cycling between -50°C and 250°C for up to 170 cycles. The best distribution and compatibility with porous sintered Ag structures was observed for sub-micron SiC particles with an average diameter of 600 nm. After high-temperature storage for 500 h at 250°C, mean Ag grain size of the SiC-containing joints was unchanged whereas that for pure sintered Ag increased from 1.1 to 2.5 μm. Ag joints containing the optimum amount (2 wt.%) of SiCp retained their original strength (20 MPa) after storage at 250°C for 500 h. The shear strength of Ag joints without added SiCp decreased from 27 to 7 MPa after 500 h because of grain growth, which obeyed the classical parabolic law. Grain growth in pure Ag joints is discussed in terms of a temperature-dependent exponent n and activation energy Q. Our SiCp-containing joints resisted the grain growth that induces interfacial cracks during thermal cycling.

  19. Cast aluminum denture base.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Dembert, M L

    1987-08-01

    The laboratory procedures for a cast aluminum base denture have been presented. If an induction casting machine is not available, the "two-oven technique" works well, provided the casting arm is kept spinning manually for 4 minutes after casting. If laboratory procedures are executed precisely and with care, the aluminum base denture can be cast with good results. PMID:3305884

  20. Effect of copper addition at a rate of 4% weight on the machininability of ZA-21A1 cast alloy by CNC milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqawabah, S. M. A.; Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Little work is published on the effect of copper addition to zinc-aluminium ZA-21Al alloy on its surface quality machined by milling. In this paper, the effect of copper addition at a rate 4 % weight to the ZA-21Al alloy on its hardness and surface quality is investigated. It was found that the addition of 4% Cu resulted in 18.3% enhancement in microhardness whereas the mechanical characteristics were reduced (softening) about 14.5% at 0.2% strain. It was found that the best surface finish for this alloy before copper addition ZA21 was achieved at a feed rate of 100 mm/min and 1.25 mm depth of cut whereas the best surface finish for ZA21-4% Cu was achieved at feed rate 250 mm/min, 1600 rpm cutting velocity and 1.25 mm depth of cut.

  1. Casting the Spirit: A Handmade Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutenberg, Mona

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses how an art therapist working in a hospital palliative care unit has incorporated a ritual of hand casting to help bring closure to dying patients and family members who are grieving as death approaches. The finished hand sculptures depict the hands of the patients and, sometimes, of their loved ones. They are faithful and…

  2. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  3. Accurate defect die placement and nuisance defect reduction for reticle die-to-die inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Vincent; Huang, L. R.; Lin, C. J.; Tseng, Y. N.; Huang, W. H.; Tuo, Laurent C.; Wylie, Mark; Chen, Ellison; Wang, Elvik; Glasser, Joshua; Kelkar, Amrish; Wu, David

    2015-10-01

    Die-to-die reticle inspections are among the simplest and most sensitive reticle inspections because of the use of an identical-design neighboring-die for the reference image. However, this inspection mode can have two key disadvantages: (1) The location of the defect is indeterminate because it is unclear to the inspector whether the test or reference image is defective; and (2) nuisance and false defects from mask manufacturing noise and tool optical variation can limit the usable sensitivity. The use of a new sequencing approach for a die-to-die inspection can resolve these issues without any additional scan time, without sacrifice in sensitivity requirement, and with a manageable increase in computation load. In this paper we explore another approach for die-to-die inspections using a new method of defect processing and sequencing. Utilizing die-to-die double arbitration during defect detection has been proven through extensive testing to generate accurate placement of the defect in the correct die to ensure efficient defect disposition at the AIMS step. The use of this method maintained the required inspection sensitivity for mask quality as verified with programmed-defectmask qualification and then further validated with production masks comparing the current inspection approach to the new method. Furthermore, this approach can significantly reduce the total number of defects that need to be reviewed by essentially eliminating the nuisance and false defects that can result from a die-to-die inspection. This "double-win" will significantly reduce the effort in classifying a die-to-die inspection result and will lead to improved cycle times.

  4. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikka, V. K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several value body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni (Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and where applicable, with data on sand castings.

  5. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and, where applicable, with data on sand castings. 22 figures.

  6. WinMod: An expert advisor for investment casting

    SciTech Connect

    Bivens, H.P.; Williamson, G.A. Jr.; Luger, G.F.; Erdmann, R.G.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Anderson, D.J.

    1998-04-01

    Investment casting is an important method for fabricating a variety of high quality components in mechanical systems. Cast components, unfortunately, have a large design and gate/runner build time associated with their fabrication. In addition, casting engineers often require many years of actual experience in order to consistently pour high quality castings. Since 1989, Sandia National Laboratories has been investigating casting technology and software that will reduce the time overhead involved in producing quality casts. Several companies in the casting industry have teamed up with Sandia to form the FASTCAST Consortium. One result of this research and the formation of the FASTCAST consortium is the creation of the WinMod software, an expert casting advisor that supports the decision making process of the casting engineer through visualization and advice to help eliminate possible casting defects.

  7. Superplastic Response of Continuously Cast AZ31B Magnesium Sheet Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boileau, J. M.; Friedman, P. A.; Houston, D. Q.; Luckey, S. G.

    2010-06-01

    Magnesium sheet is typically produced for commercial applications with the traditional DC-ingot casting method. As a result of the hexagonal close-packed crystallographic structure in magnesium, multiple rolling passes and annealing steps are required to reduce the thickness of the ingots. Thus, high fabrication costs characterize the creation of magnesium sheet suitable for common forming operations. Recently, continuous casting (CC) technology, where molten metal is solidified directly into sheet form, has been applied to magnesium alloys; this method has shown the potential to significantly reduce the cost of fabricating magnesium sheet alloys. In order to understand the viability of the CC process, a study was conducted to investigate the superplastic potential of alloys produced by this method. This study focused on AZ31B Mg that was continuously-cast on twin-roll casters from three different suppliers. These three materials were compared with a production DC-cast AZ31B alloy in terms of microstructure, elevated-temperature tensile properties, and superplastic forming response. The data from this study found that microstructural features such as grain size and segregation can significantly affect the forming response. Additionally, the CC alloys can have equivalent or superior SPF response compared to DC-cast alloys, as demonstrated in both elevated temperature tensile tests and superplastic forming trials using a rectangular pan die.

  8. Modeling of cast systems using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul; Prakash, Mahesh; Ha, Joseph; Sinnott, Matthew; Nguyen, Thang; Grandfield, John

    2004-03-01

    To understand and control the filling process for metals in high-pressure die casting and ingot casting, researchers have used new flow-simulation software for the modeling of mold filling. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a non-conventional computational fluid dynamics method that has been successfully applied to these problems. Due to its mesh-free nature, it can handle complex splashing free surface flows and the differential motion of multiple solid-casting equipment components relatively easily. The ability of SPH to predict the detailed filling patterns of real large-scale automotive die castings is demonstrated in this study, and the use of SPH simulation for wheel shape optimization in ingot casting based on minimizing oxide generation while increasing the throughput is also presented.

  9. Comparing the Accuracy of Three Different Impression Materials in Making Duplicate Dies

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Farshad; Sabouhi, Mahmoud; Nosouhian, Saeid; Davoudi, Amin; Behnamnia, Zeynab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Marginal adaptation is very important in cast restorations. Maladaptation leads to plaque retention, reduction of mechanical and esthetic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision of three different impression materials (including: Additional silicone [AS] and condensational silicone [CS] and polyether [PE]) for duplicating master dies. Materials and Methods: Three master dies from an acrylic tooth model-with supragingival and shoulder finishing line was made by using PE: Impergum, CS: Speedex, and AS: Panasil separately. The Ni-Cr copings were prepared from master dies separately. They were placed on the acrylic model and the mean marginal difference was recorded by using a stereomicroscope. Then 30 duplicate test dies were made by using the same impression materials and the marginal gaps were recorded. The comparison was done by one-way ANOVA and SPSS software (Version 13) at a significant level of 0.05. Results: The mean marginal difference of four walls from Impergum (38.56 um) was the lowest than Speedex (38.92 um) and Panasil (38.24 um). The Impergum had the highest capability in making duplicate dies (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The Impergum impression material manifested the highest capability in making a better marginal adaptation of duplicate dies but further studies are needed to make a precise decision. PMID:26229364

  10. Structure and properties of dies obtained from scrap of 5KhNM and R6M5 steels by electroslag remelting

    SciTech Connect

    Timchenko, E.I.; Semenova, L.M.; Berezkin, Yu.A.; Zaitseva, I.D.

    1987-11-01

    It is known that in a number of cases cast dies of tool steels for hot working possess increased life. In the Lozovaya Forging and Machining Plant in electroslag remelting (ESR) of worn dies, a method is used making it possible to improve the quality of the cast blanks (dies) by additional alloying of them. A consumable composite electrode made of worn dies of 5KhNM steel reforged into bars and butt welded and scrap of R6M5 tool steel welded along the whole length of the main electrode in the form of a solid bar is used. Practically none of the chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, and vanadium additionally added in electroslag remelting burns off and therefore it is sufficient to add the expensive R6M5 steel scrap once. The improved characteristics of the steel are maintained in subsequent operations in the production chain. A comparative investigation was made of the character of the structure in the as-cast, annealed, hardened, and tempered conditions of 5KhNMVF steel produced by the above method and of 5KhNM steel produced by different methods.

  11. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  12. The effect of upper limb casting on gait pattern.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Daniel; Elbaz, Avi; Mor, Amit; Segal, Ganit; Calif, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Casting of the arm may interfere with normal walking patterns because of additional load of the cast or prevention of arm swing. This study aimed to determine the effect of applying various casts on temporospatial walking parameters, including gait velocity and cadence, step length, and single limb support. A computerized gait system was used to assess these variables for 23 healthy individuals in four walking modes: normal walking, with a cast above the elbow and a sling, and with a cast below the elbow, with and without a sling. Thirteen participants had their dominant hand casted and 10 had their nondominant hand casted. On average, casted participants took significantly smaller steps with the leg on the casted side and spent less time supported on the casted side. The least changes were noted with the arm in a cast below the elbow and no sling, and the greatest changes were noted with the arm in a cast above the elbow and in a sling. This difference was heightened when the dominant hand was casted and lessened when the nondominant hand was casted. No differences were found in walking velocity or cadence between the walking modes. Casting of the upper limb has significant effects on gait, which should be taken into consideration, especially in individuals with previous gait abnormalities. PMID:26855024

  13. High-Density-Tape Casting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Centrifuge packs solids from slurry into uniform, dense layer. New system produces tapes of nearly theoretical packing density. Centrifugal system used to cast thin tapes for capacitors, fuel cells, and filters. Cylindrical rotary casting chamber mounted on high-speed bearings and connected to motor. Liquid for vapor-pressure control and casting slurry introduced from syringes through rotary seal. During drying step, liquid and vapor vented through feed tubes or other openings. Laminated tapes produced by adding more syringes to cast additional layers of different materials.

  14. Die Materials for Critical Applications and Increased Production Rates

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John Wallace; Sebastian Birceanu

    2002-11-30

    Die materials for aluminum die-casting need to be resistant to heat checking, and have good resistance to washout and to soldering in a fast flow of molten aluminum. To resist heat checking, die materials should have a low coefficient of thermal expansion, high thermal conductivity, high hot yield strength, good temper softening resistance, high creep strength, and adequate ductility. To resist the washout and soldering, die materials should have high hot hardness, good temper resistance, low solubility in molten aluminum and good oxidation resistance. It is difficult for one material to satisfy with all above requirements. In practice, H13 steel is the most popular material for aluminum die casting dies. While it is not an ideal choice, it is substantially less expensive to use than alternative materials. However, in very demanding applications, it is sometimes necessary to use alternative materials to ensure a reasonable die life. Copper-base, nickel-base alloys and superalloys, titanium-,molybdenum-, tungsten-base alloys, and to some extent yttrium and niobium alloys, have all been considered as potential materials for demanding die casting applications. Most of these alloys exhibit superior thermal fatigue resistance, but suffer from other shortcomings.

  15. Evaluation of Heat Checking and Washout of Heat Resistant Superalloys and Coatings for Die inserts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Edward Courtright; Harold Adkins

    2005-01-30

    This project had two main objectives: (1) To design, fabricate and run a full size test for evaluating soldering and washout in die insert materials. This test utilizes the unique capabilities of the 350 Ton Squeeze Casting machine available in the Case Meal Casting Laboratory. Apply the test to evaluate resistance of die materials and coating, including heat resistant alloys to soldering and washout damage. (2) To evaluate materials and coatings, including heat resistant superalloys, for use as inserts in die casting of aluminum alloys.

  16. DIE Deflection Modeling: Empirical Validation and Tech Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller

    2003-05-28

    This report summarizes computer modeling work that was designed to help understand how the die casting die and machine contribute to parting plane separation during operation. Techniques developed in earlier research (8) were applied to complete a large computational experiment that systematically explored the relationship between the stiffness of the machine platens and key dimensional and structural variables (platen area covered, die thickness, platen thickness, thickness of insert and the location of the die with respect to the platen) describing the die/machine system. The results consistently show that there are many significant interactions among the variables and it is the interactions, more than the individual variables themselves, which determine the performance of the machine/die system. That said, the results consistently show that it is the stiffness of the machine platens that has the largest single impact on die separation.

  17. Wege in die Zukunft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauermann, Göran; Mosler, Karl

    Die Zukunft stellt große Herausforderungen an die Arbeit der Deutschen Statistischen Gesellschaft. Sie betreffen die gestiegenen Anforderungen der Nutzer von Statistik, die Kommunikationsmöglichkeiten des Internets sowie die Dynamik der statistischen Wissenschaften und ihrer Anwendungsgebiete. Das Kapitel 5 beschreibt, wie sich die Gesellschaft diesen Herausforderungen stellt und welche Ziele sie sich in der wissenschaftlichen Zusammenarbeit und im Kampf gegen das Innumeratentum gesetzt hat.

  18. Interfacial heat transfer in squeeze casting of magnesium alloy AM60 with variation of applied pressures and casting wall-thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Fang, Li; Sun, Zhizhong; Hu, Henry; Nie, Xueyuan; Tjong, Jimi

    2015-12-01

    The heat transfer coefficient at the casting-die interface is the most important factor on the solidification process. With the 75-ton hydraulic press machine and P20 steel die mold, 5-step castings of magnesium alloy AM60 with different wall-thicknesses (3, 5, 8, 12, 20 mm) were poured under various hydraulic pressures (30, 60, and 90 MPa) using an indirect squeeze casting process. Thermal histories throughout the die wall and the casting surface have been recorded by fine type-K thermocouples. The in-cavity local pressures measured by pressure transducers were explored at the casting-die interfaces of 5 steps. The casting-die interfacial heat transfer coefficients (IHTC) initially reached a maximum peak value followed by a gradually decline to the lower level. Similar characteristics of IHTC peak values can be observed at the applied pressures of 30, 60 and 90 MPa. With the applied pressure of 90 MPa, the peak IHTC values from steps 1 to 5 varied from 5623 to 10,649 W/m2 K. As the applied hydraulic pressure increased, the IHTC peak value of each step was increased accordingly. The wall thickness also affected IHTC peak values significantly. The peak IHTC value and heat flux increased as the step became thicker. The empirical equations relating the IHTCs to the local pressures and the solidification temperature at the casting surface were developed based on the multivariate linear and polynomial regression.

  19. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  20. Computer simulation applied to jewellery casting: challenges, results and future possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberto, Dario; Klotz, Ulrich E.

    2012-07-01

    Computer simulation has been successfully applied in the past to several industrial processes (such as lost foam and die casting) by larger foundries and direct automotive suppliers, while for the jewelry sector it is a procedure which is not widespread, and which has been tested mainly in the context of research projects. On the basis of a recently concluded EU project, the authors here present the simulation of investment casting, using two different softwares: one for the filling step (Flow-3D®), the other one for the solidification (PoligonSoft®). A work on material characterization was conducted to obtain the necessary physical parameters for the investment (used for the mold) and for the gold alloys (through thermal analysis). A series of 18k and 14k gold alloys were cast in standard set-ups to have a series of benchmark trials with embedded thermocouples for temperature measurement, in order to compare and validate the software output in terms of the cooling curves for definite test parts. Results obtained with the simulation included the reduction of micro-porosity through an optimization of the feeding channels for a controlled solidification of the metal: examples of the predicted porosity in the cast parts (with metallographic comparison) will be shown. Considerations on the feasibility of applying the casting simulation in the jewelry sector will be reached, underlining the importance of the software parametrization necessary to obtain reliable results, and the discrepancies found with the experimental comparison. In addition an overview on further possibilities of application for the CFD in jewellery casting, such as the modeling of the centrifugal and tilting processes, will be presented.

  1. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  2. LLNL casting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Comfort, W. J., III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US competiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  3. Investigation on Tool Wear Rate for Modified and Unmodified Aluminium-Silicon Casting Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, M. M.; Khan, A. A.; Ismail, Ahmad F.

    This study demonstrates and explains the effect of strontium modification on machinability of aluminium-silicon eutectic (LM-6 type) alloy. This alloy is known to have many favourable features including weight to strength ratio, high corrosion resistance and excellent castability. However, normal unmodified LM-6 alloy has poor machinability, which reduces its applications range. In this work, various samples of LM-6 alloy were cast using sand and metallic chill mould with and without strontium addition. Machining on each cast product, was carried out using recommended cutting parameters for Al-Si alloys. Strontium modified samples have recorded a reduction in average flank wear, an increase in shear plane angles and a reduction in chip thickness. The main reason for this improvement is the refining effect of strontium, which reduces the size of the hard silicon particles. As a result, their abrasive action on the tool face has reduced a lot. Dramatic reductions in tool wear rate were recorded when the microstructures were refined. On the other hand, when no refinement of microstructure occurs, tool wear rate becomes high. Chip analysis showed that strontium modified sample produced a thinner chip thickness with a larger shear plane angle, requiring less cutting forces. The tool wear depends not only on the phases present in the work material, but also on their sizes and distribution over entire structure. Thus, strontium modification has better effect on machinability of die cast alloy compared to that of the sand cast LM-6 alloy.

  4. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration

  5. Rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes: Literature review on cast tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, M.D.; Hochanadel, P.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report is a literature review on cast tooling with the general focus on AISI H13 tool steel. The review includes processing of both wrought and cast H13 steel along with the accompanying microstructures. Also included is the incorporation of new rapid prototyping technologies, such as Stereolithography and Selective Laser Sintering, into the investment casting of tool steel. The limiting property of using wrought or cast tool steel for die casting is heat checking. Heat checking is addressed in terms of testing procedures, theories regarding the mechanism, and microstructural aspects related to the cracking.

  6. Evaluation of electroslag castings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results of evaluations of electroslag castings of ferritic (2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo) and austenitic (CF8M or type 316) steels are presented. The castings have been characterized for surface finish, cracking, solidification structure, chemical composition, hardness, ferrite distribution, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties, and creep properties. Pertinent data are compared with equivalent data for sand castings and wrought products of the same materials. Based on the results of these studies, the properties of electroslag castings compare favorably with those of sand castings and wrought materials.

  7. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  8. Prediction of ALLOY SHRINKAGE FACTORS FOR THE INVESTMENT CASTING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of alloy shrinkage factors (SFs) related to the investment casting process. The dimensions of the A356 aluminum alloy casting were determined from the numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and deformation phenomena. The investment casting process was carried out using wax patterns of unfilled wax and shell molds that were made of fused silica with a zircon prime coat. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured, in order to determine the actual tooling allowances. Several numerical simulations were carried out, to assess the level of accuracy for the casting shrinkage. The solid fraction threshold, at which the transition from the fluid dynamics to the solid dynamics occurs, was found to be important in predicting shrinkage factors (SFs). It was found that accurate predictions were obtained for all measued dimensions when the shell mold was considered a deformable material.

  9. Die drool and die drool theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzer, A. M.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    When molten plastic is extruded from a die, it sometimes collects on the open face of the die. Known as die drool, this phenomenon costs plastics manufacturers by requiring die cleaning. This has been attributed to many causes, but none of these has led to an equation for the drool rate. In this work we provide an exact analytical solution for the drool rate, and we base this solution on a postulate of a cohesive slip layer near the die walls. We thus attribute die drool to cohesive failure within the fluid at an internal surface where the fluid slips on itself. We adimensionalize the drool rate with the production rate, and call this the build up ratio, BR. We provide an exact analytical solution for BR when the cohesive slip layer either sticks at the wall. We examine the slit geometry corresponding to sheet or film extrusion.

  10. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  11. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  12. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  13. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  14. Study of protective coatings for aluminum die casting molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Ildiko; Rosso, Mario; Gobber, Federico Simone

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the development and characterization of some protective coatings on steel substrate are presented. The coatings are realized by plasma spray techniques. The substrate material used is a Cr-Mo-V based hot work tool steel, initially submitted to vacuum heat treatment to achieve homogeneous hardness. The main attention is focused on the study of wear and on the characterization of the interface between the substrate material and the coating layer, because of their key role in determining the resistance of the coating layer. Simulation of friction and wear processes is performed by pin-on-disk test and the tested samples are observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-03-01

    One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

  16. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  17. HIGH PRESSURE DIES

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, W.B.

    1960-05-31

    A press was invented for subjecting specimens of bismuth, urania, yttria, or thoria to high pressures and temperatures. The press comprises die parts enclosing a space in which is placed an electric heater thermally insulated from the die parts so as not to damage them by heat. The die parts comprise two opposed inner frustoconical parts and an outer part having a double frustoconical recess receiving the inner parts. The die space decreases in size as the inner die parts move toward one another against the outer part and the inner parts, though very hard, do not fracture because of the mode of support provided by the outer part.

  18. An Application of Trapped-Air Analysis to Large Complex High-Pressure Magnesium Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Prindiville, J; Lee, S; Gokhale, A

    2004-07-08

    The usual method for simulating die-castings consists of a solidification analysis of the casting process - a computer calculation of heat transfer between the casting and the die components. The use of cyclic simulations, coupled with the geometric accuracy of the finite element method, has advanced this procedure to the point where it is routinely used for reliable prediction of shrinkage defects in die-castings. Filling analysis is also routinely used to get a glimpse of cavity filling and ensures that overflows are at their most effective location. When coupled with heat transfer, a filling analysis is also very effective in demonstrating the effects of heat loss in the fluid and how it consequentially can negatively affect filling.

  19. Casting the Die before the Die Is Cast: The Importance of the Home Numeracy Environment for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niklas, Frank; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical competencies are important not only for academic achievement at school but also for professional success later in life. Although we know a lot about the impact of "Home Literacy Environment" on the development of early linguistic competencies, research on "Home Numeracy Environment" (HNE) and the assessment of its…

  20. Advanced lost foam from casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C. E.; Littleton, H. E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B. A.; Sheldon, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects Task 4: Pattern Gating Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas in the period of October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers.

  1. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter (Inventor); Hutto, William R. (Inventor); Philips, Albert R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  2. Compaction die for forming a solid annulus on a right circular cylinder. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Harlow, J.L.

    1981-09-14

    A compacting die is disclosed wherein the improvement comprises providing a screen in the die cavity, the screen being positioned parallel to the side walls of said die and dividing the die cavity into center and annular compartments. In addition, the use of this die in a method for producing an annular clad ceramic fuel material is disclosed.

  3. Low Cost Al-Si Casting Alloy As In-Situ Composite for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloy has been successfully developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that has significant improvement in tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures (500 F-700 F). The alloy offers a number of benefits such as light weight, high hardness, low thermal expansion and high surface wear resistance. In hypereutectic form, this alloy is considered as an in-situ Al-Si composite with tensile strength of about 90% higher than the auto industry 390 alloy at 600 F. This composite is very economically produced by using either conventional permanent steel molds or die casting. The projected material cost is less than $0.90 per pound, and automotive components such as pistons can be cast for high production rate using conventional casting techniques with a low and fully accounted cost. Key Words: Metal matrix composites, In-situ composite, aluminum-silicon alloy, hypereutectic alloy, permanent mold casting, die casting.

  4. Impact of Simulation Technology on Die and Stamping Business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Mark W.

    2005-08-01

    Over the last ten years, we have seen an explosion in the use of simulation-based techniques to improve the engineering, construction, and operation of GM production tools. The impact has been as profound as the overall switch to CAD/CAM from the old manual design and construction methods. The changeover to N/C machining from duplicating milling machines brought advances in accuracy and speed to our construction activity. It also brought significant reductions in fitting sculptured surfaces. Changing over to CAD design brought similar advances in accuracy, and today's use of solid modeling has enhanced that accuracy gain while finally leading to the reduction in lead time and cost through the development of parametric techniques. Elimination of paper drawings for die design, along with the process of blueprinting and distribution, provided the savings required to install high capacity computer servers, high-speed data transmission lines and integrated networks. These historic changes in the application of CAE technology in manufacturing engineering paved the way for the implementation of simulation to all aspects of our business. The benefits are being realized now, and the future holds even greater promise as the simulation techniques mature and expand. Every new line of dies is verified prior to casting for interference free operation. Sheet metal forming simulation validates the material flow, eliminating the high costs of physical experimentation dependent on trial and error methods of the past. Integrated forming simulation and die structural analysis and optimization has led to a reduction in die size and weight on the order of 30% or more. The latest techniques in factory simulation enable analysis of automated press lines, including all stamping operations with corresponding automation. This leads to manufacturing lines capable of running at higher levels of throughput, with actual results providing the capability of two or more additional strokes per

  5. Prediction of Cooling Curves for Squeeze Cast Al/SiCp Composites Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurusamy, P.; Balasivanandha Prabu, S.; Paskaramoorthy, R.

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports the experimental and finite element analyses of the solidification behavior of Al/SiCp composites, fabricated by the squeeze casting technique. Experiments were carried out by varying the melt temperatures for cylindrical-shaped composite castings. The composite samples were produced at the following constant temperatures: melt—1023 K, 1073 K, 1123 K, and 1173 K (750 °C, 800 °C, 850 °C, and 900 °C); and die—673 K (400 °C). The pressure applied throughout the experiment is 100 MPa. The melt temperature shows significant influence on the solidification behavior of the metal matrix composite. It was observed that the solidification time was 40 seconds when the melt temperature was 1023 K (750 °C) but it increased to 51 seconds when the melt temperature was at 1173 K (900 °C). The results also showed that the cooling rate decreased on increasing the melt temperature. Cooling curves for our system, squeeze cast composites, were predicted using the finite element software ANSYS. K-type thermocouples were interfaced to the die and the microcomputer from which the experimental cooling curves were constructed. The experimental and predicted cooling curves were then compared. While both show similar trends, the finite element analysis consistently under-predicts the temperature. In addition, finite element stress analysis reveals that both radial and tangential thermal stresses increase with the melt temperature.

  6. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' PIPE OPERATOR SPRAYING A POWDER TO HELP SOLIDIFY THE PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  7. The twin-roll casting of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. S.; Park, W.-J.; Kim, C. H.; You, B. S.; Kim, Nack J.

    2009-08-01

    Recently, technologies for twin-roll casting have been widely developed to efficiently fabricate the lightweight Mg alloy sheets that are quite attractive for numerous weight-sensitive applications. This paper reviews the recent progress in the twin-roll casting of Mg alloys, focusing on the processing aspects that have close relations to the solidification behavior of Mg alloy strips. In addition, recent attempts to develop new Mg alloys utilizing the metallurgical advantages attainable by this novel casting process are also presented.

  8. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  9. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  10. Die singulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Thomas P; Garcia, Ernest J; Francis, Kathryn M

    2014-01-07

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a semiconductor substrate (e.g. a semiconductor-on-insulator substrate or a bulk silicon substrate) containing an oxide layer (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) and one or more semiconductor layers (e.g. monocrystalline or polycrystalline silicon) located above the oxide layer. The method etches trenches through the substrate and through each semiconductor layer about the die being singulated, with the trenches being offset from each other around at least a part of the die so that the oxide layer between the trenches holds the substrate and die together. The trenches can be anisotropically etched using a Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) process. After the trenches are etched, the oxide layer between the trenches can be etched away with a HF etchant to singulate the die. A release fixture can be located near one side of the substrate to receive the singulated die.

  11. Die singulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Thomas P.; Garcia, Ernest J.; Francis, Kathryn M.

    2013-06-11

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a semiconductor substrate (e.g. a semiconductor-on-insulator substrate or a bulk silicon substrate) containing an oxide layer (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) and one or more semiconductor layers (e.g. monocrystalline or polycrystalline silicon) located above the oxide layer. The method etches trenches through the substrate and through each semiconductor layer about the die being singulated, with the trenches being offset from each other around at least a part of the die so that the oxide layer between the trenches holds the substrate and die together. The trenches can be anisotropically etched using a Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) process. After the trenches are etched, the oxide layer between the trenches can be etched away with an HF etchant to singulate the die. A release fixture can be located near one side of the substrate to receive the singulated die.

  12. Extrusion die and method

    DOEpatents

    Lipp, G. Daniel

    1994-04-26

    A method and die apparatus for manufacturing a honeycomb body of rhombic cell cross-section by extrusion through an extrusion die of triangular cell discharge slot configuration, the die incorporating feedholes at selected slot intersections only, such that slot segments communicating directly with the feedholes discharge web material and slot segments not so connected do not discharge web material, whereby a rhombic cell cross-section in the extruded body is provided.

  13. The Ambiguous Dying Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2004-01-01

    More than one-half of the 2.4 million deaths that will occur in the United States in 2004 will be immediately preceded by a time in which the likelihood of dying can best be described as "ambiguous." Many people die without ever being considered "dying" or "at the end of life." These people may miss out on the opportunity to close important…

  14. Old soldiers never die ....

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An ancestral supersoldier phenotype of Pheidole ants can be recovered when selection for supersoldiers re-emerges, indicating that the developmental potential for caste pathways is retained. PMID:22356770

  15. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  16. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  17. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  18. Viability changes: Microbiological analysis of dental casts

    PubMed Central

    Žilinskas, Juozas; Junevičius, Jonas; Ramonaitė, Agnė; Pavilonis, Alvydas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Sakalauskienė, Jurgina

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the survival of the most prevalent oral bacteria and fungi (Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans) in dental casts, and compared changes in the amounts of these microorganisms at different time intervals to determine how long dental casts may pose threat to the health of dental personnel and patients. Material/Methods When manufacturing the casts, regular water was replaced with sterile distilled water, where suspensions of the studied bacteria or the fungus at certain concentrations were prepared. When the dental casts were fully set (solidified), plaster shavings were examined immediately after the contact of the studied microorganism with the plaster, as well as after 1, 2, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours. Following that, we measured how the amount of the studied bacteria and fungi in 1 gram of the plaster changed within the studied period of time. Results Klebsiella pneumoniae survived in plaster for up to 4 days, and the reduction in the number of these bacteria became statistically significant after 1 day (p<0.05). Staphylococcus aureus remained viable in plaster for up to 4 days, and the number of these bacteria dropped after 1 day (p<0.05). Escherichia coli disappeared after 2 days, and a reduction was already observed after 2 hours (p<0.05). Candida albicans in plaster models died within 2 days, and a reduction in their number was observed after 1 day (p<0.05). Conclusions The microorganisms did not multiply in the gypsum casts and their number significantly dropped instead of increasing. PMID:24902637

  19. (Continuous casting 1985)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, R.A.

    1985-06-12

    The report covers the Continuous Casting '85 Conference including informal discussions with conference attendees. In general, the papers presented at the conference concerned an overview of continuous steel casting worldwide, state-of-the-art aspects of steel continuous casting technology including caster startup problems, modifications, control system strategies, energy use profiles, quality control aspects, steel chemistry control, refractories, operational aspects of continuous casters, etc. No papers were presented in the development of thin section or thin strip casting of steel. Informal discussions were held with several conference attendees including (1) Bernard Trentini, Executive Director of the Association Technique De La Siderurgie Francaise in Paris, France (similar to the American Iron and Steel Institute); (2) Dr. Wolfgang Reichelt and Dr. Peter Voss-Spilker both of Mannesmann Demag Huttentechnik -a continuous casting and other steel making machine builder in-lieu of meeting at their plant in Duisburg, FRG on May 31; (3) Ewan C. Hewitt of Devote McKee Corp., Sheffield, England; (4) Wilfried Heinemann, head of R D Dept. at Concast Standard AG in Zurich, Switzerland; and (5) Hideo Ueno, engineer of melting section, Mitsubishi Steel Mfg. Co. Ltd, Tokyo Japan. A visit was made to the Teesside Laboratories of British Steel Corp. for discussions of their thin section casting research program in particular and R D program in general.

  20. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  1. Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Robert Alan; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Lee, Ching-Pang; Abuaf, Nesim; Hasz, Wayne Charles

    2002-01-01

    Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

  2. Cold Cracking Development in AA7050 Direct Chill-Cast Billets under Various Casting Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-09-01

    Cold cracking is a potentially catastrophic phenomenon in direct chill (DC) casting of 7 xxx series aluminum alloys that leads to safety hazards and loss of production. The relatively low thermal conductivity and wide solidification temperature range in these alloys results in accumulation of residual thermal stress under nonuniform cooling conditions of the billets. In addition, such alloys show a severe loss in ductility below a critical temperature of 573 K (300 °C). This brittleness along with high stress concentration at the tips of voids and microcracks can lead to catastrophic failure. Casting process parameters affect the magnitude and distribution of stresses in the billet and increase the susceptibility of the material to cold cracking. In order to investigate the effect of casting process parameters such as casting speed, billet size, and water flow rate, thermomechanical simulations were applied using ALSIM5 casting simulation software. Among the studied casting process parameters, the increased billet size and high casting speed resulted in the most dramatic increase in residual stress level. Critical crack sizes that led to catastrophic failure were also calculated and are reported against process parameters.

  3. Numerical Optimization of the Method of Cooling of a Massive Casting of Ductile Cast-Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovska, Jana; Kavicka, Frantisek; Stransky, Karel; Sekanina, Bohumil; Stetina, Josef

    2010-06-01

    The numerical models of the temperature field of solidifying castings, according to various authors, have been observing two main goals—directed solidification as the basic assumption for the healthiness of a casting and the optimization of the technology while maintaining the optimal product properties. The achievement of these goals is conditioned by the ability to analyze and, successively, to control the effect of the deciding factors, which either characterize the process or accompany it. An original application of ANSYS simulated the forming of the temperature field of a massive casting from ductile cast-iron during the application various methods of its cooling using steel chills. The numerical model managed to optimize more than one method of cooling but, in addition to that, provided serious results for the successive model of structural and chemical heterogeneity, and so it also contributes to influencing the pouring structure. The file containing the acquired results from both models, as well as from their organic unification, brings new and, simultaneously, remarkable findings of causal relationships between the structural and chemical heterogeneity (i.e. between the sizes of the spheroids of graphite, the cells, density of the spheroids of graphite, etc.) and the local solidification time in any point of the casting. The determined relations therefore enable the prediction of the face density of the spheroids of graphite in dependence on the local solidification time. The calculated temperature field of a two-ton 500×500×1000 mm casting of ductile cast-iron with various methods of cooling has successfully been compared with temperatures obtained experimentally. The casting was cast in sand mould. The calculated model of the kinetics of the temperature field of the casting was verified during casting with temperature measurements in selected points. This has created a tool for the optimization of the structure with an even distribution of the

  4. A method for determining adequate resistance form of complete cast crown preparations.

    PubMed

    Weed, R M; Baez, R J

    1984-09-01

    A diagram with various degrees of occlusal convergence, which takes into consideration the length and diameter of complete crown preparations, was designed as a guide to assist the dentist to obtain adequate resistance form. To test the validity of the diagram, five groups of complete cast crown stainless steel dies were prepared (3.5 mm long, occlusal convergence 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees). Gold copings were cast for each of the 50 preparations. Displacement force was applied to the casting perpendicularly to a simulated 30-degree cuspal incline until the casting was displaced. Castings were deformed at margins except for the 22-degree group. Castings from this group were displaced without deformation, and it was concluded that there was a lack of adequate resistance form as predicted by the diagram. The hypothesis that the diagram could be used to predict adequate or inadequate resistance form was confirmed by this study. PMID:6384470

  5. Is Dying Young Worse than Dying Old?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecker, Nancy S.; Schneiderman, Lawrence J.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that, in contemporary Western society, people feel death of small child is greater injustice than death of older adult and experience correspondingly greater sorrow, anger, regret, or bitterness when very young person dies. Contrasts these attitudes with those of ancient Greece and shows relevance that different attitudes toward death have…

  6. Micromechanical die attachment surcharge

    DOEpatents

    Filter, William F.; Hohimer, John P.

    2002-01-01

    An attachment structure is disclosed for attaching a die to a supporting substrate without the use of adhesives or solder. The attachment structure, which can be formed by micromachining, functions purely mechanically in utilizing a plurality of shaped pillars (e.g. round, square or polygonal and solid, hollow or slotted) that are formed on one of the die or supporting substrate and which can be urged into contact with various types of mating structures including other pillars, a deformable layer or a plurality of receptacles that are formed on the other of the die or supporting substrate, thereby forming a friction bond that holds the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure can further include an alignment structure for precise positioning of the die and supporting substrate to facilitate mounting the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure has applications for mounting semiconductor die containing a microelectromechanical (MEM) device, a microsensor or an integrated circuit (IC), and can be used to form a multichip module. The attachment structure is particularly useful for mounting die containing released MEM devices since these devices are fragile and can otherwise be damaged or degraded by adhesive or solder mounting.

  7. Extrusion die and method

    DOEpatents

    Lipp, G. Daniel

    1994-05-03

    A method and die apparatus for manufacturing a honeycomb body of triangular cell cross-section and high cell density, the die having a combination of (i) feedholes feeding slot intersections and (ii) feedholes feeding slot segments not supplied from slot intersections, whereby a reduction in feedhole count is achieved while still retaining good extrusion efficiency and extrudate uniformity.

  8. Slip casting and pressure slip casting of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} aqueous suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Castanho, S.M.; Moreno, R.; Salomoni, A.; Stamenkovic, I.

    1995-09-01

    The stability of silicon nitride aqueous slips has been studied in order to obtain Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} pressureless sintered compacts. High solid content slips (up to 65 wt%) have been prepared by using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as dispersing agent. The effect of sintering aids on the rheology and casting conditions has been studied by slip casting and uniaxial pressure filtration. The casting rate, the green density and the microstructure of samples obtained from both slurry consolidation techniques have been compared taking into account the role of the sintering additives. Sintering of cast green specimens has been performed at 1750{degrees}C in N{sub 2} atmosphere.

  9. Correlation between macroscopic porosity location and liquid metal pressure in centrifugal casting technique.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, T K; Schulman, A; Nielsen, J P; Shalita, S

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic analysis of uniform cylindrical castings fabricated by the centrifugal casting technique has revealed that the macroscopic porosity is dependent on the location of the sprue attachment to the casting. This is attributed to the significant pressure gradient associated with the centrifugal casting technique. The pressure gradient results in different heat transfer rates at portions of the castings near and away from the free surface of the button. Consequently, the macroscopic porosity is invariably at portions of the casting close to the free surface of the button. In addition, some optimized sprue-reservoir combinations could be predicted and proved, based on this pressure gradient concept. PMID:7002971

  10. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique. [CF8M

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-01-01

    ELectroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and sand castings.