Science.gov

Sample records for additional radial velocity

  1. FAME Radial Velocity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.; Gould, A.

    2000-12-01

    Full-Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) belongs to a new generation of astrometry satellites and will probe the surrounding space some 20 times deeper than its predecessor Hipparcos. As a result we will acquire precise knowledge of 5 out of 6 components of phase-space for millions of stars. The remaining coordinate, radial velocity, will remain unknown. In this study, we look at how the knowledge of radial velocity affects the determination of the structure of the Galaxy, and its gravitational potential. We therefore propose a radial velocity survey of FAME stars, and discuss its feasibility and technical requirements.

  2. Radial velocity confirmation of Kepler-91 b. Additional evidence of its planetary nature using the Calar Alto/CAFE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Henning, Th.; Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2014-08-01

    The object transiting the star Kepler-91 was recently assessed as being of planetary nature. The confirmation was achieved by analysing the light-curve modulations observed in the Kepler data. However, quasi-simultaneous studies claimed a self-luminous nature for this object, thus rejecting it as a planet. In this work, we apply anindependent approach to confirm the planetary mass of Kepler-91b by using multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph (CAFE). We obtain the physical and orbital parameters with the radial velocity technique. In particular, we derive a value of 1.09 ± 0.20 MJup for the mass of Kepler-91b, in excellent agreement with our previous estimate that was based on the orbital brightness modulation.

  3. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  4. TMT and Exoplanet Radial Velocity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Crossfield, Ian

    2014-07-01

    With echelle spectrometers on the verge of crossing over the 0.1 m/s radial velocity (RV) measurement precision threshold needed to detect habitable Earth mass planets around Sun-like stars, conducing such surveys on state-of-the-art telescopes is an imperative. RV exoplanets surveys conducted with the optical and infrared echelle spectrometers being built for the TMT have the potential to complete a census of the population of Earth-mass planets in our local stellar neighborhood. The detection of such systems will provide a valuable stellar sample for follow-up exoplanet studies which would characterize the atmospheres of these or additional planets found in these nearby solar systems. Here, we will further discuss the impact of the TMT on radial velocity exoplanet surveys.

  5. Catalogue of radial velocities of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, G.G.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Catalogue of Radial Velocities of Galaxies is a survey of radial velocities of redshifts of the galaxies in the universe. It lists all available measurements for each galaxy (including Russian citations) from the measurement of the first radial velocity by Slipher in 1914 through December 1980. It includes optical and radio measurements for all galaxies in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In bringing together uniformly and concisely all published references, the catalogue affords readers the opportunity to evaluate the data and determine which measurement for the radical velocity of each galaxy.

  6. Radial Velocity Eclipse Mapping of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin-orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  7. Coupling Between Velocities in a Radial Supercharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlechko, V. N.; Petrov, O. A.

    2014-03-01

    We have analyzed the velocities of the medium and impeller in a radial supercharger with consideration of the Coriolis acceleration. We have derived an expression for determining the angular velocity of the medium that differs from the angular velocity of the impeller. Dependences have been obtained to determine the velocity of the medium at the exit from the impeller on the inclination angle of the supercharger blades and their coupling with the circumferential velocity of the impeller in the absence of energy losses. Graphical dependences of velocities on the inclination angle of the blades at different ratios of inside radius to outside radius have been constructed.

  8. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements are being made to search for planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The reflex acceleration induced on stars by planets can be sensed by measuring the small, slow changes in the line-of-site velocities of stars. To detect these planetary perturbations, the data series must be made on a uniform instrumental scale for as long as it takes a planet to orbit its star. A spectrometer of extreme stability and unprecedented sensitivity to changes in stellar radial velocities was operated.

  9. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour. PMID:24664922

  10. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  11. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  12. Stellar Rotation and Precise Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, D. F.

    Two aspects will be considered. First, I will view the spectroscopic measurement of rotation rates as a differential precision radial velocity: how do we get rotation rates; what are the uncertainties stemming from differential rotation, time variable profiles caused by spots, uncertain limb darkening, and the presence of macroturbulence? What do we even mean by the rotation rate when there is differential rotation? Second, I will discuss the effects of rotation on specifying the precise position of spectral lines, i.e., the classical radial velocity of a star. I will present some thoughts on the effects of having our sharp markers of the Doppler effect degraded by rotation, the meaning of line position when the Doppler effects of rotation and convection interact, and the altered shapes of composite spectrum features with increased rotational smearing.

  13. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 μm near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~ 46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m s-1 on our survey targets.

  14. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): First Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, M.; Zwitter, T.; Siebert, A.; Watson, F. G.; Freeman, K. C.; Munari, U.; Campbell, R.; Williams, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Parker, Q. A.; Bienaymé, O.; Roeser, S.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Dawe, J. A.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russell, K. S.; Saunders, W.; Enke, H.; Bailin, J.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Dehnen, W.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Evans, N. W.; Fiorucci, M.; Fulbright, J. P.; Gerhard, O.; Jauregi, U.; Kelz, A.; Mijović, L.; Minchev, I.; Parmentier, G.; Peñarrubia, J.; Quillen, A. C.; Read, M. A.; Ruchti, G.; Scholz, R.-D.; Siviero, A.; Smith, M. C.; Sordo, R.; Veltz, L.; Vidrih, S.; von Berlepsch, R.; Boyle, B. J.; Schilbach, E.

    2006-10-01

    We present the first data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey to measure radial velocities and stellar atmosphere parameters (temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity) of up to one million stars using the Six Degree Field multiobject spectrograph on the 1.2 m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The RAVE program started in 2003, obtaining medium-resolution spectra (median R=7500) in the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795 Å) for southern hemisphere stars drawn from the Tycho-2 and SuperCOSMOS catalogs, in the magnitude range 9radial velocities for 24,748 individual stars (25,274 measurements when including reobservations). Those data were obtained on 67 nights between 2003 April 11 and 2004 April 3. The total sky coverage within this data release is ~4760 deg2. The average signal-to-noise ratio of the observed spectra is 29.5, and 80% of the radial velocities have uncertainties better than 3.4 km s-1. Combining internal errors and zero-point errors, the mode is found to be 2 km s-1. Repeat observations are used to assess the stability of our radial velocity solution, resulting in a variance of 2.8 km s-1. We demonstrate that the radial velocities derived for the first data set do not show any systematic trend with color or signal-to-noise ratio. The RAVE radial velocities are complemented in the data release with proper motions from Starnet 2.0, Tycho-2, and SuperCOSMOS, in addition to photometric data from the major optical and infrared catalogs (Tycho-2, USNO-B, DENIS, and the Two Micron All Sky Survey). The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  15. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): THIRD DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Siviero, A.; Boeche, C.; Steinmetz, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Enke, H.; Anguiano, B.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Fulbright, J.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Munari, U.; Zwitter, T.; Watson, F. G.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russel, K. S.

    2011-06-15

    We present the third data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) which is the first milestone of the RAVE project, releasing the full pilot survey. The catalog contains 83,072 radial velocity measurements for 77,461 stars in the southern celestial hemisphere, as well as stellar parameters for 39,833 stars. This paper describes the content of the new release, the new processing pipeline, as well as an updated calibration for the metallicity based upon the observation of additional standard stars. Spectra will be made available in a future release. The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  16. Starspot-Induced Radial Velocity Jitter During a Stellar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Andersen, Jan Marie; Järvinen, Silva

    2014-04-01

    Late-type stars exhibit cool regions on their surface, the stellar equivalent of sunspots. These dark starspots can also mimic the radial velocity variations caused by orbiting planets, making it at times difficult to distinguish between planets and activity signatures. The amount of spots on the Sun and other cool stars changes cyclically during an activity cycle, which has length varying from about a year to longer than the solar 11 years. In this work we investigate the influence of varying amount of starspots on the sparsely sampled radial velocity observations - which are the norm in the radial velocity studies searching for exoplanets on wide orbits. We study two simulated cases: one with a random spot configuration, and one where the spot occurrence is concentrated. In addition we use Doppler images of young solar analogue V889 Her as a high activity case.

  17. Radial Velocity Detection of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, T. G.

    2004-05-01

    Spectroscopy has long been an ignored corner of amateur astronomy and is generally regarded as difficult if not impossible with small telescopes. With the advent of robotic scopes and high efficiency CCD's, this aspect of astronomy is now open for exploration. The Spectrashift.com project is a team of amateurs that have constructed and implemented a spectrograph and tele- scope system capable of measuring radial velocities down to approximately 100 meters per second. This level of precision can detect extrasolar planets known as "hot Jupiters". The system's performance has been demonstrated on the star Tau Boötis.

  18. Radial Velocity Study of UZ Serpentis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.; Michel, R.

    2007-10-01

    We present high dispersion time-resolved spectroscopic observations of the dwarf nova UZ. We find the radial velocity curve of the accretion disc, surrounding the primary star, with a semi-amplitude K_1 = 98 km s^{-1}. There is no spectral evidence of the secondary star. The orbital period, estimated from its velocity curve is 0.17589 days, slightly larger than that found by Echevarría (1988), from photometric observations. New ephemerides of the object are discussed from both results. An analysis of the masses and inclination angle of the binary, using the diagnostic M_1-M_2 diagram, favors a set of values with M_1 = 0.90+/-0.1M_⊙; M_2 = 0.40+/-0.1M_⊙; and i = 50°+/-0.1, which is consistent with the ultraviolet observations and models and also with the optical photometry.

  19. Precise radial velocities in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.

    Since the first detection of a planet outside our Solar System byWolszczan & Frail (1992), over 500 exoplanets have been found to date2, none of which resemble the Earth. Most of these planets were discovered by measuring the radial velocity (hereafter, RV) of the host star, which wobbles under the gravitational influence of any existing planetary companions. However, this method has yet to achieve the sub-m/s precision necessary to detect an Earth-mass planet in the Habitable Zone (the region around a star that can support liquid water; hereafter, HZ) (Kasting et al. 1993) around a Solar-type star. Even though Kepler (Borucki et al. 2010) has announced several Earth-sized HZ candidates, these targets will be exceptionally difficult to confirm with current astrophysical spectrographs (Borucki et al. 2011). The fastest way to discover and confirm potentiallyhabitable Earth-mass planets is to observe stars with lower masses - in particular, late M dwarfs. While M dwarfs are readily abundant, comprising some 70% of the local stellar population, their low optical luminosity presents a formidable challenge to current optical RV instruments. By observing in the near-infrared (hereafter, NIR), where the flux from M dwarfs peaks, we can potentially reach low RV precisions with significantly less telescope time than would be required by a comparable optical instrument. However, NIR precision RV measurements are a relatively new idea and replete with challenges: IR arrays, unlike CCDs, are sensitive to the thermal background; modal noise is a bigger issue in the NIR than in the optical; and the NIR currently lacks the calibration sources like the very successful thorium-argon (hereafter, ThAr) hollow-cathode lamp and Iodine gas cell of the optical. The PSU Pathfinder (hereafter, Pathfinder) was designed to explore these technical issues with the intention of mitigating these problems for future NIR high-resolution spectrographs, such as the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HZPF

  20. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  1. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillen, R. S.; Smith, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Stars are observed with a ground-based instrument designed to measure small changes in the line-of-sight velocities. The purpose of the observations is to detect large planets by the oscillatory reflex motion they induce on the stars they are orbiting. The instrument is an optical spectrometer for which wavelengths are first calibrated by transmission through a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon interferometer. Changes in the line-of-sight velocities are revealed by changes in the Doppler shift of the absorption-line spectra of stars. The scrambling of incident light by an optical fiber and the stability of wavelength calibration by a tilt-tunable Fabry-Perot etalon provide immunity to systematic errors that historically have effected more conventional radial velocity spectrographs. A cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph spatially separates the orders of constructive interference transmitted through the etalon. Selecting several echelle diffraction orders in the vicinity of 4250 to 4750 A, which are imaged on a CCD, about 350 points on the profile of the stellar spectrum are sampled by successive orders of interferometric transmission through the etalon.

  2. Future prospects for radial-velocity searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier Cameron, A.

    2015-10-01

    Instrumental advances in the last few years have seen the "high frontier" of radial-velocity searches moving towards detection of planets in the few-Earth-mas regime around solar-type stars. A new generation of stable high-resolution infared spectrometers will soon see a move towards detection of Earth-mass planets in the habitable zones of low-mass stars. The infared and polarimetric capabilities of the next generation of instruments will also help to combat astrophysical noise from the host stars. In this talk I will survey prospects for realising these ambitions in the face of the challenges presented by instrumental limitations and astrophysical noise originating in the host stars themselves. I will discuss synergies with forthcoming ground-based and space-based transit missions such as NGTS, TESS and CHEOPS, and examine considerations to be taken into account when selecting targets and formulating observation strategies.

  3. Bayesian planet searches in radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Phil

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic stellar variability caused by magnetic activity and convection has become the main limiting factor for planet searches in both transit and radial velocity (RV) data. New spectrographs are under development like ESPRESSO and EXPRES that aim to improve RV precision by a factor of approximately 100 over the current best spectrographs, HARPS and HARPS-N. This will greatly exacerbate the challenge of distinguishing planetary signals from stellar activity induced RV signals. At the same time good progress has been made in simulating stellar activity signals. At the Porto 2014 meeting, “Towards Other Earths II,” Xavier Dumusque challenged the community to a large scale blind test using the simulated RV data to understand the limitations of present solutions to deal with stellar signals and to select the best approach. My talk will focus on some of the statistical lesson learned from this challenge with an emphasis on Bayesian methodology.

  4. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC O-TYPE STARS. I. SHORT-TERM CONSTANT VELOCITY STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R.; Hillwig, T. C.; McSwain, M. V.; Huang, W. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: mcswain@lehigh.edu

    2011-11-15

    We present radial velocities for 18 Galactic O-type stars. These stars display small radial velocity scatter over timescales of one to two weeks. Some of them are long-period binaries while others are probably single stars. By fitting model spectra to our observed spectra we obtain estimates for effective temperature, log g, rotational velocity, and average radial velocity for each target.

  5. THE NIRSPEC ULTRACOOL DWARF RADIAL VELOCITY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Cullen H.; Charbonneau, David; White, Russel J.

    2010-11-01

    We report the results of an infrared Doppler survey designed to detect brown dwarf and giant planetary companions to a magnitude-limited sample of ultracool dwarfs. Using the NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II telescope, we obtained approximately 600 radial velocity (RV) measurements over a period of six years of a sample of 59 late-M and L dwarfs spanning spectral types M8/L0 to L6. A subsample of 46 of our targets has been observed on three or more epochs. We rely on telluric CH{sub 4} absorption features in Earth's atmosphere as a simultaneous wavelength reference and exploit the rich set of CO absorption features found in the K-band spectra of cool stars and brown dwarfs to measure RVs and projected rotational velocities. For a bright, slowly rotating M dwarf standard we demonstrate an RV precision of 50 m s{sup -1} and for slowly rotating L dwarfs we achieve a typical RV precision of approximately 200 m s{sup -1}. This precision is sufficient for the detection of close-in giant planetary companions to mid-L dwarfs as well as more equal mass spectroscopic binary systems with small separations (a < 2 AU). We present an orbital solution for the subdwarf binary LSR1610 - 0040 as well as an improved solution for the M/T binary 2M0320 - 04. We compare the distribution of our observed values for the projected rotational velocities, Vsin i, to those in the literature and find that our sample contains examples of slowly rotating mid-L dwarfs, which have not been seen in other surveys. We also combine our RV measurements with distance estimates and proper motions from the literature and estimate the dispersion of the space velocities of the objects in our sample. Using a kinematic age estimate, we conclude that our UCDs have an age of 5.0{sup +0.7}{sub -0.6} Gyr, similar to that of nearby sun-like stars. We simulate the efficiency with which we detect spectroscopic binaries and find that the rate of tight (a < 1 AU) binaries in our sample is 2.5{sup +8.6}{sub -1

  6. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  7. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-03-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  8. Radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The frequency splittings of intermediate-degree (3 to 170 deg) p-mode oscillations obtained from a 16-day subset of observations were analyzed. Results show evidence for both radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity. From 0.6 to 0.95 solar radii, the solar internal angular velocity increases systematically from 440 to 463 nHz, corresponding to a positive radial gradient of 66 nHz/solar radius for that portion of the solar interior. Analysis also indicates that the latitudinal differential rotation gradient which is seen at the solar surface persists throughout the convection zone, although there are indications that the differential rotation might disappear entirely below the base of the convection zone. The analysis was extended to include comparisons with additional observational studies and between earlier results and the results of additional inversions of several of the observational datasets. All the comparisons reinforce conclusions regarding the existence of radial and latitudinal gradients in the internal angular velocity.

  9. Radial velocity fitting challenge. I. Simulating the data set including realistic stellar radial-velocity signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Stellar signals are the main limitation for precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements. These signals arise from the photosphere of the stars. The m s-1 perturbation created by these signals prevents the detection and mass characterization of small-mass planetary candidates such as Earth-twins. Several methods have been proposed to mitigate stellar signals in RV measurements. However, without precisely knowing the stellar and planetary signals in real observations, it is extremely difficult to test the efficiency of these methods. Aims: The goal of the RV fitting challenge is to generate simulated RV data including stellar and planetary signals and to perform a blind test within the community to test the efficiency of the different methods proposed to recover planetary signals despite stellar signals. Methods: In this first paper, we describe the simulation used to model the measurements of the RV fitting challenge. Each simulated planetary system includes the signals from instrumental noise, stellar oscillations, granulation, supergranulation, stellar activity, and observed and simulated planetary systems. In addition to RV variations, this simulation also models the effects of instrumental noise and stellar signals on activity observables obtained by HARPS-type high-resolution spectrographs, that is, the calcium activity index log (R'HK) and the bisector span and full width at half maximum of the cross-correlation function. Results: We publish the 15 systems used for the RV fitting challenge including the details about the planetary systems that were injected into each of them. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Parana Observatory, ESO (Chile), with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope.The simulated data sets are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/593/A5 and at the wiki of the RV fitting challenge http://https://rv-challenge.wikispaces.com.

  10. The Impact of Red Noise in Radial Velocity Planet Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate that moderate exoplanet radial velocity searches are often subject to the effect of the correlated (red) radial velocity noise. When disregarded, this effect may induce strong distortions in the results of the time series analysis and, ultimately, can even lead to false planet detections. We construct a maximum-likelihood algorithm, which is able to manage this issue rather efficiently.

  11. Radar Wind Profiler Radial Velocity: A Comparison with Doppler Lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Stephen A.; Goodrich, R. Kent

    2002-12-01

    The accuracy of the radial wind velocity measured with a radar wind profiler will depend on turbulent variability and instrumental noise. Radial velocity estimates of a boundary layer wind profiler are compared with those estimated by a Doppler lidar over 2.3 h. The lidar resolution volume was much narrower than the profiler volume, but the samples were well matched in range and time. The wind profiler radial velocity was computed using two common algorithms [profiler online program (POP) and National Center for Atmospheric Research improved moments algorithm (NIMA)]. The squared correlation between radial velocities measured with the two instruments was R2 = 0.99, and the standard deviation of the difference was about r = 0.20-0.23 m s1 for radial velocities of greater than 1 m s1 and r = 0.16-0.35 m s1 for radial velocities of less than 1 m s1. Small radial velocities may be treated differently in radar wind profiler processing because of ground-clutter mitigation strategies. A standard deviation of r = 0.23 m s1 implies an error in horizontal winds from turbulence and noise of less than 1 m s1 for a single cycle through the profiler beam directions and of less than 0.11-0.27 m s1 for a 30-min average measurement, depending on the beam pointing sequence. The accuracy of a wind profiler horizontal wind measurement will also depend on assumptions of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of the atmosphere, which are not considered in this comparison. The wind profiler radial velocities from the POP and NIMA are in good agreement. However, the analysis does show the need for improvements in wind profiler processing when radial velocity is close to zero.

  12. The Radial Velocity Method for the Detection of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.

    The radial velocity (RV) method has provided the foundation for the research field of exoplanets. It created the field by discovering the first exoplanets and then blazed a trail by detecting over 1000 exoplanets in orbit around other stars. The method also plays a vital role in transit searches by providing the planetary mass needed to calculate the bulk density of the exoplanet. The RV method requires a wide range of techniques: novel instrumentation for making precise RV measurements, clever techniques for extracting the periodic signals due to planets from the RV data, tools for assessing their statistical significance, and programs for calculating the Keplerian orbital parameters. Finally, RV measurements have become so precise that the measurement error is now dominated by the intrinsic stellar noise. New tools have to be developed to extract planetary signals from RV variability originating from the star. In these series of lectures I will cover (1) basic instrumentation for stellar radial velocity methods, (2) methods for achieving high radial velocity precision, (3) finding periodic signals in radial velocity data, (4) Keplerian orbits, (5) sources of errors for radial velocity measurements, and (6) dealing with the contribution of stellar noise to the radial velocity measurement.

  13. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. VIII. Testing for the presence of planets with CRIRES infrared radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Trifon; Reffert, Sabine; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Context. We have been monitoring 373 very bright (V ≤ 6 mag) G and K giants with high precision optical Doppler spectroscopy for more than a decade at Lick Observatory. Our goal was to discover planetary companions around those stars and to better understand planet formation and evolution around intermediate-mass stars. However, in principle, long-term, g-mode nonradial stellar pulsations or rotating stellar features, such as spots, could effectively mimic a planetary signal in the radial velocity data. Aims: Our goal is to compare optical and infrared radial velocities for those stars with periodic radial velocity patterns and to test for consistency of their fitted radial velocity semiamplitudes. Thereby, we distinguish processes intrinsic to the star from orbiting companions as reason for the radial velocity periodicity observed in the optical. Methods: Stellar spectra with high spectral resolution have been taken in the H-band with the CRIRES near-infrared spectrograph at ESO's VLT for 20 stars of our Lick survey. Radial velocities are derived using many deep and stable telluric CO2 lines for precise wavelength calibration. Results: We find that the optical and near-infrared radial velocities of the giant stars in our sample are consistent. We present detailed results for eight stars in our sample previously reported to have planets or brown dwarf companions. All eight stars passed the infrared test. Conclusions: We conclude that the planet hypothesis provides the best explanation for the periodic radial velocity patterns observed for these giant stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under program IDs 088.D-0132, 089.D-0186, 090.D-0155 and 091.D-0365.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Radial Velocity Planet Detection Biases at the Stellar Rotational Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Asher Johnson, John; Ciardi, David R.; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-04-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical radial velocity noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical timescale and amplitude of stellar radial velocity noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic timescales of quasi-periodic radial velocity jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.

  15. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillen, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers are measuring small changes in the line-of-sight velocities of stars to detect the oscillating reflex acceleration induced by large planets. The intention is to observe enough stars for a long enough time to be able to make a statement of the probability of planets in a certain range of masses even if no planetary perturbations are detected. To make these measurements of Doppler shift with the required sensitivity, a new instrument was specifically designed, built and tested for this campaign of ground-based planet detection. The instrument is an optical spectrometer for which wavelengths are first calibrated by transmission through a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon interferometer. The intrinsic stability of the etalon and an image-scrambling fiber optic light feed provide great sensitivity to line-of-sight accelerations and immunity to systematic errors.

  16. RADIAL VELOCITY STUDIES OF CLOSE BINARY STARS. XV

    SciTech Connect

    Pribulla, Theodor; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Blake, R. M.; Lu, Wenxian; Thomson, J. R.; DeBond, Heide; Karmo, Toomas; De Ridder, Archie; Ogloza, Waldemar; Stachowski, Greg; Siwak, Michal E-mail: rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: karmo@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: ogloza@ap.krakow.pl E-mail: siwak@oa.uj.edu.pl

    2009-03-15

    Radial velocity (RV) measurements and sine curve fits to the orbital RV variations are presented for the last eight close binary systems analyzed in the same way as in the previous papers of this series: QX And, DY Cet, MR Del, HI Dra, DD Mon, V868 Mon, ER Ori, and Y Sex. For another seven systems (TT Cet, AA Cet, CW Lyn, V563 Lyr, CW Sge, LV Vir, and MW Vir), phase coverage is insufficient to provide reliable orbits but RVs of individual components were measured. Observations of a few complicated systems observed throughout the David Dunlap Observatory (DDO) close binary program are also presented; among them is an especially interesting multiple system V857 Her which-in addition to the contact binary-very probably contains one or more subdwarf components of much earlier spectral type. All suspected binaries which were found to be most probably pulsating stars are briefly discussed in terms of mean RVs and projected rotation velocities (vsin i) as well as spectral-type estimates. In two of them, CU CVn and V752 Mon, the broadening functions show a clear presence of nonradial pulsations. The previously missing spectral types for Paper I are given here in addition to such estimates for most of the program stars of this paper.

  17. Radial Velocity Studies of Close Binary Stars. XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribulla, Theodor; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Blake, R. M.; Lu, Wenxian; Thomson, J. R.; DeBond, Heide; Karmo, Toomas; De Ridder, Archie; Ogłoza, Waldemar; Stachowski, Greg; Siwak, Michal

    2009-03-01

    Radial velocity (RV) measurements and sine curve fits to the orbital RV variations are presented for the last eight close binary systems analyzed in the same way as in the previous papers of this series: QX And, DY Cet, MR Del, HI Dra, DD Mon, V868 Mon, ER Ori, and Y Sex. For another seven systems (TT Cet, AA Cet, CW Lyn, V563 Lyr, CW Sge, LV Vir, and MW Vir), phase coverage is insufficient to provide reliable orbits but RVs of individual components were measured. Observations of a few complicated systems observed throughout the David Dunlap Observatory (DDO) close binary program are also presented; among them is an especially interesting multiple system V857 Her which—in addition to the contact binary—very probably contains one or more subdwarf components of much earlier spectral type. All suspected binaries which were found to be most probably pulsating stars are briefly discussed in terms of mean RVs and projected rotation velocities (vsin i) as well as spectral-type estimates. In two of them, CU CVn and V752 Mon, the broadening functions show a clear presence of nonradial pulsations. The previously missing spectral types for Paper I are given here in addition to such estimates for most of the program stars of this paper. Based on the data obtained at the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

  18. Several problems of exoplanetary orbits determination from radial velocity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2008-05-01

    Existing algorithms of analysis of radial velocity time series are improved for the purposes of extrasolar planets detection and characterizing. Three important effects are considered: the poorly known radial velocity jitter, periodic systematic errors, and statistical bias due to non-linearity of models. Mathematical tools to account for these effects are developed and applied to a number of real planetary systems. In particular, it is shown that two outer planets of HD37124 are likely trapped in the 2/1 resonance. The dwarf star GJ876 may host an extra, Neptune-mass, planet which is in resonance with two giant planets in this system.

  19. Radial-Velocity Searches for Exoplanets in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Bun'ei

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of extrasolar planets have been discovered around various types of stars by various techniques during the past decade. Among them precise radial velocity measurements for stars are fundamental technique to detect and confirm exoplanets. In this paper activities in East-Asian region in this research field are introduced: East-Asian Planet Search Network, which is a network searching for planets around evolved intermediate-mass stars, and Subaru/IRD project, which will search for habitable planets around M-type dwarfs using infrared radial-velocity method.

  20. Radial velocities of stars with multiple co-orbital planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2015-04-01

    To date, well over a thousand planets have been discovered orbiting other stars, hundreds of them in multi-planet systems. Most of these exoplanets have been detected by either the transit method or the radial velocity method, rather than by other methods such as astrometry or direct imaging. Both the radial velocity and astrometric methods rely upon the reflex motion of the parent star induced by the gravitational attraction of its planets. However, this reflex motion is subject to misinterpretation when a star has two or more planets with the same orbital period. Such co-orbital planets may effectively "hide" from detection by current algorithms.

  1. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  2. High Precision Measurement of Stellar Radial Velocity Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype instrument for measurement of stellar radial velocity variations to a precision of a few meters per second is discussed. The instrument will be used to study low amplitude stellar non-radial oscillations, to search for binary systems with large mass ratios, and ultimately to search for extrasolar planetary systems. The instrument uses a stable Fabry-Perot etalon, in reflection, to impose a set of fixed reference absorption lines on the stellar spectrum before it enters the coude spectrograph of the McDonald Observatory 2.7-m telescope. The spectrum is recorded on the Octicon detector, which consists of eight Reticon arrays placed end to end. Radial velocity variations of the star are detected by measuring the shift of the stellar lines with respect the artificial Fabry-Perot lines, and correcting for the known motions in the solar system.

  3. Kinematic versus Spectroscopic Radial Velocities for the Gaia RVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasniewicz, G.; Thévenin, F.; Chiavassa, A.; Bigot, L.; Chemin, L.; Crifo, F.; Hestroffer, D.; Katz, D.; Sartoretti, P.; Soubiran, C.; Udry, S.; Zurbach, C.

    2013-11-01

    The Gaia spectrometer (RVS) has no built-in calibration device and the RVS will rely on its own observations to carry out the wavelength calibration. A small sample (˜1420) of bright RVS F-G-K standard stars will be used for the Radial Velocity Zero Point (RVZP) of the RVS. These standard stars have been observed on the ground with the Sophie, Coralie and Narval spectrometers, and their Spectroscopic Radial Velocities (SRVs) have been published by Soubiran et al. (2013). These SRVs are not Kinematic Radial Velocities (KRVs) which are what we need for studies of galatic dynamics. However in this paper we show that these SRVs are well suited to establish the Radial Velocity Zero Point of the Gaia RVS, provided that CU6 pipelines of the DPAC such as Calibration of the RVS (DU630) and Determination of RVs by cross-correlation with templates (DU650 STA) really use wavelength lines and spectra computed with 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres, which conveniently treat the convective shifts. Final SRVs given by the Gaia CU6 pipelines and later published in the Gaia final catalogue would then only be corrected from the gravitational shift by the DPAC CU8 in order to become true KRVs.

  4. Radial velocities in the globular cluster ω Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijns, R. A.; Seitzer, P.; Arnold, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Ingerson, T.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; van de Ven, G.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2006-01-01

    We have used the ARGUS multi-object spectrometer at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope to obtain 2756 radial velocity measurements for 1966 individual stars in the globular cluster ω Centauri brighter than blue photographic magnitude of about 16.5. Of these, 1589 stars are cluster members. A comparison with two independent radial velocity studies, carried out by Suntzeff & Kraft and by Mayor et al., demonstrates that the median error of our measurements is below 2 km s-1 for the stars brighter than B-magnitude 15, which constitute the bulk of the sample. The observed velocity dispersion decreases from about 15 km s-1 in the inner few arcmin to about 6 km s-1 at a radius of 25'. The cluster shows significant rotation, with a maximum amplitude of about 6 km s-1 in the radial zone between 6' and 10'. In a companion paper by van de Ven et al., we correct these radial velocities for the perspective rotation caused by the space motion of the cluster, and combine them with the internal proper motions of nearly 8000 cluster members measured by van Leeuwen et al., to construct a detailed dynamical model of ω Centauri and to measure its distance.

  5. Photoelectric Radial Velocities, Paper XX 45 Years' Monitoring of the Radial Velocities of the Redman K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. F.; Stroe, A.

    2012-06-01

    The `Redman K stars' are a group of 80-odd seventh-magnitude late-type stars, nearly all giants, distributed along the Galactic equator between approximate longitudes 50° and 150° (roughly Sagitta to Cassiopeia). Their radial velocities have been measured systematically once per season in 30 of the 45 seasons from 1966 to 2010/11. At least 26 of them (30%) have proved to vary in velocity. Orbits have been derived for all but one of the 26, many of them having longer periods than have normally been associated with spectroscopic binaries; several are comparable with, or longer than, the present duration of the observing campaign. Also reported here are radial-velocity measurements made casually of stars seen in the fields of some of the Redman stars. Two of the companions have proved to vary in velocity on long time-scales, and (somewhat preliminary) orbits are given for them.

  6. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC HALO STARS IN VIRGO

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Thomas G.; Mateo, Mario; Martinez-Delgado, David E-mail: mmateo@umich.ed

    2010-11-15

    We present multi-slit radial velocity measurements for 111 stars in the direction of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS). The stars were photometrically selected to be probable main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo. When compared with the radial velocity distribution expected for the halo of the Milky Way, as well as the distribution seen in a control field, we observe a significant excess of negative velocity stars in the field, which can likely be attributed to the presence of a stellar stream. This kinematic excess peaks at a Galactic standard of rest radial velocity of -75 km s{sup -1}. A rough distance estimate suggests that this feature extends from {approx}15 kpc out to, and possibly beyond, the {approx}30 kpc limit of the study. The mean velocity of these stars is incompatible with those of the VSS itself (V{sub gsr} {approx} 130 km s{sup -1}), which we weakly detect, but it is consistent with radial velocity measurements of nearby 2MASS M-giants and SDSS+SEGUE K/M-giants and blue horizontal branch stars that constitute the leading tidal tail of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Some oblate models for the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo predict that the leading arm of the Sagittarius Stream should pass through this volume, and have highly negative (V{sub gsr} {approx}< -200 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities, as it descends down from the northern Galactic hemisphere toward the Galactic plane. The kinematic feature observed in this study, if it is in fact Sagittarius debris, is not consistent with these predictions, and instead, like other leading stream radial velocity measurements, is consistent with a recently published triaxial halo model, or, if axisymmetry is imposed, favors a prolate shape for the Galactic halo potential. However, a rough distance estimate to the observed kinematic feature places it somewhat closer (D {approx} 15-30 kpc) than the Sagittarius models predict (D {approx} 35-45 kpc).

  7. Short-period radial velocity variations of alpha Bootis: Evidence for radial pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, Aritie P.; Cochran, William D.

    1994-02-01

    Precise radial velocity measurements (sigma approximately 20 m/s) of alpha Boo taken over eight consecutive nights in 1992 June are presented. A periodogram of the data shows significant power at periods of 2.46 days and 3.8 days. A separate analysis, using nonlinear least-squares fitting,reveals an additional period at 8.5 days, but at a very low amplitude (approximately 14 m/s), in addition to 2.46 day and 4.03 day periods. However, the 1.84 day period found by Smith et al. is not in these data. The expected periods of the fundamental and first harmonic modes of radial pulsations were estimated using the radius determination of Di Benedetto & Rabbia, published log(g) values, and the empirical Q(M,R) relationship of Cox, King & Stellingwerf. The 2.46 day period is near that expected for the fundamental or first harmonic radial mode, depending on the choice of stellar mass which is uncertain due to the wide range of surface gravity determinations. For a given mass and radius the 1.84 day period found by Smith et al. coincides with that of the next harmonic. These periods indicate that the short-term variability of alpha Boo may be explained by radial pulsations. Furthermore, it seems that this star has switched pulsation modes to a lower overtone from the time of the Smith et al. measurements. A recent investigation into the excitation of acoustic oscillations in alpha Boo by Balmforth, Gough, & Tout reveals peaks in the growth rates of modes having periods very near those observed in alpha Boo for a stellar model of 0.23 solar mass. This low value of the mass, however, is inconsistent with stellar evolution theory and a recent determination of the surface gravity of this star. It is clear that alpha Boo is multiperiodic and may be changing modes on timescales of a few years. This star may thus be an ideal candidate for the application of pulsation theory to late-type, evolved stars and my provide important tests of stellar evolution theory.

  8. Short-period terrestrial planets and radial velocity stellar jitter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar jitter is the main limitation to ultra-precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. It currently precludes our ability to detect a planet like the Earth. Short-period terrestrial planets present first the advantage of inducing a stronger RV signal. In addition, the signal produced by these planets have a period completely different than stellar activity. This allows us, when the observational strategy is adequate, to decorrelate the planetary signal from the jitter induced by the star using filtering techniques. I will show the examples of Kepler-78b and Corot-7b, where the amplitude of the planetary signal can be detected, despite the stellar activity jitter that is 5 and 3 times larger, respectively. The cases of Alpha Cen Bb will also be reviewed, with a new reduction of the published data that increases the significance of the planetary signal.This project is funded by ETAEARTH, a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of extrasolar planets can only be fully exploited when analyzed together.

  9. Modelling nonstationary Doppler noise in exoplanetary radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We construct a new class of analytic nonstationary noise models for exoplanetary Doppler data. The observable correlated noise is represented as a convolution of a parent activity process with a given memory function. The model honours the casuality principle, meaning that only past values of the activity may affect the observable value. This model does not approximate detailedly any real stellar activity phenomena, but it becomes mathematically simple, simultaneously satisfying the basic natural principles of physical sensibility and self-consistency.Additionally, we develop a new type of periodograms that can be used to detect periodic modulations in the Doppler noise characteristics, rather than in the observed radial velocity curve itself. We present first results of applying this technique to public Doppler time series available for a set of planet-hosting stars.This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 14-02-92615 KO_a), the UK Royal Society International Exchange grant IE140055, by the President of Russia grant for young scientists (No. MK-733.2014.2), by the programme of the Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences P21, and by the Saint Petersburg State University research grant 6.37.341.2015.

  10. State of the Field: Extreme Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Arriagada, Pamela; Baluev, Roman V.; Bean, Jacob L.; Bouchy, Francois; Buchhave, Lars A.; Carroll, Thorsten; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Crepp, Justin R.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Diddams, Scott A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Eastman, Jason D.; Endl, Michael; Figueira, Pedro; Ford, Eric B.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Fournier, Paul; Fűrész, Gabor; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gregory, Philip C.; Grundahl, Frank; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hébrard, Guillaume; Herrero, Enrique; Hogg, David W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Jorden, Paul; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Latham, David W.; Laughlin, Greg; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lovis, Christophe; Mahadevan, Suvrath; McCracken, Tyler M.; Pepe, Francesco; Perez, Mario; Phillips, David F.; Plavchan, Peter P.; Prato, Lisa; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Robertson, Paul; Santos, Nuno C.; Sawyer, David; Segransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Tilo; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stéphane; Valenti, Jeff A.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2016-06-01

    The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm s‑1 measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this bold precision are summarized here. Beginning with the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity (RV) measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to improve upon the state of the art, producing even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision RV community include distinguishing center of mass (COM) Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities (time correlated noise) and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. COM velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. However, higher precision RV measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds, to confirm and characterize detections from transit missions, and to provide mass measurements for other space-based missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that

  11. STARSPOT JITTER IN PHOTOMETRY, ASTROMETRY, AND RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V. V.; Beichman, C. A.; Lebreton, J.; Malbet, F.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Shao, M.; Fischer, D. A.

    2009-12-10

    Analytical relations are derived for the amplitude of astrometric, photometric, and radial velocity (RV) perturbations caused by a single rotating spot. The relative power of the starspot jitter is estimated and compared with the available data for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and HD 166435, as well as with numerical simulations for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and the Sun. A Sun-like star inclined at i = 90 deg. at 10 pc is predicted to have an rms jitter of 0.087 muas in its astrometric position along the equator, and 0.38 m s{sup -1} in radial velocities. If the presence of spots due to stellar activity is the ultimate limiting factor for planet detection, the sensitivity of SIM Lite to Earth-like planets in habitable zones is about an order of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of prospective ultra-precise RV observations of nearby stars.

  12. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported four closely related research programs at The University of Texas at Austin: 1) The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) Program, using the McDonald Observatory 2.7m Harlan Smith telescope and its 2dcoud6 spectrometer, 2) A high-precision radial-velocity survey of Hyades dwarfs, using the Keck telescope and its HIRES spectrograph, 3) A program at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectra of the parent stars of planetary systems at R = 210,000, and 4) the start of high precision radial velocity surveys using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The most important results from NASA support of these research programs are described below. A list of all papers published under support of this grant is included at the end.

  13. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported four closely related research programs at The University of Texas at Austin: 1) The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) Program, using the McDonald Observatory 2.7m Harlan Smith telescope and its 2dcoude spectrometer, 2) A high-precision radial-velocity survey of Hyades dwarfs, using the Keck telescope and its HIRES spectrograph, 3) A program at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectra of the parent stars of planetary systems at R = 210,000, and 4) the start of high precision radial velocity surveys using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The most important results from NASA support of these research programs are described. A list of all papers published under support of this grant is included at the end.

  14. Radial Velocity Data Analysis with Compressed Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Nathan C.; Boué, G.; Laskar, J.; Correia, A. C. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel approach for analysing radial velocity data that combines two features: all the planets are searched at once and the algorithm is fast. This is achieved by utilizing compressed sensing techniques, which are modified to be compatible with the Gaussian processes framework. The resulting tool can be used like a Lomb-Scargle periodogram and has the same aspect but with much fewer peaks due to aliasing. The method is applied to five systems with published radial velocity data sets: HD 69830, HD 10180, 55 Cnc, GJ 876 and a simulated very active star. The results are fully compatible with previous analysis, though obtained more straightforwardly. We further show that 55 Cnc e and f could have been respectively detected and suspected in early measurements from the Lick observatory and Hobby-Eberly Telescope available in 2004, and that frequencies due to dynamical interactions in GJ 876 can be seen.

  15. Activity-Induced Radial Velocity Variation of M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jan Marie; Korhonen, Heidi

    2014-04-01

    Stellar magnetic activity manifests itself in a variety of ways including starspots-cool, dark regions on the stellar surface. Starspots can cause variations (`jitter') in spectral line-profiles which can mimic the radial velocity (RV) variations caused by an orbiting planet, or create RV noise that can drown out a planetary signature. Cool, low-mass M dwarf stars can be highly active, which can make detection of potentially habitable planets around these stars difficult. We investigate radial velocity variations caused by different activity (spot) patterns on M dwarf stars in order to determine the limits of detectability for small planets orbiting active M dwarfs. We report on our progress toward the aim of answering the following questions: What types of spot patterns are realistic for M dwarf stars? What effect will spots have on M dwarf RV measurements? Can jitter from M dwarf spots mimic planetary signals? What is the ideal observing wavelength to reduce M dwarf jitter?

  16. A spectroscopic orbit for Theta Draconis from photoelectric radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen-Xian; Shen, Liang-Zhao; Jiang, Zhao-Ji

    1988-09-01

    23 observations of the single-spectrum binary θ Dra, F8 IV, were secured in 1985 - 86 by the first author using the radial velocity spectrometer of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO). Making use of previous studies of this binary published in the literature the authors first computed orbits separately for the Lick (L), Kitt Peak (K), and DAO (D) radial velocity data subsets. After a number of trials they arrived at a combined orbital solution based on all the 74 observations made at the three observatories covering the interval 1898 - 1986. The combined (LKD) orbit yields a period of PLKD = 3.0707943±0.0000010 days. Finally, following a strategy of Batten and Fletcher the authors tried orbit determination for θ Dra based on the DAO observations alone while fixing the period at PLKD.

  17. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Fourth Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, Georges; RAVE Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances and distances determined for 425 561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the intermediate spectroscopic stellar survey of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). Compared to previous RAVE data releases, the present one increases the available catalog size by an order of magnitude. The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the 2MASS photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline which is also improved compared to that available for the previous data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration website and the Vizier database.

  18. New measurements of radial velocities in clusters of galaxies. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, D.; Mazure, A.; Sodre, L.; Capelato, H.; Lund, G.

    1988-03-01

    Heliocentric radial velocities are determined for 100 galaxies in five clusters, on the basis of 380-518-nm observations obtained using a CCD detector coupled by optical fibers to the OCTOPUS multiobject spectrograph at the Cassegrain focus of the 3.6-m telescope at ESO La Silla. The data-reduction procedures and error estimates are discussed, and the results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized.

  19. An extensive radial velocity survey towards NGC 6253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Melo, C. H. F.; Santos, N. C.; Queloz, D.; Piotto, G.; Desidera, S.; Bedin, L. R.; Momany, Y.; Saviane, I.

    2016-04-01

    The old and metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 was observed with the Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) multi-object spectrograph during an extensive radial velocity campaign monitoring 317 stars with a median of 15 epochs per object. All the targeted stars are located along the upper main sequence of the cluster between 14.8 < V < 16.5. Fifty nine stars are confirmed cluster members both by radial velocities and proper motions and do not show evidence of variability. We detected 45 variable stars among which 25 belong to NGC 6253. We were able to derive an orbital solution for four cluster members (and for two field stars) yielding minimum masses in between ˜90 MJ and ˜460 MJ and periods between 3 and 220 d. Simulations demonstrated that this survey was sensitive to objects down to 30 MJ at 10 days orbital periods with a detection efficiency equal to 50 per cent. On the basis of these results we concluded that the observed frequency of binaries down to the hydrogen burning limit and up to 20 d orbital period is around (1.5 ± 1.3) per cent in NGC 6253. The overall observed frequency of binaries around the sample of cluster stars is (13 ± 3) per cent. The median radial velocity precision achieved by the GIRAFFE spectrograph in this magnitude range was around ˜240 m s- 1 (˜180 m s- 1 for UVES). Based on a limited follow-up analysis of seven stars in our sample with the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph we determined that a precision of 35 m s- 1 can be reached in this magnitude range, offering the possibility to further extend the variability analysis into the substellar domain. Prospects are even more favourable once considering the upcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at VLT.

  20. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) was designed to search for Jovian-mass planets in orbit around solar-type stars by making high-precision measurements of the Radial Velocity (RV) of a star, to attempt to detect the reflex orbital motion of the star around the star-planet barycenter. In our solar system, the velocity of the Sun around the Sun-Jupiter barycenter averages 12.3 m/ s. The MOPS survey started operation in September 1987, and searches 36 bright, nearby, solar-type dwarfs to 10 m/s precision. The survey was started using telluric O2 absorption lines as the velocity reference metric. Observations use the McDonald Observatory 2.7-m Harlan Smith Telescope coude spectrograph with the six-foot camera. This spectrograph configuration isolates a single order of the echelle grating on a Texas Instruments 800 x 800 CCD. The telluric line method gave us a routine radial velocity precision of about 15 m/s for stars down to about 5-th magnitude. However, the data obtained with this technique suffered from some source of long-term systematic errors, which was probably the intrinsic velocity variability of the terrestrial atmosphere, i.e. winds. In order to eliminate this systematic error and to improve our overall measurement precision, we installed a stabilized I2 gas absorption cell as the velocity metric for the MOPS in October 1990. In use at the telescope, the cell is placed directly in front of the spectrograph entrance slit, with starlight passing through the cell. The use of this sealed stabilized I2 cell removes potential problems with possible long-term drifts in the velocity metric. The survey now includes a sample of 36 nearby F, G, and K type stars of luminosity class V or IV-V.

  1. RADIAL VELOCITY CONFIRMATION OF A BINARY DETECTED FROM PULSE TIMINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, B. N.; Dunlap, B. H.; Clemens, J. C.

    2011-08-10

    A periodic variation in the pulse timings of the pulsating hot subdwarf B (sdB) star CS 1246 was recently discovered via the observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram and suggests the presence of a binary companion with an orbital period of two weeks. Fits to this phase variation, when interpreted as orbital reflex motion, imply CS 1246 orbits a barycenter 11 lt-s away with a velocity of 16.6 km s{sup -1}. Using the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR telescope, we decided to confirm this hypothesis by obtaining radial velocity measurements of the system over several months. Our spectra reveal a velocity variation with amplitude, period, and phase in accordance with the O-C diagram predictions. This corroboration demonstrates that the rapid pulsations of hot sdB stars can be adequate clocks for the discovery of binary companions via the pulse timing method.

  2. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Second Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwitter, T.; Siebert, A.; Munari, U.; Freeman, K. C.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F. G.; Fulbright, J. P.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Campbell, R.; Seabroke, G. M.; Williams, M.; Steinmetz, M.; Bienaymé, O.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Anguiano, B.; Boeche, C.; Burton, D.; Cass, P.; Dawe, J.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russell, K.; Veltz, L.; Bailin, J.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brown, A.; Dehnen, W.; Evans, N. W.; Re Fiorentin, P.; Fiorucci, M.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B.; Kelz, A.; Kujken, K.; Matijevič, G.; Minchev, I.; Parker, Q. A.; Peñarrubia, J.; Quillen, A.; Read, M. A.; Reid, W.; Roeser, S.; Ruchti, G.; Scholz, R.-D.; Smith, M. C.; Sordo, R.; Tolstoi, E.; Tomasella, L.; Vidrih, S.; Wylie-de Boer, E.

    2008-07-01

    We present the second data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey to measure radial velocities and stellar atmosphere parameters (temperature, metallicity, surface gravity, and rotational velocity) of up to one million stars using the 6 dF multi-object spectrograph on the 1.2 m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). The RAVE program started in 2003, obtaining medium resolution spectra (median R = 7500) in the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795 Å) for southern hemisphere stars drawn from the Tycho-2 and SuperCOSMOS catalogues, in the magnitude range 9 < I < 12. Following the first data release, the current release doubles the sample of published radial velocities, now containing 51,829 radial velocities for 49,327 individual stars observed on 141 nights between 2003 April 11 and 2005 March 31. Comparison with external data sets shows that the new data collected since 2004 April 3 show a standard deviation of 1.3 km s-1, about twice as good as for the first data release. For the first time, this data release contains values of stellar parameters from 22,407 spectra of 21,121 individual stars. They were derived by a penalized χ2 method using an extensive grid of synthetic spectra calculated from the latest version of Kurucz stellar atmosphere models. From comparison with external data sets, our conservative estimates of errors of the stellar parameters for a spectrum with an average signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ~40 are 400 K in temperature, 0.5 dex in gravity, and 0.2 dex in metallicity. We note however that, for all three stellar parameters, the internal errors estimated from repeat RAVE observations of 855 stars are at least a factor 2 smaller. We demonstrate that the results show no systematic offsets if compared to values derived from photometry or complementary spectroscopic analyses. The data release includes proper motions from Starnet2, Tycho-2, and UCAC2 catalogs and photometric measurements

  3. A Catalogue of Galaxies Having Radial Velocities: Volume 15: Part 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrick, L. W.; Gutsch, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A tabulation of galaxies which have radial velocities is presented. The parameters of each galaxy are: (1) an abbreviation for the catalog designation, (2) RA(1950), (3) Dec. (1950), (4) new galactic longitude, (5) new galactic latitude, (6) morphological type, (7) magnitude, (8) observed radial velocity in kilometers per second (9) radial velocity corrected for solar motion, and (10) estimated error in radial velocity in kilometers per second.

  4. Improved Radial Velocity Precision with a Tunable Laser Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Claire; Brown, S.; Dupree, A. K.; Lykke, K. R.; Smith, A.; Szentgyorgyi, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present radial velocities obtained using a novel laser-based wavelength calibration technique. We have built a prototype laser calibrator for the Hectochelle spectrograph at the MMT 6.5 m telescope. The Hectochelle is a high-dispersion, fiber-fed, multi-object spectrograph capable of recording up to 240 spectra simultaneously with a resolving power of 40000. The standard wavelength calibration method makes use of spectra from thorium-argon hollow cathode lamps shining directly onto the fibers. The difference in light path between calibration and science light as well as the uneven distribution of spectral lines are believed to introduce errors of up to several hundred m/s in the wavelength scale. Our tunable laser wavelength calibrator solves these problems. The laser is bright enough for use with a dome screen, allowing the calibration light path to better match the science light path. Further, the laser is tuned in regular steps across a spectral order to generate a calibration spectrum, creating a comb of evenly-spaced lines on the detector. Using the solar spectrum reflected from the atmosphere to record the same spectrum in every fiber, we show that laser wavelength calibration brings radial velocity uncertainties down below 100 m/s. We present these results as well as an application of tunable laser calibration to stellar radial velocities determined with the infrared Ca triplet in globular clusters M15 and NGC 7492. We also suggest how the tunable laser could be useful for other instruments, including single-object, cross-dispersed echelle spectrographs, and adapted for infrared spectroscopy.

  5. Bok Prize Lecture (shared) The Brown Dwarf Radial Velocity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Dave

    2004-03-01

    The swarm of nearby brown dwarfs and very low mass stars is an attractive sample for radial velocity monitoring. Such work is best conducted with an echelle spectrograph operating at infrared wavelengths where these objects(i) are most luminous, (ii) have a forest of molecular features, providing an excellent velocity metric, and {iii) are superimposed on the telluric spectrum, which yields the requisite wavelength calibration. I will present first results from such a survey, with a precision sufficient to detect Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of less than a year. Should such systems be uncovered, the planets would be amenable to direct study, due to system proximity, and the favorable contrast ratio between the planet and parent object.

  6. Improve Radial Velocity Precision with Better Data Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuesong Wang, Sharon; Wright, Jason; Zhao, Ming

    2015-12-01

    The synergy between Kepler and the ground-based radial velocity (RV) surveys have made numerous discoveries of low-mass exoplanets, opening the age of Earth analogs. However, Earth analogs such as Kepler 452-b require a much higher RV precision ( ~ 10 cm/s) than the achievable with current instruments (~ 1 m/s) and understanding of stellar photosphere. This presentation will cover some of the instrumental and data issues that are currently hindering us from achieving the sub 1 m/s precision, as well as remedies and ways forward with future RV instruments. Highlights of our work include: (1) how telluric contamination affects RV precision and how to "telluric-proof" a Doppler pipeline; (2) how errors in the deconvolved stellar reference spectrum can mimic the signal of a super-Earth on a ~1 year orbit; (3) the battle with imperfections in the iodine reference spectra and how an ultra-high resolution (R ~ 500,000) echelle spectrum can help; (4) and a new RV extraction code in Python which incorporates MCMC and Gaussian Processes. This research is based on radial velocity data taken with iodine cell calibrators using Keck/HIRES and HET/HRS.

  7. A Goldilocks principle for modelling radial velocity noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, F.; Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S.

    2016-09-01

    The Doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interpret signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modelling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model with RHK-dependent jitter is used in combination with the moving average model to detect planetary signals for M dwarfs. Our work may also shed light on the noise modelling for hotter stars, and provide a valid approach for finding similar principles in other disciplines.

  8. Radial Velocity Studies of Close Binary Stars. XII.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribulla, Theodor; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Conidis, George; DeBond, Heide; Thomson, J. R.; Gazeas, Kosmas; Ogłoza, Waldemar

    2007-05-01

    Radial velocity measurements and sine-curve fits to the orbital radial velocity variations are presented for 10 close binary systems: OO Aql, CC Com, V345 Gem, XY Leo, AM Leo, V1010 Oph, V2612 Oph, XX Sex, W UMa, and XY UMa. Most of these binaries have been observed spectroscopically before, but our data are of higher quality and consistency than in the previous studies. While most of the studied eclipsing pairs are contact binaries, V1010 Oph is probably a detached or semidetached double-lined binary, and XY UMa is a detached, chromospherically active system whose broadening functions clearly show well-defined and localized dark spots on the primary component. A particularly interesting case is XY Leo, which is a member of visually unresolved quadruple system composed of a contact binary and a detached, noneclipsing, active binary with an 0.805 day orbital period. V345 Gem and AM Leo are known members of visual binaries. We found faint visual companions at about 2"-3" from XX Sex and XY UMa. Based on data obtained at the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto.

  9. Radial velocity planet detection biases at the stellar rotational period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David R.; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-07-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical RV noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical time-scale and amplitude of stellar RV noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic time-scales of quasi-periodic RV jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable-zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable-zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.

  10. Binary Properties from Cepheid Radial Velocities (CRaV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Berdnikov, Leonid; Lauer, Jennifer; Morgan, Douglas; Nichols, Joy; Günther, H. Moritz; Gorynya, Natalya; Rastorguev, Alexey; Moskalik, Pawel

    2015-07-01

    We have examined high accuracy radial velocities of Cepheids to determine the binary frequency. The data are largely from the CORAVEL spectrophotometer and the Moscow version, with a typical uncertainty of ≤slant 1 km s-1, and a time span from 1 to 20 years. A systemic velocity was obtained by removing the pulsation component using a high order Fourier series. From this data we have developed a list of stars showing no orbital velocity larger than ±1 km s-1. The binary fraction was analyzed as a function of magnitude, and yields an apparent decrease in this fraction for fainter stars. We interpret this as incompleteness at fainter magnitudes, and derive the preferred binary fraction of 29% ± 8% (20% ± 6% per decade of orbital period) from the brightest 40 stars. A comparison of this fraction in this period range (1-20 years) implies a large fraction for the full period range. This is reasonable in that the high accuracy velocities are sensitive to the longer periods and smaller orbital velocity amplitudes in the period range sampled here. Thus the Cepheid velocity sample provides a sensitive detection in the period range between short period spectroscopic binaries and resolved companions. The recent identification of δ Cep as a binary with very low amplitude and high eccentricity underscores the fact that the binary fractions we derive are lower limits, to which other low amplitude systems will probably be added. The mass ratio (q) distribution derived from ultraviolet observations of the secondary is consistent with a flat distribution for the applicable period range (1-20 years).

  11. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  12. Lyman-Alpha Observations of High Radial Velocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1990-12-01

    H I LYMAN -ALPHA (LY-A) IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT LINES EMITTED BY PLASMA IN THE TEMPERATURE RANGE OF 7000 TO 10 TO THE FIFTH POWER K IN LATE-TYPE STARS. IT IS A MAJOR COMPONENT OF THE TOTAL RADIATIVE LOSS RATE, AND IT PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN DETERMINING THE ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE AND IN FLUORESCING OTHER UV LINES. YET IT IS ALSO THE LEAST STUDIED MAJOR LINE IN THE FAR UV, BECAUSE MOST OF THE LINE FLUX IS ABSORBED BY THE ISM ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT AND BECAUSE IT IS STRONGLY COMTAMINATED BY THE GEOCORONAL BACKGROUND. A KNOWLEDGE OF THE Ly-A PROFILE IS ALSO IMPORTANT FOR STUDIES OF DEUTERIUM IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM. BY OBSERVING HIGH RADIAL VELOCITY STARS WE WILL OBTAIN FOR THE FIRST TIME HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTRA OF THE CORE OF A STELLAR H I LYMAN-A EMISSION LINE PROFILE.

  13. The symbiosis of photometry and radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP mission is optimized to detect the inner planets of a planetary system. According to the current paradigm of planet formation, these planets will probably be small Earth-sized objects. Ground-based radial-velocity programs now have the sensitivity to detect Jovian-mass planets in orbit around bright solar-type stars. We expect the more massive planets to form in the outer regions of a proto-stellar nebula. These two types of measurements will very nicely complement each other, as they have highest detection probability for very different types of planets. The combination of FRESIP photometry and ground-based spectra will provide independent confirmation of the existence of planetary systems in orbit around other stars. Such detection of both terrestrial and Jovian planets in orbit around the same star is essential to test our understanding of planet formation.

  14. Optimal strategies of radial velocity observations in planet search surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2008-09-01

    Applications of the theory of optimal design of experiments to radial velocity (RV) planet search surveys are considered. Different optimality criteria are discussed, basing on the Fisher, Shannon and Kullback-Leibler informations. Algorithms of optimal scheduling of RV observations for two important practical problems are considered. The first problem is finding the time for future observations to yield the maximum improvement of the precision of exoplanetary orbital parameters and masses. The second problem is finding the most favourable time for distinguishing alternative orbital fits (the scheduling of discriminating observations). These methods of optimal planning are demonstrated to be potentially efficient for multiplanet extrasolar systems, in particular for resonant ones. In these cases, the optimal dates of observations are often concentrated in quite narrow time segments.

  15. OGLE-2011-BLG-0417: A RADIAL VELOCITY TESTBED FOR MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C.; Shin, In-Gu; Han, Cheongho; Udalski, Andrzej

    2013-05-10

    Microlensing experiments are returning increasingly detailed information about the planetary and binary systems that are being detected, far beyond what was originally expected. In several cases the lens mass and distance are measured, and a few very special cases have yielded complete eight-parameter Kepler solutions, i.e., the masses of both components, five Kepler invariants, and the phase. We identify one such case that is suitable for a precision test that could be carried out by comparing Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurements with the predictions from the microlensing solution. The lens primary is reasonably bright (I = 16.3, V = 18.2) and is expected to have a relatively large RV semi-amplitude (K {approx} 6.35 km s{sup -1}).

  16. MARVELS Radial Velocity Solutions to Seven Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, Michael Francis; Thomas, Neil B.; Ge, Jian; Ma, Bo; Herczeg, Alec; Reyes, Alan; SDSS-III MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve momentous purposes to improve the basis of understanding aspects of stellar astrophysics, such as the accurate calculation of the physical parameters of stars and the enigmatic mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. We report the investigation results of 7 eclipsing binary candidates, initially identified by the Kepler mission, overlapped with the radial velocity observations from the SDSS-III Multi-Object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS). The RV extractions and spectroscopic solutions of these eclipsing binaries were generated by the University of Florida's 1D data pipeline with a median RV precision of ~60-100 m/s, which was utilized for the DR12 data release. We performed the cross-reference fitting of the MARVELS RV data and the Kepler photometric fluxes obtained from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (V2) and modelled the 7 eclipsing binaries in the BinaryMaker3 and PHOEBE programs. This analysis accurately determined the absolute physical and orbital parameters of each binary. Most of the companion stars were determined to have masses of K and M dwarf stars (0.3-0.8 M⊙), and allowed for an investigation into the mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. Among the cases are KIC 9163796, a 122.2 day period "heartbeat star", a recently-discovered class of eccentric binaries known for tidal distortions and pulsations, with a high eccentricity (e~0.75) and KIC 11244501, a 0.29 day period, contact binary with a double-lined spectrum and mass ratio (q~0.45). We also report on the possible reclassification of 2 Kepler eclipsing binary candidates as background eclipsing binaries based on the analysis of the flux measurements, flux ratios of the spectroscopic and photometric solutions, the differences in the FOVs, the image processing of Kepler, and RV and spectral analysis of MARVELS.

  17. The Galactic Bulge Radial Velocity/Abundance Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, R. M.

    2012-08-01

    The Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) measured radial velocities for ˜ 9500 late-type giants in the Galactic bulge, predominantly from -10° < l < +10° and -2° < b < -10°. The project has discovered that the bulge exhibits cylindrical rotation characteristic of bars, and two studies of dynamics (Shen et al. 2010; Wang et al. 2012 MNRAS sub.) find that bar models- either N-body formed from an instability in a preexisting disk, or a self-consistent model- can account for the observed kinematics. Studies of the Plaut field at (l,b) = 0°, -8° show that alpha enhancement is found in bulge giants even 1 kpc from the nucleus. New infrared studies extending to within 0.25° = 35 pc of the Galactic Center find no iron or alpha gradient from Baade's Window (l,b) = 0.9°, -3.9° to our innermost field, in contrast to the marked gradient observed in the outer bulge. We consider the case of the remarkable globular cluster Terzan 5, which has a strongly bimodal iron and rm [α/Fe] within its members, and we consider evidence pro and con that the bulge was assembled from dissolved clusters. The Subaru telescope has the potential to contribute to study of the Galactic bulge, especially using the Hyper Superime-Cam and planned spectroscopic modes, as well as the high resolution spectrograph. The planned Jasmine satellite series may deliver a comprehensive survey of distances and proper motions of bulge stars, and insight into the origin and importance of the X-shaped bulge.

  18. The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio of the Sculptor dwarf galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armandroff, T. E.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio for 16 K giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy are calculated. Spectra at the Ca II triplet are analyzed using cross-correlation techniques in order to obtain the mean velocity of + 107.4 + or - 2.0 km/s. The dimensional velocity dispersion estimated as 6.3 (+1.1, -1.3) km/s is combined with the calculated core radius and observed central surface brightness to produce a mass-to-light ratio of 6.0 in solar units. It is noted that the data indicate that the Sculptor contains a large amount of mass not found in globular clusters, and the mass is either in the form of remnant stars or low-mass dwarfs.

  19. KECK NIRSPEC RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS OF LATE-M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Angelle; White, Russel; Bailey, John; Blake, Cullen; Blake, Geoffrey; Cruz, Kelle; Burgasser, Adam J.; Kraus, Adam

    2012-11-15

    We present the results of an infrared spectroscopic survey of 23 late-M dwarfs with the NIRSPEC echelle spectrometer on the Keck II telescope. Using telluric lines for wavelength calibration, we are able to achieve measurement precisions of down to 45 m s{sup -1} for our late-M dwarfs over a one- to four-year long baseline. Our sample contains two stars with radial velocity (RV) variations of >1000 m s{sup -1}. While we require more measurements to determine whether these RV variations are due to unseen planetary or stellar companions or are the result of starspots known to plague the surface of M dwarfs, we can place upper limits of <40 M{sub J} sin i on the masses of any companions around those two M dwarfs with RV variations of <160 m s{sup -1} at orbital periods of 10-100 days. We have also measured the rotational velocities for all the stars in our late-M dwarf sample and offer our multi-order, high-resolution spectra over 2.0-2.4 {mu}m to the atmospheric modeling community to better understand the atmospheres of late-M dwarfs.

  20. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities. PMID:10790082

  1. A radial velocity study of the intermediate polar EX Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.; Ramírez-Torres, A.; Michel, R.; Hernández Santisteban, J. V.

    2016-09-01

    A study on the intermediate polar EX Hya is presented, based on simultaneous photometry and high-dispersion spectroscopic observations, during four consecutive nights. The strong photometric modulation related to the 67-min spin period of the primary star is clearly present, as well as the narrow eclipses associated with the orbital modulation. Since our eclipse timings have been obtained almost 91 000 cycles since the last reported observations, we present new linear ephemeris, although we cannot rule out a sinusoidal variation suggested by previous authors. The system shows double-peaked H α, H β and He I λ5876 Å emission lines, with almost no other lines present. As H α is the only line with enough S/N ratio in our observations, we have concentrated our efforts in its study, in order to obtain a reliable radial velocity semi-amplitude. From the profile of this line, we find two important components; one with a steep rise and velocities not larger than ˜1000 km s-1 and another broader component extending up to ˜2000 km s-1, which we interpret as coming mainly from the inner disc. A strong and variable hotspot is found and a stream-like structure is seen at times. We show that the best solution correspond to K1 = 58 ± 5 km s-1 from H α, from the two emission components, which are both in phase with the orbital modulation. We remark on a peculiar effect in the radial velocity curve around phase zero, which could be interpreted as a Rositter-MacLaughlin-like effect, which has been taken into account before deriving K1. This value is compatible with the values found in high resolution both in the ultraviolet and X-ray. Using the published inclination angle of i =78° ± 1° and semi-amplitude K2 = 432 ± 5 km s-1, we find: M1 = 0.78 ± 0.03 M⊙, M2 = 0.10 ± 0.02 M⊙ and a = 0.67 ± 0.01 R⊙. Doppler Tomography has been applied, to construct six Doppler tomograms for single orbital cycles spanning the four days of observations to support our conclusions

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abell 3733 radial velocities (Solanes+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanes, J. M.; Stein, P.

    1998-03-01

    Cross-correlation and emission-line heliocentric radial velocities for 112 galaxies observed with the MEFOS and OPTOPUS spectrographs in the field of the galaxy cluster A3733. The last column lists the final radial velocities which result form a weighted average of the velocity data in the previous columns. (1 data file).

  3. Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, M.; Figon, P.; Meyssonnier, N.

    1995-12-01

    We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocities by Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogue of spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star, when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set of Identifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) of the CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the number HIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number (Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) by Dommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study has been done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out the problems we have had to deal with.

  4. Radial Velocity Measurements for Pulsating Stars with Poznan Spectroscopic Telescope: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozek, A.; Baranowski, R.; Bartczak, P.; Borczyk, W.; Dimitrov, W.; Fagas, M.; Kaminski, K.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Ratajczak, R.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    2008-12-01

    We present examples of radial velocity measurements obtained with the Poznan Spectroscopic Telescope (PST). Observations on PST are run on regular basis since August 2007. The PST is a binary telescope with two 40 cm mirrors of a Newtonian focus, connected by optic fibers with an echelle spectrograph. Radial velocity measurements are done for δ Sct, β Cep, classical Cepheids, eclipsing binaries and other types of variable stars. Echelle spectra reduction and radial velocity measurements are performed with IRAF package. Final results are obtained from cross-correlating stellar spectra either with radial velocity standards or the program star itself using IRAF fxcor procedure.

  5. RADIAL VELOCITY STUDIES OF CLOSE BINARY STARS. XIV

    SciTech Connect

    Pribulla, Theodor; Rucinski, Slavek M.; DeBond, Heide; De Ridder, Archie; Karmo, Toomas; Thomson, J. R.; Croll, Bryce; Ogloza, Waldemar; Pilecki, Bogumil; Siwak, Michal E-mail: rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: ridder@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: croll@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: pilecki@astrouw.edu.pl

    2009-03-15

    Radial velocity (RV) measurements and sine curve fits to the orbital RV variations are presented for 10 close binary systems: TZ Boo, VW Boo, EL Boo, VZ CVn, GK Cep, RW Com, V2610 Oph, V1387 Ori, AU Ser, and FT UMa. Our spectroscopy revealed two quadruple systems, TZ Boo and V2610 Oph, while three stars showing small photometric amplitudes, EL Boo, V1387 Ori, and FT UMa, were found to be triple systems. GK Cep is a close binary with a faint third component. While most of the studied eclipsing systems are contact binaries, VZ CVn and GK Cep are detached or semidetached double-lined binaries, and EL Boo, V1387 Ori, and FT UMa are close binaries of uncertain binary type. The large fraction of triple and quadruple systems found in this sample supports the hypothesis of formation of close binaries in multiple stellar systems; it also demonstrates that low photometric amplitude binaries are a fertile ground for further discoveries of multiple systems.

  6. Searching for Radial Velocity Variations in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Gull, T. R.; Ivarsson, S.; Nielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (see poster by Sonneborn et al.). Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. The N II 1084-86 emission feature indicates that the star may be nitrogen rich. The FUV continuum and the S IV 1073 P-Cygni wind line suggest that the effective temperature of eta Car B is at least 25,000 K. FUV spectra of eta Carinae were obtained with the FUSE satellite at 9 epochs between 2000 February and 2005 July. The data consists of 12 observations taken with the LWRS aperture (30x30 arcsec), three with the HIRS aperture (1.25x20 arcsec), and one MRDS aperture (4x20 arcsec). In this paper we discuss the analysis of these spectra to search for radial velocity variations associated with the 5.54-year binary orbit of Eta Car AB.

  7. Impact of magnetic field on radial velocity measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard, E. M.; Delfosse, X.; Morin, J.; Boisse, I.; Moutou, C.; Hébrard, G.

    2014-12-01

    Very low-mass stars are very promising targets for planet-search programs, in particular to discover super-Earths / Earths located in their habitable zone. Their detection is in principle accessible to the existing velocimeters of highest radial-velocity (RV) precision, but challenging due to activity ( i.e., dark spots and magnetic regions at their surfaces) which generate a noise level in RV curves (RV jitter). It can severely limit our practical ability at detecting Earth-like planets. To overcome this intrinsic limitation, a promising option consists in modeling directly the stellar activity behind the activity jitter, and in particular the magnetic field that gives rise to it. To do this, simultaneous observations in velocimetry (for activity jitter) and in spectropolarimetry (for the Zeeman signatures in spectral lines tracing the presence of a large-scale field) are needed. We present here our first results both on the simulations on the impact of magnetic fields on line profiles (bisectors & RV data), and on the simultaneous observations done thanks to HARPSPol@LaSilla and NARVAL@TBL/SOPHIE@OHP on a small sample.

  8. Photonic systems for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    I will discuss new instrumentation and techniques designed to maximize the Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of next generation exoplanet discovery instruments. These systems include a novel wavelength calibration device based on an all-fiber fabry-perot interferometer, a compact and efficient optical fiber image scrambler based on a single high-index ball lens, and a unique optical fiber mode mixer. These systems have been developed specifically to overcome three technological hurdles that have classically hindered high precision RV measurements in both the optical and near-infrared (NIR), namely: lack of available wavelength calibration sources, inadequate decoupling of the spectrograph from variable telescope illumination, and speckle-induced noise due to mode interference in optical fibers. The instrumentation presented here will be applied to the Habitable-zone Planet Finder, a NIR RV instrument designed to detect rocky planets orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby M-dwarfs, and represents a critical technological step towards the detection of potentially habitable Earth-like planets. While primarily focused in the NIR, many of these systems will be adapted to future optical RV instruments as well, such as NASA's new Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer for the WIYN telescope.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Barycentric radial velocities of Gl 586A (Strassmeier+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.; Granzer, T.

    2013-09-01

    Barycentric radial velocities of Gl 586A. Data from the STELLA echelle spectrograph (SES), from the ELODIE archive (ELODIE), from the SOPHIE archive (SOPHIE) and from Duquennoy et al. 1992 (CORAVEL). All velocities are in the STELLA radial velocity system (see paper). Secondary velocities are set to -999.99 where they are not available or not used in the paper (SOPHIE and CORAVEL). (1 data file).

  10. Estimating Stellar Radial Velocity Variability from Kepler and GALEX: Implications for the Radial Velocity Confirmation of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, H. M.; Stassun, K. G.; Watson, C. A.; Bastien, F. A.; Pepper, J.

    2014-01-01

    We cross match the GALEX and Kepler surveys to create a unique dataset with both ultraviolet (UV) measurements and highly precise photometric variability measurements in the visible light spectrum. As stellar activity is driven by magnetic field modulations, we have used UV emission from the magnetically heated gas in the stellar atmosphere to serve as our proxy for the more well-known stellar activity indicator, R' HK . The R' HK approximations were in turn used to estimate the level of astrophysical noise expected in radial velocity (RV) measurements and these were then searched for correlations with photometric variability. We find significant scatter in our attempts to estimate RV noise for magnetically active stars, which we attribute to variations in the phase and strength of the stellar magnetic cycle that drives the activity of these targets. However, for stars we deem to be magnetically quiet, we do find a clear correlation between photometric variability and estimated levels of RV noise (with variability up to ~10 m s-1). We conclude that for these quiet stars, we can use photometric measurements as a proxy to estimate the RV noise expected. As a result, the procedure outlined in this paper may help select targets best-suited for RV follow-up necessary for planet confirmation.

  11. Estimating stellar radial velocity variability from Kepler and GALEX: Implications for the radial velocity confirmation of exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Cegla, H. M.; Watson, C. A.; Stassun, K. G.; Bastien, F. A.; Pepper, J.

    2014-01-01

    We cross match the GALEX and Kepler surveys to create a unique dataset with both ultraviolet (UV) measurements and highly precise photometric variability measurements in the visible light spectrum. As stellar activity is driven by magnetic field modulations, we have used UV emission from the magnetically heated gas in the stellar atmosphere to serve as our proxy for the more well-known stellar activity indicator, R' {sub HK}. The R' {sub HK} approximations were in turn used to estimate the level of astrophysical noise expected in radial velocity (RV) measurements and these were then searched for correlations with photometric variability. We find significant scatter in our attempts to estimate RV noise for magnetically active stars, which we attribute to variations in the phase and strength of the stellar magnetic cycle that drives the activity of these targets. However, for stars we deem to be magnetically quiet, we do find a clear correlation between photometric variability and estimated levels of RV noise (with variability up to ∼10 m s{sup –1}). We conclude that for these quiet stars, we can use photometric measurements as a proxy to estimate the RV noise expected. As a result, the procedure outlined in this paper may help select targets best-suited for RV follow-up necessary for planet confirmation.

  12. Uncovering the planets and stellar activity of CoRoT-7 using only radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, J. P.; Haywood, R. D.; Brewer, B. J.; Figueira, P.; Oshagh, M.; Santerne, A.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    Stellar activity can induce signals in the radial velocities of stars, complicating the detection of orbiting low-mass planets. We present a method to determine the number of planetary signals present in radial-velocity datasets of active stars, using only radial-velocity observations. Instead of considering separate fits with different number of planets, we use a birth-death Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to infer the posterior distribution for the number of planets in a single run. In a natural way, the marginal distributions for the orbital parameters of all planets are also inferred. This method is applied to HARPS data of CoRoT-7. We confidently recover the orbits of both CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c although the data show evidence for the presence of additional signals. All data and software presented in this article are available online at http://https://github.com/j-faria/exoBD-CoRoT7

  13. WHICH RADIAL VELOCITY EXOPLANETS HAVE UNDETECTED OUTER COMPANIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2009-09-01

    The observed radial velocity (RV) eccentricity distribution for extrasolar planets in single-planet systems shows that a significant fraction of planets are eccentric (e > 0.1). However, an RV planet's eccentricity, which comes from the Keplerian fitting, can be biased by low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sampling. Here, we investigate the effects on eccentricity produced by undetected outer companions. We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations of mock RV data to understand this effect and predict its impact on the observed distribution. We first quantify the statistical bias of known RV planets' eccentricities produced by undetected zero-eccentricity wide-separation companions and show that this effect alone cannot explain the observed distribution. We then modify the simulations to consist of two populations, one of zero-eccentricity planets in double-planet systems and the other of single planets drawn from an eccentric distribution. Our simulations show that a good fit to the observed distribution is obtained with 45% zero-eccentricity double planets and 55% single eccentric planets. Assuming that our two simulated populations of planets are a good approximation for the true RV population, matching the observed distribution allows us to determine the probability that a known RV planet's orbital eccentricity has been biased by an undetected wide-separation companion. Averaged over eccentricity we calculate this probability to be {approx}4%, suggesting that a small fraction of systems may have a yet to be discovered outer companion. Our simulations show that moderately eccentric planets, with 0.1 < e < 0.3 and 0.1 < e < 0.2, have a {approx}13% and {approx}19% probability, respectively, of having an undetected outer companion. We encourage both high-contrast direct imaging and RV follow-up surveys of known RV planets with moderate eccentricities to test our predictions and look for previously undetected outer companions.

  14. Extreme Precision Environmental Control for Next Generation Radial Velocity Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, Gudmundur K.; Hearty, Fred; Levi, Eric; Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Nelson, Matt; Halverson, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radial velocity precisions of order 10cm/s will enable the discoveries of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. Temperature and pressure variations inside a spectrograph can lead to thermomechanical instabilities in the optics and mounts, and refractive index variations in both the optical elements as well as the surrounding air. Together, these variations can easily induce instrumental drifts of several tens to hundreds of meters per second. Enclosing the full optical train in thermally stabilized high-vacuum environments minimizes such errors. In this talk, I will discuss the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF) spectrograph: a near infrared (NIR) facility class instrument we will commission at the Hobby Eberly Telescope in 2016. The ECS will maintain the HPF optical bench stable at 180K at the sub milli-Kelvin level on the timescale of days, and at the few milli-Kelvin level over months to years. The entire spectrograph is kept under high-quality vacuum (<10-6 Torr), and environmental temperature fluctuations are compensated for with an actively controlled radiation shield outfitted with custom feedback electronics. High efficiency Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) blankets, and a passive external thermal enclosure further isolate the optics from ambient perturbations. This environmental control scheme is versatile, suitable to stabilize both next generation NIR, and optical spectrographs. I will show how we are currently testing this control system for use with our design concept of the Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrograph (EPDS), the next generation optical spectrograph for the WIYN 3.5m telescope. Our most recent results from full-scale stability tests will be presented.

  15. Long-lived, long-period radial velocity variations in Aldebaran: A planetary companion and stellar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Guenther, E. W.; MacQueen, P.; Hartmann, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Han, I.; Lee, B.-C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Yang, S.; Larson, A. M.; Kim, K.-M.; Mkrtichian, , D. E.; Döllinger, M.; Simon, , A. E.; Girardi, L.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the nature of the long-period radial velocity variations in α Tau first reported over 20 yr ago. Methods: We analyzed precise stellar radial velocity measurements for α Tau spanning over 30 yr. An examination of the Hα and Ca II λ8662 spectral lines, and Hipparcos photometry was also done to help discern the nature of the long-period radial velocity variations. Results: Our radial velocity data show that the long-period, low amplitude radial velocity variations are long-lived and coherent. Furthermore, Hα equivalent width measurements and Hipparcos photometry show no significant variations with this period. Another investigation of this star established that there was no variability in the spectral line shapes with the radial velocity period. An orbital solution results in a period of P = 628.96 ± 0.90 d, eccentricity, e = 0.10 ± 0.05, and a radial velocity amplitude, K = 142.1 ± 7.2 m s-1. Evolutionary tracks yield a stellar mass of 1.13 ± 0.11 M⊙, which corresponds to a minimum companion mass of 6.47 ± 0.53 MJup with an orbital semi-major axis of a = 1.46 ± 0.27 AU. After removing the orbital motion of the companion, an additional period of ≈520 d is found in the radial velocity data, but only in some time spans. A similar period is found in the variations in the equivalent width of Hα and Ca II. Variations at one-third of this period are also found in the spectral line bisector measurements. The ~520 d period is interpreted as the rotation modulation by stellar surface structure. Its presence, however, may not be long-lived, and it only appears in epochs of the radial velocity data separated by ~10 yr. This might be due to an activity cycle. Conclusions: The data presented here provide further evidence of a planetary companion to α Tau, as well as activity-related radial velocity variations. Based in part on observations obtained at the 2-m-Alfred Jensch Telescope at the Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg and the

  16. Developing Gradient Metal Alloys through Radial Deposition Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R. Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  17. Developing gradient metal alloys through radial deposition additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  18. STARSPOT-INDUCED OPTICAL AND INFRARED RADIAL VELOCITY VARIABILITY IN T TAURI STAR HUBBLE I 4

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Hartigan, Patrick M.; Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: cmj@rice.edu E-mail: crockett@lowell.edu E-mail: dtj@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2011-08-01

    We report optical ({approx}6150 A) and K-band (2.3 {mu}m) radial velocities obtained over two years for the pre-main-sequence weak-lined T Tauri star Hubble I 4. We detect periodic and near-sinusoidal radial velocity variations at both wavelengths, with a semi-amplitude of 1395 {+-} 94 m s{sup -1} in the optical and 365 {+-} 80 m s{sup -1} in the infrared. The lower velocity amplitude at the longer wavelength, combined with bisector analysis and spot modeling, indicates that there are large, cool spots on the stellar surface that are causing the radial velocity modulation. The radial velocities maintain phase coherence over hundreds of days suggesting that the starspots are long-lived. This is one of the first active stars where the spot-induced velocity modulation has been resolved in the infrared.

  19. Kepler beaming binaries radial velocity follow-up with WIYN/Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Stassun, Keivan; Faigler, Simchon; Boyajian, Tabetha; Mazeh, Tsevi; Tal-Or, Lev; Prsa, Andrej

    2015-12-01

    High-quality space-based time series photometry reveals the minute photometric modulations induced by orbital motion in short-period binary systems with stellar and substellar secondaries. Those modulations are induced by both gravitational and atmospheric processes. Gravitational processes include the beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and the atmospheric processes include reflected light and thermal emission by the secondary atmosphere. Therefore, non-eclipsing (non-transiting) systems are detectable using photometry alone. The availability of Kepler data for a large sample of stars combined with the sensitivity to non-eclipsing systems (which are at least an order of magnitude more common than eclipsing systems) has the potential of transforming the Kepler survey into the equivalent of a radial velocity survey of a large sample of stars. This allows detecting intrinsically rare systems, where traditional approaches, e.g., radial velocity and transit surveys, are highly inefficient. Those include systems where the companion is a brown-dwarf or a massive planet, or even a white dwarf. As this approach is still in its infancy, we are carrying out radial velocity follow-up of Kepler photometric detections, to confirm the nature of the system and accurately measure the orbit and the companion’s mass. Here we present our results from an radial velocity campaign with the WIYN/Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph, where we used 26 nights during the 2014 and 2015 Kepler observing seasons to observe five Hydra one-degree diameter fields within the Kepler field. Our list of targets includes 131 Kepler beaming binaries, and we used additional fibers to observe 85 Kepler eclipsing binaries and 31 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). A detailed comparison between the photometrically predicted companion’s mass and the mass measured through radial velocities will improve our understanding of this young approach, and will support similar projects

  20. Radial velocity variations in the young eruptive star EX Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Curé, M.; Henning, Th.; Kiss, Cs.; Launhardt, R.; Moór, A.; Müller, A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. EX Lup-type objects (EXors) are low-mass pre-main sequence objects characterized by optical and near-infrared outbursts attributed to highly enhanced accretion from the circumstellar disk onto the star. Aims: The trigger mechanism of EXor outbursts is still debated. One type of theory requires a close (sub)stellar companion that perturbs the inner part of the disk and triggers the onset of the enhanced accretion. Here, we study the radial velocity (RV) variations of EX Lup, the prototype of the EXor class, and test whether they can be related to a close companion. Methods: We conducted a five-year RV survey, collecting 54 observations with HARPS and FEROS. We analyzed the activity of EX Lup by checking the bisector, the equivalent width of the Ca 8662 Å line, the asymmetry of the Ca II K line, the activity indicator SFEROS, the asymmetry of the cross-correlation function, the line depth ratio of the VI/FeI lines, and the TiO, CaH 2, CaH 3, CaOH, and Hα indices. We complemented the RV measurements with a 14-day optical/infrared photometric monitoring to look for signatures of activity or varying accretion. Results: We found that the RV of EX Lup is periodic (P = 7.417 d), with stable period, semi-amplitude (2.2 km s-1), and phase over at least four years of observations. This period is not present in any of the above-mentioned activity indicators. However, the RVs of narrow metallic emission lines suggest the same period, but with an anti-correlating phase. The observed absorption line RVs can be fitted with a Keplerian solution around a 0.6 M⊙ central star with msini = (14.7 ± 0.7) MJup and eccentricity of e = 0.24. Alternatively, we attempted to model the observations with a cold or hot stellar spot as well. We found that in our simple model, the spot parameters needed to reproduce the RV semi-amplitude are in contradiction with the photometric variability, making the spot scenario unlikely. Conclusions: We qualitatively discuss two possibilities to

  1. High Proper Motion Stars. III. Radial Velocities of 24 Late-Type Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. C.; De Robertis, M. M.

    1998-11-01

    We report 27 radial velocity measurements for 24 stars, all with annual proper motions larger than 1". For 17 of these, no velocities have previously been published. We identify a few stars that may be spectroscopic binaries and a sdK star of spectacularly high space velocity.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HD1461, HD40307, and HD204313 radial velocities (Diaz+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, R. F.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Dumusque, X.; Marmier, M.; Alonso, R.; Benz, W.; Bouchy, F.; Coffinet, A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Deleuil, M.; Figueira, P.; Gillon, M.; Lo Curto, G.; Mayor, M.; Mordasini, C.; Motalebi, F.; Moutou, C.; Pollacco, D.; Pompei, E.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N.; Wyttenbach, A.

    2015-11-01

    Each file contains the radial velocity and ancillary measurements (bisector velocity span, full-width at half-maximum, and activity indicator) for a star. Measurements were obtained with the HARPS spectrograph installed at the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla observatory. For HD204313 additional measurements done with the CORALIE spectrograph at the Swiss Euler telescope are also reported. (4 data files).

  3. Quasilinear model for energetic particle diffusion in radial and velocity space

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Bass, E. M.

    2013-04-15

    A quasilinear model for passive energetic particle (EP) turbulent diffusion in radial and velocity space is fitted and tested against nonlinear gyrokinetic tokamak simulations with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 045001 (2003)]. Off diagonal elements of a symmetric positive definite 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 EP diffusion matrix account for fluxes up radial (energy) gradients driven by energy (radial) gradients of the EP velocity space distribution function. The quasilinear ratio kernel of the model is provided by a simple analytic formula for the EP radial and velocity space EP diffusivity relative to radial thermal ion energy diffusivity at each linear mode of the turbulence driven by the thermal plasma. The TGLF [G. M. Staebler, J. E. Kinsey, and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Plasmas 14, 0055909 (2007); ibid. 15, 0055908 (2008)] tokamak transport model provides the linear mode frequency and growth rates to the kernel as well as the nonlinear spectral weight for each mode.

  4. Quasilinear model for energetic particle diffusion in radial and velocity space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Bass, E. M.; Staebler, G. M.

    2013-04-01

    A quasilinear model for passive energetic particle (EP) turbulent diffusion in radial and velocity space is fitted and tested against nonlinear gyrokinetic tokamak simulations with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 045001 (2003)]. Off diagonal elements of a symmetric positive definite 2×2 EP diffusion matrix account for fluxes up radial (energy) gradients driven by energy (radial) gradients of the EP velocity space distribution function. The quasilinear ratio kernel of the model is provided by a simple analytic formula for the EP radial and velocity space EP diffusivity relative to radial thermal ion energy diffusivity at each linear mode of the turbulence driven by the thermal plasma. The TGLF [G. M. Staebler, J. E. Kinsey, and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Plasmas 14, 0055909 (2007); ibid. 15, 0055908 (2008)] tokamak transport model provides the linear mode frequency and growth rates to the kernel as well as the nonlinear spectral weight for each mode.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Milky Way Cepheids radial velocities (Storm+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, J.; Gieren, W.; Fouque, P.; Barnes, T. G.; Pietrzynski, G.; Nardetto, N.; Weber, M.; Granzer, T.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2011-10-01

    Repeated high precision radial velocity measurements for 14 galactic Cepheids obtained with the STELLA telescope and echelle spectrograph are presented together with the associated time stamps. From these data radial velocity curves with good phase coverage can be established. The Cepheids observed are: V496 Aql, TT Aql, VZ Cyg, {zeta} Gem, X Pup, AQ Pup, BN Pup, LS Pup, VZ Pup, X Sgr, Y Sgr, BB Sgr, XX Sgr, YZ Sgr. (2 data files).

  6. The M 4 Core Project with HST - IV. Internal kinematics from accurate radial velocities of 2771 cluster members★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Sneden, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Sommariva, V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed study of the internal kinematics of the Galactic globular cluster M 4 (NGC 6121), by deriving the radial velocities from 7250 spectra for 2771 stars distributed from the upper part of the red giant branch down to the main sequence. We describe new approaches to determine the wavelength solution from day-time calibrations and to determine the radial velocity drifts that can occur between calibration and science observations when observing with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at Very Large Telescope. Two techniques to determine the radial velocity are compared, after a qualitative description of their advantages with respect to other commonly used algorithm, and a new approach to remove the sky contribution from the spectra obtained with fibre-fed spectrograph and further improve the radial velocity precision is presented. The average radial velocity of the cluster is = 71.08 ± 0.08 km s-1 with an average dispersion of μ _{v_c} = 3.97 km s-1. Using the same data set and the same statistical approach of previous analyses, 20 additional binary candidates are found, for a total of 87 candidates. A new determination of the internal radial velocity dispersion as a function of cluster distance is presented, resulting in a dispersion of 4.5 km s-1 within 2 arcmin from the centre of cluster and steadily decreasing outward. We statistically confirm the small amplitude of the cluster rotation, as suggested in the past by several authors. This new analysis represents a significant improvement with respect to previous results in literature and provides a fundamental observational input for the modelling of the cluster dynamics.

  7. Shear-velocity structure, radial anisotropy and dynamics of the Tibetan crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agius, Matthew R.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2014-12-01

    of radial anisotropy in the crust does not correlate with isotropic-average shear speed (and, by inference, with crustal rock viscosity) or with surface elevation. Instead, radial anisotropy is related to the deformation pattern and is the strongest in regions experiencing extension (crustal flattening), as noted previously. The growth of Tibet by the addition of Indian crustal rocks into its crust from the south is reflected in the higher crustal seismic velocities (and, thus, lower temperatures) in the southern compared to northern parts of the plateau (more recently added rocks having had less time to undergo radioactive heating within the thickened Tibetan crust). Gravity-driven flattening-the basic cause of extension and normal faulting in the southern, western and central Tibet-is evidenced by pervasive radial anisotropy in the middle crust beneath the regions undergoing extension; the overall eastward flow of the crust is directed by the boundaries and motions of the lithospheric blocks that surround Tibet.

  8. Effect of rotor meridional velocity ratio on response to inlet radial and circumferential distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, N. L.

    1979-01-01

    Three single transonic fan stages, each having a different meridional velocity ratio across its rotor, were tested with two magnitudes of tip radial distortion and with a 90 deg circumferential distortion imposed on the inlet flow. The rotor with the lowest meridional velocity ratio (less than 0.9 at the tip) demonstrated the least degradation of performance due to these distortions. Loss and deviation angle data (as needed for performance prediction with radial distortion) calculated along actual streamlines for radially distorted flow and correlated against diffusion factor, showed consistent agreement with data calculated along design streamlines for undistorted flow.

  9. Origins of Solar Systems: Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We have continued the super high resolution (R is approximately 200,000), high S/N (> 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., K Ceti; P(sub cyc)=5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and v(sub r), changes which we have uncovered. A preliminary analysis of the limited data in hand, and find some tantalizing evidence for correlations between median line bisector displacement and radial velocity v(sub r). The correlation appears to be specific to the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Additional information regarding progress on the grant is included.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WOCS. LXVI. Radial velocity survey in M35 (Leiner+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiner, E. M.; Mathieu, R. D.; Gosnell, N. M.; Geller, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    In this second paper (see also Geller et al. 2010, cat. J/AJ/139/1383) in a series studying the dynamical state of the young (150Myr) open cluster M35 we present an updated version of our complete radial velocity database for the cluster. Our sample is selected to cover the range of the M35 main sequence from 0.8 to 1.6Mȯ out to 30' from cluster center. In the 17 years that we have observed M35, we have gathered ~8000 moderate-precision (σi=0.5km/s) spectra of ~1300 stars. We find 418 of these to be confirmed radial velocity cluster members or likely members. Within our sample of 418 cluster members or likely members, we detect 64 velocity-variable stars. We present orbital solutions for 52 (see Tables 5 and 7) of these 64 systems, in addition to 28 (see Tables 6 and 8) completed orbital solutions for non-member binaries in our field of view. The binaries are drawn from a sample initially derived from the photometry of T. von Hippel taken at KPNO on the Burrell Schmidt telescope. Observations were taken on 1993 November 18-19, and include B and V photometry down to a magnitude of V=17 lying within a 70'*70' field of view. Subsequently, we updated this photometry for 74% of our sources with more precise BV photometry from C. P. Deliyannis (2006, private communication; Sarrazine et al., 2000AAS...197.4107S). This new photometry was taken on the WIYN 0.9m telescope with the S2KB imager and covers a 40'*40' field of view. See Geller et al. 2010 (cat. J/AJ/139/1383) for more information on these two sets of photometry. Beginning in 1997 September, we have obtained spectra for the stars in our sample at the WIYN 3.5m telescope at KPNO using the Hydra Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS). For a detailed description of our observing and data reduction procedure see Geller et al. 2008 (cat. J/AJ/135/2264). In short, we typically use Hydra's blue sensitive fibers and an echelle grating providing a resolution of R~20000. These spectra are centered on 512.5nm, and span a ~25nm

  11. Radial velocities of three poorly studied clusters and the kinematics of open clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Christian R.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu

    2014-04-01

    We present radial velocities for stars in the field of the open star clusters Berkeley 44, Berkeley 81, and NGC 6802 from spectra obtained using the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO (WIYN) 3.5 m telescope. These clusters are of intermediate age (1-3 Gyr), located within the solar Galactocentric radius, and have no previous radial velocity measurements. We find mean radial velocities of –9.6 ± 3.0 km s{sup –1}, 48.1 ± 2.0 km s{sup –1}, and 12.4 ± 2.8 km s{sup –1} for Be 44, Be 81, and NGC 6802, respectively. We present an analysis of radial velocities of 134 open clusters of a wide range of ages using data obtained in this study and the literature. Assuming the system of clusters rotates about the Galactic center with a constant velocity, we find older clusters exhibit a slower rotation and larger line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion than younger clusters. The gradual decrease in rotational velocity of the cluster system with age is accompanied by a smooth increase in LOS velocity dispersion, which we interpret as the effect of heating on the open cluster system over time.

  12. Radial velocity study of the intermediate polar EX Hydrae .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Torres, A.; Echevarria, J.; Michel, R.

    Intermediate Polars study from the canonical approach used for non magnetic systems is indeed controversial. Nevertheless, we present hereby high dispersion spectroscopic observations with simultaneous optical photometry of the intermediate polar EX Hya. A normalization method for doppler tomography throughout a complete observation run is introduced. We find rapid variations, orbital period averaged, in the Halpha emission line, with the capability to map the region where they come from in the velocity-space doppler tomogram. By applying the double-Gaussian method to the same line profile we determine a velocity semi-amplitude of the primary star K_1= 52 ± 5 \\: km s-1 which, even if suggests a lower value than recent results, is still within the error bars of the such estimations.

  13. An ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian radial velocity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, P. S.; Claus, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    A transducer with a velocity profile which is Gaussian as a function of radius and independent of angle is described. In materials evaluation applications requiring the interrogation of modified far field patterns of an ultrasonic transducer, it is desirable to use a transducer which produces a beam with a Gaussian profile. A computer aided electrode design and calibrated three dimensional interferometric optical and ultrasonic measurements of the far field distribution are presented.

  14. Radial Velocity Studies of Southern Close Binary Stars. II. Spring/Summer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Rucinski, Slavek M.

    2007-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements and sine-curve fits to the orbital velocity variations are presented for 14 close binary stars, S Ant, TT Cet, TW Cet, AA Cet, RW Dor, UX Eri, YY Eri, BV Eri, CT Eri, SZ Hor, AD Phe, TY Pup, HI Pup, and TZ Pyx. All are double-lined binaries, and all except the last one are contact binaries. The orbital data must be considered preliminary because of the relatively small number of observations (6-12), a circumstance that is partly compensated by the good definition of the broadening functions used for the radial velocity determinations. Based on data obtained at the European Southern Observatory.

  15. The radial velocity technique and the discovery of exoplanets as seen by high school students.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Mauro; Gusev, Anatoly; Pugacheva, Galina; Martin, Inacio; Lyra, Cassia

    2012-07-01

    Presently, the existence of more than 750 exoplanets has been confirmed. The radial velocity technique has proven to be the most effective means to detect planets orbiting other stars. In this technique, which is based on the Doppler effect, the observation of the displacement of spectral lines is used to infer the presence of exoplanets orbiting distant stars. Despite the apparent complexity of this technique, high-school students not only can understand its basic principles, but also create simple programs and software to represent and simulate changes in the radial velocity of a star. Thus, as an extracurricular activity, high-school students developed a simple computer program using the C programming language to simulate the influence of a planet orbiting a star in order to obtain radial velocity curves. The radial velocity curve depends on the masses of the star and planet, and orbital parameters such as orbital period, semi-major axis, eccentricity, inclination, argument of periapsis, longitude of the ascending node and mean anomaly. The software allows the variation of these parameters so that the influence of any planet (or system of planets) in orbit of a star can be simulated and the corresponding changes in the radial velocity be observed. For comparison purposes, the radial velocity curve of the Sun under the influence of Jupiter and Saturn are compared with the radial velocity curves of other stars with known exoplanets. This activity became a multidisciplinary study of an interesting physical phenomenon. To obtain the desired results, the students had to learn new concepts and use different tools, which was very rewarding to them.

  16. Radial gradient of solar wind velocity from 1 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, H. R.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Solar wind velocity measurements made by Pioneers 10 and 11 are compared to investigate radial variations in the velocity at heliocentric distances of 1 to 5 AU. Two hundred days of corresponding Pioneer 10 and 11 data are plotted, the velocity profiles for 25-day segments are compared, and the same general pattern of peaks and troughs is found in the corresponding profiles. A comparison of the relative smoothness of the profiles clearly shows that velocity amplitudes in the solar wind stream structure decrease dramatically with increasing radial distance from the sun, although the rate of decrease is not as clear. It is hypothesized that stream-stream interactions play a dominant part in inhibiting the classical radial expansion process in the solar wind and produce scattering centers which prevent the observation of a significant galactic cosmic ray gradient in this region of space.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of HD 41004A/B (Zucker+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, S.; Mazeh, T.; Santos, N. C.; Udry, S.; Mayor, M.

    2003-04-01

    The table presents 103 measurements of the radial velocities of HD 41004A and HD 41004B. The spectra used for the derivation were observed with CORALIE and the velocities were derived using Multi-Order TODCOR. The precision of the primary velocity is about 0.010km/s and the precision of the secondary is about 0.56km/s. (1 data file).

  18. Radial gradient of solar wind velocity from 1 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, H. R.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Solar wind velocities have been measured on a daily basis from data obtained by the Ames Research Center plasma analyzers on both Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11. A comparison between the time profiles of the solar wind velocities observed at the two spacecraft shows that the solar wind has the same major features, such as high velocity streams, out to at least 5 astronomical units (AU) from the sun. Major features in the velocity time profile observed first at Pioneer 11 are seen later at Pioneer 10 with a delay consistent with the respective heliocentric longitudes of the two spacecraft, their radial distances from the sun, and the solar wind velocity. A more detailed comparison between the velocity measurements made at Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 shows that the range of solar wind velocities decreases with increasing radial distance from the sun. Although the average value of the solar wind velocity as measured over a sufficiently long period is approximately the same at both spacecraft, the deviations to higher and lower velocities are less at a greater radial distance from the sun.

  19. Radial velocity curves of ellipsoidal red giant binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R. E-mail: peter.wood@anu.edu.au

    2014-12-01

    Ellipsoidal red giant binaries are close binary systems where an unseen, relatively close companion distorts the red giant, leading to light variations as the red giant moves around its orbit. These binaries are likely to be the immediate evolutionary precursors of close binary planetary nebula and post-asymptotic giant branch and post-red giant branch stars. Due to the MACHO and OGLE photometric monitoring projects, the light variability nature of these ellipsoidal variables has been well studied. However, due to the lack of radial velocity curves, the nature of their masses, separations, and other orbital details has so far remained largely unknown. In order to improve this situation, we have carried out spectral monitoring observations of a large sample of 80 ellipsoidal variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud and we have derived radial velocity curves. At least 12 radial velocity points with good quality were obtained for most of the ellipsoidal variables. The radial velocity data are provided with this paper. Combining the photometric and radial velocity data, we present some statistical results related to the binary properties of these ellipsoidal variables.

  20. Transit and radial velocity survey efficiency comparison for a habitable zone Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Christopher J.

    2014-09-01

    Transit and radial velocity searches are two techniques for identifying nearby extrasolar planets to Earth that transit bright stars. Identifying a robust sample of these exoplanets around bright stars for detailed atmospheric characterization is a major observational undertaking. In this study we describe a framework that answers the question of whether a transit or radial velocity survey is more efficient at finding transiting exoplanets given the same amount of observing time. Within the framework we show that a transit survey's window function can be approximated using the hypergeometric probability distribution. We estimate the observing time required for a transit survey to find a transiting Earth-sized exoplanet in the habitable zone (HZ) with an emphasis on late-type stars. We also estimate the radial velocity precision necessary to detect the equivalent HZ Earth-mass exoplanet that also transits when using an equal amount of observing time as the transit survey. We find that a radial velocity survey with σ{sub rv} ∼ 0.6 m s{sup –1} precision has comparable efficiency in terms of observing time to a transit survey with the requisite photometric precision σ{sub phot} ∼ 300 ppm to find a transiting Earth-sized exoplanet in the HZ of late M dwarfs. For super-Earths, a σ{sub rv} ∼ 2.0 m s{sup –1} precision radial velocity survey has comparable efficiency to a transit survey with σ{sub phot} ∼ 2300 ppm.

  1. Long-term radial-velocity variations of the Sun as a star: The HARPS view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.; Molaro, P.; Monaco, L.; Haywood, R. D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Stellar radial velocities play a fundamental role in the discovery of extrasolar planets and the measurement of their physical parameters as well as in the study of stellar physical properties. Aims: We investigate the impact of the solar activity on the radial velocity of the Sun using the HARPS spectrograph to obtain measurements that can be directly compared with those acquired in the extrasolar planet search programmes. Methods: We used the Moon, the Galilean satellites, and several asteroids as reflectors to measure the radial velocity of the Sun as a star and correlated this velocity with disc-integrated chromospheric and magnetic indexes of solar activity that are similar to stellar activity indexes. We discuss in detail the systematic effects that affect our measurements and the methods to account for them. Results: We find that the radial velocity of the Sun as a star is positively correlated with the level of its chromospheric activity at ~95 percent significance level. The amplitude of the long-term variation measured in the 2006-2014 period is 4.98 ± 1.44 m/s, which is in good agreement with model predictions. The standard deviation of the residuals obtained by subtracting a linear best fit is 2.82 m/s and is due to the rotation of the reflecting bodies and the intrinsic variability of the Sun on timescales shorter than the activity cycle. A correlation with a lower significance is detected between the radial velocity and the mean absolute value of the line-of-sight photospheric magnetic field flux density. Conclusions: Our results confirm similar correlations found in other late-type main-sequence stars and provide support to the predictions of radial velocity variations induced by stellar activity based on current models.

  2. RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM VLT-KMOS SPECTRA OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6388

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Valenti, E.; Cirasuolo, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for 82 stars, members of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6388, obtained from ESO-VLT K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) spectra acquired during the instrument Science Verification. The accuracy of the wavelength calibration is discussed and a number of tests of the KMOS response are presented. The cluster systemic velocity obtained (81.3 ± 1.5 km s{sup –1}) is in very good agreement with previous determinations. While a hint of ordered rotation is found between 9'' and 20'' from the cluster center, where the distribution of radial velocities is clearly bimodal, more data are needed before drawing any firm conclusions. The acquired sample of radial velocities has also been used to determine the cluster velocity dispersion (VD) profile between ∼9'' and 70'', supplementing previous measurements at r < 2'' and r > 60'' obtained with ESO-SINFONI and ESO-FLAMES spectroscopy, respectively. The new portion of the VD profile nicely matches the previous ones, better defining the knee of the distribution. The present work clearly shows the effectiveness of a deployable integral field unit in measuring the radial velocities of individual stars for determining the VD profile of Galactic GCs. It represents the pilot project for an ongoing large program with KMOS and FLAMES at the ESO-VLT, aimed at determining the next generation of VD and rotation profiles for a representative sample of GCs.

  3. A Precision Radial Velocity Pathfinder Instrument in the H Band with a Laser Frequency Comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Ryan; Mahadevan, S.; Ramsey, L.; Bender, C.; Redman, S.; Osterman, S.; Diddams, S.; Ycas, G.; Quinlan, F.; Botzer, B.

    2011-01-01

    We describe changes to the warm-bench, fiber-fed, Penn State Pathfinder instrument that enabled us to test the ability to recover precision radial velocities in the H-band. The use of thermal blocking filters that cut off at 1.7 microns allows us to observe in the H-band by blocking the overwhelming thermal flux beyond 2 microns. A PK-50 window provides further suppression of this thermal flux. We also describe the observations, reduction, and results from an August 2010 test run of this instrument with a 25 GHz NIST laser frequency comb calibration system. We obtained radial velocities of several bright stars with on-sky observation with the laser comb. Our results demonstrate the potential of our testbed configuration for obtaining precision radial velocities in the NIR, as well as the utility of laser frequency combs as wavelength calibrators in this wavelength regime.

  4. Open Cluster Radial Velocity determination from observations at Observatório Pico Dos Dias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, M. A. F.; Monteiro, H.; Dias, W. S.; Lépine, J. R. D.

    2014-10-01

    In studies of the dynamics of the Galactic disk, such as the determination of the speed of the spiral pattern and the permanence of stars in the spiral arms, it is crucial to know orbits obtained from proper motions, radial velocities and the potential of the Galaxy. Aiming to improve the statistics of our catalog of open clusters, maintained by our research group, we determined the radial velocity of stars belonging to a group of open clusters using spectra with a resolution of 4000, obtained at the Pico dos Dias Observatory (LNA) with the 1.60 m telescope and the Coudé spectrograph. We observed the open cluster's member stars and calculated their radial speeds using standard techniques. The stars were selected from our own database based on relevant information concerning the clusters, obtained by statistical analysis of their proper motions and/or their position in the HR's diagram. In this work, we present the detailed analysis of the data reduction and radial velocity determination using synthetic spectra from different libraries. Finally we present the open cluster's radial (and spacial) velocities.

  5. The OCCASO survey: presentation and radial velocities of 12 Milky Way open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamiquela, L.; Carrera, R.; Jordi, C.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Pancino, E.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Murabito, S.; del Pino, A.; Aparicio, A.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Gallart, C.

    2016-05-01

    Open clusters (OCs) are crucial for studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, the lack of a large number of OCs analysed homogeneously hampers the investigations about chemical patterns and the existence of Galactocentric radial and vertical gradients, or an age-metallicity relation. To overcome this, we have designed the Open Cluster Chemical Abundances from Spanish Observatories (OCCASO) survey. We aim to provide homogeneous radial velocities, physical parameters and individual chemical abundances of six or more red clump stars for a sample of 25 old and intermediate-age OCs visible from the Northern hemisphere. To do so, we use high-resolution spectroscopic facilities (R ≥ 62 000) available at Spanish observatories. We present the motivation, design and current status of the survey, together with the first data release of radial velocities for 77 stars in 12 OCs, which represents about 50 per cent of the survey. We include clusters never studied with high-resolution spectroscopy before (NGC 1907, NGC 6991, NGC 7762), and clusters in common with other large spectroscopic surveys like the Gaia-ESO Survey (NGC 6705) and Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (NGC 2682 and NGC 6819). We perform internal comparisons between instruments to evaluate and correct internal systematics of the results, and compare our radial velocities with previous determinations in the literature, when available. Finally, radial velocities for each cluster are used to perform a preliminary kinematic study in relation with the Galactic disc.

  6. Frequentist and Bayesian Orbital Parameter Estimaton from Radial Velocity Data Using RVLIN, BOOTTRAN, and RUN DMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Benjamin Earl; Wright, Jason Thomas; Wang, Sharon

    2015-08-01

    For this hack session, we will present three tools used in analyses of radial velocity exoplanet systems. RVLIN is a set of IDL routines used to quickly fit an arbitrary number of Keplerian curves to radial velocity data to find adequate parameter point estimates. BOOTTRAN is an IDL-based extension of RVLIN to provide orbital parameter uncertainties using bootstrap based on a Keplerian model. RUN DMC is a highly parallelized Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm that employs an n-body model, primarily used for dynamically complex or poorly constrained exoplanet systems. We will compare the performance of these tools and their applications to various exoplanet systems.

  7. Radial velocities of blue stragglers in the old open cluster NGC 7789

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drilling, J. S.; Schoenberner, D.

    NGC 7789 is a populous, old galactic cluster with a large number of blue stragglers. In an attempt to determine the stellar parameters of as many of these objects as possible in order to unravel their origin, the brighter blue stragglers of NGC 7789 were observed with the 4-meter echelle spectrograph at Kitt Peak and the 2.2-meter coude spectrograph at Calar Alto. This paper reports on the determination of radial velocities from these high resolution spectra. The results are compared with the previous radial velocity studies of Strom and Strom (1970) and Stryker and Hrivnak (1984).

  8. Radial Velocity Solution for Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars from SDSS APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Joni Marie; Mason, Paul A.; Rawls, Meredith L.; Jackiewicz, Jason; SDSS NMSU FAST

    2016-06-01

    Proper characterization of binary stars is provided by high quality spectra combined with light curves allowing for precise determination of stellar masses, radii, and effective temperatures along with binary semi-major axes and eccentricities. A program to extract radial velocities of Kepler eclipsing binaries observed by SDSS APOGEE is presented. We combine the quality light curves from the Kepler telescope with high precision radial velocity measurements from SDSS APOGEE in order to characterize the binary and stellar components. We report on the first results of this program on three eclipsing binaries, KIC 6864859, KIC 6698670, and KIC 7121885.

  9. A demonstration device to simulate the radial velocity method for exoplanet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choopan, W.; Liewrian, W.; Ketpichainarong, W.; Panijpan, B.

    2016-07-01

    A device for simulating exoplanet detection by the radial method based on the Doppler principle has been constructed. The spectral shift of light from a distant star, mutually revolving with the exoplanet, is simulated by the spectral shift of the sound wave emitted by the device’s star approaching and receding relative to the static frequency detector. The detected sound frequency shift reflects the relative velocity of the ‘star’ very well. Both teachers and students benefit from the radial velocity method and the transit method (published by us previously) provided by this device.

  10. Ground-Based Radial Velocity Measurements of the Secondary Stars in Binary-Cepheid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrow, Michael D.

    2000-05-01

    During the last decade, considerable advances have been made towards the determination of Cepheid dynamical masses in systems where the companion is a B-type main sequence star. (See the series of papers by N. Evans et al. for details.) Such determinations have involved two stages. First, intensive optical spectroscopic observations of the primary Cepheid star are carried out over a number of years to quantify its pulsational and orbital motion. Second, ultraviolet spectroscopic observations from HST (and previously IUE) are used to measure the radial velocity of the hot companion star at key orbital phases. These methods have proven relatively successful, but in a number of the observed systems (e.g. S Mus) the B-star γ -velocity has not matched that of the Cepheid, prompting suspicion of a third body being present in the system and casting doubts over the derived Cepheid mass. Resolution of this problem will only come from a larger program of observations of the secondaries. Through numerical simulations, I will show that in some cases such measurements of the companion-star radial velocities can be made with sufficient precision from the ground, enabling more intensive campaigns than can readily be carried out with HST. The new method requires high-resolution, high-signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy and employs the TODCOR algorithm (Zucker & Mazeh 1994) for simultaneous measurement of the radial velocities of Cepheid and companion. The first measurements of Cepheid-companion radial velocities using this technique will be presented.

  11. A photometric and radial velocity study of six southern Cepheids. I - The data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, I. M.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Gieren, W. P.

    1985-03-01

    New observations of the galactic Cepheids AQ Car (period = 9d.77), XX Cen (10d.95), XY Car (12d.44), TT Aql (13d.75), XX Car (15d.71), and XZ Car (16d.65) are presented. 365 photometric measures in the UBVRIc system and 297 radial velocities are combined with previous data to produce light, color, and velocity curves of almost total phase coverage.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Coralie radial velocities for l Car (Anderson+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. I.; Merand, A.; Kervella, P.; Breitfelder, J.; Lebouquin, J.-B.; Eyer, L.; Gallenne, A.; Palaversa, L.; Semaan, T.; Saesen, S.; Mowlavi, N.

    2016-07-01

    360 radial velocity measurements (RVs) of {ell} Carinae are made publicly available. These RVs were measured using optical spectra observed with the Coralie spectrograph mounted to the 1.2m Swiss Euler telescope situated at La Silla Observatory, Chile. (1 data file).

  13. A Companion Assessment of Equatorial Stars with both Astrometry and Radial Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Cassy; White, R. J.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.; Bailey, J. I.; Cantrell, J. R.; Riedel, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of CAESAR, a Companion Assessment of Equatorial Stars with both Astrometry and Radial velocity, is to determine the frequency of close companions around mid M stars, all the way down to planetary masses. The ensemble sample of 61 stars includes all known mid-M dwarfs (includes M3.5V to M8V) within 10 parsecs that have declinations between +/- 30 degrees without known companions within 2"; here we show results for half of the stars in the survey. We are using CSHELL at NASA's Infaraed Telescope Falicity to obtain high precision infrared radial velocity (RV) measurements to search for planets with short periods, close-in to their parent star. Our radial velocity precision for high signal to noise targets is 50 to 80m/s. As a complement to our radial velocity program, we are using results from the RECONS astrometry program at the CTIO 0.9m to search for more massive planets and brown dwarfs at distances as large as 2 AU from the majority of our stars, which is past the snowline. Our demonstrated astrometric precision is ~ 4 milli-arcseconds per night. The combination of both methods allows us to establish the most complete assessment to date on the companion frequency around these very low mass stars. This effort is supported by the NSF through grant AST-0908402 and by the NSF Graduate Reseach Fellowhip. Observations were made possible by the SMARTS Consortium and by NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility.

  14. PlanetPack: Radial-velocity time-series analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2013-11-01

    PlanetPack facilitates and standardizes the advanced analysis of radial velocity (RV) data for the goal of exoplanets detection, characterization, and basic dynamical N-body simulations. PlanetPack is a command-line interpreter that can run either in an interactive mode or in a batch mode of automatic script interpretation.

  15. Daily variability of Ceres' albedo detected by means of radial velocities changes of the reflected sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.; Lanza, A. F.; Monaco, L.; Tosi, F.; Lo Curto, G.; Fulle, M.; Pasquini, L.

    2016-05-01

    Bright features have been recently discovered by Dawn on Ceres, which extend previous photometric and Space Telescope observations. These features should produce distortions of the line profiles of the reflected solar spectrum and therefore an apparent radial velocity variation modulated by the rotation of the dwarf planet. Here we report on two sequences of observations of Ceres performed in the nights of 2015 July 31, August 26 and 27 by means of the high-precision High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph at the 3.6 m La Silla European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescope. The observations revealed a quite complex behaviour which likely combines a radial velocity modulation due to the rotation with an amplitude of ≈±6 m s-1 and an unexpected diurnal effect. The latter changes imply changes in the albedo of Occator's bright features due to the blaze produced by the exposure to solar radiation. The short-term variability of Ceres' albedo is on time-scales ranging from hours to months and can both be confirmed and followed by means of dedicated radial velocity observations.

  16. A Decade of Radial-Velocity Discoveries in the Exoplanet Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udry, S.; Fischer, D.; Queloz, D.

    Since the detection of a planetary companion orbiting 51 Peg one decade ago, close to 200 extrasolar planets have been unveiled by radial-velocity measurements. They exhibit a wide variety of characteristics, including large masses with small orbital separations, high eccentricities, multiplanet architectures, and orbital period resonances. Here, we discuss the statistical distributions of orbital parameters and host star properties in the context of constraints they provide for planet-formation models. We expect that radial-velocity surveys will continue to provide important discoveries. Thanks to ongoing instrumental developments and improved observing strategies, Neptune-mass planets in short-period orbits have recently been detected. We foresee continued improvement in radial-velocity precision that will reveal Neptune-mass planets in longer-period orbits and planets down to a few Earth masses in short-period orbits. The next decade of Doppler observations should expand the mass distribution function of exoplanets to lower masses. Finally, the role of radial-velocity followup measurements of transit candidates is emphasized.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity monitoring of 5 FGK stars (Endl+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, M.; Brugamyer, E. J.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Robertson, P.; Meschiari, S.; Ramirez, I.; Shetrone, M.; Gullikson, K.; Johnson, M. C.; Wittenmyer, R.; Horner, J.; Ciardi, D. R.; Horch, E.; Simon, A. E.; Howell, S. B.; Everett, M.; Caldwell, C.; Castanheira, B. G.

    2016-04-01

    Our radial velocity (RV) measurements were obtained using the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith Telescope (HJST; R=60000, 3750-10200Å). For HD 95872, we also obtained 10 precise RV measurements using the 10m Keck I and its HIRES spectrograph (R=50000). (6 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of HD 41004A/B (Zucker+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, S.; Mazeh, T.; Santos, N. C.; Udry, S.; Mayor, M.

    2004-07-01

    The table presents 149 measurements of the radial velocities of HD41004A and HD41004B, including the first 103 which had already been published in a previous paper (2003A&A...404..775Z). The spectra used for the derivation were observed with CORALIE and the velocities were derived using Multi-Order TODCOR. The precision of the primary velocity is about 0.010km/s and the precision of the secondary is about 0.60km/s. (1 data file).

  19. A catalog of rotational and radial velocities for evolved stars. V. Southern stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Medeiros, J. R.; Alves, S.; Udry, S.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Mayor, M.

    2014-01-01

    Rotational and radial velocities have been measured for 1589 evolved stars of spectral types F, G, and K and luminosity classes IV, III, II, and Ib, based on observations carried out with the CORAVEL spectrometers. The precision in radial velocity is better than 0.30 km s-1 per observation, whereas rotational velocity uncertainties are typically 1.0 km s-1 for subgiants and giants and 2.0 km s-1 for class II giants and Ib supergiants. Based on observations collected at the Haute-Provence Observatory, Saint-Michel, France, and at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A126

  20. Laser Frequency Comb Supported Stellar Radial Velocity Determination in the NIR: Initial Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Steve; Diddams, S.; Quinlan, F.; Ycas, G.; Mahadevan, S.; Ramsey, L.; Bender, C.; Terrien, R.; Botzer, B.; Redman, S.

    2011-09-01

    The laser frequency comb presents the potential for a revolutionary increase in radial velocity precision by providing a calibration reference of unprecedented quality in terms of wavelength knowledge, repeatability, number, density and regularity of lines. Promising first steps have been taken leading to the derivation of stellar radial velocities in the NIR H band, a wavelength range well suited to the observation of M dwarfs. These stars, with low mass and low luminosity, are the most prevalent class of stars within 10 parsecs and can be expected to yield a higher reflex velocity for a terrestrial mass planet in the liquid water habitable zone than would be the case with a more massive star such as our own. We present the design and both laboratory and on-sky performance of an H-band laser frequency comb used in conjunction with the Penn State Pathfinder testbed spectrograph and discuss lessons learned and plans for follow on testing.

  1. Eclipsing binaries and fast rotators in the Kepler sample. Characterization via radial velocity analysis from Calar Alto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Mancini, L.; Henning, Th.; Figueira, P.; Ciceri, S.; Santos, N.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The Kepler mission has searched for planetary transits in more than two hundred thousand stars by obtaining very accurate photometric data over a long period of time. Among the thousands of detected candidates, the planetary nature of around 15% has been established or validated by different techniques. But additional data are needed to characterize the rest of the candidates and reject other possible configurations. Aims: We started a follow-up program to validate, confirm, and characterize some of the planet candidates. In this paper we present the radial velocity analysis of those that present large variations, which are compatible with being eclipsing binaries. We also study those showing high rotational velocities, which prevents us from reaching the necessary precision to detect planetary-like objects. Methods: We present new radial velocity results for 13 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the Calar Alto Observatory and analyze their high-spatial resolution (lucky) images obtained with AstraLux and the Kepler light curves of some interesting cases. Results: We have found five spectroscopic and eclipsing binaries (group A). Among them, the case of KOI-3853 is of particular interest. This system is a new example of the so-called heartbeat stars, showing dynamic tidal distortions in the Kepler light curve. We have also detected duration and depth variations of the eclipse. We suggest possible scenarios to explain such an effect, including the presence of a third substellar body possibly detected in our radial velocity analysis. We also provide upper mass limits to the transiting companions of six other KOIs with high rotational velocities (group B). This property prevents the radial velocity method from achieving the necessary precision to detect planetary-like masses. Finally, we analyze the large radial velocity variations of two other KOIs, which are incompatible with the presence of planetary-mass objects

  2. Radial velocities for the HIPPARCOS-Gaia Hundred-Thousand-Proper-Motion project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Eilers, A.-C.

    2012-10-01

    Context. The Hundred-Thousand-Proper-Motion (HTPM) project will determine the proper motions of ~113 500 stars using a ~23-year baseline. The proper motions will be based on space-based measurements exclusively, with the Hipparcos data, with epoch 1991.25, as first epoch and with the first intermediate-release Gaia astrometry, with epoch ~2014.5, as second epoch. The expected HTPM proper-motion standard errors are 30-190 μas yr-1, depending on stellar magnitude. Aims: Depending on the astrometric characteristics of an object, in particular its distance and velocity, its radial velocity can have a significant impact on the determination of its proper motion. The impact of this perspective acceleration is largest for fast-moving, nearby stars. Our goal is to determine, for each star in the Hipparcos catalogue, the radial-velocity standard error that is required to guarantee a negligible contribution of perspective acceleration to the HTPM proper-motion precision. Methods: We employ two evaluation criteria, both based on Monte-Carlo simulations, with which we determine which stars need to be spectroscopically (re-)measured. Both criteria take the Hipparcos measurement errors into account. The first criterion, the Gaussian criterion, is applicable to nearby stars. For distant stars, this criterion works but returns overly pessimistic results. We therefore use a second criterion, the robust criterion, which is equivalent to the Gaussian criterion for nearby stars but avoids biases for distant stars and/or objects without literature radial velocity. The robust criterion is hence our prefered choice for all stars, regardless of distance. Results: For each star in the Hipparcos catalogue, we determine the confidence level with which the available radial velocity and its standard error, taken from the XHIP compilation catalogue, are acceptable. We find that for 97 stars, the radial velocities available in the literature are insufficiently precise for a 68.27% confidence

  3. RADIAL VELOCITY ALONG THE VOYAGER 1 TRAJECTORY: THE EFFECT OF SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Borovikov, S. N.; Burlaga, L. F.; Decker, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2012-05-01

    As Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are approaching the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the solar wind (SW) and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-we expect new, unknown features of the heliospheric interface to be revealed. A seeming puzzle reported recently by Krimigis et al. concerns the unusually low, even negative, radial velocity components derived from the energetic ion distribution. Steady-state plasma models of the inner heliosheath (IHS) show that the radial velocity should not be equal to zero even at the surface of the HP. Here we demonstrate that the velocity distributions observed by Voyager 1 are consistent with time-dependent simulations of the SW-LISM interaction. In this Letter, we analyze the results from a numerical model of the large-scale heliosphere that includes solar cycle effects. Our simulations show that prolonged periods of low to negative radial velocity can exist in the IHS at substantial distances from the HP. It is also shown that Voyager 1 was more likely to observe such regions than Voyager 2.

  4. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING STELLAR RADIAL VELOCITY JITTER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH: THE SUN AS A PROXY

    SciTech Connect

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.edu E-mail: lwr@psu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  5. Toward Understanding Stellar Radial Velocity Jitter as a Function of Wavelength: The Sun as a Proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  6. Estimating vertical velocity and radial flow from Doppler radar observations of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. L.; Lee, W. C.; MacDonald, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    The mesoscale vorticity method (MVM) is used in conjunction with the ground-based velocity track display (GBVTD) to derive the inner-core vertical velocity from Doppler radar observations of tropical cyclone (TC) Danny (1997). MVM derives the vertical velocity from vorticity variations in space and in time based on the mesoscale vorticity equation. The use of MVM and GBVTD allows us to derive good correlations among the eye-wall maximum wind, bow-shaped updraught and echo east of the eye-wall in Danny. Furthermore, we demonstrate the dynamically consistent radial flow can be derived from the vertical velocity obtained from MVM using the wind decomposition technique that solves the Poisson equations over a limited-area domain. With the wind decomposition, we combine the rotational wind which is obtained from Doppler radar wind observations and the divergent wind which is inferred dynamically from the rotational wind to form the balanced horizontal wind in TC inner cores, where rotational wind dominates the divergent wind. In this study, we show a realistic horizontal and vertical structure of the vertical velocity and the induced radial flow in Danny's inner core. In the horizontal, the main eye-wall updraught draws in significant surrounding air, converging at the strongest echo where the maximum updraught is located. In the vertical, the main updraught tilts vertically outwards, corresponding very well with the outward-tilting eye-wall. The maximum updraught is located at the inner edge of the eye-wall clouds, while downward motions are found at the outer edge. This study demonstrates that the mesoscale vorticity method can use high-temporal-resolution data observed by Doppler radars to derive realistic vertical velocity and the radial flow of TCs. The vorticity temporal variations crucial to the accuracy of the vorticity method have to be derived from a high-temporal-frequency observing system such as state-of-the-art Doppler radars.

  7. Disentangling planetary orbits from stellar activity in radial-velocity surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, R. D.; Cameron, A. Collier; Queloz, D.; Barros, S. C. C.; Deleuil, M.; Fares, R.; Gillon, M.; Hatzes, A.; Lanza, A. F.; Lovis, C.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Santerne, A.; Ségransan, D.; Unruh, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The majority of extra-solar planets have been discovered (or confirmed after follow-up) through radial-velocity (RV) surveys. Using ground-based spectrographs such as High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planetary Search (HARPS) and HARPS-North, it is now possible to detect planets that are only a few times the mass of the Earth. However, the presence of dark spots on the stellar surface produces RV signals that are very similar in amplitude to those caused by orbiting low-mass planets. Disentangling these signals has thus become the biggest challenge in the detection of Earth-mass planets using RV surveys. To do so, we use the star's lightcurve to model the RV variations produced by spots. Here we present this method and show the results of its application to CoRoT-7.

  8. CARMENES: A New Visible/Near-IR Radial-Velocity Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Carmenes Consortium

    2016-07-01

    CARMENES is a next-generation radial-velocity instrument that has been constructed for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of eleven Spanish and German institutions. It consists of two separate échelle spectrographs covering the wavelength range from 0.55 to 1.7μm at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000, fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. CARMENES saw "First Light" on Nov 9, 2015. We report on results from the commissioning and the first months of operation, and discuss the plans for the large M dwarf survey that is the core science program of CARMENES. With a bit of luck, CARMENES may find a few planets that are very well suited for characterization by JWST. In the longer run, CARMENES will be an excellent instrument for radial-velocity follow-up of transit survey missions such as TESS and PLATO.

  9. Radial Velocity and Light Curves Analysis of the Contact Binary V839 Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazhouhesh, R.; Edalati, M. T.

    2003-09-01

    Complete UBV light curves of the W Ursae Majoris binary V839 Oph obtained in the year 2000 are presented. The available spectroscopic data of V839 Oph is new and we used the first radial velocity data of this system obtained by Rucinski and Lu (1999) for analysis. The radial velocity and light curves analysis was made with the latest version of Wilson programme (1998) and the geometric and physical elements of the system are derived. By searching the simultaneous solutions of the system we have determined the masses and radii of the components: 1.61Msolar and 1.49402Rsolar for the primary component; 0.50Msolar and 0.90147Rsolar for the secondary component. We estimated effective temperatures of 6650+/-18 (K) for the primary and 6554+/-15 (K) for the secondary component.

  10. Optimal planning of radial velocity observations for multi-planet extrasolar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, R. V.

    2010-04-01

    Applications of the theory of the optimal design of radial-velocity planet-search surveys are discussed. Two important practical problems are considered. The first problem is finding the time for future observations to yield the maximum improvement of the accuracy of exoplanetary orbital parameters and masses. In this case, the optimal scheduling rules are designed to maximize the determinant of the Fisher information matrix (the so-called D-optimality criterion). This method is asymptotically equivalent to the maximization of the expected gain of the Shannon information provided by making extra observations. The second problem is finding the most favourable observing time for distinguishing alternative orbital fits (the design of discriminating experiments). In this case, the optimal scheduling rules are designed to maximize the Kullback-Leibler divergence information. We also consider the potential efficiency of these methods of optimal planning of radial velocity observations for multi-planet systems.

  11. First Stellar Radial Velocities with a Laser Frequency Comb: Observations in the NIR H Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Steve; Diddams, S.; Quinlan, F.; Ycas, G.; Mahadevan, S.; Ramsey, L.; Bender, C.; Redman, S.; Terrien, R.; Botzer, B.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in high precision radial velocity spectroscopy have been hindered by the lack of suitable wavelength references. This has been especially the case in the infrared where until recently radial velocity precision has been limited to 50-100m/s, hindering investigations such as the search for extrasolar planets orbiting cooler M stars at these wavelengths. To redress deficiency this we have developed a 25GHz laser frequency comb spanning the H band and suitable for use with spectrographs with spectral resolution in the range of 40,000 - 60,000, with RV precision limited by instrument stability and object S/N rather than by the lack of a suitable wavelength standard. We will present CU/NIST frequency comb performance and results obtained using the Pennsylvania State University's Pathfinder Spectrograph on the Hobby Eberly Telescope and will discuss lessons learned.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity and photometry in NGC 4372 (Kacharov+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present the radial velocities of 220 stars in the field of the globular cluster NGC 4372 measured from high resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra. We have confirm 131 cluster member stars from radial velocity and metallicity constraints. The rest are foreground contaminants. We also present a BVI photometric catalogue in a field of view covering 30x30arcmin, centred on NGC 4372. We used archival imaging obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at the 2.2m MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla. We used the 2MASS point source catalog as astrometric reference. Photometric zero points were fixed to standard stars in the same field from the standard star database of Stetson (2000PASP..112..925S, 2005PASP..117..563S). We have estimated individual reddening for each star in the catalogue. (2 data files).

  13. Origins of Solar Systems: Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise To Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven

    2002-01-01

    We have continued the super high resolution (R is approximately 200,000), high S/N ((greater than) 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D (two dimensional) coude. Observing runs in October 2000 and March 2001 were plagued by poor weather, but runs in June and October 2001 were good. We have made a preliminary analysis of the limited data in hand, and find some tantalizing evidence for correlations between median line bisector displacement and radial velocity v (sub r). The correlation appears to be specific to the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity curves of LMC ellipsoidal variables (Nie+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R.

    2014-11-01

    We initially selected 86 sequence E candidates from those given in Soszynski et al. 2004 (cat. J/AcA/54/347). The radial velocity observations were taken using the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) mounted on the Australian National University 2.3m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory. WiFes has six gratings. For our observations, the gratings B7000 (wavelength coverage of 4184-5580Å) and I7000 (wavelength coverage of 6832-9120Å) were chosen for the blue and red CCD, respectively. These two gratings give a two-pixel resolution R=7000. We carried out 18 weeks of radial velocity monitoring, from 2010 September to 2012 March. (2 data files).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of HD 6434 (Hinkel+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, N. R.; Kane, S. R.; Pilyavsky, G.; Boyajian, T. S.; James, D. J.; Naef, D.; Fischer, D. A.; Udry, S.

    2016-04-01

    Previous radial velocity observations of HD6434 (Mayor et al. 2004, cat. J/A+A/415/391) were undertaken with the CORALIE spectrometer mounted on the 1.2m Euler Swiss telescope at La Silla. Those observations were conducted as part of the CORALIE exoplanet search program (Udry et al. 2000, cat. J/A+A/356/590). We continued to monitor HD6434 using CORALIE to improve the Keplerian orbital solution and provide an accurate transit ephemeris. The complete data set of 137 measurements is shown in Table2 including previously acquired measurements and 59 new measurements. These new measurements extend the overall time baseline for the radial velocity observations by a factor of ~3.6, for a total baseline of ~15 years. (1 data file).

  16. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  17. Radial velocity measurements of a sample of northern metal-deficient stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasniewicz, G.; Mayor, M.

    1988-09-01

    Observations of 41 northern stars with Fe/H between -1.1 and -0.3, obtained with the Coravel radial-velocity scanner on the 1-m Swiss telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence during 1977-1986, are reported. The data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Seven stars are identified as spectroscopic binaries, and their distribution as a function of period is shown to be similar to that for a sample of metal-rich G stars. The present radial velocities are found to be in relatively good agreement with those of Carney and Latham (1987), but not with those of Stryker et al. (1985).

  18. Long-Term Radial Velocity Monitoring of the HeI 6678 Line of zeta Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, E.

    2016-06-01

    With our investigation period of approximately 15 years we have been able to calculate a new long-term period of the HeI 6678 radial velocity (RV) of the binary system zeta Tau. Such a long investigation period was possible because we were able to combine RV data from Ruzdjak et al. (2009) with our own data of the ARAS group (http://www.astrosurf.com/aras/).

  19. ELODIE & SOPHIE spectrographs: 20 years of continuous improvements in radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchy, F.

    2015-10-01

    From the first light of ELODIE spectrograph in 1993 up to the recent upgrade of SOPHIE, the radial-velocity precision was improved by an order of magnitude. The different steps of instrumental refinement are described and their impact on the detection and characterization of giant exoplanets are highlighted. Synergies of these two instruments with other detection technics like photometric transit and astrometry are presented with a special focus on the incoming space missions GAIA, CHEOPS, TESS and PLATO.

  20. Revised [Fe/H] and Radial Velocities for 28 Distant RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, J. R.; Saha, A.; Kinman, T. D.

    2003-10-01

    New abundances ([Fe/H] and radial velocities are given for 28 RR Lyrae stars discovered by Kinman, Mahaffey and Wirtanen (1982) and by Saha (1984). The stars were observed with the IIDS scanner on the KPNO 2.1-m telescope. The scans were calibrated by observing 18 nearby RR Lyrae stars whose [Fe/H] have been given by Suntzeff et al. (1991).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HU Vir radial velocities and VI light curves (Harutyunyan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Kuenstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.; Weber, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present two tables with the new STELLA radial velocity data set and the APT Johnson-Cousins V and I photometric data set for HU Virginis. RVs from STELLA-SES spectra were derived from an order-by-order cross correlation with a synthetic template spectrum and then averaged. The photometric measurements were always made differentially with respect to HD 106270 and HD 106332 as a comparison and check star, respectively. (2 data files).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity curve of V440 Per (Baranowski+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, R.; Smolec, R.; Dimitrov, W.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Bartczak, P.; Fagas, M.; Borczyk, W.; Kaminski, K.; Moskalik, P.; Ratajczak, R.; Rozek, A.

    2009-11-01

    The PST is located in Poland at the Borowiec station, 20km south from Poznan city, at a meagre elevation of 123m above sea level. The PST consists of parallel twin 0.4-m Newton telescopes of the f ratio 4.5, fixed on a single parallactic fork mount. In total 158 radial velocity measurements of V440 Per were obtained with the PST from 2007 August 15 to 2008 July 03. (1 data file).

  3. Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David M. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We have made significant progress towards the proposal goals of understanding the causes and effects of magnetic activity-induced radial velocity (v_r) jitter and developing methods for correcting it. In the process, we have also made some significant discoveries in the fields of planet-induced stellar activity, planet detection methods, M dwarf convection, starspot properties, and magnetic dynamo cycles. We have obtained super high resolution (R approximately 200,000), high S / N (greater than 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 in particular was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., kappa Ceti; P_cyc = 5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and radial velocity (v-r) changes which we have uncovered. Preliminary analysis (Saar et al. 2003) of the data in hand, reveals correlations between median line bisector displacement and v_r. The correlation appears to be specific the the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Further analysis and interpretation will be in the context of evolving plage models and is in progress.

  4. AN AFFINE-INVARIANT SAMPLER FOR EXOPLANET FITTING AND DISCOVERY IN RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Fengji; Hogg, David W.; Goodman, Jonathan; Weare, Jonathan; Schwab, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the nonlinear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. This new sampler has only one free parameter, and does not require much tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. This novel sampler would be ideal for projects involving large data sets such as statistical investigations of planet distribution. The biggest obstacle to ensemble samplers is the existence of multiple local optima; we present a clustering technique to deal with local optima by clustering based on the likelihood of the walkers in the ensemble. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampler on real radial velocity data.

  5. Miniature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) I. Design, Commissioning, and First Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Jonathan J.; Bottom, Michael; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.; McCrady, Nate; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Plavchan, Peter; Riddle, Reed; Muirhead, Philip S.; Herzig, Erich; Myles, Justin; Blake, Cullen H.; Eastman, Jason; Beatty, Thomas G.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Gibson, Steven R.; Lin, Brian; Zhao, Ming; Gardner, Paul; Falco, Emilio; Criswell, Stephen; Nava, Chantanelle; Robinson, Connor; Sliski, David H.; Hedrick, Richard; Ivarsen, Kevin; Hjelstrom, Annie; de Vera, Jon; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The Miniature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) is a U.S.-based observational facility dedicated to the discovery and characterization of exoplanets around a nearby sample of bright stars. MINERVA employs a robotic array of four 0.7-m telescopes outfitted for both high-resolution spectroscopy and photometry, and is designed for completely autonomous operation. The primary science program is a dedicated radial velocity survey and the secondary science objective is to obtain high-precision transit light curves. The modular design of the facility and the flexibility of our hardware allows for both science programs to be pursued simultaneously, while the robotic control software provides a robust and efficient means to carry out nightly observations. We describe the design of MINERVA, including major hardware components, software, and science goals. The telescopes and photometry cameras are characterized at our test facility on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, California, and their on-sky performance is validated. The design and simulated performance of the spectrograph is briefly discussed as we await its completion. New observations from our test facility demonstrate sub-mmag photometric precision of one of our radial velocity survey targets, and we present new transit observations and fits of WASP-52b-a known hot-Jupiter with an inflated radius and misaligned orbit. The process of relocating the MINERVA hardware to its final destination at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona has begun, and science operations are expected to commence in 2015.

  6. Radial-velocity observations of pulsating stars with a new Poznan Spectroscopic Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrow, W.

    2008-12-01

    We present results of radial velocity measurements of classical cepheids, δ Scuti and β Cephei stars. The spectra were obtained with Poznan Spectroscopic Telescope (PST). The telescope has been operating since August 2007. The PST is equipped with two 40cm diameter mirrors of Newtonian focus, connected by an optic fiber with an echelle spectrograph. The PSTs design aimed at the best cooperation with the spectrograph as well as limiting light looses. It allows us to measure radial velocity of stars as faint as 11.5 magnitudes. The peltier-liquid cooled CCD camera covers 64 echelle orders with spectral range from 4480 to 9250˚A. The dispersion of the obtained radial velocity measurements is on the level of 150 m/s. Echelle spectra reduction and RV measu- rements are performed with Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF). We have achived sufficient phase coverage for 28 And, γ Peg, Polaris and V440 Per. Further data acquirement for other pulsating stars is currently held.

  7. Radial velocities of stars in the globular cluster M4 and the cluster distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. C.; Rees, Richard F.; Cudworth, Kyle M.

    1995-01-01

    The internal stellar velocity distribution of the globular cluster M4 is evaluated from nearly 200 new radial velocity measurements good to 1 km/s and a rederivation of existing proper motions. The mean radial velocity of the cluster is 70.9 +/- 0.6 km/s. The velocity dispersion is 3.5 +/- 0.3 km/s at the core, dropping marginally towards the outskirts. Such a low internal dispersion is somewhat at odds with the cluster's orbit, for which the perigalacticon is sufficiently close to the galactic center that the probability of cluster disruption is high; a tidal radius two-thirds the currently accepted value would eliminate the discrepancy. The cluster mass-to-light ratio is also small, M/L(sub V) = 1.0 +/- 0.4 in solar units. M4 thus joins M22 as a cluster of moderate and concentration with a mass-to-light ratio among the lowest known. The astrometric distance to the cluster is also smaller than expected, 1.72 +/- 0.14 kpc. This is only consistent with conventional estimates of the luminosity of horizontal branch stars provided an extinction law R = A(sub V)/E(B-V) approximately 4 is adopted, as has been suggested recently by several authors.

  8. The first high-precision radial velocity search for extra-solar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gordon A. H.

    2012-01-01

    The reflex motion of a star induced by a planetary companion is too small to detect by photographic astrometry. The apparent discovery in the 1960s of planetary systems around certain nearby stars, in particular Barnard's star, turned out to be spurious. Conventional stellar radial velocities determined from photographic spectra at that time were also too inaccurate to detect the expected reflex velocity changes. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the introduction of solid-state, signal-generating detectors and absorption cells to impose wavelength fiducials directly on the starlight, reduced radial velocity errors to the point where such a search became feasible. Beginning in 1980, our team from UBC introduced an absorption cell of hydrogen fluoride gas in front of the CFHT coudé spectrograph and, for 12 years, monitored the radial velocities of some 29 solar-type stars. Since it was assumed that extra-solar planets would most likely resemble Jupiter in mass and orbit, we were awarded only three or four two-night observing runs each year. Our survey highlighted three potential planet hosting stars, γ Cep (K1 IV), β Gem (K0 III), and ɛ Eri (K2 V). The putative planets all resembled Jovian systems with periods and masses of: 2.5 years and 1.4 MJ, 1.6 years and 2.6 MJ, and 6.9 years and 0.9 MJ, respectively. All three were subsequently confirmed from more extensive data by the Texas group led by Cochran and Hatzes who also derived the currently accepted orbital elements. None of these three systems is simple. All five giant stars and the supergiant in our survey proved to be intrinsic velocity variables. When we first drew attention to a possible planetary companion to γ Cep in 1988 it was classified as a giant, and there was the possibility that its radial velocity variations and those of β Gem (K0 III) were intrinsic to the stars. A further complication for γ Cep was the presence of an unseen secondary star in an orbit with a period initially estimated at

  9. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC O-TYPE STARS. II. SINGLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R.; Hillwig, T. C.; McSwain, M. V.; Huang, W. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: mcswain@lehigh.edu

    2013-02-01

    We report on new radial velocity measurements of massive stars that are either suspected binaries or lacking prior observations. This is part of a survey to identify and characterize spectroscopic binaries among O-type stars with the goal of comparing the binary fraction of field and runaway stars with those in clusters and associations. We present orbits for HDE 308813, HD 152147, HD 164536, BD-16 Degree-Sign 4826, and HDE 229232, Galactic O-type stars exhibiting single-lined spectroscopic variation. By fitting model spectra to our observed spectra, we obtain estimates for effective temperature, surface gravity, and rotational velocity. We compute orbital periods and velocity semiamplitudes for each system and note the lack of photometric variation for any system. These binaries probably appear single-lined because the companions are faint and because their orbital Doppler shifts are small compared to the width of the rotationally broadened lines of the primary.

  10. Radial velocity studies and absolute parameters of contact binaries. I - AB Andromedae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    1988-01-01

    New radial velocity curves have been obtained for the contact binary AB And, using the cross-correlation technique. A mass ratio of 0.479 is determined, which is revised to 0.491 when the velocities are corrected for proximity effects using a light curve model. These values differ by less than ten percent from the photometric mass ratio. An analysis of the symmetric B and V light curves reported by Rigterink in 1973 using the spectroscopic mass ratio yields a consistent set of light and velocity curve elements. These also produce a reasonably good fit to the infrared J and K light curves reported by Jameson and Akinci in 1979. Absolute elements are determined, and these indicate that both components have a main-sequence internal structure. These absolute parameters, together with the Galactic kinematics, suggest an age for the system similar to or greater than that of the Sun.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 7 cataclysmic binaries (Halpern+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Thorstensen, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    Our instrumentation, and reduction and analysis procedures are essentially identical to those described in Paper I (Thorstensen et al. 2013, cat. J/AJ/146/107). All of our optical data are from the MDM Observatory (http://mdm.kpno.noao.edu/index/Instrumentation.html), which comprises the 1.3m McGraw-Hill telescope and the 2.4m Hiltner telescope, both on the southwest ridge of Kitt Peak, Arizona. With a single exception, the radial velocity studies to search for the orbital periods were done on the 2.4m, while high-cadence photometry sensitive to spin periods was carried out on the 1.3m. All of our radial velocity studies used the modular spectrograph, as described in Paper I (Thorstensen et al. 2013, cat. J/AJ/146/107). Most of our velocities are from the the 2.4m telescope. Some spectra of Swift J2124.6+0500, and all the data we used for Swift J0939.7-3224, are from the McGraw-Hill 1.3m telescope, again with the modular spectrograph. For four newly identified objects we have only single spectra that were obtained on two observing runs on the 2.4m. These used the Boller and Chivens CCD spectrograph (CCDS) and the Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph (OSMOS). Descriptions of these instruments can be found on the MDM Observatory web page (http://mdm.kpno.noao.edu/index/Instrumentation.html). The objects observed are listed in Table1. Table2 lists the radial velocity data, and Table3 gives parameters of the best-fit sinusoids. (3 data files).

  12. Velocity measurements inside a rotating cylindrical cavity with a radial outflow of fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, J. M.; Pincombe, J. R.

    1980-07-01

    Flow visualization and laser-Doppler anemometry have been used to determine the flow structure and measure the velocity distribution inside a rotating cylindrical cavity with an outer to inner radius ratio of 10, and an axial spacing to inner radius ratio of 2.67. A flow structure comprising an inner layer, Ekman layers, an outer layer and an interior potential core has been confirmed for the cases where the inlet air enters the cavity either axially, through a central hole, or radially, through a central gauze tube; and leaves radially through a series of holes in the peripheral shroud. Velocity measurements in the laminar Ekman layers agree well with the 'modified linear theory', and long- and short-wavelength disturbances (which have been reported by other experimenters) have been observed on the Ekman layers when the radial Reynolds number exceeds a critical value. The phenomenon of reverse flow in the Ekman layers and the possibility of ingress of external fluid through the holes in the shroud have also been observed.

  13. The catalogue of radial velocity standard stars for Gaia. I. Pre-launch release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, C.; Jasniewicz, G.; Chemin, L.; Crifo, F.; Udry, S.; Hestroffer, D.; Katz, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Radial Velocity Spectrograph (RVS) on board Gaia needs to be calibrated using stable reference stars known in advance. The catalogue presented here was built for that purpose. It includes 1420 radial velocity standard star candidates selected on strict criteria to fulfil the Gaia-RVS requirements. A large programme of ground-based observations has been underway since 2006 to monitor these stars and verify their stability, which has to be better than 300 m s-1 over several years. The observations were done on the echelle spectrographs ELODIE and SOPHIE on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), NARVAL on the Télescope Bernard Lyot at Observatoire du Pic du Midi and CORALIE on the Euler-Swiss Telescope at La Silla. Data from the OHP and Geneva Observatory archives have also been retrieved as have HARPS spectra from the ESO archive. We provide a mean radial velocity in the SOPHIE scale for each star, derived from the combination of velocities measured with those instruments, after having carefully estimated their differences in zero points. In total, 10214 radial velocity measurements have been obtained for the 1420 stars. With a mean time baseline of 6.35 years, 92.9% of the candidates fulfil a target stability criterion of 300 m s-1. Three hundred forty-three stars are found to be constant at the level of 100 m s-1 over 10 years. Comparisons with earlier catalogues show excellent agreement for FGK stars, with zero-point differences lower than 100 m s-1 and a remarkably low rms scatter of 33 m s-1 in one case, suggesting that the precision of the catalogue presented here is better than this value. This catalogue will likely be useful for other large-scale spectroscopic surveys, such as APOGEE, Gaia-ESO, HERMES, and LAMOST. Based on data obtained within the Gaia DPAC (Data Processing and Analysis Consortium) and coordinated by the GBOG (Ground-Based Observations for Gaia) working group, at various telescopes; see abstract.Full Tables 3 and 4

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Aldebaran radial velocity variations (Hatzes+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Guenther, E. W.; MacQueen, P.; Hartmann, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Han, I.; Lee, B.-C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Yang, S.; Larson, A. M.; Kim, K.-M.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Dollinger, M.; Simon, A. E.; Girardi, L.

    2015-07-01

    Seven independent data sets of high precision radial velocity data were used for our analysis. Precise RV measurements were also made with a Hydrogen-Fluoride (H-F) cell as part of the CFHT survey (hereafter the "CFHT" data set) of Walker et al. (1989ApJ...343L..21W) as well as additional measurements from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (hereafter "DAO" data set) using the same technique. See Campbell & Walker (1979PASP...91..540C) and Larson et al. (1993PASP..105..825L) for a description of the H-F measurements. For the remaining five RV data sets an iodine (I2) cell provided the wave- length reference. These include the original measurements using the McDonald Observatory 2.1m telescope (here-after "McD-2.1m" data set) and the coude spectrograph in the so-called "cs11" focus (hereafter "McD-CS11" data set) of the 2.7m telescope at McDonald Observatory. We should note that the we did not include the McDonald data that were used for the bisector measurements of Hatzes & Cochran (1998MNRAS.293..469H). These were taken using telluric lines as a wavelength reference which had a lower precision than the iodine wavelength calibration or H-F methods. The latest McDonald measurements were taken using the Tull Spectrograph at the so-called "cs23" focus (here-after the "McD-Tull" data set) as part of a long-term planet search program (e.g. Cochran et al., 1997ApJ...483..457C; Endl et al., 2004ApJ...611.1121E; Robertson et al., 2012ApJ...749...39R). (7 data files).

  15. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study. PMID:24822441

  16. Stellar radial velocities using a laser frequency comb: Application and observations in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Steve

    2011-04-01

    The laser frequency comb presents the potential for a revolutionary increase in radial velocity precision by providing a calibration reference of unprecedented quality in terms of wavelength knowledge, repeatability, number, density, and regularity of lines. However, implementation has proven challenging, particularly in the near infrared. Nevertheless, with the right combination of comb and instrument, promising first steps have been taken, allowing for the derivation of stellar radial velocities in a wavelength range which is well suited to the observation of M dwarfs. These stars, with low mass and low luminosity, are the most prevalent class of stars within 10 parsecs and can be expected to yield a higher reflex velocity for a terrestrial mass planet in the liquid water habitable zone than would be the case with a more massive star such as our own. We present the design and both laboratory and on-sky performance of an H-band laser frequency comb used in conjunction with the Penn State Pathfinder testbed spectrograph and discuss lessons learned and plans for follow on testing with both the Pathfinder and the CSHELL instruments.

  17. A high-precision radial-velocity survey for other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.; Hatzes, Artie P.

    1994-01-01

    The precise measurement of variations in stellar radial velocities provides one of several promising methods of surveying a large sample of nearby solar type stars to detect planetary systems in orbit around them. The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) was started in 1987 September with the goal of detecting other nearby planetary systems. A stabilized I2 gas absorption cell placed in front of the entrance slit to the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m telescope coude spectrograph serves as the velocity metric. With this I2 cell we can achieve radial velocity measurement precision better than 10 m/s in an individual measurement. At this level we can detect a Jupiter-like planet around a solar-type star, and have some hope of detecting Saturn-like planets in a long-term survey. The detectability of planets is ultimately limited by stellar pulsation modes and photospheric motions. Monthly MOPS observing runs allow us to obtain at least 5 independent observations per year of the 33 solar-type (F5-K7) stars on our observing list. We present representative results from the first five years of the survey.

  18. Relativistic Velocity Addition Law from Machine Gun Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Popescu, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Many derivations of the relativistic addition law of parallel velocities without use of the Lorentz transformations (LT) are known.1-5 Some of them are based on thought experiments that require knowledge of the time dilation and the length contraction effects.1,4,5 Other derivations involve the Doppler effect in the optic domain considered from three inertial reference frames in relative motion.6 A few derivations simply involve only the principle of constancy of the light velocity.2 Such derivations are interesting for the teaching of special relativity theory since the relativistic addition of velocities leads directly to the LT.7 The derivation we propose is based on a machine gun-target analogy8 of the acoustic Doppler effect, considered from the rest frame of the machine gun and from the rest frame of the target.

  19. Hide and Seek: Radial-Velocity Searches for Planets around Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Raphaëlle Dawn

    2015-11-01

    The detection of low-mass extra-solar planets through radial-velocity searches is currently limited by the intrinsic magnetic activity of the host stars. The correlated noise that arises from their natural radial-velocity variability can easily mimic or conceal the orbital signals of super-Earth and Earth-mass extra-solar planets. I developed an intuitive and robust data analysis framework in which the activity-induced variations are modelled with a Gaussian process that has the frequency structure of the photometric variations of the star, thus allowing me to determine precise and reliable planetary masses. I applied this technique to three recently discovered planetary systems: CoRoT-7, Kepler-78 and Kepler-10. I determined the masses of the transiting super-Earth CoRoT-7b and the small Neptune CoRoT-7c to be 4.73 ± 0.95 M⊕ and 13.56 ± 1.08 M⊕, respectively. The density of CoRoT-7b is 6.61 ± 1.72 g.cm-3, which is compatible with a rocky composition. I carried out Bayesian model selection to assess the nature of a previously identified signal at 9 days, and found that it is best interpreted as stellar activity. Despite the high levels of activity of its host star, I determined the mass of the Earth-sized planet Kepler-78b to be 1.76 ± 0.18 M⊕. With a density of 6.2(+1.8:-1.4) g.cm-3, it is also a rocky planet. I found the masses of Kepler-10b and Kepler-10c to be 3.31 ± 0.32 M⊕ and 16.25 ± 3.66 M⊕, respectively. Their densities, of 6.4(+1.1:-0.7) g.cm-3 and 8.1 ± 1.8 g.cm-3, imply that they are both of rocky composition - even the 2 Earth-radius planet Kepler-10c! In parallel, I deepened our understanding of the physical origin of stellar radial-velocity variability through the study of the Sun, which is the only star whose surface can be imaged at high resolution. I found that the full-disc magnetic flux is an excellent proxy for activity-induced radial-velocity variations; this result may become key to breaking the activity barrier in coming

  20. The Radial Variation of H I Velocity Dispersions in Dwarfs and Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianjamasimanana, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, Fabian; Heald, George H.; Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Jarrett, Thomas H.

    2015-08-01

    Gas velocity dispersions provide important diagnostics of the forces counteracting gravity to prevent collapse of the gas. We use the 21 cm line of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) to study H i velocity dispersion ({σ }{{H} {{I}}}) and H i phases as a function of galaxy morphology in 22 galaxies from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We stack individual H i velocity profiles and decompose them into broad and narrow Gaussian components. We study the H i velocity dispersion and the H i surface density, {{{Σ }}}{{H} {{I}}}, as a function of radius. For spirals, the velocity dispersions of the narrow and broad components decline with radius and their radial profiles are well described by an exponential function. For dwarfs, however, the profiles are much flatter. The single Gaussian dispersion profiles are, in general, flatter than those of the narrow and broad components. In most cases, the dispersion profiles in the outer disks do not drop as fast as the star formation profiles derived in the literature. This indicates the importance of other energy sources in driving {σ }{{H} {{I}}} in the outer disks. The radial surface density profiles of spirals and dwarfs are similar. The surface density profiles of the narrow component decline more steeply than those of the broad component, but not as steep as what was found previously for the molecular component. As a consequence, the surface density ratio between the narrow and broad components, an estimate of the mass ratio between cold H i and warm H i, tends to decrease with radius. On average, this ratio is lower in dwarfs than in spirals. This lack of a narrow, cold H i component in dwarfs may explain their low star formation activity.

  1. A RADIAL VELOCITY AND CALCIUM TRIPLET ABUNDANCE SURVEY OF FIELD SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, Roberto; Rich, R. Michael; Mallery, Ryan C.; Howard, Christian D.

    2010-05-10

    We present the results of a pilot wide-field radial velocity and metal abundance survey of red giants in 10 fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The targets lie at projected distances of 0.9 and 1.9 kpc from the SMC center (m - M = 18.79) to the north, east, south, and west. Two more fields are to the east at distances of 3.9 and 5.1 kpc. In this last field, we find only a few to no SMC giants, suggesting that the edge of the SMC in this direction lies approximately at 6 kpc from its center. In all eastern fields, we observe a double peak in the radial velocities of stars, with a component at the classical SMC recession velocity of {approx}160 km s{sup -1} and a high-velocity component at about 200 km s{sup -1}, similar to observations in H I. In the most distant field (3.9 kpc), the low-velocity component is at 106 km s{sup -1}. The metal abundance distribution in all fields is broad and centered at about [Fe/H] {approx}-1.25, reaching to solar and possibly slightly supersolar values and down to [Fe/H] of about -2.5. In the two innermost (0.9 kpc) northern and southern fields, we observe a secondary peak at metallicities of about {approx}-0.6. This may be evidence of a second episode of star formation in the center, possibly triggered by the interactions that created the Stream and Bridge.

  2. A Whole-Mantle Three Dimensional Radially Anisotropic S Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, M. P.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    We present a 3D radially anisotropic model of the whole mantle obtained using a large three component surface and body waveform dataset and an iterative inversion for structure and source parameters based on Nonlinear Asymptotic Coupling Theory (NACT) (Li and Romanowicz, 1995). The model is parameterized by isotropic VS up to spherical harmonic degree 24 and ξ (ξ = VSH2 / VSV2), a measurement of radial anisotropy in shear velocity, up to degree 16. While the isotropic portion of the model is consistent with previous shear velocity tomographic models, the anisotropic portion suggests relationships between flow and anisotropy in a vairety of depth ranges. In the uppermost mantle, we confirm observations of regions with VSH}>V{SV starting at ˜80 km under oceanic regions and ˜250 km under old continental lithosphere, suggesting horizontal flow beneath the lithosphere (Gung et al., 2003). We also observe a VSV}>V{SH signature at ˜200-300 km depth beneath major ridge systems with amplitude significantly correlated with spreading rate for fast-spreading segments. In the transition zone (400-700 km depth), regions of subducted slab material are associated with VSV}>V{SH. We also confirm the observation of strong radially symmetric VSH}>V{SV in the lowermost 300 km (Panning and Romanowicz, 2004). The 3D deviations from this degree 0 signature are associated with the transition to the large-scale low-velocity superplumes under the central Pacific and Africa, suggesting that VSH}>V{SV is generated in the predominant horizontal flow of a mechanical boundary layer, with a change in signature related to transition to upwelling at the superplumes. We also solve for source perturbations in an interative procedure. Source perturbations are generally small compared to published Harvard CMT solutions, but significantly improve the fit to the data. The sources in the circum-Pacific subduction zones show small but clearly systematic shifts in location due to an improved structural

  3. Study on a multi-delay spectral interferometry for stellar radial velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Haijiao; Tang, Jin; Ji, Hangxin; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Liang

    2014-08-01

    High accuracy radial velocity measurement isn't only one of the most important methods for detecting earth-like Exoplanets, but also one of the main developing fields of astronomical observation technologies in future. Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) generates a kind of particular interference spectrum through combining a fixed-delay interferometer with a medium-resolution spectrograph. It effectively enhances radial velocity measuring accuracy by several times. Another further study on multi-delay interferometry was gradually developed after observation success with only a fixed-delay, and its relative instrumentation makes more impressive performance in near Infrared band. Multi-delay is capable of giving wider coverage from low to high frequency in Fourier field so that gives a higher accuracy in radial velocity measurement. To study on this new technology and verify its feasibility at Guo Shoujing telescope (LAMOST), an experimental instrumentation with single fixed-delay named MESSI has been built and tested at our lab. Another experimental study on multi-delay spectral interferometry given here is being done as well. Basically, this multi-delay experimental system is designed in according to the similar instrument named TEDI at Palomar observatory and the preliminary test result of MESSI. Due to existence of LAMOST spectrograph at lab, a multi-delay interferometer design actually dominates our work. It's generally composed of three parts, respectively science optics, phase-stabilizing optics and delay-calibrating optics. To switch different fixed delays smoothly during observation, the delay-calibrating optics is possibly useful to get high repeatability during switching motion through polychromatic interferometry. Although this metrology is based on white light interferometry in theory, it's different that integrates all of interference signals independently obtained by different monochromatic light in order to avoid dispersion error caused by

  4. A More Intuitive Version of the Lorentz Velocity Addition Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz velocity addition formula for one-dimensional motion presents a number of problems for beginning students of special relativity. In this paper we suggest a simple rewrite of the formula that is easier for students to memorize and manipulate, and furthermore is more intuitive in understanding the correction necessary when adding…

  5. Relativistic Velocity Addition Law from Machine Gun Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Popescu, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Many derivations of the relativistic addition law of parallel velocities without use of the Lorentz transformations (LT) are known. Some of them are based on thought experiments that require knowledge of the time dilation and the length contraction effects. Other derivations involve the Doppler effect in the optic domain considered from three…

  6. Near-infrared metallicities, radial velocities, and spectral types for 447 nearby M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Charbonneau, David; Irwin, Jonathan; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin; Lloyd, James P.

    2014-01-01

    We present metallicities, radial velocities, and near-infrared (NIR) spectral types for 447 M dwarfs determined from moderate resolution (R ≈ 2000) NIR spectra obtained with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF)/SpeX. These M dwarfs are primarily targets of the MEarth Survey, a transiting planet survey searching for super Earths around mid-to-late M dwarfs within 33 pc. We present NIR spectral types for each star and new spectral templates for the IRTF in the Y, J, H, and K-bands, created using M dwarfs with near-solar metallicities. We developed two spectroscopic distance calibrations that use NIR spectral type or an index based on the curvature of the K-band continuum. Our distance calibration has a scatter of 14%. We searched 27 NIR spectral lines and 10 spectral indices for metallicity sensitive features, taking into account correlated noise in our estimates of the errors on these parameters. We calibrated our relation using 36 M dwarfs in common proper pairs with an F-, G-, or K-type star of known metallicity. We validated the physical association of these pairs using proper motions, radial velocities, and spectroscopic distance estimates. Our resulting metallicity calibration uses the sodium doublet at 2.2 μm as the sole indicator for metallicity. It has an accuracy of 0.12 dex inferred from the scatter between the metallicities of the primaries and the estimated metallicities of the secondaries. Our relation is valid for NIR spectral types from M1V to M5V and for –1.0 dex < [Fe/H] < +0.35 dex. We present a new color-color metallicity relation using J – H and J – K colors that directly relates two observables: the distance from the M dwarf main sequence and equivalent width of the sodium line at 2.2 μm. We used radial velocities of M dwarf binaries, observations at different epochs, and comparison between our measurements and precisely measured radial velocities to demonstrate a 4 km s{sup –1} accuracy.

  7. Activity induced detection limits for Earth-sized planets from radial velocity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Gråe Jørgensen, Uffe; Andersen, Jan Marie

    2015-08-01

    The detection of exoplanets using any method is prone to confusion due to the intrinsic variability of the host star. We have recently investigated the effect of cool starspots on the detectability of exoplanets around solar-like stars and M dwarfs using the radial velocity method. Our methods use full radiative transfer, known stellar atomic and molecular lines, different surface spot configurations, and an added planetary signal. In this talk we present our methods, and apply them to studying the detectability of small planets, and especially the case of alpha Centauri B planet.

  8. Telluric Line Effect on High Precision Radial Velocity Survey of K and M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithajan, Sirinrat; Ge, Jian; Wang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The red and NIR region, where K and M dwarfs emit most of light, is the desirable region for radial velocity (RV) measurements for detecting low mass planets, but this wavelength region is heavily contaminated with telluric absorption lines. Variation in the telluric line depths and centroids can result in large RV measurement uncertainties, limiting the sensitivity to detect low mass planets. Here we use simulations to study effect of telluric removal and the residuals on RV measurements and determine the level of correction needed to minimize the effect. Simulated spectra from three representative spectrographs with spectral resolutions, R=60K, 80K, 100K and 120K for wavelength coverage at 0.38-0.62 μm (called the optical spectrograph), 0.38-0.90 μm (called the broad optical spectrograph) and 0.90-2.4 μm (called the NIR spectrograph), have been studied. Two methods are used to study the RV effect by the telluric lines. The first one is a 'Masking' method, in which the telluric lines are identified and removed from RV calculation. The other method is a 'Removal' method, in which all heavily saturated lines are masked out and the remaining lines are subtracted by synthetic atmospheric spectra to a desired level. Our results show that, in case of late M dwarfs, the broad optical spectrograph can gain additional RV sensitivity over the optical spectrograph if telluric lines can be modeled and subtracted to better than 10%, or all lines deeper than 5% are masked out from RV calculation. For the earlier type stars, it requires better than 2% modeling and subtracting precision with the broad optical spectrograph to gain additional Doppler sensitivity over the optical spectrograph. Besides the photon gain with the NIR spectrograph over the optical spectrograph for late M dwarf observations, the NIR can gain additional advantage of Doppler sensitivity over the optical tool for late M dwarfs when telluric residuals can be subtracted to below 1%. However, it is never

  9. Searching for IMBHs in Galactic globular clusters through radial velocities of individual stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    I present an overview of our ongoing project aimed at building a new generation of velocity dispersion profiles ad rotation curves for a representative sample of Galactic globular clusters, from the the radial velocity of hundreds of individual stars distributed at different distances from the cluster center. The innermost portion of the profiles will be used to constrain the possible presence of intermediate-mass black holes. The adopted methodology consists of combining spectroscopic observations acquired with three different instruments at the ESO-VLT: the adaptive-optics assisted, integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph SINFONI for the innermost and highly crowded cluster cores, the multi-IFU spectrograph KMOS for the intermediate regions, and the multi-fiber instrument FLAMES/GIRAFFE-MEDUSA for the outskirts. The case of NGC 6388, representing the pilot project that motivated the entire program, is described in some details.

  10. Astrophysical Sources of Statistical Uncertainty in Precision Radial Velocities and Their Approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2015-12-01

    We investigate various astrophysical contributions to the statistical uncertainty of precision radial velocity measurements of stellar spectra. We first analytically determine the intrinsic uncertainty in centroiding isolated spectral lines broadened by Gaussian, Lorentzian, Voigt, and rotational profiles, finding that for all cases and assuming weak lines, the uncertainty in the line centroid is σV ≈ C\\Theta3/2/(WI1/20), where Θ is the full-width at half-maximum of the line, W is the equivalent width, and I0 is the continuum signal-to-noise ratio, with C a constant of order unity that depends on the specific line profile. We use this result to motivate approximate analytic expressions to the total radial velocity uncertainty for a stellar spectrum with a given photon noise, resolution, wavelength, effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, macroturbulence, and stellar rotation. We use these relations to determine the dominant contributions to the statistical uncertainties in precision radial velocity measurements as a function of effective temperature and mass for main-sequence stars. For stars more massive than ~1.1 Msolar we find that stellar rotation dominates the velocity uncertainties for moderate and high-resolution spectra (R gsim 30,000). For less-massive stars, a variety of sources contribute depending on the spectral resolution and wavelength, with photon noise due to decreasing bolometric luminosity generally becoming increasingly important for low-mass stars at fixed exposure time and distance. In most cases, resolutions greater than 60,000 provide little benefit in terms of statistical precision, although higher resolutions would likely allow for better control of systematic uncertainties. We find that the spectra of cooler stars and stars with higher metallicity are intrinsically richer in velocity information, as expected. We determine the optimal wavelength range for stars of various spectral types, finding that the optimal region

  11. Twenty Years of Precise Radial Velocities at Keck and Lick Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. T.

    2015-10-01

    The precise radial velocity survey at Keck Observatory began over 20 years ago. Its survey of thousands of stars now has the time baseline to be sensitive to planets with decade-long orbits, including Jupiter analogs. I present several newly-finished orbital solutions for long-period giant planets. Although hot Jupiters are generally ``lonely'' (i.e. they are not part of multiplanet systems), those that are not appear to often have giant companions at 5 AU or beyond. I present two of the highest period-ratios among planets in a two-planet system, and some of the longest orbital periods ever measured for exoplanets. In many cases, combining Keck radial velocities from those from other long-term surveys at Lick Observatory, McDonald Observatory, HARPS, and, of course, OHP spectrographs, produces superior orbital fits, constraining both period and eccentricity better than could be possible with any single set alone. Stellar magnetic activity cycles can masquerade as long-period planets. In most cases this effect is very small, but a loud minority of stars, including, apparently, HD 154345, show very strong RV-activity correlations.

  12. Radial velocity monitoring of Kepler heartbeat stars with Keck/HIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Hambleton, Kelly; Mullally, Susan; Isaacson, Howard T.; Howard, Andrew; Kurtz, Donald; Zimmerman, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Heartbeat stars are an emerging class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic heartbeat signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, reflection, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many heartbeat stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute an exciting opportunity to observe tidal effects in action. We are carrying out a radial velocity monitoring of Kepler heartbeat stars using Keck/HIRES, in order to measure the orbit and characterize the two stars. Our sample currently includes over 30 systems, which is the largest sample of these unique systems where the orbit was measured with radial velocities. Our goal is to understand the formation and evolution of heartbeat stars, and to use them to study the processes of tidal dissipation and orbital migration. The physics learned from them will apply to many other astrophysical systems, such as high-eccentricity planet migration and eccentricity-induced mergers in triple systems.

  13. PlanetPack3: a software tool for exoplanets characterization from radial velocity and transit data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We describe the forthcoming third major release of the PlanetPack software tool for exoplanets detection and characterization from Doppler and/or transit data. Among other things, this major update will bring routines for the joint fitting of radial velocities and transits, optionally taking into account various subtle effects: the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, the light arrival time delay between the radial velocity and transit curves, new experimental models of the Doppler or photometry noise, including non-stationary models with variable noise magnitude (due to e.g. the stellar activity variations).This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 14-02-92615 KO_a), the UK Royal Society International Exchange grant IE140055, by the President of Russia grant for young scientists (No. MK-733.2014.2), by the programme of the Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences P21, and by the Saint Petersburg State University research grant 6.37.341.2015.

  14. The Milky Way's halo in 6D: Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabroke, George; Cropper, Mark; Katz, David; Sartoretti, Paola; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Marchal, Olivier; Gueguen, Alain; Benson, Kevin; Dolding, Chris; Huckle, Howard; Smith, Mike; Baker, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) has been operating in routine phase for over one year since initial commissioning. RVS continues to work well but the higher than expected levels of straylight reduce the limiting magnitude. The end-of-mission radial-velocity (RV) performance requirement for G2V stars was 15 km s-1 at V = 16.5 mag. Instead, 15 km s-1 precision is achieved at 15 < V < 16 mag, consistent with simulations that predict a loss of 1.4 mag. Simulations also suggest that changes to Gaia's onboard software could recover ~0.14 mag of this loss. Consequently Gaia's onboard software was upgraded in April 2015. The status of this new commissioning period is presented, as well as the latest scientific performance of the on-ground processing of RVS spectra. We illustrate the implications of the RVS limiting magnitude on Gaia's view of the Milky Way's halo in 6D using the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 1 Gem (Lane+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, B. F.; Muterspaugh, M. W.; Griffin, R. F.; Scarfe, C. D.; Fekel, F. C.; Williamson, M. H.; Eaton, J. A.; Shao, M.; Colavita, M. M.; Konacki, M.

    2016-05-01

    Extensive radial-velocity measurements of the 1 Gem system have been obtained in four separate campaigns spanning 40yr, including data from eight different instruments. Between 1969 and 2009 R.F.G. acquired a total of 128 observations of 1 Gem using the original radial-velocity spectrometer at Cambridge; a second-generation, computerized instrument at Palomar; the CORAVEL spectrometer at Haute Provence Observatory (OHP), and most recently, the Cambridge CORAVEL. The "Cambridge CORAVEL" operates at the Coude focus of the 36inch reflector on the home site of the Cambridge Observatories, Madingley Road, Cambridge, England. The Cambridge and Palomar data are referred to as data set A, while the OHP data are labeled set B. The data for components A and Ba are provided in Table1. A series of observations of 1 Gem has been obtained by C.D.S. with the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) radial-velocity spectrometer. Observations were begun early in 1980 and continued until the end of 2003. The DAO velocities of components A and Ba are listed in Table2. The total number of acceptable velocities from DAO radial-velocity scanner observations is 123 of the primary star and 107 of the brighter component of the close pair. The third component was not detectable in the DAO traces. We identify the DAO observations as data set C. >From 1983 through 2009 F.C.F. obtained observations at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) with the 0.9m coude feed telescope, coude spectrograph, and several different CCD detectors. All of the spectrograms were acquired with a Texas Instruments (TI) CCD except for five that were obtained in 1983 with an RCA CCD and a single observation in 2008 September with a Tektronix CCD. All those observations were centered near 6430Å and had typical signal-to-noise ratios of about 250. The numerous TI CCD spectra have a wavelength range of just 84Å and a resolution of 0.21Å. The 86 velocities of component A and 80 of component Ba are listed in Table3

  16. CHARACTERIZING THE GALACTIC WHITE DWARF BINARY POPULATION WITH SPARSELY SAMPLED RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Maoz, Dan; Badenes, Carles; Bickerton, Steven J. E-mail: badenes@pitt.edu

    2012-06-01

    We present a method to characterize statistically the parameters of a detached binary sample-binary fraction, separation distribution, and mass-ratio distribution-using noisy radial velocity data with as few as two, randomly spaced, epochs per object. To do this, we analyze the distribution of {Delta}RV{sub max}, the maximum radial velocity difference between any two epochs for the same object. At low values, the core of this distribution is dominated by measurement errors, but for large enough samples there is a high-velocity tail that can effectively constrain the parameters of the binary population. We discuss our approach for the case of a population of detached white dwarf (WD) binaries with separations that are decaying via gravitational wave emission. We derive analytic expressions for the present-day distribution of separations, integrated over the star formation history of the Galaxy, for parameterized initial WD separation distributions at the end of the common-envelope phase. We use Monte Carlo techniques to produce grids of simulated {Delta}RV{sub max} distributions with specific binary population parameters, and the same sampling cadences and radial velocity errors as the observations, and we compare them to the real {Delta}RV{sub max} distribution to constrain the properties of the binary population. We illustrate the sensitivity of the method to both the model and observational parameters. In the particular case of binary WDs, every model population predicts a merger rate per star which can easily be compared to specific Type Ia supernova rates. In a companion paper, we apply the method to a sample of {approx}4000 WDs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The binary fractions and separation distribution parameters allowed by the data indicate a rate of WD-WD mergers per unit stellar mass in the Galactic disk, {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} mergers yr{sup -1} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }, remarkably similar to the rate per unit mass of Type Ia

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yue; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS) has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth. PMID:26694393

  18. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yue; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS) has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth. PMID:26694393

  19. Kepler beaming binaries radial velocity follow-up with WIYN/Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Stassun, Keivan; Faigler, Simchon; Mazeh, Tsevi; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Tal-Or, Lev; Prsa, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    High-quality space-based time series photometry reveals the minute photometric modulations induced by orbital motion in short-period binary systems with stellar and substellar secondaries. Those modulations are induced by both gravitational and atmospheric processes. Gravitational processes include the beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and the atmospheric processes include reflected light and thermal emission by the secondary atmosphere. Therefore, non-eclipsing systems are detectable using photometry alone. The availability of Kepler data for a large sample of stars combined with the sensitivity to non-eclipsing systems has the potential of transforming the Kepler survey into the equivalent of a radial velocity (RV) survey of a large sample of stars with a wide range of spectral type. This allows detecting intrinsically rare systems, where traditional approaches, e.g., RV and transit surveys, are highly inefficient. Those include systems where the companion is a brown-dwarf or a massive planet, or even a white dwarf. As this approach is still in its infancy, we are carrying out RV follow-up of Kepler photometric detections, to confirm the nature of the system and measure the orbit and the companion's mass. Here we present our results from an RV campaign with the WIYN/Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph, where we used 26 nights so far during the 2014 and 2015 Kepler observing seasons to observe 5 Hydra one-degree diameter fields within the Kepler field. Our list of targets includes 131 Kepler beaming binary candidates, and we used additional fibers to observe 85 Kepler eclipsing binaries and 31 KOIs. A detailed comparison between the photometrically predicted companion's mass and the mass measured through RVs will improve our understanding of this young approach, and will support similar projects using data from current and future space-based time series photometry missions including K2, TESS, and PLATO. Our primary long term goal

  20. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Empirical determination of the precision of stellar radial velocities and projected rotation velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. J.; Jeffries, R. D.; Lewis, J.; Koposov, S. E.; Sacco, G. G.; Randich, S.; Gilmore, G.; Asplund, M.; Binney, J.; Bonifacio, P.; Drew, J. E.; Feltzing, S.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Micela, G.; Neguerela, I.; Prusti, T.; Rix, H.-W.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Babusiaux, C.; Bensby, T.; Blomme, R.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Francois, P.; Hambly, N.; Irwin, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Van Eck, S.; Walton, N.; Bayo, A.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Edvardsson, B.; Franciosini, E.; Frasca, A.; Heiter, U.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Marconi, G.; Martayan, C.; Masseron, T.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The Gaia-ESO Survey (GES) is a large public spectroscopic survey at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. Aims: A key aim is to provide precise radial velocities (RVs) and projected equatorial velocities (vsini) for representative samples of Galactic stars, which will complement information obtained by the Gaia astrometry satellite. Methods: We present an analysis to empirically quantify the size and distribution of uncertainties in RV and vsini using spectra from repeated exposures of the same stars. Results: We show that the uncertainties vary as simple scaling functions of signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and vsini, that the uncertainties become larger with increasing photospheric temperature, but that the dependence on stellar gravity, metallicity and age is weak. The underlying uncertainty distributions have extended tails that are better represented by Student's t-distributions than by normal distributions. Conclusions: Parametrised results are provided, which enable estimates of the RV precision for almost all GES measurements, and estimates of the vsini precision for stars in young clusters, as a function of S/N, vsini and stellar temperature. The precision of individual high S/N GES RV measurements is 0.22-0.26 km s-1, dependent on instrumental configuration. Based on observations collected with the FLAMES spectrograph at VLT/UT2 telescope (Paranal Observatory, ESO, Chile), for the Gaia- ESO Large Public Survey (188.B-3002).Full Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A75

  1. RADIAL VELOCITIES AND PULSATION EPHEMERIDES OF 11 FIELD RR Lyrae STARS

    SciTech Connect

    For, Bi-Qing; Sneden, Christopher; Preston, George W.

    2011-06-01

    We present new radial velocities (RVs), improved pulsation periods, and reference epochs of 11 field RR Lyrae ab-type variables: AS Vir, BS Aps, CD Vel, DT Hya, RV Oct, TY Gru, UV Oct, V1645 Sgr, WY Ant, XZ Aps, and Z Mic. This study is based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the echelle spectrograph of the 2.5 m du Pont telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We obtained {approx}200 spectra per star (i.e., a total of {approx}2300 spectra), distributed more or less uniformly throughout their pulsation cycles. RV curves and photometric light curves phased to our new ephemerides are presented for all program stars. In a subsequent paper, we will use these spectra to derive stellar atmospheric parameters and chemical compositions throughout the pulsational cycles, based purely on spectroscopic constraints.

  2. The Search for Extrasolar Planets by Means of the Radial-Velocity Spectral Method and Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomaliti, L. V.

    The discovery of companion planets of alien stars (exoplanets) commands the interest of the scientific community all over the world. The factual data in the paper appearing below should help to draw the attention of Russian specialists to this fascinating problem. The data make it possible to assess the feasibility of identifying exoplanets, using available instruments, by detecting indications of Keplerian Doppler shifts in stellar motion. Consideration is given to the effects produced by the gravitational pull exerted on a star by companion planets similar to the main planets of the Solar System. The signatures of companion planets observed from a distance of 10 pc are evaluated. Some specific experimental results, together with the corresponding radial velocities and angular wobbles of the star, are given. Information about achieved thresholds and the techniques by which they were reached is summarized.

  3. Radial Velocity and Light Curve Analysis of the Eclipsing Binary Nn Vir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazhouhesh, R.; Melendo, E. G.

    2005-04-01

    The eclipsing binary NN Vir is a short period system showing an EW-type light curve. Photometric observations of NN Vir were done by Gomez Ferrellad and Garcia Melendo (1997) at Esteve Duran Observatory. The first spectroscopic observations of this system were obtained by Rucinski and Lu (1999). The radial velocity and light curves analysis was made with the latest version of the Wilson program (1998), and the geometric and physical elements of the system are derived. From the simultaneous solutions of the system, we determined the masses and radii of the components: 1.89 M ⊙ and 1.65 R ⊙ for the primary component; 0.93 M ⊙ and 1.23 R ⊙ for the secondary component. We estimated effective temperatures of 7030 K for the primary and 6977 K for the secondary component.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HD 165052 radial-velocity measurements (Ferrero+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, G.; Gamen, R.; Benvenuto, O. G.; Fernandez-Lajus, E.

    2013-05-01

    Radial velocity (RV) measurements of primary (A) and secondary (B) components of HD 165052 obtained by disentangling method (Gonzalez & Levato, 2006A&A...448..283G). 37 high-resolution spectra were acquired with: mainly with the REOSC-DC spectrograph at 2.15-m Sahade telescope (CASLEO, Argentina) between 2008 August and 2010 August; and with the echelle spectrograph at 2.5-m Du-Pont tel. (LCO, Chile) in May 2010; and FEROS at 2.2-m tel. (ESO-La Silla, Chile) in 2009 May. Cross-correlation was calculated over a disjoint sample region composed of 17 wavelength intervals, each ~1nm wide, taken around the spectral lines indicated. RVs measured in this mode are listed as mean RVs. Subsequently we have defined several sampling regions, each one around a single spectral line, and computed cross-correlation separately for each one. These are the RVs listed for each line. (2 data files).

  5. SKARPS: The Search for Kuiper Belts around Radial-Velocity Planet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryden, Geoffrey; Marshall, Jonathan; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Su, Kate; Wyatt, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Search for Kuiper belts Around Radial-velocity Planet Stars - SKARPS -is a Herschel survey of solar-type stars known to have orbiting planets. When complete, the 100-star SKARPS sample will be large enough for a meaningful statistical comparison against stars not known to have planets. (This control sample has already been observed by Herschel's DUst around NEarby Stars - DUNES - key program). Initial results include previously known disks that are resolved for the first time and newly discovered disks that are fainter and colder than those typically detected by Spitzer. So far, with only half of the sample in hand, there is no measured correlation between inner RV planets and cold outer debris. While this is consistent with the results from Spitzer, it is in contrast with the relationship suggested by the prominent debris disks in imaged-planet systems.

  6. Analytical determination of orbital elements using Fourier analysis. I. The radial velocity case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisle, J.-B.; Ségransan, D.; Buchschacher, N.; Alesina, F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe an analytical method for computing the orbital parameters of a planet from the periodogram of a radial velocity signal. The method is very efficient and provides a good approximation of the orbital parameters. The accuracy is mainly limited by the accuracy of the computation of the Fourier decomposition of the signal which is sensitive to sampling and noise. Our method is complementary with more accurate (and more expensive in computer time) numerical algorithms (e.g. Levenberg-Marquardt, Markov chain Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms). Indeed, the analytical approximation can be used as an initial condition to accelerate the convergence of these numerical methods. Our method can be applied iteratively to search for multiple planets in the same system.

  7. EFFICIENT FITTING OF MULTIPLANET KEPLERIAN MODELS TO RADIAL VELOCITY AND ASTROMETRY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. T.; Howard, A. W.

    2009-05-15

    We describe a technique for solving for the orbital elements of multiple planets from radial velocity (RV) and/or astrometric data taken with 1 m s{sup -1} and {mu}as precision, appropriate for efforts to detect Earth-massed planets in their stars' habitable zones, such as NASA's proposed Space Interferometry Mission. We include details of calculating analytic derivatives for use in the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm for the problems of fitting RV and astrometric data separately and jointly. We also explicate the general method of separating the linear and nonlinear components of a model fit in the context of an LM fit, show how explicit derivatives can be calculated in such a model, and demonstrate the speed up and convergence improvements of such a scheme in the case of a five-planet fit to published RV data for 55 Cnc.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HARPS radial velocities of GJ 163 (Bonfils+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfils, X.; Lo Curto, G.; Correia, A. C. M.; Laskar, J.; Udry, S.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Benz, W.; Bouchy, F.; Gillon, M.; Hebrard, G.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Moutou, C.; Naef, D.; Neves, V.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.; Segransan, D.

    2013-08-01

    We observed GJ 163 with HARPS, a spectrograph fiber-fed by the ESO/3.6m telescope of La Silla Observatory. Our settings and computation of radial velocities (RV) remained the same as for our GTO program and we refer the reader to Bonfils et al. (2013A&A...549A.109B) for a detailed description. We gathered RVs for 154 epochs spread over 2988 days (8.2 years) between UT 30 October 2003 and 04 January 2012. Table 6 (available in electronic form) lists all RVs in the barycentric reference frame of the Solar System. Four measurements have significantly higher uncertainties (the RVs taken at epochs BJD=2454804.7, 2455056.9, 2455057.9 and, 2455136.8 have uncertainties greater than twice the median uncertainty). We removed them and perform our analysis with the remaining 150 RVs. (1 data file).

  9. Solar radial velocity variations and the search for Venus enabled by a laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David F.; Dumusque, Xavier; Li, Chih-Hao; Glenday, Alexander; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently demonstrated 50 cm/s sensitivity in measuring the radial velocity (RV) between the Earth and Sun using a simple, compact solar telescope feeding the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Italian National Telescope calibrated with our green astro-comb. The green astro-comb is a laser frequency comb optimized for calibrating astrophysical spectrographs. We have been operating the solar telescope to detect the RV signal of the Sun as a star for the past year both to study RV jitter associated with stellar (solar) fluctuations and to demonstrate sensitivity of these instruments to detect terrestrial exoplanets. In this talk I will present results from calibrating the HARPS-N exoplanet searcher spectrograph, solar RV stability, and the current status of our search for the signature of Venus.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: uvby, UBV and radial velocity of WW Aur (Southworth+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, J.; Smalley, B.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Claret, A.; Etzel, P. B.

    2005-10-01

    Observational data and results are presented for the A-type detached eclipsing binary star system WW Aurigae. The known times of minimum light of the system are given. Stromgren uvby photoelectric light curves, with about 950 measurements in each passband, are given. These are originally from Etzel (1975, Masters Thesis, San Diego State University, unpublished). Johnson UBV photoelectric light curves, with about 1000 measurements in each passband, are given. These were obtained from Kiyokawa & Kitamura (1975AnTok..15..117K) using optical character recognition software and were included here for convenience. We also give the radial velocities of the two stars measured using TODCOR (Zucker & Mazeh, 1994ApJ...420..806Z) with template spectra of HD 39945 (for the primary component of WW Aur) and HD 32115 (for the secondary component). (9 data files).

  11. Radial Velocities and Pulsation Ephemerides of 11 Field RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For, Bi-Qing; Preston, George W.; Sneden, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    We present new radial velocities (RVs), improved pulsation periods, and reference epochs of 11 field RR Lyrae ab-type variables: AS Vir, BS Aps, CD Vel, DT Hya, RV Oct, TY Gru, UV Oct, V1645 Sgr, WY Ant, XZ Aps, and Z Mic. This study is based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the echelle spectrograph of the 2.5 m du Pont telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We obtained ~200 spectra per star (i.e., a total of ~2300 spectra), distributed more or less uniformly throughout their pulsation cycles. RV curves and photometric light curves phased to our new ephemerides are presented for all program stars. In a subsequent paper, we will use these spectra to derive stellar atmospheric parameters and chemical compositions throughout the pulsational cycles, based purely on spectroscopic constraints.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WEB Catalog of Radial Velocities (Duflot+ 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, M.; Figon, P.; Meyssonnier, N.

    1998-04-01

    We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocities by Wilson (1953; catalogue ) and Evans (1978; catalogue ) to which we have added the catalogue of spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989; catalogue ). For each star, when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set of Identifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data; see ) of the CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the number HIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992; catalogue ). 3) the CCDM number (Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) by Dommanget & Nys (1994; catalogue ). For the cluster stars, a precise study has been done, on the identification numbers. Numerous remarks point out the problems we have had to deal with. (3 data files).

  13. Reanalysis of radial velocity data from the resonant planetary system HD128311

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno

    2015-03-01

    The multiplanetary system HD128311 hosts at least two planets. Its dynamical formation history has been studied extensively in the literature. We reanalyse the latest radial velocity data for this system with the affine-invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler EMCEE. Using the high-order integrator IAS15, we perform a fully dynamical fit, allowing the planets to interact during the sampling process. A stability analysis using the Mean Exponential Growth of Nearby Orbits indicator reveals that the system is located in a stable island of the parameter space. In contrast to a previous study, we find that the system is locked in a 2:1 mean motion resonance. The resonant angle ϕ1 is librating with a libration amplitude of approximately 37°. The existence of mean motion resonances has important implication for planet formation theories. Our results confirm predictions of models involving planet migration and stochastic forces.

  14. Radial velocities of very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarf members of the Hyades and Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Liebert, James; Giampapa, Mark; Macintosh, Bruce; Reid, Neill; Hamilton, Donald

    1994-01-01

    We have determined H alpha equivalent widths and radial velocities with 1 sigma accuracies of approximately 5 km s(exp -1) for approximately 20 candidate very low mass members of the Hyades and Pleiades clusters. The radial velocities for the Hyades sample suggest that nearly all of these stars are indeed highly probable members of the Hyades. The faintest stars in the Hyades sample have masses of order 0.1 solar mass. We also obtained radial velocities for four candidate very low mass members of the Pleiades and two objects that are candidate BD Pleiads. All of these stars have apparent V magnitudes fainter than the Hyades stars we observed, and the resultant radial velocity accuracy is worse. We believe that the three brighter stars are indeed likely very low mass stellar members of the Pleiades, whereas the status of the two brown dwarf candidates is uncertain. The Hyades stars we have observed and the three Pleiades very low mass stars are the lowest mass members of any open cluster whose membership has been confirmed by radial velocities and whose chromospheric activity has been measured. We see no change in chromospheric activity at the boundary where stars are expected to become fully convective (M approximately equals 0.3 solar mass) in either cluster. In the Pleiades, however, there may be a decrease in chromospheric activity for stars with (V-I)(sub K) greater than 3.5 (M less than or equal to 0.1 solar mass).

  15. Study of Optical Mode Scrambling of Fiber Optics for High Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassette, Anthony; Ge, Jian; Jeram, Sarik; Klanot, Khaya; Ma, Bo; Varosi, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Optical Fibers have been used throughout Astronomy for spectroscopy with spectrographs located some distance away from the telescope. This fiber-fed design has greatly increased precision for radial velocity (RV) measurements. However, due to the incomplete fiber illumination mode scrambling in the radial direction, high resolution spectrographs with regular circular fibers have suffered RV uncertainties on the order of a few to tens of m/s with stellar observations, which largely limited their sensitivity in detecting and characterizing low mass planets around stars. At the University of Florida, we studied mode scrambling gain of a few different optical devices, such as three-lens optical double scramblers, octagonal fibers and low numerical aperture fibers with a goal to find an optimal mode scrambling solution for the TOU optical very high resolution spectrograph (R=100,000, 0.38-0.9 microns) and FIRST near infrared high resolution spectrograph (R=60,000, 0.9-1.8 microns) for the on-going Dharma Planet Survey. This presentation will report our lab measurement results and also stellar RV measurements at the observatories.

  16. "Modal Noise" in Single-mode Fibers: A Cautionary Note for High Precision Radial Velocity Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Schwab, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the use of single-mode fibers (SMFs) in high precision Doppler spectrometers has become increasingly attractive since the advent of diffraction-limited adaptive optics systems on large-aperture telescopes. Spectrometers fed with these fibers can be made significantly smaller than typical “seeing-limited” instruments, greatly reducing cost and overall complexity. Importantly, classical mode interference and speckle issues associated with multi-mode fibers, also known as “modal noise,” are mitigated when using SMFs, which also provide perfect radial and azimuthal image scrambling. However, SMFs do support multiple polarization modes, an issue that is generally ignored for larger-core fibers given the large number of propagation modes. Since diffraction gratings used in most high resolution astronomical instruments have dispersive properties that are sensitive to incident polarization changes, any birefringence variations in the fiber can cause variations in the efficiency profile, degrading illumination stability. Here we present a cautionary note outlining how the polarization properties of SMFs can affect the radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of high resolution spectrographs. This work is immediately relevant to the rapidly expanding field of diffraction-limited, extreme precision RV spectrographs that are currently being designed and built by a number of groups.

  17. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XVIII. Classifications and radial velocities of the B-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. J.; Kennedy, M. B.; Dufton, P. L.; Howarth, I. D.; Walborn, N. R.; Markova, N.; Clark, J. S.; de Mink, S. E.; de Koter, A.; Dunstall, P. R.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; McEvoy, C. M.; Sana, H.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Taylor, W. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2015-02-01

    We present spectral classifications for 438 B-type stars observed as part of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS) in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Radial velocities are provided for 307 apparently single stars, and for 99 targets with radial-velocity variations which are consistent with them being spectroscopic binaries. We investigate the spatial distribution of the radial velocities across the 30 Dor region, and use the results to identify candidate runaway stars. Excluding potential runaways and members of two older clusters in the survey region (SL 639 and Hodge 301), we determine a systemic velocity for 30 Dor of 271.6 ± 12.2 kms-1 from 273 presumed single stars. Employing a 3σ criterion we identify nine candidate runaway stars (2.9% of the single stars with radial-velocity estimates). The projected rotational velocities of the candidate runaways appear to be significantly different to those of the full B-type sample, with a strong preference for either large (≥345 kms-1) or small (≤65 kms-1) rotational velocities. Of the candidate runaways, VFTS 358 (classified B0.5: V) has the largest differential radial velocity (-106.9 ± 16.2 kms-1), and a preliminary atmospheric analysis finds a significantly enriched nitrogen abundance of 12 + log (N/H) ≳ 8.5. Combined with a large rotational velocity (vesini = 345 ± 22 kms-1), this is suggestive of past binary interaction for this star. Table 7 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Technology for radial velocity search and characterisation of exoplanets in the 2020s and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael; Feger, Tobias; Bento, Joao; Rains, Adam

    2015-12-01

    In the past 20 years, radial velocity exoplanet instrumentation has been focussed on a small number of moderate sized (or moderate efficiency) telescopes. I will argue that there are two very different uses for radial velocity in the near future: transit follow-up and low-mass exoplanet detection around relatively nearby stars. For the first of these science goals, targets are relatively distant, and a high eficiency spectrograph on a large telescope is needed, for example the Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST): a stabilised spectrograph fed by an array of multi-mode fibers at the final design stage. For the second of these goals, stellar noise due to pulsations, convective cells and activity provide a lower limit to the noise floor achievable for any given temporal sampling. I will argue through simple simulations that an array of small telescopes with precise spectrographs making a very large number of measurements is a much more effective way to detect the smallest exoplanets than instrumentation on large telescopes. I will describe the first results from the Replicable High-Resoluition Exoplanet and Asteroseismology (RHEA) spectrograph designed for 0.25 to 0.5m telescopes, which has single-epoch measurement uncertainties at the 1 m/s level and a total whole cost for detecting the smallest exoplanets that is significantly lower than medium to large telescope concepts. RHEA has an eyepiece-sized fast tip/tilt and mode reformatting system that efficiently injects a small array of single-mode fibers, feeding a <0.5m sized stabilised inexpensive spectrograph. I will show preliminary performance results from both stars and laboratory tests that verify the precision, and will discuss pathways to turn this into a broader community project.

  19. A three-dimensional radially anisotropic model of shear velocity in the whole mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Mark; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    We present a 3-D radially anisotropic S velocity model of the whole mantle (SAW642AN), obtained using a large three component surface and body waveform data set and an iterative inversion for structure and source parameters based on Non-linear Asymptotic Coupling Theory (NACT). The model is parametrized in level 4 spherical splines, which have a spacing of ~ 8°. The model shows a link between mantle flow and anisotropy in a variety of depth ranges. In the uppermost mantle, we confirm observations of regions with VSH > VSV starting at ~80 km under oceanic regions and ~200 km under stable continental lithosphere, suggesting horizontal flow beneath the lithosphere. We also observe a VSV > VSH signature at ~150-300 km depth beneath major ridge systems with amplitude correlated with spreading rate for fast-spreading segments. In the transition zone (400-700 km depth), regions of subducted slab material are associated with VSV > VSH, while the ridge signal decreases. While the mid-mantle has lower amplitude anisotropy (<1 per cent), we also confirm the observation of radially symmetric VSH > VSV in the lowermost 300 km, which appears to be a robust conclusion, despite an error in our previous paper which has been corrected here. The 3-D deviations from this signature are associated with the large-scale low-velocity superplumes under the central Pacific and Africa, suggesting that VSH > VSV is generated in the predominant horizontal flow of a mechanical boundary layer, with a change in signature related to transition to upwelling at the superplumes.

  20. Searching For Planets Around M Dwarfs Using the Radial Velocity Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Ge, J.; Wan, X.

    2012-01-01

    M dwarfs account for 70% of stars in the solar neighborhood, but less than 5% of the known exoplanets orbit these cool, red stars. Despite the overwhelming success of the radial-velocity method in detecting more than 500 planets to date, not a single planet has been found to orbit a late-type M dwarf. I conducted simulations to investigate the photon-limited performance of RV instruments using two methods, the dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) method and the traditional echelle method. I found that the instrument using the DFDI method is more advantageous in the multi-object survey at a low-median spectral resolution. I used the EXPERT spectrograph (R=27,000) at the 2.1 m telescope on Kitt Peak to demonstrate the feasibility of telluric-line modeling with a telluric standard star. The featureless spectrum of a fast-rotating hot star is observed nearby the science star in order to obtain a telluric-line absorption spectrum, which is later used to remove the telluric-line contamination from the spectrum of the science star. A signicant innovation of my PhD work is the development of a portable inexpensive wavelength calibration source with the potential of reaching better than 10 cm/s precision. I have compared this source to an Iodine cell and a Th-Ar emission lamp in the optical wavelength. The results show that different sources track each other to within 10 m/s. The number is expected to be decreased once the radial-velocity code is improved. The proposed wavelength calibration source provides an alternative to the expensive laser comb technology, which is the only technique that offers a comparable precision in the I band (0.7-0.9 micron).

  1. Radial-Velocity Analysis of the Post-AGB Star, HD101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F.; Hearnshaw, J.; Rosenzweig, P.; Guzman, E.; Sivarani, T.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2007-08-01

    This project concerns the analysis of the periodicity of the radial velocity of the peculiar emission-line supergiant star HD 101584 (F0 Ia), and also we propose a physical model to account for the observations. From its peculiarities, HD 101584 is a star that is in the post-AGB phase. This study is considered as a key to clarify the multiple aspects related with the evolution of the circum-stellar layer associated with this star's last phase. The star shows many lines with P Cygni profiles, including H-alpha, Na D lines in the IR Ca triplet, indicating a mass outflow. For HD 101584 we have performed a detailed study of its radial-velocity variations, using both emission and absorption lines over a wide range of wavelength. We have analyzed the variability and found a periodicity for all types of lines of 144 days, which must arise from the star's membership in a binary system. The data span a period of five consecutive years and were obtained using the 1-m telescope of Mt John Observatory, in New Zealand., with the echelle and Hercules high resolution spectrographs and CCD camera. HD101584 is known to be an IRAS source, and our model suggests it is a proto-planetary nebula, probably with a bipolar outflow and surrounded by a dusty disk as part of a binary system. We have found no evidence for HD101584 to contain a B9 star as found by Bakker et al (1996). A low resolution IUE spectrum shows the absence of any strong UV continuum that would be expected for a B star to be in this system.

  2. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W.; Blake, C. H.; Carlberg, J. K.; Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F.; Crepp, J.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C.; Nidever, D. L.; Prieto, C. Allende; Hernández, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Ebelke, G.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Ge, J.; and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ∼2 km s{sup –1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup –1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ∼100-200 m s{sup –1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we

  3. Binaries at Birth: Stellar multiplicity in embedded clusters from radial velocity variations in the IN-SYNC survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskar Jaehnig, Karl; Stassun, Keivan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Covey, Kevin R.; Da Rio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of stellar multiplicity in young stellar systems using the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) survey, carried out in SDSS III with the APOGEE spectrograph. Multi-epoch observations of thousands of low-mass stars in Orion A, NGC2264, NGC1333 and IC348 have been carried out, yielding H-band spectra with R=22,500 for sources with H<12 mag. Radial velocity sensitivities ~0.3 km/s can be achieved, depending on the spectral type of the star. We search the IN-SYNC radial velocity catalog to identify sources with radial velocity variations indicative of spectroscopically undetected companions, analyze their spectral properties and discuss the implications for the overall multiplicity of stellar populations in young, embedded star clusters.

  4. Suppression of Fiber Modal Noise Induced Radial Velocity Errors for Bright Emission-line Calibration Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  5. A Gaussian process framework for modelling stellar activity signals in radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpaul, V.; Aigrain, S.; Osborne, M. A.; Reece, S.; Roberts, S.

    2015-09-01

    To date, the radial velocity (RV) method has been one of the most productive techniques for detecting and confirming extrasolar planetary candidates. Unfortunately, stellar activity can induce RV variations which can drown out or even mimic planetary signals - and it is notoriously difficult to model and thus mitigate the effects of these activity-induced nuisance signals. This is expected to be a major obstacle to using next-generation spectrographs to detect lower mass planets, planets with longer periods, and planets around more active stars. Enter Gaussian processes (GPs) which, we note, have a number of attractive features that make them very well suited to disentangling stellar activity signals from planetary signals. We present here a GP framework we developed to model RV time series jointly with ancillary activity indicators (e.g. bisector velocity spans, line widths, chromospheric activity indices), allowing the activity component of RV time series to be constrained and disentangled from e.g. planetary components. We discuss the mathematical details of our GP framework, and present results illustrating its encouraging performance on both synthetic and real RV data sets, including the publicly available Alpha Centauri B data set.

  6. Radial velocity measurements of a sample of northern metal-deficient stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasniewicz, G.; Mayor, M.

    A sample of 41 northern metal-deficient stars composed of 14 stars with Fe/H less than -1.1, 11 stars with -1.1 less than or equal to Fe/H less than -0.6 and 16 stars with -0.6 less than or equal to Fe/H less than -0.3 was observed with the radial velocity scanner CORAVEL. Seven stars were discovered as certain or possible spectroscopic binaries (SBs). The measurements are in fair agreement with those of Carney and Latham (1987), but in disagreement with those of Stryker et al (1985). Spectroscopic orbits are determined for HD 108754 (period: 26d) and HD 153847 (period: 5d). The distribution of SBs as a function of period between this sample of metal-deficient stars and a sample of metal-rich G-type stars (Fe/H greater than or equal to -0.3) is proved to be statistically similar. For high-velocity and/or metal-deficient SBs, the distribution of orbital eccentricities versus logarithm of period is discussed in terms of tidal circularization.

  7. Suppression of fiber modal noise induced radial velocity errors for bright emission-line calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  8. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  9. Orbital structure of the GJ876 extrasolar planetary system based on the latest Keck and HARPS radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2011-10-01

    We use full available array of radial velocity data, including recently published HARPS and Keck observatory sets, to characterize the orbital configuration of the planetary system orbiting GJ876. First, we propose and describe in detail a fast method to fit perturbed orbital configuration, based on the integration of the sensitivity equations inferred by the equations of the original N-body problem. Further, we find that it is unsatisfactory to treat the available radial velocity data for GJ876 in the traditional white noise model, because the actual noise appears autocorrelated (and demonstrates non-white frequency spectrum). The time scale of this correlation is about a few days, and the contribution of the correlated noise is about 2 m/s (i.e., similar to the level of internal errors in the Keck data). We propose a variation of the maximum-likelihood algorithm to estimate the orbital configuration of the system, taking into account the red noise effects. We show, in particular, that the non-zero orbital eccentricity of the innermost planet d, obtained in previous studies, is likely a result of misinterpreted red noise in the data. In addition to offsets in some orbital parameters, the red noise also makes the fit uncertainties systematically underestimated (while they are treated in the traditional white noise model). Also, we show that the orbital eccentricity of the outermost planet is actually ill-determined, although bounded by ~0.2. Finally, we investigate possible orbital non-coplanarity of the system, and limit the mutual inclination between the planets b and c orbits by 5°-15°, depending on the angular position of the mutual orbital nodes.

  10. Astrometry, radial velocity, and photometry: the HD 128311 system remixed with data from HST, HET, and APT

    SciTech Connect

    McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz.; Cochran, William D.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hatzes, Artie; Harrison, Tom E.; Johns-Krull, Chris; Nelan, Ed

    2014-11-01

    We have used high-cadence radial velocity measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with published velocities from the Lick 3 m Shane Telescope, combined with astrometric data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance Sensors to refine the orbital parameters of the HD 128311 system, and determine an inclination of 55.°95 ± 14.°55 and true mass of 3.789 {sub −0.432}{sup +0.924} M {sub JUP} for HD 128311 c. The combined radial velocity data also reveal a short period signal which could indicate a third planet in the system with an Msin i of 0.133 ± 0.005 M {sub JUP} or stellar phenomena. Photometry from the T12 0.8 m automatic photometric telescope at the Fairborn Observatory and HST are used to determine a photometric period close to, but not within the errors of the radial velocity signal. We performed a cross-correlation bisector analysis of the radial velocity data to look for correlations with the photometric period and found none. Dynamical integrations of the proposed system show long-term stability with the new orbital parameters of over 10 million years. Our new orbital elements do not support the claims of HD 128311 b and c being in mean motion resonance.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 107 B8-A0 stars (Albitzky, 1947)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albitzky, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    In Table XII are given the final values of the observed radial velocities for 107 stars. For 16 of these stars the radial velocities have been admitted to be variable which makes 14% of the total number of the stars observed. This percentage is smaller than that usually accepted, viz. about 25-30%; but with so small dispersion as ours one must be more careful in announcing the variability of a radial velocity. The data of the Table XII are self-explanatory; the magnitudes are visual and the spectral types are those of H.D. in the column 8 are given the numbers of spectrograms measured. In the remarks betGC signifies Burnham's General catalogue of Double Stars, etc.; Moore - J.H. Moore, General Catalogue of the Radial Velocities of Star, etc.; D.D.O. - Publications of the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto, Vol. I, Nr. 3. (2). For 91 stars with adopted constant velocities the mean value of p.e's is +/-3.57km/s and the number of spectrograms per star is 5.3. For the catalogue D.D.O. corresponding data are +/-2.85km/s and 5.8 (for stars B8-A0). The lower precision of the present catalogue may be explained by the small dispersion of our spectrograph: 75Å/mm instead of 33-66Å/mm for D.D.O. (1 data file).

  12. Whole-mantle radially anisotropic shear velocity structure from spectral-element waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, S. W.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    The radially anisotropic shear velocity structure of the Earth's mantle provides a critical window on the interior dynamics of the planet, with isotropic variations that are interpreted in terms of thermal and compositional heterogeneity and anisotropy in terms of flow. While significant progress has been made in the more than 30 yr since the advent of global seismic tomography, many open questions remain regarding the dual roles of temperature and composition in shaping mantle convection, as well as interactions between different dominant scales of convective phenomena. We believe that advanced seismic imaging techniques, such as waveform inversion using accurate numerical simulations of the seismic wavefield, represent a clear path forwards towards addressing these open questions through application to whole-mantle imaging. To this end, we employ a `hybrid' waveform-inversion approach, which combines the accuracy and generality of the spectral finite element method (SEM) for forward modelling of the global wavefield, with non-linear asymptotic coupling theory for efficient inverse modelling. The resulting whole-mantle model (SEMUCB-WM1) builds on the earlier successful application of these techniques for global modelling at upper mantle and transition-zone depths (≤800 km) which delivered the models SEMum and SEMum2. Indeed, SEMUCB-WM1 is the first whole-mantle model derived from fully numerical SEM-based forward modelling. Here, we detail the technical aspects of the development of our whole-mantle model, as well as provide a broad discussion of isotropic and radially anisotropic model structure. We also include an extensive discussion of model uncertainties, specifically focused on assessing our results at transition-zone and lower-mantle depths.

  13. The kinematical analysis of proper motions and radial velocities of stars by means of the vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, A.; Vityazev, . V.; , Kumkova I. I.

    2009-09-01

    The paper describes the application of the 3-D vector spherical harmonics (henceforth VSH) to the investigation of stellar kinematics. The VSH technique is suitable for present and future catalogues which contain all three components of velocity vector: proper motions and radial velocities. In general, the VSH allows to detect all the systematic components in the stellar velocity field and does not depend on any model. If some physical model is used, the VSH not only determines the parameters of the model, but detects the systematic components which are beyond the model. The application of the VSH to the Hipparcos data complimented with radial velocities discovers the systematic components which are beyond the linear Ogorodnikov-milne model.

  14. Radial velocities of bright southern stars. III - Late-type standard stars at 12 A/mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J.; Nordstrom, B.

    1983-08-01

    An analysis is conducted of radial velocities measured on 51 spectrograms of 14 late type standard stars at a dispersion of 12.4 A/mm. A list of 15 suitable lines and wavelengths for radial velocity determination in late type spectra is established, by means of which the internal and external standard errors for a single plate are found to be 0.25 and 0.66 km/sec. The present velocity system is in good agreement with the standard system, but the results obtained for HD 51250 agree better with the revised velocity proposed by Batten (1982). The variability of the former IAU standard stars HD 35410 and HD 80170 is confirmed.

  15. WIYN open cluster study. LIX. Radial velocity membership of the evolved population of the old open cluster NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect

    Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Platais, Imants E-mail: imants@pha.jhu.edu

    2014-10-01

    The open cluster NGC 6791 has been the focus of much recent study due to its intriguing combination of old age and high metallicity (∼8 Gyr, [Fe/H] = +0.30), as well as its location within the Kepler field. As part of the WIYN Open Cluster Study, we present precise (σ = 0.38 km s{sup –1}) radial velocities for proper motion candidate members of NGC 6791 from Platais et al. Our survey, extending down to g' ∼ 16.8, is comprised of the evolved cluster population, including blue stragglers, giants, and horizontal branch stars. Of the 280 proper-motion-selected stars above our magnitude limit, 93% have at least one radial velocity measurement and 79% have three measurements over the course of at least 200 days, sufficient for secure radial-velocity-determined membership of non-velocity-variable stars. The Platais et al. proper motion catalog includes 12 anomalous horizontal branch candidates blueward of the red clump, of which we find only 4 to be cluster members. Three fall slightly blueward of the red clump and the fourth is consistent with being a blue straggler. The cleaned color-magnitude diagram shows a richly populated red giant branch and a blue straggler population. Half of the blue stragglers are in binaries. From our radial velocity measurement distribution, we find the cluster's radial velocity dispersion to be σ {sub c} = 0.62 ± 0.10 km s{sup –1}. This corresponds to a dynamical mass of ∼4600 M {sub ☉}.

  16. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ☉} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ∼1.6M {sub ☉} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  17. Radial velocity mapping of Paczyński's star AW UMa: not a contact binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribulla, T.; Rucinski, S. M.

    2008-05-01

    We present 2D (radial velocity, orbital phase) spectroscopic results for the very low mass-ratio close binary AW UMa which strongly indicate that the spectroscopic mass ratio (qsp = 0.10) does not agree with the photometrically derived one and that the widely adopted contact binary model appears to experience serious inconsistencies and limitations for this object. AW UMa is compared with V566 Oph (qsp = 0.26) which we found to behave according to the contact model. Observed broadening functions of AW UMa can be interpreted by a very strong limb darkening and/or non-solid-body rotation of the dominant primary component; the former assumption is unphysical while the differential rotation is not supported by an apparent stability of localized, dark features on the outer side of the primary. There are indications of the existence of an equatorial belt encompassing the whole system. All deficiencies in the interpretation and the discrepancy between the photometric and spectroscopic mass ratio of AW UMa can be solved within a new model of AW UMa where both components are detached and the system is submerged in a stream of hot, optically thick matter which mimics the stellar contact. While the masses and their ratio are correctly given by spectroscopy, the photometric picture is heavily modified by the matter engulfing both stars in the equatorial plane. Based on the data obtained at the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto. E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk (TP); rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca (SMR)

  18. The Latest Results from Project NIRRVS: Precise Near Infrared Radial Velocity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; NIRRVS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We will present the latest results from a prototype PRV survey with CSHELL. With CSHELL at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility atop Mauna Kea (R~46,000), we have completed a PRV 2.3 micron survey to detect exoplanets around ~30 red, low mass, and young stars. We are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~30 m/s on our survey targets. We are following up candidate RV variables, and have confirmed other previously known RV variables. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm at 2.3 microns, this performance with CSHELL is limited by detector artifacts, and fringing in the data and flatfields. iSHELL will replace CSHELL at IRTF, with first light expected in April 2016. iSHELL is a 1.15-5.4 micron high spectral resolution (R~70,000) immersion grating, cross-dispersed, white pupil spectrograph. With iSHELL we should be able to obtain a precision of less than 5 m/s in the NIR with iSHELL from the improvements in spectral grasp alone.

  19. Study of SBS 1202+583. Features of the Radial Velocity Distribution Over the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.

    2014-09-01

    This article is a continuation of our study of the galaxy SBS 1202+583 (VV270ab) by using panoramic spectroscopy data obtained in our observations with multipupil spectrographs - the MPFS at the 6-m telescope of the SAO of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the `'VAGR" at the 2.6-m telescope of the BAO in Armenia. An analysis of the radial velocity field in the Hα emission line of this object, previously characterized as a complex consisting of more than nine HII regions [1], indicates the two main substructures of them. The closest substructure associated with the HII region SBS1202+583C1 (from the component VV270b) is disintegrating under the influence of a distant substructure associated with SBS1202+583NE4 (from the component VV270a) which is the most massive and most powerful Hα emission source. The perturbation field, owing to its gravitational effect, stimulates a directed motion of most of the HII regions as they rotate simultaneously.

  20. Determination of U, V, and W from single station Doppler radar radial velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. L.; Green, J. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The ST/MST (stratosphere troposphere/mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) clear air Doppler radar, or wind profiler, is an important tool in observational meteorology because of its capability to remote observe dynamic parameters of the atmosphere. There are difficulties in transforming the observed radial velocities into meteorological wind components. How this problem has been treated in the past is reviewed, and some of the analysis is recast to a form more suited to the high diagnostic abilities of a number of fixed beam configurations with reference to a linear wind field. The results, in conjunction with other works which treats problems such as the effects of finite sample volumes in the presence of nonhomogeneous atmospheric reflectivity, have implications important to the design of both individual MST/ST radars and MST/ST radar networks. The key parameters to uncoupling terms in the scaling equations are w sub x and w sub y. Whenever the stratiform condition, which states that these two parameters are negligible, is satisfied, a five beam ST radar may determine unbiased values of u, v, and w for sample volumes directly above the radar. The divergence and partial deformation of the flow may also be determined. Three beam systems can determine w and w sub z, but are unable to obtain u and v wind components uncontaminated by vertical sheer terms, even when the stratiform condition is satisfied.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M dwarfs activity and radial velocity (Gomes da Silva+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes da, Silva; J.; Santos; N., C.; Bonfils; X.; Delfosse; X.; Forveille; T.; Udry; S.; Dumusque; X.; Lovis; C.

    2012-03-01

    Due to their low mass and luminosity, M dwarfs are ideal targets if one hopes to find low-mass planets similar to Earth by using the radial velocity (RV) method. However, stellar magnetic cycles could add noise or even mimic the RV signal of a long-period companion. Following our previous work that studied the correlation between activity cycles and long-term RV variations for K dwarfs we now expand that research to the lower-end of the main sequence. Our objective is to detect any correlations between long-term activity variations and the observed RV of a sample of M dwarfs. We used a sample of 27 M-dwarfs with a median observational timespan of 5.9 years. The cross-correlation function (CCF) with its parameters RV, bisector inverse slope (BIS), full-width-at-half- maximum (FWHM) and contrast have been computed from the HARPS spectrum. The activity index have been derived using the Na I D doublet. These parameters were compared with the activity level of the stars to search for correlations. We detected RV variations up to ~5m/s that we can attribute to activity cycle effects. However, only 36% of the stars with long-term activity variability appear to have their RV affected by magnetic cycles, on the typical timescale of ~6 years. Therefore, we suggest a careful analysis of activity data when searching for extrasolar planets using long-timespan RV data. (2 data files).

  2. Developments in simulations and software for a near-infrared precision radial velocity spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Bender, Chad F.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel P.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Hearty, Frederick R.

    2014-07-01

    We present developments in simulations and software for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF), an R~50,000 near-infrared cross-dispersed radial velocity spectrograph that will be used to search for planets around M dwarfs. HPF is fiber-fed, operates in the zYJ bands, and uses a 1.7μm cutoff HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) NIR detector. We have constructed an end-to-end simulator that accepts as input a range of stellar models contaminated with telluric features and processes these through a simulated detector. This simulator accounts for the characteristics of the H2RG, including interpixel capacitance, persistence, nonlinearities, read noise, and other detector characteristics, as measured from our engineering-grade H2RG. It also implements realistic order curvature. We describe applications of this simulator including optimization of the fiber configuration at the spectrograph slit and selection of properties for a laser frequency comb calibration source. The simulator has also provided test images for development of the HPF survey extraction and RV analysis pipeline and we describe progress on this pipeline itself, which will implement optimal extraction, laser frequency comb and emission lamp wavelength calibration, and cross-correlation based RV measurement.

  3. Calibration of high accuracy radial velocity spectrographs: beyond the Th-Ar lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildi, Francois; Pepe, Francesco; Lovis, Christophe; Chazelas, Bruno; Wilken, Tobias; Manescau, Antonio; Pasquini, Luca; Holzwarth, Ronald; Stenimetz, Tilo; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor; Lo Curto, Gaspare

    2009-08-01

    Since its first light in 2003, the HARPS radial velocity spectrograph (RVS) has performed exquisitely well on the 3.6m ESO telescope at La Silla Observatory (Chile). It now routinely exhibits a measurement noise of 0.5 m/s or 1.7 10-9 on a relative scale. Despite innovative work by Lovis and colleagues [14] to improve the accuracy obtained with the calibration lamps used, there is evidence that still better performance could be achieved by using more stable wavelength standards. In this paper, we present two methods are aim at overcoming the shortcoming of present day calibrators and that could satisfy the need for a cm/s -level calibrator like we are planning on using on the 2nd generation instruments at the VLT and on the ELT instrumentation. A temperature-stabilized Fabry-Perot interferometer has the promise of being stable to a few cm/s and has very uniform line levels and spacings, while a laser comb has already achieved a precision better than 15 cm/s, despite using only one of the 72 orders of the spectrographs.

  4. Studying the Sun's radial velocity jitter to improve low-mass exoplanet detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, R. D.; Cameron, A. C.; Queloz, D.; Fares, R.; Llama, J.; Deleuil, M.; Gillon, M.; Hatzes, A.; Lanza, A. F.; Lovis, C.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Pollaco, D.; Ségransan, D.; Unruh, Y.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most common methods used to discover extra-solar planets is to monitor a star's radial velocity (RV) in order to detect the reflex orbital motion caused by one or more planets orbiting the star. When looking for "small" planets (Neptune or Earth mass), the RV signals induced by these planets are entangled with the jitter arising from the star's magnetic activity. The Sun's activity is well known and it is possible to remove all RV components induced by all other bodies of the solar system. We have obtained its activity-driven RV variations over two solar rotations using HARPS by observing sunlight reflected off the bright asteroid Vesta. We aim to model the solar RV jitter in terms of the continuum lightcurve, the chromospheric Ca II H&K emission, and the line-profile distortions produced by spots drifting across the face of the Sun. By using the "ground truth" of solar observations in this way, we will identify photometric and spectroscopic proxies that will make it possible to model and remove the stellar activity RV contribution from exoplanet RV curves.

  5. Near-infrared calibration systems for precise radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Kerber, Florian; Nave, Gillian; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Smoker, Jonathan; Käufl, Hans-Ulrich; Figueira, P. R. L.

    2012-09-01

    We present work done to prepare two new near-infrared calibration sources for use on high-precision astrophysical spectrographs. Uranium-neon is an atomic calibration source, commercially available as a hollow-cathode lamp, with over 10 000 known emission lines between 0.85 and 4 μm. Four gas cells — containing C2H2, H13CN, 12CO, and 13CO, respectively—are available as National Institute of Standards and Technology (nist) Standard Reference Materials (SRMs), and provide narrow absorption lines between 1.5 and 1.65 μm. These calibration sources may prove useful for wavelength-calibrating the future near-infrared high-precision radial-velocity spectrometers, including the Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with a Near-infrared Echelle Spectrograph (CARMENES),1 the SpectroPolarimetre InfraROUge (SPIRou)∗, and the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HPF).2

  6. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from transit timing variations and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses - radial velocities (RVs) and transit timing variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable - as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This `sensitivity bias' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in the sensitivity of the two methods with orbital period and system architecture, which may compound the discrepancies between them (e.g. short-period planets detectable by RVs may be more dense due to atmospheric loss). We advocate for continued mass measurements using both approaches as a means both to measure the masses of more planets and to identify potential differences in planet structure that may result from their dynamical and environmental histories.

  7. Retrieval of Precise Radial Velocities from High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectra of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Plavchan, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Bottom, Michael; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; White, Russel J.; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Charles A.; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Johnson, John; Ciardi, David R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; von Braun, Kaspar; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa A.; Kane, Stephen R.; Tanner, Angelle M.; Walp, Bernie; Crawford, Sam; Lin, Sean

    2015-01-01

    We present a data analysis pipeline focused on obtaining precision radial velocities (RV) of M Dwarfs from spectra taken between 2.309 and 2.316 microns by the CSHELL spectrograph (R~46,000) at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility with the aid of a methane isotopologue gas cell (see poster by Plavchan et al. at this meeting). The pipeline compares the observed spectra with a forward model defined by parameters that are optimized using a simplex amoeba algorithm. The stellar template is optimized simultaneously with the fit parameters in an iterative process. The pipeline accounts for temporal variations in the spectral wavelength solution, line spread function, and interference fringes due to instrumental effects. We apply our pipeline to the M Dwarfs GJ 15 A and GJ 876 and the M Giant SV Peg. For GJ 15 A, we are able to obtain 30 m/s RV precision. For the planet host GJ 876, the two most massive planets are easily retrievable from our RV curve. For SV Peg, the single night RV precision can be as low as 15 m/s, with < 5 m/s obtainable through data stacking.

  8. Asymmetric orbital distribution near mean motion resonance: Application to planets observed by Kepler and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-05-10

    Many multiple-planet systems have been found by the Kepler transit survey and various radial velocity (RV) surveys. Kepler planets show an asymmetric feature, namely, there are small but significant deficits/excesses of planet pairs with orbital period spacing slightly narrow/wide of the exact resonance, particularly near the first order mean motion resonance (MMR), such as 2:1 and 3:2 MMR. Similarly, if not exactly the same, an asymmetric feature (pileup wide of 2:1 MMR) is also seen in RV planets, but only for massive ones. We analytically and numerically study planets' orbital evolutions near and in the MMR. We find that their orbital period ratios could be asymmetrically distributed around the MMR center regardless of dissipation. In the case of no dissipation, Kepler planets' asymmetric orbital distribution could be partly reproduced for 3:2 MMR but not for 2:1 MMR, implying that dissipation might be more important to the latter. The pileup of massive RV planets just wide of 2:1 MMR is found to be consistent with the scenario that planets formed separately then migrated toward the MMR. The location of the pileup infers a K value of 1-100 on the order of magnitude for massive planets, where K is the damping rate ratio between orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis during planet migration.

  9. Radial velocity studies and absolute parameters of contact binaries. II - OO Aquilae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    1989-01-01

    New high-precision radial velocities of the contact binary OO Aql have been obtained using the cross-correlation technique. The orbital elements have been corrected for proximity effects, using an analysis of published light curves of the system. The spectroscopically determined mass ratio of 0.843 is in excellent agreement with the photometrically determined value. OO Aql thus has one of the largest mass ratios observed for a contact binary. In contrast to almost all other contact binaries of G spectral type, the primary minimum is due to a transit by the less massive component, and thus the system is classified as an A-type contact binary. Absolute parameters are determined for OO Aql, which indicate that the primary component, although similar to the Sun in mass, is significantly more evolved. An age of about 8 Gyr and a metal abundance of one-half that of the Sun are determined. It seems that the system may have only recently evolved into contact, as suggested by Mochnacki, and that it is an important object for studies of the structure and evolution of contact binaries.

  10. An Efficient, Compact, and Versatile Fiber Double Scrambler for High Precision Radial Velocity Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence; Levi, Eric; Schwab, Christian; Hearty, Fred; MacDonald, Nick

    2015-06-01

    We present the design and test results of a compact optical fiber double-scrambler for high-resolution Doppler radial velocity instruments. This device consists of a single optic: a high-index n ∼ 2 ball lens that exchanges the near and far fields between two fibers. When used in conjunction with octagonal fibers, this device yields very high scrambling gains (SGs) and greatly desensitizes the fiber output from any input illumination variations, thereby stabilizing the instrument profile of the spectrograph and improving the Doppler measurement precision. The system is also highly insensitive to input pupil variations, isolating the spectrograph from telescope illumination variations and seeing changes. By selecting the appropriate glass and lens diameter the highest efficiency is achieved when the fibers are practically in contact with the lens surface, greatly simplifying the alignment process when compared to classical double-scrambler systems. This prototype double-scrambler has demonstrated significant performance gains over previous systems, achieving SGs in excess of 10,000 with a throughput of ∼87% using uncoated Polymicro octagonal fibers. Adding a circular fiber to the fiber train further increases the SG to >20,000, limited by laboratory measurement error. While this fiber system is designed for the Habitable-zone Planet Finder spectrograph, it is more generally applicable to other instruments in the visible and near-infrared. Given the simplicity and low cost, this fiber scrambler could also easily be multiplexed for large multi-object instruments.