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Sample records for adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis

  1. Methemoglobinemia and eccentrocytosis in equine erythrocyte flavin adenine dinucleotide deficiency.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J W; Stockham, S L; Scott, M A; Johnson, P J; Donald, J J; Chandler, C J

    2003-11-01

    This report describes erythrocyte biochemical findings in an adult Spanish mustang mare that exhibited persistent methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis that were not related to the consumption or administration of an exogenous oxidant. The methemoglobinemia was attributed to a deficiency in cytochrome-b5 reductase (Cb5R) activity, and the eccentrocytes and pyknocytes were attributed to a marked deficiency in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutathione reductase (GR) activity that resulted in decreased reduced glutathione concentration within erythrocytes. The GR activity increased to a near-normal value after addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to the enzyme assay, indicating a deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes. The methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis were attributed to deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes because the GR and Cb5R enzymes use FAD as a cofactor. This deficiency in FAD results from a defect in erythrocyte riboflavin metabolism, which has not been documented previously in animals. PMID:14608016

  2. Orthophosphite-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Malacinski, George M.; Konetzka, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Information was obtained on the general properties and specificity of orthophosphite-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidoreductase. The enzyme was extracted from Pseudomonas fluorescens 195 grown in medium containing orthophosphite as the sole source of phosphorus. An enzyme preparation suitable for characterization was obtained from crude extracts by use of high-speed centrifugation, protamine sulfate precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex gel filtration. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at pH 7.0, and was inactivated within 6 min at 37 C. Arsenite, hypophosphite, nitrite, selenite, and tellurite were not oxidized by the enzyme. Sulfite inhibited the enzymatic oxidation of orthophosphite in an apparent competitive manner. PMID:4381632

  3. Selective inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinases by dinucleoside disulfide mimics of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Sham, Yuk Yin; Chen, Liqiang; Felczak, Krzysztof; Bennett, Eric; Wilson, Daniel; Aldrich, Courtney; Yu, Jose S; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Magni, Giulio; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2009-08-01

    Diadenosine disulfide (5) was reported to inhibit NAD kinase from Listeria monocytogenes and the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex has been solved. We have synthesized tiazofurin adenosine disulfide (4) and the disulfide 5, and found that these compounds were moderate inhibitors of human NAD kinase (IC(50)=110 microM and IC(50)=87 microM, respectively) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD kinase (IC(50)=80 microM and IC(50)=45 microM, respectively). We also found that NAD mimics with a short disulfide (-S-S-) moiety were able to bind in the folded (compact) conformation but not in the common extended conformation, which requires the presence of a longer pyrophosphate (-O-P-O-P-O-) linkage. Since majority of NAD-dependent enzymes bind NAD in the extended conformation, selective inhibition of NAD kinases by disulfide analogues has been observed. Introduction of bromine at the C8 of the adenine ring restricted the adenosine moiety of diadenosine disulfides to the syn conformation making it even more compact. The 8-bromoadenosine adenosine disulfide (14) and its di(8-bromoadenosine) analogue (15) were found to be the most potent inhibitors of human (IC(50)=6 microM) and mycobacterium NAD kinase (IC(50)=14-19 microM reported so far. None of the disulfide analogues showed inhibition of lactate-, and inosine monophosphate-dehydrogenase (IMPDH), enzymes that bind NAD in the extended conformation. PMID:19596199

  4. Intermolecular interactions of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasensky, Joshua; Junaid Farooqi, M.; Urayama, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD^+/NADH) is a coenzyme involved in cellular respiration as an electron transporter. In aqueous solution, the molecule exhibits a folding transition characterized by the stacking of its aromatic moieties. A transition to an unfolded conformation is possible using chemical denaturants like methanol. Because the reduced NADH form is fluorescent, the folding transition can be monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy, e.g., via a blue-shift in the UV-excited emission peak upon methanol unfolding. Here we present evidence of interactions between NADH molecules in solution. We measure the excited-state emission from NADH at various concentrations (1-100 μM in MOPS buffer, pH 7.5; 337-nm wavelength excitation). Unlike for the folded form, the emission peak wavelength of the unfolded form is concentration dependent, exhibiting a red-shift with higher NADH concentration, suggesting the presence of intermolecular interactions. An understanding of NADH spectra in solution would assist in interpreting intercellular NADH measurements used for the in vivo monitoring cellular energy metabolism.

  5. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and Ca2+ mobilization.

    PubMed

    Mándi, Miklós; Bak, Judit

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological processes are controlled by a great diversity of Ca2+ signals that depend on Ca2+ entry into the cell and/or Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores. Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores is gated by a family of messengers including inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). There is increasing evidence for a novel intracellular Ca2+ release channel that may be targeted by NAADP and that displays properties distinctly different from the well-characterized InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. These channels appear to localize on a wider range of intracellular organelles, including the acidic Ca2+ stores. Activation of the NAADP-sensitive Ca2+ channels evokes complex changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels by means of channel chatter with other intracellular Ca2+ channels. The recent demonstration of changes in intracellular NAADP levels in response to physiologically relevant extracellular stimuli highlights the significance of NAADP as an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:18569524

  6. Ototoxic Model of Oxaliplatin and Protection from Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Dalian, Ding; Haiyan, Jiang; Yong, Fu; Yongqi, Li; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, an anticancer drug commonly used to treat colorectal cancer and other tumors, has a number of serious side effects, most notably neuropathy and ototoxicity. To gain insights into its ototoxic profile, oxaliplatin was applied to rat cochlear organ cultures. Consistent with it neurotoxic propensity, oxaliplatin selectively damaged nerve fibers at a very low dose 1 μM. In contrast, the dose required to damage hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons was 50 fold higher (50 μM). Oxailiplatin-induced cochlear lesions initially increased with dose, but unexpectedly decreased at very high doses. This non-linear dose response could be related to depressed oxaliplatin uptake via active transport mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that axonal degeneration involves biologically active processes which can be greatly attenuated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). To determine if NAD+ would protect spiral ganglion axons and the hair cells from oxaliplatin damage, cochlear cultures were treated with oxaliplatin alone at doses of 10 μM or 50 μM respectively as controls or combined with 20 mM NAD+. Treatment with 10 μM oxaliplatin for 48 hours resulted in minor damage to auditory nerve fibers, but spared cochlear hair cells. However, when cochlear cultures were treated with 10 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+, most auditory nerve fibers were intact. 50 μM oxaliplatin destroyed most of spiral ganglion neurons and cochlear hair cells with apoptotic characteristics of cell fragmentations. However, 50 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+ treatment greatly reduced neuronal degenerations and hair cell missing. The results suggested that NAD+ provides significant protection against oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, which may be due to its actions of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and energy supply. PMID:25419212

  7. Molybdopterin Dinucleotide Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Meina; Seduk, Farida; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Leimkühler, Silke

    2011-01-01

    The molybdenum cofactor is modified by the addition of GMP or CMP to the C4′ phosphate of molybdopterin forming the molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide or molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor, respectively. The two reactions are catalyzed by specific enzymes as follows: the GTP:molybdopterin guanylyltransferase MobA and the CTP:molybdopterin cytidylyltransferase MocA. Both enzymes show 22% amino acid sequence identity and are specific for their respective nucleotides. Crystal structure analysis of MobA revealed two conserved motifs in the N-terminal domain of the protein involved in binding of the guanine base. Based on these motifs, we performed site-directed mutagenesis studies to exchange the amino acids to the sequence found in the paralogue MocA. Using a fully defined in vitro system, we showed that the exchange of five amino acids was enough to obtain activity with both GTP and CTP in either MocA or MobA. Exchange of the complete N-terminal domain of each protein resulted in the total inversion of nucleotide specificity activity, showing that the N-terminal domain determines nucleotide recognition and binding. Analysis of protein-protein interactions showed that the C-terminal domain of either MocA or MobA determines the specific binding to the respective acceptor protein. PMID:21081498

  8. Glutamate Synthase: Properties of the Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roon, Robert J.; Even, Harvey L.; Larimore, Fred

    1974-01-01

    A reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent glutamate synthase has been detected and partially purified from crude extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme is specific for NADH, glutamine, and α-ketoglutarate (Km values of 2.6 μM, 1.0 mM, and 140 μM, respectively) and has a pH optimum between 7.1 and 7.7. The stoichiometry of the reaction has been determined as 2 mol of glutamate synthesized per mol of glutamine consumed. Glutamate synthase can be distinguished from either of the glutamate dehydrogenases of yeast on the basis of its substrate requirements and behavior during agarose gel and ion exchange chromatography. Variations in the specific activity of glutamate synthase, which occur in response to changes in the growth medium, are similar in character to those observed with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent (anabolic) glutamate dehydrogenase. PMID:4362465

  9. Affinity chromatography of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide-linked dehydrogenases on immobilized derivatives of the dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Standish; O'Carra, Pádraig

    1973-01-01

    1. Three established methods for immobilization of ligands through primary amino groups promoted little or no attachment of NAD+ through the 6-amino group of the adenine residue. Two of these methods (coupling to CNBr-activated agarose and to carbodi-imide-activated carboxylated agarose derivatives) resulted instead in attachment predominantly through the ribosyl residues. Other immobilized derivatives were prepared by azolinkage of NAD+ (probably through the 8 position of the adenine residue) to a number of different spacer-arm–agarose derivatives. 2. The effectiveness of these derivatives in the affinity chromatography of a variety of NAD-linked dehydrogenases was investigated, applying rigorous criteria to distinguish general or non-specific adsorption effects from truly NAD-specific affinity (bio-affinity). The ribosyl-attached NAD+ derivatives displayed negligible bio-affinity for any of the NAD-linked dehydrogenases tested. The most effective azo-linked derivative displayed strong bio-affinity for glycer-aldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, weaker bio-affinity for lactate dehydrogenase and none at all for malate dehydrogenase, although these three enzymes have very similar affinities for soluble NAD+. Alcohol dehydrogenase and xanthine dehydrogenase were subject to such strong non-specific interactions with the hydrocarbon spacer-arm assembly that any specific affinity was completely eclipsed. 3. It is concluded that, in practice, the general effectiveness of a general ligand may be considerably distorted and attenuated by the nature of the immobilization linkage. However, this attenuation can result in an increase in specific effectiveness, allowing dehydrogenases to be separated from one another in a manner unlikely to be feasible if the general effectiveness of the ligand remained intact. 4. The bio-affinity of the various derivatives for lactate dehydrogenase is correlated with the known structure of the NAD+-binding site of this enzyme. Problems

  10. Sample preparation workflow for the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based analysis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate cofactors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ortmayr, Karin; Nocon, Justyna; Gasser, Brigitte; Mattanovich, Diethard; Hann, Stephan; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2014-08-01

    The accurate quantification of the highly unstable intracellular cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in its oxidized and reduced forms demands a thorough evaluation of the analytical workflow and dedicated methods reflecting their solution chemistry as well as the biological importance of their ratio. In this work, we present a workflow for the analysis of intracellular levels of oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in the yeast Pichia pastoris, including hot aqueous extraction, chromatographic separation in reversed-phase conditions employing a 100% wettable stationary phase, and subsequent tandem mass spectrometric analysis. A thorough evaluation and optimization of the sample preparation procedure resulted in excellent biological repeatabilities (on average <10%, N = 3) without employing an internal standardization approach. As a consequence, the methodology proved to be appropriate for the relative assessment of intracellular levels of oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in different P. pastoris strains. The ratio of reduced versus oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate was significantly higher in an engineered strain overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase than in the corresponding wildtype strain. Interestingly, a difference was also observed in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate pool size, which was significantly higher in the wildtype than in the modified strain. PMID:24841212

  11. Unusual folded conformation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide bound to flavin reductase P.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J. J.; Tu, S. C.; Barbour, L. J.; Barnes, C. L.; Krause, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    The 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of flavin reductase P with the inhibitor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) bound in the active site has been determined. NAD adopts a novel, folded conformation in which the nicotinamide and adenine rings stack in parallel with an inter-ring distance of 3.6 A. The pyrophosphate binds next to the flavin cofactor isoalloxazine, while the stacked nicotinamide/adenine moiety faces away from the flavin. The observed NAD conformation is quite different from the extended conformations observed in other enzyme/NAD(P) structures; however, it resembles the conformation proposed for NAD in solution. The flavin reductase P/NAD structure provides new information about the conformational diversity of NAD, which is important for understanding catalysis. This structure offers the first crystallographic evidence of a folded NAD with ring stacking, and it is the first enzyme structure containing an FMN cofactor interacting with NAD(P). Analysis of the structure suggests a possible dynamic mechanism underlying NADPH substrate specificity and product release that involves unfolding and folding of NADP(H). PMID:10493573

  12. Conducting polymer and its composite materials based electrochemical sensor for Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH).

    PubMed

    Omar, Fatin Saiha; Duraisamy, Navaneethan; Ramesh, K; Ramesh, S

    2016-05-15

    Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH) is an important coenzyme in the human body that participates in many metabolic reactions. The impact of abnormal concentrations of NADH significantly causes different diseases in human body. Electrochemical detection of NADH using bare electrode is a challenging task especially in the presence of main electroactive interferences such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and dopamine (DA). Modified electrodes have been widely explored to overcome the problems of poor sensitivity and selectivity occurred from bare electrodes. This review gives an overview on the progress of using conducting polymers, polyelectrolyte and its composites (co-polymer, carbonaceous, metal, metal oxide and clay) based modified electrodes for the sensing of NADH. In addition, developments on the fabrication of numerous conducting polymer composites based modified electrodes are clearly described. PMID:26774092

  13. Production and characterization of reduced NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate).

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Richard A; Thuring, Jan W; Conway, Stuart J; Packman, Len; Holmes, Andrew B; Genazzani, Armando A

    2004-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotide NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate) has been shown to act as a Ca2+-releasing intracellular messenger in a wide variety of systems from invertebrates to mammals and has been implicated in a number of cellular processes. NAADP is structurally very similar to its precursor, the endogenous coenzyme NADP and while much is known about the reduced form of NADP, NADPH, it is not known whether NAADP can also exist in a reduced state. Here we report that NAADP can be reduced to NAADPH by endogenous cellular enzymes and that NAADPH is functionally inert at the NAADP receptor. These data suggest that NAADPH could represent a mechanism for rapidly inactivating NAADP in cells. PMID:14606955

  14. Isotope effect studies of the chemical mechanism of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Willeford, O.; Wedding, R.T.

    1987-05-05

    The /sup 13/C primary kinetic isotope effect on the decarboxylation of malate by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula argentea is 1.0199 +/- 0.0006 with proteo L-malate-2-H and 1.0162 +/- 0.0003 with malate-2-d. The primary deuterium isotope effect is 1.45 +/- 0.10 on V/K and 1.93 +/- 0.13 on V/sub max/. This indicates a stepwise conversion of malate to pyruvate and CO/sub 2/ with hydride transfer preceding decarboxylation, thereby suggesting a discrete oxaloacetate intermediate. This is in agreement with the stepwise nature of the chemical mechanism of other malic enzymes despite the Crassula enzyme's inability to reduce or decarboxylate oxaloacetate. Differences in morphology and allosteric regulation between enzymes suggest specialization of the Crassula malic enzyme for the physiology of crassulacean and acid metabolism while maintaining the catalytic events founds in malic enzymes from animal sources.

  15. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum: Purification and Properties

    PubMed Central

    Andreesen, Jan R.; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    1974-01-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent formate dehydrogenase in Clostridium thermoaceticum used, in addition to its natural electron acceptor, methyl and benzyl viologen. The enzyme was purified to a specific activity of 34 (micromoles per minute per milligram of protein) with NADP as electron acceptor. Disc gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme yielded two major and two minor protein bands, and during centrifugation in sucrose gradients two components of apparent molecular weights of 270,000 and 320,000 were obtained, both having formate dehydrogenase activity. The enzyme preparation catalyzed the reduction of riboflavine 5′-phosphate flavine adenine dinucleotide and methyl viologen by using reduced NADP as a source of electrons. It also had reduced NADP oxidase activity. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by cyanide and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. It was also inhibited by hypophosphite, an inhibition that was reversed by formate. Sulfite inhibited the activity with NADP but not with methyl viologen as acceptor. The apparent Km at 55 C and pH 7.5 for formate was 2.27 × 10−4 M with NADP and 0.83 × 10−4 with methyl viologen as acceptor. The apparent Km for NADP was 1.09 × 10−4 M and for methyl viologen was 2.35 × 10−3 M. NADP showed substrate inhibition at 5 × 10−3 M and higher concentrations. With NADP as electron acceptor, the enzyme had a broad pH optimum between 7 and 9.5. The apparent temperature optimum was 85 C. In the absence of substrates, the enzyme was stable at 70 C but was rapidly inactivated at temperatures above 73 C. The enzyme was very sensitive to oxygen but was stabilized by thiol-iron complexes and formate. PMID:4154039

  16. A method of preparation and purification of (4R)-deuterated-reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S S; Gready, J E

    1994-09-01

    (4R)-Deuterated-reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, (4R)-[2H]NADPH, was prepared by reduction of NADP+ using an NADP(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.2) from Thermoanaerobium brockii and isopropanol-d8 as substrate at 43 degrees C, pH 9. More than 80% of the product was identified as reduced cofactor by reverse-phase (ODS) HPLC, and a 1H NMR study showed that all of the reduced cofactor was (4R)-deuterated. Less than 10% of the product was oxidized cofactor, the remainder being impurities from the breakdown of the dinucleotide compound. Subsequent purification carried out by semipreparative reverse-phase HPLC with 0.1 M NaCl at pH 8.5 gave a compound of more than 96% purity. Separated (4R)-[2H]NADPH fractions were freeze-dried and the white solid was stored at 5 degrees C with desiccant. PMID:7810866

  17. Magnitude of malate-aspartate reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide shuttle activity in intact respiring tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1977-11-01

    Measurements of respiration, CO2 and lactate production, and changes in the levels of various key metabolites of the glycolytic sequence and tricarboxylic acid cycle were made on five lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, Krebs II carcinoma, AS-30D carcinoma, and L1210 cells) incubated aerobically in the presence of uniformly labeled D-[14C]glucose. From these data, as well as earlier evidence demonstrating that the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) shuttle in these cells requires a transaminase step and is thus identified as the malate-aspartate shuttle (W.V.V. Greenhouse and A.L. Lehninger, Cancer Res., 36: 1392-1396, 1976), metabolic flux diagrams were constructed for the five cell lines. These diagrams show the relative rates of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and the malate-aspartate shuttle in these tumors. Large amounts of cytosolic NADH were oxidized by the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the NADH shuttle, comprising anywhere from about 20 to 80% of the total flow of reducing equivalents to oxygen in these tumors. Calculations of the sources of energy for adenosine triphosphate synthesis indicated that on the average about one-third of the respiratory adenosine triphosphate is generated by electron flow originating from cytosolic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle. PMID:198130

  18. Ligation-triggered fluorescent silver nanoclusters system for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijuan; Wang, Pei; Qiu, Xue; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we demonstrate a novel silver nanocluster-based fluorescent system for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an important biological small molecule involved in a wide range of biological processes. A single-stranded dumbbell DNA probe was designed and used for the assay, which contained a nick in the stem, a poly-cytosine nucleotide loop close to 5' end as the template for the formation of highly fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and another loop close to 3' end. Only in the presence of NAD(+), the probe was linked at 5' and 3' ends by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, which blocked the DNA polymerase-based extension reaction, ensuring the formation of fluorescent Ag NCs. This technique provided a logarithmic linear relationship in the range of 1 pM-500 nM with a detection limit of as low as 1 pM NAD(+), and exhibited high selectivity against its analogues, and was then successfully used for the detection of NAD(+) level in four kinds of cell homogenates. In addition, this new approach was conducted in an isothermal and homogeneous condition without the need of any thermal cycling, washing, and separation steps, making it very simple. Overall, this label-free protocol offers a promising alternative for the detection of NAD(+), taking advantage of specificity, sensitivity, cost-efficiency, and simplicity. PMID:24442015

  19. BRCA1 as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent metabolic switch in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Chen, Na-Na; Cao, Ji-Min; Sun, Wu-Ping; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Li, Chun-Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Both hereditary factors (e.g., BRCA1) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent metabolic pathways are implicated in the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. However, whether crosstalk exists between BRCA1 and NAD metabolism remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that: (i) BRCA1 inactivation events (mutation and promoter methylation) were accompanied by elevated levels of NAD; (ii) the knockdown or overexpression of BRCA1 was an effective way to induce an increase or decrease of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)-related NAD synthesis, respectively; and (iii) BRCA1 expression patterns were inversely correlated with NAD levels in human ovarian cancer specimens. In addition, it is worth noting that: (i) NAD incubation induced increased levels of BRCA1 in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) Nampt knockdown-mediated reduction in NAD levels was effective at inhibiting BRCA1 expression; and (iii) the overexpression of Nampt led to higher NAD levels and a subsequent increase in BRCA1 levels in primary ovarian cancer cells and A2780, HO-8910 and ES2 ovarian cancer cell lines. These results highlight a novel link between BRCA1 and NAD. Our findings imply that genetic (e.g., BRCA1 inactivation) and NAD-dependent metabolic pathways are jointly involved in the malignant progression of ovarian cancer. PMID:25486197

  20. 3-Picolyl Azide Adenine Dinucleotide as a Probe of Femtosecond to Picosecond Enzyme Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Li, Yun-Liang; Rock, William; Houtman, Jon C. D.; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Functionally relevant femtosecond to picosecond dynamics in enzyme active sites can be difficult to measure because of a lack of spectroscopic probes that can be located in the active site without altering the behavior of the enzyme. We have developed a new NAD+ analog 3-Picolyl Azide Adenine Dinucleotide (PAAD+), which has the potential to be a general spectroscopic probe for NAD-dependent enzymes. This analog is stable and binds in the active site of a typical NAD-dependent enzyme formate dehydrogenase (FDH) with similar characteristics to natural NAD+. It has an isolated infrared transition with high molar absorptivity that makes it suitable for observing enzyme dynamics using 2D IR spectroscopy. 2D IR experiments show that in aqueous solution, the analog undergoes complete spectral diffusion within hundreds of femtoseconds consistent with the water hydrogen bonding dynamics that would be expected. When bound to FDH in a binary complex, it shows picosecond fluctuations and a large static offset, consistent with previous studies of the binary complexes of this enzyme. These results show that PAAD+ is an excellent probe of local dynamics and that it should be a general tool for probing the dynamics of a wide range of NAD-dependent enzymes. PMID:22126535

  1. Preclinical evidence of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as an effective alarm parameter under hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Sun, Nannan; Mayevsky, Avraham; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of tissue hypoxia in the intensive care unit is essential for effective treatment. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been suggested to be the most sensitive indicator of tissue oxygenation at the mitochondrial level. However, no experimental evidence comparing the kinetics of changes in NADH and other physiological parameters has been provided. The aim of this study is to obtain the missing data in a systematic and reliable manner. We constructed four acute hypoxia models, including hypoxic hypoxia, hypemic hypoxia, circulatory hypoxia, and histogenous hypoxia, and measured NADH fluorescence, tissue reflectance, cerebral blood flow, respiration, and electrocardiography simultaneously from the induction of hypoxia until death. We found that NADH was not always the first onset parameter responding to hypoxia. The order of responses was mainly affected by the cause of hypoxia. However, NADH reached its alarm level earlier than the other monitored parameters, ranging from several seconds to >10 min. As such, we suggest that the NADH can be used as a hypoxia indicator, although the exact level that should be used must be further investigated. When the NADH alarm is detected, the body still has a chance to recover if appropriate and timely treatment is provided.

  2. Electrochemical oxidation of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Goran, Jacob M; Favela, Carlos A; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) substantially lower the overpotential necessary for dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation compared to nondoped CNTs or traditional carbon electrodes such as glassy carbon (GC). We observe a 370 mV shift in the peak potential (Ep) from GC to CNTs and another 170 mV shift from CNTs to 7.4 atom % N-CNTs in a sodium phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0) with 2.0 mM NADH (scan rate 10 mV/s). The sensitivity of 7.4 atom % N-CNTs to NADH was measured at 0.30 ± 0.04 A M(-1) cm(-2), with a limit of detection at 1.1 ± 0.3 μM and a linear range of 70 ± 10 μM poised at a low potential of -0.32 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4). NADH fouling, known to occur to the electrode surface during NADH oxidation, was investigated by measuring both the change in Ep and the resulting loss of electrode sensitivity. NADH degradation, known to occur in phosphate buffer, was characterized by absorbance at 340 nm and correlated with the loss of NADH electroactivity. N-CNTs are further demonstrated to be an effective platform for dehydrogenase-based biosensing by allowing glucose dehydrogenase to spontaneously adsorb onto the N-CNT surface and measuring the resulting electrode's sensitivity to glucose. The glucose biosensor had a sensitivity of 0.032 ± 0.003 A M(-1) cm(-2), a limit of detection at 6 ± 1 μM, and a linear range of 440 ± 50 μM. PMID:23991631

  3. Nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate activates the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hohenegger, Martin; Suko, Josef; Gscheidlinger, Regina; Drobny, Helmut; Zidar, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Calcium is a universal second messenger. The temporal and spatial information that is encoded in Ca(2+)-transients drives processes as diverse as neurotransmitter secretion, axonal outgrowth, immune responses and muscle contraction. Ca(2+)-release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores can be triggered by diffusible second messengers like Ins P (3), cyclic ADP-ribose or nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). A target has not yet been identified for the latter messenger. In the present study we show that nanomolar concentrations of NAADP trigger Ca(2+)-release from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. This was due to a direct action on the Ca(2+)-release channel/ryanodine receptor type-1, since in single channel recordings, NAADP increased the open probability of the purified channel protein. The effects of NAADP on Ca(2+)-release and open probability of the ryanodine receptor occurred over a similar concentration range (EC(50) approximately 30 nM) and were specific because (i) they were blocked by Ruthenium Red and ryanodine, (ii) the precursor of NAADP, NADP, was ineffective at equimolar concentrations, (iii) NAADP did not affect the conductance and reversal potential of the ryanodine receptor. Finally, we also detected an ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity in the sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction of skeletal muscle. This enzyme was not only capable of synthesizing cyclic GDP-ribose but also NAADP, with an activity of 0.25 nmol/mg/min. Thus, we conclude that NAADP is generated in the vicinity of type 1 ryanodine receptor and leads to activation of this ion channel. PMID:12102654

  4. Relationships between laser powers and photoacoustic signal intensities of flavin adenine dinucleotide and beta-carotene dissolved in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imakubo, Keiichi

    1994-10-01

    Ar ion laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy has been performed on 0.01 mu M flavin adenine dinucleotide in H2O and 0.01 mu M beta-carotene in n-hexane where the optical absorption spectroscopy is not applicable. On the basis of the linear relationships between laser powers and photoacoustic signal intensities up to 500 mW, it may be concluded that laser power ranging from 10 to 50 mW is required for the successful observation of photoacoustic signals without any photochemical or photobiological effects.

  5. In vivo native fluorescence spectroscopy and nicotinamide adinine dinucleotide/flavin adenine dinucleotide reduction and oxidation states of oral submucous fibrosis for chemopreventive drug monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivabalan, Shanmugam; Vedeswari, C. Ponranjini; Jayachandran, Sadaksharam; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Pravda, Chidambaranathan; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2010-01-01

    Native fluorescence spectroscopy has shown potential to characterize and diagnose oral malignancy. We aim at extending the native fluorescence spectroscopy technique to characterize normal and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) patients under pre- and post-treated conditions, and verify whether this method could also be considered in the monitoring of therapeutic prognosis noninvasively. In this study, 28 normal subjects and 28 clinically proven cases of OSF in the age group of 20 to 40 years are diagnosed using native fluorescence spectroscopy. The OSF patients are given dexamethasone sodium phosphate and hyaluronidase twice a week for 6 weeks, and the therapeutic response is monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence emission spectra of normal and OSF cases of both pre- and post-treated conditions are recorded in the wavelength region of 350 to 600 nm at an excitation wavelength of 330 nm. The statistical significance is verified using discriminant analysis. The oxidation-reduction ratio of the tissue is also calculated using the fluorescence emission intensities of flavin adenine dinucleotide and nicotinamide adinine dinucleotide at 530 and 440 nm, respectively, and they are compared with conventional physical clinical examinations. This study suggests that native fluorescence spectroscopy could also be extended to OSF diagnosis and therapeutic prognosis.

  6. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (Naadp+) Is an Essential Regulator of T-Lymphocyte Ca2+-Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Ingeborg; Potter, Barry V.L.; Mayr, Georg W.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2000-01-01

    Microinjection of human Jurkat T-lymphocytes with nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP+) dose-dependently stimulated intracellular Ca2+-signaling. At a concentration of 10 nM NAADP+ evoked repetitive and long-lasting Ca2+-oscillations of low amplitude, whereas at 50 and 100 nM, a rapid and high initial Ca2+-peak followed by trains of smaller Ca2+-oscillations was observed. Higher concentrations of NAADP+ (1 and 10 μM) gradually reduced the initial Ca2+-peak, and a complete self-inactivation of Ca2+-signals was seen at 100 μM. The effect of NAADP+ was specific as it was not observed with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate– and cyclic adenosine diphosphoribose–mediated Ca2+-signaling were efficiently inhibited by coinjection of a self-inactivating concentration of NAADP+. Most importantly, microinjection of a self-inactivating concentration of NAADP+ completely abolished subsequent stimulation of Ca2+-signaling via the T cell receptor/CD3 complex, indicating that a functional NAADP+ Ca2+-release system is essential for T-lymphocyte Ca2+-signaling. PMID:10931869

  7. Comparison of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced immune responses against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Xudong; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-06-01

    The pyridine nucleotide nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a universal coenzyme in anabolic reactions and also functions in intracellular signaling by serving as a substrate for production of the Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). It has recently been shown that, in mammalian cells, cellular NADP can be released into the extracellular compartment (ECC) upon environmental stresses by active exocytosis or diffusion through transmembrane transporters in living cells or passive leakage across the membrane in dying cells. In the ECC, NADP can either serve as a substrate for production of NAADP or act directly on purinoceptors to activate transmembrane signaling. In the last several years, extracellular NADP has also been suggested to function in plant immune responses. Here, we compared exogenous NADP-induced immune responses against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens in the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia and found that NADP addition induces salicylic acid-mediated defense signaling but not jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated defense responses. These results suggest the specificity of exogenous NADP-activated signaling in plants. PMID:27031653

  8. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors. PMID:26323301

  9. Biochemical characterization of a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent monooxygenase, ornithine hydroxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggests a novel reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Lamb, Audrey L

    2007-10-23

    Pyoverdin is the hydroxamate siderophore produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa under the iron-limiting conditions of the human host. This siderophore includes derivatives of ornithine in the peptide backbone that serve as iron chelators. PvdA is the ornithine hydroxylase, which performs the first enzymatic step in preparation of these derivatives. PvdA requires both flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for activity; it was found to be a soluble monomer most active at pH 8.0. The enzyme demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics in an NADPH oxidation assay, but a hydroxylation assay indicated substrate inhibition at high ornithine concentration. PvdA is highly specific for both substrate and coenzyme, and lysine was shown to be a nonsubstrate effector and mixed inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to ornithine. Chloride is a mixed inhibitor of PvdA with respect to ornithine but a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH, and a bulky mercurial compound (p-chloromercuribenzoate) is a mixed inhibitor with respect to ornithine. Steady-state experiments indicate that PvdA/FAD forms a ternary complex with NADPH and ornithine for catalysis. PvdA in the absence of ornithine shows slow substrate-independent flavin reduction by NADPH. Biochemical comparison of PvdA to p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH, from Pseudomonas fluorescens) and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs, from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and hog liver microsomes) leads to the hypothesis that PvdA catalysis proceeds by a novel reaction mechanism. PMID:17900176

  10. Separation of the primary dehydrogenase from the cytochromes of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) oxidase of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Wolin, M J

    1972-01-01

    A selective extraction procedure was developed for sequentially extracting a fraction containing the primary dehydrogenase and a fraction containing the cytochromes of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) (NADH) oxidase of Bacillus megaterium KM membranes. The primary dehydrogenase (NADH-2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase) activity was extracted from sonically treated membranes with 0.4% sodium deoxycholate for 30 min at 4 C. The insoluble residue was extracted with 0.4% sodium deoxycholate in 1 m KCl for 30 min at 25 C. A combination of the two extracts and dilution in Mg(2+) gave good recovery of the original membrane NADH oxidase activity. The primary dehydrogenase fraction contained 41% of the membrane protein, no cytochromes, flavine adenine dinucleotide as the sole acid-extractable flavine, and most of the membrane ribonucleic acid (RNA). The cytochrome-containing fraction had 16% of the membrane protein, 61% of the membrane cytochrome with the same relative amounts of cytochromes a and b as the original membrane, no acid-extractable flavine, little RNA, and no oxidoreductase activity. The oxidoreductase fraction remained soluble after removal of deoxycholate whereas the cytochrome fraction became insoluble after removal of deoxycholate-KCl, but the precipitated fraction could be redissolved in 0.4% sodium deoxycholate. Treatment of both fractions with ribonuclease to destroy all of the RNA present did not affect the ability of the fractions to recombine into a functional oxidase unit. Treatment of either fraction with phospholipase A prevented restoration of a functional oxidase when the oxidoreductase and cytochrome fractions were treated in solution, but no affect on restoration of oxidase was observed when the phospholipase A treatment was carried out with the soluble oxidoreductase fraction and the insoluble cytochrome fraction. PMID:4333382

  11. The conserved baculovirus protein p33 (Ac92) is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C.M.; Rohrmann, G.F.; Merrill, G.F.

    2009-06-05

    Open reading frame 92 of the Autographa californica baculovirus (Ac92) is one of about 30 core genes present in all sequenced baculovirus genomes. Computer analyses predicted that the Ac92 encoded protein (called p33) and several of its baculovirus orthologs were related to a family of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-linked sulfhydryl oxidases. Alignment of these proteins indicated that, although they were highly diverse, a number of amino acids in common with the Erv1p/Alrp family of sulfhydryl oxidases are present. Some of these conserved amino acids are predicted to stack against the isoalloxazine and adenine components of FAD, whereas others are involved in electron transfer. To investigate this relationship, Ac92 was expressed in bacteria as a His-tagged fusion protein, purified, and characterized both spectrophotometrically and for its enzymatic activity. The purified protein was found to have the color (yellow) and absorption spectrum consistent with it being a FAD-containing protein. Furthermore, it was demonstrated to have sulfhydryl oxidase activity using dithiothreitol and thioredoxin as substrates.

  12. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Analogs Substituted on the Nicotinic Acid and Adenine Ribosides. Effects on Receptor-Mediated Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Trabbic, Christopher J.; Zhang, Fan; Walseth, Timothy F.; Slama, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a Ca2+ releasing intracellular second messenger in both mammals and echinoderms. We report that large functionalized substituents introduced at the nicotinic acid 5-position are recognized by the sea urchin receptor, albeit with a 20–500 fold loss in agonist potency. 5-(3-Azidopropyl)-NAADP was shown to release Ca2+ with an EC50 of 31 µM and to compete with NAADP for receptor binding with an IC50 of 56 nM. Attachment of charged groups to the nicotinic acid of NAADP is associated with loss of activity, suggesting that the nicotinate riboside moiety is recognized as a neutral zwitterion. Substituents (Br- and N3-) can be introduced at the 8-adenosyl position of NAADP while preserving high potency and agonist efficacy and an NAADP derivative substituted at both the 5-position of the nicotinic acid and at the 8-adenosyl position was also recognized although the agonist potency was significantly reduced. PMID:25826221

  13. Surface enhanced Raman scattering investigation of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskevich, S. A.; Strekal, N. D.; Artsukevich, I. M.; Kivach, L. N.; Chernikevich, I. P.

    1995-04-01

    The SERS spectra of alcohol oxidase from Pichia pastoris adsorbed on a silver electrode were obtained. The similarities and differences of these spectra with the SERS spectrum of free flavin adenine dinucleiotide were considered. The dependence of relative intensity of 1258 cm -1 band from the electrode potential in the protein SERS spectra differed from that of free flavin. From the data on this band being sensitive to the protein-flavin interaction a suggestion was made about incomplete dissociation of flavin from the protein. This conclusion is confirmed both by the fluorescence data and the SERS data on alcohol oxidase purified from Candida boidinii. The results of the SERS investigation of the interaction between the substrate, ethanol and the cofactor, FAD, as well as between protein-bound cofactor with the substrate are presented. The problem of retaining the protein enzyme activity is discussed.

  14. Population Genetics of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) Invading Populations, Using Mitochondrial nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Dehydrogenase Subunit 5 Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Usmani-Brown, Sahar; Cohnstaedt, Lee; Munstermann, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae), the Asian tiger mosquito indigenous to Asia, now an invasive species worldwide, is an important vector for several arboviruses. Genetic analysis using the mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) gene was carried out in populations from Cameroon (n = 50), Hawaii (n = 38), Italy (n = 20), the continental United States, Brazil, and its native range. Data for Brazil, the continental United States, and the native range was obtained from Birungi and Munstermann (2002). Direct sequencing was used to identity unique haplotypes. The limited phylogeographic partitioning of haplotypes with low levels of sequence divergence in both Cameroon and Hawaii was consistent with the population structure of Ae. albopictus in the United States and Brazil. Four new haplotypes were identified from the samples from Cameroon and Hawaii, adding to previously described haplotypes. Hawaii shared a haplotype with Cameroon that was unique to these two regions. Hawaii also had higher overall haplotype diversity than seen in previous continental United States, Brazil, or native range populations. Hawaiian, Cameroon, and Italian populations did not share haplotypes with Brazil, which validates the earlier mitochondrial DNA studies indicating a separate introduction of this species into Brazil. PMID:22544973

  15. The first step in polyethylene glycol degradation by sphingomonads proceeds via a flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase containing flavin adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, M; Tanabe, M; Hataya, M; Enokibara, S; Duine, J A; Kawai, F

    2001-11-01

    Several Sphingomonas spp. utilize polyethylene glycols (PEGs) as a sole carbon and energy source, oxidative PEG degradation being initiated by a dye-linked dehydrogenase (PEG-DH) that oxidizes the terminal alcohol groups of the polymer chain. Purification and characterization of PEG-DH from Sphingomonas terrae revealed that the enzyme is membrane bound. The gene encoding this enzyme (pegA) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme was vulnerable to aggregation and inactivation, but this could be prevented by addition of detergent. It is as a homodimeric protein with a subunit molecular mass of 58.8 kDa, each subunit containing 1 noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide but not Fe or Zn. PEG-DH recognizes a broad variety of primary aliphatic and aromatic alcohols as substrates. Comparison with known sequences revealed that PEG-DH belongs to the group of glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) flavoprotein oxidoreductases and that it is a novel type of flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase related (percent identical amino acids) to other, so far uncharacterized bacterial, membrane-bound, dye-linked dehydrogenases: alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oleovorans (46%); choline dehydrogenase from E. coli (40%); L-sorbose dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans (38%); and 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from a Pseudomonas species (35%). PMID:11673442

  16. Redox state of flavin adenine dinucleotide drives substrate binding and product release in Escherichia coli succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Victor W T; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H

    2015-02-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyzes reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, soluble fumarate reductases (e.g., those from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and FAD was examined. Variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in the assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (-87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The "free" and "occupied" states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of FAD, respectively. Our data allow for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  17. Redox State of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Drives Substrate Binding and Product Release in Escherichia coli Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Victor W.T.; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A.; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising the respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyze reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, the soluble fumarate reductases (e.g. that from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and the FAD was examined. The variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y, that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (−87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The “free” and “occupied” states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of the FAD, respectively. Our data allows for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  18. Application of nicotin amide-adenine dinucleotide analogs for clinical enzymology: alcohol dehydrogenase activity in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, K; Kimura, A; Minato, S; Tamaoki, H; Mizushima, H

    1976-06-01

    The activities of alcohol dehydrogease(ADH) in serum and in the subcellular fractions of rat liver were determined with n-amyl alcohol or ethanol as substrate and thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide as coenzyme. It was found that the enzyme's activity ratio on the amyl alcohol and ethanol(A/E value) of serum and on the particulate fractions of the liver were different, but the A/E value of the soluble fraction was similar to that of serum. The A/E value of the particulate fractions were higher than that of the soluble fraction. From the results of experimental liver damage in the rat, it seems that estimation of the A/E value of ADH activity in serum is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of active liver injury. Since the A/E values of patients' sera differed from those of the normal subjects, the estimation of the A/E value of serum may give diagnostic information on liver injury, especially in chronic liver injury. PMID:179739

  19. Development of an enzymatic chromatography strip with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-tetrazolium coupling reactions for quantitative l-lactate analysis.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shu-Chen; Chang, Wei-Feng; Lan, Min-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Lai, Wei-Shiang; Shieh, Chwen-Jen; Hsiung, Kuang-Pin; Liu, Yung-Chuan

    2015-02-15

    In this study, a dry assay of l-lactate via the enzymatic chromatographic test (ECT) was developed. An l-lactate dehydrogenase plus a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) regeneration reaction were applied simultaneously. Various tetrazolium salts were screened to reveal visible color intensities capable of determining the lactate concentrations in the sample. The optimal analysis conditions were as follows. The diaphorase (0.5 μl, 2(-6)U/μl) was immobilized in the test line of the ECT strip. Nitrotetrazolium blue chloride (5 μl, 12 mM), l-lactate dehydrogenase (1 μl, 0.25U/μl), and NAD(+) (2μl, 1.5×10(-5)M) were added into the mobile phase (100 μl) composed of 0.1% (w/w) Tween 20 in 10mM phosphate buffer (pH 9.0), and the process was left to run for 10 min. This detection had a linear range of 0.039 to 5mM with a detection limit of 0.047 mM. This quantitative analysis process for l-lactate was easy to operate with good stability and was proper for the point-of-care testing applications. PMID:25454507

  20. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Umapathy, Nagavedi Siddaramappa; Gonzales, Joyce; Fulzele, Sadanand; Kim, Kyung-mi; Lucas, Rudolf; Verin, Alexander Dimitrievich

    2012-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) occur in approximately 200,000 patients per year. Studies indicate that lung endothelium plays a significant role in ALI. The authors' recent in vitro studies demonstrate a novel mechanism of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD)-induced protection against gram-positive (pneumolysin, PLY) and gram-negative (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) toxin-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) barrier dysfunction. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the protective effect of β-NAD against LPS-induced ALI in mice. C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: vehicle, β-NAD, LPS, and LPS/β-NAD. After surgery, mice were allowed to recover for 24 hours. Evans blue dye-albumin (EBA) was given through the internal jugular vein 2 hours prior to the termination of the experiments. Upon sacrificing the animals, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected and the lungs were harvested. β-NAD treatment significantly attenuated the inflammatory response by means of reducing the accumulation of cells and protein in BALF, blunting the parenchymal neutrophil infiltration, and preventing capillary leak. In addition, the histological examination demonstrated decreased interstitial edema in the LPS/β-NAD specimens, as compared to the LPS-only specimens. The mRNA levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokines were up-regulated in the LPS group treated with β-NAD compared to the LPS-only-treated group. β-NAD treatment down-regulated the mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that β-NAD could be investigated as a therapeutic option against bacterial toxin-induced lung inflammation and ALI in mice. PMID:22563684

  1. Induction of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and apoptosis by biodegradable polymers in macrophages: implications for stents.

    PubMed

    Potnis, Pushya A; Tesfamariam, Belay; Wood, Steven C

    2011-06-01

    The drug-eluting stent platform has a limited surface area, and a polymer carrier matrix is coated to enable sufficient loading of drugs. The development of a suitable polymer has been challenging because it must exhibit biocompatibility with the intravascular milieu. The use of biodegradable polymers seems to be attractive because it enables drug release as it degrades and is eventually eliminated from the body leaving the permanent metallic stent polymer-free. The aim of this study was to investigate the biocompatibility of biodegradable polymers using the human monocyte cell line. Cultured monocytes differentiated into functional macrophages (THP-1) were incubated with various polymers including poly-L-lactide (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), or poly-D, L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) for up to 5 days. Exposure of cells to the polymers resulted in macrophage-polymer adhesion and induced marked pro-oxidant species as measured by calcein AM uptake assay and flow cytometric analysis of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin fluorescence, respectively. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis of expression of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases revealed enhanced expression of NADPH oxidase subunits in response to PLA and PLGA compared with that of PCL. Flow cytometric analysis of fluorescein isothiocyanate-Annexin V and propium iodide-stained PLA and PGLA polymer-exposed THP-1 cells showed early and late apoptotic changes. Similarly, exposure to the PLA and PGLA polymers, but not to the PCL polymer, resulted in enhanced staining for cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, a protein fragment produced by caspase cleavage. These results indicate that biodegradable polymers are associated with cell adhesion, NADPH oxidase-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and excess apoptosis. PMID:21436724

  2. A comparative cluster analysis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase histochemistry in the brains of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, Claudia; Rastogi, Rakesh K; Scandurra, Anna; Jadhao, Arun G; Aria, Massimo; D'Aniello, Biagio

    2014-09-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of the gaseous neurotransmitter nitric oxide. We compare the distribution of NADPH-d in the brain of four species of hylid frogs. NADPH-d-positive fibers are present throughout much of the brain, whereas stained cell groups are distributed in well-defined regions. Whereas most brain areas consistently show positive neurons in all species, in some areas species-specific differences occur. We analyzed our data and those available for other amphibian species to build a matrix on NADPH-d brain distribution for a multivariate analysis. Brain dissimilarities were quantified by using the Jaccard index in a hierarchical clustering procedure. The whole brain dendrogram was compared with that of its main subdivisions by applying the Fowlkes-Mallows index for dendrogram similarity, followed by bootstrap replications and a permutation test. Despite the differences in the distribution map of the NADPH-d system among species, cluster analysis of data from the whole brain and hindbrain faithfully reflected the evolutionary history (framework) of amphibians. Dendrograms from the secondary prosencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, and isthmus showed some deviation from the main scheme. Thus, the present analysis supports the major evolutionary stability of the hindbrain. We provide evidence that the NADPH-d system in main brain subdivisions should be cautiously approached for comparative purposes because specific adaptations of a single species could occur and may affect the NADPH-d distribution pattern in a brain subdivision. The minor differences in staining pattern of particular subdivisions apparently do not affect the general patterns of staining across species. PMID:24549578

  3. Exceptionally high glucose current on a hierarchically structured porous carbon electrode with "wired" flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Seiya; Murata, Kazuki; Akatsuka, Wataru

    2014-10-15

    This article introduces a carbon electrode designed to achieve efficient enzymatic electrolysis by exploiting a hierarchical pore structure based on macropores for efficient mass transfer and mesopores for high enzyme loading. Magnesium oxide-templated mesoporous carbon (MgOC, mean pore diameter 38 nm) was used to increase the effective specific surface area for enzyme immobilization. MgOC particles were deposited on a current collector by an electrophoretic deposition method to generate micrometer-scale macropores to improve the mass transfer of glucose and electrolyte (buffer) ions. To create a glucose bioanode, the porous-carbon-modified electrode was further coated with a biocatalytic hydrogel composed of a conductive redox polymer, deglycosylated flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (d-FAD-GDH), and a cross-linker. Carbohydrate chains on the peripheral surfaces of the FAD-GDH molecules were removed by periodate oxidation before cross-linking. The current density for the oxidation of glucose was 100 mA cm(-2) at 25 °C and pH 7, with a hydrogel loading of 1.0 mg cm(-2). For the same hydrogel composition and loading, the current density on the MgOC-modified electrode was more than 30 times higher than that on a flat carbon electrode. On increasing the solution temperature to 45 °C, the catalytic current increased to 300 mA cm(-2), with a hydrogel loading of 1.6 mg cm(-2). Furthermore, the stability of the hydrogel electrode was improved by using the mesoporous carbon materials; more than 95% of the initial catalytic current remained after a 220-day storage test in 4 °C phosphate buffer, and 80% was observed after 7 days of continuous operation at 25 °C. PMID:25244161

  4. Interaction of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with an antifreeze protein from Dendroides canadensis: mechanistic implication of antifreeze activity enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xin; Wang, Sen; Amornwittawat, Natapol; Houghton, Eric A.; Sacco, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) found in many organisms can noncolligatively lower the freezing point of water without altering the melting point. The difference between the depressed freezing point and the melting point, termed thermal hysteresis (TH), is usually a measure of the antifreeze activity of AFPs. Certain low molecular mass molecules and proteins can further enhance the antifreeze activity of AFPs. Interaction between an enhancer and arginine is known to play an important role in enhancing the antifreeze activity of an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis (DAFP-1). Here, we examined the enhancement effects of several prevalent phosphate-containing coenzymes on the antifreeze activity of DAFP-1. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced) (NADH) is identified as the most efficient enhancer of DAFP-1, which increases the antifreeze activity of DAFP-1 by around 10 times. Examination of the enhancement abilities of a series of NADH analogs and various molecular fragments of NADH reveals that the modifications of nicotinamide generate a series of highly efficient enhancers, though none as effective as NADH itself, and the whole molecular structure of NADH is necessary for its highly efficient enhancement effect. We also demonstrated a 1:1 binding between DAFP-1 and NADH. The binding was characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using the gel filtration method of Hummel and Dreyer. The data analysis suggests binding between DAFP-1 and NADH with a dissociation constant in the micromolar range. Interactions between DAFP-1 and NADH are discussed along with molecular mechanisms of enhancer action. PMID:22038809

  5. Modulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and poly(adenosine diphosphoribose) metabolism by the synthetic "C" nucleoside analogs, tiazofurin and selenazofurin. A new strategy for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, N A; Berger, S J; Catino, D M; Petzold, S J; Robins, R K

    1985-01-01

    Tiazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) and selenazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylselenazole-4-carboxamide) are synthetic "C" nucleosides whose antineoplastic activity depends on their conversion to tiazofurin-adenine dinucleotide and selenazofurin-adenine dinucleotide which are analogs of NAD. The present study was conducted to determine whether these nucleoside analogs and their dinucleotide derivatives interfere with NAD metabolism and in particular with the NAD-dependent enzyme, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Incubation of L1210 cells with 10 microM tiazofurin or selenazofurin resulted in inhibition of cell growth, reduction of cellular NAD content, and interference with NAD synthesis. Using [14C]nicotinamide to study the uptake of nicotinamide and its conversion to NAD, we showed that the analogs interfere with NAD synthesis, apparently by blocking formation of nicotinamide mononucleotide. The analogs also serve as weak inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, which is an NAD-utilizing, chromatin-bound enzyme, whose function is required for normal DNA repair processes. Continuous incubation of L1210 cells in tiazofurin or selenazofurin resulted in progressive and synergistic potentiation of the cytotoxic effects of DNA-damaging agents, such as 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. These studies provide a basis for designing chemotherapy combinations in which tiazofurin or selenazofurin are used to modulate NAD and poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism to synergistically potentiate the effects of DNA strand-disrupting agents. PMID:3919063

  6. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A complexed with a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analog: implications for the activation process and for ADP ribosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Li, M; Dyda, F; Benhar, I; Pastan, I; Davies, D R

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic, or third domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PEIII) catalyzes the transfer of ADP ribose from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to elongation factor-2 in eukaryotic cells, inhibiting protein synthesis. We have determined the structure of PEIII crystallized in the presence of NAD to define the site of binding and mechanism of activation. However, NAD undergoes a slow hydrolysis and the crystal structure revealed only the hydrolysis products, AMP and nicotinamide, bound to the enzyme. To better define the site of NAD binding, we have now crystallized PEIII in the presence of a less hydrolyzable NAD analog, beta-methylene-thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-TAD), and refined the complex structure at 2.3 angstroms resolution. There are two independent molecules of PEIII in the crystal, and the conformations of beta-TAD show some differences in the two binding sites. The beta-TAD attached to molecule 2 appears to have been hydrolyzed between the pyrophosphate and the nicotinamide ribose. However molecule 1 binds to an intact beta-TAD and has no crystal packing contacts in the vicinity of the binding site, so that the observed conformation and interaction with the PEIII most likely resembles that of NAD bound to PEIII in solution. We have compared this complex with the catalytic domains of diphtheria toxin, heat labile enterotoxin, and pertussis toxin, all three of which it closely resembles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8692916

  7. Facile synthesis of near infrared fluorescent trypsin-stabilized Ag nanoclusters with tunable emission for 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and ethanol sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyu; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-07-30

    A facile chemical synthetic route was developed to prepare near-infrared fluorescent trypsin-stabilized Ag nanoclusters (Try-Ag NCs). The fluorescence emission wavelength of the produced Try-Ag NCs is tunable by simple adjusting pH value of the synthesis system, and the Try-Ag NCs offer a symmetric fluorescent excitation and emission peak. The fluorescence of Try-Ag NCs remains constant in the presence of various ions and molecules, and it can be effectively quenched by 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) instead of its oxidized forms nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). This property enables the Try-Ag NCs to be a novel analytical platform to monitor biological reaction involved with NADH. In this work, the Try-Ag NCs was also applied to analyze ethanol based on the generation of NADH which was the product of NAD(+) and ethanol in the catalysis of alcohol dehydrogenase. And the proposed platform allowed ethanol to be determined in the range from 10 to 300 μmol/L with 5 μmol/L detection limit. PMID:26320647

  8. Simultaneous determination of purine nucleotides, their metabolites and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in cerebellar granule cells by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Gagliardi, Sara; Samaja, Michele; Marra, Ersilia

    2003-02-01

    The method described here allows the quantitative simultaneous determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine, guanosine 5'-triphosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, uric acid, xanthine, hypoxanthine and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography. The chromatographic analysis requires 26 min per sample and allows the separation of the mentioned metabolites in a time as short as 16 min. Primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing 25 mM KCl for 1.5-48 h and their acid extracts were injected onto column. Uric acid, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine 5'-triphosphate and adenosine 5'-triphosphate were identified and quantified, while hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanosine were below the detection limit. This method makes use of a single-step sample pre-treatment procedure which allows a greater than 91% recovery of the compounds of interest and provides the assay of the metabolites of interest in little amounts of cell extracts. Therefore, this method is suitable to evaluate the energetic state in a variety of cell types, both under normal and dismetabolic conditions, such as after the induction of apoptosis or necrosis. PMID:12565687

  9. Oxidation of reduced cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the malate-aspartate shuttle in the K-562 human leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    López-Alarcón, L; Eboli, M L

    1986-11-01

    The activity of the malate-aspartate shuttle for the reoxidation of reduced cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by mitochondria was studied in a line of human myeloid leukemia cells (K-562). The tumor cells showed mitochondrial reoxidation of cytosolic NADH, as evidenced by the accumulation of pyruvate, when incubated aerobically with L-lactate. The involvement of the respiratory chain in the reoxidation of cytosolic NADH was demonstrated by the action of rotenone, antimycin A, and oligomycin which strongly inhibited the formation of pyruvate from added L-lactate. Moreover, pyruvate production was greatly inhibited by the transaminase inhibitor, aminooxyacetate. Under glycolytic conditions, in the presence of aminooxyacetate, the rate of pyruvate production was also markedly inhibited, the rate of lactate accumulation was stimulated, and at 60 min the cytosolic NADH/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) ratio had increased progressively about 5-fold with respect to untreated cells. The maximal rate of the malate-aspartate shuttle has also been established by addition of arsenite to inhibit mitochondrial oxidation of the pyruvate formed from added L-lactate. PMID:3756905

  10. Reduction of mitomycin C is catalysed by human recombinant NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 using reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as an electron donating co-factor

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, D; Tung, A T Y; Knox, R J; Boddy, A V

    2006-01-01

    NRH:Quinone Oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) has been described as having no enzymatic activity with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) or NADPH as electron donating cosubstrates. Mitomycin C (MMC) is both a substrate for and a mechanistic inhibitor of the NQO2 homologue NQO1. NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 catalysed the reduction of MMC at pH 5.8 with NADH as a co-factor. This reaction results in species that inhibit the NQO2-mediated metabolism of CB1954. In addition, MMC caused an increase in DNA cross-links in a cell line transfected to overexpress NQO2 to an extent comparable to that observed with an isogenic NQO1-expressing cell line. These data indicate that NQO2 may contribute to the metabolism of MMC to cytotoxic species. PMID:17031400

  11. Biocomposite based on reduced graphene oxide film modified with phenothiazone and flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase for glucose sensing and biofuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Ravenna, Yehonatan; Xia, Lin; Gun, Jenny; Mikhaylov, Alexey A; Medvedev, Alexander G; Lev, Ovadia; Alfonta, Lital

    2015-10-01

    A novel composite material for the encapsulation of redox enzymes was prepared. Reduced graphene oxide film with adsorbed phenothiazone was used as a highly efficient composite for electron transfer between flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and electrodes. Measured redox potential for glucose oxidation was lower than 0 V vs Ag/AgCl electrode. The fabricated biosensor showed high sensitivity of 42 mA M(-1) cm(-2), a linear range of glucose detection of 0.5-12 mM, and good reproducibility and stability as well as high selectivity for different interfering compounds. In a semibiofuel cell configuration, the hybrid film generated high power output of 345 μW cm(-2). These results demonstrate a promising potential for this composition in various bioelectronic applications. PMID:26334692

  12. Modulation of spontaneous transmitter release from the frog neuromuscular junction by interacting intracellular Ca(2+) stores: critical role for nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP).

    PubMed Central

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Patel, Sandip; Dun, Nae J

    2003-01-01

    Nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a recently described potent intracellular Ca(2+)-mobilizing messenger active in a wide range of diverse cell types. In the present study, we have investigated the interaction of NAADP with other Ca(2+)-mobilizing messengers in the release of transmitter at the frog neuromuscular junction. We show, for the first time, that NAADP enhances neurosecretion in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)), cADP-ribose (cADPR) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), but not sphingosylphosphorylcholine. Thapsigargin was without effect on transmitter release in response to NAADP, but blocked the responses to subsequent application of IP(3), cADPR and S1P and their potentiation by NAADP. Asynchronous neurotransmitter release may therefore involve functional coupling of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores with distinct Ca(2+) stores targeted by NAADP. PMID:12749764

  13. Conformational change in cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at a Au(110)—phosphate buffer interface induced by interaction with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. I.; Convery, J. H.; Harrison, P.; Khara, B.; Scrutton, N. S.; Weightman, P.

    2014-08-01

    Changes observed in the reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) profiles of monolayers of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at Au(110)-electrolyte interfaces at 0.056 V following the addition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) are explained in terms of a simple model as arising from changes in the orientation of an isoalloxazine ring located in the flavin mononucleotide binding domain of the protein. The model also accounts for the changes observed in the RAS as the potential applied to the Au(110) surface is varied and suggests that differences in the dependence of the RAS profile of the adsorbed protein on the potential applied to the electrode in the absence and presence of NADP+ are explicable as arising from a competition between the applied potential acting to reduce the protein and the NADP+ to oxidize it.

  14. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3. PMID:27181414

  15. Protonation mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malic enzyme reaction from isotope effects and pH studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiick, D.M.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1986-01-14

    The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and the primary deuterium isotope effects with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and also thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) as the nucleotide substrates were determined in order to obtain information about the chemical mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction. The maximum velocity with thio-NAD as the nucleotide is pH-independent from pH 4.2 to 9.6, while with NAD, V decreases below a pK of 4.8. V/K for both nucleotides decreases below a pK of 5.6 and above a pK of 8.9. Both the tartronate pKi and V/Kmalate decrease below a pK of 4.8 and above a pK of 8.9. Oxalate is competitive vs. malate above pH 7 and noncompetitive below pH 7 with NAD as the nucleotide. The oxalate Kis increases from a constant value above a pK of 4.9 to another constant value above a pK of 6.7. The oxalate Kii also increases above a pK of 4.9, and this inhibition is enhanced by NADH. In the presence of thio-NAD the inhibition by oxalate is competitive vs. malate below pH 7. For thio-NAD, both DV and D(V/K) are pH-independent and equal to 1.7. With NAD as the nucleotide, DV decreases to 1.0 below a pK of 4.9, while D(V/KNAD) and D(V/Kmalate) are pH-independent. Above pH 7 the isotope effects on V and the V/K values for NAD and malate are equal to 1.45, the pH-independent value of DV above pH 7. Results indicate that substrates bind to only the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Two enzyme groups are necessary for binding of substrates and catalysis. Both NAD and malate are released from the Michaelis complex at equal rates which are equal to the rate of NADH release from E-NADH above pH 7. Below pH 7 NADH release becomes more rate-determining as the pH decreases until at pH 4.0 it completely limits the overall rate of the reaction.

  16. Sleep Fragmentation in Mice Induces Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase 2-Dependent Mobilization, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Adipocyte Progenitors in Visceral White Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley X.; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Abdelkarim, Amal; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) without sleep curtailment induces increased adiposity. However, it remains unclear whether mobilization, proliferation, and differentiation of adipocyte progenitors (APs) occurs in visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT), and whether nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 2 (Nox2) activity plays a role. Methods: Changes in VWAT depot cell size and AP proliferation were assessed in wild-type and Nox2 null male mice exposed to SF and control sleep (SC). To assess mobilization, proliferation, and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC), Sca-1+ bone marrow progenitors were isolated from GFP+ or RFP+ mice, and injected intravenously to adult male mice (C57BL/6) previously exposed to SF or SC. Results: In comparison with SC, SF was associated with increased weight accrual at 3 w and thereafter, larger subcutaneous and visceral fat depots, and overall adipocyte size at 8 w. Increased global AP numbers in VWAT along with enhanced AP BrDU labeling in vitro and in vivo emerged in SF. Systemic injections of GFP+ BM-MSC resulted in increased AP in VWAT, as well as in enhanced differentiation into adipocytes in SF-exposed mice. No differences occurred between SF and SC in Nox2 null mice for any of these measurements. Conclusions: Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) induces obesity in mice and increased proliferation and differentiation of adipocyte progenitors (AP) in visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) that are mediated by increased Nox2 activity. In addition, enhanced migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from the systemic circulation into VWAT, along with AP differentiation, proliferation, and adipocyte formation occur in SF-exposed wild-type but not in oxidase 2 (Nox2) null mice. Thus, Nox2 may provide a therapeutic target to prevent obesity in the context of sleep disorders. Citation: Khalyfa A, Wang Y, Zhang SX, Qiao Z, Abdelkarim A, Gozal D. Sleep fragmentation in mice induces

  17. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:6432847

  18. Role of key residues at the flavin mononucleotide (FMN):adenylyltransferase catalytic site of the bifunctional riboflavin kinase/flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) Synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    In mammals and in yeast the conversion of Riboflavin (RF) into flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is catalysed by the sequential action of two enzymes: an ATP:riboflavin kinase (RFK) and an ATP:FMN adenylyltransferase (FMNAT). However, most prokaryotes depend on a single bifunctional enzyme, FAD synthetase (FADS), which folds into two modules: the C-terminal associated with RFK activity and the N-terminal associated with FMNAT activity. Sequence and structural analysis suggest that the 28-HxGH-31, 123-Gx(D/N)-125 and 161-xxSSTxxR-168 motifs from FADS must be involved in ATP stabilisation for the adenylylation of FMN, as well as in FAD stabilisation for FAD phyrophosphorolysis. Mutants were produced at these motifs in the Corynebacterium ammoniagenes FADS (CaFADS). Their effects on the kinetic parameters of CaFADS activities (RFK, FMNAT and FAD pyrophosphorilase), and on substrates and product binding properties indicate that H28, H31, N125 and S164 contribute to the geometry of the catalytically competent complexes at the FMNAT-module of CaFADS. PMID:23203077

  19. A label-free fluorescence strategy for selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide based on a dumbbell-like probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-15

    In this work we developed a novel label-free fluorescence sensing approach for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) based on a dumbbell-like DNA probe designed for both ligation reaction and digestion reaction with low background noise. SYBR Green I (SG I), a double-helix dye, was chosen as the readout fluorescence signal. In the absence of NAD(+), the ligation reaction did not occur, but the probe was digested to mononucleotides after the addition of exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease I (Exo III), resulting in a weak fluorescence intensity due to the weak interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. In the presence of NAD(+), the DNA probe was ligated by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, blocking the digestion by Exo I and Exo III. As a result, SG I was intercalated into the stem part of the DNA dumbbell probe and fluorescence enhancement was achieved. This method was simple in design, fast to operate, with good sensitivity and selectivity which could discriminate NAD(+) from its analogs. PMID:26454831

  20. New insights into the analysis of the electrode kinetics of flavin adenine dinucleotide redox center of glucose oxidase immobilized on carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Alexandr N; Grosse, Willo; Mashkina, Elena A; Bethwaite, Blair; Tan, Jeff; Abramson, David; Wallace, Gordon G; Moulton, Simon E; Bond, Alan M

    2014-03-25

    New insights into electrochemical kinetics of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) redox center of glucose-oxidase (GlcOx) immobilized on reduced graphene oxide (rGO), single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SW and MWCNT), and combinations of rGO and CNTs have been gained by application of Fourier transformed AC voltammetry (FTACV) and simulations based on a range of models. A satisfactory level of agreement between experiment and theory, and hence establishment of the best model to describe the redox chemistry of FAD, was achieved with the aid of automated e-science tools. Although still not perfect, use of Marcus theory with a very low reorganization energy (≤0.3 eV) best mimics the experimental FTACV data, which suggests that the process is gated as also deduced from analysis of FTACV data obtained at different frequencies. Failure of the simplest models to fully describe the electrode kinetics of the redox center of GlcOx, including those based on the widely employed Laviron theory is demonstrated, as is substantial kinetic heterogeneity of FAD species. Use of a SWCNT support amplifies the kinetic heterogeneity, while a combination of rGO and MWCNT provides a more favorable environment for fast communication between FAD and the electrode. PMID:24571209

  1. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) and Endolysosomal Two-pore Channels Modulate Membrane Excitability and Stimulus-Secretion Coupling in Mouse Pancreatic β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Arredouani, Abdelilah; Ruas, Margarida; Collins, Stephan C.; Parkesh, Raman; Clough, Frederick; Pillinger, Toby; Coltart, George; Rietdorf, Katja; Royle, Andrew; Johnson, Paul; Braun, Matthias; Zhang, Quan; Sones, William; Shimomura, Kenju; Morgan, Anthony J.; Lewis, Alexander M.; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Tunn, Ruth; Gadea, Joaquin; Teboul, Lydia; Heister, Paula M.; Tynan, Patricia W.; Bellomo, Elisa A.; Rutter, Guy A.; Rorsman, Patrik; Churchill, Grant C.; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic β cells are electrically excitable and respond to elevated glucose concentrations with bursts of Ca2+ action potentials due to the activation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs), which leads to the exocytosis of insulin granules. We have examined the possible role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores during stimulus-secretion coupling in primary mouse pancreatic β cells. NAADP-regulated Ca2+ release channels, likely two-pore channels (TPCs), have recently been shown to be a major mechanism for mobilizing Ca2+ from the endolysosomal system, resulting in localized Ca2+ signals. We show here that NAADP-mediated Ca2+ release from endolysosomal Ca2+ stores activates inward membrane currents and depolarizes the β cell to the threshold for VDCC activation and thereby contributes to glucose-evoked depolarization of the membrane potential during stimulus-response coupling. Selective pharmacological inhibition of NAADP-evoked Ca2+ release or genetic ablation of endolysosomal TPC1 or TPC2 channels attenuates glucose- and sulfonylurea-induced membrane currents, depolarization, cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, and insulin secretion. Our findings implicate NAADP-evoked Ca2+ release from acidic Ca2+ storage organelles in stimulus-secretion coupling in β cells. PMID:26152717

  2. Effects of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and Diadenosine Tetraphosphate (Ap4A) on Electrical Activity of Working and Pacemaker Atrial Myocardium in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Pustovit, K B; Abramochkin, D V

    2016-04-01

    Effects of nucleotide polyphosphate compounds (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NAD(+); diadenosine tetraphosphate, Ap4A) on the confi guration of action potentials were studied in isolated preparations of guinea pig sinoatrial node and right atrial appendage (auricle). In the working myocardium, NAD(+) and Ap4A in concentrations of 10(-5) and 10(-4) M had no effect on resting potential, but significantly reduced the duration of action potentials; the most pronounced decrease was found at 25% repolarization. In the primary pacemaker of the sinoatrial node, both concentrations of NAD(+) and Ap4A induced hyperpolarization and reduction in the rate of slow diastolic depolarization, but significant slowing of the sinus rhythm was produced by these substances only in the concentration of 10(-4) M. Moreover, AP shortening and marked acceleration of AP upstroke were observed in the pacemaker myocardium after application of polyphosphates. Comparative analysis of the effects of NAD(+) and Ap4A in the working and pacemaker myocardium drove us to a hypothesis on inhibitory effects of these substances on L-type calcium current accompanied by stimulation of one or several potassium currents, which induce enhancement of repolarization and hyperpolarization of membranes probably mediated by the activation of purine receptors. PMID:27165058

  3. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) and Endolysosomal Two-pore Channels Modulate Membrane Excitability and Stimulus-Secretion Coupling in Mouse Pancreatic β Cells.

    PubMed

    Arredouani, Abdelilah; Ruas, Margarida; Collins, Stephan C; Parkesh, Raman; Clough, Frederick; Pillinger, Toby; Coltart, George; Rietdorf, Katja; Royle, Andrew; Johnson, Paul; Braun, Matthias; Zhang, Quan; Sones, William; Shimomura, Kenju; Morgan, Anthony J; Lewis, Alexander M; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Tunn, Ruth; Gadea, Joaquin; Teboul, Lydia; Heister, Paula M; Tynan, Patricia W; Bellomo, Elisa A; Rutter, Guy A; Rorsman, Patrik; Churchill, Grant C; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony

    2015-08-28

    Pancreatic β cells are electrically excitable and respond to elevated glucose concentrations with bursts of Ca(2+) action potentials due to the activation of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs), which leads to the exocytosis of insulin granules. We have examined the possible role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores during stimulus-secretion coupling in primary mouse pancreatic β cells. NAADP-regulated Ca(2+) release channels, likely two-pore channels (TPCs), have recently been shown to be a major mechanism for mobilizing Ca(2+) from the endolysosomal system, resulting in localized Ca(2+) signals. We show here that NAADP-mediated Ca(2+) release from endolysosomal Ca(2+) stores activates inward membrane currents and depolarizes the β cell to the threshold for VDCC activation and thereby contributes to glucose-evoked depolarization of the membrane potential during stimulus-response coupling. Selective pharmacological inhibition of NAADP-evoked Ca(2+) release or genetic ablation of endolysosomal TPC1 or TPC2 channels attenuates glucose- and sulfonylurea-induced membrane currents, depolarization, cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals, and insulin secretion. Our findings implicate NAADP-evoked Ca(2+) release from acidic Ca(2+) storage organelles in stimulus-secretion coupling in β cells. PMID:26152717

  4. Increase of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence lifetime precedes mitochondrial dysfunction in staurosporine-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia-Sin; Guo, Han-Wen; Wang, Chih-Hao; Wei, Yau-Huei; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2011-03-01

    In vivo noninvasive detection of apoptosis represents a new tool that may yield a more definite diagnosis, a more accurate prognosis, and help improve therapies for human diseases. The intrinsic fluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) may be a potential optical biomarker for the apoptosis detection because NADH is involved in the respiration for the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) formation and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, and the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP level is the hallmark of apoptosis. We have previously observed the NADH fluorescence lifetime change is associated with staurosporine (STS)-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. However, its relationship with mitochondrial functions such as ΔΨ, ATP, and oxygen consumption rate is not clear. In this study, we investigated this relationship. Our results indicate that the NADH fluorescence lifetime increased when ΔΨ and ATP levels were equal to or higher than their values of controls and decreased before the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP, and the oxygen consumption rate did not change. These findings suggest that the increased NADH fluorescence lifetime in STS-induced cell death occurred before the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP and activation of caspase 3, and was not simply caused by cellular metabolic change. Furthermore, the NADH fluorescence lifetime change is associated with the pace of apoptosis.

  5. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP)-mediated Calcium Signaling and Arrhythmias in the Heart Evoked by β-Adrenergic Stimulation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Merle; Schwoerer, Alexander P.; Warszta, Dominik; Siebrands, Cornelia C.; Limbrock, Ann-Christin; Swarbrick, Joanna M.; Fliegert, Ralf; Weber, Karin; Bruhn, Sören; Hohenegger, Martin; Geisler, Anne; Herich, Lena; Schlegel, Susan; Carrier, Lucie; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Potter, Barry V. L.; Ehmke, Heimo; Guse, Andreas H.

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is the most potent Ca2+-releasing second messenger known to date. Here, we report a new role for NAADP in arrhythmogenic Ca2+ release in cardiac myocytes evoked by β-adrenergic stimulation. Infusion of NAADP into intact cardiac myocytes induced global Ca2+ signals sensitive to inhibitors of both acidic Ca2+ stores and ryanodine receptors and to NAADP antagonist BZ194. Furthermore, in electrically paced cardiac myocytes BZ194 blocked spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ transients caused by high concentrations of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Ca2+ transients were recorded both as increases of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and as decreases of the sarcoplasmic luminal Ca2+ concentration. Importantly, NAADP antagonist BZ194 largely ameliorated isoproterenol-induced arrhythmias in awake mice. We provide strong evidence that NAADP-mediated modulation of couplon activity plays a role for triggering spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ transients in isolated cardiac myocytes and arrhythmias in the intact animal. Thus, NAADP signaling appears an attractive novel target for antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:23564460

  6. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  7. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25813057

  8. Characterization of Chlorophenol 4-Monooxygenase (TftD) and NADH:Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidoreductase (TftC) of Burkholderia cepacia AC1100

    PubMed Central

    Gisi, Michelle R.; Xun, Luying

    2003-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 uses 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, an environmental pollutant, as a sole carbon and energy source. Chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase is a key enzyme in the degradation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and it was originally characterized as a two-component enzyme (TftC and TftD). Sequence analysis suggests that they are separate enzymes. The two proteins were separately produced in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. TftC was an NADH:flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) oxidoreductase. A C-terminally His-tagged fusion TftC used NADH to reduce either FAD or flavin mononucleotide (FMN) but did not use NADPH or riboflavin as a substrate. Kinetic and binding property analysis showed that FAD was a better substrate than FMN. TftD was a reduced FAD (FADH2)-utilizing monooxygenase, and FADH2 was supplied by TftC. It converted 2,4,5-trichlorophenol to 2,5-dichloro-p-quinol and then to 5-chlorohydroxyquinol but converted 2,4,6-trichlorophenol only to 2,6-dichloro-p-quinol as the final product. TftD interacted with FADH2 and retarded its rapid oxidation by O2. A spectrum of possible TftD-bound FAD-peroxide was identified, indicating that the peroxide is likely the active oxygen species attacking the aromatic substrates. The reclassification of the two enzymes further supports the new discovery of FADH2-utilizing enzymes, which have homologues in the domains Bacteria and Archaea. PMID:12700257

  9. Oxidation of C1 Compounds by Particulate fractions from Methylococcus capsulatus: distribution and properties of methane-dependent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase (methane hydroxylase).

    PubMed Central

    Ribbons, D W

    1975-01-01

    Cell-free particulate fractions of extracts from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus catalyze the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and O2-dependent oxidation of methane (methane hydroxylase). The only oxidation product detected was formate. These preparations also catalyze the oxidation of methanol and formaldehyde to formate in the presence or absence of phenazine methosulphate with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Methane hydroxylase activity cannot be reproducibly obtained from disintegrated cell suspensions even though the whole cells actively respired when methane was presented as a substrate. Varying the disintegration method or extraction medium had no significant effect on the activities obtained. When active particles were obtained, hydroxylase activity was stable at 0 C for days. Methane hydroxylase assays were made by measuring the methane-dependent oxidation of NADH by O2. In separate experiments, methane consumption and the accumulation of formate were also demonstrated. Formate is not oxidized by these particulate fractions. The effects of particle concentration, temperature, pH, and phosphate concentration on enzymic activity are described. Ethane is utilized in the presence of NADH and O2. The stoichiometric relationships of the reaction(s) with methane as substrate were not established since (i) the presumed initial product, methanol, is also oxidized to formate, and (ii) the contribution that NADH oxidase activity makes to the observed consumption of reactants could not be assessed in the presence of methane. Studies with known inhibitors of electron transport systems indicate that the path of electron flow from NADH to oxygen is different for the NADH oxidase, methane hydroxylase, and methanol oxidase activities. Images PMID:238946

  10. De-methylation of displacement loop of mitochondrial DNA is associated with increased mitochondrial copy number and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide subunit 2 expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinhang; Wen, Shilei; Zhou, Hongying; Feng, Shi

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation occurs in the displacement loop (D-loop) region of mammals; however, D-loop regions of certain tumor tissue types were found to be de‑methylated. Whether hypomethylation of the D‑loop region is involved in the regulation of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide subunit 2 (ND‑2) expressions in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. In the present study, the association between methylation status of the D‑loop region, mtDNA copy number and ND‑2 expression was investigated in 65 colorectal cancer specimens and their corresponding non‑cancerous tissues. In addition, a de‑methylation experiment was performed on the Caco‑2 colorectal cancer cell line by using 5‑aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5‑Aza). The methylation rate of the D‑loop region in all 65 colorectal cancer tissues was markedly reduced when compared with that of their corresponding non‑cancerous tissues (13.8 vs. 81.5%; P<0.05). Furthermore, the methylation rate of the D‑loop region in colorectal cancer tissues was markedly decreased in clinicopathological stages III and IV compared with that in clinicopathological stages I and II (7.1 and 0% vs. 25 and 16%; P<0.05). In addition, the mean relative mtDNA copy number and ND‑2 expression in colorectal cancer tissues were increased compared with those in the corresponding non‑cancerous tissues. De‑methylation of the D‑loop region was associated with an elevated mtDNA copy number and an increased ND‑2 expression. Furthermore, the mtDNA copy number and ND‑2 expression in Caco‑2 cells were significantly increased after 5‑Aza treatment. In conclusion, de‑methylation of the D‑loop region is likely to be involved in the regulation of the mtDNA copy number and ND-2 expression. PMID:26323487

  11. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25813057

  12. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Plays a Critical Role in Naive and Effector Murine T Cells but Not Natural Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ramadan A; Camick, Christina; Wiles, Katherine; Walseth, Timothy F; Slama, James T; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Giovannucci, David R; Wall, Katherine A

    2016-02-26

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), the most potent Ca(2+) mobilizing second messenger discovered to date, has been implicated in Ca(2+) signaling in some lymphomas and T cell clones. In contrast, the role of NAADP in Ca(2+) signaling or the identity of the Ca(2+) stores targeted by NAADP in conventional naive T cells is less clear. In the current study, we demonstrate the importance of NAADP in the generation of Ca(2+) signals in murine naive T cells. Combining live-cell imaging methods and a pharmacological approach using the NAADP antagonist Ned-19, we addressed the involvement of NAADP in the generation of Ca(2+) signals evoked by TCR stimulation and the role of this signal in downstream physiological end points such as proliferation, cytokine production, and other responses to stimulation. We demonstrated that acidic compartments in addition to the endoplasmic reticulum were the Ca(2+) stores that were sensitive to NAADP in naive T cells. NAADP was shown to evoke functionally relevant Ca(2+) signals in both naive CD4 and naive CD8 T cells. Furthermore, we examined the role of this signal in the activation, proliferation, and secretion of effector cytokines by Th1, Th2, Th17, and CD8 effector T cells. Overall, NAADP exhibited a similar profile in mediating Ca(2+) release in effector T cells as in their counterpart naive T cells and seemed to be equally important for the function of these different subsets of effector T cells. This profile was not observed for natural T regulatory cells. PMID:26728458

  13. Purification and properties of 4-hydroxybenzoate 1-hydroxylase (decarboxylating), a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent monooxygenase from Candida parapsilosis CBS604.

    PubMed Central

    Eppink, M H; Boeren, S A; Vervoort, J; van Berkel, W J

    1997-01-01

    A novel flavoprotein monooxygenase, 4-hydroxybenzoate 1-hydroxylase (decarboxylating), from Candida parapsilosis CBS604 was purified to apparent homogeneity. The enzyme is induced when the yeast is grown on either 4-hydroxybenzoate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, or 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate as the sole carbon source. The purified monooxygenase is a monomer of about 50 kDa containing flavin adenine dinucleotide as weakly bound cofactor. 4-Hydroxybenzoate 1-hydroxylase from C. parapsilosis catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of a wide range of 4-hydroxybenzoate derivatives with the stoichiometric consumption of NAD(P)H and oxygen. Optimal catalysis is reached at pH 8, with NADH being the preferred electron donor. By using (18)O2, it was confirmed that the oxygen atom inserted into the product 1,4-dihydroxybenzene is derived from molecular oxygen. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that the enzyme catalyzes the conversion of fluorinated 4-hydroxybenzoates to the corresponding hydroquinones. The activity of the enzyme is strongly inhibited by 3,5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzoate, 4-hydroxy-3,5-dinitrobenzoate, and 4-hydroxyisophthalate, which are competitors with the aromatic substrate. The same type of inhibition is exhibited by chloride ions. Molecular orbital calculations show that upon deprotonation of the 4-hydroxy group, nucleophilic reactivity is located in all substrates at the C-1 position. This, and the fact that the enzyme is highly active with tetrafluoro-4-hydroxybenzoate and 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzoate, suggests that the phenolate forms of the substrates play an important role in catalysis. Based on the substrate specificity, a mechanism is proposed for the flavin-mediated oxidative decarboxylation of 4-hydroxybenzoate. PMID:9352916

  14. Amelioration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase mediated stress reduces cell death after blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Naser, Zachary J; Logsdon, Aric F; Turner, Ryan C; Smith, Kelly E; Robson, Matthew J; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Rosen, Charles L; Huber, Jason D

    2015-12-01

    A total of 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur each year in the United States, but available pharmacologic options for the treatment of acute neurotrauma are limited. Oxidative stress is an important secondary mechanism of injury that can lead to neuronal apoptosis and subsequent behavioral changes. Using a clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model, we investigated how nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) expression and associated oxidative stress contribute to cellular apoptosis after single and repeat blast injuries. Nox4 forms a complex with p22phox after injury, forming free radicals at neuronal membranes. Using immunohistochemical-staining methods, we found a visible increase in Nox4 after single blast injury in Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, Nox4 was also increased in postmortem human samples obtained from athletes diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Nox4 activity correlated with an increase in superoxide formation. Alpha-lipoic acid, an oxidative stress inhibitor, prevented the development of superoxide acutely and increased antiapoptotic markers B-cell lymphoma 2 (t = 3.079, P < 0.05) and heme oxygenase 1 (t = 8.169, P < 0.001) after single blast. Subacutely, alpha-lipoic acid treatment reduced proapoptotic markers Bax (t = 4.483, P < 0.05), caspase 12 (t = 6.157, P < 0.001), and caspase 3 (t = 4.573, P < 0.01) after repetitive blast, and reduced tau hyperphosphorylation indicated by decreased CP-13 and paired helical filament staining. Alpha-lipoic acid ameliorated impulsive-like behavior 7 days after repetitive blast injury (t = 3.573, P < 0.05) compared with blast exposed animals without treatment. TBI can cause debilitating symptoms and psychiatric disorders. Oxidative stress is an ideal target for neuropharmacologic intervention, and alpha-lipoic acid warrants further investigation as a therapeutic for prevention of chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:26414010

  15. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of TiO2 nanoparticles and their use as a platform for flavin adenine dinucleotide immobilization and efficient electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok Kumar, S.; Lo, Po-Hsun; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2008-06-01

    Here, we report the electrochemical synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) using the potentiostat method. Synthesized particles have been characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that the TiO2 film produced was mainly composed of rutile and that the particles are of a size in the range of 100 ± 50 nm. TiO2 NPs were used for the modification of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPE). The resulting TiO2 film coated SPE was used to immobilize flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). The flavin enzyme firmly attached onto the metal oxide surface and this modified electrode showed promising electrocatalytic activities towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in physiological conditions. The electrochemistry of FAD confined in the oxide film was investigated. The immobilized FAD displayed a pair of redox peaks with a formal potential of -0.42 V in pH 7.0 oxygen-free phosphate buffers at a scan rate of 50 mV s-1. The FAD in the nanostructured TiO2 film retained its bioactivity and exhibited excellent electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H2O2, based on which a mediated biosensor for H2O2 was achieved. The linear range for the determination of H2O2 was from 0.15 × 10-6 to 3.0 × 10-3 M with the detection limit of 0.1 × 10-6 M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The stability and repeatability of the biosensor is also discussed.

  16. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase-Mediated Redox Signaling and Vascular Remodeling by 16α-Hydroxyestrone in Human Pulmonary Artery Cells: Implications in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hood, Katie Y; Montezano, Augusto C; Harvey, Adam P; Nilsen, Margaret; MacLean, Margaret R; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-09-01

    Estrogen and oxidative stress have been implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mechanisms linking these systems are elusive. We hypothesized that estrogen metabolite, 16α-hydroxyestrone (16αOHE1), stimulates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and proliferative responses in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs) and that in PAH aberrant growth signaling promotes vascular remodeling. The pathophysiological significance of estrogen-Nox-dependent processes was studied in female Nox1(-/-) and Nox4(-/-) mice with PAH. PASMCs from control subjects (control hPASMCs) and PAH patients (PAH-hPASMCs) were exposed to estrogen and 16αOHE1 in the presence/absence of inhibitors of Nox, cytochrome P450 1B1, and estrogen receptors. Estrogen, through estrogen receptor-α, increased Nox-derived ROS and redox-sensitive growth in hPASMCs, with greater effects in PAH-hPASMCs versus control hPASMCs. Estrogen effects were inhibited by cytochrome P450 1B1 blockade. 16αOHE1 stimulated transient ROS production in hPASMCs, with sustained responses in PAH-hPASMCs. Basal expression of Nox1/Nox4 was potentiated in PAH-hPASMCs. In hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 increased Nox1 expression, stimulated irreversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, decreased nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 activity and expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2-regulated antioxidant genes, and promoted proliferation. This was further amplified in PAH-hPASMCs. Nox1(-/-) but not Nox4(-/-) mice were protected against PAH and vascular remodeling. Our findings demonstrate that in PAH-hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 stimulates redox-sensitive cell growth primarily through Nox1. Supporting this, in vivo studies exhibited protection against pulmonary hypertension and remodeling in Nox1(-/-) mice. This study provides new insights through Nox1/ROS and nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 whereby 16αOHE1 influences

  17. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase–Mediated Redox Signaling and Vascular Remodeling by 16α-Hydroxyestrone in Human Pulmonary Artery Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Katie Y.; Montezano, Augusto C.; Harvey, Adam P.; Nilsen, Margaret; MacLean, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen and oxidative stress have been implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mechanisms linking these systems are elusive. We hypothesized that estrogen metabolite, 16α-hydroxyestrone (16αOHE1), stimulates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox)–induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and proliferative responses in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs) and that in PAH aberrant growth signaling promotes vascular remodeling. The pathophysiological significance of estrogen–Nox–dependent processes was studied in female Nox1−/− and Nox4−/− mice with PAH. PASMCs from control subjects (control hPASMCs) and PAH patients (PAH-hPASMCs) were exposed to estrogen and 16αOHE1 in the presence/absence of inhibitors of Nox, cytochrome P450 1B1, and estrogen receptors. Estrogen, through estrogen receptor-α, increased Nox-derived ROS and redox-sensitive growth in hPASMCs, with greater effects in PAH-hPASMCs versus control hPASMCs. Estrogen effects were inhibited by cytochrome P450 1B1 blockade. 16αOHE1 stimulated transient ROS production in hPASMCs, with sustained responses in PAH-hPASMCs. Basal expression of Nox1/Nox4 was potentiated in PAH-hPASMCs. In hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 increased Nox1 expression, stimulated irreversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, decreased nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2 activity and expression of nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2–regulated antioxidant genes, and promoted proliferation. This was further amplified in PAH-hPASMCs. Nox1−/− but not Nox4−/− mice were protected against PAH and vascular remodeling. Our findings demonstrate that in PAH-hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 stimulates redox-sensitive cell growth primarily through Nox1. Supporting this, in vivo studies exhibited protection against pulmonary hypertension and remodeling in Nox1−/− mice. This study provides new insights through Nox1/ROS and nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2

  18. Dynamic changes in nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotide content in normal human epidermal keratinocytes and their effect on retinoic acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkas-Sarafova, Adriana . E-mail: apinkassaraf@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Markova, N.G. . E-mail: nmarkova@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Simon, M. . E-mail: marsimon@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    2005-10-21

    The function of many enzymes that regulate metabolism and transcription depends critically on the nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotides. To understand the role of NAD(P)(H) in physiology and pathophysiology, it is imperative to estimate both their amount and ratios in a given cell type. In human epidermis and in cultured epidermal keratinocytes, we found that the total dinucleotide content is in the low millimolar range. The dinucleotide pattern changes during proliferation and maturation of keratinocytes in culture. Differences in the concentrations of NAD(P)(H) of 1.5- to 12-fold were observed. This resulted in alteration of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P) ratio, which could impact the differential regulation of both transcriptional and metabolic processes. In support of this notion, we provide evidence that the two-step oxidation of retinol to retinoic acid, a nuclear hormone critical for epidermal homeostasis, can be regulated by the relative physiological amounts of the pyridine dinucleotides.

  19. Two-pore Channels (TPC2s) and Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) at Lysosomal-Sarcoplasmic Reticular Junctions Contribute to Acute and Chronic β-Adrenoceptor Signaling in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Capel, Rebecca A; Bolton, Emma L; Lin, Wee K; Aston, Daniel; Wang, Yanwen; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xin; Burton, Rebecca-Ann B; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Shade, Kai-Ting; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Churchill, Grant C; Lei, Ming; Galione, Antony; Terrar, Derek A

    2015-12-11

    Ca(2+)-permeable type 2 two-pore channels (TPC2) are lysosomal proteins required for nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-evoked Ca(2+) release in many diverse cell types. Here, we investigate the importance of TPC2 proteins for the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart. NAADP-AM failed to enhance Ca(2+) responses in cardiac myocytes from Tpcn2(-/-) mice, unlike myocytes from wild-type (WT) mice. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitors suppressed actions of NAADP in myocytes. Ca(2+) transients and contractions accompanying action potentials were increased by isoproterenol in myocytes from WT mice, but these effects of β-adrenoreceptor stimulation were reduced in myocytes from Tpcn2(-/-) mice. Increases in amplitude of L-type Ca(2+) currents evoked by isoproterenol remained unchanged in myocytes from Tpcn2(-/-) mice showing no loss of β-adrenoceptors or coupling mechanisms. Whole hearts from Tpcn2(-/-) mice also showed reduced inotropic effects of isoproterenol and a reduced tendency for arrhythmias following acute β-adrenoreceptor stimulation. Hearts from Tpcn2(-/-) mice chronically exposed to isoproterenol showed less cardiac hypertrophy and increased threshold for arrhythmogenesis compared with WT controls. Electron microscopy showed that lysosomes form close contacts with the sarcoplasmic reticulum (separation ∼ 25 nm). We propose that Ca(2+)-signaling nanodomains between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum dependent on NAADP and TPC2 comprise an important element in β-adrenoreceptor signal transduction in cardiac myocytes. In summary, our observations define a role for NAADP and TPC2 at lysosomal/sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions as unexpected but major contributors in the acute actions of β-adrenergic signaling in the heart and also in stress pathways linking chronic stimulation of β-adrenoceptors to hypertrophy and associated arrhythmias. PMID:26438825

  20. Two-pore Channels (TPC2s) and Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) at Lysosomal-Sarcoplasmic Reticular Junctions Contribute to Acute and Chronic β-Adrenoceptor Signaling in the Heart*

    PubMed Central

    Capel, Rebecca A.; Bolton, Emma L.; Lin, Wee K.; Aston, Daniel; Wang, Yanwen; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xin; Burton, Rebecca-Ann B.; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Shade, Kai-Ting; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Churchill, Grant C.; Lei, Ming; Galione, Antony; Terrar, Derek A.

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-permeable type 2 two-pore channels (TPC2) are lysosomal proteins required for nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-evoked Ca2+ release in many diverse cell types. Here, we investigate the importance of TPC2 proteins for the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart. NAADP-AM failed to enhance Ca2+ responses in cardiac myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice, unlike myocytes from wild-type (WT) mice. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitors suppressed actions of NAADP in myocytes. Ca2+ transients and contractions accompanying action potentials were increased by isoproterenol in myocytes from WT mice, but these effects of β-adrenoreceptor stimulation were reduced in myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice. Increases in amplitude of L-type Ca2+ currents evoked by isoproterenol remained unchanged in myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice showing no loss of β-adrenoceptors or coupling mechanisms. Whole hearts from Tpcn2−/− mice also showed reduced inotropic effects of isoproterenol and a reduced tendency for arrhythmias following acute β-adrenoreceptor stimulation. Hearts from Tpcn2−/− mice chronically exposed to isoproterenol showed less cardiac hypertrophy and increased threshold for arrhythmogenesis compared with WT controls. Electron microscopy showed that lysosomes form close contacts with the sarcoplasmic reticulum (separation ∼25 nm). We propose that Ca2+-signaling nanodomains between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum dependent on NAADP and TPC2 comprise an important element in β-adrenoreceptor signal transduction in cardiac myocytes. In summary, our observations define a role for NAADP and TPC2 at lysosomal/sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions as unexpected but major contributors in the acute actions of β-adrenergic signaling in the heart and also in stress pathways linking chronic stimulation of β-adrenoceptors to hypertrophy and associated arrhythmias. PMID:26438825

  1. Null mutation of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase subunit p67phox protects the Dahl-S rat from salt-induced reductions in medullary blood flow and glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Evans, Louise C; Ryan, Robert P; Broadway, Elizabeth; Skelton, Meredith M; Kurth, Theresa; Cowley, Allen W

    2015-03-01

    Null mutations in the p67(phox) subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase confer protection from salt sensitivity on Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Here, we track the sequential changes in medullary blood flow (MBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinary protein, and mean arterial pressure in SSp67(phox) null rats and wild-type littermates during 21 days of 4.0% NaCl high-salt (HS) diet. Optical fibers were implanted in the renal medulla and MBF was measured in conscious rats by laser Doppler flowmetry. Separate groups of rats were prepared with femoral venous catheters and GFR was measured by the transcutaneous assessment of fluorescein isothiocyanate-sinistrin disappearance curves. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured by telemetry. In wild-type rats, HS caused a rapid reduction in MBF, which was significantly lower than control values by HS day-6. Reduced MBF was associated with a progressive increase in mean arterial pressure, averaging 170±5 mm Hg by HS salt day-21. A significant reduction in GFR was evident on day-14 HS, after the onset of hypertension and reduced MBF. In contrast, HS had no significant effect on MBF in SSp67(phox) null rats and the pressor response to sodium was blunted, averaging 150±3 mm Hg on day-21 HS. GFR was maintained throughout the study and proteinuria was reduced. In summary, when p67(phox) is not functional in the salt-sensitive rats, HS does not cause reduced MBF and salt-sensitive hypertension is attenuated, and consequently renal injury is reduced and GFR is maintained. PMID:25489057

  2. Biochemical Analysis of Recombinant AlkJ from Pseudomonas putida Reveals a Membrane-Associated, Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Dehydrogenase Suitable for the Biosynthetic Production of Aliphatic Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Kirmair, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    The noncanonical alcohol dehydrogenase AlkJ is encoded on the alkane-metabolizing alk operon of the mesophilic bacterium Pseudomonas putida GPo1. To gain insight into the enzymology of AlkJ, we have produced the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified it to homogeneity using His6 tag affinity and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Despite synthesis in the cytoplasm, AlkJ was associated with the bacterial cell membrane, and solubilization with n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside was necessary to liberate the enzyme. SEC and spectrophotometric analysis revealed a dimeric quaternary structure with stoichiometrically bound reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2). The holoenzyme showed thermal denaturation at moderate temperatures around 35°C, according to both activity assay and temperature-dependent circular dichroism spectroscopy. The tightly bound coenzyme was released only upon denaturation with SDS or treatment with urea-KBr and, after air oxidation, exhibited the characteristic absorption spectrum of FAD. The enzymatic activity of purified AlkJ for 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octanol as well as the n-alkanol derivative ω-hydroxy lauric acid methyl ester (HLAMe) was quantified in the presence of the artificial electron acceptors phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP), indicating broad substrate specificity with the lowest activity on the shortest alcohol, 1-butanol. Furthermore, AlkJ was able to accept as cosubstrates/oxidants the ubiquinone derivatives Q0 and Q1, also in conjunction with cytochrome c, which suggests coupling to the bacterial respiratory chain of this membrane-associated enzyme in its physiological environment. Using gas chromatographic analysis, we demonstrated specific biocatalytic conversion by AlkJ of the substrate HLAMe to the industrially relevant aldehyde, thus enabling the biotechnological production of 12-amino lauric acid methyl ester via subsequent enzymatic transamination. PMID:24509930

  3. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Based Therapeutics, Update.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, K W; Petrelli, R; Singh, R; Felczak, K

    2015-01-01

    About 500 NAD (P)-dependent enzymes in the cell use NAD (P) as a cofactor or a substrate. This family of broadly diversified enzymes is crucial for maintaining homeostasis of all living organisms. The NAD binding domain of these enzymes is conserved and it was believed that NAD mimics would not be of therapeutic value due to lack of selectivity. Consequently, only mycophenolic acid which selectively binds at the cofactor pocket of NAD-dependent IMP-dehydrogenase (IMPDH) has been approved as an immunosuppressant. Recently, it became clear that the NAD (P)-binding domain was structurally much more diversified than anticipated and numerous highly potent and selective inhibitors of NAD (P) dependent enzymes have been reported. It is likely, that as in the case of protein kinases inhibitors, inhibitors of NAD (P)-dependent enzymes would find soon their way to the clinic. In this review, recent developments of selective inhibitors of NAD-dependent human IMPDH, as well as inhibitors of IMPDHs from parasites, and from bacterial sources are reported. Therapies against Cryptosporidium parvum and the development of new antibiotics that are on the horizon will be discussed. New inhibitors of bacterial NAD-ligases, NAD-kinases, NMN-adenylyl transferases, as well as phosphoribosyl transferases are also described. Although none of these compounds has yet to be approved, the progress in revealing and understanding crucial factors that might allow for designing more potent and efficient drug candidates is enormous and highly encouraging. PMID:26295463

  4. Control of dinucleoside polyphosphates by the FHIT-homologous HNT2 gene, adenine biosynthesis and heat shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Varnum, James M; Bieganowski, Pawel; Brenner, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Background The FHIT gene is lost early in the development of many tumors. Fhit possesses intrinsic ApppA hydrolase activity though ApppA cleavage is not required for tumor suppression. Because a mutant form of Fhit that is functional in tumor suppression and defective in catalysis binds ApppA well, it was hypothesized that Fhit-substrate complexes are the active, signaling form of Fhit. Which substrates are most important for Fhit signaling remain unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that dinucleoside polyphosphate levels increase 500-fold to hundreds of micromolar in strains devoid of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of Fhit, Hnt2. Accumulation of dinucleoside polyphosphates is reversed by re-expression of Hnt2 and is active site-dependent. Dinucleoside polyphosphate levels depend on an intact adenine biosynthetic pathway and time in liquid culture, and are induced by heat shock to greater than 0.1 millimolar even in Hnt2+ cells. Conclusions The data indicate that Hnt2 hydrolyzes both ApppN and AppppN in vivo and that, in heat-shocked, adenine prototrophic yeast strains, dinucleoside polyphosphates accumulate to levels in which they may saturate Hnt2. PMID:12028594

  5. Binding of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotides to diphtheria toxin

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, L.; Sperti, Simonetta

    1967-01-01

    1. Changes in protein fluorescence have been utilized in determining the stoicheiometry and dissociation constants of the complexes of diphtheria toxin with NADH2, NAD, NADPH2 and NADP. 2. The binding stoicheiometry is 2moles of NADH2 and 1mole of NADPH2/mole of diphtheria toxin. The binding sites for NADH2 appear to be equivalent and independent. 3. The toxin shows a higher affinity for the reduced than for the oxidized forms of the nucleotides. 4. Dissociation constants at 0·01I, pH7 and 25° are 0·7×10−6m for NADH2 and 0·45×10−6m for NADPH2. Dissociation constants increase with increasing ionic strength, indicating that the binding is mainly electrostatic. 5. Bound NADH2 and NADPH2 may be activated to fluoresce by the transfer of energy from the excited aromatic amino acids of the toxin. Activation and emission spectra of bound and free nucleotides are compared. 6. Since NAD and NADH2 are cofactors specifically required for the inhibition of protein synthesis by diphtheria toxin, the possible role of toxin–nucleotide complexes is discussed in this regard. PMID:4384596

  6. The Nature's Clever Trick for Making Cyclic Dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min

    2015-05-01

    Ever since their initial discovery few years ago, cyclic dinucleotides (cDNs), their biosynthesis, and their biological function have been in focus of intense research efforts. In this issue, Kato et al. (2015) present strong evidence that the key enzyme in cDN biosynthesis, DncV, is poised on a tipping point such that, given a nudge, the enzyme, can link the nucleotides into a distinct cyclic loop, leading to a specific innate immune response. PMID:25955098

  7. Bioluminescent Cell-Based NAD(P)/NAD(P)H Assays for Rapid Dinucleotide Measurement and Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Leippe, Donna; Sobol, Mary; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Cali, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The central role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in cellular energy metabolism and signaling makes them important nodes that link the metabolic state of cells with energy homeostasis and gene regulation. In this study, we describe the implementation of cell-based bioluminescence assays for rapid and sensitive measurement of those important redox cofactors. We show that the sensitivity of the assays (limit of detection ∼0.5 nM) enables the selective detection of total amounts of nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated dinucleotides directly in cell lysates. The total amount of NAD+NADH or NADP+NADPH levels can be detected in as low as 300 or 600 cells/well, respectively. The signal remains linear up to 5,000 cells/well with the maximum signal-to-background ratios ranging from 100 to 200 for NAD+NADH and from 50 to 100 for NADP+NADPH detection. The assays are robust (Z′ value >0.7) and the inhibitor response curves generated using a known NAD biosynthetic pathway inhibitor FK866 correlate well with the reported data. More importantly, by multiplexing the dinucleotide detection assays with a fluorescent nonmetabolic cell viability assay, we show that dinucleotide levels can be decreased dramatically (>80%) by FK866 treatment before changes in cell viability are detected. The utility of the assays to identify modulators of intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels was further confirmed using an oncology active compound library, where novel dinucleotide regulating compounds were identified. For example, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat was a potent inhibitor of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides, whereas the selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene unexpectedly caused a twofold increase in cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels. PMID:25506801

  8. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  9. Fate of prebiotic adenine.

    PubMed

    Cohn, C A; Hansson, T K; Larsson, H S; Sowerby, S J; Holm, N G

    2001-01-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherm data for the purine base adenine has been obtained on several prebiotically relevant minerals by frontal analysis using water as a mobile phase. Adenine is far displaced toward adsorption on pyrite (FeS2), quartz (SiO2), and pyrrhotite (FeS), but somewhat less for magnetite (Fe3O4) and forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The prebiotic prevalence of these minerals would have allowed them to act as a sink for adenine; removal from the aqueous phase would confer protection from hydrolysis as well, establishing a nonequilibrium thermodynamic framework for increased adenine synthesis. Our results provide evidence that adsorption phenomena may have been critical for the primordial genetic architecture. PMID:12448980

  10. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves. PMID:26345717

  11. A DFT study of 2-aminopurine-containing dinucleotides: prediction of stacked conformations with B-DNA structure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren A; Holroyd, Leo F; van Mourik, Tanja; Jones, Anita C

    2016-05-25

    The fluorescence properties of dinucleotides incorporating 2-aminopurine (2AP) suggest that the simplest oligonucleotides adopt conformations similar to those found in duplex DNA. However, there is a lack of structural data for these systems. We report a density functional theory (DFT) study of the structures of 2AP-containing dinucleotides (deoxydinucleoside monophosphates), including full geometry optimisation of the sugar-phosphate backbone. Our DFT calculations employ the M06-2X functional for reliable treatment of dispersion interactions and include implicit aqueous solvation. Dinucleotides with 2AP in the 5'-position and each of the natural bases in the 3'-position are examined, together with the analogous 5'-adenine-containing systems. Computed structures are compared in detail with typical B-DNA base-step parameters, backbone torsional angles and sugar pucker, derived from crystallographic data. We find that 2AP-containing dinucleotides adopt structures that closely conform to B-DNA in all characteristic parameters. The structures of 2AP-containing dinucleotides closely resemble those of their adenine-containing counterparts, demonstrating the fidelity of 2AP as a mimic of the natural base. As a first step towards exploring the conformational heterogeneity of dinucleotides, we also characterise an imperfectly stacked conformation and one in which the bases are completely unstacked. PMID:27186599

  12. Photodissociation of dinucleotide ions in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worm, Esben S.; Andersen, Inge Hald; Andersen, Jens Ulrik; Holm, Anne I. S.; Hvelplund, Preben; Kadhane, Umesh; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Støchkel, Kristian

    2007-04-01

    The decay of protonated DNA dinucleotides, dA2+ , dG2+ , dT2+ , dC2+ and deprotonated ones, dA2- and dT2- , after 260nm photon absorption was measured in an electrostatic ion storage ring (A denotes adenine, G guanine, T thymine, and C cytosine). Fragmentation on the microsecond time scale was observed and assigned to statistical dissociation. Good fits to the decay spectra were obtained with a model based on microcanonical rate constants of the Arrhenius type with activation energies and preexponential factors for the dissociation that agree well with literature values. In accordance with results from other groups, dT2+ was found to have the longest lifetime among the cations. The importance of decay processes faster than the microsecond time scale is elucidated by a comparison between the total ion beam depletion and that due to the observed statistical decay. We find that such processes play a major role for all of the dinucleotides, being more than 25 times more probable than the microsecond statistical dissociation for dA2+ , dG2+ , and dC2+ , about 10 times for dT2+ , and between 2 and 6 times for dA2- and dT2- . For the cations, we ascribe these processes to nonstatistical dissociation prior to randomization of the excitation energy among all degrees of freedom whereas direct photoelectron detachment may play a role for the anions. Thus, our data indicate that the propensity for nonstatistical dissociation increases upon nucleobase protonation. Consistent with this trend, the propensity is less for dT2+ than for the other dinucleotide cations because the phosphoric acid group competes with thymine for the proton.

  13. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region. PMID:25660103

  14. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  15. Maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J; Pellegrini, Marco; Pirillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-21

    We determine here the number and the list of maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. We prove that there is no maximal dinucleotide circular code having strictly less than 6 elements (maximum size of dinucleotide circular codes). On the other hand, a computer calculus shows that there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with less than 20 elements (maximum size of trinucleotide circular codes). More precisely, there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 elements and no maximal trinucleotide circular code having less than 14 elements. We give the same information for the maximal self-complementary dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. The amino acid distribution of maximal trinucleotide circular codes is also determined. PMID:26382231

  16. Gene Transfers Shaped the Evolution of De Novo NAD+ Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ternes, Chad M.; Schönknecht, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    NAD+ is an essential molecule for life, present in each living cell. It can function as an electron carrier or cofactor in redox biochemistry and energetics, and serves as substrate to generate the secondary messenger cyclic ADP ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Although de novo NAD+ biosynthesis is essential, different metabolic pathways exist in different eukaryotic clades. The kynurenine pathway starting with tryptophan was most likely present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes, and is active in fungi and animals. The aspartate pathway, detected in most photosynthetic eukaryotes, was probably acquired from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to chloroplasts. An evolutionary analysis of enzymes catalyzing de novo NAD+ biosynthesis resulted in evolutionary trees incongruent with established organismal phylogeny, indicating numerous gene transfers. Endosymbiotic gene transfers probably introduced the aspartate pathway into eukaryotes and may have distributed it among different photosynthetic clades. In addition, several horizontal gene transfers substituted eukaryotic genes with bacterial orthologs. Although horizontal gene transfer is accepted as a key mechanism in prokaryotic evolution, it is supposed to be rare in eukaryotic evolution. The essential metabolic pathway of de novo NAD+ biosynthesis in eukaryotes was shaped by numerous gene transfers. PMID:25169983

  17. Aging-related nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase response to dietary supplementation: the French paradox revisited.

    PubMed

    Morré, D James; Morré, Dorothy M; Shelton, Thomas B

    2010-01-01

    Aging-related cell-surface NADH oxidase (arNOX)-specific activities increase with age between age 30 and ages 50-65. The protein is shed and circulates. Activity correlates with a number of aging-related disorders including low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation as a precondition to atherosclerosis as well as oxidation of collagen and elastin as a major contributor to skin aging. arNOX inhibitors formulated for sustained release are capable of maintaining circulating arNOX at low levels with regular use as food supplements formulated with natural compounds. Among the best sources are certain culinary seasonings, all of which are ingredients used extensively in the French kitchen. Their regular use may contribute to an understanding of the nutritional basis for the French Paradox. PMID:19954304

  18. Interaction of pigeon-liver nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide kinase with cibacron blue F3GA.

    PubMed Central

    Apps, D K; Gleed, C D

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of pigeon liver NAD kinase with Cibacron Blue F3GA was investigated. By using steady-state rate measurements, spectrophotometric titration and chromatography of the enzyme on immobilized dye, it was shown that binding occurs at two nucleotide sites with different affinities, and also at a site distinct from the substrate-binding region. PMID:187176

  19. Predicting Flavin and Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-Binding Sites in Proteins Using the Fragment Transformation Method

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Feng; Chen, Jin-Yi

    2015-01-01

    We developed a computational method to identify NAD- and FAD-binding sites in proteins. First, we extracted from the Protein Data Bank structures of proteins that bind to at least one of these ligands. NAD-/FAD-binding residue templates were then constructed by identifying binding residues through the ligand-binding database BioLiP. The fragment transformation method was used to identify structures within query proteins that resembled the ligand-binding templates. By comparing residue types and their relative spatial positions, potential binding sites were identified and a ligand-binding potential for each residue was calculated. Setting the false positive rate at 5%, our method predicted NAD- and FAD-binding sites at true positive rates of 67.1% and 68.4%, respectively. Our method provides excellent results for identifying FAD- and NAD-binding sites in proteins, and the most important is that the requirement of conservation of residue types and local structures in the FAD- and NAD-binding sites can be verified. PMID:26000290

  20. Oxidized and Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Levels of Plants Hardened and Unhardened Against Chilling Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Susumu; Arai, Noriko; Ushijima, Tadahiro; Tazaki, Tadayoshi

    1968-01-01

    Pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) subjected to low temperature (5°) in the light acquired resistance against chilling injury. Unhardened plants maintained high NADP and low NADPH levels during illumination at 25° but hardened plants had low NADP and high NADPH levels in the light. When the unhardened plants were transferred to the dark room at 25°, their NADPH levels decreased immediately. On the other hand, hardened plants maintained a high NADPH level for a few hours even in the dark. PMID:16656757

  1. Studies on free and enzyme-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bielski, B.H.J.; Chan, P.C.

    1980-02-27

    The spectral and kinetic properties of the NAD free radical have been studied as a function of temperature and pH. The radical decays by second-order kinetics to an enzymatically inactive dimer (NAD)/sub 2/. At 23.5/sup 0/C and pH 7.3 the corresponding rate constant is k/sub 9/ = (7.72 +- 0.78) x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ with an activation energy E/sub a/ = 3.4 +- 0.4 kcal/mol. Upon attachment of the NAD radical to an enzyme active site, the radical becomes stabilized. The stabilization effect (ratio of the rate of NAD disappearance in the absence and presence of an enzyme) depends upon the nature of the enzyme and varies from 1.54 x 10/sup 2/ for alcohol dehydrogenase, 2.57 x 10/sup 2/ for malate dehydrogenase, 1.1 x 10/sup 3/ for lactate dehydrogenase, to 1.54 x 10/sup 4/ for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The observed second-order disappearance of enzyme-stabilized NAD is explained by a mechanism that is dependent upon the dissociation constant of the enzyme-NAD complex. 6 figures

  2. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-catalyzed chain oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by perhydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, P.C.

    1980-02-10

    The chain oxidation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH by perhydroxyl radicals and propagated by molecular oxygen was studied by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system, /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-ray, and pulse radiolysis. The chain length, amount of NADH oxidized per HO/sub 2/ generated, increases with increasing acidity of the medium and reaches a value of 73 at pH 5.0. The rate constant for the oxidation of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH complex by HO/sub 2/ was estimated to be 2 x 10/sup 7/ m/sup -1/s/sup -1/ at ambient temperatures (23-24/sup 0/C). Rate studies as a function of pH indicate that O/sub 2//sup -/ is unreactive toward the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH complex. Other dehydrogenases (malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and isocitric dehydrogenase) studied showed no catalytic activity in the oxidation of NADH by HO/sub 2//O/sub 2//sup -/.

  3. [Synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in the nuclei of pigeon erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Nemchinskaia, V L; Makarova, T G; Mozhenok, T P; Braun, A D

    1975-08-01

    The nuclei of pigeon erythrocytes are capable of synthesizing NAD from nicotinamid-mononucleotides and ATP. Some data on the kinetics of NAD-pyrophosphorylase have been obtained: the optimal concentration of nuclei and the effect of various incubation time. The pretreatment of nuclei by Triton X-100, or by ultrasonics enhances NAD synthesis. The results suggest that cyclic 3',5'-AMP (Fluka) may have no effect on NAD synthesis. The control of the cell metabolism by NAD formation is considered. PMID:181878

  4. Modification of Metabolic Pattern by Variation of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Level 1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yukio

    1969-01-01

    The experiments were designed to get some information on the metabolism controlled by variation of the NADP level, which is known to change with the variation of environmental factors. The exogenous NADP added to the mitochondria prepared from Vigna sesquipedalis cotyledons was associated with and/or penetrated into the mitochondria. The combined NADP served in the operation of the mitochondrial NADP-isocitric acid dehydrogenase. The variation of NADP level by exogenous NADP was observed to modify the rates of metabolic processes. The increase of exogenous NADP in Vigna hypocotyl slices lowered malic- and citric-acid contents and raised the α-ketoglutaric acid content. The incorporation of 14C from acetate-2-14C into lipid, organic acid, amino acid, was promoted with the exogenous NADP. The 14C-incorporation into glycolic acid, malic acid and glutamic acid was accelerated. In the mannitol homogenate of Vigna cotyledon, 14CO2 evolution and 14C-incorporation into lipid, sugar, and glycolic acid from acetate-2-14C were promoted with the exogenous NADP. Endogenous citric acid content was lowered by NADP, while malic acid content was increased. The activation of NADP-enzymes by NADP was discussed to be involved in these variations. PMID:16657076

  5. Assignment of the Gene for Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Human Chromosome 16 by Mouse-Human Somatic Cell Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tischfield, Jay A.; Ruddle, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    A series of mouse-human hybrids was prepared from mouse cells deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7) and normal human cells. The hybrids were made in medium containing adenine and alanosine, an antimetabolite known to inhibit de novo adenylic acid biosynthesis. The mouse cells, unable to utilize exogenous adenine, were killed in this medium, but the hybrids proliferated as a consequence of their retaining the human aprt gene. The hybrids were then exposed to the adenine analogs 2,6-diaminopurine and 2-fluoroadenine to select for cells that had lost this gene. Before exposure to the adenine analogs, the expression of human adenine phosphoribosyltransferase by the hybrids was strongly associated only with the presence of human chromosome 16, and afterwards this was the only human chromosome consistently lost. This observation suggests that the human aprt gene can be assigned to chromosome 16. Images PMID:4129802

  6. Streptomyces clavuligerus HlmI is an intramolecular disulfide-forming dithiol oxidase in holomycin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Walsh, Christopher T

    2011-05-31

    Holomycin and related dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and contain a unique 5,5-bicyclic ring structure with an N-acylated aminopyrrolone fused to a cyclic ene-disulfide. Here we show that the intramolecular disulfide bridge is constructed from the acyclic ene-dithiol at a late stage in the pathway by a thioredoxin oxidoreductase-like enzyme HlmI from the holomycin producer Streptomyces clavuligerus. Recombinant HlmI was purified from E. coli with bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and converts reduced holomycin to holomycin utilizing O(2) as cosubstrate. As a dithiol oxidase, HlmI is functionally homologous to GliT and DepH, which perform a similar dithiol to disulfide oxidation in the biosynthesis of fungal natural product gliotoxin and epigenetic regulator compound FK228, respectively. Deletion of the hlmI gene in the wild type S. clavuligerus and in a holomycin-overproducing mutant resulted in decreased level of holomycin production and increased sensitivity toward holomycin, suggesting a self-protection role of HlmI in the holomycin biosynthetic pathway. HlmI belongs to a new clade of uncharacterized thioredoxin oxidoreductase-like enzymes, distinctive from the GliT-like enzymes and the DepH-like enzymes, and represents a third example of oxidoreductases that catalyzes disulfide formation in the biosynthesis of small molecules. PMID:21504228

  7. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25605906

  8. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Love, Nick R.; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD+ kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25605906

  9. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  10. Nicotinamide mononucleotide synthetase is the key enzyme for an alternative route of NAD biosynthesis in Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Leonardo; Martynowski, Dariusz; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Eyobo, Yvonne; Zogaj, Xhavit; Klose, Karl E.; Nikolaev, Evgeni V.; Magni, Giulio; Zhang, Hong; Osterman, Andrei L.

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes involved in the last 2 steps of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) cofactor biosynthesis, which catalyze the adenylylation of the nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) precursor to nicotinic acid dinucleotide (NaAD) followed by its amidation to NAD, constitute promising drug targets for the development of new antibiotics. These enzymes, NaMN adenylyltransferase (gene nadD) and NAD synthetase (gene nadE), respectively, are indispensable and conserved in nearly all bacterial pathogens. However, a comparative genome analysis of Francisella tularensis allowed us to predict the existence of an alternative route of NAD synthesis in this category A priority pathogen, the causative agent of tularaemia. In this route, the amidation of NaMN to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) occurs before the adenylylation reaction, which converts this alternative intermediate to the NAD cofactor. The first step is catalyzed by NMN synthetase, which was identified and characterized in this study. A crystal structure of this enzyme, a divergent member of the NadE family, was solved at 1.9-Å resolution in complex with reaction products, providing a rationale for its unusual substrate preference for NaMN over NaAD. The second step is performed by NMN adenylyltransferase of the NadM family. Here, we report validation of the predicted route (NaMN → NMN → NAD) in F. tularensis including mathematical modeling, in vitro reconstitution, and in vivo metabolite analysis in comparison with a canonical route (NaMN → NaAD → NAD) of NAD biosynthesis as represented by another deadly bacterial pathogen, Bacillus anthracis. PMID:19204287

  11. Nicotinamide mononucleotide synthetase is the key enzyme for an alternative route of NAD biosynthesis in Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Leonardo; Martynowski, Dariusz; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Eyobo, Yvonne; Zogaj, Xhavit; Klose, Karl E; Nikolaev, Evgeni V; Magni, Giulio; Zhang, Hong; Osterman, Andrei L

    2009-03-01

    Enzymes involved in the last 2 steps of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) cofactor biosynthesis, which catalyze the adenylylation of the nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) precursor to nicotinic acid dinucleotide (NaAD) followed by its amidation to NAD, constitute promising drug targets for the development of new antibiotics. These enzymes, NaMN adenylyltransferase (gene nadD) and NAD synthetase (gene nadE), respectively, are indispensable and conserved in nearly all bacterial pathogens. However, a comparative genome analysis of Francisella tularensis allowed us to predict the existence of an alternative route of NAD synthesis in this category A priority pathogen, the causative agent of tularaemia. In this route, the amidation of NaMN to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) occurs before the adenylylation reaction, which converts this alternative intermediate to the NAD cofactor. The first step is catalyzed by NMN synthetase, which was identified and characterized in this study. A crystal structure of this enzyme, a divergent member of the NadE family, was solved at 1.9-A resolution in complex with reaction products, providing a rationale for its unusual substrate preference for NaMN over NaAD. The second step is performed by NMN adenylyltransferase of the NadM family. Here, we report validation of the predicted route (NaMN --> NMN --> NAD) in F. tularensis including mathematical modeling, in vitro reconstitution, and in vivo metabolite analysis in comparison with a canonical route (NaMN --> NaAD --> NAD) of NAD biosynthesis as represented by another deadly bacterial pathogen, Bacillus anthracis. PMID:19204287

  12. Adenine nucleotide translocator transports haem precursors into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Motoki; Kabe, Yasuaki; Kuramori, Chikanori; Kondo, Masao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Haem is a prosthetic group for haem proteins, which play an essential role in oxygen transport, respiration, signal transduction, and detoxification. In haem biosynthesis, the haem precursor protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) must be accumulated into the mitochondrial matrix across the inner membrane, but its mechanism is largely unclear. Here we show that adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), the inner membrane transporter, contributes to haem biosynthesis by facilitating mitochondrial accumulation of its precursors. We identified that haem and PP IX specifically bind to ANT. Mitochondrial uptake of PP IX was inhibited by ADP, a known substrate of ANT. Conversely, ADP uptake into mitochondria was competitively inhibited by haem and its precursors, suggesting that haem-related porphyrins are accumulated into mitochondria via ANT. Furthermore, disruption of the ANT genes in yeast resulted in a reduction of haem biosynthesis by blocking the translocation of haem precursors into the matrix. Our results represent a new model that ANT plays a crucial role in haem biosynthesis by facilitating accumulation of its precursors into the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:18728780

  13. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  14. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet 2D fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-2D FS)

    PubMed Central

    Widom, Julia R.; Johnson, Neil P.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analog of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) – a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy – to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 Å ± 0.5 Å, twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5°), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes. PMID:24223491

  15. Mutations in Haemophilus influenzae mismatch repair genes increase mutation rates of dinucleotide repeat tracts but not dinucleotide repeat-driven pilin phase variation rates.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Christopher D; Sweetman, Wendy A; Moxon, E Richard

    2004-05-01

    High-frequency, reversible switches in expression of surface antigens, referred to as phase variation (PV), are characteristic of Haemophilus influenzae. PV enables this bacterial species, an obligate commensal and pathogen of the human upper respiratory tract, to adapt to changes in the host environment. Phase-variable hemagglutinating pili are expressed by many H. influenzae isolates. PV involves alterations in the number of 5' TA repeats located between the -10 and -35 promoter elements of the overlapping, divergently orientated promoters of hifA and hifBCDE, whose products mediate biosynthesis and assembly of pili. Dinucleotide repeat tracts are destabilized by mismatch repair (MMR) mutations in Escherichia coli. The influence of mutations in MMR genes of H. influenzae strain Rd on dinucleotide repeat-mediated PV rates was investigated by using reporter constructs containing 20 5' AT repeats. Mutations in mutS, mutL, and mutH elevated rates approximately 30-fold, while rates in dam and uvrD mutants were increased 14- and 3-fold, respectively. PV rates of constructs containing 10 to 12 5' AT repeats were significantly elevated in mutS mutants of H. influenzae strains Rd and Eagan. An intact hif locus was found in 14 and 12% of representative nontypeable H. influenzae isolates associated with either otitis media or carriage, respectively. Nine or more tandem 5' TA repeats were present in the promoter region. Surprisingly, inactivation of mutS in two serotype b H. influenzae strains did not alter pilin PV rates. Thus, although functionally analogous to the E. coli MMR pathway and active on dinucleotide repeat tracts, defects in H. influenzae MMR do not affect 5' TA-mediated pilin PV. PMID:15126452

  16. Monocyte-derived extracellular Nampt-dependent biosynthesis of NAD(+) protects the heart against pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Yano, Masamichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Toru; Yabumoto, Chizuru; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Kamo, Takehiro; Shimizu, Yu; Yagi, Hiroki; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Lee, Jong-Kook; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Yasushi; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the salvage pathway for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) biosynthesis, and thereby regulates the deacetylase activity of sirtuins. Here we show accommodative regulation of myocardial NAD(+) by monocyte-derived extracellular Nampt (eNampt), which is essential for hemodynamic compensation to pressure overload. Although intracellular Nampt (iNampt) expression was decreased in pressure-overloaded hearts, myocardial NAD(+) concentration and Sirt1 activity were preserved. In contrast, iNampt was up-regulated in spleen and monocytes, and circulating eNampt protein and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), a key precursor of NAD(+), were significantly increased. Pharmacological inhibition of Nampt by FK866 or depletion of monocytes/macrophages by clodronate liposomes disrupted the homeostatic mechanism of myocardial NAD(+) levels and NAD(+)-dependent Sirt1 activity, leading to susceptibility to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac decompensation in pressure-overloaded mice. These biochemical and hemodynamic defects were prevented by systemic administration of NMN. Our studies uncover a crucial role of monocyte-derived eNampt in myocardial adaptation to pressure overload, and highlight a potential intervention controlling myocardial NAD(+) against heart failure. PMID:26522369

  17. Adenine Aminohydrolase from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Strasser, Rona; Hartman, Charles U.; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2012-01-01

    Adenine aminohydrolase (AAH) is an enzyme that is not present in mammalian cells and is found exclusively in Leishmania among the protozoan parasites that infect humans. AAH plays a paramount role in purine metabolism in this genus by steering 6-aminopurines into 6-oxypurines. Leishmania donovani AAH is 38 and 23% identical to Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAH and human adenosine deaminase enzymes, respectively, catalyzes adenine deamination to hypoxanthine with an apparent Km of 15.4 μm, and does not recognize adenosine as a substrate. Western blot analysis established that AAH is expressed in both life cycle stages of L. donovani, whereas subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies confirmed that AAH is localized to the parasite cytosol. Deletion of the AAH locus in intact parasites established that AAH is not an essential gene and that Δaah cells are capable of salvaging the same range of purine nucleobases and nucleosides as wild type L. donovani. The Δaah null mutant was able to infect murine macrophages in vitro and in mice, although the parasite loads in both model systems were modestly reduced compared with wild type infections. The Δaah lesion was also introduced into a conditionally lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant in which viability was dependent on pharmacologic ablation of AAH by 2′-deoxycoformycin. The Δaah/Δhgprt/Δxprt triple knock-out no longer required 2′-deoxycoformycin for growth and was avirulent in mice with no persistence after a 4-week infection. These genetic studies underscore the paramount importance of AAH to purine salvage by L. donovani. PMID:22238346

  18. A9145, a New Adenine-Containing Antifungal Antibiotic: Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, L. D.; Clem, G. M.; Wilson, M. M.; Westhead, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co2+, PO43−, and CaCO3, were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O2 level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 × 10−2 to 4.5 × 10−2 μmole of O2/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels. PMID:4208279

  19. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  20. Formation of the imidazolides of dinucleotides under potentially prebiotic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeper, H. L.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    Imidazolides of dinucleotides such as ImpApA can be formed from the corresponding dinucleotides in a two-stage process, which gives up to 15% yields under potentially prebiotic conditions. First a solution of the dinucleotide and sodium trimetaphosphate is dried out at constant temperature and humidity. This produces polyphosphates such as p(n)ApA in excellent yield (greater than or equal to 80%). The products are dissolved in water, imidazole is added, and the solution is dried out again. This yields the 5'-phosphorimidazolides.

  1. Quantitation of NAD+ biosynthesis from the salvage pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sporty, J; Lin, S; Kato, M; Ognibene, T; Stewart, B; Turteltaub, K; Bench, G

    2009-02-18

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) is synthesized via two major pathways in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems: the de novo biosynthesis pathway from tryptophan precursors, or by the salvage biosynthesis pathway from either extracellular nicotinic acid or various intracellular NAD{sup +} decomposition products. NAD{sup +} biosynthesis via the salvage pathway has been linked to an increase in yeast replicative lifespan under calorie restriction (CR). However, the relative contribution of each pathway to NAD{sup +} biosynthesis under both normal and CR conditions is not known. Here, we have performed lifespan, NAD{sup +} and NADH (the reduced form of NAD{sup +}) analyses on BY4742 wild type, NAD+ salvage pathway knockout (npt1{Delta}), and NAD+ de novo pathway knockout (qpt1{Delta}) yeast strains cultured in media containing either 2% glucose (normal growth) or 0.5% glucose (CR). We have utilized {sup 14}C labeled nicotinic acid in the culture media combined with HPLC speciation and both UV and {sup 14}C detection to quantitate the total amounts of NAD{sup +} and NADH and the amounts derived from the salvage pathway. We observe that wild type and qpt1{Delta} yeast exclusively utilize extracellular nicotinic acid for NAD{sup +} and NADH biosynthesis under both the 2% and 0.5% glucose growth conditions suggesting that the de novo pathway plays little role if a functional salvage pathway is present. We also observe that NAD{sup +} concentrations decrease in all three strains under CR. However, unlike the wild type strain, NADH concentrations do not decrease and NAD{sup +}:NADH ratios do not increase under CR for either knockout strain. Lifespan analyses reveal that CR results in a lifespan increase of approximately 25% for the wild type and qpt1{Delta} strains, while no increase in lifespan is observed for the npt1{Delta} strain. In combination these data suggest that having a functional salvage pathway is more important than the absolute levels of NAD

  2. Mononucleotide and dinucleotide frequencies, and codon usage in poliovirion RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, P G; Wimmer, E

    1981-01-01

    The polio type 1 (Mahoney) RNA sequence (1) has been analyzed in terms of the distribution of its mononucleotides, dinucleotides and trinucleotides (codons). The distribution of adenosine in the sequence is nonuniform, being lower at the 5' end and higher at the 3' end. The dinucleotide CG is relatively rare and the dinucleotides UG and CA are relatively more common than expected. Codon usage is decidedly nonrandom. Codons containing CG are avoided and those ending in adenosine are favored. The asymmetric use of mononucleotides, dinucleotides and codons in polio RNA is unexplained at the present time although the lowered CG frequency may be the result of a DNA origin for polio RNA. PMID:6275352

  3. Syntheses of nicotinamide riboside and derivatives: effective agents for increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianle; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Sauve, Anthony A

    2007-12-27

    A new two-step methodology achieves stereoselective synthesis of beta-nicotinamide riboside and a series of related amide, ester, and acid nucleosides. Compounds were prepared through a triacetylated-nicotinate ester nucleoside, via coupling of either ethylnicotinate or phenylnicotinate with 1,2,3,5-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-ribofuranose. Nicotinamide riboside, nicotinic acid riboside, O-ethylnicotinate riboside, O-methylnicotinate riboside, and several N-alkyl derivatives increased NAD+ concentrations from 1.2-2.7-fold in several mammalian cell lines. These findings establish bioavailability and potent effects of these nucleosides in stimulating the increase of NAD+ concentrations in mammalian cells. PMID:18052316

  4. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-specific "Malic" Enzyme in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Other Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, P

    1976-02-01

    NAD-specific "malic" enzyme (EC 1.1.1.39) has been isolated and purified 1200-fold from leaves of Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Kinetic studies of this enzyme, which is activated 14-fold by CoA, acetyl-CoA, and SO(4) (2-), suggest allosteric properties. Cofactor requirements show an absolute specificity for NAD and for Mn(2+), which cannot be replaced by NADP or Mg(2+). For maintaining enzyme activity in crude leaf extracts a thiol reagent, Mn(2+), and PVP-40 were required. The latter could be omitted from purified preparations. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation NAD-malic enzyme could be localized in mitochondria. A survey of plants with crassulacean acid metabolism revealed the presence of NAD-malic enzyme in all 31 plants tested. Substantial levels of this enzyme (121-186 mumole/hr.mg of Chl) were detected in all members tested of the family Crassulaceae. It is proposed that NAD-malic enzyme in general supplements activity of NADP-malic enzyme present in these plants and may be specifically employed to increase internal concentrations of CO(2) for recycling during cessation of gas exchange in periods of severe drought. PMID:16659473

  5. The synthesis of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide and poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) in various classes of rat liver nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Haines, M. E.; Johnston, I. R.; Mathias, A. P.; Ridge, D.

    1969-01-01

    1. The activities of NMN adenylyltransferase and an enzyme that synthesizes poly (ADP-ribose) from NAD were investigated in the various classes of rat liver nuclei fractionated by zonal centrifugation. 2. The highest specific activities of these two nuclear enzymes occur in different classes of nuclei. In very young and in mature rats it was shown that a correlation exists between DNA synthesis and NMN adenylyltransferase activity, but in rats of intermediate age this correlation is less evident. The highest activities of the enzyme that catalyses formation of poly (ADP-ribose) are in the nuclei involved in the synthesis of RNA. 3. The significance of these results in relation to NAD metabolism is discussed. PMID:4311824

  6. A COUPLED MICROSOMAL-ACTIVATING/EMBRYO CULTURE SYSTEM: TOXICITY OF REDUCED BETA-NICOTINAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE PHOSPHATE (NADPH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An NADPH-dependent microsomal-activating system has been coupled to a rat embryo culture in vitro. No embryonic morphological abnormalities or decrease in final yolk sac or embryo DNA and protein contents occurred when 0.2 mM NADPH was used in this coupled system. In contrast, 1....

  7. Enzymatic production by tissue extracts of a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with calcium-releasing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Tich, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigated the occurrence and characterization of the metabolite in mammalian tissues. In all mammalian tissues tested, including rabbit liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain, the factor to convert NAD into its active metabolite was present. The conversion exhibited many characteristics of an enzymatic process such as temperature sensitivity, concentration dependence and protease sensitivity. Production of the NAD metabolite occurred within a time frame of 15-45 minutes at 37{degree}C, depending upon the particular preparation. The metabolite was isolated using high performance liquid chromatography from all mammalian tissues. This purified metabolite was then tested for its effectiveness in releasing intracellular calcium in an intact cell by microinjecting it into unfertilized sea urchin eggs. These eggs undergo a massive morphological change upon fertilization which is dependent upon the release of calcium from inside the cell. Upon injection of the NAD metabolite into unfertilized eggs, this same morphological change was observed showing indirectly that the metabolite released intracellular calcium from an intact, viable cell. In addition, radioactive studies using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} loaded into permeabilized hepatocytes, indicated in preliminary studies that the NAD metabolite could also release calcium from intracellular stores of mammalian cells.

  8. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Gyun Kim, Tae; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Bu Kang, Gil; Youn Kang, Jung; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Yop An, Jun; Ryoung Park, Kyoung; Lee, Youngjin; Jun Im, Young; Hyuck Lee, Jun; Hyun Eom, Soo

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  9. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Tae Gyun; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kang, Jung Youn; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Im, Young Jun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  10. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  11. Regiospecific chlorination of (S)-beta-tyrosyl-S-carrier protein catalyzed by SgcC3 in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuangjun; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2007-10-17

    C-1027 is a potent antitumor antibiotic composed of an apo-protein and a reactive enediyne chromophore. The chromophore consists of four different chemical subunits including an (S)-3-chloro-4,5-dihydroxy-beta-phenylalanine moiety, the biosynthesis of which from l-alpha-tyrosine is catalyzed by six proteins, SgcC, SgcC1, SgcC2, SgcC3, SgcC4, and SgcC5. Biochemical characterization of SgcC3 unveiled the following: (i) SgcC3 is a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent halogenase; (ii) SgcC3 acts only on the SgcC2 peptidyl carrier protein-tethered substrates; (iii) SgcC3-catalyzed halogenation requires O2 and reduced FAD and either the C-1027 pathway-specific flavin reductase SgcE6 or E. coli flavin reductase (Fre) can support the SgcC3 activity; (iv) SgcC3 also efficiently catalyzes bromination but not fluorination or iodination; (v) SgcC3 can utilize both (S)- and (R)-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 but not 3-hydroxy-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as a substrate. These results establish that SgcC3 catalyzes the third enzymatic transformation during the biosynthesis of the (S)-3-chloro-4,5-dihydroxy-beta-phenylalanine moiety of C-1027 from l-alpha-tyrosine. SgcC3 now represents the second biochemically characterized flavin-dependent halogenase that acts on a carrier protein-tethered substrate. These findings will facilitate the engineering of new C-1027 analogs by combinatorial biosynthesis methods. PMID:17887753

  12. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn(2+) before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO(4). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe(II) /Fe(II) ]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H(2)O(2) to O(2) and H(2)O. The values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the catalase activity are 200 s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H(2)O(2) before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g(ave) = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H(2)O(2) by [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  13. Biosynthesis and metabolism of retinoic acid: roles of CRBP and CRABP in retinoic acid: roles of CRBP and CRABP in retinoic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Napoli, J L

    1993-02-01

    The enzymes that constitute the pathway of retinoic acid biosynthesis and metabolism may recognize retinoid binding proteins as effectors and substrates. Apocellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) stimulates a bile-salt independent membrane-bound retinyl ester hydrolase resulting in the hydrolysis of endogenous retinyl esters and the formation of holoCRBP. HoloCRBP delivers retinol to a microsomal nicotin-amide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent dehydrogenase, protects it from artifactual oxidation and denies enzymes that cannot recognize the binding protein access to retinol. The retinal synthesized may be transferred from the microsomes to the cytosol by CRBP. A cytosolic retinal dehydrogenase has been purified that produces retinoic acid from retinal generated by microsomes in the presence of CRBP and from the complex CRBP-retinal itself. Thus, CRBP(type I) seems to channel retinoids through the reactions of retinoic acid synthesis via a series of protein-protein interactions. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (type I) facilitates retinoic acid metabolism by sequestering it and by acting as a low Km substrate, thereby also modulating the steady-state concentrations of retinoic acid. PMID:8381481

  14. A Dedicated Type II NADPH Dehydrogenase Performs the Penultimate Step in the Biosynthesis of Vitamin K1 in Synechocystis and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Latimer, Scott; Schmollinger, Stefan; Block, Anna; Dussault, Patrick H.; Vermaas, Wim F.J.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Basset, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of Arabidopsis thaliana NAD(P)H DEHYDROGENASE C1 (NDC1; At5g08740) results in the accumulation of demethylphylloquinone, a late biosynthetic intermediate of vitamin K1. Gene coexpression and phylogenomics analyses showed that conserved functional associations occur between vitamin K biosynthesis and NDC1 homologs throughout the prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Deletion of Synechocystis ndbB, which encodes for one such homolog, resulted in the same defects as those observed in the cyanobacterial demethylnaphthoquinone methyltransferase knockout. Chemical modeling and assay of purified demethylnaphthoquinone methyltransferase demonstrated that, by virtue of the strong electrophilic nature of S-adenosyl-l-methionine, the transmethylation of the demethylated precursor of vitamin K is strictly dependent on the reduced form of its naphthoquinone ring. NDC1 was shown to catalyze such a prerequisite reduction by using NADPH and demethylphylloquinone as substrates and flavine adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor. NDC1 displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and was markedly inhibited by dicumarol, a competitive inhibitor of naphthoquinone oxidoreductases. These data demonstrate that the reduction of the demethylnaphthoquinone ring represents an authentic step in the biosynthetic pathway of vitamin K, that this reaction is enzymatically driven, and that a selection pressure is operating to retain type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in this process. PMID:26023160

  15. A Dedicated Type II NADPH Dehydrogenase Performs the Penultimate Step in the Biosynthesis of Vitamin K1 in Synechocystis and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Latimer, Scott; Schmollinger, Stefan; Block, Anna; Dussault, Patrick H; Vermaas, Wim F J; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Basset, Gilles J

    2015-06-01

    Mutation of Arabidopsis thaliana NAD(P)H DEHYDROGENASE C1 (NDC1; At5g08740) results in the accumulation of demethylphylloquinone, a late biosynthetic intermediate of vitamin K1. Gene coexpression and phylogenomics analyses showed that conserved functional associations occur between vitamin K biosynthesis and NDC1 homologs throughout the prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Deletion of Synechocystis ndbB, which encodes for one such homolog, resulted in the same defects as those observed in the cyanobacterial demethylnaphthoquinone methyltransferase knockout. Chemical modeling and assay of purified demethylnaphthoquinone methyltransferase demonstrated that, by virtue of the strong electrophilic nature of S-adenosyl-l-methionine, the transmethylation of the demethylated precursor of vitamin K is strictly dependent on the reduced form of its naphthoquinone ring. NDC1 was shown to catalyze such a prerequisite reduction by using NADPH and demethylphylloquinone as substrates and flavine adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor. NDC1 displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and was markedly inhibited by dicumarol, a competitive inhibitor of naphthoquinone oxidoreductases. These data demonstrate that the reduction of the demethylnaphthoquinone ring represents an authentic step in the biosynthetic pathway of vitamin K, that this reaction is enzymatically driven, and that a selection pressure is operating to retain type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in this process. PMID:26023160

  16. Dinucleotide controlled null models for comparative RNA gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Tanja; Washietl, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparative prediction of RNA structures can be used to identify functional noncoding RNAs in genomic screens. It was shown recently by Babak et al. [BMC Bioinformatics. 8:33] that RNA gene prediction programs can be biased by the genomic dinucleotide content, in particular those programs using a thermodynamic folding model including stacking energies. As a consequence, there is need for dinucleotide-preserving control strategies to assess the significance of such predictions. While there have been randomization algorithms for single sequences for many years, the problem has remained challenging for multiple alignments and there is currently no algorithm available. Results We present a program called SISSIz that simulates multiple alignments of a given average dinucleotide content. Meeting additional requirements of an accurate null model, the randomized alignments are on average of the same sequence diversity and preserve local conservation and gap patterns. We make use of a phylogenetic substitution model that includes overlapping dependencies and site-specific rates. Using fast heuristics and a distance based approach, a tree is estimated under this model which is used to guide the simulations. The new algorithm is tested on vertebrate genomic alignments and the effect on RNA structure predictions is studied. In addition, we directly combined the new null model with the RNAalifold consensus folding algorithm giving a new variant of a thermodynamic structure based RNA gene finding program that is not biased by the dinucleotide content. Conclusion SISSIz implements an efficient algorithm to randomize multiple alignments preserving dinucleotide content. It can be used to get more accurate estimates of false positive rates of existing programs, to produce negative controls for the training of machine learning based programs, or as standalone RNA gene finding program. Other applications in comparative genomics that require randomization of multiple

  17. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules.

    PubMed

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-12-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine. PMID:27075339

  18. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  19. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-14

    Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in DNA. The general features of DNA recognition by an adenine DNA glycosylase, Bacillus stearothermophilus MutY, have previously been revealed via the X-ray structure of a catalytically inactive mutant protein bound to an A:oxoG-containing DNA duplex. Although the structure revealed the substrate adenine to be, as expected, extruded from the DNA helix and inserted into an extrahelical active site pocket on the enzyme, the substrate adenine engaged in no direct contacts with active site residues. This feature was paradoxical, because other glycosylases have been observed to engage their substrates primarily through direct contacts. The lack of direct contacts in the case of MutY suggested that either MutY uses a distinctive logic for substrate recognition or that the X-ray structure had captured a noncatalytically competent state in lesion recognition. To gain further insight into this issue, we crystallized wild-type MutY bound to DNA containing a catalytically inactive analog of 2'-deoxyadenosine in which a single 2'-H atom was replaced by fluorine. The structure of this fluorinated lesion-recognition complex (FLRC) reveals the substrate adenine buried more deeply into the active site pocket than in the prior structure and now engaged in multiple direct hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This structure appears to capture the catalytically competent state of adenine DNA glycosylases, and it suggests a catalytic mechanism for this class of enzymes, one in which general acid-catalyzed protonation of the nucleobase promotes glycosidic bond cleavage.

  20. Profiles of the biosynthesis and metabolism of pyridine nucleotides in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Katahira, Riko; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    As part of a research program on nucleotide metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.), profiles of pyridine (nicotinamide) metabolism were examined based on the in situ metabolic fate of radio-labelled precursors and the in vitro activities of enzymes. In potato tubers, [(3)H]quinolinic acid, which is an intermediate of de novo pyridine nucleotide synthesis, and [(14)C]nicotinamide, a catabolite of NAD, were utilised for pyridine nucleotide synthesis. The in situ tracer experiments and in vitro enzyme assays suggest the operation of multiple pyridine nucleotide cycles. In addition to the previously proposed cycle consisting of seven metabolites, we found a new cycle that includes newly discovered nicotinamide riboside deaminase which is also functional in potato tubers. This cycle bypasses nicotinamide and nicotinic acid; it is NAD --> nicotinamide mononucleotide --> nicotinamide riboside --> nicotinic acid riboside --> nicotinic acid mononucleotide --> nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide --> NAD. Degradation of the pyridine ring was extremely low in potato tubers. Nicotinic acid glucoside is formed from nicotinic acid in potato tubers. Comparative studies of [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid metabolism indicate that nicotinic acid is converted to nicotinic acid glucoside in all organs of potato plants. Trigonelline synthesis from [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid was also found. Conversion was greater in green parts of plants, such as leaves and stem, than in underground parts of potato plants. Nicotinic acid utilised for the biosynthesis of these conjugates seems to be derived not only from the pyridine nucleotide cycle, but also from the de novo synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide. PMID:19820966

  1. PGC1α drives NAD biosynthesis linking oxidative metabolism to renal protection.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mei T; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K; Berg, Anders H; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bhasin, Manoj K; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-24

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischaemia. Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients. Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α, is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Following renal ischaemia, Pgc1α(-/-) (also known as Ppargc1a(-/-)) mice develop local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (NAM, also known as nicotinamide), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Notably, exogenous NAM improves local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischaemic Pgc1α(-/-) mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulate the effects of NAM supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischaemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulates the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuates the de novo pathway. NAM enhances NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augments production of the fat breakdown product β-hydroxybutyrate, leading to increased production of prostaglandin PGE2 (ref. 5), a secreted autacoid that maintains renal function. NAM treatment reverses established ischaemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-hydroxybutyrate signalling or prostaglandin production similarly abolishes PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in ageing and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate NAM and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  2. Excimer states in microhydrated adenine clusters.

    PubMed

    Smith, V R; Samoylova, E; Ritze, H-H; Radloff, W; Schultz, T

    2010-09-01

    We present femtosecond pump-probe mass and photoelectron spectra for adenine (A) and microhydrated A(m)(H(2)O)(n) clusters. Three distinct relaxation processes of photoexcited electronic states were distinguished: in unhydrated A, relaxation of the optically bright pipi* state occurred via the dark npi* state with respective lifetimes of <0.1 and 1.3 ps. In microhydrated clusters A(H(2)O)(n), relaxation via the npi* state is quenched by a faster relaxation process, probably involving pisigma* states. For the predominantly hydrogen-bonded adenine dimer (A(2)), excited state relaxation is dominated by monomer-like processes. When the adenine dimer is clustered with several water molecules, we observe a nanosecond lifetime from excimer states in pi-stacked clusters. From the electron spectra we estimate adiabatic ionization potentials of 8.32 eV (A), 8.27 eV (A(H(2)O)(1)), 8.19 eV (A(H(2)O)(2)), 8.10 eV (A(H(2)O)(3)), 8.18 eV (A(2)), and 8.0 eV (A(2)(H(2)O)(3-5)). PMID:20556283

  3. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  4. Background correction using dinucleotide affinities improves the performance of GCRMA

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z; Fodor, Anthony A; Gibas, Cynthia J

    2008-01-01

    Background High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data, which can have serious implications for the interpretation of the generated data if not estimated correctly. Results We introduce an approach to calculate probe affinity based on sequence composition, incorporating nearest-neighbor (NN) information. Our model uses position-specific dinucleotide information, instead of the original single nucleotide approach, and adds up to 10% to the total variance explained (R2) when compared to the previously published model. We demonstrate that correcting for background noise using this approach enhances the performance of the GCRMA preprocessing algorithm when applied to control datasets, especially for detecting low intensity targets. Conclusion Modifying the previously published position-dependent affinity model to incorporate dinucleotide information significantly improves the performance of the model. The dinucleotide affinity model enhances the detection of differentially expressed genes when implemented as a background correction procedure in GeneChip preprocessing algorithms. This is conceptually consistent with physical models of binding affinity, which depend on the nearest-neighbor stacking interactions in addition to base-pairing. PMID:18947404

  5. Cyclic Dinucleotide-Controlled Regulatory Pathways in Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cyclic dinucleotides cyclic 3′,5′-diguanylate (c-di-GMP) and cyclic 3′,5′-diadenylate (c-di-AMP) have emerged as key components of bacterial signal transduction networks. These closely related second messengers follow the classical general principles of nucleotide signaling by integrating diverse signals into regulatory pathways that control cellular responses to changing environments. They impact distinct cellular processes, with c-di-GMP having an established role in promoting bacterial adhesion and inhibiting motility and c-di-AMP being involved in cell wall metabolism, potassium homeostasis, and DNA repair. The involvement of c-dinucleotides in the physiology of the filamentous, nonmotile streptomycetes remained obscure until recent discoveries showed that c-di-GMP controls the activity of the developmental master regulator BldD and that c-di-AMP determines the level of the resuscitation-promoting factor A(RpfA) cell wall-remodelling enzyme. Here, I summarize our current knowledge of c-dinucleotide signaling in Streptomyces species and highlight the important roles of c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP in the biology of these antibiotic-producing, multicellular bacteria. PMID:26216850

  6. Auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  7. Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  8. Oxytetracycline Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Tang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that acts by inhibiting protein synthesis in bacteria. It is an important member of the bacterial aromatic polyketide family, which is a structurally diverse class of natural products. OTC is synthesized by a type II polyketide synthase that generates the poly-β-ketone backbone through successive decarboxylative condensation of malonyl-CoA extender units, followed by modifications by cyclases, oxygenases, transferases, and additional tailoring enzymes. Genetic and biochemical studies have illuminated most of the steps involved in the biosynthesis of OTC, which is detailed here as a representative case study in type II polyketide biosynthesis. PMID:20522541

  9. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  10. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  11. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J

    2013-11-26

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  12. Role of pipecolic acid in the biosynthesis of lysine in Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, J J; Bhattacharjee, J K

    1979-05-01

    The role of pipecolic acid in the biosynthesis of lysine was investigated in Rhodotorula glutinis, an aerobic red yeast. Supplementation of pipecolic acid in the minimal medium supported the growth of mutants lys2, lys3, and lys5; alpha-aminoadipic acid supported the growth of lys5; but neither alpha-aminoadipic acid nor pipecolic acid supported the growth of mutants MNNG42 and MNNG37. During the growth of the appropriate mutants, pipecolic acid was removed from the growth medium and the intracellular pool. In tracer experiments, radioactivity from [(14)C]pipecolic acid was selectively incorporated into the cellular lysine of lys5 and the wild-type strain. l-Pipecolic acid-dependent enzyme activity did not require any cofactor and was inhibited by mercuric chloride and potassium cyanide. This activity was present in the wild-type strain and all of the mutants tested and was repressed in mutant lys5 when grown in the presence of higher concentration of lysine. The reaction product of pipecolic acid was converted to saccharopine by lys5 enzyme in the presence of glutamate and reduced nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Mutant MNNG37 lacked the saccharopine dehydrogenase activity, indicating that this step is involved in the conversion of alpha-aminoadipic acid and pipecolic acid to lysine. Mutants MNNG37 and MNNG42 accumulated a p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde-reacting product in the culture supernatant and in the intracellular pool. Chromatographic properties of the p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde adduct and that of the pipecolic acid-dependent reaction product were similar. The reaction product and the accumulation product were characterized on the basis of mass and absorption spectra as alpha-aminoadipic-semialdehyde, which in solution remains in equilibrium with Delta(1)-piperideine-6-carboxylic acid. Since alpha-aminoadipic-semialdehyde is a known intermediate of the alpha-aminoadipic acid pathway for the biosynthesis of lysine, it is concluded that pipecolic

  13. In vitro selection of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Meli, Marc; Vergne, Jacques; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2003-03-14

    Adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes were isolated by in vitro selection from a degenerated hairpin ribozyme population. Two new adenine-dependent ribozymes catalyze their own reversible cleavage in the presence of free adenine. Both aptamers have Mg(2+) requirements for adenine-assisted cleavage similar to the wild-type hairpin ribozyme. Cleavage kinetics studies in the presence of various other small molecules were compared. The data suggest that adenine does not induce RNA self-cleavage in the same manner for both aptamers. In addition, investigations of pH effects on catalytic rates show that both adenine-dependent aptamers are more active in basic conditions, suggesting that they use new acid/base catalytic strategies in which adenine could be involved directly. The discovery of hairpin ribozymes dependent on adenine for their reversible self-cleavage presents considerable biochemical and evolutionary interests because we show that RNA is able to use exogenous reactive molecules to enhance its own catalytic activity. Such a mechanism may have been a means by which the ribozymes of the RNA world enlarged their chemical repertoire. PMID:12519767

  14. Chloramphenicol Biosynthesis: The Structure of CmlS, a Flavin-Dependent Halogenase Shwing a Covalent Flavin-Aspartate Bond

    SciTech Connect

    Podzelinska, K.; Latimer, R; Bhattacharya, A; Vining, L; Zechel, D; Jia, Z

    2010-01-01

    Chloramphenicol is a halogenated natural product bearing an unusual dichloroacetyl moiety that is critical for its antibiotic activity. The operon for chloramphenicol biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae encodes the chloramphenicol halogenase CmlS, which belongs to the large and diverse family of flavin-dependent halogenases (FDH's). CmlS was previously shown to be essential for the formation of the dichloroacetyl group. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of CmlS determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a flavin monooxygenase domain shared by all FDHs, but also a unique 'winged-helix' C-terminal domain that creates a T-shaped tunnel leading to the halogenation active site. Intriguingly, the C-terminal tail of this domain blocks access to the halogenation active site, suggesting a structurally dynamic role during catalysis. The halogenation active site is notably nonpolar and shares nearly identical residues with Chondromyces crocatus tyrosyl halogenase (CndH), including the conserved Lys (K71) that forms the reactive chloramine intermediate. The exception is Y350, which could be used to stabilize enolate formation during substrate halogenation. The strictly conserved residue E44, located near the isoalloxazine ring of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, is optimally positioned to function as a remote general acid, through a water-mediated proton relay, which could accelerate the reaction of the chloramine intermediate during substrate halogenation, or the oxidation of chloride by the FAD(C4{alpha})-OOH intermediate. Strikingly, the 8{alpha} carbon of the FAD cofactor is observed to be covalently attached to D277 of CmlS, a residue that is highly conserved in the FDH family. In addition to representing a new type of flavin modification, this has intriguing implications for the mechanism of FDHs. Based on the crystal structure and in analogy to known halogenases, we propose a reaction mechanism for CmlS.

  15. Characterization of the two-component, FAD-dependent monooxygenase SgcC that requires carrier protein-tethered substrates for the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuangjun; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2008-05-21

    C-1027 is a potent antitumor antibiotic composed of an apoprotein (CagA) and a reactive enediyne chromophore. The chromophore has four distinct chemical moieties, including an ( S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine moiety, the biosynthesis of which from l-alpha-tyrosine requires five proteins: SgcC, SgcC1, SgcC2, SgcC3, and SgcC4; a sixth protein, SgcC5, catalyzes the incorporation of this beta-amino acid moiety into C-1027. Biochemical characterization of SgcC has now revealed that (i) SgcC is a two-component, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase, (ii) SgcC is only active with SgcC2 (peptidyl carrier protein)-tethered substrates, (iii) SgcC-catalyzed hydroxylation requires O 2 and FADH 2, the latter supplied by the C-1027 pathway-specific flavin reductase SgcE6 or Escherichia coli flavin reductase Fre, and (iv) SgcC efficiently catalyzes regioselective hydroxylation of 3-substituted beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 analogues, including the chloro-, bromo-, iodo-, fluoro-, and methyl-substituted analogues, but does not accept 3-hydroxy-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as a substrate. Together with the in vitro data for SgcC4, SgcC1, and SgcC3, the results establish that SgcC catalyzes the hydroxylation of ( S)-3-chloro-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as the final step in the biosynthesis of the ( S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine moiety prior to incorporation into C-1027. SgcC now represents the first biochemically characterized two-component, FAD-dependent monooxygenase that acts on a carrier-protein-tethered aromatic substrate. PMID:18426211

  16. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed. PMID:26547179

  17. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  18. Depletion of CpG Dinucleotides in Papillomaviruses and Polyomaviruses: A Role for Divergent Evolutionary Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are small ds-DNA viruses infecting a wide-range of vertebrate hosts. Evidence supporting co-evolution of the virus with the host does not fully explain the evolutionary path of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Studies analyzing CpG dinucleotide frequencies in virus genomes have provided interesting insights on virus evolution. CpG dinucleotide depletion has not been extensively studied among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. We sought to analyze the relative abundance of dinucleotides and the relative roles of evolutionary pressures in papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Methods We studied 127 full-length sequences from papillomaviruses and 56 full-length sequences from polyomaviruses. We analyzed the relative abundance of dinucleotides, effective codon number (ENC), differences in synonymous codon usage. We examined the association, if any, between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We also investigated the contribution of mutational pressure and translational selection to the evolution of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Results All papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are CpG depleted. Interestingly, the evolutionary lineage of the infected host determines the extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. CpG dinucleotide depletion was more pronounced among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses infecting human and other mammals as compared to those infecting birds. Our findings demonstrate that CpG depletion among papillomaviruses is linked to mutational pressure; while CpG depletion among polyomaviruses is linked to translational selection. We also present evidence that suggests methylation of CpG dinucleotides may explain, at least in part, the depletion of CpG dinucleotides among papillomaviruses but not polyomaviruses. Conclusions The extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses is linked to the

  19. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase†

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Siddhesh S.; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P.; Fan, Hao; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Lindahl, Paul A.; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (kcat = 2.0 s−1; kcat/Km = 2.5 × 103 M−1 s−1). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn2+ prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with values of kcat and kcat/Km of 200 s−1 and 5 × 105 M−1s−1, respectively. The apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe2+, Zn2+, or Mn2+. In each case, two enzyme-equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member within the deaminase sub-family of the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [FeII/FeII]-ADE was oxidized to [FeIII/FeIII]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [FeIII/FeIII]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity and thus the di-ferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence for spin-coupling between metal ions was evident by EPR or Mössbauer spectroscopies. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and adenine was modeled into the active site based on homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Based on the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH rate profiles and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the identity of the rate limiting steps. PMID:21247091

  20. Oxidant injury of cells. DNA strand-breaks activate polyadenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase and lead to depletion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstatter, I U; Hinshaw, D B; Hyslop, P A; Spragg, R G; Cochrane, C G

    1986-01-01

    To determine the biochemical basis of the oxidant-induced injury of cells, we have studied early changes after exposure of P388D1 murine macrophages to hydrogen peroxide. Total intracellular NAD+ levels in P388D1 cells decreased with H2O2 concentrations of 40 microM or higher. Doses of H2O2 between 0.1 and 2.5 mM led to an 80% depletion of NAD within 20 min. With doses of H2O2 of 250 microM or lower, the fall in NAD and, as shown previously, ATP, was reversible. Higher doses of H2O2 that cause ultimate lysis of the cells, induced an irreversible depletion of NAD and ATP. Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, a nuclear enzyme associated with DNA damage and repair, which catalyzes conversion of NAD to nicotinamide and protein-bound poly-ADP-ribose, was activated by exposure of the cells to concentrations of 40 microM H2O2 or higher. Activation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase was also observed in peripheral lymphocytes incubated in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Examination of the possibility that DNA alteration was involved was performed by measurement of thymidine incorporation and determination of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in cells exposed to H2O2. H2O2 at 40 microM or higher inhibited DNA synthesis, and induced SSB within less than 30 s. These results suggest that DNA damage induced within seconds after addition of oxidant may lead to stimulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, and a consequent fall in NAD. Excessive stimulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase leads to a fall in NAD sufficient to interfere with ATP synthesis. PMID:2937805

  1. The lactate dehydrogenase--reduced nicotinamide--adenine dinucleotide--pyruvate complex. Kinetics of pyruvate binding and quenching of coeznyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Südi, J

    1974-04-01

    The stopped-flow kinetic studies described in this and the following paper (Südi, 1974) demonstrate that a Haldane-type description of the reversible lactate dehydrogenase reaction presents an experimentally feasible task. Combined results of these two papers yield numerical values for the six rate constants defined by the following equilibrium scheme, where E represents lactate dehydrogenase: [Formula: see text] The experiments were carried out at pH8.4 at a relatively low temperature (6.3 degrees C) with the pig heart enzyme. Identification of the above two intermediates and determination of the corresponding rate constants actually involve four series of independent observations in these studies, since (a) the reaction can be followed in both directions, and (b) both the u.v. absorption and the fluorescence of the coenzymes are altered in the reaction, and it is shown that these two spectral changes do not occur simultaneously. Kinetic observations made in the reverse direction are reported in this paper. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence of NADH can no longer be observed in the ternary complex E(NADH) (Pyr). Even though the oxidation-reduction reaction rapidly follows the formation of this complex, the numerical values of k(-4) (8.33x10(5)m(-1).s(-1)) and k(+4) (222s(-1)) are easily obtained from a directly observed second-order reaction step in which fluorescent but not u.v.-absorbing material is disappearing. U.v.-absorption measurements do not clearly resolve the subsequent oxidation-reduction step from the dissociation of lactate. It is shown that this must be due partly to the instrumental dead time, and partly to a low transient concentration of E(NAD+) (Lac) in the two-step sequential reaction in which the detectable disappearance of u.v.-absorbing material takes place. It is estimated that about one-tenth of the total change in u.v. absorption is due to a ;burst reaction' in which E(NAD+) (Lac) is produced, and this estimation yields, from k(obs.)=120s(-1), k(-2)=1200s(-1). PMID:4377095

  2. Enhanced Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide electrocatalysis onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes-decorated gold nanoparticles and their use in hybrid biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino Neto, S.; Almeida, T. S.; Belnap, D. M.; Minteer, S. D.; De Andrade, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of Au nanoparticles synthetized by different protocols and supported on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes containing different functional groups, focusing on their electrochemical performance towards NADH oxidation, ethanol bioelectrocatalysis, and ethanol/O2 biofuel cell. We describe four different synthesis protocols: microwave-assisted heating, water-in-oil, and dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles using acid or thiol species in the extraction step. The physical characterization of the metallic nanoparticles indicated that both the synthetic protocol as well as the type of functional groups on the carbon nanotubes affect the final particle size (varying from 13.4 to 2.4 nm) and their distribution onto the carbon surface. Moreover, the electrochemical data indicated that these two factors also influence their performance toward the electrooxidation of NADH. We observed that the samples containing Au nanoparticles with smaller size leads to higher catalytic currents and also shifts the oxidation potential of the targeted reaction, which varied from 0.13 to -0.06 V vs Ag/AgCl. Ethanol/O2 biofuel cell tests indicated that the hybrid bioelectrodes containing smaller and better distributed Au nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes generates higher power output, confirming that the electrochemical regeneration of NAD+ plays an important role in the overall biofuel cell performance.

  3. Towards understanding the origins of the different specificities of binding the reduced (NADPH) and oxidised (NADP +) forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate coenzyme to dihydrofolate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polshakov, Vladimir I.; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Birdsall, Berry; Feeney, James

    2002-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) binds more than a thousand times tighter to NADPH than to NADP +. The origins of the difference in binding affinity to DHFR between NADPH and NADP + are investigated in the present study using experimental NMR data and hybrid density functional, B3LYP, calculations. Certain protein residues (Ala 6, Gln 7, Ile 13 and Gly 14) that are directly involved in hydrogen bonding with the nicotinamide carboxamide group show consistent differences in 1H and 15N chemical shift between NADPH and NADP + in a variety of ternary complexes. B3LYP calculations in model systems of protein-coenzyme interactions show differences in the H-bond geometry and differences in charge distribution between the oxidised and reduced forms of the nicotinamide ring. GIAO isotropic nuclear shieldings calculated for nuclei in these systems reproduce the experimentally observed trends in magnitudes and signs of the chemical shifts. The experimentally observed reduction in binding of NADP + compared with NADPH results partly from NADP + having to change its nicotinamide amide group from a cis- to a trans-conformation on binding and partly from the oxidised nicotinamide ring of NADP + being unable to take up its optimal hydrogen bonding geometry in its interactions with protein residues.

  4. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-specific “Malic” Enzyme in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Other Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Peter

    1976-01-01

    NAD-specific “malic” enzyme (EC 1.1.1.39) has been isolated and purified 1200-fold from leaves of Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Kinetic studies of this enzyme, which is activated 14-fold by CoA, acetyl-CoA, and SO42−, suggest allosteric properties. Cofactor requirements show an absolute specificity for NAD and for Mn2+, which cannot be replaced by NADP or Mg2+. For maintaining enzyme activity in crude leaf extracts a thiol reagent, Mn2+, and PVP-40 were required. The latter could be omitted from purified preparations. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation NAD-malic enzyme could be localized in mitochondria. A survey of plants with crassulacean acid metabolism revealed the presence of NAD-malic enzyme in all 31 plants tested. Substantial levels of this enzyme (121-186 μmole/hr·mg of Chl) were detected in all members tested of the family Crassulaceae. It is proposed that NAD-malic enzyme in general supplements activity of NADP-malic enzyme present in these plants and may be specifically employed to increase internal concentrations of CO2 for recycling during cessation of gas exchange in periods of severe drought. PMID:16659473

  5. Expression and characterization of ferredoxin and flavin adenine dinucleotide binding domains of the reductase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Blazyk, Jessica L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2002-12-31

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) catalyzes the selective oxidation of methane to methanol, the first step in the primary catabolic pathway of methanotrophic bacteria. A reductase (MMOR) mediates electron transfer from NADH through its FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors to the dinuclear non-heme iron sites housed in a hydroxylase (MMOH). The structurally distinct [2Fe-2S], FAD, and NADH binding domains of MMOR facilitated division of the protein into its functional ferredoxin (MMOR-Fd) and FAD/NADH (MMOR-FAD) component domains. The 10.9 kDa MMOR-Fd (MMOR residues 1-98) and 27.6 kDa MMOR-FAD (MMOR residues 99-348) were expressed and purified from recombinant Escherichia coli systems. The Fd and FAD domains have absorbance spectral features identical to those of the [2Fe-2S] and flavin components, respectively, of MMOR. Redox potentials, determined by reductive titrations that included indicator dyes, for the [2Fe-2S] and FAD cofactors in the domains are as follows: -205.2 +/- 1.3 mV for [2Fe-2S](ox/red), -172.4 +/- 2.0 mV for FAD(ox/sq), and -266.4 +/- 3.5 mV for FAD(sq/hq). Kinetic and spectral properties of intermediates observed in the reaction of oxidized MMOR-FAD (FAD(ox)) with NADH at 4 degrees C were established with stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy. Analysis of the influence of pH on MMOR-FAD optical spectra, redox potentials, and NADH reaction kinetics afforded pK(a) values for the semiquinone (FAD(sq)) and hydroquinone (FAD(hq)) MMOR-FAD species and two protonatable groups near the flavin cofactor. Electron transfer from MMOR-FAD(hq) to oxidized MMOR-Fd is extremely slow (k = 1500 M(-1) s(-1) at 25 degrees C, compared to 90 s(-1) at 4 degrees C for internal electron transfer between cofactors in MMOR), indicating that cofactor proximity is essential for efficient interdomain electron transfer. PMID:12501207

  6. Induction of hepatoma carcinoma cell apoptosis through activation of the JNK-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-ROS self-driven death signal circuit.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Song, Fang-Jiao; Wang, Ying-Hong; Li, Ning; Yu, Qian; Liao, Li-Xi; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-10-28

    As an efficient method for inducing tumor cell apoptosis, ROS can be constantly formed and accumulated in NADPH oxidase overactivated-cells, resulting in further mitochondrial membrane damage and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. In addition, JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (JNK MAPK) signal also acts as a vital candidate pathway for inducing tumor cell apoptosis by targeting mitochondrial death pathway. However, the relationship between NADPH oxidase-ROS and JNK MAPK signal still remains unclear. Here, we discovered a novel self-driven signal circuit between NADPH oxidase-ROS and JNK MAPK, which was induced by a cytotoxic steroidal saponin (ASC) in hepatoma carcinoma cells. NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production was markedly activated by ASC and directly led to JNK MAPK activation. Moreover, antioxidant, NADPH oxidase inhibitor and specific knock-out for p47 subunit of NADPH oxidase could effectively block NADPH oxidase-ROS-dependent JNK activation, suggesting that NADPH oxidase is an upstream regulator of JNK MAPK. Conversely, a specific JNK inhibitor could inhibit ASC-induced NADPH oxidase activation and down-regulate ROS levels as well, indicating that JNK might also regulate NADPH oxidase activity to some extent. These observations indicate that NADPH oxidase and JNK MAPK activate each other as a signal circuit. Furthermore, drug pretreatment experiments with ASC showed this signal circuit operated continuously via a self-driven mode and finally induced apoptosis in hepatoma carcinoma cells. Taken together, we provide a proof for inducing hepatoma carcinoma cell apoptosis by activating the JNK-NADPH oxidase-ROS-dependent self-driven signal circuit pathway. PMID:25064608

  7. Enhancement of photophysical and photosensitizing properties of flavin adenine dinucleotide by mutagenesis of the C-terminal extension of a bacterial flavodoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Valle, Lorena; Abatedaga, Inés; Vieyra, Faustino E Morán; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2015-03-16

    The role of the mobile C-terminal extension present in Rhodobacter capsulatus ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (RcFPR) was evaluated using steady-state and dynamic spectroscopies for both intrinsic Trp and FAD in a series of mutants in the absence of NADP(H). Deletion of the six C-terminal amino acids beyond Ala266 was combined with the replacement A266Y to emulate the structure of plastidic reductases. Our results show that these modifications of the wild-type RcFPR produce subtle global conformational changes, but strongly reduce the local rigidity of the FAD-binding pocket, exposing the isoalloxazine ring to the solvent. Thus, the ultrafast charge-transfer quenching of (1) FAD* by the conserved Tyr66 residue was absent in the mutant series, producing enhancement of the excited singlet- and triplet-state properties of FAD. This work highlights the delicate balance of the specific interactions between FAD and the surrounding amino acids, and how the functionality and/or photostability of redox flavoproteins can be modified. PMID:25641205

  8. Activation of human neutrophil nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced (triphosphopyridine nucleotide, reduced) oxidase by arachidonic acid in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Curnutte, J T

    1985-01-01

    Sonicates from unstimulated human neutrophils produce no measurable superoxide since the superoxide-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase, is inactive in these preparations. Previous attempts to activate the oxidase in disrupted cells with conventional neutrophil stimuli have been unsuccessful. This report describes a cell-free system in which arachidonic acid (82 microM) was able to activate superoxide generation that was dependent upon the presence of NADPH and the sonicate. For activation to occur, both the particulate and supernatant fractions of the sonicate must be present. Calcium ions, which are required for activation of intact neutrophils by arachidonate, were not necessary in the cell-free system. In quantitative terms, the superoxide-generating activity in the cell-free system could account for at least 20-50% of the superoxide rate observed in intact neutrophils stimulated with arachidonate. Sonicates from patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) could not be activated by arachidonic acid in the cell-free system. In three patients representing both genetic forms of CGD, the defect appeared to reside in the particulate fraction. The soluble cofactor was normal in all three patients and could be used to activate normal neutrophil pellets in the presence of arachidonic acid. Thus, at least a portion of the activation mechanism in the neutrophil, that residing in the soluble phase, appeared to be normal in patients with CGD. PMID:2987311

  9. The role of phospholipids in the reduction of ubiquinone analogues by the mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, C I

    1978-01-01

    The isolated NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex of bovine heart mitochondria reduces ubiquinone analogues by two pathways. One pathway is inhibited by rotenone, and reduction of quinones takes place in the lipid phase of the system. The other pathway is insensitive to rotenone and reduction takes place in the aqueous phase. The variation of rates of electron transpport with the chemical nature of the quinone analogue and the concentrations of both quinone and phospholipid can be rationalized in terms of partition of the quinone between the aqueous and lipid phases of the system. Thus one function of phospholipid associated with the enzyme appears to be to act as solvent for ubiquinone reduced by the rotenone-sensitive pathway. This proposal is supported by the kinetic behaviour of enzyme whose endogenous lipids have been replaced by (1,2)-dimyristoylsn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Thus, under certain circumstances, the rotenone-sensitive reduction of ubiquinone-1 exhibited a substantial increase in activation energy below the phase-transition temperature of the synthetic lipid, whereas the reduction of other acceptors was unaffected. PMID:210762

  10. Flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide metabolism in rat liver--the occurrence of FAD pyrophosphatase and FMN phosphohydrolase in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Barile, M; Brizio, C; De Virgilio, C; Delfine, S; Quagliariello, E; Passarella, S

    1997-11-01

    In order to gain some insight into mitochondrial flavin biochemistry, rat liver mitochondria essentially free of lysosomal and microsomal contamination were prepared and their capability to metabolise externally added and endogenous FAD and FMN tested both spectroscopically and via HPLC. The existence of two novel mitochondrial enzymes, namely FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18) and FMN phosphohydrolase (EC 3.1.3.2), which catalyse FAD-->FMN and FMN-->riboflavin conversion, respectively, is shown. They differ from each other and from extramitochondrial enzymes, as judged by their pH profile and inhibitor sensitivity, and can be separated in a partial FAD pyrophosphatase purification. Digitonin titration and subfractionation experiments show that FAD pyrophosphatase is located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and FMN phosphohydrolase in the intermembrane space. Since these enzymes can metabolise endogenous FAD and FMN, which are made available by using both Triton X-100 and the effector oxaloacetate, a proposal is made that FAD pyrophosphatase and FMN phosphohydrolase play a major role in mitochondrial flavoprotein turnover. PMID:9395326

  11. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) and Cyclic ADP-Ribose (cADPR) Mediate Ca2+ Signaling in Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by β-Adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Im, Soo-Yeul; Nam, Tae-Sik; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Ko, Jae-Ki; Jang, Kyu Yoon; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling plays a fundamental role in cardiac hypertrophic remodeling, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of Ca2+-mobilizing second messengers, NAADP and cADPR, in the cardiac hypertrophy induced by β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. Isoproterenol induced an initial Ca2+ transients followed by sustained Ca2+ rises. Inhibition of the cADPR pathway with 8-Br-cADPR abolished only the sustained Ca2+ increase, whereas inhibition of the NAADP pathway with bafilomycin-A1 abolished both rapid and sustained phases of the isoproterenol-mediated signal, indicating that the Ca2+ signal is mediated by a sequential action of NAADP and cADPR. The sequential production of NAADP and cADPR was confirmed biochemically. The isoproterenol-mediated Ca2+ increase and cADPR production, but not NAADP production, were markedly reduced in cardiomyocytes obtained from CD38 knockout mice. CD38 knockout mice were rescued from chronic isoproterenol infusion-induced myocardial hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and decrease in fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Thus, our findings indicate that β-adrenergic stimulation contributes to the development of maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy via Ca2+ signaling mediated by NAADP-synthesizing enzyme and CD38 that produce NAADP and cADPR, respectively. PMID:26959359

  12. Specific labelling of a constituent polypeptide of bovine heart mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone reductase by the inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, C I; Bloxham, D P

    1977-01-01

    1. NADH-ubiquinone-1 and NADH-menadione reductase activities of Complex I were inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium (apparent Ki 23 and 30 nmol/mg of protein respectively). Reduction of K3Fe(CN)6 and juglone was relatively unaffected. 2. Iodoniumdiphenyl and derivatives were much less effective inhibitors. Compounds with similar ring structures to diphenyleneiodonium, in particular dibenzofuran, were inhibitors of NADH-ubiquinone-1 oxidoreductase. 3. Diphenylene[125I]iodonium specifically labelled a polypeptide of mol.wt. 23500. Maximum incorporation was 1 mol/mol of Complex-I flavin or 1 mol/mol of the 23500-mol.wt. polypeptide. 4. The label associated with this polypeptide was of limited stability, especially at lower pH. 5. Complete inhibition of ubiquinone reduction was achieved when 1 mol of inhibitor was incorporated/mol of Complex-I flavin, but the relationship between inhibition and labelling was not linear. 6. No evidence for covalent interaction between diphenyleneiodonium and the phospholipids of Complex I was obtained. 7. Rotenone increased the apparent affinity of diphenyleneiodonium for the 23500-mol.wt. polypeptide without affecting the maximum incorporation. 8. The 23500-mol.wt. polypeptide was not solubilized by chaotropic agents. Prior treatment of Complex I with chaotropic agents or sodium dodecyl sulphate prevented incorporation of diphenyleneiodonium into this polypeptide. PMID:18140

  13. Characterization of DNA methylation as a function of biological complexity via dinucleotide inter-distances.

    PubMed

    Paci, Giulia; Cristadoro, Giampaolo; Monti, Barbara; Lenci, Marco; Degli Esposti, Mirko; Castellani, Gastone C; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-03-13

    We perform a statistical study of the distances between successive occurrences of a given dinucleotide in the DNA sequence for a number of organisms of different complexity. Our analysis highlights peculiar features of the CG dinucleotide distribution in mammalian DNA, pointing towards a connection with the role of such dinucleotide in DNA methylation. While the CG distributions of mammals exhibit exponential tails with comparable parameters, the picture for the other organisms studied (e.g. fish, insects, bacteria and viruses) is more heterogeneous, possibly because in these organisms DNA methylation has different functional roles. Our analysis suggests that the distribution of the distances between CG dinucleotides provides useful insights into characterizing and classifying organisms in terms of methylation functionalities. PMID:26857665

  14. Structural basis for removal of adenine mispaired with 8-oxoguanine by MutY adenine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Fromme, J Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Huang, Susan J; Verdine, Gregory L

    2004-02-12

    The genomes of aerobic organisms suffer chronic oxidation of guanine to the genotoxic product 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). Replicative DNA polymerases misread oxoG residues and insert adenine instead of cytosine opposite the oxidized base. Both bases in the resulting A*oxoG mispair are mutagenic lesions, and both must undergo base-specific replacement to restore the original C*G pair. Doing so represents a formidable challenge to the DNA repair machinery, because adenine makes up roughly 25% of the bases in most genomes. The evolutionarily conserved enzyme adenine DNA glycosylase (called MutY in bacteria and hMYH in humans) initiates repair of A*oxoG to C*G by removing the inappropriately paired adenine base from the DNA backbone. A central issue concerning MutY function is the mechanism by which A*oxoG mispairs are targeted among the vast excess of A*T pairs. Here we report the use of disulphide crosslinking to obtain high-resolution crystal structures of MutY-DNA lesion-recognition complexes. These structures reveal the basis for recognizing both lesions in the A*oxoG pair and for catalysing removal of the adenine base. PMID:14961129

  15. Mature Microsatellites: Mechanisms Underlying Dinucleotide Microsatellite Mutational Biases in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Beverly A.; Ananda, Guruprasad; Strubczewski, Noelle; Lutzkanin, Andrew; Khoo, Su Jen; Srikanth, Abhinaya; Kim, Nari; Makova, Kateryna D.; Krasilnikova, Maria M.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2013-01-01

    Dinucleotide microsatellites are dynamic DNA sequences that affect genome stability. Here, we focused on mature microsatellites, defined as pure repeats of lengths above the threshold and unlikely to mutate below it in a single mutational event. We investigated the prevalence and mutational behavior of these sequences by using human genome sequence data, human cells in culture, and purified DNA polymerases. Mature dinucleotides (≥10 units) are present within exonic sequences of >350 genes, resulting in vulnerability to cellular genetic integrity. Mature dinucleotide mutagenesis was examined experimentally using ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We observe an expansion bias for dinucleotide microsatellites up to 20 units in length in somatic human cells, in agreement with previous computational analyses of germ-line biases. Using purified DNA polymerases and human cell lines deficient for mismatch repair (MMR), we show that the expansion bias is caused by functional MMR and is not due to DNA polymerase error biases. Specifically, we observe that the MutSα and MutLα complexes protect against expansion mutations. Our data support a model wherein different MMR complexes shift the balance of mutations toward deletion or expansion. Finally, we show that replication fork progression is stalled within long dinucleotides, suggesting that mutational mechanisms within long repeats may be distinct from shorter lengths, depending on the biochemistry of fork resolution. Our work combines computational and experimental approaches to explain the complex mutational behavior of dinucleotide microsatellites in humans. PMID:23450065

  16. Dinucleotide Weight Matrices for Predicting Transcription Factor Binding Sites: Generalizing the Position Weight Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Siddharthan, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Background Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in silico is key in understanding gene regulation. TFBS are string patterns that exhibit some variability, commonly modelled as “position weight matrices” (PWMs). Though convenient, the PWM has significant limitations, in particular the assumed independence of positions within the binding motif; and predictions based on PWMs are usually not very specific to known functional sites. Analysis here on binding sites in yeast suggests that correlation of dinucleotides is not limited to near-neighbours, but can extend over considerable gaps. Methodology/Principal Findings I describe a straightforward generalization of the PWM model, that considers frequencies of dinucleotides instead of individual nucleotides. Unlike previous efforts, this method considers all dinucleotides within an extended binding region, and does not make an attempt to determine a priori the significance of particular dinucleotide correlations. I describe how to use a “dinucleotide weight matrix” (DWM) to predict binding sites, dealing in particular with the complication that its entries are not independent probabilities. Benchmarks show, for many factors, a dramatic improvement over PWMs in precision of predicting known targets. In most cases, significant further improvement arises by extending the commonly defined “core motifs” by about 10bp on either side. Though this flanking sequence shows no strong motif at the nucleotide level, the predictive power of the dinucleotide model suggests that the “signature” in DNA sequence of protein-binding affinity extends beyond the core protein-DNA contact region. Conclusion/Significance While computationally more demanding and slower than PWM-based approaches, this dinucleotide method is straightforward, both conceptually and in implementation, and can serve as a basis for future improvements. PMID:20339533

  17. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  18. PolyAdenine cryogels for fast and effective RNA purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Erol, Kadir; Özgür, Erdoğan; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Cryogels are used effectively for many diverse applications in a variety of fields. The isolation or purification of RNA, one of the potential utilizations for cryogels, is crucial due to their vital roles such as encoding, decoding, transcription and translation, and gene expression. RNA principally exists within every living thing, but their tendency to denaturation easily is still the most challenging issue. Herein, we aimed to develop adenine incorporated polymeric cryogels as an alternative sorbent for cost-friendly and fast RNA purification with high capacity. For this goal, we synthesized the polymerizable derivative of adenine called as adenine methacrylate (AdeM) through the substitution reaction between adenine and methacryloyl chloride. Then, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based cryogels were prepared in a partially frozen aqueous medium by copolymerization of monomers, AdeM, and HEMA. The cryogels were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and swelling tests. RNA adsorption experiments were performed via batch system while varying different conditions including pH, initial RNA concentration, temperature, and interaction time. We achieved high RNA adsorption capacity of cryogels, with the swelling ratio around 510%, as 11.86mg/g. The cryogels might be reused at least five times without significant decrease in adsorption capacity. PMID:27434154

  19. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  20. Effect of Adenine on Clozapine-induced Neutropenia in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ippei; Kishi, Taro; Hanya, Manako; Uno, Junji; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the utility of adenine for preventing clozapine-induced neutropenia. Methods This retrospective study examined the effect of adenine on clozapine-induced neutropenia in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and was conducted at Okehazama Hospital in Japan from July 2010 to June 2013. Adenine was available for use from June 2011 onwards. Twenty-one patients started receiving clozapine treatment from July 2010 to April 2011 (the pre-adenine adoption group), and 47 patients started receiving it from May 2011 to June 2013 (the post-adenine adoption group). The effects of adenine were assessed based on changes in the patients’ leukocyte counts and the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia. Results Sixty-eight patients were treated with clozapine from July 2010 to June 2013. Of the 21 patients in the pre-adenine adoption group, 4 discontinued treatment due to clozapine-induced neutropenia, whereas only 2 of the 47 patients in the post-adenine adoption group discontinued treatment. The frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia was significantly lower in post-adenine adoption group than in the pre-adenine adoption group (p=0.047). Conclusion Adenine decreased the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia. Our data suggest that combined treatment with clozapine and adenine is a safe and effective strategy against treatment-resistant schizophrenia. PMID:26243842

  1. Multiple isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.M.; Urbauer, J.L.; Cleland, W.W. ); Gavva, S.R.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. )

    1991-06-11

    Deuterium isotope effects and {sup 13}C isotope effects with deuterium- and protium-labeled malate have been obtained for both NAD- and NADP-malic enzymes by using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates. With nicotinamide-containing dinucleotides as the oxidizing substrate, the {sup 13}C effect decreases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data are consistent with a stepwise chemical mechanism in which hydride transfer precedes decarboxylation of the oxalacetate intermediate as previously proposed. When dinucleotide substrates such as thio-NAD, 3-nicotinamide rings are used, the {sup 13}C effect increases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data, at face value, are consistent with a change in mechanism from stepwise to concerted for the oxidative decarboxylation portion of the mechanism. However, the increase in the deuterium isotope effect from 1.5 to 3 with a concomitant decrease in the {sup 13}C isotope effect from 1.034 to 1.003 as the dinucleotide substrate is changed suggests that the reaction may still be stepwise with the non-nicotinamide dinucleotides. A more likely explanation is that a {beta}-secondary {sup 13}C isotope effect accompanies hydride transfer as a result of hyperconjugation of the {beta}-carboxyl of malate as the transition state for the hydride transfer step is approached.

  2. Bud endophytes of Scots pine produce adenine derivatives and other compounds that affect morphology and mitigate browning of callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Joensuu, Päivi; Pospiech, Helmut; Jalonen, Jorma; Hohtola, Anja

    2004-06-01

    Endophytes are found in meristematic bud tissues of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) especially prior to growth, which would suggest their involvement in growth of the bud. To test this hypothesis, production of phytohormones by two bacterial (Methylobacterium extorquens, Pseudomonas synxantha) and one fungal endophyte (Rhodotorula minuta) was studied by mass spectrometry. The most common gibberellins, auxins, or cytokinins were not detected in the fractions studied. Instead, M. extorquens and R. minuta produced adenine derivatives that may be used as precursors in cytokinin biosynthesis. A plant tissue culture medium was conditioned with the endophytes, and pine tissue cultures were started on the media. Tetracycline inhibited callus production, which was restored on the endophyte-conditioned media. In addition, conditioning mitigated browning of the Scots pine explants. However, a decrease in tissue size was observed on the endophyte-conditioned media. Addition of adenosine monophosphate in the plant culture medium restored callus production and increased growth of the tissues, but had no effect on browning. Therefore, production of adenine ribosides by endophytes may play some role in the morphological effect observed in the pine tissues. PMID:15153198

  3. Excited-State Deactivation of Adenine by Electron-Driven Proton-Transfer Reactions in Adenine-Water Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Karsili, Tolga N V; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity of photoexcited 9H-adenine with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the 9H-adenine-(H2 O)5 cluster is investigated by using ab initio electronic structure methods, focusing on the photoreactivity of the three basic sites of 9H-adenine. The energy profiles of excited-state reaction paths for electron/proton transfer from water to adenine are computed. For two of the three sites, a barrierless or nearly barrierless reaction path towards a low-lying S1 -S0 conical intersection is found. This reaction mechanism, which is specific for adenine in an aqueous environment, can explain the substantially shortened excited-state lifetime of 9H-adenine in water. Depending on the branching ratio of the nonadiabatic dynamics at the S1 -S0 conical intersection, the electron/proton transfer process can enhance the photostability of 9H-adenine in water or can lead to the generation of adenine-H(⋅) and OH(⋅) free radicals. Although the branching ratio is yet unknown, these findings indicate that adenine might have served as a catalyst for energy harvesting by water splitting in the early stages of the evolution of life. PMID:26833826

  4. Cyclic dinucleotides modulate human T-cell response through monocyte cell death.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Marie; Pont, Frédéric; Verhoeyen, Els; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides, a class of microbial messengers, have been recently identified in bacteria, but their activity in humans remains largely unknown. Here, we have studied the function of cyclic dinucleotides in humans. We found that c-di-AMP and cGAMP, two adenosine-based cyclic dinucleotides, activated T lymphocytes in an unusual manner through monocyte cell death. c-di-AMP and cGAMP induced the selective apoptosis of human monocytes, and T lymphocytes were activated by the direct contact with these dying monocytes. The ensuing T-cell response comprised cell-cycle exit, phenotypic maturation into effector memory cells and proliferation arrest, but not cell death. This quiescence was transient since T cells remained fully responsive to further restimulation. Together, our results depict a novel activation pattern for human T lymphocytes: a transient quiescence induced by c-di-AMP- or cGAMP-primed apoptotic monocytes. PMID:26460927

  5. Copper-Adenine Complex Catalyst for O2 Production from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jacques; Bruston, F.; Calvayrac, R.; Grajcar, L.; Baron, M.-H.; Maurel, M.-C.

    The advent of oxygen-evolving photosynthesis is one of the central event in the development of life on earth. The early atmosphere has been midly reducing or neutral in overall redox balance and water photolysis by UV light can produce hydrogen peroxide. Before oxidation of water, intermediate stages are proposed in which H_2^O_2 was oxidized. The oxidation of H_2^O_2 to oxygen can be carried out by a modestly oxidizing species in which a metal-catalase like enzyme could extract electrons from H_2^O_2 producing the first oxygen-evolving complex. After what, modern photosynthesis with chlorophyll, to help transform H_2^O in O_2 was ready to come to light. In preliminary UV studies we were able to show that [Cu(adenine)2] system, containing copper coordinated to nitrogen activates H_2^O_2 disappearance. This was confirmed with the help of Raman and polarographic studies. Raman spectroscopy shows the formation of [Cu(adenine)2] complex in solution, quantifies H_2^O_2 consumption, polarography quantifies O_2 production. In both cases CuCl_2 addition entails H_2^O_2 disappearance. Without adenine, Cu_2^+ has only a weak catalytic effect. The molar activity of the [Cu(adenine)2] complex is much larger and concentration dependent. We emphasize that Cu(adenine)2 may have mimicked enzyme properties in the first stage of life evolution, in order to split H_2^O_2 into O_2 and H_2^O. Moreover, diluted copper and adenine, in small ephemeral prebiotic ponds , could have preserved biologically active entities from H_2^O_2 damage via dual properties: catalyzing H_2^O_2 disproportionation and also directly acting as a reductant complex. Finally, the present Mars surface is considered to be both reactive and embedded with oxydants. As it has been shown that the depth of diffusion for H_2^O_2 is less than 3 meters, it is important to study all the ways of H_2^O_2 consumption.

  6. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). PMID:27163876

  7. Dynamics and reactivity in Thermus aquaticus N6-adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Zinovjev, Kirill; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-11-19

    M.TaqI is a DNA methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N6 position of an adenine, a process described only in prokaryotes. We have used full atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the protein-SAM-DNA ternary complex where the target adenine is flipped out into the active site. Key protein-DNA interactions established by the target adenine in the active site are described in detail. The relaxed structure was used for a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics exploration of the reaction mechanism using the string method. According to our free energy calculations the reaction takes place through a stepwise mechanism where the methyl transfer precedes the abstraction of the proton from the exocyclic amino group. The methyl transfer is the rate-determining step, and the obtained free energy barrier is in good agreement with the value derived from the experimental rate constant. Two possible candidates to extract the leftover proton have been explored: a water molecule found in the active site and Asn105, a residue activated by the hydrogen bonds formed through the amide hydrogens. The barrier for the proton abstraction is smaller when Asn105 acts as a base. The reaction mechanisms can be different in other N6-DNA-methyltransferases, as determined from the exploration of the reaction mechanism in the Asn105Asp M.TaqI mutant. PMID:25347783

  8. Isolation and characterizaton of dinucleotide microsatellites in greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirteen nuclear-encoded dinucleotide microsatellites were characterized from a genomic DNA library of greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili. The microsatellites include 12 perfect-repeat motifs and one imperfect-repeat motif. The number of alleles at the 13 microsatellites among a sample of 29 fish...

  9. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ωB97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality. PMID:25257334

  10. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  11. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  12. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  13. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  14. Identification of Prophages in Bacterial Genomes by Dinucleotide Relative Abundance Difference

    PubMed Central

    Srividhya, K. V.; Alaguraj, V.; Poornima, G.; Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, G. P.; Raghavenderan, L.; Katta, A. V. S. K. Mohan; Mehta, Preeti; Krishnaswamy, S.

    2007-01-01

    Background Prophages are integrated viral forms in bacterial genomes that have been found to contribute to interstrain genetic variability. Many virulence-associated genes are reported to be prophage encoded. Present computational methods to detect prophages are either by identifying possible essential proteins such as integrases or by an extension of this technique, which involves identifying a region containing proteins similar to those occurring in prophages. These methods suffer due to the problem of low sequence similarity at the protein level, which suggests that a nucleotide based approach could be useful. Methodology Earlier dinucleotide relative abundance (DRA) have been used to identify regions, which deviate from the neighborhood areas, in genomes. We have used the difference in the dinucleotide relative abundance (DRAD) between the bacterial and prophage DNA to aid location of DNA stretches that could be of prophage origin in bacterial genomes. Prophage sequences which deviate from bacterial regions in their dinucleotide frequencies are detected by scanning bacterial genome sequences. The method was validated using a subset of genomes with prophage data from literature reports. A web interface for prophage scan based on this method is available at http://bicmku.in:8082/prophagedb/dra.html. Two hundred bacterial genomes which do not have annotated prophages have been scanned for prophage regions using this method. Conclusions The relative dinucleotide distribution difference helps detect prophage regions in genome sequences. The usefulness of this method is seen in the identification of 461 highly probable loci pertaining to prophages which have not been annotated so earlier. This work emphasizes the need to extend the efforts to detect and annotate prophage elements in genome sequences. PMID:18030328

  15. 3-base periodicity in coding DNA is affected by intercodon dinucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    All coding DNAs exhibit 3-base periodicity (TBP), which may be defined as the tendency of nucleotides and higher order n-tuples, e.g. trinucleotides (triplets), to be preferentially spaced by 3, 6, 9 etc, bases, and we have proposed an association between TBP and clustering of same-phase triplets. We here investigated if TBP was affected by intercodon dinucleotide tendencies and whether clustering of same-phase triplets was involved. Under constant protein sequence intercodon dinucleotide frequencies depend on the distribution of synonymous codons. So, possible effects were revealed by randomly exchanging synonymous codons without altering protein sequences to subsequently document changes in TBP via frequency distribution of distances (FDD) of DNA triplets. A tripartite positive correlation was found between intercodon dinucleotide frequencies, clustering of same-phase triplets and TBP. So, intercodon C|A (where “|” indicates the boundary between codons) was more frequent in native human DNA than in the codon-shuffled sequences; higher C|A frequency occurred along with more frequent clustering of C|AN triplets (where N jointly represents A, C, G and T) and with intense CAN TBP. The opposite was found for C|G, which was less frequent in native than in shuffled sequences; lower C|G frequency occurred together with reduced clustering of C|GN triplets and with less intense CGN TBP. We hence propose that intercodon dinucleotides affect TBP via same-phase triplet clustering. A possible biological relevance of our findings is briefly discussed. PMID:21814388

  16. Adenine attenuates the Ca(2+) contraction-signaling pathway via adenine receptor-mediated signaling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Takahiro; Kono, Miki; Hyoguchi, Mai; Tajiri, Satoshi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that adenine (6-amino-6H-purine) relaxed contracted rat aorta rings in an endothelial-independent manner. Although adenine receptors (AdeRs) are expressed in diverse tissues, aortic AdeR expression has not been ascertained. Thus, the aims of this study were to clarify the expression of AdeR in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the adenine-induced vasorelaxation mechanism(s). VSMCs were isolated from 8-week-old male Wistar-Kyoto rats and used in this study. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (p-MLC) was measured by western blot. AdeR mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured by using Fura-2/AM. Vasorelaxant adenine (10-100 μM) significantly reduced p-MLC by angiotensin II (Ang II, 10 μM) in VSMCs (P < 0.05). We confirmed the expression of aortic AdeR mRNA and the activation of PKA in VSMCs through stimulation of AdeR by adenine by ELISA. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) measurement demonstrated that adenine inhibits Ang II- and m-3M3FBS (PLC agonist)-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation. In AdeR-knockdown VSMCs, PKA activation and p-MLC reduction by adenine were completely abolished. These results firstly demonstrated that vasorelaxant adenine can suppress Ca(2+) contraction signaling pathways via aortic AdeR/PKA activation in VSMCs. PMID:27318925

  17. Adenine, a hairpin ribozyme cofactor--high-pressure and competition studies.

    PubMed

    Ztouti, Myriam; Kaddour, Hussein; Miralles, Francisco; Simian, Christophe; Vergne, Jacques; Hervé, Guy; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2009-05-01

    The RNA world hypothesis assumes that life arose from ancestral RNA molecules, which stored genetic information and catalyzed chemical reactions. Although RNA catalysis was believed to be restricted to phosphate chemistry, it is now established that the RNA has much wider catalytic capacities. In this respect, we devised, in a previous study, two hairpin ribozymes (adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 1 and adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 2) that require adenine as cofactor for their reversible self-cleavage. We have now used high hydrostatic pressure to investigate the role of adenine in the catalytic activity of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 1. High-pressure studies are of interest because they make it possible to determine the volume changes associated with the reactions, which in turn reflect the conformational modifications and changes in hydration involved in the catalytic mechanism. They are also relevant in the context of piezophilic organisms, as well as in relation to the extreme conditions that prevailed at the origin of life. Our results indicate that the catalytic process involves a transition state whose formation is accompanied by a positive activation volume and release of water molecules. In addition, competition experiments with adenine analogs strongly suggest that exogenous adenine replaces the adenine present at the catalytic site of the wild-type hairpin ribozyme. PMID:19476496

  18. Characterization of photophysical and base-mimicking properties of a novel fluorescent adenine analogue in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dierckx, Anke; Dinér, Peter; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Kumar, Joshi Dhruval; Brown, Tom; Grøtli, Morten; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus

    2011-01-01

    To increase the diversity of fluorescent base analogues with improved properties, we here present the straightforward click-chemistry-based synthesis of a novel fluorescent adenine-analogue triazole adenine (AT) and its photophysical characterization inside DNA. AT shows promising properties compared to the widely used adenine analogue 2-aminopurine. Quantum yields reach >20% and >5% in single- and double-stranded DNA, respectively, and show dependence on neighbouring bases. Moreover, AT shows only a minor destabilization of DNA duplexes, comparable to 2-aminopurine, and circular dichroism investigations suggest that AT only causes minimal structural perturbations to normal B-DNA. Furthermore, we find that AT shows favourable base-pairing properties with thymine and more surprisingly also with normal adenine. In conclusion, AT shows strong potential as a new fluorescent adenine analogue for monitoring changes within its microenvironment in DNA. PMID:21278417

  19. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules. PMID:25754395

  20. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  1. Ultraviolet absorption and luminescence of matrix-isolated adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Polewski, K.; Sutherland, J.; Zinger, D.; Trunk, J.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the absorption, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission and the fluorescence lifetimes of adenine in low-temperature argon and nitrogen matrices at 15 K. Compared to other environments the absorption spectrum shows higher intensity at the shortest wavelengths, and a weak apparent absorption peak is observed at 280 nm. The resolved fluorescence excitation spectrum has five peaks at positions corresponding to those observed in the absorption spectrum. The position of the fluorescence maximum depends on the excitation wavelength. Excitation below 220 nm displays a fluorescence maximum at 305 nm, while for excitations at higher wavelengths the maximum occurs at 335 nm. The results suggest that multiple-emission excited electronic states are populated in low-temperature gas matrices. Excitation at 265 nm produces a phosphorescence spectrum with a well-resolved vibrational structure and a maximum at 415 nm. The fluorescence decays corresponding to excitation at increasing energy of each resolved band could be fit with a double exponential, with the shorter and longer lifetimes ranging from 1.7 to 3.3 ns and from 12 to 23 ns, respectively. Only for the excitation at 180 nm one exponential is required, with the calculated lifetimes of 3.3 ns. The presented results provide an experimental evidence of the existence of multiple site-selected excited electronic states, and may help elucidate the possible deexcitation pathways of adenine. The additional application of synchrotron radiation proved to result in a significant enhancement of the resolution and spectral range of the phenomena under investigation.

  2. Tirandamycin biosynthesis is mediated by co-dependent oxidative enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Jacob C.; Li, Shengying; Gunatilleke, Shamila S.; Anzai, Yojiro; Burr, Douglas A.; Podust, Larissa M.; Sherman, David H.

    2011-08-01

    Elucidation of natural product biosynthetic pathways provides important insights into the assembly of potent bioactive molecules, and expands access to unique enzymes able to selectively modify complex substrates. Here, we show full reconstitution, in vitro, of an unusual multi-step oxidative cascade for post-assembly-line tailoring of tirandamycin antibiotics. This pathway involves a remarkably versatile and iterative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (TamI) and a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidase (TamL), which act co-dependently through the repeated exchange of substrates. TamI hydroxylates tirandamycin C (TirC) to generate tirandamycin E (TirE), a previously unidentified tirandamycin intermediate. TirE is subsequently oxidized by TamL, giving rise to the ketone of tirandamycin D (TirD), after which a unique exchange back to TamI enables successive epoxidation and hydroxylation to afford, respectively, the final products tirandamycin A (TirA) and tirandamycin B (TirB). Ligand-free, substrate- and product-bound crystal structures of bicovalently flavinylated TamL oxidase reveal a likely mechanism for the C10 oxidation of TirE.

  3. Keratan Sulfate Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Funderburgh, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Keratan sulfate was originally identified as the major glycosaminoglycan of cornea but is now known to modify at least a dozen different proteins in a wide variety of tissues. Despite a large body of research documenting keratan sulfate structure, and an increasing interest in the biological functions of keratan sulfate, until recently little was known of the specific enzymes involved in keratan sulfate biosynthesis or of the molecular mechanisms that control keratan sulfate expression. In the last 2 years, however, marked progress has been achieved in identification of genes involved in keratan sulfate biosynthesis and in development of experimental conditions to study keratan sulfate secretion and control in vitro. This review summarizes current understanding of keratan sulfate structure and recent developments in understanding keratan sulfate biosynthesis. PMID:12512857

  4. Mammalian cardiolipin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Edgard M; Nguyen, Hieu; Hatch, Grant M

    2014-04-01

    Cardiolipin is a major phospholipid in mitochondria and is involved in the generation of cellular energy in the form of ATP. In mammalian and eukaryotic cells it is synthesized via the cytidine-5'-diphosphate-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol phosphate pathway. This brief review will describe some of the more recent studies on mammalian cardiolipin biosynthesis and provide an overview of regulation of cardiolipin biosynthesis. In addition, the important role that this key phospholipid plays in disease processes including heart failure, diabetes, thyroid hormone disease and the genetic disease Barth Syndrome will be discussed. PMID:24144810

  5. Novel electrochemical sensor based on functionalized graphene for simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Niu, De-Jun; Sun, Jun-Yong; Han, Cong-Hui; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Yan-Li; Xiong, Xiao-Qin

    2011-02-01

    A nano-material carboxylic acid functionalized graphene (graphene-COOH) was prepared and used to construct a novel biosensor for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. The direct electrooxidation behaviors of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH modified glassy carbon electrode (graphene-COOH/GCE) were carefully investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The results indicated that both adenine and guanine showed the increase of the oxidation peak currents with the negative shift of the oxidation peak potentials in contrast to that on the bare glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical parameters of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH/GCE were calculated and a simple and reliable electroanalytical method was developed for the detection of adenine and guanine, respectively. The modified electrode exhibited good behaviors in the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine with the peak separation as 0.334V. The detection limit for individual determination of guanine and adenine was 5.0×10(-8)M and 2.5×10(-8)M (S/N=3), respectively. Furthermore, the measurements of thermally denatured single-stranded DNA were carried out and the value of (G+C)/(A+T) of single-stranded DNA was calculated as 0.80. The biosensor exhibited some advantages, such as simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability. PMID:21050729

  6. Cosolute effect on crystallization of two dinucleotide complexes of bovine seminal ribonuclease from concentrated salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, Filomena; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Vitagliano, Luigi; Zagari, Adriana; Capasso, Sante; Mazzarella, Lelio

    1996-10-01

    Two complexes of bovine seminal ribonuclease with dinucleotides, uridylyl(2'-5')adenosine (UpA) and 2'-deoxycytidylyl(3'-5')-2'-deoxyadenosine (d(CpA)), were crystallized under unusual conditions involving a liquid-liquid phase separation. This phenomenon was induced by adding small aliquots of organic cosolutes to highly concentrated ammonium sulfate solutions. The liquid-liquid interface acts as a source of nucleation centers for growth of large crystals. Among the cosolutes tested in these salt-mediated crystallizations, 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol was found to be the most efficient.

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of dinucleotide mRNA cap analog containing propargyl moiety.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Muthian; Charles, Irudaya; Kore, Anilkumar R

    2016-03-15

    The first example of the synthesis of new dinucleotide cap analog containing propargyl group such as m(7,3'-)(O)(-propargyl)G[5']ppp[5']G is reported. The effect of propargyl cap analog with standard cap was evaluated with respect to their capping efficiency, in vitro T7 RNA polymerase transcription efficiency, and translation activity using cultured HeLa cells. It is noteworthy that propargyl cap analog outperforms standard cap by 3.1 fold in terms of translational properties. The propargyl cap analog forms a more stable complex with translation initiation factor eIF4E based on the molecular modeling studies. PMID:26899596

  8. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Human STING Can Affect Innate Immune Response to Cyclic Dinucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guanghui; Brendel, Volker P.; Shu, Chang; Li, Pingwei; Palanathan, Satheesh; Cheng Kao, C.

    2013-01-01

    The STING (stimulator of interferon genes) protein can bind cyclic dinucleotides to activate the production of type I interferons and inflammatory cytokines. The cyclic dinucleotides can be bacterial second messengers c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP, 3’5’-3’5’ cyclic GMP-AMP (3’3’ cGAMP) produced by Vibrio cholerae and metazoan second messenger 2’5’-3’5’ Cyclic GMP-AMP (2’3’ cGAMP). Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from the 1000 Genome Project revealed that R71H-G230A-R293Q (HAQ) occurs in 20.4%, R232H in 13.7%, G230A-R293Q (AQ) in 5.2%, and R293Q in 1.5% of human population. In the absence of exogenous ligands, the R232H, R293Q and AQ SNPs had only modest effect on the stimulation of IFN-β and NF-κB promoter activities in HEK293T cells, while HAQ had significantly lower intrinsic activity. The decrease was primarily due to the R71H substitution. The SNPs also affected the response to the cyclic dinucleotides. In the presence of c-di-GMP, the R232H variant partially decreased the ability to activate IFN-βsignaling, while it was defective for the response to c-di-AMP and 3’3’ cGAMP. The R293Q dramatically decreased the stimulatory response to all bacterial ligands. Surprisingly, the AQ and HAQ variants maintained partial abilities to activate the IFN-β signaling in the presence of ligands due primarily to the G230A substitution. Biochemical analysis revealed that the recombinant G230A protein could affect the conformation of the C-terminal domain of STING and the binding to c-di-GMP. Comparison of G230A structure with that of WT revealed that the conformation of the lid region that clamps onto the c-di-GMP was significantly altered. These results suggest that hSTING variation can affect innate immune signaling and that the common HAQ haplotype expresses a STING protein with reduced intrinsic signaling activity but retained the ability to response to bacterial cyclic dinucleotides. PMID:24204993

  9. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model. PMID:27029427

  10. Biosynthesis of Polyisoprenoids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The invention is a process for synthesis of a polymer with the same chemical structure as Natural Rubber (NR) obtained from Hevea brasiliensis and other plant species. The research collaborators recently proposed that NR biosynthesis proceeds via a carbocationic polymerization. Based on this theory...

  11. Dinucleotide repeat loci contribute highly informative genetic markers to the human chromosome 2 linkage map

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S. ); Sherman, S.L. ); Naylor, S.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Microsatellite repeat loci can provide informative markers for genetic linkage. Currently, the human chromosome 2 genetic linkage map has very few highly polymorphic markers. Being such a large chromosome, it will require a large number of informative markers for the dense coverage desired to allow disease genes to be mapped quickly and accurately. Dinucleotide repeat loci from two anonymous chromosome 2 genomic DNA clones were sequenced so that oligonucleotide primers could be designed for amplifying each locus using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Five sets of PCR primers were also generated from nucleotide sequences in the GenBank Database of chromosome 2 genes containing dinucleotide repeats. In addition, one PCR primer pair was made that amplifies a restriction fragment length polymorphism on the TNP1 gene. These markers were placed on the CEPH genetic linkage map by screening the CEPH reference DNA panel with each primer set, combining these data with those of other markers previously placed on the map, and analyzing the combined data set using CRI-MAP and LINKAGE. The microsatellite loci are highly informative markers and the TNP1 locus, as expected, is only moderately informative. A map was constructed with 38 ordered loci (odds [ge] 1000:1) spanning 296 cM (male) and 476 cM (female) of chromosome 2 compared with 306 cM (male) and 529 cM (female) for a previous map of 20 markers. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Resolvase-catalysed reactions between res sites differing in the central dinucleotide of subsite I.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, W M; Grindley, N D; Hatfull, G F; Boocock, M R

    1991-01-01

    The resolvase-catalysed reaction between two res sites in a circular DNA substrate normally gives two circular recombination products linked in a two-noded catenane. Homology between the two res sites at the central overlap dinucleotide of subsite I is important for recombination. Reactions between res sites differing at one position in the central dinucleotide (AC X AT) gave a low yield of recombinants containing mismatched base-pairs, but gave large amounts of a non-recombinant four-noded knot. This result was predicted by a 'simple rotation' model for strand exchange. The mismatch is evidently recognized only after commitment to an initial 180 degrees rotation of the resolvase-linked DNA ends, and it induces a second 180 degrees rotation which restores correct base-pairing at the overlap, giving the four-noded product. Correct base-pairing is not essential for religation, but may be important for release of the products. Characteristic patterns of 4, 6, 8 and 10 node knots, or 4, 8, 12 and 16 node knots were obtained, depending on the reaction conditions and the resolvase. Two pathways for multiple rounds of rotation in 360 degrees steps are inferred. The results support a model for strand exchange by supercoil-directed subunit rotation within a resolvase tetramer. Images PMID:1655422

  13. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of PEA seed glutamine synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    The energy charge in the plant cell has been proposed as a regulator of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. The authors have shown that 2.1 moles of ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-ATP were bound/mole subunits of purified pea seed GS during complete inactivation with methionine sulfoximine. Since GS has one active site per subunit, the second binding site provides the potential for allosteric regulation of GS by adenine nucleotides. The authors have investigated the inhibition of the ATP-dependent synthetic activity by ADP and AMP. ADP and AMP cannot completely inhibit GS; but ATP does overcome the inhibition by ADP and AMP as shown by plots of % inhibition vs inhibitor concentration. This indicates that inhibition of GS by ADP or AMP is not completely due to competitive inhibition. In the absence of ADP or AMP, double reciprocal plots for ATP are linear below 10 mM; however, in the presence of either ADP or AMP these pots are curvilinear downwards. The ratio of Vm/asymptote is less than 1. The Hill number for ATP in the absence of ADP or AMP is 0.93 but decreases with increasing ADP or AMP to a value of 0.28 with 10 mM ADP. These data are consistent with negative cooperativity by ADP and AMP. Thus, as the ADP/ATP or AMP/ATP ratios are increased GS activity decreases. This is consistent with regulation of GS activity by energy charge in planta.

  14. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  15. The Cellular Environment Stabilizes Adenine Riboswitch RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Jillian; McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Pielak, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    There are large differences between the intracellular environment and the conditions widely used to study RNA structure and function in vitro. To assess the effects of the crowded cellular environment on RNA, we examined the structure and ligand-binding function of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain in healthy, growing Escherichia coli cells at single-nucleotide resolution on the minute timescale using SHAPE. The ligand-bound aptamer structure is essentially the same in cells and in buffer at 1 mM Mg2+, the approximate Mg2+ concentration we measured in cells. In contrast, the in-cell conformation of the ligand-free aptamer is much more similar to the fully folded ligand-bound state. Even adding high Mg2+ concentrations to the buffer used for in vitro analyses did not yield the conformation observed for the free aptamer in cells. The cellular environment thus stabilizes the aptamer significantly more than does Mg2+ alone. Our results show that the intracellular environment has a large effect on RNA structure that ultimately favors highly organized conformations. PMID:24215455

  16. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  17. Identification of a mitochondrial ATP synthase-adenine nucleotide translocator complex in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Detke, Siegfried; Elsabrouty, Rania

    2008-01-01

    The ATP synthasome is a macromolecular complex consisting of ATP synthase, adenine nucleotide translocator and phosphate carrier. To determine if this complex is evolutionary old or young, we searched for its presence in Leishmania, a mitochondria containing protozoan which evolved from the main eukaryote line soon after eukaryotes split from prokaryotes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation showed that the distribution of ANT among the fractions coincided with the distribution of ATP synthase. In addition, ATP synthase co-precipitated with FLAG tagged and wild type adenine nucleotide translocator isolated with anti FLAG and anti adenine nucleotide translocator antibodies, respectively. These data indicate that the adenine nucleotide translocator interacted with the ATP synthase to form a stable structure referred to as the ATP synthasome. The presence of the ATP synthasome in Leishmania, an organism branching off the main line of eukaryotes early in the development of eukaryotes, as well as in higher eukaryotes suggests that the ATP synthasome is a phylogenetically ancient structure. PMID:17920025

  18. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  19. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K. PMID:26317826

  20. Sequence-dependent folding landscapes of adenine riboswitch aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    Prediction of the functions of riboswitches requires a quantitative description of the folding landscape so that the barriers and time scales for the conformational change in the switching region in the aptamer can be estimated. Using a combination of all atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained model simulations we studied the response of adenine (A) binding add and pbuE A-riboswitches to mechanical force. The two riboswitches contain a structurally similar three-way junction formed by three paired helices, P1, P2, and P3, but carry out different functions. Using pulling simulations, with structures generated in MD simulations, we show that after P1 rips the dominant unfolding pathway in add A-riboswitch is the rupture of P2 followed by unraveling of P3. In the pbuE A-riboswitch, after P1 unfolds P3 ruptures ahead of P2. The order of unfolding of the helices, which is in accord with single molecule pulling experiments, is determined by the relative stabilities of the individual helices. Our results show that the stability of isolated helices determines the order of assembly and response to force in these non-coding regions. We use the simulated free energy profile for pbuE A-riboswitch to estimate the time scale for allosteric switching, which shows that this riboswitch is under kinetic control lending additional support to the conclusion based on single molecule pulling experiments. A consequence of the stability hypothesis is that a single point mutation (U28C) in the P2 helix of the add A-riboswitch, which increases the stability of P2, would make the folding landscapes of the two riboswitches similar. This prediction can be tested in single molecule pulling experiments.

  1. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  2. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  3. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease caused by deletion at a dinucleotide repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Casimir, C.M.; Bu-Ghanim, H.N.; Rowe, P.; Segal, A.W. ); Rodaway, A.R.F.; Bentley, D.L. )

    1991-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited condition rendering neutrophils incapable of killing invading pathogens. This condition is due to the failure of a multicomponent microbicidal oxidase that normally yields a low-midpoint-potential b cytochrome (cytochrome b{sub 245}). Although defects in the X chromosome-linked cytochrome account for the majority of CGD patients, as many as 30% of CGD cases are due to an autosomal recessive disease. Of these, {gt}90% have been shown to be defective in the synthesis of a 47-kDa cytosolic component of the oxidase. The authors demonstrate here in three unrelated cases of autosomal recessive CGD that the identical underlying molecular lesion is a dinucleotide deletion at a GTGT tandem repeat, corresponding to the acceptor site of the first intron - exon junction. Slippage of the DNA duplex at this site may contribute to the high frequency of defects in this gene.

  4. Role of the intergenic dinucleotide in vesicular stomatitis virus RNA transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, J N; Whelan, S P; Wertz, G W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the role played by the intergenic dinucleotide sequence of the conserved vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) gene junction in modulation of polymerase activity, we analyzed the RNA synthesis activities of bicistrionic genomic analogs that contained either the authentic N/P gene junction or gene junctions that had been altered to contain either the 16 possible dinucleotide combinations, single nucleotide intergenic sequences, or no intergenic sequence at all. Quantitative measurements of the amounts of upstream, downstream, and readthrough mRNAs that were transcribed by these mutant templates showed that the behavior of the viral polymerase was profoundly affected by the nucleotide sequence that it encountered as it traversed the gene junction, although the polymerase was able to accommodate a remarkable degree of sequence variation without altogether losing the ability to terminate and reinitiate transcription. Alteration or removal of the intergenic sequence such that the U tract responsible for synthesis of the upstream mRNA poly(A) tail was effectively positioned adjacent to the consensus downstream gene start signal resulted in almost complete abrogation of downstream mRNA synthesis, thus defining the intergenic sequence as an essential sequence element of the gene junction. Many genome analogs with altered intergenic sequences directed abundant synthesis of a readthrough transcript without correspondingly high levels of downstream mRNA, an observation inconsistent with the shunting model of VSV transcription, which suggests that polymerase molecules are prepositioned at gene junctions, awaiting a push from upstream. Instead, the findings of this study support a model of sequential transcription in which initiation of downstream mRNA can occur only following termination of the preceding transcript. PMID:9032308

  5. Sequence-dependent dynamics of duplex DNA: the applicability of a dinucleotide model.

    PubMed Central

    Okonogi, T M; Alley, S C; Reese, A W; Hopkins, P B; Robinson, B H

    2002-01-01

    The short-time (submicrosecond) bending dynamics of duplex DNA were measured to determine the effect of sequence on dynamics. All measurements were obtained from a single site on duplex DNA, using a single, site-specific modified base containing a rigidly tethered, electron paramagnetic resonance active spin probe. The observed dynamics are interpreted in terms of single-step sequence-dependent bending force constants, determined from the mean squared amplitude of bending relative to the end-to-end vector using the modified weakly bending rod model. The bending dynamics at a single site are a function of the sequence of the nucleotides constituting the duplex DNA. We developed and examined several dinucleotide-based models for flexibility. The models indicate that the dominant feature of the dynamics is best explained in terms of purine- and pyrimidine-type steps, although distinction is made among all 10 unique steps: It was found that purine-purine steps (which are the same as pyrimidine-pyrimidine steps) were near average in flexibility, but the pyrimidine-purine steps (5' to 3') were nearly twice as flexible, whereas purine-pyrimidine steps were more than half as flexible as average DNA. Therefore, the range of stepwise flexibility is approximately fourfold and is characterized by both the type of base pair step (pyrimidine/purine combination) and the identity of the bases within the pair (G, A, T, or C). All of the four models considered here underscore the complexity of the dependence of dynamics on DNA sequence with certain sequences not satisfactorily explainable in terms of any dinucleotide model. These findings provide a quantitative basis for interpreting the dynamics and kinetics of DNA-sequence-dependent biological processes, including protein recognition and chromatin packaging. PMID:12496111

  6. Active mammalian replication origins are associated with a high-density cluster of mCpG dinucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Rein, T; Zorbas, H; DePamphilis, M L

    1997-01-01

    ori-beta is a well-characterized origin of bidirectional replication (OBR) located approximately 17 kb downstream of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in hamster cell chromosomes. The approximately 2-kb region of ori-beta that exhibits greatest replication initiation activity also contains 12 potential methylation sites in the form of CpG dinucleotides. To ascertain whether DNA methylation might play a role at mammalian replication origins, the methylation status of these sites was examined with bisulfite to chemically distinguish cytosine (C) from 5-methylcytosine (mC). All of the CpGs were methylated, and nine of them were located within 356 bp flanking the minimal OBR, creating a high-density cluster of mCpGs that was approximately 10 times greater than average for human DNA. However, the previously reported densely methylated island in which all cytosines were methylated regardless of their dinucleotide composition was not detected and appeared to be an experimental artifact. A second OBR, located at the 5' end of the RPS14 gene, exhibited a strikingly similar methylation pattern, and the organization of CpG dinucleotides at other mammalian origins revealed the potential for high-density CpG methylation. Moreover, analysis of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled nascent DNA confirmed that active replication origins were methylated. These results suggest that a high-density cluster of mCpG dinucleotides may play a role in either the establishment or the regulation of mammalian replication origins. PMID:8972222

  7. DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Influences the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Pillai, Lakshmi; Fadl, Amin A.; Sha, Jian; Wang, Shaofei; Galindo, Cristi L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2006-01-01

    Among the various virulence factors produced by Aeromonas hydrophila, a type II secretion system (T2SS)-secreted cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) and the T3SS are crucial in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas-associated infections. Our laboratory molecularly characterized both Act and the T3SS from a diarrheal isolate, SSU of A. hydrophila, and defined the role of some regulatory genes in modulating the biological effects of Act. In this study, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the DNA adenine methyltransferase gene of A. hydrophila SSU (damAhSSU) in a T7 promoter-based vector system using Escherichia coli ER2566 as a host strain, which could alter the virulence potential of A. hydrophila. Recombinant Dam, designated as M.AhySSUDam, was produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and purified from an E. coli cell lysate using nickel affinity chromatography. The purified Dam had methyltransferase activity, based on its ability to transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N6-methyladenine-free lambda DNA and to protect methylated lambda DNA from digestion with DpnII but not against the DpnI restriction enzyme. The dam gene was essential for the viability of the bacterium, and overproduction of Dam in A. hydrophila SSU, using an arabinose-inducible, PBAD promoter-based system, reduced the virulence of this pathogen. Specifically, overproduction of M.AhySSUDam decreased the motility of the bacterium by 58%. Likewise, the T3SS-associated cytotoxicity, as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in murine macrophages infected with the Dam-overproducing strain, was diminished by 55% compared to that of a control A. hydrophila SSU strain harboring the pBAD vector alone. On the contrary, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities associated with Act as well as the protease activity in the culture supernatant of a Dam-overproducing strain were increased by 10-, 3-, and 2.4-fold, respectively, compared to those of the control A. hydrophila SSU strain. The Dam

  8. Carnitine biosynthesis in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Frédéric M; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2002-01-01

    Carnitine is indispensable for energy metabolism, since it enables activated fatty acids to enter the mitochondria, where they are broken down via beta-oxidation. Carnitine is probably present in all animal species, and in numerous micro-organisms and plants. In mammals, carnitine homoeostasis is maintained by endogenous synthesis, absorption from dietary sources and efficient tubular reabsorption by the kidney. This review aims to cover the current knowledge of the enzymological, molecular, metabolic and regulatory aspects of mammalian carnitine biosynthesis, with an emphasis on the human and rat. PMID:11802770

  9. A computational study of adenine, uracil, and cytosine adsorption upon AlN and BN nano-cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baei, Mohammad T.; Taghartapeh, Mohammad Ramezani; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Soltani, Alireza

    Density-functional theory calculations are used to investigate the interaction of Al12N12 and B12N12 clusters with the adenine (A), uracil (U), and cytosine (C) molecules. The current calculations demonstrate that these hybrid adsorbent materials are able to adsorb the adenine, uracil, and cytosine molecules through exothermic processes. Our theoretical results reveal improvement in the adsorption of adenine, uracil, and cytosine on Al12N12 and B12N12. It is observed that B12N12 is highly sensitive to adenine, uracil, and cytosine compared with Al12N12 to serve as a biochemical sensor.

  10. Adenine: an important drug scaffold for the design of antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyuan; Song, Zhendong; Yu, Haiqing; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Adenine derivatives, in particular the scaffold bearing the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPS), possess significant antiviral and cytostatic activity. Till now, several effective adenine derivatives have been marketed for the treatment of HIV, HBV, CMV and other virus-infected diseases. These compounds are represented by tenofovir (PMPA), a medicine for both HIV and HBV, and adefovir as an anti-HBV agent. More than this, other analogs, such as GS9148, GS9131, and GS7340, are also well-known anti-viral agents that have been progressed to the clinical studies for their excellent activity. In general, the structures of these compounds include an adenine nucleobase linked to a phosphonate side chain. Considerable structural modifications on the scaffold itself and the peripheral sections were made. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of this skeleton will provide valuable clues to identify more effective adenine derivatives as antiviral drugs. Here, we systematically summarized the SARs of the adenine derivatives, and gave important information for further optimizing this template. PMID:26579473

  11. Absolute effective cross sections of ionization of adenine and guanine molecules by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranyosh, I. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu.; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    Effective cross sections of the formation of positive ions of nitrous nucleic acids of adenine and guanine are determined by the crossed electron and molecular beam method in the energy interval from the threshold to 200 eV. It is found that the maximal value of the total cross section of adenine ionization is attained at an energy of 90 eV and is equal to (2.8 ± 0.6) × 10-15 cm2. The maximal value of the total cross section of guanine ionization is equal to (3.2 ± 0.7) × 10-15 cm2 and is observed at an energy of 88 eV. The energy ionization thresholds are determined, which amount to (8.8 ± 0.2) eV for adenine and to (8.3 ± 0.2) eV for guanine. The adenine and guanine mass spectra are measured. The absolute values of partial ionization cross sections of adenine and guanine molecules are determined.

  12. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  13. Regulation of photolyase in Escherichia coli K-12 during adenine deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, J L; Rupert, C S

    1990-01-01

    DNA photolyase, a DNA repair enzyme encoded by the phr gene of Escherichia coli, is normally regulated at 10 to 20 active molecules per cell. In purA mutants deprived of adenine, this amount increased sixfold within 2 h. Operon fusions placing lacZ under transcriptional control of phr promoters indicated no change in transcription rate during adenine deprivation, and gene fusions of phr with lacZ showed a nearly constant level of translation as well. Immunoblot analysis indicated that the total amount of photolyase protein remained constant during enzyme amplification. On the other hand, treatment of cells with chloramphenicol during the adenine deprivation prevented any increase. DNA regions lying 1.3 to 4.2 kb upstream of the phr coding sequences were necessary for this amplification to occur and for this purpose would function in trans. These results suggest that adenine deprivation leads to a posttranslational change, involving synthesis of protein encoded by sequences lying upstream of phr, which increases photolyase activity. The amplification in activity was found to be reversible, for when adenine was restored, the photolyase activity declined before cell growth resumed. Images PMID:2254263

  14. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  15. Terpene Biosynthesis: Modularity Rules

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Lin, Fu-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Terpenes are the largest class of small molecule natural products on Earth, and the most abundant by mass. Here, we summarize recent developments in elucidating the structure and function of the proteins involved in their biosynthesis. There are 6 main building blocks or modules (α,β,γ,δ,ε and ζ) that make up the structures of these enzymes: the αα and αδ head-to-tail trans-prenyl transferases that produce trans-isoprenoid diphosphates from C5 precursors; the ε head-to-head prenyl transferases that convert these diphosphates into the tri-and tetra-terpene precursors of sterols, hopanoids and carotenoids; the βγ di- and tri-terpene synthases; the ζ head-to-tail cis-prenyl transferases that produce the cis-isoprenoid diphosphates involved in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, and finally the α, αβ and αβγ terpene synthases that produce plant terpenes, with many of these modular enzymes having originated from ancestral α and β domain proteins. We also review progress in determining the structure and function of the two 4Fe-4S reductases involved in formation of the C5 diphosphates in many bacteria, where again, highly modular structures are found. PMID:22105807

  16. Taxol biosynthesis: an update.

    PubMed

    Hezari, M; Croteau, R

    1997-08-01

    The novel diterpenoid taxol (paclitaxel) is now well-established as a potent chemotherapeutic agent. Total synthesis of the drug is not commercially feasible and, in the foreseeable future, the supply of taxol and its synthetically useful progenitors must rely on biological methods of production. The first three steps of taxol biosynthesis have been defined and the responsible enzymes described. These are the cyclization of the universal diterpenoid precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate to taxa-4(5),11(12)-diene, the cytochrome P450-catalyzed hydroxylation of this olefin to taxa-4(20), 11(12)-dien-5 alpha-ol, and the acetyl CoA-dependent conversion of the alcohol to the corresponding acetate ester. Demonstration of these early steps of taxol biosynthesis suggests that the complete pathway can be defined by a systematic, stepwise approach at the cell-free enzyme level. When combined with in vivo studies to determine contribution to pathway flux, slow steps can be targeted for gene isolation and subsequent overexpression in Taxus to improve the yield of taxol and related compounds. PMID:9270370

  17. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease. PMID:24459232

  18. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  19. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (uplc-ms/ms) for the rapid, simultaneous analysis of thiamin, riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide and pyridoxal in human milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel, rapid and sensitive Ultra Performance Liquid-Chromatography tandem Mass-Spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of several B-vitamins in human milk was developed. Resolution by retention time or multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) for thiamin, riboflavin, flavin a...

  20. Replacement of Tyr50 stacked on the si-face of the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group modulates Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase activity toward NADPH.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Naito, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Erika; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P)(+) oxidoreductases ([EC 1.18.1.2], [EC 1.18.1.3], FNRs) from green sulfur bacteria, purple non-sulfur bacteria and most of Firmicutes, such as Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) are homo-dimeric flavoproteins homologous to bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. These FNRs contain two unique aromatic residues stacked on the si- and re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the FAD prosthetic group whose configurations are often found among other types of flavoproteins including plant-type FNR and flavodoxin, but not in bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. To investigate the role of the si-face Tyr50 residue in BsFNR, we replaced Tyr50 with Gly, Ser, and Trp and examined its spectroscopic properties and enzymatic activities in the presence of NADPH and ferredoxin (Fd) from B. subtilis (BsFd). The replacement of Tyr50 to Gly (Y50G), Ser (Y50S), and Trp (Y50W) in BsFNR resulted in a blue shift of the FAD transition bands. The Y50G and Y50S mutations enhanced the FAD fluorescence emission, whereas those of the wild type and Y50W mutant were quenched. All three mutants decreased thermal stabilities compared to wild type. Using a diaphorase assay, the k cat values for the Y50G and Y50S mutants in the presence of NADPH and ferricyanide were decreased to less than 5 % of the wild type activity. The Y50W mutant retained approximately 20 % reactivity in the diaphorase assay and BsFd-dependent cytochrome c reduction assay relative to wild type. The present results suggest that Tyr50 modulates the electronic properties and positioning of the prosthetic group. PMID:25698107

  1. Effects of increased mechanical work by isolated perfused rat heart during production or uptake of ketone bodies. Assessment of mitochondrial oxidized to reduced free nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide ratios and oxaloacetate concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Opie, L H; Owen, P

    1975-01-01

    Metabolic effects of increased mechanical work were studied by comparing isolated pumping rat hearts perfused by the atrial-filling technique with aortic-perfused non-pumping hearts perfused by the technique of Langendorff. The initial medium usually contained glucose (11 mm) and palmitate (0.6 mm bound to 0.1 mm albumin). During increased heart work (comparing pumping with non-pumping hearts) the uptake of oxygen and glucose increased threefold, but that of free fatty acids was unchanged. Tissue contents of alpha-oxoglutarate, NH4+, malate, lactate, pyruvate and Pi rose with increased heart work, but contents of ATP, phosphocreatine and citrate fell. Ketone bodies were produced with a ratio of beta-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate of about 3:1 in both pumping and non-pumping hearts but with higher net production rates in non-pumping hearts. When ketone bodies were added in relatively high concentrations (total 4 mm) to a glucose (11 mm) medium the medium, ratios of beta-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate were not steady even after 60 min of perfusion. The validity of calculating mitochondrial free NAD+/NADH ratios from the tissue contents of the reactants of the glutamate dehydrogenase system or the beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase system is assessed. The activities of these enzymes are considerably less in the rat heart than in the rat liver, introducing reservations into the application to the heart of the principles used by Williamson et al. (1967) for calculation of mitochondrial free NAD+/NADH ratios of liver mitochondria... PMID:173281

  2. Incorporation of L-[1-14C]leucine into protein by liver postmitochondrial supernatant: opposing effects of preincubated nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and 4-dimethylamino-3'-methylazobenzene.

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, N P; Labuc, J E

    1975-01-01

    Combination of preincubated drug-metabolizing medium containing NADP+ with a cell-free protein-synthesizing system resulted in marked stimulation of incorporation of L-[1-14C]leucine into protein. Addition of 4-dimethylamino-3'-methylazobenzene, present and previously preincubated in the drug-metabolizing medium, decreased this effect. PMID:239694

  3. One-step versus stepwise mechanism in protonated amino acid-promoted electron-transfer reduction of a quinone by electron donors and two-electron reduction by a dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analogue. Interplay between electron transfer and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Junpei; Yamada, Shunsuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2008-04-30

    Semiquinone radical anion of 1-(p-tolylsulfinyl)-2,5-benzoquinone (TolSQ(*-)) forms a strong hydrogen bond with protonated histidine (TolSQ(*-)/His x 2 H(+)), which was successfully detected by electron spin resonance. Strong hydrogen bonding between TolSQ(*-) and His x 2 H(+) results in acceleration of electron transfer (ET) from ferrocenes [R2Fc, R = C5H5, C5H4(n-Bu), C5H4Me] to TolSQ, when the one-electron reduction potential of TolSQ is largely shifted to the positive direction in the presence of His x 2 H(+). The rates of His x 2 H(+)-promoted ET from R2Fc to TolSQ exhibit deuterium kinetic isotope effects due to partial dissociation of the N-H bond in His x 2 H(+) at the transition state, when His x 2 H(+) is replaced by the deuterated compound (His x 2 D(+)-d6). The observed deuterium kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD) decreases continuously with increasing the driving force of ET to approach kH/kD = 1.0. On the other hand, His x 2 H(+) also promotes a hydride reduction of TolSQ by an NADH analogue, 9,10-dihydro-10-methylacridine (AcrH2). The hydride reduction proceeds via the one-step hydride-transfer pathway. In such a case, a large deuterium kinetic isotope effect is observed in the rate of the hydride transfer, when AcrH2 is replaced by the dideuterated compound (AcrD2). In sharp contrast to this, no deuterium kinetic isotope effect is observed, when His x 2 H(+) is replaced by His x 2 D(+)-d6. On the other hand, direct protonation of TolSQ and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) also results in efficient reductions of TolSQH(+) and PQH(+) by AcrH2, respectively. In this case, however, the hydride-transfer reactions occur via the ET pathway, that is, ET from AcrH2 to TolSQH(+) and PQH(+) occurs in preference to direct hydride transfer from AcrH2 to TolSQH(+) and PQH(+), respectively. The AcrH2(*+) produced by the ET oxidation of AcrH2 by TolSQH(+) and PQH(+) was directly detected by using a stopped-flow technique. PMID:18386924

  4. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  5. Copper-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine: synthesis of purine-fused tricyclics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Long; Liang, Lei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Qu, Gui-Rong; Niu, Hong-Ying; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2014-04-18

    A novel protocol to construct fluorescent purine-fused tricyclic products via intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine has been developed. With CuBr as the catalyst, a series of purine-fused tricyclic products were obtained in good to excellent yields (19 examples, 75-89% yields). When R2 was a hydrogen atom in N-propargyl-adenines, the reactions only afforded the endocyclic double bond products. When R2 was an aryl group, the electron-donating groups favored the endocyclic double bond products, while the electron-withdrawing groups favored the exocyclic double bond products. PMID:24678722

  6. bis-Molybdopterin Guanine Dinucleotide Is Required for Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Monique J.; Shanley, Crystal A.; Zilavy, Andrew; Peixoto, Blas; Manca, Claudia; Kaplan, Gilla; Orme, Ian M.; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is able to synthesize molybdopterin cofactor (MoCo), which is utilized by numerous enzymes that catalyze redox reactions in carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism. In bacteria, MoCo is further modified through the activity of a guanylyltransferase, MobA, which converts MoCo to bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (bis-MGD), a form of the cofactor that is required by the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family of enzymes, which includes the nitrate reductase NarGHI. In this study, the functionality of the mobA homolog in M. tuberculosis was confirmed by demonstrating the loss of assimilatory and respiratory nitrate reductase activity in a mobA deletion mutant. This mutant displayed no survival defects in human monocytes or mouse lungs but failed to persist in the lungs of guinea pigs. These results implicate one or more bis-MGD-dependent enzymes in the persistence of M. tuberculosis in guinea pig lungs and underscore the applicability of this animal model for assessing the role of molybdoenzymes in this pathogen. PMID:25404027

  7. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named “DeepMethyl” to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/. PMID:26797014

  8. Efficient UV-induced charge separation and recombination in an 8-oxoguanine-containing dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2014-08-12

    During the early evolution of life, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (O) may have functioned as a proto-flavin capable of repairing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA or RNA by photoinduced electron transfer using longer wavelength UVB radiation. To investigate the ability of O to act as an excited-state electron donor, a dinucleotide mimic of the FADH2 cofactor containing O at the 5'-end and 2'-deoxyadenosine at the 3'-end was studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in aqueous solution. Following excitation with a UV pulse, a broadband mid-IR pulse probed vibrational modes of ground-state and electronically excited molecules in the double-bond stretching region. Global analysis of time- and frequency-resolved transient absorption data coupled with ab initio quantum mechanical calculations reveal vibrational marker bands of nucleobase radical ions formed by electron transfer from O to 2'-deoxyadenosine. The quantum yield of charge separation is 0.4 at 265 nm, but decreases to 0.1 at 295 nm. Charge recombination occurs in 60 ps before the O radical cation can lose a deuteron to water. Kinetic and thermodynamic considerations strongly suggest that all nucleobases can undergo ultrafast charge separation when π-stacked in DNA or RNA. Interbase charge transfer is proposed to be a major decay pathway for UV excited states of nucleic acids of great importance for photostability as well as photoredox activity. PMID:25071180

  9. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named “DeepMethyl” to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/.

  10. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named "DeepMethyl" to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/. PMID:26797014