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Sample records for adenoviral sub-unit proteins

  1. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  2. Adenoviral gene transfer of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, R.; Driscoll, K.; Wan, Y.; Braciak, T.; Howard, B.; Xing, Z.; Graham, F.; Gauldie, J.

    1996-01-01

    Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are capable of localized transfer and expression of incorporated gene product in lung tissue. We have constructed an adenoviral vector that expresses rat macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, a C-X-C chemokine specifically chemotactic for neutrophils, Supernatants from 293 cells, infected with the adenoviral MIP-2 (ADMIP-2) construct, showed potent chemotactic activity and the ability of the ADMIP-2 vector to transcribe and make functional protein was confirmed. In vivo analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rats after intratracheal instillation of ADMIP-2 (10(9) plaque-forming units) showed a 10-fold increase in the absolute number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as opposed to rats treated with an equal titer of an E1-disabled control virus expressing firefly luciferase (ADCA-18). Neutrophils constituted 65% of total BAL cells with alveolar macrophages being the other major cell type recovered. Rat MIP-2 protein was increased (nanograms per milliliter) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid over a period of 7 days in ADMIP-2-treated animals. MIP-2 mRNA was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis in lung tissue, and histological analysis confirmed the presence of massive localized tissue neutrophilia. Evidence of chronic tissue injury and repair (ie, fibrosis) was not detected up to 2 weeks after the neutrophil infiltrate had resolved, subsequent to decreased chemokine presence. Adenoviral gene transfer proved an effective tool for the assessment of lung tissue expression of this chemokine in vivo and is useful in developing rodent models of tissue neutrophilia. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8863686

  3. Sequence dependent interaction of hnRNP proteins with late adenoviral transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    van Eekelen, C; Ohlsson, R; Philipson, L; Mariman, E; van Beek, R; van Venrooij, W

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation with ultraviolet light was used to induce covalent linkage between hnRNA and its associated proteins in intact HeLa cells, late after infection with adenovirus type 2. Covalently linked hnRNA-protein complexes, containing polyadenylated adenoviral RNA, were isolated and their protein moiety characterized. Host 42,000 Mr hnRNP proteins proved to be the major proteins crosslinked to viral hnRNA. To investigate their possible involvement in RNA processing, the localization of these cross-linked polypeptides on adenoviral late transcripts was determined. Sequences of RNA around the attachment sites of the protein were isolated. After in vitro labeling they were hybridized to Southern blots of adeno DNA fragments. The hybridization patterns revealed that the 42,000 Mr polypeptides can be linked to adenoviral transcripts over the entire length of the RNA, corresponding to 16.2-91.5 m.u. of the viral genome. Fine mapping within the Hind III B region (16.8-31.5 m.u.) established, however, that the localization of the cross-linked polypeptides was not random in all parts of the transcript. Sequences around the third leader and the 3' part of the i-leader were overrepresented, whereas the regions encoding VA I and VA II RNA and the late region 1 mRNA bodies were underrepresented in the cross-linked RNA. Using genomic DNA fragments and a cDNA clone containing the tripartite leader it appeared that leader and intervening sequences were represented about equally in cross-linked RNA fragments. Although these results do not support the notion that introns or exons are specifically interacting with one RNP protein, they demonstrate that the 42,000 hnRNP proteins are non randomly positioned on the RNA sequence. Images PMID:6296766

  4. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  5. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  6. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  7. Adenoviral expression of murine serum amyloid A proteins to study amyloid fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kindy, M S; King, A R; Yu, J; Gerardot, C; Whitley, J; de Beer, F C

    1998-06-15

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are one of the most inducible acute-phase reactants and are precursors of secondary amyloidosis. In the mouse, SAA1 and SAA2 are induced in approximately equal quantities in response to amyloid induction models. These two isotypes differ in only 9 of 103 amino acid residues; however, only SAA2 is selectively deposited into amyloid fibrils. SAA expression in the CE/J mouse species is an exception in that gene duplication did not occur and the CE/J variant is a hybrid molecule sharing features of SAA1 and SAA2. However, even though it is more closely related to SAA2 it is not deposited as amyloid fibrils. We have developed an adenoviral vector system to overexpress SAA proteins in cell culture to determine the ability of these proteins to form amyloid fibrils, and to study the structural features in relation to amyloid formation. Both the SAA2 and CE/J SAA proteins were synthesized in large quantities and purified to homogeneity. Electron microscopic analysis of the SAA proteins revealed that the SAA2 protein was capable of forming amyloid fibrils, whereas the CE/J SAA was incapable. Radiolabelled SAAs were associated with normal or acute-phase high-density lipoproteins (HDLs); we examined them for their clearance from the circulation. In normal mice, SAA2 had a half-life of 70 min and CE/J SAA had a half-life of 120 min; however, in amyloid mice 50% of the SAA2 cleared in 55 min, compared with 135 min for the CE/J protein. When the SAA proteins were associated with acute-phase HDLs, SAA2 clearance was decreased to 60 min in normal mice compared with 30 min in amyloidogenic mice. Both normal and acute-phase HDLs were capable of depositing SAA2 into preformed amyloid fibrils, whereas the CE/J protein did not become associated with amyloid fibrils. This established approach opens the doors for large-scale SAA production and for the examination of specific amino acids involved in the fibrillogenic capability of the SAA2 molecule in vitro

  8. Adenoviral protein V promotes a process of viral assembly through nucleophosmin 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, Hideyo; Dobbins, George C.; Wang, Minghui; Le, Long P.; Matthews, David A.; Curiel, David T.

    2012-10-25

    Adenoviral infection induces nucleoplasmic redistribution of a nucleolar nucleophosmin 1/NPM1/B23.1. NPM1 is preferentially localized in the nucleoli of normal cells, whereas it is also present at the nuclear matrix in cancer cells. However, the biological roles of NPM1 during infection are unknown. Here, by analyzing a pV-deletion mutant, Ad5-dV/TSB, we demonstrate that pV promotes the NPM1 translocation from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm in normal cells, and the NPM1 translocation is correlated with adenoviral replication. Lack of pV causes a dramatic reduction of adenoviral replication in normal cells, but not cancer cells, and Ad5-dV/TSB was defective in viral assembly in normal cells. NPM1 knockdown inhibits adenoviral replication, suggesting an involvement of NPM1 in adenoviral biology. Further, we show that NPM1 interacts with empty adenovirus particles which are an intermediate during virion maturation by immunoelectron microscopy. Collectively, these data implicate that pV participates in a process of viral assembly through NPM1.

  9. Specific interaction between adenoviral 55-kDa E1B protein and in vivo produced p53 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Chumakov, A; Koeffler, H P

    1993-09-15

    Several protein fusion systems have been used in recent years to study protein-protein and DNA-protein interactions. Most of them use bacterially produced proteins which have several inherent disadvantages, notably, the absence of correct post-translational modifications and the frequent insolubility of recombinant proteins. We sought to develop a system to study proteins interacting with the nuclear phosphoprotein p53, which is believed to be a tumor suppressor. To prepare fusions of p53, we developed a convenient system that permits both in vivo and in vitro production and easy affinity purification of peptides and protein fragments as glutathione-transferase fusions. We placed the coding sequence of the Schistosoma japonica glutathione S-transferase (GST) under the control of the strong CMV/T7 promoter and SV40 splice and polyadenylation signals. An extensive polylinker (MCS) at the 3' end of the GST gene is preceded by the sequence encoding the cleavage site of the site-specific protease. We cloned the complete coding sequences of human wild-type p53, as well as p53 mutants representing all four mutational hotspots (codons 141, 175, 248, and 273), into our expression vector. In vitro transcription using the upstream T7 promoter and translation in reticulocyte lysates form an easy way to produce hybrid proteins; affinity purification on a glutathione-agarose column removes proteins that are present in reticulocyte lysates. We have also studied specific in vivo interactions of human p53 with the adenoviral 55-kDa E1B protein by transfecting expression constructs of GST-p53 fusions into human Ad5-transformed 293 cells. PMID:8406015

  10. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga; Pool, Madeline; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-11-25

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: > We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. > Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. > A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. > Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  11. Adenoviral vector which delivers FasL-GFP fusion protein regulated by the tet-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Rubinchik, S; Ding, R; Qiu, A J; Zhang, F; Dong, J

    2000-05-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) is a member of the tumor necrosis family and when bound to its receptor, Fas, induces apoptosis. It plays important roles in immune response, degenerative and lymphoproliferative diseases, development and tumorigenesis. It is also involved in generation of immune privilege sites in the eye and testis. Harnessing the power of this molecule is expected to lead to a powerful chemotherapeutic. We describe the construction and characterization of replication-deficient adenoviral vectors that express a fusion of murine FasL and green fluorescent protein (GFP). FasL-GFP retains full activity of wild-type FasL, at the same time allowing for easy visualization and quantification in both living and fixed cells. The fusion protein is under the control of a tetracycline-regulated gene expression system. Tight control of expression is achieved by creating a novel 'double recombinant' Ad vector, in which the tet-responsive element and the transactivator element are built into the opposite ends of the same vector to avoid enhancer interference. Expression can be conveniently regulated by tetracycline or its derivatives in a dose-dependent manner. The vector was able to deliver FasL-GFP gene to cells in vitro efficiently, and the expression level and function of the fusion protein was modulated by the concentration of doxycycline. This regulation allows us to produce high titers of the vector by inhibiting FasL expression in an apoptosis-resistant cell line. Induction of apoptosis was demonstrated in all cell lines tested. These results indicate that our vector is a potentially valuable tool for FasL-based gene therapy of cancer and for the study of FasL/Fas-mediated apoptosis and immune privilege. PMID:10845726

  12. Adenoviral E4orf3 and E4orf6 Proteins, But Not E1B55K, Increase Killing of Cancer Cells by Radiotherapy in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liikanen, Ilkka; Dias, Joao D.; Nokisalmi, Petri; Sloniecka, Marta; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Rajecki, Mari; Dobner, Thomas; Tenhunen, Mikko; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Ahtiainen, Laura Ph.D.; Hemminki, Akseli

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is widely used for treatment of many tumor types, but it can damage normal tissues. It has been proposed that cancer cells can be selectively sensitized to radiation by adenovirus replication or by using radiosensitizing transgenes. Adenoviral proteins E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 play a role in radiosensitization, by targeting the Mre11, Rad50, and NBS1 complex (MRN) and inhibiting DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We hypothesize that combined with irradiation, these adenoviral proteins increase cell killing through the impairment of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: We assessed the radiosensitizing/additive potential of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 proteins. Combination treatments with low-dose external photon beam radiotherapy were studied in prostate cancer (PC-3MM2 and DU-145), breast cancer (M4A4-LM3), and head and neck cancer (UT-SCC8) cell lines. We further demonstrated radiosensitizing or additive effects in mice with PC-3MM2 tumors. Results: We show enhanced cell killing with adenovirus and radiation combination treatment. Co-infection with several of the viruses did not further increase cell killing, suggesting that both E4orf6 and E4orf3 are potent in MRN inhibition. Our results show that adenoviral proteins E4orf3 and E4orf6, but not E1B55K, are effective also in vivo. Enhanced cell killing was due to inhibition of DSB repair resulting in persistent double-strand DNA damage, indicated by elevated phospho-H2AX levels at 24 h after irradiation. Conclusions: This knowledge can be applied for improving the treatment of malignant tumors, such as prostate cancer, for development of more effective combination therapies and minimizing radiation doses and reducing side effects.

  13. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  14. [Construction of recombinant adenoviral vector expressing genes of the conservative influenza proteins M2 and nucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Esmagambetov, I B; Sedova, E S; Shcherbinin, D N; Lysenko, A A; Garas, M N; Shmarov, M M; Logunov, D Iu

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is a highly contagious and one of the most massive infection diseases. General epidemiological significance has a strain, which belongs to subtype A. A high degree of genetic variety leads to the permanent changes in the antigenic structure of the influenza virus. Therefore, the current influenza vaccines require periodic updating of the composition of strains. Presently, it is important to develop a universal vaccine that can protect against different strains of influenza A virus at the same time and is based on the conserved antigens of the influenza virus. The recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing genes of conserved viral antigenes may be a promising candidate vaccine against influenza A. Using the method of the homologous recombination, we developed in this study recombinant adenovirus of fifth serotype that expresses genes of the ion channel M2 and nucleoprotein NP of the influenza virus A. Genes of the consensus protein M2 and NP of human influenza A virus were included into the structure of the viral genome. The expression of the antigens M2 and NP using recombinant adenovirus vector was detected by a Western blot assay. The immunogenicity of the developed recombinant adenovirus vector was demonstrated by the intranasal immunization of laboratory mice. PMID:25080815

  15. Heterologous Prime-Boost Regimens with a Recombinant Chimpanzee Adenoviral Vector and Adjuvanted F4 Protein Elicit Polyfunctional HIV-1-Specific T-Cell Responses in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lorin, Clarisse; Vanloubbeeck, Yannick; Baudart, Sébastien; Ska, Michaël; Bayat, Babak; Brauers, Geoffroy; Clarinval, Géraldine; Donner, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Martine; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Mettens, Pascal; Cohen, Joe; Voss, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are important for HIV-1 replication control. F4/AS01 consists of F4 recombinant fusion protein (containing clade B Gag/p24, Pol/RT, Nef and Gag/p17) formulated in AS01 Adjuvant System, and was shown to induce F4-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses in humans. While replication-incompetent recombinant HIV-1/SIV antigen-expressing human adenoviral vectors can elicit high-frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, their use is hampered by widespread pre-existing immunity to human serotypes. Non-human adenovirus serotypes associated with lower prevalence may offer an alternative strategy. We evaluated the immunogenicity of AdC7-GRN (‘A’), a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 7 vector expressing clade B Gag, RT and Nef, and F4/AS01 (‘P’), when delivered intramuscularly in homologous (PP or AA) and heterologous (AAPP or PPAA) prime-boost regimens, in macaques and mice. Vaccine-induced HIV-1-antigen-specific T cells in peripheral blood (macaques), liver, spleen, and intestinal and genital mucosa (mice) were characterized by intracellular cytokine staining. Vaccine-specific IgG antibodies (macaques) were detected using ELISA. In macaques, only the heterologous prime-boost regimens induced polyfunctional, persistent and balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific to each HIV-1 vaccine antigen. AdC7-GRN priming increased the polyfunctionality of F4/AS01-induced CD4+ T cells. Approximately 50% of AdC7-GRN-induced memory CD8+ T cells exhibited an effector-memory phenotype. HIV-1-specific antibodies were detected with each regimen. In mice, antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in the mucosal and systemic anatomical compartments assessed. When administered in heterologous prime-boost regimens, AdC7-GRN and F4/AS01 candidate vaccines acted complementarily in inducing potent and persistent peripheral blood HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and antibodies in macaques

  16. Modulation of hormone-sensitive lipase and protein kinase A-mediated lipolysis by perilipin A in an adenoviral reconstituted system.

    PubMed

    Souza, Sandra C; Muliro, Kizito V; Liscum, Laura; Lien, Ping; Yamamoto, Mia T; Schaffer, Jean E; Dallal, Gerard E; Wang, Xinzhong; Kraemer, Fredric B; Obin, Martin; Greenberg, Andrew S

    2002-03-01

    Perilipin (Peri) A is a phosphoprotein located at the surface of intracellular lipid droplets in adipocytes. Activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) results in the phosphorylation of Peri A and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), the predominant lipase in adipocytes, with concurrent stimulation of adipocyte lipolysis. To investigate the relative contributions of Peri A and HSL in basal and PKA-mediated lipolysis, we utilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts lacking Peri A and HSL but stably overexpressing acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACS1) and fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1). When incubated with exogenous fatty acids, ACS1/FATP1 cells accumulated 5 times more triacylglycerol (TG) as compared with NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Adenoviral-mediated expression of Peri A in ACS1/FATP1 cells enhanced TG accumulation and inhibited lipolysis, whereas expression of HSL fused to green fluorescent protein (GFPHSL) reduced TG accumulation and enhanced lipolysis. Forskolin treatment induced Peri A hyperphosphorylation and abrogated the inhibitory effect of Peri A on lipolysis. Expression of a mutated Peri A Delta 3 (Ser to Ala substitutions at PKA consensus sites Ser-81, Ser-222, and Ser-276) reduced Peri A hyperphosphorylation and blocked constitutive and forskolin-stimulated lipolysis. Thus, perilipin expression and phosphorylation state are critical regulators of lipid storage and hydrolysis in ACS1/FATP1 cells. PMID:11751901

  17. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.J. . E-mail: sjflint@molbio.princeton.edu; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  18. STRO-1 selected rat dental pulp stem cells transfected with adenoviral-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene show enhanced odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuechao; van der Kraan, Peter M; van den Dolder, Juliette; Walboomers, X Frank; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Mingwen; Jansen, John A

    2007-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells harbor great potential for tissue-engineering purposes. However, previous studies have shown variable results, and some have reported only limited osteogenic and odontogenic potential.Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-established agents to induce bone and dentin formation,in this study STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells were transfected with the adenoviral mediated human BMP-2 gene. Subsequently, the cells were evaluated for their odontogenic differentiation ability in medium not containing dexamethasone or other stimuli. Cultures were investigated using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and evaluated for cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase(ALP) activity, and calcium content. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for gene expression of Alp, osteocalcin, collagen type I, bone sialoprotein, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1. Finally, an oligo-microarray was used to profile the expression of odontogenesis-related genes. Results of ALP activity, calcium content, and real-time PCR showed that only BMP2-transfected cells had the ability to differentiate into the odontoblast phenotype and to produce a calcified extracellular matrix. SEM and oligo-microarray confirmed these results. In contrast, the non-transfected cells represented a less differentiated cell phenotype. Based on our results, we concluded that the adenovirus can transfect STRO-1 selected cells with high efficacy. After BMP2 gene transfection, these cells had the ability to differentiate into odontoblast phenotype, even without the addition of odontogenic supplements to the medium. PMID:17824831

  19. Enhancement of Protective Efficacy through Adenoviral Vectored Vaccine Priming and Protein Boosting Strategy Encoding Triosephosphate Isomerase (SjTPI) against Schistosoma japonicum in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yang; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Xing, Yuntian; Dai, Jianrong; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yinchang

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease; developing transmission blocking veterinary vaccines are urgently needed for the prevention and control of schistosomiasis in China. Heterologous prime-boost strategy, a novel vaccination approach, is more effective in enhancing vaccine efficacy against multiple pathogens. In the present study, we established a novel heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy, the rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming and rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting strategy, and evaluated its protective efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Adenoviral vectored vaccine (rAdV-SjTPI.opt) and recombinant protein vaccine (rSjTPI) were prepared and used in different combinations as vaccines in a mouse model. The specific immune responses and protective efficacies were evaluated. Furthermore, the longevity of protective efficacy was also determined. Results showed that the rAdV-SjTPI.opt priming-rSjTPI boosting strategy elicited higher levels of specific IgG responses and broad-spectrum specific cellular immune responses. The protective efficacy could reach up to nearly 70% and 50% of protection could be observed at 10 weeks after the last immunization in mice. Conclusions/Significance The rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming-rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting vaccination strategy is a novel, highly efficient, and stable approach to developing vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infections in China. PMID:25793406

  20. Inhibition of proteolytic processing of adenoviral proteins by epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum in adenovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Nosach, Lidiya; Dyachenko, Nataliya; Zhovnovataya, Valentina; Lozinskiy, Miron; Lozitsky, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Maturation of adenovirus particles is markedly affected by proteolytic processing. The possibility for blocking the conversion of precursor structural core protein (preVII) into mature structure protein VII by officinal drugs epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum has been demonstrated in Hep-2 cells infected with adenovirus. Proteolytic processing may be regarded as one of the targets for inhibiting adenovirus reproduction. PMID:12545207

  1. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Alexander J.; Gardner, Oliver F. W.; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W.; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  2. Impact of the Adenoviral E4 Orf3 Protein on the Activity and Posttranslational Modification of p53

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Perlman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our previous studies have established that the p53 populations that accumulate in normal human cells exposed to etoposide or infected by an E1B 55-kDa protein-null mutant of human adenovirus type 5 carry a large number of posttranslational modifications at numerous residues (C. J. DeHart, J. S. Chahal, S. J. Flint, and D. H. Perlman, Mol Cell Proteomics 13:1–17, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/mcp.M113.030254). In the absence of this E1B protein, the p53 transcriptional program is not induced, and it has been reported that the viral E4 Orf3 protein inactivates p53 (C. Soria, F. E. Estermann, K. C. Espantman, and C. C. O'Shea, Nature 466:1076–1081, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature09307). As the latter protein disrupts nuclear Pml bodies, sites at which p53 is modified, we used mass spectrometry to catalogue the posttranscriptional modifications of the p53 population that accumulates when neither the E1B 55-kDa nor the E4 Orf3 protein is made in infected cells. Eighty-five residues carrying 163 modifications were identified. The overall patterns of posttranslational modification of this population and p53 present in cells infected by an E1B 55-kDa-null mutant were similar. The efficiencies with which the two forms of p53 bound to a consensus DNA recognition sequence could not be distinguished and were lower than that of transcriptionally active p53. The absence of the E4 Orf3 protein increased expression of several p53-responsive genes when the E1B protein was also absent from infected cells. However, expression of these genes did not attain the levels observed when p53 was activated in response to etoposide treatment and remained lower than those measured in mock-infected cells. IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53, a master regulator of cellular responses to stress, is inactivated and destroyed in cells infected by species C human adenoviruses, such as type 5. It is targeted for proteasomal degradation by the action of a virus-specific E3

  3. Capsid modification strategies for detargeting adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alan L; Bradshaw, Angela C; Alba, Raul; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors hold immense potential for a wide variety of gene therapy based applications; however, their efficacy and toxicity is dictated by "off target" interactions that preclude cell specific targeting to sites of disease. A number of "off target" interactions have been described in the literature that occur between the three major capsid proteins (hexon, penton, and fiber) and components of the circulatory system, including cells such as erythrocytes, white blood cells, and platelets, as well as circulatory proteins including complement proteins, coagulation factors, von Willebrand Factor, p-selectin as well as neutralizing antibodies. Thus, to improve efficacious targeting to sites of disease and limit nonspecific uptake of virus to non-target tissues, specifically the liver and the spleen, it is necessary to develop suitable strategies for genetically modifying the capsid proteins to preclude these interactions. To this end we have developed versatile systems based on homologous recombination for modification of each of the major capsid proteins, which are described herein. PMID:24132476

  4. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Amanda; Vetrini, Francesco; Ng, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are devoid of all viral coding sequences, possess a large cloning capacity, and can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types from various species independent of the cell cycle to mediate long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. These non-integrating vectors hold tremendous potential for a variety of gene transfer and gene therapy applications. Here, we review the production technologies, applications, obstacles to clinical translation and their potential resolutions, and the future challenges and unanswered questions regarding this promising gene transfer technology. PMID:24533227

  5. Targeting different types of human meningioma and glioma cells using a novel adenoviral vector expressing GFP-TRAIL fusion protein from hTERT promoter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of Ad/gTRAIL (an adenoviral vector in which expression of GFP and TRAIL is driven by a human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERT) on malignant meningiomas and gliomas. Background Gliomas and meningiomas are the two most common types of human brain tumors. Currently there is no effective cure for recurrent malignant meningiomas or for gliomas. Ad/gTRAIL has been shown to be effective in killing selected lung, colon and breast cancer cells, but there have been no studies reporting its antitumor effects on malignant meningiomas. Therefore, we tested the antitumor effect of Ad/gTRAIL for the first time in human malignant meningioma and glioma cell lines, and in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts. Methods Materials and Methods: Human malignant meningioma and glioma cells were infected with adenoviruses, Ad/gTRAIL and Ad/CMV-GFP. Cell viability was determined by proliferation assay. FACS analysis and quantification of TRAIL were used to measure apoptosis in these cells. We injected Ad/gTRAIL viruses in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts, and measured the brain tumor volume, quantified apoptosis by TUNEL assay in the brain tumor tissue. Results Our studies demonstrate that in vitro/in vivo treatment with Ad/gTRAIL virus resulted in significant increase of TRAIL activity, and elicited a greater tumor cell apoptosis in malignant brain tumor cells as compared to treatment with the control, Ad/CMV-GFP virus without TRAIL activity. Conclusions We showed for the first time that adenovirus Ad/gTRAIL had significant antitumor effects against high grade malignant meningiomas as well as gliomas. Although more work needs to be done, our data suggests that Ad/gTRAIL has the potential to be useful as a tool against malignant brain tumors. PMID:22035360

  6. Capsid-Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Improved Muscle-Directed Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guse, Kilian; Suzuki, Masataka; Sule, Gautam; Bertin, Terry K.; Tyynismaa, Henna; Ahola-Erkkilä, Sofia; Palmer, Donna; Suomalainen, Anu; Ng, Philip; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Skeletal muscle represents an attractive target tissue for adenoviral gene therapy to treat muscle disorders and as a production platform for systemic expression of therapeutic proteins. However, adenovirus serotype 5 vectors do not efficiently transduce adult muscle tissue. Here we evaluated whether capsid modifications on adenoviral vectors could improve transduction in mature murine muscle tissue. First-generation and helper-dependent serotype 5 adenoviral vectors featuring the serotype 3 knob (5/3) showed significantly increased transduction of skeletal muscle after intramuscular injection in adult mice. Furthermore, we showed that full-length dystrophin could be more efficiently transferred to muscles of mdx mice using a 5/3-modified helper-dependent adenoviral vector. In contrast to first-generation vectors, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediated stable marker gene expression for at least 1 year after intramuscular injection. In conclusion, 5/3 capsid-modified helper-dependent adenoviral vectors show enhanced transduction in adult murine muscle tissue and mediate long-term gene expression, suggesting the suitability of these vectors for muscle-directed gene therapy. PMID:22888960

  7. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  8. Adenoviral virotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Suvobroto; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of primary brain cancer. In the past decade, virotherapy of tumors has gained credence, particularly in glioma management, as these tumors are not completely resectable and tend to micro-metastasize. Adenoviral vectors have an advantage over other viral vectors in that they are relatively non-toxic and do not integrate in the genome. However, the lack of coxsackie and adenovirus receptors (CAR) on surface of gliomas provides for inefficient transduction of wild-type adenoviral vectors in these tumors. By targeting receptors that are over-expressed in gliomas, modified adenoviral constructs have been shown to efficiently infect glioma cells. In addition, by taking advantage of tumor specific promoter (TSP) elements, oncolytic adenoviral vectors offer the promise of selective tumor-specific replication. This dual targeting strategy has enabled specificity in both laboratory and pre-clinical settings. This review looks at current trends in adenoviral virotherapy of gliomas, with an emphasis on targeting modalities and future clinical applications. PMID:19456208

  9. Adenoviral virotherapy for malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Suvobroto; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common form of primary brain cancer. In the past decade, virotherapy of tumors has gained credence, particularly in glioma management, as these tumors are not completely resectable and tend to micro-metastasize. Adenoviral vectors have an advantage over other viral vectors in that they are relatively non-toxic and do not integrate in the genome. However, the lack of coxsackie and adenovirus receptors on surface of gliomas provides for inefficient transduction of wild-type adenoviral vectors in these tumors. By targeting receptors that are overexpressed in gliomas, modified adenoviral constructs have been shown to efficiently infect glioma cells. In addition, by taking advantage of tumor-specific promoter elements, oncolytic adenoviral vectors offer the promise of selective tumor-specific replication. This dual targeting strategy has enabled specificity in both laboratory and pre-clinical settings. This review examines current trends in adenoviral virotherapy of gliomas, with an emphasis on targeting modalities and future clinical applications. PMID:19456208

  10. Actin-binding protein alpha-actinin 4 (ACTN4) is a transcriptional co-activator of RelA/p65 sub-unit of NF-kB

    PubMed Central

    Aksenova, Vasilisa; Turoverova, Lidia; Khotin, Mikhail; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Tulchinsky, Eugene; Melino, Gerry; Pinaev, George P.; Barlev, Nickolai; Tentler, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    ACTN4 is an actin-binding protein that participates in cytoskeleton organisation. It resides both in the cytoplasm and nucleus and physically associates with various transcription factors. Here, we describe an effect of ACTN4 expression on transcriptional activity of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-kB. We demonstrate that ACTN4 enhances RelA/p65-dependant expression of c-fos, MMP-3 and MMP-1 genes, but it does not affect TNC, ICAM1 and FN1 expression. Importantly, actin-binding domains of ACTN4 are not critical for the nuclear translocation and co-activation of RelA/p65-dependent transcription. Collectively, our data suggest that in the nucleus, ACTN4 functions as a selective transcriptional co-activator of RelA/p65. PMID:23482348

  11. [Immunogenicity and heterologous protection in mice with a recombinant adenoviral-based vaccine carrying a hepatitis C virus truncated NS3 and core fusion protein].

    PubMed

    Guan, Jie; Deng, Yao; Chen, Hong; Yang, Yang; Wen, Bo; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    To develop a safe and broad-spectrum effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) T cell vaccine,we constructed the recombinant adenovirus-based vaccine that carried the hepatitis C virus truncated NS3 and core fusion proteins. The expression of the fusion antigen was confirmed by in vitro immunofluorescence and western blotting assays. Our results indicated that this vaccine not only stimulated antigen-specific antibody responses,but also activated strong NS3-specific T cell immune responses. NS3-specific IFN-γ+ and TNF-α+ CD4+ T cell subsets were also detected by a intracellular cytokine secretion assay. In a surrogate challenge assay based on a recombinant heterologous HCV (JFH1,2a) vaccinia virus,the recombinant adenovirus-based vaccine was capable of eliciting effective levels of cross-protection. These findings have im- portant implications for the study of HCV immune protection and the future development of a novel vaccine. PMID:25997323

  12. Amplification of inflammation in emphysema and its association with latent adenoviral infection.

    PubMed

    Retamales, I; Elliott, W M; Meshi, B; Coxson, H O; Pare, P D; Sciurba, F C; Rogers, R M; Hayashi, S; Hogg, J C

    2001-08-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that the cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory process is amplified in severe emphysema and explores the association of this response with latent adenoviral infection. Lung tissue from patients with similar smoking histories and either no (n = 7), mild (n = 7), or severe emphysema (n = 7) was obtained by lung resection. Numbers of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), macrophages, B cells, CD4, CD8 lymphocytes, and eosinophils present in tissue and airspaces and of epithelial cells expressing adenoviral E1A protein were determined using quantitative techniques. Severe emphysema was associated with an absolute increase in the total number of inflammatory cells in the lung tissue and airspaces. The computed tomography (CT) determined extent of lung destruction was related to the number of cells/m(2) surface area by R(2) values that ranged from 0.858 (CD8 cells) to 0.483 (B cells) in the tissue and 0.630 (CD4 cells) to 0.198 (B cells) in the airspaces. These changes were associated with a 5- to 40-fold increase in the number of alveolar epithelial cells expressing adenoviral E1A protein in mild and severe disease, respectively. We conclude that cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation is amplified in severe emphysema and that latent expression of the adenoviral E1A protein expressed by alveolar epithelial cells influenced this amplification process. PMID:11500352

  13. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tylka, Joanna C.; McCrory, Michael C.; Gertz, Shira J.; Custer, Jason W.; Spaeder, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in four children's hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58%) did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p = 0.015), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.001), requirement of renal replacement therapy (p = 0.01), ICU admission severity of illness score (p = 0.011), and treatment with cidofovir (p = 0.005). Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.01), require renal replacement therapy (p = 0.02), and not survive to hospital discharge (p = 0.004). One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children. PMID:27242924

  14. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter. PMID:24243238

  15. Adenoviral Vectors for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited blood clotting disorder resulting from deficiency of blood coagulation factors. Current standard of care for hemophilia patients is frequent intravenous infusions of the missing coagulation factor. Gene therapy for hemophilia involves the introduction of a normal copy of the deficient coagulation factor gene thereby potentially offering a definitive cure for the bleeding disorder. A variety of approaches have been pursued for hemophilia gene therapy and this review article focuses on those that use adenoviral vectors. PMID:24883229

  16. Interleukin-Encoding Adenoviral Vectors as Genetic Adjuvant for Vaccination against Retroviral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity. PMID:24349306

  17. Specific NFκB subunit activation and kinetics of cytokine induction in adenoviral keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaiya, Jaya; Sadeghi, Neda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Corneal inflammation associated with ocular adenoviral infection is caused by leukocytic infiltration of the subepithelial stroma in response to expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by infected corneal cells. We have shown that these two chemokines are activated by the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 for IL-8, and Jun-terminal kinase (JNK) for MCP-1. It is also well established that transcription of each of these chemokines is tightly controlled by the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) transcription factor family. Therefore, we sought to better understand the differential regulation of chemokine expression by NFκB in adenoviral infection of the cornea. Methods Primary keratocytes derived from human donor corneas were treated with signaling inhibitors and small interfering RNA specific to MAPKs, and infected with adenovirus for different time periods before analysis. Activation of specific NFκB subunits was analyzed by western blot, confocal microscopy, electromobility shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation, and chemokine expression was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Upon adenoviral infection, NFκB p65, p50, and cREL subunits translocate to the nucleus. This translocation is blocked by inhibitors of specific MAPK signaling pathways. Confocal microscopy showed that inhibitors of the p38, JNK, and ERK pathways differentially inhibited NFκB nuclear translocation, while PP2, an inhibitor of Src family kinases, completely inhibited NFκB nuclear translocation. Western blot analysis revealed that activation of specific NFκB subunits was time dependent following infection. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that binding of NFκB p65 and p50 subunits to the IL-8 promoter upon viral infection was differentially reduced by chemical inhibitors of MAPKs. Electromobility shift assay and luciferase assay analysis

  18. Early osteoblastic differentiation induced by dexamethasone enhances adenoviral gene delivery to marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jeremy S; Parrott, M Brandon; Mikos, Antonios G; Barry, Michael A

    2004-03-01

    We investigated the implications of induced osteogenic differentiation on gene delivery in multipotent rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Prior to genetic manipulation cells were cultured with or without osteogenic supplements (5x10(-8) M dexamethasone, 160 microM l-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate). Comparison of liposome, retroviral, and adenoviral vectors demonstrated that all three vectors could mediate gene delivery to primary rat MSCs. When these vectors were applied in the absence or presence of osteogenic supplements, we found that MSCs differentiated prior to transduction with adenovirus type 5 vectors produced a 300% increase in transgene expression compared to MSCs that were not exposed to osteogenic supplements. This differentiation effect appeared specific to adenoviral mediated gene delivery, since there was minimal increase in retroviral gene delivery and no increase in liposome gene delivery when MSCs were treated with osteogenic supplements. In addition, we also determined this increase in transgene production to occur at a higher concentration of dexamethasone (5x10(-8) M) in the culture medium of MSCs prior to adenoviral transduction. We found that this increased transgene production could be extended to the osteogenic protein, human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP-2). When delivered by an adenoviral vector, hBMP-2 transgene production could be increased from 1.4 ng/10(5) cells/3 days to 4.3 ng/10(5) cells/3 days by culture of MSCs with osteogenic supplements prior to transduction. These results indicate that the utility of MSCs as a therapeutic protein delivery mechanism through genetic manipulation can be enhanced by pre-culture of these cells with dexamethasone. PMID:15013104

  19. Transfection of Primary Hepatocytes with Liver-Enriched Transcription Factors Using Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Benet, Marta; Jover, Ramiro; Bort, Roque

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultured hepatocytes are probably the best model to study endogenous metabolic pathways, toxicity, or drug metabolism. Many of these studies require expression of ectopic genes. It would be desirable to use a method of transfection that allows dose-response studies, high efficiency of transfection, and the possibility to express several genes at the same time. Adenoviral vectors fulfill these requirements, becoming a valuable tool for primary hepatocyte transfection. Moreover, they are easy to generate and do not require a high level of biocontainment. In the present chapter, we describe the generation, cloning, amplification, and purification of an adenoviral vector capable of infecting primary cultured hepatocytes. This recombinant adenovirus induces robust expression of the protein of interest in hepatocytes within a wide range of doses. PMID:26272145

  20. Inhibition of apoptosis reduces immunogeneic potential of adenoviral-treated syngeneic liver grafts.

    PubMed

    Puellmann, Kerstin; Beham, Alexander; Kienle, Klaus; Vogel, Mandy; Schlitt, Hans Juergen; Jauch, Karl Walter; Rentsch, Markus

    2006-11-27

    Effects of adenoviral therapy and reduced apoptosis on immune response were investigated in a rat liver transplantation model after prolonged ischemia-reperfusion. Liver donors were treated i.v. either with an adenoviral construct, expressing bcl-2, green-fluorescent-protein, or doxycyclin. Intrahepatic apoptosis was assessed by terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The intrahepatic presence of CD4, CD8a, CD163, immunoglobulin (Ig)beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and myeloperoxidase (MPO) was quantified by realtime polymerase chain reaction at 24 hours and seven days after transplantation. Bcl-2 expression abrogated the TNF-alpha elevation and reduced apoptosis of hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells as compared to advCMV green fluorescent protein. No effects on CD4, CD8a, CD163 and MPO expression were noticed in bcl-2 pretreated livers, whereas Igbeta was slightly enhanced compared to controls. Adenoviral infected liver grafts trigger an immune response but reduced apoptosis resulted in down-regulation of TNF-alpha. Thus, bcl-2 transfer might simultaneously reduce graft ischemia reperfusion injury and immunogenicity. PMID:17130789

  1. An early function of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein is required for the nuclear relocalization of the cellular p53 protein in adenovirus-infected normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, F.M.; Kato, Sayuri E.M.; Huang Wenying; Flint, S. Jane; Gonzalez, Ramon A.

    2008-09-01

    It is well established that the human subgroup C adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55 kDa protein can regulate the activity and concentration of the cellular tumor suppressor, p53. However, the contribution(s) of these functions of the E1B protein to viral reproduction remains unclear. To investigate this issue, we examined properties of p53 in normal human cells infected by E1B mutant viruses that display defective entry into the late phase or viral late mRNA export. The steady-state concentrations of p53 were significantly higher in cells infected by the E1B 55 kDa null mutant Hr6 or three mutants carrying small insertions in the E1B 55 kDa protein coding sequence than in Ad5-infected cells. Nevertheless, none of the mutants induced apoptosis in infected cells. Rather, the localization of p53 to E1B containing nuclear sites observed during infection by Ad5 was prevented by mutations that impair interaction of the E1B protein with p53 and/or with the E4 Orf6 protein. These results indicate that the E1B protein fulfills an early function that correlates efficient entry into the late phase with the localization of E1B and p53 in the nucleus of Ad5-infected normal human cells.

  2. CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) and C/EBPalpha (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) are required for the superstimulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene transcription by adenoviral E1a and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Routes, J M; Colton, L A; Ryan, S; Klemm, D J

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, we observed superstimulated levels of cAMP-stimulated transcription from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene promoter in cells infected with wild-type adenovirus expressing 12 S and 13 S E1a proteins, or in cells expressing 13 S E1a alone. cAMP-stimulated transcription was inhibited in cells expressing only 12 S E1a, but slightly elevated in cells expressing E1a proteins with mutations in conserved regions 1 or 2, leading us to conclude that the superstimulation was mediated by conserved region 3 of 13 S E1a. E1a failed to enhance cAMP-stimulated transcription from promoters containing mutations that abolish binding by cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) or CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs). This result was supported by experiments in which expression of dominant-negative CREB and/or C/EBP proteins repressed E1a- and cAMP-stimulated transcription from the PEPCK gene promoter. In reconstitution experiments using a Gal4-responsive promoter, E1a enhanced cAMP-stimulated transcription when chimaeric Gal4-CREB and Gal4-C/EBPalpha were co-expressed. Phosphorylation of CREB on serine-133 was stimulated in cells treated with dibutyryl cAMP, whereas phosphorylation of C/EBPalpha was increased by E1a expression. Our data support a model in which cAMP agonists increase CREB activity and stimulate PEPCK gene transcription, a process that is enhanced by E1a through the phosphorylation of C/EBPalpha. PMID:11085926

  3. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models. PMID:27274908

  4. Recombinant adenoviral microRNA-206 induces myogenesis in C2C12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Tao; Su, Yongping; Li, Wang; Frame, Lynn T.; Ai, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The expression of microRNA-206 (miR-206) is high in skeletal muscle but low in most other tissues. The expression of miR-206 is increased in muscular dystrophy, suggesting its involvement in the pathogenesis of muscle diseases. To determine the role of miR-206 in muscle cell differentiation and explore a possible gene therapy vector, we constructed a miR-206 adenoviral expression vector (AdvmiR-206) and tested for transfection into C2C12 stem cells. Material/Methods A 355-bp PCR amplicon from C57B6 mouse skeletal muscle genomic DNA was inserted into the adenoviral shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV, which was then co-transformed with the adenoviral backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1 into competent E. coli BJ5183 bacteria. The specificity and function of this recombinant adenoviral MiR-206 were studied in C2C12 cells by Northern blot, immunofluorescence, Western blot, and flow cytometry. Results Increased expression of miR-206 in AdvmiR-206 transfected C2C12 cells (P<0.001) and resulted in morphological and biochemical changes over time that were similar to serum deprivation, including elongated cells and increased myosin heavy chain proteins. Even in the absence of serum deprivation, miR-206 overexpression accounted for a 50% reduction of S-phase cells (P<0.01). Moreover, in untransfected C2C12 cells, the introduction of miR-206-specific antisense oligoribonucleotides inhibited the normal response to serum deprivation. Twenty-four hours after lipofection of antisense oligoribonucleotides, the number of elongated cells was reduced by half (P<0.01). Conclusions Collectively, these data support a role for miR-206 in myoblast differentiation. We foresee potential applications for the AdvmiR-206 vector in research and therapy. PMID:22129894

  5. Serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the adenoviral L4-33K splicing enhancer protein is essential for function and reorganization of the protein to the periphery of viral replication centers

    SciTech Connect

    Oestberg, Sara; Toermaenen Persson, Heidi; Akusjaervi, Goeran

    2012-11-25

    The adenovirus L4-33K protein is a key regulator involved in the temporal shift from early to late pattern of mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit. L4-33K is a virus-encoded alternative splicing factor, which enhances processing of 3 Prime splice sites with a weak sequence context. Here we show that L4-33K expressed from a plasmid is localized at the nuclear margin of uninfected cells. During an infection L4-33K is relocalized to the periphery of E2A-72K containing viral replication centers. We also show that serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the conserved carboxy-terminus of L4-33K, which is critical for the splicing enhancer function of L4-33K, is necessary for the nuclear localization and redistribution of the protein to viral replication sites. Collectively, our results show a good correlation between the activity of L4-33K as a splicing enhancer protein and its localization to the periphery of viral replication centers.

  6. A cost-effective method to enhance adenoviral transduction of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M; Williams, Mark S; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    We report here a method for the use of poly-l-lysine (PLL) to markedly improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in culture and in situ, which are typically difficult to transduce. We show by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the addition of PLL to the viral-containing medium significantly increases the number of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive osteoblasts and BMSCs transduced with an enhanced GFP-expressing adenovirus. We also demonstrate that PLL can greatly enhance the adenoviral transduction of osteoblasts and osteocytes in situ in ex vivo tibia and calvaria, as well as in long bone fragments. In addition, we validate that PLL can improve routine adenoviral transduction studies by permitting the use of low multiplicities of infection to obtain the desired biologic effect. Ultimately, the use of PLL to facilitate adenoviral gene transfer in osteogenic cells can provide a cost-effective means of performing efficient gene transfer studies in the context of bone research. PMID:27547486

  7. Extensions to the D-Cam sub-unit architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Padraig; Connell, Joseph

    2005-06-01

    Multispectral imaging produces large amounts of data which extend processing, transmission and storage systems to their upper limits. Although there are several interface standards specific to image data acquisition, such as CameraLink, it is Firewire which provides a high-speed data bus, integrated control capability, without loss of flexibility, and which is commonly available as a low cost solution. The class of multispectral imaging requires a different treatment of the processing principals than standard imaging. The same spatial region is captured multiple times using different optical wavelengths. This technique finds application in such diverse areas as coastal monitoring, fruit sorting and automated agriculture. Modifications and additional features to the camera operating and configuration parameters are therefore required which are not generally present with conventional imaging sensors. This paper describes extensions to the IIDC Digital Camera (D-Cam) specification in the development of a Firewire technology platform for transmitting the data structures described and for providing real-time, online control of spectral information acquisition. Additionally, it describes how a set of registers in the sub-unit architecture of the Firewire protocol is augmented to accommodate the demands of a multispectral system. The extensions are specification conformant and do not alter underlining compliance with the base standard. The paper also describes the implementation of the extended D-Cam in the Firewire subsystem of a smart multispectral camera used in commercial applications.

  8. Improved Gene Delivery to Intestinal Mucosa by Adenoviral Vectors Bearing Subgroup B and D Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lecollinet, S.; Gavard, F.; Havenga, M. J. E.; Spiller, O. B.; Lemckert, A.; Goudsmit, J.; Eloit, M.; Richardson, J.

    2006-01-01

    A major obstacle to successful oral vaccination is the lack of antigen delivery systems that are both safe and highly efficient. Conventional replication-incompetent adenoviral vectors, derived from human adenoviruses of subgroup C, are poorly efficient in delivering genetic material to differentiated intestinal epithelia. To date, 51 human adenovirus serotypes have been identified and shown to recognize different cellular receptors with different tissue distributions. This natural diversity was exploited in the present study to identify suitable adenoviral vectors for efficient gene delivery to the human intestinal epithelium. In particular, we compared the capacities of a library of adenovirus type 5-based vectors pseudotyped with fibers of several human serotypes for transduction, binding, and translocation toward the basolateral pole in human and murine tissue culture models of differentiated intestinal epithelia. In addition, antibody-based inhibition was used to gain insight into the molecular interactions needed for efficient attachment. We found that vectors differing merely in their fiber proteins displayed vastly different capacities for gene transfer to differentiated human intestinal epithelium. Notably, vectors bearing fibers derived from subgroup B and subgroup D serotypes transduced the apical pole of human epithelium with considerably greater efficiency than a subgroup C vector. Such efficiency was correlated with the capacity to use CD46 or sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates as opposed to CAR as attachment receptors. These results suggest that substantial gains could be made in gene transfer to digestive epithelium by exploiting the tropism of existing serotypes of human adenoviruses. PMID:16501084

  9. Molecular epidemiology of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Nazri; Hammouda, Ehab; Akanuma, Masataka; Ohguchi, Takeshi; Ariga, Toshihide; Tagawa, Yoshitsugu; Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi; Ishida, Susumu; Aoki, Koki; Ishiko, Hiroaki; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis is a major cause of ocular morbidity and may lead to visual loss. Adenovirus types 8, 19, and 37 may cause epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. The main objective of this study was to determine the types of adenoviruses causing keratoconjunctivitis in Saudi Arabia. Methods We conducted a non-interventional observational clinical study. Seventy three eyes from 65 patients who presented to The Eye Center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with clinical features of acute adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis were included. Each patient underwent complete clinical examination and features such as membranous reaction, conjunctival hemorrhage, subepithelial corneal infiltrates, and preauricular lymph node enlargement were recorded. Conjunctival swabs were obtained from patients with presumed acute viral conjunctivitis. Immunochromatography (IC) and restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP) were performed on the conjunctival swabs obtained from each eye. Serotype identification was performed using direct sequencing technique. Results Forty-nine (67.1%) were adenovirus type 8, 8 (11.0%) were adenovirus type 3, 6 (8.2%) type 37, 5 (6.8%) were adenovirus type 4, and 2 (2.3%) type 19. The remaining 5 were types 14, 19, and 22. The prevalence of membranous conjunctivitis was highest (83%) among eyes with adenovirus type 37 while subepithelial corneal opacities were most commonly seen among eyes with adenovirus type 8 (47%). Immunochromatography tests were positive for adenovirus in 48 (65.7%) out of 73 eyes. Conclusions This study determined the types of adenoviruses causing keratoconjunctivitis at one center in Saudi Arabia. Direct sequencing techniques is an efficient, accurate, and rapid means of diagnosing adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. The most common causes of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis in Saudi Arabia were adenovirus types 8, 3, and 37. Membranous conjunctivitis and subepithelial opacities had the highest

  10. Regulated Expression of Adenoviral Vectors-Based Gene Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, James F.; Candolfi, Marianela; Puntel, Mariana; Xiong, Weidong; Muhammad, A. K. M.; Kroeger, Kurt; Mondkar, Sonali; Liu, Chunyan; Bondale, Niyati; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Regulatable promoter systems allow gene expression to be tightly controlled in vivo. This is highly desirable for the development of safe, efficacious adenoviral vectors that can be used to treat human diseases in the clinic. Ideally, regulatable cassettes should have minimal gene expression in the “OFF” state, and expression should quickly reach therapeutic levels in the “ON” state. In addition, the components of regulatable cassettes should be non-toxic at physiological concentrations and should not be immunogenic, especially when treating chronic illness that requires long-lasting gene expression. In this chapter, we will describe in detail protocols to develop and validate first generation (Ad) and high-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors that express therapeutic genes under the control of the TetON regulatable system. Our laboratory has successfully used these protocols to regulate the expression of marker genes, immune stimulatory genes, and toxins for cancer gene therapeutics, i.e., glioma that is a deadly form of brain cancer. We have shown that this third generation TetON regulatable system, incorporating a doxycycline (DOX)-sensitive rtTA2S-M2 inducer and tTSKid silencer, is non-toxic, relatively non-immunogenic, and can tightly regulate reporter transgene expression downstream of a TRE promoter from adenoviral vectors in vitro and also in vivo. PMID:18470649

  11. Immunization with Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing HCV Core or F Proteins Leads to T Cells with Reduced Effector Molecules Granzyme B and IFN-γ: A Potential New Strategy for Immune Evasion in HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Vedi, Satish; Singh, Shakti; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Multispecific, broad, and potent T cell responses have been correlated with viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the majority of infected patients develop chronic infection, suggesting that natural infection mostly leads to development of inefficient T cell immunity. Multiple mechanisms of immune modulation and evasion have been shown in HCV infection through various investigations. This study examined the generation and modulation of T cell responses against core and frameshift (F) proteins of HCV. A single immunization of mice with replication incompetent recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding for F or core antigens induces poor T cell responses and leads to generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with low granzyme B (GrB) expression. These T cells have impaired GrB enzyme activity and are unable to kill peptide loaded target cells. The low intracellular expression of GrB is not due to degranulation of cytotoxic granules containing cytotoxic T cells. Addition of exogenous IL-2 in in vitro cultures leads to partial recovery of GrB production, whereas immunization with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly I:C leads to complete restoration of GrB expression in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, a possible new strategy of T cell modulation is recognized wherein effector T cells are caused to be dysfunctional by HCV-derived antigens F or core, and strategies are also delineated to overcome this dysfunction. These studies are important in the investigation of prophylactic vaccine and immunotherapy strategies for HCV infection. PMID:26133045

  12. Accelerated evolution and coevolution drove the evolutionary history of AGPase sub-units during angiosperm radiation

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, Jonathan; Dutheil, Julien Y.; Damerval, Catherine; Tenaillon, Maud I.; Manicacci, Domenica

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is a key enzyme of starch biosynthesis. In the green plant lineage, it is composed of two large (LSU) and two small (SSU) sub-units encoded by paralogous genes, as a consequence of several rounds of duplication. First, our aim was to detect specific patterns of molecular evolution following duplication events and the divergence between monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Secondly, we investigated coevolution between amino acids both within and between sub-units. Methods A phylogeny of each AGPase sub-unit was built using all gymnosperm and angiosperm sequences available in databases. Accelerated evolution along specific branches was tested using the ratio of the non-synonymous to the synonymous substitution rate. Coevolution between amino acids was investigated taking into account compensatory changes between co-substitutions. Key Results We showed that SSU paralogues evolved under high functional constraints during angiosperm radiation, with a significant level of coevolution between amino acids that participate in SSU major functions. In contrast, in the LSU paralogues, we identified residues under positive selection (1) following the first LSU duplication that gave rise to two paralogues mainly expressed in angiosperm source and sink tissues, respectively; and (2) following the emergence of grass-specific paralogues expressed in the endosperm. Finally, we found coevolution between residues that belong to the interaction domains of both sub-units. Conclusions Our results support the view that coevolution among amino acid residues, especially those lying in the interaction domain of each sub-unit, played an important role in AGPase evolution. First, within SSU, coevolution allowed compensating mutations in a highly constrained context. Secondly, the LSU paralogues probably acquired tissue-specific expression and regulatory properties via the coevolution between sub-unit interacting domains. Finally, the

  13. Retrograde adenoviral vector targeting of nociresponsive pontospinal noradrenergic neurons in the rat in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Howorth, Patrick W; Teschemacher, Anja G; Pickering, Anthony E

    2009-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn receives a dense innervation of noradrenaline-containing fibers that originate from pontine neurons in the A5, locus coeruleus (LC), and A7 cell groups. These pontospinal neurons are believed to constitute a component of the endogenous analgesic system. We used an adenoviral vector with a catecholaminergic-selective promoter (AVV-PRS) to retrogradely label the noradrenergic neurons projecting to the lumbar (L4–L5) dorsal horn with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP). Retrogradely labeled neurons (145 ± 12, n = 14) were found in A5-12%, LC-80% and A7-8% after injection of AVV-PRS-EGFP to the dorsal horn of L4–L5. These neurons were immunopositive for dopamine β-hydroxylase, indicating that they were catecholaminergic. Retrograde labeling was optimal 7 days after injection, persisted for over 4 weeks, and was dependent on viral vector titer. The spinal topography of the noradrenergic projection was examined using EGFP- and mRFP-expressing adenoviral vectors. Pontospinal neurons provide bilateral innervation of the cord and there was little overlap in the distribution of neurons projecting to the cervical and lumbar regions. The axonal arbor of the pontospinal neurons was visualized with GFP immunocytochemistry to show projections to the inferior olive, cerebellum, thalamus, and cortex but not to the hippocampus or caudate putamen. Formalin testing evoked c-fos expression in these pontospinal neurons, suggesting that they were nociresponsive (A5-21%, LC-16%, and A7-26%, n = 8). Thus, we have developed a viral vector-based strategy to selectively, retrogradely target the pontospinal noradrenergic neurons that are likely to be involved in the descending control of nociception. PMID:19003793

  14. Development of Adenoviral Delivery Systems to Target Hepatic Stellate Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Claudia; Kowtharapu, Bhavani S.; Timm, Franziska; Vollmar, Brigitte; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Abshagen, Kerstin; Pützer, Brigitte M.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are known as initiator cells that induce liver fibrosis upon intoxication or other noxes. Deactivation of this ongoing remodeling process of liver parenchyma into fibrotic tissue induced by HSCs is an interesting goal to be achieved by targeted genetic modification of HSCs. The most widely applied approach in gene therapy is the utilization of specifically targeted vectors based on Adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5. To narrow down the otherwise ubiquitous tropism of parental Ad, two modifications are required: a) ablating the native tropism and b) redirecting the vector particles towards a specific entity solely present on the cells of interest. Therefore, we designed a peptide of the nerve growth factor (NGFp) with specific affinity for the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) present on HSCs. Coupling of this NGFp to vector particles was done either via chemical conjugation using bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) or, alternatively, by molecular bridging with a fusion protein specific for viral fiber knob and p75NTR. Both Ad vectors transmit the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP). GFP expression was monitored in vitro on primary murine HSCs as well as after systemic administration in mice with healthy and fibrotic livers using intravital fluorescence microscopy. Coupling of NGFp to Ad via S11 and/or PEGylation resulted in markedly reduced liver tropism and an enhanced adenoviral-mediated gene transfer to HSCs. Transduction efficiency of both specific Ads was uniformly higher in fibrotic livers, whereas Ad.GFP-S11-NGFp transduce activated HSCs better than Ad.GFP-PEG-NGFp. These experiments contribute to the development of a targeted gene transfer system to specifically deliver antifibrotic compounds into activated HSCs by systemically applied adenoviral vector modified with NGFp. PMID:23825626

  15. 7 CFR 275.7 - Selection of sub-units for review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM Management Evaluation (ME... Food Stamp Program, exclusive of Post Offices which may issue coupons. Sub-units shall be...

  16. 7 CFR 275.7 - Selection of sub-units for review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Selection of sub-units for review. 275.7 Section 275.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM Management Evaluation (ME) Reviews § 275.7 Selection...

  17. 7 CFR 275.7 - Selection of sub-units for review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM Management Evaluation (ME... eligibility, maintaining (or having easy access to) casefiles, and transmitting information to the data... review system. (c) Combined responsibilities. (1) When a sub-unit has more than one of the areas...

  18. 7 CFR 275.7 - Selection of sub-units for review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM Management Evaluation (ME... eligibility, maintaining (or having easy access to) casefiles, and transmitting information to the data... review system. (c) Combined responsibilities. (1) When a sub-unit has more than one of the areas...

  19. 7 CFR 275.7 - Selection of sub-units for review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM Management Evaluation (ME... eligibility, maintaining (or having easy access to) casefiles, and transmitting information to the data... review system. (c) Combined responsibilities. (1) When a sub-unit has more than one of the areas...

  20. Efficacy of Topical Immunoglobulins against Experimental Adenoviral Ocular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nwanegbo, Edward C.; Romanowski, Eric G.; Gordon, Y. Jerold; Gambotto, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Presently, there is no U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA)–approved antiviral therapy for the treatment of adenoviral (Ad) ocular infections. The goal of the present study was to determine the antiviral efficacy of human immunoglobulin (Ig), a preparation of highly purified and concentrated immunoglobulin (IgG) antibodies isolated from a large pool of human plasma donors, in vitro and on acute Ad replication in the Ad5 New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit ocular model. Methods The antiviral activity of human Ig against multiple wild-type and human ocular isolates of adenovirus serotypes was investigated in vitro by using neutralizing assays in different human epithelial cell lines. In vivo bilateral topical ocular toxicity and antiviral efficacy were evaluated with established Ad5/NZW rabbit ocular models. In vivo Ig antiviral results were compared with those obtained with topical 0.5% cidofovir and saline. Results In three different epithelial cell lines, ≤6.25 mg/mL of the Ig neutralized several wild-type adenoviral serotypes that cause ocular infections. A dose of ≤10 mg/mL neutralized 88% of ocular isolates of the adenovirus serotypes. After treatment of infected animals, adenovirus-positive cultures per total cultures (days 1–14; P = 0.021), the duration of Ad5 shedding, (P = 0.008), and the mean combined ocular viral titer during the early (days 1–5; P = 0.0001) and the late (days 7–14; P = 0.013) phases of infection were significantly lower in Ig-treated animals than in saline-treated animals and were similar to those in cidofovir-treated animals. Conclusions Ig demonstrated antiviral properties against multiple adenoviral serotypes in vitro and in the Ad5/NZW rabbit ocular model. Further studies are needed to advance topical immunoglobulin for treatment and prophylaxis of ocular infections. PMID:17724203

  1. Adenoviral vector-based strategies against infectious disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviral vectors are widely employed against infectious diseases or cancers, as they can elicit specific antibody responses and T cell responses when they are armed with foreign genes as vaccine carriers, and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells when they are genetically modified for cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize the biological characteristics of adenovirus (Ad) and the latest development of Ad vector-based strategies for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases or cancers. Strategies to circumvent the pre-existing neutralizing antibodies which dampen the immunogenicity of Ad-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:27105067

  2. Chromatography purification of canine adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Segura, María Mercedes; Puig, Meritxell; Monfar, Mercè; Chillón, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Canine adenovirus vectors (CAV2) are currently being evaluated for gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. Despite the need for increasing volumes of purified CAV2 preparations for preclinical and clinical testing, their purification still relies on the use of conventional, scale-limited CsCl ultracentrifugation techniques. A complete downstream processing strategy for CAV2 vectors based on membrane filtration and chromatography is reported here. Microfiltration and ultra/diafiltration are selected for clarification and concentration of crude viral stocks containing both intracellular and extracellular CAV2 particles. A DNase digestion step is introduced between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations. At these early stages, concentration of vector stocks with good recovery of viral particles (above 80%) and removal of a substantial amount of protein and nucleic acid contaminants is achieved. The ability of various chromatography techniques to isolate CAV2 particles was evaluated. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a Fractogel propyl tentacle resin was selected as a first chromatography step, because it allows removal of the bulk of contaminating proteins with high CAV2 yields (88%). An anion-exchange chromatography step using monolithic supports is further introduced to remove the remaining contaminants with good recovery of CAV2 particles (58-69%). The main CAV2 viral structural components are visualized in purified preparations by electrophoresis analyses. Purified vector stocks contained intact icosahedral viral particles, low contamination with empty viral capsids (10%), and an acceptable total-to-infectious particle ratio (below 30). The downstream processing strategy that was developed allows preparation of large volumes of high-quality CAV2 stocks. PMID:22799886

  3. Production of human epidermal growth factor using adenoviral based system

    PubMed Central

    Negahdari, Babak; Shahosseini, Zahra; Baniasadi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a growth factor involved in cell growth and differentiation, is a small polypeptide with molecular weight of approximately 6 kDa known to be present in a number of different mammalian species. Experimental studies in animals and humans have demonstrated that the topical application of EGF accelerates the rate of epidermal regeneration of partial-thickness wounds and second-degree burns. Due to its commercial applications, Human EGF (hEGF) has been cloned in several forms. In the present study, adenoviral based expression system was used to produce biologically active recombinant hEGF. The presence of secreted recombinant hEGF was confirmed by a dot blot and its expression level was determined by enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Moreover, biological activity of secreted hEGF was evaluated by a proliferation assay performed on A549 cells. For production of hEGF in a secretory form, a chimeric gene coding for the hEGF fused to the signal peptide was expressed using adenoviral based method. This method enables the production of hEGF at the site of interest and moreover it could be used for cell proliferation and differentiation assays in tissue engineering research experiments instead of using commercially available EGF. PMID:27051431

  4. Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer to rabbit synovium in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, B J; Allen, E D; Wilson, J M; Hartman, J W; Davidson, B L

    1993-01-01

    Currently, treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthropathies is often ineffective in ameliorating the progression of the disease, particularly the invasive destruction of cartilage and bone by rheumatoid synovium. Multiple aspects of this inflammatory process are mediated by the synovial lining cells (synoviocytes). Genetic modification of these cells in vivo represents a potential method for the treatment of these conditions. In this report, we describe a novel technique for the genetic transduction of synovial lining cells in vivo using recombinant adenoviral vectors and intraarticular injection techniques. Purified high titer suspensions of a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the gene for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (AdCMVlacZ) were directly injected into the hind knees of New Zealand white rabbits. Synovial tissues were then examined for transgenic lacZ expression using a combination of in situ staining for beta-galactosidase activity, immunohistochemical staining, and transmission electron microscopy. High efficiency gene transfer and lacZ expression was observed in both type A and type B synoviocytes throughout the articular and periarticular synovium of the rabbit knee, with continued expression of transgenic lacZ detected for > or = 8 wk after infection. Images PMID:8349791

  5. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  6. A formalism for scattering of complex composite structures. I. Applications to branched structures of asymmetric sub-units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2012-03-01

    We present a formalism for the scattering of an arbitrary linear or acyclic branched structure build by joining mutually non-interacting arbitrary functional sub-units. The formalism consists of three equations expressing the structural scattering in terms of three equations expressing the sub-unit scattering. The structural scattering expressions allow composite structures to be used as sub-units within the formalism itself. This allows the scattering expressions for complex hierarchical structures to be derived with great ease. The formalism is generic in the sense that the scattering due to structural connectivity is completely decoupled from internal structure of the sub-units. This allows sub-units to be replaced by more complex structures. We illustrate the physical interpretation of the formalism diagrammatically. By applying a self-consistency requirement, we derive the pair distributions of an ideal flexible polymer sub-unit. We illustrate the formalism by deriving generic scattering expressions for branched structures such as stars, pom-poms, bottle-brushes, and dendrimers build out of asymmetric two-functional sub-units.

  7. A formalism for scattering of complex composite structures. I. Applications to branched structures of asymmetric sub-units.

    PubMed

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2012-03-14

    We present a formalism for the scattering of an arbitrary linear or acyclic branched structure build by joining mutually non-interacting arbitrary functional sub-units. The formalism consists of three equations expressing the structural scattering in terms of three equations expressing the sub-unit scattering. The structural scattering expressions allow composite structures to be used as sub-units within the formalism itself. This allows the scattering expressions for complex hierarchical structures to be derived with great ease. The formalism is generic in the sense that the scattering due to structural connectivity is completely decoupled from internal structure of the sub-units. This allows sub-units to be replaced by more complex structures. We illustrate the physical interpretation of the formalism diagrammatically. By applying a self-consistency requirement, we derive the pair distributions of an ideal flexible polymer sub-unit. We illustrate the formalism by deriving generic scattering expressions for branched structures such as stars, pom-poms, bottle-brushes, and dendrimers build out of asymmetric two-functional sub-units. PMID:22423826

  8. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D.; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  9. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  10. GSH depletion enhances adenoviral bax-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Honda, Tsuyoshi; Coppola, Simona; Ghibelli, Lina; Cho, Song H; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Spurgers, Kevin B; Brisbay, Shawn M; Roth, Jack A; Meyn, Raymond E; Fang, Bingliang; McDonnell, Timothy J

    2004-04-01

    The utility of dominant acting proapoptotic molecules to induce cell death in cancer cells is being evaluated in preclinical studies and clinical trials. We recently developed a binary adenoviral expression system to enable the efficient gene transfer of Bax and other proapoptotic molecules. Using this system, overexpression of Bax protein in four non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, H1299, A549, H226 and H322, was evaluated. The H322 line exhibited significant resistance to Bax-induced cell death compared to the other cell lines. H322 cells had the highest level of glutathione (GSH). GSH levels were significantly decreased following buthionine sulfoximine treatment and this coincided with enhanced apoptosis induction by Ad-Bax in H322 cells. GSH depletion enhanced Bax protein translocation to mitochondrial membranes. These findings suggest that the redox status may be a determinant of Bax-mediated cell death and that manipulation of intracellular thiols may sensitize cells to apoptosis by facilitating Bax insertion into mitochondrial membranes. PMID:15002033

  11. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors. PMID:17525704

  12. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan HL

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  13. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Merry Zc; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan Hl

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  14. Restoration of β -Adrenergic Signaling in Failing Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shahab A.; Skaer, Christine A.; Kypson, Alan P.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Peppel, Karsten C.; Glower, Donald D.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Koch, Walter J.

    1997-10-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a novel approach to the treatment of diseases such as congestive heart failure (CHF). Gene transfer to the heart would allow for the replacement of defective or missing cellular proteins that may improve cardiac performance. Our laboratory has been focusing on the feasibility of restoring β -adrenergic signaling deficiencies that are a characteristic of chronic CHF. We have now studied isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbits that have been chronically paced to produce hemodynamic failure. We document molecular β -adrenergic signaling defects including down-regulation of myocardial β -adrenergic receptors (β -ARs), functional β -AR uncoupling, and an upregulation of the β -AR kinase (β ARK1). Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of the human β 2-AR or an inhibitor of β ARK1 to these failing myocytes led to the restoration of β -AR signaling. These results demonstrate that defects present in this critical myocardial signaling pathway can be corrected in vitro using genetic modification and raise the possibility of novel inotropic therapies for CHF including the inhibition of β ARK1 activity in the heart.

  15. The sodium pump α1 sub-unit: a disease progression–related target for metastatic melanoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Véronique; Pirker, Christine; Martin de Lassalle, Elisabeth; Vernier, Mathieu; Mijatovic, Tatjana; DeNeve, Nancy; Gaussin, Jean-François; Dehoux, Mischael; Lefranc, Florence; Berger, Walter; Kiss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Melanomas remain associated with dismal prognosis because they are naturally resistant to apoptosis and they markedly metastasize. Up-regulated expression of sodium pump α sub-units has previously been demonstrated when comparing metastatic to non-metastatic melanomas. Our previous data revealed that impairing sodium pump α1 activity by means of selective ligands, that are cardiotonic steroids, markedly impairs cell migration and kills apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. The objective of this study was to determine the expression levels of sodium pump α sub-units in melanoma clinical samples and cell lines and also to characterize the role of α1 sub-units in melanoma cell biology. Quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression levels of sodium pump α sub-units. In vitro cytotoxicity of various cardenolides and of an anti-α1 siRNA was evaluated by means of MTT assay, quantitative videomicroscopy and through apoptosis assays. The in vivo activity of a novel cardenolide UNBS1450 was evaluated in a melanoma brain metastasis model. Our data show that all investigated human melanoma cell lines expressed high levels of the α1 sub-unit, and 33% of human melanomas displayed significant α1 sub-unit expression in correlation with the Breslow index. Furthermore, cardenolides (notably UNBS1450; currently in Phase I clinical trials) displayed marked anti-tumour effects against melanomas in vitro. This activity was closely paralleled by decreases in cMyc expression and by increases in apoptotic features. UNBS1450 also displayed marked anti-tumour activity in the aggressive human metastatic brain melanoma model in vivo. The α1 sodium pump sub-unit could represent a potential novel target for combating melanoma. PMID:19243476

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Anti-Adenoviral Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Mårten; Carlsson, Marcus; Uvell, Hanna; Islam, Koushikul; Edlund, Karin; Cullman, Inger; Altermark, Björn; Mei, Ya-Fang; Elofsson, Mikael; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Wadell, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure. PMID:24477283

  17. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated

  18. The Evolution of Adenoviral Vectors through Genetic and Chemical Surface Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges. PMID:24549268

  19. Intranasal vaccination with a helper-dependent adenoviral vector enhances transgene-specific immune responses in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuan-hui; He, Jin-sheng; Zheng, Xian-xian; Wang, Xiao-bo; Xie, Can; Shi, Chang-xin; Zhang, Mei; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei; Qu, Jian-guo; Hong, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors were developed primarily for genetic disease therapy by deleting all coding regions for attenuating the host cellular immune response to adenovirus (Ad) and long-lasting gene expression. Recently Harui et al. reported that HDAd vaccine could stimulate superior transgene-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antibody responses via the intraperitoneal route, compared to first-generation adenoviral (FGAd) vaccine. This prompted us to explore the potential of HDAd as a vaccine vector administrated intranasally. In this study, we prepared HDAd and FGAd vectors expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), respectively, and compared their efficacy in mice. Mice were immunized intranasally with 5x10(9) vp HDAd or FGAd vector particles. Despite stimulating similar anti-Ad antibody responses with FGAd vaccine in the prime/boost strategy, HDAd vector expressing EGFP displayed superior transgene-specific serum IgG, mucosal IgA and cellular immune response, with the characterization of balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Meanwhile, a single dose of intranasal (i.n.) vaccine of HDAd-EGFP induced a serum IgG response with more efficacy than FGAd-EGFP. In addition, i.n. boost immunization enhanced transgene-specific humoral and cellular responses, compared to single i.n. HDAd-EGFP immunization. Our results suggest that HDAd has potential for a mucosal vaccine vector via i.n. route, which will be useful for the development of vaccines against respiratory viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus. PMID:19945423

  20. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  1. Combination recombinant simian or chimpanzee adenoviral vectors for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Colloca, Stefano; Seder, Robert A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-12-16

    Recombinant adenoviral vector (rAd)-based vaccines are currently being developed for several infectious diseases and cancer therapy, but pre-existing seroprevalence to such vectors may prevent their use in broad human populations. In this study, we investigated the potential of low seroprevalence non-human primate rAd vectors to stimulate cellular and humoral responses using HIV/SIV Env glycoprotein (gp) as the representative antigen. Mice were immunized with novel simian or chimpanzee rAd (rSAV or rChAd) vectors encoding HIV gp or SIV gp by single immunization or in heterologous prime/boost combinations (DNA/rAd; rAd/rAd; rAd/NYVAC or rAd/rLCM), and adaptive immunity was assessed. Among the rSAV and rChAd tested, rSAV16 or rChAd3 vector alone generated the most potent immune responses. The DNA/rSAV regimen also generated immune responses similar to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. rChAd63/rChAd3 and rChAd3 /NYVAC induced similar or even higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell and IgG responses as compared to rAd28/rAd5, one of the most potent combinations of human rAds. The optimized vaccine regimen stimulated improved cellular immune responses and neutralizing antibodies against HIV compared to the DNA/rAd5 regimen. Based on these results, this type of novel rAd vector and its prime/boost combination regimens represent promising candidates for vaccine development. PMID:26514419

  2. Effects of fatigue on the chemical and mechanical degradation of model stent sub-units.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Maureen L; Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Batchelor, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the fatigue and durability performance of implantable cardiovascular stents is critical for assessing their performance. When the stent is manufactured from an absorbable material, however, this durability assessment is complicated by the transient nature of the device. Methodologies for evaluating the fatigue performance of absorbable stents while accurately simulating the degradation are limited and little is known about the interaction between fatigue and degradation. In this study, we investigated the fatigue behavior and effect of fatigue on the degradation rate for a model absorbable cardiovascular stent. Custom v-shaped stent sub-units manufactured from poly(L-lactide), i.e., PLLA, were subjected to a simultaneous fatigue and degradation study with cycle counts representative of one year of expected in vivo use. Fatigue loading was carried out such that the polymer degraded at a rate that was aligned with a modest degree of fatigue acceleration. Control, un-loaded specimens were also degraded under static immersion conditions representative of simulated degradation without fatigue. The study identified that fatigue loading during degradation significantly increased specimen stiffness and lowered the force at break. Fatigue loading also significantly increased the degree of molecular weight decline highlighting an interaction between mechanical loading and chemical degradation. This study demonstrates that fatigue loading during degradation can affect both the mechanical properties and the chemical degradation rate. The results are important for defining appropriate in vitro degradation conditions for absorbable stent preclinical evaluation. PMID:26759973

  3. INSM1 promoter-driven adenoviral herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase cancer gene therapy for the treatment of primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Breslin, Mary B; Chen, Chiachen; Akerstrom, Victoria; Zhong, Qiu; Lan, Michael S

    2009-11-01

    The INSM1 gene encodes a developmentally regulated zinc finger transcription factor. INSM1 expression is normally absent in adult tissues, but is reactivated in neuroendocrine tumor cells. In the present study, we analyzed the therapeutic potential of an adenoviral INSM1 promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) construct in primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs). We constructed an adenoviral INSM1 promoter-driven HSV-tk gene for therapy in PNETs. The PNET-specific adeno-INSM1 promoter HSV-tk construct was tested both in vitro and in vivo in a nude mouse tumor model. Northern blot analysis and transient transfection of an INSM1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene indicated that the INSM1 promoter was active in neuroblastoma (IMR-32), retinoblastoma (Y79), and medulloblastoma (D283 Med) cells, but not in glioblastoma (U-87 MG) cells. After Ad-INSM1p-HSV-tk infection, the levels of HSV-tk protein expression were consistent with INSM1 promoter activities. Furthermore, in vitro multiplicity of infection and ganciclovir (GCV) sensitivity studies indicated that the INSM1 promoter could mediate specific expression of the HSV-tk gene and selective killing of INSM1-positive PNETs. In vivo intratumoral adenoviral delivery demonstrated that the INSM1 promoter could direct HSV-tk gene expression in a nude mouse tumor model and effectively repressed tumor growth in response to GCV treatment. Taken together, our data show that the INSM1 promoter is specific and effective for targeted cancer gene therapy in PNETs. PMID:19604042

  4. Prostate-specific expression of Bax delivered by an adenoviral vector induces apoptosis in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lowe, S L; Rubinchik, S; Honda, T; McDonnell, T J; Dong, J Y; Norris, J S

    2001-09-01

    In prostate carcinoma, overexpression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 has been found to be associated with resistance to therapies including radiation and androgen ablation. Restoring the balance of Bcl-2 family members may result in the induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells previously resistant to treatment. To accomplish this, a strategy involving overexpression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax was executed. The use of cytotoxic genes such as Bax require selective expression of the gene. In this study, we examined the ability of selective expression of Bax protein directed by a prostate-specific promoter to induce apoptosis in human prostate carcinoma. A second-generation adenoviral vector was constructed with the modified prostate-specific probasin promoter, ARR2PB, directing expression of an HA-tagged Bax gene and a green fluorescent protein reporter translated from an internal ribosome entry site (ARR2PB.Bax.GFP). ARR2PB promoter activity is tightly regulated and highly prostate specific and is responsive to androgens and glucocorticoids. The prostate-specific promoter-Bax-GFP transgene cassette was inserted into a cloning site near the right inverted terminal repeat of the adenoviral vector to retain specificity of the promoter. LNCaP cells infected with Ad/ARR(2)PB.Bax.GFP showed high levels of Bax expression 48 h after infection resulting in an 85% reduction in cell viability. Importantly, LNCaP cells stably transfected to overexpress Bcl-2 showed similar patterns of cell death when infected with Ad/ARR(2)PB.Bax.GFP, an 82% reduction in cell viability seen 48 h after infection. Apoptosis was confirmed by measuring caspase activation and using the TUNEL assay. Tissue specificity was evaluated using A549 cells (lung adenocarcinoma), SK-Hep-1 (liver cancer) cells, and Hela (cervical cancer) cells which did not show detectable expression of virally delivered Bax protein or any increase in cell death. Systemic administration of Ad/ARR2PB. Bax.GFP in nude

  5. Evaluation of signal transduction pathways after transient cutaneous adenoviral gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adenoviral vectors have provided effective methods for in vivo gene delivery in therapeutic applications. However, these vectors can induce immune responses that may severely affect the ability of vector re-application. There is limited information about the mechanisms and signal transduction pathways involved in adenoviral recognition. For optimization of cutaneous gene therapy it is necessary to investigate molecular mechanisms of virus recognition in epidermal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the signal transduction of the innate immunity after adenoviral DNA internalization in keratinocytes. Methods In vitro, keratinocytes were transfected with DNA, in the presence and absence of inhibitors for signalling molecules. In vivo, immunocompetent and athymic mice (n = 3 per group) were twice transduced with an Ad-vector. Results The results show an acute induction of type-I-interferon after in vitro transfection. Inhibition of PI3K, p38 MAPK, JNK and NFkappaB resulted in a decreased expression of type-I-interferon. In contrast to immunocompetent mice, athymic mice demonstrated a constant transgene expression and reduced inflammatory response in vivo. Conclusion The results suggest an induction of the innate immunity triggered by cytoplasm localised DNA which is mediated by PI3K-, p38 MAPK-, JNK-, NFkappaB-, JAK/STAT- and ERK1/2-dependent pathways. A stable transgene expression and a reduced inflammatory response in immunodeficient mice have been observed. These results provide potential for an effective adenoviral gene delivery into immunosupressed skin. PMID:21255430

  6. AN UPDATE OF ADENOVIRAL HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE IN MULE DEER IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the summer and fall of 1993, a newly recognized disease, adenoviral hemorrhagic disease, caused widespread mortality in black-tailed (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) and California mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus californicus) in northern California. Greater than a thousand deer were estimated t...

  7. Replication-deficient adenoviral vector for gene transfer potentiates airway neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Piedimonte, G; Pickles, R J; Lehmann, J R; McCarty, D; Costa, D L; Boucher, R C

    1997-03-01

    Human trials for the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease with adenoviral vectors have been complicated by acute inflammatory reactions of unknown etiology. Because replicating respiratory viruses can potentiate tachykinin-mediated neurogenic inflammatory responses in airways, we studied whether the endotracheal administration of a replication-deficient adenoviral vector potentiated this response. The vector Ad5CMVLacZ was administered endotracheally to rats and the leakage of Evans blue dye was used to measure the capsaicin-induced neurogenic albumin extravasation. These studies show that neurogenic albumin extravasation is significantly potentiated in the airways of rats after administration of Ad5CMVLacZ. This inflammatory response can be blocked by selective antagonists of the substance P receptor or by glucocorticoids. Therefore, (1) the acute airway inflammation observed in patients after exposure to adenoviral vectors may exhibit a neurogenic component, which can be blocked pharmacologically, and (2) preclinical adenoviral vector safety studies of other organs innervated by the tachykinin system, e.g., coronary arteries and gastrointestinal tract, should include assessment of neurogenic inflammation. PMID:9070609

  8. Effect of 6-azacytidine on the course of experimental adenoviral infection in newborn Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zarubalev, V V; Slita, A V; Sukhinin, V P; Nosach, L N; Dyachenko, N S; Povnitsa, O Y; Zhovnovataya, V L; Alexeeva, I V; Palchikovskaya, L I

    2007-02-01

    Adenoviral infection is a serious human pathology leading to respiratory, gastrointestinal and ocular disorders and epidemic outbreaks, especially in children's groups. Here we present the results from an investigation of anti- adenoviral effect of 6-azacytidine (6-AC) both in vitro and in vivo. The selectivity index of 6-AC for adenovirus type 5 in HEp-2 cells was 374, the 50% effective concentration was 0.5 mg/ml. For in vivo investigations we developed a model of disseminated adenoviral infection in newborn Syrian hamsters. The infectious virus was recovered from the liver, kidney, lungs and heart. Application of 6-AC led to a reduced period of the virus presence (7 days in the liver and 4 days in the kidney and heart) and lowered virus titers on day 3 post-inoculation (p.i.) (liver - 2.7 and 4.1, heart - 0 and 3.2, kidney - 0 and 2.4 log(10 )CPD(50)/mg tissue weight, in the presence and absence of 6-AC, respectively). Application of 6-AC to newborn Syrian hamsters led to partial destruction of their splenocytes. The results obtained suggest that 6-AC or 6-ACbased drugs with lower toxicity or applied topically may be suitable for therapy and prevention of adenoviral infection in humans. PMID:17309850

  9. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Roberto Damian Pacheco; Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Castro, Rosane Silvestre; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Viral conjunctivitis is a common, highly contagious disease that is often caused by an adenovirus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis by analyzing data from a prospective clinical study of 122 consecutively enrolled patients who were treated at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) after a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis between November 2011 and June 2012. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate all cases of clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis and based on the laboratory findings, the prevalence of adenoviral infections was determined. The incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates was also investigated. RESULTS: Of the 122 patients with acute infectious conjunctivitis included, 72 had positive polymerase chain reaction results for adenoviruses and 17 patients developed subepithelial corneal infiltrates (13.93%). CONCLUSIONS: The polymerase chain reaction revealed that the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis was 59% in all patients who presented with a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis from November 2011 to June 2012. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis in the study population was similar to its prevalence in other regions of the world. PMID:26602522

  10. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Racel G.; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential “cure.” Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained. PMID:21245323

  11. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-12-17

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  12. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  13. Sub-unit vaccine against S. aureus-mediated infections: set-up of nano-sized polymeric adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Colonna, C; Dorati, R; Conti, B; Caliceti, P; Genta, I

    2013-08-16

    The aim of this work was the design of a novel adjuvanted system for vaccination against S. aureus-mediated infections: in particular, poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanoparticles were developed in order to efficiently load and boost a sub-unit model vaccine, namely a purified recombinant collagen binding bacterial adhesin fragment (CNA19). At first, the assessment of the actual immunogenicity of free CNA19 via subcutaneous administration was evaluated, in order to consider it as subunit antigen model. Secondly, for the development of CNA19 loaded PLGA nanoparticles, a preliminary study was focused on the production of well-formed nanoparticles by w/o/w double emulsion method exploiting ultrasonication cycles under mild conditions, then the optimization of the freeze-drying conditions and different CNA19 loading methods were considered (encapsulation, adsorption of on blank or CNA19 encapsulated nanoparticles). The set-up preparation method (process yield of about 83%) permitted to obtain CNA19 loaded nanoparticles with spherical shape, narrow size distribution (187.41 ± 51.2 nm), a slightly negative zeta-potential (-2.91 ± 0.64 mV) and to elicit satisfactory protein encapsulation efficiency (75.91 ± 4.22%) and loading capacity (8.59 ± 0.33 μg CNA19/nanoparticles mg). Then, CNA19 loaded PLGA nanoparticles were characterized by (i) an in vitro release test performed at different temperatures, namely 4°C, 25°C and 37°C, testing the antigen integrity (SDS-PAGE) and activity (ELISA); (ii) an in vitro stability study in terms of dimension and surface charge performed in a 21 days period of time. At 37°C there was evidence of a sustained release of the antigen, in active form, for almost 240 h with a burst release of about 20% in the first 2h. At 4°C stability tests and activity assays allowed to identify storage conditions useful to maintain CNA19 activity and easily NP re-suspendability with intact physical characteristics. Furthermore the evaluation of CNA

  14. Prime/boost immunization with DNA and adenoviral vectors protects from hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection after simultaneous infection with HDV and woodchuck hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Melanie; Kosinska, Anna; Schumann, Alexandra; Brovko, Olena; Walker, Andreas; Lu, Mengji; Johrden, Lena; Mayer, Anja; Wildner, Oliver; Roggendorf, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) superinfection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers causes severe liver disease and a high rate of chronicity. Therefore, a vaccine protecting HBV carriers from HDV superinfection is needed. To protect from HDV infection an induction of virus-specific T cells is required, as antibodies to the two proteins of HDV, p24 and p27, do not neutralize the HBV-derived envelope of HDV. In mice, HDV-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses were induced by a DNA vaccine expressing HDV p27. In subsequent experiments, seven naive woodchucks were immunized with a DNA prime and adenoviral boost regimen prior to simultaneous woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) and HDV infection. Five of seven HDV-immunized woodchucks were protected against HDV infection, while acute self-limiting WHV infection occurred as expected. The two animals with the breakthrough had a shorter HDV viremia than the unvaccinated controls. The DNA prime and adenoviral vector boost vaccination protected woodchucks against HDV infection in the setting of simultaneous infection with WHV and HDV. In future experiments, the efficacy of this protocol to protect from HDV infection in the setting of HDV superinfection will need to be proven. PMID:23637419

  15. Ex Vivo Adenoviral Vector Gene Delivery Results in Decreased Vector-associated Inflammation Pre- and Post–lung Transplantation in the Pig

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  16. Oncolytic adenoviral vectors which employ the survivin promoter induce glioma oncolysis via a process of beclin-dependent autophagy

    PubMed Central

    ULASOV, ILYA V.; TYLER, MATHEW A.; ZHU, ZENG B.; HAN, YU; HE, TONG-CHUAN; LESNIAK, MACIEJ S.

    2009-01-01

    Survivin has gained attention as a tumor-specific marker which is upregulated in a variety of neoplasms. Although the survivin protein is implicated in anti-apoptotic tumor pathways, little is known about the function of the survivin promoter. In this study, we constructed a conditionally replicative adenoviral vector (CRAd) that utilizes the survivin promoter and examined the mechanism of CRAd induced cell death in malignant glioma. Our results indicate that CRAd vectors which utilize the survivin promoter effectively replicate in glioma cells and exhibit a high oncolytic effect. The survivin-mediated CRAd appeared to induce apoptosis as measured by Annexin/7-AAD. Caspase-3 and BAX mRNAs were upregulated based on microarray data, however, Western blot analysis of infected cells showed no evidence of elevated caspase-3, BAX, or p53 protein expression. Of note, at each time point infected glioma cells showed no evidence of activated BAD or AKT. The inhibition of AKT signaling led us to examine autophagy in infected cells. Electron micrographs of virally infected glioma cells suggested autophagosomal-mediated cell death and selective blocking of beclin with siRNA prevented autophagy. These results indicate that the survivin promoter enhances viral replication and induces autophagy of infected glioma cells via a beclin-dependent mechanism. PMID:19212678

  17. Adenoviral transfer of the heme oxygenase-1 gene protects striatal astrocytes from heme-mediated oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Jing; Chau, Lee-Young; Galunic, Nicholas; Regan, Raymond F

    2004-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in the CNS after hemorrhage, and may have an effect on injury to surrounding tissue. Hemin, the preferred substrate of HO, is a neurotoxin that is present in intracranial hematomas. In a prior study, we observed that HO inhibitors increased the vulnerability of cultured cortical astrocytes to heme-mediated oxidative injury. To investigate the effect of HO more specifically, we used an adenoviral vector encoding the human HO-1 gene to specifically increase HO-1 expression. Incubation with 100 MOI of the HO-1 adenovirus (Adv-HHO-1) for 24 h increased both HO-1 protein and HO activity; a control adenovirus lacking the HO-1 gene had no effect. Using a DNA probe that was specific for human HO-1, 80.5 +/- 7.2% of astrocytes were observed to be infected by in situ hybridization. The cell death produced by 30-60 microM hemin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with 100 MOI Adv-HHO-1, as assessed by LDH release, propidium iodide exclusion, and MTT reduction assay. The threefold increase in cell protein oxidation produced by hemin was also attenuated in cultures pretreated with Adv-HHO-1. These results support the hypothesis that HO-1 protects astrocytes from heme-mediated oxidative injury. Specifically increasing astrocytic HO-1 by gene transfer may have a beneficial effect on hemorrhagic CNS injury. PMID:15474356

  18. Role of the Polymerase ϵ sub-unit DPB2 in DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Garcia, José Antonio; Domenichini, Séverine; Mazubert, Christelle; Bourge, Mickael; White, Charles; Hudik, Elodie; Bounon, Rémi; Tariq, Zakia; Delannoy, Etienne; del Olmo, Ivan; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, Jose Antonio; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication maintains genome stability in dividing cells and from one generation to the next. This is particularly important in plants because the whole plant body and reproductive cells originate from meristematic cells that retain their proliferative capacity throughout the life cycle of the organism. DNA replication involves large sets of proteins whose activity is strictly regulated, and is tightly linked to the DNA damage response to detect and respond to replication errors or defects. Central to this interconnection is the replicative polymerase DNA Polymerase ϵ (Pol ϵ) which participates in DNA replication per se, as well as replication stress response in animals and in yeast. Surprisingly, its function has to date been little explored in plants, and notably its relationship with DNA Damage Response (DDR) has not been investigated. Here, we have studied the role of the largest regulatory sub-unit of Arabidopsis DNA Pol ϵ: DPB2, using an over-expression strategy. We demonstrate that excess accumulation of the protein impairs DNA replication and causes endogenous DNA stress. Furthermore, we show that Pol ϵ dysfunction has contrasting outcomes in vegetative and reproductive cells and leads to the activation of distinct DDR pathways in the two cell types. PMID:27193996

  19. Synthesis and Comparative Study of Anti-Adenoviral Activity of 6-Azacytidine and Its Analogues.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, Inna; Nosach, Lydia; Palchykovska, Larisa; Usenko, Lyubov; Povnitsa, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of synthesis and study of cytotoxicity and the anti-adenoviral activity of new N4-derivatives of 6-azacytidine and its α-L-glycopyranosyl analogues obtained by the simplified one-pot version of the silyl condensation method. The resulting acylated 4-methylmercapto-1,2,4-triazin-3(2Н)-one glycosides then underwent the amination and/or ammonolysis to provide 6-azacytidine glycoside analogues (2-6, 12, 15, 17) and compounds with modifications at both base and sugar fragments (11, 15). The evaluation of cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of new compounds against AdV5 showed high selectivity indexes for N4-methyl-6-azacytidine (2) and N,O-tetraacetyl-6-azacytidine (8). High anti-adenoviral activity of N4-methyl-6-azacytidine as well as very low cytotoxicity may suggest its further investigation as potential compound for the therapy of AdV infection. PMID:26167665

  20. Adenoviral-mediated Gene Transfer into the Canine Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Bergeron, Josee; Puntel, Mariana; Curtin, James F.; McNiel, Elizabeth A.; Freese, Andrew B.; Ohlfest, John R.; Moore, Peter; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain tumor for which there is no cure. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of conditional cytotoxic (herpes simplex virus [HSV] 1-derived thymidine kinase [TK]) and immunostimulatory (Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand [Flt3L]) transgenes elicited immune-mediated long-term survival in a syngeneic intracranial GBM model in rodents. However, the lack of a large GBM animal model makes it difficult to predict the outcome of therapies in humans. Dogs develop spontaneous GBM that closely resemble the human disease; therefore, they constitute an excellent large animal model. We assayed the transduction efficiency of adenoviral vectors (Ads) encoding β-galactosidase (βGal), TK, and Flt3L in J3T dog GBM cells in vitro and in the dog brain in vivo. METHODS: J3T cells were infected with Ads (30 plaque-forming units/cell; 72 h) encoding βGal (Ad-βGal), TK (Ad-TK), or Flt3L (Ad-Flt3L). We determined transgene expression by immunocytochemistry, βGal activity, Flt3L enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TK-induced cell death. Ads were also injected intracranially into the parietal cortex of healthy dogs. We determined cell-type specific transgene expression and immune cell infiltration. RESULTS: Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of HSV1-TK, Flt3L, and βGal was detected in dog glioma cells in vitro (45% transduction efficiency) and in the dog brain in vivo (10-mm2 area transduced surrounding each injection site). T cells and macrophages/activated microglia infiltrated the injection sites. Importantly, no adverse clinical or neuropathological side effects were observed. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate effective adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into the brain of dogs in vivo and support the use of these vectors to develop an efficacy trial for canine GBM as a prelude to human trials. PMID:17228266

  1. Treatment for retinopathy of prematurity in an infant with adenoviral conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Con, Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been a major problematic disorder during childhood. Laser photocoagulation (LPC) has been proven to be effective in most of the ROP cases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis (AVC) is responsible for epidemics among adult and pediatric population. It has also been reported to be a cause of outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) several times. We herein demonstrate a case with AVC who underwent LPC for ROP. And we discuss the treatment methodology in such cases. PMID:25874149

  2. An adenoviral vector regulated by hypoxia for the treatment of ischaemic disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Binley, K; Iqball, S; Kingsman, A; Kingsman, S; Naylor, S

    1999-10-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have a number of advantages for gene therapy, including transduction of a range of dividing and non-dividing cell types. However, this broad range may be a disadvantage if non-target cells are transduced and are adversely affected by expression of the transferred gene. Here we describe a novel adenoviral vector in which transcription of the transgene is restricted to the patho-physiological condition of low oxygen tension (hypoxia). Hypoxia activates the expression of a number of genes, principally via the stabilisation of members of the bHLH/PAS family of transcription factors that bind to a con- sensus DNA sequence, the hypoxia response element (HRE). We have configured an optimised HRE expression cassette into an adenoviral vector, AdOBHRE. A range of cell types, including primary human skeletal muscle, when transduced with AdOBHRE display a low basal level of transgene expression that is highly induced in hypoxia to levels equivalent to that obtained from the CMV promoter. The AdOBHRE vector could be exploited for transcriptionally targeted gene therapy for the treatment of diseases such as cancer, peripheral arterial disease, arthritis and anaemia where tissue hypoxia is a cardinal feature. PMID:10516721

  3. Adenoviral Delivery of the EMX2 Gene Suppresses Growth in Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Mo, Minli; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Zhe; Sheng, Qing; Mu, Hang; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Li, Hui; He, Biao; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2012-01-01

    Background EMX2 is a human orthologue of the Drosophila empty spiracles homeobox gene that has been implicated in embryogenesis. Recent studies suggest possible involvement of EMX2 in human cancers; however, the role of EMX2 in carcinogenesis needs further exploration. Results In this study, we reported that down-regulation of EMX2 expression was significantly correlated with EMX2 promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer. Restoring EMX2 expression using an adenovirus delivery system in gastric cancer cell lines lacking endogenous EMX2 expression led to inhibition of cell proliferation and Wnt signaling pathway both in vitro and in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo. In addition, we observed that animals treated with the adenoviral EMX2 expression vector had significantly better survival than those treated with empty adenoviral vector. Conclusion Our study suggests that EMX2 is a putative tumor suppressor in human gastric cancer. The adenoviral-EMX2 may have potential as a novel gene therapy for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:23029345

  4. Advances and future challenges in recombinant adenoviral vectored H5N1 influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2012-11-01

    The emergence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 has increased the potential for a new pandemic to occur. This event highlights the necessity for developing a new generation of influenza vaccines to counteract influenza disease. These vaccines must be manufactured for mass immunization of humans in a timely manner. Poultry should be included in this policy, since persistent infected flocks are the major source of avian influenza for human infections. Recombinant adenoviral vectored H5N1 vaccines are an attractive alternative to the currently licensed influenza vaccines. This class of vaccines induces a broadly protective immunity against antigenically distinct H5N1, can be manufactured rapidly, and may allow mass immunization of human and poultry. Recombinant adenoviral vectors derived from both human and non-human adenoviruses are currently being investigated and appear promising both in nonclinical and clinical studies. This review will highlight the current status of various adenoviral vectored H5N1 vaccines and will outline novel approaches for the future. PMID:23202501

  5. Adenoviral vectors for prodrug activation-based gene therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Doloff, Joshua C.; Waxman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is a common feature - both between patients diagnosed with the same cancer and within an individual patient’s tumor - and leads to widely different response rates to cancer therapies and the potential for the emergence of drug resistance. Diverse therapeutic approaches have been developed to combat the complexity of cancer, including individual treatment modalities designed to target tumor heterogeneity. This review discusses adenoviral vectors and how they can be modified to replicate in a cancer-specific manner and deliver therapeutic genes under multi-tiered regulation to target tumor heterogeneity, including heterogeneity associated with cancer stem cell-like subpopulations. Strategies that allow for combination of prodrug-activation gene therapy with a novel replication-conditional, heterogeneous tumor-targeting adenovirus are discussed, as are the benefits of using adenoviral vectors as tumor-targeting oncolytic vectors. While the anticancer activity of many adenoviral vectors has been well established in preclinical studies, only limited successes have been achieved in the clinic, indicating a need for further improvements in activity, specificity, tumor cell delivery and avoidance of immunogenicity. PMID:23869779

  6. Advances and Future Challenges in Recombinant Adenoviral Vectored H5N1 Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 has increased the potential for a new pandemic to occur. This event highlights the necessity for developing a new generation of influenza vaccines to counteract influenza disease. These vaccines must be manufactured for mass immunization of humans in a timely manner. Poultry should be included in this policy, since persistent infected flocks are the major source of avian influenza for human infections. Recombinant adenoviral vectored H5N1 vaccines are an attractive alternative to the currently licensed influenza vaccines. This class of vaccines induces a broadly protective immunity against antigenically distinct H5N1, can be manufactured rapidly, and may allow mass immunization of human and poultry. Recombinant adenoviral vectors derived from both human and non-human adenoviruses are currently being investigated and appear promising both in nonclinical and clinical studies. This review will highlight the current status of various adenoviral vectored H5N1 vaccines and will outline novel approaches for the future. PMID:23202501

  7. Adenoviral gene transfer of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) partially restores normal pulmonary arterial pressure in eNOS-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Hunter C.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Greenberg, Stanley S.; Giles, Thomas D.; Hyman, Albert L.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that mice deficient in the gene coding for endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) have increased pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. In the present study, the effect of transfer to the lung of an adenoviral vector encoding the eNOS gene (AdCMVeNOS) on pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance was investigated in eNOS-deficient mice. One day after intratracheal administration of AdCMVeNOS to eNOS−/− mice, there was an increase in eNOS protein, cGMP levels, and calcium-dependent conversion of l-arginine to l-citrulline in the lung. The increase in eNOS protein and activity in eNOS−/− mice was associated with a reduction in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance when compared with values in eNOS-deficient mice treated with vehicle or a control adenoviral vector coding for β-galactosidase, AdCMVβgal. These data suggest that in vivo gene transfer of eNOS to the lung in eNOS−/− mice can increase eNOS staining, eNOS protein, calcium-dependent NOS activity, and cGMP levels and partially restore pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance to near levels measured in eNOS+/+ mice. Thus, the major finding in this study is that in vivo gene transfer of eNOS to the lung in large part corrects a genetic deficiency resulting from eNOS deletion and may be a useful therapeutic intervention for the treatment of pulmonary hypertensive disorders in which eNOS activity is reduced. PMID:12237402

  8. Adenoviral vector expressing murine β-defensin 2 enhances immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector based H5N1 influenza vaccine in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sai V; Pandey, Aseem; Singh, Neetu; Katz, Jacqueline M; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K

    2013-10-01

    The ability to resist infections and respond to vaccinations is greatly reduced in the older adult population owing to a general decline in innate and adaptive immune functions with aging. Over the years several strategies such as increasing the vaccine dose, number of immunizations and using adjuvants have been evaluated to improve the immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines in the older adult population. Murine β-defensin 2 (Mbd2) has been shown to function as a molecular adjuvant by recruiting and activating immature dendritic cells (DCs), professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), to the site of the immunization. In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Mbd2 to enhance the efficacy of an adenoviral vector-based H5N1 influenza vaccine expressing hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) (HAd-HA-NP) in an aged mouse model. Our results indicated that immunostimulation with an adenoviral vector expressing Mbd2 (HAd-Mbd2) activated DCs and significantly enhanced the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by HAd-HA-NP. Furthermore, immunostimulation with HAd-Mbd2 followed by immunization with HAd-HA-NP resulted in significantly lower virus titers in the lungs following challenge with a H5N1 influenza virus compared to the group immunized with HAd-HA-NP without immunostimulation. Overall, our results highlight the potential utility of Mbd2 as a molecular adjuvant to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines for the elderly. PMID:23892144

  9. Adenoviral Vector Expressing Murine β-Defensin 2 Enhances Immunogenicity of an Adenoviral Vector based H5N1 Influenza Vaccine in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Sai V.; Pandey, Aseem; Singh, Neetu; Katz, Jacqueline M; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to resist infections and respond to vaccinations is greatly reduced in the older adult population owing to a general decline in innate and adaptive immune functions with aging. Over the years several strategies such as increasing the vaccine dose, number of immunizations and using adjuvants have been evaluated to improve the immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines in the older adult population. Murine ß-defensin 2 (Mbd2) has been shown to function as a molecular adjuvant by recruiting and activating immature dendritic cells (DCs), professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), to the site of the immunization. In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Mbd2 to enhance the efficacy of an adenoviral vector-based H5N1 influenza vaccine expressing hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) (HAd-HA-NP) in an aged mouse model. Our results indicated that immunostimulation with an adenoviral vector expressing Mbd2 (HAd-Mbd2) activated DCs and significantly enhanced the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by HAd-HA-NP. Furthermore, immunostimulation with HAd-Mbd2 followed by immunization with HAd-HA-NP resulted in significantly lower virus titers in the lungs following challenge with a H5N1 influenza virus compared to the group immunized with HAd-HA-NP without immunostimulation. Overall, our results highlight the potential utility of Mbd2 as a molecular adjuvant to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines for the elderly. PMID:23892144

  10. The Effects of Adenoviral Transfection of the Keratinocyte Growth Factor Gene on Epidermal Stem Cells: an In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinping; Liang, Ling; Zhao, Pin; Uchida, Kenzo; Baba, Hisatoshi; Huang, Hong; Bai, Wenfang; Bai, Liming; Zhang, Mingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are characterized as slow-cycling, multi-potent, and self-renewing cells that not only maintain somatic homeostasis but also participate in tissue regeneration and repair. To examine the feasibility of adenoviral vector-mediated keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene transfer into in vitro-expanded ESCs, ESCs were isolated from samples of human skin, cultured in vitro, and then transfected with recombinant adenovirus (Ad) carrying the human KGF gene (AdKGF) or green fluorescent protein gene (AdGFP). The effects of KGF gene transfer on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, cell surface antigen phenotype, and β-catenin expression were investigated. Compared to ESCs transfected with AdGFP, AdKGF-transfected ESCs grew well, maintained a high proliferative capacity in keratinocyte serum-free medium, and expressed high levels of β-catenin. AdKGF infection increased the number of ESCs in the G0/G1 phase and promoted ESCs entry into the G2/M phase, but had no effect on cell surface antigen phenotype (CD49f+/CD71−). The results suggest that KGF gene transfer can stimulate ESCs to grow and undergo cell division, which can be applied to enhance cutaneous wound healing. PMID:24170090

  11. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Deinzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B′ core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based “modular promoter” system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B′ core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  12. Live Cell Imaging of Primary Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes Following Adenoviral and Lentiviral Transduction Using Confocal Spinning Disk Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takashi; Lanahan, Anthony; Woolls, Melissa J.; Li, Na; Tirziu, Daniela; Murakami, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes are useful in basic in vitro cardiovascular research because they can be easily isolated in large numbers in a single procedure. Due to advances in microscope technology it is relatively easy to capture live cell images for the purpose of investigating cellular events in real time with minimal concern regarding phototoxicity to the cells. This protocol describes how to take live cell timelapse images of primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes using a confocal spinning disk microscope following lentiviral and adenoviral transduction to modulate properties of the cell. The application of two different types of viruses makes it easier to achieve an appropriate transduction rate and expression levels for two different genes. Well focused live cell images can be obtained using the microscope’s autofocus system, which maintains stable focus for long time periods. Applying this method, the functions of exogenously engineered proteins expressed in cultured primary cells can be analyzed. Additionally, this system can be used to examine the functions of genes through the use of siRNAs as well as of chemical modulators. PMID:24998400

  13. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Knippertz, Ilka; Deinzer, Andrea; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B' core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based "modular promoter" system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B' core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  14. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase-deficient mice, a model for primary hyperoxaluria that responds to adenoviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Salido, Eduardo C; Li, Xiao M; Lu, Yang; Wang, Xia; Santana, Alfredo; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Torres, Armando; Shapiro, Larry J; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta

    2006-11-28

    Mutations in the alanine-glyoxylate amino transferase gene (AGXT) are responsible for primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare disease characterized by excessive hepatic oxalate production that leads to renal failure. We generated a null mutant mouse by targeted mutagenesis of the homologous gene, Agxt, in embryonic stem cells. Mutant mice developed normally, and they exhibited hyperoxaluria and crystalluria. Approximately half of the male mice in mixed genetic background developed calcium oxalate urinary stones. Severe nephrocalcinosis and renal failure developed after enhancement of oxalate production by ethylene glycol administration. Hepatic expression of human AGT1, the protein encoded by AGXT, by adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer in Agxt(-/-) mice normalized urinary oxalate excretion and prevented oxalate crystalluria. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that, as in the human liver, the expressed wild-type human AGT1 was predominantly localized in mouse hepatocellular peroxisomes, whereas the most common mutant form of AGT1 (G170R) was localized predominantly in the mitochondria. PMID:17110443

  15. Live cell imaging of primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes following adenoviral and lentiviral transduction using confocal spinning disk microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takashi; Lanahan, Anthony; Woolls, Melissa J; Li, Na; Tirziu, Daniela; Murakami, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes are useful in basic in vitro cardiovascular research because they can be easily isolated in large numbers in a single procedure. Due to advances in microscope technology it is relatively easy to capture live cell images for the purpose of investigating cellular events in real time with minimal concern regarding phototoxicity to the cells. This protocol describes how to take live cell timelapse images of primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes using a confocal spinning disk microscope following lentiviral and adenoviral transduction to modulate properties of the cell. The application of two different types of viruses makes it easier to achieve an appropriate transduction rate and expression levels for two different genes. Well focused live cell images can be obtained using the microscope's autofocus system, which maintains stable focus for long time periods. Applying this method, the functions of exogenously engineered proteins expressed in cultured primary cells can be analyzed. Additionally, this system can be used to examine the functions of genes through the use of siRNAs as well as of chemical modulators. PMID:24998400

  16. Evaluation of excipients for enhanced thermal stabilization of a human type 5 adenoviral vector through spray drying.

    PubMed

    LeClair, Daniel A; Cranston, Emily D; Xing, Zhou; Thompson, Michael R

    2016-06-15

    We have produced a thermally stable recombinant human type 5 adenoviral vector (AdHu5) through spray drying with three excipient formulations (l-leucine, lactose/trehalose and mannitol/dextran). Spray drying leads to immobilization of the viral vector which is believed to prevent viral protein unfolding, aggregation and inactivation. The spray dried powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, Karl Fischer titrations, and X-ray diffraction to identify the effects of temperature and atmospheric moisture on the immobilizing matrix. Thermal stability of the viral vector was confirmed in vitro by infection of A549 lung epithelial cells. Mannitol/dextran powders showed the greatest improvement in thermal stability with almost no viral activity loss after storage at 20°C for 90days (0.7±0.3 log TCID50) which is a significant improvement over the current -80°C storage protocol. Furthermore, viral activity was retained over short term exposure (72h) to temperatures as high as 55°C. Conversely, all powders exhibited activity loss when subjected to moisture due to amplified molecular motion of the matrix. Overall, a straightforward method ideal for the production of thermally stable vaccines has been demonstrated through spray drying AdHu5 with a blend of mannitol and dextran and storing the powder under low humidity conditions. PMID:27130366

  17. HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccines Expressing Multi-Trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL Enhance T Cell Mediated Anti-Viral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N.; Fuller, Katherine A.; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S.; Stone, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia

  18. Protection of Cftr knockout mice from acute lung infection by a helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing Cftr in airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, David R.; Sajjan, Umadevi; Chow, Yu-Hua; Martin, Bernard; Kent, Geraldine; Tanswell, A. Keith; McKerlie, Colin; Forstner, Janet F.; Hu, Jim

    2003-01-01

    We developed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector for cystic fibrosis lung gene therapy. The vector expresses cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr) using control elements from cytokeratin 18. The vector expressed properly localized CFTR in cultured cells and in the airway epithelia of mice. Cftr RNA and protein were present in whole lung and bronchioles, respectively, for 28 days after a vector dose. Acute inflammation was minimal to moderate. To test the therapeutic potential of the vector, we challenged mice with a clinical strain of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Cftr knockout mice (but not Cftr+/+ littermates) challenged with Bcc developed severe lung histopathology and had high lung bacteria counts. Cftr knockout mice receiving gene therapy 7 days before Bcc challenge had less severe histopathology, and the number of lung bacteria was reduced to the level seen in Cftr+/+ littermates. These data suggest that gene therapy could benefit cystic fibrosis patients by reducing susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens. PMID:14673110

  19. Protection of Cftr knockout mice from acute lung infection by a helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing Cftr in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Koehler, David R; Sajjan, Umadevi; Chow, Yu-Hua; Martin, Bernard; Kent, Geraldine; Tanswell, A Keith; McKerlie, Colin; Forstner, Janet F; Hu, Jim

    2003-12-23

    We developed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector for cystic fibrosis lung gene therapy. The vector expresses cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr) using control elements from cytokeratin 18. The vector expressed properly localized CFTR in cultured cells and in the airway epithelia of mice. Cftr RNA and protein were present in whole lung and bronchioles, respectively, for 28 days after a vector dose. Acute inflammation was minimal to moderate. To test the therapeutic potential of the vector, we challenged mice with a clinical strain of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Cftr knockout mice (but not Cftr+/+ littermates) challenged with Bcc developed severe lung histopathology and had high lung bacteria counts. Cftr knockout mice receiving gene therapy 7 days before Bcc challenge had less severe histopathology, and the number of lung bacteria was reduced to the level seen in Cftr+/+ littermates. These data suggest that gene therapy could benefit cystic fibrosis patients by reducing susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens. PMID:14673110

  20. Antitumor activity of adenoviral vector containing T42 and 4xT42 peptide gene through inducing apoptosis of tumor cells and suppressing angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Qi, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Sui, Guang-Yu; Hao, Xue-Wei; Sun, Shouli; Song, Xue; Chen, Ying-Li

    2015-03-01

    The T42 peptide, generated from two active fragments of tumstatin, has been shown to have anti‑tumor activity. The adenoviral vector is the most frequently used vector in research and clinical trials for gene therapy. In the present study, the anti‑tumor activity of the T42 peptide and quadruple T42 (4xT42) peptide adenoviral vectors were elucidated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were infected with plasmid adenovirus (pAd)‑enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)‑T42 or pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 and the expression of the T42 and 4xT42 genes was confirmed by the identification of GFP expression and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments. The anti‑cancer effects of pAd‑EGFP‑T42 and pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 on breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro were subsequently investigated. The results indicated that the packaging of the recombinant adenoviruses with the viral titer was successful, following purification at 5x109 plaque forming units/ml. The results also revealed that the recombinant adenoviruses promoted apoptosis in MCF‑7 breast cancer cells and inhibited cancer growth. Through the analysis of caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein expression, it was demonstrated that the T42/4xT42 peptide may induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, mouse xenograft experiments confirmed that the T42 peptide inhibited tumor growth and reduced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the T42 and 4xT42 peptide genes, transfected by a recombinant adenovirus, may provide a potential novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25384346

  1. Induction of Specific Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in a Mouse Model following Gene Fusion of HSP70C and Hantaan Virus Gn and S0.7 in an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Wei; Li, Puyuan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) display adjuvant functions when given as fusion proteins to enhance vaccination efficiency. To evaluate enhanced potency of Hantaan virus (HTNV) glycoprotein (GP) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) immunogenicity by heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), a recombinant adenovirus rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C expression vector was developed by genetically linking the HSP70 C-terminal gene (HSP70 359–610 aa, HSP70C) to the Gn and 0.7 kb fragment of the NP (aa1–274-S0.7). C57BL/6 mice were immunized with these recombinant adenoviral vectors. A series of immunological assays determined the immunogenicity of the recombinant adenoviral vectors. The results showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C induced a stronger humoral and cellular immune response than other recombinant adenoviruses (rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG and rAd-GnS0.7) and the HFRS vaccine control. Animal protection experiments showed that rAd-GnS0.7-pCAG-HSP70C was effective at protecting C57BL/6 mice from HTNV infection. The results of the immunological experiments showed that HSP70C lead to enhanced vaccine potency, and suggested significant potential in the development of genetically engineered vaccines against HTNV. PMID:24505421

  2. Vertical transmission and clinical signs in broiler breeders and broilers experiencing adenoviral gizzard erosion.

    PubMed

    Grafl, Beatrice; Aigner, Franz; Liebhart, Dieter; Marek, Ana; Prokofieva, Irina; Bachmeier, Josef; Hess, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The present report documents an outbreak of adenoviral gizzard erosion in 22 broiler flocks in Germany. The clinical picture was characterized by uneven growth of affected broilers that resulted in considerably lower than average weight at slaughtering. Fowl adenovirus serotype 1 (FAdV-1) was isolated from gizzard lesions and histological examinations demonstrated FAdV-1-positive intranuclear inclusion bodies in gizzard epithelial cells of affected broilers by in-situ hybridization. Birds from all affected flocks originated from one broiler breeder farm. During production of affected birds, broiler breeders were between 27 and 32 weeks old. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and specific virus neutralization assay of sera from parent birds demonstrated an acute FAdV-1 infection within the first 5 weeks of the production cycle. Clinically, broiler breeders exhibited a moderate fall in the hatchability of their chicks, while egg production remained normal. No further clinical signs could be observed. Genetically identical FAdV-1 strains were isolated from gizzards of embryos at the lowest point of hatchability and from affected broiler flocks raised on independent farms. For the first time, direct detection of viable FAdV-1 from gizzards of embryos and progenies of one FAdV-1-seropositive broiler breeder farm in the course of an outbreak of adenoviral gizzard erosion could be demonstrated, highlighting the importance of vertical transmission of this disease. Additionally, growth retardation and subsequent reduced average weight at the time of slaughter of broiler chickens underline the economic impact of adenoviral gizzard erosion for poultry production. PMID:23237373

  3. A Novel and Simple Method for Rapid Generation of Recombinant Porcine Adenoviral Vectors for Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lu; Tikoo, Suresh K.; Yang, Zengqi

    2015-01-01

    Many human (different serotypes) and nonhuman adenovirus vectors are being used for gene delivery. However, the current system for isolating recombinant adenoviral vectors is either time-consuming or expensive, especially for the generation of recombinant non-human adenoviral vectors. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach for the rapid generation of a porcine adenovirus (PAdV-3) vector which shows promise for gene transfer to human cells and evasion of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) immunity. Based on the final cloning plasmid, pFPAV3-CcdB-Cm, and our modified SLiCE strategy (SLiCE cloning and lethal CcdB screening), the process for generating recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids required only one step in 3 days, with a cloning efficiency as high as 620±49.56 clones/ng and zero background (100% accuracy). The recombinant PAdV-3 plasmids could be successfully rescued in porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells (VR1BL), which constitutively express the HAdV-5 E1 and PAdV-3 E1B 55k genes, and the foreign genes were highly expressed at 24 h after transduction into swine testicle (ST) cells. In conclusion, this strategy for generating recombinant PAdV-3 vectors based on our modified SLiCE cloning system was rapid and cost-efficient, which could be used as universal cloning method for modification the other regions of PAdV-3 genome as well as other adenoviral genomes. PMID:26011074

  4. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  5. A Human Vaccine Strategy Based On Chimpanzee Adenoviral and MVA Vectors That Primes, Boosts and Sustains Functional HCV Specific T-Cell Memory*

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D.; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W.; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Sorbo, Mariarosaria Del; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T-cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype-1b. Analysis employed single cell mass cytometry (CyTOF), and HLA class-I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV specific T-cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8+ and CD4+ HCV specific T-cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T-cell populations are generated and T-cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) following heterologous MVA boost. We have developed a HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained and balanced T-cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine. PMID:25378645

  6. Intra-testicular injection of adenoviral constructs results in Sertoli cell-specific gene expression and disruption of the seminiferous epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hooley, R P; Paterson, M; Brown, P; Kerr, K; Saunders, P T K

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process that cannot be modelled in vitro. The somatic Sertoli cells (SCs) within the seminiferous tubules perform a key role in supporting maturation of germ cells (GCs). Progress has been made in determining what aspects of SC function are critical to maintenance of fertility by developing rodent models based on the Cre/LoxP system; however, this is time-consuming and is only applicable to mice. The aim of the present study was to establish methods for direct injection of adenoviral vectors containing shRNA constructs into the testis as a way of inducing target-selective knock-down in vivo. This paper describes a series of experiments using adenovirus expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene. Injection via the efferent ductules resulted in SC-specific expression of GFP; expression levels paralleled the amount of infective viral particles injected. At the highest doses of virus seminiferous tubule architecture were grossly disturbed and immune cell invasion noted. At lower concentrations, the expression of GFP was variable/negligible, the seminiferous tubule lumen was maintained but stage-dependent GC loss and development of numerous basal vacuoles was observed. These resembled intercellular dilations of SC junctional complexes previously described in rats and may be a consequence of disturbances in SC function due to interaction of the viral particles with the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor that is a component of the junctional complexes within the blood testis barrier. In conclusion, intra-testicular injection of adenoviral vectors disturbs SC function in vivo and future work will therefore focus on the use of lentiviral delivery systems. PMID:18955374

  7. A human vaccine strategy based on chimpanzee adenoviral and MVA vectors that primes, boosts, and sustains functional HCV-specific T cell memory.

    PubMed

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2014-11-01

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies, and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study, we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A, and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype 1b. Analysis used single-cell mass cytometry and human leukocyte antigen class I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV-specific T cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) HCV-specific T cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T cell populations are generated, and T cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) after heterologous MVA boost. We have developed an HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained, and balanced T cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine. PMID:25378645

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant adenoviral based vaccine expressing heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) and K99 adhesion antigen of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guangcun; Li, Wu; Wu, Xiaoling; Bao, Shaowen; Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Ning; Luo, Meihui; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2015-12-01

    The diarrheal disease of domestic animals or in humans caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections remains a major issue for public health in developing countries. Unfortunately, there is no effective vaccine available for preventing from an ETEC infection. Therefore, the development of a safe and effective vaccine against ETEC is urgently needed. In the present study, A recombinant adenoviral vector Ad5-STa-K99 that capable of expressing a fusion protein of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) and K99 adhesion antigen of ETEC was generated and its immunogenicity was evaluated in a murine model. The intestinal mucosal secretory IgA(sIgA), serum anti-STa-K99 antibody responses, antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells frequencies, as well as T-cell proliferation of mice immunized with the viral vector were determined as immunological indexes. The results demonstrated that Ad5-STa-K99 was able to enhance humoral responses with a dramatically augmented antigen-specific serum IgG antibody, and an elevated production of intestinal sIgA in immunized mice, suggesting the elicitation of both of humoral and mucosal immune responses. In addition, this adenoviral vector could significantly promote splenic T cell proliferation and increase the frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell populations in mice, indicative of a capacity to activate T cell responses. More importantly, vaccination of the Ad5-STa-K99 showed a potential to evoke a protective effect from ETEC challenge in mice. These data indicate that the Ad5-STa-K99 is a highly immunogenic vector able to induce a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, and evoke a protective immune response against ETEC infections, implying that it may be a novel vaccine candidate warranted for further investigation. PMID:26589454

  9. Vascular Gene Transfer from Metallic Stent Surfaces Using Adenoviral Vectors Tethered through Hydrolysable Cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P.; Adamo, Richard F.; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.

    2014-01-01

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  10. [Clinical syndrome of convulsive cough of adenoviral etiology in a children's collective].

    PubMed

    Grobnicu, M; Andreescu, V; Caffé, I; Măgureanu, E; Marion, M; Ivan, I; Botez, D; Cuteanu, I; Barbu, I

    1976-01-01

    Bacteriological, viral and serological investigators were carried out in a community with 100 prescholar children (Kindergarden), 34 of whom presented a clinical syndrome of whooping cough, in order to establish the bacteriologic or viral etiology of the syndrome. The etiologic role of organisms of the Bordetella, B. pertussis and B. parapertussis was invalidated by the bacteriologic and serological tests. Viral and serological tests, performed to demonstrate the participation of viral agents in the causation of this clinical syndrome, established an adenoviral diagnosis in 13 (43.3%) of the 30 children. Adenovirus type 6 was isolated and there was a significant increase in the titers of antibodies to adenoviruses. PMID:184515

  11. The catalase–hydrogen peroxide system. Role of sub-units in the thermal deactivation of bacterial catalase in the absence of substrate

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter; Suggett, A.

    1968-01-01

    1. Kinetic studies of the thermal deactivation of bacterial catalase in the absence of substrate suggest that the reaction involves a protonation-induced reversible dissociation of catalase into catalatically inactive sub-units, followed by an irreversible transformation of the sub-units into deactivated products. It is possible that the sub-units are mono-haem species. The rate of deactivation decreases with increasing pressure in accordance with the predictions of the proposed model. 2. The results also imply that the addition of hydrogen peroxide substrate induces the re-formation of active catalase. Under appropriate conditions the activity of catalase is found to increase with time in a manner that is quantitatively consistent with the results of deactivation studies. PMID:5673527

  12. Adenoviral Delivery of VEGF121 Early in Pregnancy Prevents Spontaneous Development of Preeclampsia in BPH/5 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ashley K.; Hoffmann, Darren S.; Weydert, Christine J.; Butler, Scott D.; Zhou, Yi; Sharma, Ram V.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    An imbalance in circulating pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors is postulated to play a causal role in pre-eclampsia (PE). We have described an inbred mouse strain, BPH/5, which spontaneously develops a PE-like syndrome including late-gestational hypertension, proteinuria, and poor feto-placental outcomes. Here we tested the hypothesis that an angiogenic imbalance during pregnancy in BPH/5 mice leads to the development of PE-like phenotypes in this model. Similar to clinical findings, plasma from pregnant BPH/5 showed reduced levels of free vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PGF) compared to C57BL/6 controls. This was paralleled by a marked decrease in VEGF protein and Pgf mRNA in BPH/5 placentae. Surprisingly, antagonism by the soluble form of the FLT1 receptor (sFLT1) did not appear to be the cause of this reduction, as sFLT1 levels were unchanged or even reduced in BPH/5 compared to controls. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of VEGF121 (Ad-VEGF) via tail vein at e7.5 normalized both the plasma free VEGF levels in BPH/5 and restored the in vitro angiogenic capacity of serum from these mice. Ad-VEGF also reduced the incidence of fetal resorptions and prevented the late-gestational spike in blood pressure and proteinuria observed in BPH/5. These data underscore the importance of dysregulation of angiogenic factors in the pathogenesis of PE, and suggest the potential utility of early pro-angiogenic therapies in treating this disease. PMID:21079047

  13. Evaluation of the immune response to recombinant DNA vaccine and adenoviral vaccine co-expressing the M1 and HA genes of H5N1 influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianqiang; Yao, Lihong; Chen, Aijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Fu, Jinqi; Xu, Pengwei; Zhang, Zhiqing

    2011-06-01

    In order to evaluate the response to vector-expressed M1 and HA genes of influenza virus in mice, we prepared recombinant plasmid pStar-M1/HA and recombinant adenovirus Ad-M1/HA containing both the full-length matrix protein 1(M1) and hemagglutinin (HA) genes of human H5N1 influenza virus strain A/Anhui/1/2005. We then combined the DNA vaccine and adenoviral vaccine in immunization of BALB/c mice with a prime-boost regime. We immunized the mice with DNA vaccine at day 0 and 28 and with recombinant adenoviral vaccines at day 14 and 42. We took blood samples before each injection and 14 days after the final injection for detection of humoral immune responses. At day 56, we sacrificed the mice and collected splenocytes for detection of cellular immune responses. ELISA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay showed that specific IgG Abs against H5N1 influenza virus was induced in serum of the immunized mice. ELISPOT results confirmed that the specific cellular immune responses were successfully induced against the M1 and HA proteins of H5N1 influenza virus. This study provides new strategy for development of novel influenza vaccines. PMID:22034816

  14. An adenoviral vector for probing promoter activity in primary immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Pulak; Madan, Rajat; Chougnet, Claire; Divanovic, Senad; Ma, Xiaojing; Wahl, Larry M.; Gajewski, Thomas; Karp, Christopher L.; Hildeman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional analysis of the DNA regulatory regions that control gene expression has largely been performed through transient transfection of promoter–reporter constructs into transformed cells. However, transformed cells are often poor models of primary cells. To directly analyze DNA regulatory regions in primary cells, we generated a novel adenoviral luciferase reporter vector, pShuttle-luciferase-GFP (pSLUG) that contains a promoterless luciferase cassette (with an upstream cloning site) for probing promoter activity, and a GFP expression cassette that allows for the identification of transduced cells. Recombinant adenoviruses generated from this vector can transduce a wide range of primary immune cells with high efficiency, including human macrophages, dendritic cells and T cells; and mouse T cells transgenic for the coxsackie and adenoviral receptor (CAR). In primary T cells, we show inducible nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) activity using a recombinant pSLUG adenovirus containing a consensus NF-AT promoter. We further show inducible IL-12/23 p40 promoter activity in primary macrophages and dendritic cells using a recombinant pSLUG adenovirus containing the proximal human IL-12/23 p40 promoter. The pSLUG system promises to be a powerful tool for the analysis of DNA regulatory regions in diverse types of primary immune cells. PMID:16563424

  15. Disseminated adenoviral infection masquerading as lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Aboumohamed, Ahmed; Flechner, Stuart M; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres; Srinivas, Titte R; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-11-01

    Viral infections continue to cause significant morbidity in immunosuppressed kidney transplant patients. Although cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and polyoma "BK" virus are more frequently encountered, the Adenovirus can cause multi-organ system infections, and may be difficult to diagnose because it is not often considered in the initial work up in kidney transplant recipients. We present an unusual case of a kidney recipient 1 year post-transplant with disseminated adenoviral infection, who had an initial presentation of lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction with hematuria and sterile pyuria. This progressed to a severe tubulointerstitial nephritis and acute kidney injury that improved with reduction of immunosuppression. Serial blood viral loads are useful for monitoring the course of infection. Urinary adenoviral infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis whenever a kidney transplant recipient presents with unexplained lower tract voiding dysfunction, hematuria, and sterile pyuria. The allograft kidney and bladder can be targets of viral proliferation. Early diagnosis with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy is essential to clear the virus and maintain allograft function. PMID:23816478

  16. Adenoviral infection or deferoxamine? Two approaches to overexpress VEGF in beta-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Allan; Bietiger, William; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Maillard, Elisa; Pinget, Michel; Kessler, Laurence; Sigrist, Severine

    2009-07-01

    Rapid and adequate revascularization of transplanted islets is important for their survival and function during transplantation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could play a critical role with respect to islet revascularization. The aim of this study was to compare two strategies that are used to overexpress VEGF in beta-cells: (1) gene therapy through adenoviral infection and (2) a pharmacological approach using deferoxamine (DFO). beta-Cell lines from rat insulinoma (RINm5F) were either infected using an adenovirus encoding the gene of human VEGF 165 or incubated with DFO. One day after treatment, the viability of RINm5F cells was preserved with 10 micromol/L of DFO (103.95 +/- 5.66% toward control; n = 4). In addition, adenoviral infection maintained the viability of cells for all the concentrations used. In both treatments, overexpression of VEGF was in a comparable level. Finally, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 indicated that the apoptosis increased in infected beta-cells whereas treatment with DFO seems to be antiapoptotic. Our results suggest that the use of DFO could be a realistic approach to improve the vascularization of islets during transplantation. PMID:19527112

  17. Development of an adenoviral vector with robust expression driven by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a new adenoviral vector where transgene expression is driven by p53. We first developed a synthetic promoter, referred to as PGTx{beta}, containing a p53-responsive element, a minimal promoter and the first intron of the rabbit {beta}-globin gene. Initial assays using plasmid-based vectors indicated that expression was tightly controlled by p53 and was 5-fold stronger than the constitutive CMV immediate early promoter/enhancer. The adenoviral vector, AdPG, was also shown to offer p53-responsive expression in prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP (wt p53), DU-145 (temperature sensitive mutant of p53) and PC3 (p53-null, but engineered to express temperature-sensitive p53 mutants). AdPG served as a sensor of p53 activity in LNCaP cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. Since p53 can be induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, this new vector could be further developed for use in combination with conventional therapies to bring about cooperation between the genetic and pharmacologic treatment modalities.

  18. ERK2-mediated phosphorylation of transcriptional coactivator binding protein PIMT/NCoA6IP at Ser298 augments hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bandish; Viswakarma, Navin; Parsa, Kishore V L; Kain, Vasundhara; Behera, Soma; Suraj, Sashidhara Kaimal; Babu, Phanithi Prakash; Kar, Anand; Panda, Sunanda; Zhu, Yi-jun; Jia, Yuzhi; Thimmapaya, Bayar; Reddy, Janardan K; Misra, Parimal

    2013-01-01

    PRIP-Interacting protein with methyl transferase domain (PIMT) serves as a molecular bridge between CREB-binding protein (CBP)/ E1A binding protein p300 (Ep300) -anchored histone acetyl transferase and the Mediator complex sub-unit1 (Med1) and modulates nuclear receptor transcription. Here, we report that ERK2 phosphorylates PIMT at Ser(298) and enhances its ability to activate PEPCK promoter. We observed that PIMT is recruited to PEPCK promoter and adenoviral-mediated over-expression of PIMT in rat primary hepatocytes up-regulated expression of gluconeogenic genes including PEPCK. Reporter experiments with phosphomimetic PIMT mutant (PIMT(S298D)) suggested that conformational change may play an important role in PIMT-dependent PEPCK promoter activity. Overexpression of PIMT and Med1 together augmented hepatic glucose output in an additive manner. Importantly, expression of gluconeogenic genes and hepatic glucose output were suppressed in isolated liver specific PIMT knockout mouse hepatocytes. Furthermore, consistent with reporter experiments, PIMT(S298D) but not PIMT(S298A) augmented hepatic glucose output via up-regulating the expression of gluconeogenic genes. Pharmacological blockade of MAPK/ERK pathway using U0126, abolished PIMT/Med1-dependent gluconeogenic program leading to reduced hepatic glucose output. Further, systemic administration of T4 hormone to rats activated ERK1/2 resulting in enhanced PIMT ser(298) phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of PIMT led to its increased binding to the PEPCK promoter, increased PEPCK expression and induction of gluconeogenesis in liver. Thus, ERK2-mediated phosphorylation of PIMT at Ser(298) is essential in hepatic gluconeogenesis, demonstrating an important role of PIMT in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. PMID:24358311

  19. ERK2-Mediated Phosphorylation of Transcriptional Coactivator Binding Protein PIMT/NCoA6IP at Ser298 Augments Hepatic Gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Kishore V. L.; Kain, Vasundhara; Behera, Soma; Suraj, Sashidhara Kaimal; Babu, Phanithi Prakash; Kar, Anand; Panda, Sunanda; Zhu, Yi-jun; Jia, Yuzhi; Thimmapaya, Bayar; Reddy, Janardan K.; Misra, Parimal

    2013-01-01

    PRIP-Interacting protein with methyl transferase domain (PIMT) serves as a molecular bridge between CREB-binding protein (CBP)/ E1A binding protein p300 (Ep300) -anchored histone acetyl transferase and the Mediator complex sub-unit1 (Med1) and modulates nuclear receptor transcription. Here, we report that ERK2 phosphorylates PIMT at Ser298 and enhances its ability to activate PEPCK promoter. We observed that PIMT is recruited to PEPCK promoter and adenoviral-mediated over-expression of PIMT in rat primary hepatocytes up-regulated expression of gluconeogenic genes including PEPCK. Reporter experiments with phosphomimetic PIMT mutant (PIMTS298D) suggested that conformational change may play an important role in PIMT-dependent PEPCK promoter activity. Overexpression of PIMT and Med1 together augmented hepatic glucose output in an additive manner. Importantly, expression of gluconeogenic genes and hepatic glucose output were suppressed in isolated liver specific PIMT knockout mouse hepatocytes. Furthermore, consistent with reporter experiments, PIMTS298D but not PIMTS298A augmented hepatic glucose output via up-regulating the expression of gluconeogenic genes. Pharmacological blockade of MAPK/ERK pathway using U0126, abolished PIMT/Med1-dependent gluconeogenic program leading to reduced hepatic glucose output. Further, systemic administration of T4 hormone to rats activated ERK1/2 resulting in enhanced PIMT ser298 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of PIMT led to its increased binding to the PEPCK promoter, increased PEPCK expression and induction of gluconeogenesis in liver. Thus, ERK2-mediated phosphorylation of PIMT at Ser298 is essential in hepatic gluconeogenesis, demonstrating an important role of PIMT in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. PMID:24358311

  20. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose. PMID:27434682

  1. Adenoviral-based foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine: effect of duration of antigen expression on immunogenicity in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An adenoviral (Ad5)-based foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) subunit vaccine, Ad5-A24, is an effective alternative to the current inactivated whole virus vaccine and has a number of advantages including no requirement for infectious FMDV and DIVA (Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals...

  2. Chemokine CXCL1/KC and its Receptor CXCR2 Are Responsible for Neutrophil Chemotaxis in Adenoviral Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), caused by human adenovirus (HAdV), is one of the most common ocular infections and results in corneal inflammation and subepithelial infiltrates. Adenoviral keratitis causes significant morbidity to the patients, and is characterized by infiltration of leukocytes in the corneal stroma, and expression of chemokines. The exact role of these chemokines in adenoviral infection has not been studied due to lack of animal models. Here, we have characterized the role of chemokine CXCL1/KC and receptor CXCR2 in adenoviral keratitis using a novel mouse model. Analysis of chemokine expression, leukocyte infiltration, and development of keratitis was performed by ELISA, flow cytometry, and histopathology, respectively. Deficiency of CXCL1 and CXCR2 resulted in delayed infiltration of neutrophils, but not inflammatory monocytes in HAdV-37 corneal infection. CXCL1−/− mice showed decreased expression of CXCL2/MIP-2, but not CCL2/MCP-1. CXCR2−/− mice showed increased expression of CXCL1 and CXCL2, but not CCL2. Both CXCL1−/− and CXCR2−/− mice demonstrated keratitis similar to wild-type mice. In conclusion, both CXCL1 and CXCR2 play an important role in chemokine expression and neutrophil infiltration following adenoviral corneal infection, but have a redundant role in the development of keratitis. PMID:19642907

  3. Osteogenic gene regulation and relative acceleration of healing by adenoviral-mediated transfer of human BMP-2 or -6 in equine osteotomy and ostectomy models.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Shields, Kathleen M; Litsky, Alan S; Mattoon, John S; Weisbrode, Steven E; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Bertone, Alicia L

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated healing of equine metatarsal osteotomies and ostectomies in response to percutaneous injection of adenoviral (Ad) bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, Ad-BMP-6, or beta-galactosidase protein vector control (Ad-LacZ) administered 14 days after surgery. Radiographic and quantitative computed tomographic assessment of bone formation indicated greater and earlier mineralized callus in both the osteotomies and ostectomies of the metatarsi injected with Ad-BMP-2 or Ad-BMP-6. Peak torque to failure and torsional stiffness were greater in osteotomies treated with Ad-BMP-2 than Ad-BMP-6, and both Ad-BMP-2- and Ad-BMP-6-treated osteotomies were greater than Ad-LacZ or untreated osteotomies. Gene expression of ostectomy mineralized callus 8 weeks after surgery indicated upregulation of genes related to osteogenesis compared to intact metatarsal bone. Expression of transforming growth factor beta-1, cathepsin H, and gelsolin-like capping protein were greater in Ad-BMP-2- and Ad-BMP-6-treated callus compared to Ad-LacZ-treated or untreated callus. Evidence of tissue biodistribution of adenovirus in distant organs was not identified by quantitative PCR, despite increased serum antiadenoviral vector antibody. This study demonstrated a greater relative potency of Ad-BMP-2 over Ad-BMP-6 in accelerating osteotomy healing when administered in this regimen, although both genes were effective at increasing bone at both osteotomy and ostectomy sites. PMID:18241059

  4. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors and Their Use for Neuroscience Applications.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, Mónica S; Satterfield, Rachel; Young, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience research has been revolutionized by the use of recombinant viral vector technology from the basic, preclinical and clinical levels. Currently, multiple recombinant viral vector types are employed with each having its strengths and weaknesses depending on the proposed application. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HdAd) are emerging as ideal viral vectors that solve a major need in the neuroscience field: (1) expression of transgenes that are too large to be packaged by other viral vectors and (2) rapid onset of transgene expression in the absence of cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the methods for large-scale production of HdAd viral vectors for in vivo use with neurospecific transgene expression. PMID:27515075

  5. Current Advances and Future Challenges in Adenoviral Vector Biology and Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on Adenoviral (Ad) vectors have enormous potential for the treatment of both hereditary and acquired disease. Detailed structural analysis of the Ad virion, combined with functional studies has broadened our knowledge of the structure/function relationships between Ad vectors and host cells/tissues and substantial achievement has been made towards a thorough understanding of the biology of Ad vectors. The widespread use of Ad vectors for clinical gene therapy is compromised by their inherent immunogenicity. The generation of safer and more effective Ad vectors, targeted to the site of disease, has therefore become a great ambition in the field of Ad vector development. This review provides a synopsis of the structure/function relationships between Ad vectors and host systems and summarizes the many innovative approaches towards achieving Ad vector targeting. PMID:17584037

  6. Hepatic Delivery of Artificial Micro RNAs Using Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Carol; Mowa, Betty; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The potential of RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy has been demonstrated in many studies. However, clinical application of this technology has been hampered by a paucity of efficient and safe methods of delivering the RNAi activators. Prolonged transgene expression and improved safety of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HD AdVs) makes them well suited to delivery of engineered artificial intermediates of the RNAi pathway. Also, AdVs' natural hepatotropism makes them potentially useful for liver-targeted gene delivery. HD AdVs may be used for efficient delivery of cassettes encoding short hairpin RNAs and artificial primary microRNAs to the mouse liver. Methods for the characterization of HD AdV-mediated delivery of hepatitis B virus-targeting RNAi activators are described here. PMID:26472456

  7. Magnetically Responsive Biodegradable Nanoparticles Enhance Adenoviral Gene Transfer in Cultured Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chorny, Michael; Fishbein, Ilia; Alferiev, Ivan; Levy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Replication-defective adenoviral (Ad) vectors have shown promise as a tool for gene delivery-based therapeutic applications. Their clinical use is however limited by therapeutically suboptimal transduction levels in cell types expressing low levels of Coxsackie-Ad receptor (CAR), the primary receptor responsible for the cell entry of the virus, and by systemic adverse reactions. Targeted delivery achievable with Ad complexed with biodegradable magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNP) may therefore be instrumental for improving both the safety and efficiency of these vectors. Our hypothesis was that magnetically driven delivery of Ad affinity-bound to biodegradable MNP can substantially increase transgene expression in CAR deficient vascular cells in culture. Fluorescently labeled MNP were formulated from polylactide with inclusion of iron oxide and surface-modified with the D1 domain of CAR as an affinity linker. MNP cellular uptake and GFP reporter transgene expression were assayed fluorimetrically in cultured endothelial and smooth muscle cells using λex/λem of 540 nm/575 nm and 485 nm/535 nm, respectively. Stable vector-specific association of Ad with MNP resulted in formation of MNP–Ad complexes displaying rapid cell binding kinetics following a brief exposure to a high gradient magnetic field with resultant gene transfer levels significantly increased compared to free vector or nonmagnetic control treatment. Multiple regression analysis suggested a mechanism of MNP–Ad mediated transduction distinct from that of free Ad, and confirmed the major contribution of the complexes to the gene transfer under magnetic conditions. The magnetically enhanced transduction was achieved without compromising the cell viability or growth kinetics. The enhancement of adenoviral gene delivery by affinity complexation with biodegradable MNP represents a promising approach with a potential to extend the applicability of the viral gene therapeutic strategies. PMID:19496618

  8. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Matthews, Qiana L

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors׳ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2. PMID:26499044

  9. Down-regulation of IL-8 expression in human airway epithelial cells through helper-dependent adenoviral-mediated RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    CAO, Huibi; WANG, Anan; MARTIN, Bernard; KOEHLER, David R.; ZEITLIN, Pamela L.; TANAWELL, A. Keith; HU, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 is a potent neutrophil chemotactic factor and a crucial mediator in neutrophil-dependent inflammation. Various cell types produce IL-8, either in response to external stimuli such as cytokines or bacterial infection, or after malignant transformation. Anti-IL-8 strategies have been considered for anti-inflammatory therapy. In this paper we demonstrate that the RNA interference technique can be used to efficiently down-regulate IL-8 protein expression in airway epithelial cells. We used a helper-dependent adenoviral vector to express a small hairpin (sh)RNA targeting human IL-8 in cultured airway epithelial cells (IB3-1, Cftr−/−; C38, Cftr-corrected) stimulated with TNF-α, IL-1β or heat-inactivated Burkholderia cenocepacia. Stimulated IL-8 expression in IB3-1 and C38 cells was significantly reduced by shRNA expression. The shRNA targeting IL-8 had no effect on the activation of NF-κB, or on the protein levels of IκB or IL-6, suggesting that this anti-IL-8 strategy was highly specific, and therefore may offer potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:15740640

  10. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors’ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2. PMID:26499044

  11. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten A.; Resende, Mafalda; de Jongh, Willem A.; Ditlev, Sisse B.; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Houard, Sophie; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.; Hamborg, Mette; Massougbodji, Achille; Issifou, Saddou; Strøbæk, Anette; Poulsen, Lars; Leroy, Odile; Kremsner, Peter G.; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Deloron, Philippe; Theander, Thor G.; Dyring, Charlotte; Salanti, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) involves different clinical manifestations that, cumulatively, kill hundreds of thousands every year. Placental malaria (PM) is one such manifestation in which Pf infected erythrocytes (IE) bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) through expression of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally constrained receptor-binding domains may, theoretically, circumvent polymorphisms, reduce the risk of escape-mutants and induce cross-reactive antibodies. However, the sub-unit composition and small differences in the borders, may lead to exposure of novel immuno-dominant antibody epitopes that lead to non-functional antibodies, and furthermore influence the folding, stability and yield of expression. Candidate antigens from the pre-clinical development expressed in High-Five insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system were transitioned into the Drosophila Schneider-2 cell (S2) expression-system compliant with clinical development. The functional capacity of antibodies against antigens expressed in High-Five cells or in S2 cells was equivalent. This enabled an extensive down-selection of S2 insect cell-expressed antigens primarily encompassing the minimal CSA-binding region of VAR2CSA. In general, we found differential potency of inhibitory antibodies against antigens with the same borders but of different var2csa sequences. Likewise, we found that subtle size differences in antigens of the same sequence gave varying levels of inhibitory antibodies. The study shows that induction of a functional response against recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens that induce a

  12. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten A; Resende, Mafalda; de Jongh, Willem A; Ditlev, Sisse B; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Houard, Sophie; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Hamborg, Mette; Massougbodji, Achille; Issifou, Saddou; Strøbæk, Anette; Poulsen, Lars; Leroy, Odile; Kremsner, Peter G; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Luty, Adrian J F; Deloron, Philippe; Theander, Thor G; Dyring, Charlotte; Salanti, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) involves different clinical manifestations that, cumulatively, kill hundreds of thousands every year. Placental malaria (PM) is one such manifestation in which Pf infected erythrocytes (IE) bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) through expression of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally constrained receptor-binding domains may, theoretically, circumvent polymorphisms, reduce the risk of escape-mutants and induce cross-reactive antibodies. However, the sub-unit composition and small differences in the borders, may lead to exposure of novel immuno-dominant antibody epitopes that lead to non-functional antibodies, and furthermore influence the folding, stability and yield of expression. Candidate antigens from the pre-clinical development expressed in High-Five insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system were transitioned into the Drosophila Schneider-2 cell (S2) expression-system compliant with clinical development. The functional capacity of antibodies against antigens expressed in High-Five cells or in S2 cells was equivalent. This enabled an extensive down-selection of S2 insect cell-expressed antigens primarily encompassing the minimal CSA-binding region of VAR2CSA. In general, we found differential potency of inhibitory antibodies against antigens with the same borders but of different var2csa sequences. Likewise, we found that subtle size differences in antigens of the same sequence gave varying levels of inhibitory antibodies. The study shows that induction of a functional response against recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens that induce a

  13. Surmounting limited gene delivery into primary immune cell populations: Efficient cell type-specific adenoviral transduction by CAR.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Björn E; Brand, Anna; Karram, Khalad

    2015-06-01

    Ectopic gene expression studies in primary immune cells have been notoriously difficult to perform due to the limitations in conventional transfection and viral transduction methods. Although replication-defective adenoviruses provide an attractive alternative for gene delivery, their use has been hampered by the limited susceptibility of murine leukocytes to adenoviral infection, due to insufficient expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR). In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Heger et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: XXXX-XXXX] report the generation of transgenic mice that enable conditional Cre/loxP-mediated expression of human CAR. The authors demonstrate that this R26/CAG-CAR∆1(StopF) mouse strain facilitates the faithful monitoring of Cre activity in situ as well as the specific and efficient adenoviral transduction of primary immune cell populations in vitro. Further tweaking of the system towards more efficient gene transfer in vivo remains a future challenge. PMID:25903647

  14. SR-A and SREC-I Are Kupffer and Endothelial Cell Receptors for Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Pasquale; Vetrini, Francesco; Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Grove, Nathan C; Bertin, Terry; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors can mediate long-term, high-level transgene expression from transduced hepatocytes with no chronic toxicity. However, a toxic acute response with potentially lethal consequences has hindered their clinical applications. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and Kupffer cells are major barriers to efficient hepatocyte transduction. Understanding the mechanisms of adenoviral vector uptake by non-parenchymal cells may allow the development of strategies aimed at overcoming these important barriers and to achieve preferential hepatocyte gene transfer with reduced toxicity. Scavenger receptors on Kupffer cells bind adenoviral particles and remove them from the circulation, thus preventing hepatocyte transduction. In the present study, we show that HDAd particles interact in vitro and in vivo with scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) and with scavenger receptor expressed on endothelial cells-I (SREC-I) and we exploited this knowledge to increase the efficiency of hepatocyte transduction by HDAd vectors in vivo through blocking of SR-A and SREC-I with specific fragments antigen-binding (Fabs). PMID:23358188

  15. A novel Cre recombinase reporter mouse strain facilitates selective and efficient infection of primary immune cells with adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Heger, Klaus; Kober, Maike; Rieß, David; Drees, Christoph; de Vries, Ingrid; Bertossi, Arianna; Roers, Axel; Sixt, Michael; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Replication-deficient recombinant adenoviruses are potent vectors for the efficient transient expression of exogenous genes in resting immune cells. However, most leukocytes are refractory to efficient adenoviral transduction as they lack expression of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR). To circumvent this obstacle, we generated the R26/CAG-CARΔ1(StopF) (where R26 is ROSA26 and CAG is CMV early enhancer/chicken β actin promoter) knock-in mouse line. This strain allows monitoring of in situ Cre recombinase activity through expression of CARΔ1. Simultaneously, CARΔ1 expression permits selective and highly efficient adenoviral transduction of immune cell populations, such as mast cells or T cells, directly ex vivo in bulk cultures without prior cell purification or activation. Furthermore, we show that CARΔ1 expression dramatically improves adenoviral infection of in vitro differentiated conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), basophils, mast cells, as well as Hoxb8-immortalized hematopoietic progenitor cells. This novel dual function mouse strain will hence be a valuable tool to rapidly dissect the function of specific genes in leukocyte physiology. PMID:25787118

  16. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yuanhui; He, Jinsheng; Zheng, Xianxian; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yan; Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin; Hong, Tao

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  17. The route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influences the recruitment of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the lung that provide potent protection from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suda, Tatsuya; Kawano, Masaaki; Nogi, Yasuhisa; Ohno, Naohito; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Matsui, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in the lung are considered to confer protection from respiratory viruses. Several groups demonstrated that the route of priming was likely to have an implication for the trafficking of antigen-specific CTLs. Therefore, we investigated whether the route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influenced the recruitment of virus-specific CTLs in the lung that should provide potent protection from influenza A virus. Mice were immunized with recombinant adenovirus expressing the matrix (M1) protein of influenza A virus via various immunization routes involving intraperitoneal, intranasal, intramuscular, or intravenous administration as well as subcutaneous administration in the hind hock. We found that the immunization route dramatically impacted the recruitment of M1-specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells both in the lung and the spleen. Surprisingly, hock immunization was most effective for the accumulation in the lung of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells that possessed M1-specific cytolytic activity. Further, antigen-driven IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells in the lung, but not in the spleen, were likely to be correlated with the resistance to challenge with influenza A virus. These results may improve our ability to design vaccines that target virus-specific CTL responses to respiratory viruses such as influenza A virus. PMID:21722671

  18. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Dolzhikova, Inna V.; Shcherbinin, Dmitry N.; Zubkova, Olga V.; Ivanova, Tatiana I.; Tukhvatulin, Amir I.; Shmarov, Maxim M.; Logunov, Denis Y.; Naroditsky, Boris S.; Gintsburg, Aleksandr L.

    2016-01-01

    Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies) is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh), for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection. PMID:26962869

  19. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed

    Burmistrova, Daria A; Tillib, Sergey V; Shcheblyakov, Dmitry V; Dolzhikova, Inna V; Shcherbinin, Dmitry N; Zubkova, Olga V; Ivanova, Tatiana I; Tukhvatulin, Amir I; Shmarov, Maxim M; Logunov, Denis Y; Naroditsky, Boris S; Gintsburg, Aleksandr L

    2016-01-01

    Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies) is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh), for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection. PMID:26962869

  20. Differential Type I Interferon-dependent Transgene Silencing of Helper-dependent Adenoviral vs. Adeno-associated Viral Vectors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Bertin, Terry K; Rogers, Geoffrey L; Cela, Racel G; Zolotukhin, Irene; Palmer, Donna J; Ng, Philip; Herzog, Roland W; Lee, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    We previously dissected the components of the innate immune response to Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) using genetic models, and demonstrated that multiple pattern recognition receptor signaling pathways contribute to this host response to HDAds in vivo. Based on analysis of cytokine expression profiles, type I interferon (IFN) mRNA is induced in host mouse livers at 1 hour post-injection. This type I IFN signaling amplifies cytokine expression in liver independent of the nature of vector DNA sequences after 3 hours post-injection. This type I IFN signaling in response to HDAds administration contributes to transcriptional silencing of both HDAd prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA in liver. This silencing occurs early and is mediated by epigenetic modification as shown by in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with anti-histone deacetylase (HDAC) and promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML). In contrast, self-complementary adeno-associated viral vectors (scAAVs) showed significantly lower induction of type I IFN mRNA in liver compared to HDAds at both early and late time points. These results show that the type I IFN signaling dependent transgene silencing differs between AAV and HDAd vectors after liver-directed gene transfer. PMID:23319058

  1. Highly efficient adenoviral transduction of pancreatic islets using a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pamuditha N; Atto, Zaid; Regeenes, Romario; Tufa, Uilki; Chen, Yih Yang; Chan, Warren C W; Volchuk, Allen; Kilkenny, Dawn M; Rocheleau, Jonathan V

    2016-08-01

    Tissues are challenging to genetically manipulate due to limited penetration of viral particles resulting in low transduction efficiency. We are particularly interested in expressing genetically-encoded sensors in ex vivo pancreatic islets to measure glucose-stimulated metabolism, however poor viral penetration biases these measurements to only a subset of cells at the periphery. To increase mass transfer of viral particles, we designed a microfluidic device that holds islets in parallel hydrodynamic traps connected by an expanding by-pass channel. We modeled viral particle flow into the tissue using fluorescently-labelled gold nanoparticles of varying sizes and showed a penetration threshold of only ∼5 nm. To increase this threshold, we used EDTA to transiently reduce cell-cell adhesion and expand intercellular space. Ultimately, a combination of media flow and ETDA treatment significantly increased adenoviral transduction to the core of the islet. As proof-of-principle, we used this protocol to transduce an ER-targeted redox sensitive sensor (eroGFP), and revealed significantly greater ER redox capacity at core islet cells. Overall, these data demonstrate a robust method to enhance transduction efficiency of islets, and potentially other tissues, by using a combination of microfluidic flow and transient tissue expansion. PMID:27378588

  2. PCR diagnostics and monitoring of adenoviral infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Bil-Lula, Iwona; Ussowicz, Marek; Rybka, Blanka; Wendycz-Domalewska, Danuta; Ryczan, Renata; Gorczyńska, Ewa; Kałwak, Krzysztof; Woźniak, Mieczysław

    2010-12-01

    After stem cell transplantation, human patients are prone to life-threatening opportunistic infections with a plethora of microorganisms. We report a retrospective study on 116 patients (98 children, 18 adults) who were transplanted in a pediatric bone marrow transplantation unit. Blood, urine and stool samples were collected and monitored for adenovirus (AdV) DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) on a regular basis. AdV DNA was detected in 52 (44.8%) patients, with mortality reaching 19% in this subgroup. Variables associated with adenovirus infection were transplantations from matched unrelated donors and older age of the recipient. An increased seasonal occurrence of adenoviral infections was observed in autumn and winter. Analysis of immune reconstitution showed a higher incidence of AdV infections during periods of low T-lymphocyte count. This study also showed a strong interaction between co-infections of AdV and BK polyomavirus in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. PMID:20848295

  3. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Castello, R; Borzone, R; D'Aria, S; Annunziata, P; Piccolo, P; Brunetti-Pierri, N

    2016-02-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate that ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Toward this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared with saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with ethylene glycol, a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy. PMID:26609667

  4. Factors involved in the maturation of murine dendritic cells transduced with adenoviral vector variants

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Naoko; Koretomo, Ryosuke; Murakami, Sayaka |; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki |; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Fujita, Takuya |; Yamamoto, Akira; Okada, Naoki |

    2008-05-10

    Adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is an attractive method for manipulating the immunostimulatory properties of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immunotherapy. DCs treated with Ad have phenotype alterations (maturation) that facilitate T cell sensitization. We investigated the mechanisms of DC maturation with Ad transduction. Expression levels of a maturation marker (CD40) on DCs treated with conventional Ad, fiber-modified Ads (AdRGD, AdF35, AdF35{delta}RGD), or a different serotype Ad (Ad35) were correlated with their transduction efficacy. The {alpha}{sub v}-integrin directional Ad, AdRGD, exhibited the most potent ability to enhance both foreign gene expression and CD40 expression, and induced secretion of interleukin-12, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, and interferon-{alpha} in DCs. The presence of a foreign gene expression cassette in AdRGD was not necessary for DC maturation. Maturation of DCs treated with AdRGD was suppressed by destruction of the Ad genome, inhibition of endocytosis, or endosome acidification, whereas proteasome inhibition increased CD40 expression levels on DCs. Moreover, inhibition of {alpha}{sub v}-integrin signal transduction and blockade of cytokine secretion affected the maturation of DCs treated with AdRGD only slightly or not at all, respectively. Thus, our data provide evidence that Ad-induced DC maturation is due to Ad invasion of the DCs, followed by nuclear transport of the Ad genome, and not to the expression of foreign genes.

  5. PCR diagnostics and monitoring of adenoviral infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ussowicz, Marek; Rybka, Blanka; Wendycz-Domalewska, Danuta; Ryczan, Renata; Gorczyńska, Ewa; Kałwak, Krzysztof; Woźniak, Mieczysław

    2010-01-01

    After stem cell transplantation, human patients are prone to life-threatening opportunistic infections with a plethora of microorganisms. We report a retrospective study on 116 patients (98 children, 18 adults) who were transplanted in a pediatric bone marrow transplantation unit. Blood, urine and stool samples were collected and monitored for adenovirus (AdV) DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) on a regular basis. AdV DNA was detected in 52 (44.8%) patients, with mortality reaching 19% in this subgroup. Variables associated with adenovirus infection were transplantations from matched unrelated donors and older age of the recipient. An increased seasonal occurrence of adenoviral infections was observed in autumn and winter. Analysis of immune reconstitution showed a higher incidence of AdV infections during periods of low T-lymphocyte count. This study also showed a strong interaction between co-infections of AdV and BK polyomavirus in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. PMID:20848295

  6. Evaluation of CD46 re-targeted adenoviral vectors for clinical ovarian cancer intraperitoneal therapy.

    PubMed

    Hulin-Curtis, S L; Uusi-Kerttula, H; Jones, R; Hanna, L; Chester, J D; Parker, A L

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer accounts for >140 000 deaths globally each year. Typically, disease is asymptomatic until an advanced, incurable stage. Although response to cytotoxic chemotherapy is frequently observed, resistance to conventional platinum-based therapies develop rapidly. Improved treatments are therefore urgently required. Virotherapy offers great potential for ovarian cancer, where the application of local, intraperitoneal delivery circumvents some of the limitations of intravenous strategies. To develop effective, adenovirus (Ad)-based platforms for ovarian cancer, we profiled the fluid and cellular components of patient ascites for factors known to influence adenoviral transduction. Levels of factor X (FX) and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in ascitic fluid were quantified and tumor cells were assessed for the expression of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and CD46. We show that clinical ascites contains significant levels of FX but consistently high CD46 expression. We therefore evaluated in vitro the relative transduction of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) by Ad5 (via CAR) and Ad5 pseudotyped with the fiber of Ad35 (Ad5T*F35++) via CD46. Ad5T*F35++ achieved significantly increased transduction in comparison to Ad5 (P<0.001), independent of FX and nAb levels. We therefore propose selective transduction of CD46 over-expressing EOCs using re-targeted, Ad35-pseudotyped Ad vectors may represent a promising virotherapy for ovarian cancer. PMID:27229159

  7. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Raffaele; Borzone, Roberta; D’Aria, Stefania; Annunziata, Patrizia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate which ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Towards this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared to saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with Ethylene Glycol (EG), a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy. PMID:26609667

  8. Fetal muscle gene transfer is not enhanced by an RGD capsid modification to high-capacity adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Hughes, T; Biermann, V; Volpers, C; Goldberg, L; Bergelson, J; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2003-10-01

    High levels of alpha(v) integrin expression by fetal muscle suggested that vector re-targeting to integrins could enhance adenoviral vector-mediated transduction, thereby increasing safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer in utero. High-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors modified by an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide motif in the HI loop of the adenoviral fiber (RGD-HC-Ad) have demonstrated efficient gene transfer through binding to alpha(v) integrins. To test integrin targeting of HC-Ad vectors for fetal muscle gene transfer, we compared unmodified and RGD-modified HC-Ad vectors. In vivo, unmodified HC-Ad vector transduced fetal mouse muscle with four-fold higher efficiency compared to RGD-HC-Ad vector. Confirming that the difference was due to muscle cell autonomous factors and not mechanical barriers, transduction of primary myogenic cells isolated from murine fetal muscle in vitro demonstrated a three-fold better transduction by HC-Ad vector than by RGD-HC-Ad vector. We hypothesized that the high expression level of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), demonstrated in fetal muscle cells both in vitro and in vivo, was the crucial variable influencing the relative transduction efficiencies of HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors. To explore this further, we studied transduction by HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors in paired cell lines that expressed alpha(v) integrins and differed only by the presence or absence of CAR expression. The results increase our understanding of factors that will be important for retargeting HC-Ad vectors to enhance gene transfer to fetal muscle. PMID:12960972

  9. Enhanced suppression of adenovirus replication by triple combination of anti-adenoviral siRNAs, soluble adenovirus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and cidofovir.

    PubMed

    Pozzuto, Tanja; Röger, Carsten; Kurreck, Jens; Fechner, Henry

    2015-08-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) generally induce mild self-limiting respiratory or intestinal infections but can also cause serious disease with fatal outcomes in immunosuppressed patients. Antiviral drug therapy is an important treatment for adenoviral infections but its efficiency is limited. Recently, we have shown that gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new approach to inhibit adenoviral infection. In the present in vitro study, we examined whether the efficiency of an RNAi-based anti-adenoviral therapy can be further increased by combination with a virus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and with the antiviral drug cidofovir. Initially, three siRNAs, siE1A_4, siIVa2_2 and Pol-si2, targeting the adenoviral E1A, IVa2 and DNA polymerase mRNAs, respectively, were used for gene silencing. Replication of the Ad was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by each siRNA, but the efficiency of inhibition differed (Pol-si2>siIVa2_2>siE1A_4). Double or triple combinations of the siRNAs compared with single siRNAs did not result in a measurably higher suppression of Ad replication. Combination of the siRNAs (alone or mixes of two or three siRNAs) with sCAR-Fc markedly increased the suppression of adenoviral replication compared to the same siRNA treatment without sCAR-Fc. Moreover, the triple combination of a mix of all three siRNAs, sCAR-Fc and cidofovir was about 23-fold more efficient than the combination of siRNAs mix/sCAR-Fc and about 95-fold more efficient than the siRNA mix alone. These data demonstrate that co-treatment of cells with sCAR-Fc and cidofovir is suitable to increase the efficiency of anti-adenoviral siRNAs. PMID:26026665

  10. Retrograde optogenetic characterization of the pontospinal module of the locus coeruleus with a canine adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Hickey, Louise; Perrins, Ray; Werlen, Emilie; Patel, Amisha A; Hirschberg, Stefan; Jones, Matt W; Salinas, Sara; Kremer, Eric J; Pickering, Anthony E

    2016-06-15

    Noradrenergic neurons of the brainstem extend projections throughout the neuraxis to modulate a wide range of processes including attention, arousal, autonomic control and sensory processing. A spinal projection from the locus coeruleus (LC) is thought to regulate nociceptive processing. To characterize and selectively manipulate the pontospinal noradrenergic neurons in rats, we implemented a retrograde targeting strategy using a canine adenoviral vector to express channelrhodopsin2 (CAV2-PRS-ChR2-mCherry). LC microinjection of CAV2-PRS-ChR2-mCherry produced selective, stable, transduction of noradrenergic neurons allowing reliable opto-activation in vitro. The ChR2-transduced LC neurons were opto-identifiable in vivo and functional control was demonstrated for >6 months by evoked sleep-wake transitions. Spinal injection of CAV2-PRS-ChR2-mCherry retrogradely transduced pontine noradrenergic neurons, predominantly in the LC but also in A5 and A7. A pontospinal LC (ps:LC) module was identifiable, with somata located more ventrally within the nucleus and with a discrete subset of projection targets. These ps:LC neurons had distinct electrophysiological properties with shorter action potentials and smaller afterhyperpolarizations compared to neurons located in the core of the LC. In vivo recordings of ps:LC neurons showed a lower spontaneous firing frequency than those in the core and they were all excited by noxious stimuli. Using this CAV2-based approach we have demonstrated the ability to retrogradely target, characterise and optogenetically manipulate a central noradrenergic circuit and show that the ps:LC module forms a discrete unit. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26903420

  11. Production of first generation adenoviral vectors for preclinical protocols: amplification, purification and functional titration.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca Estela; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Ana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Gómez-Meda, Belinda; García-Bañuelos, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach in the treatment of several diseases. Currently, the ideal vector has yet to be designed; though, adenoviral vectors (Ad-v) have provided the most utilized tool for gene transfer due principally to their simple production, among other specific characteristics. Ad-v viability represents a critical variable that may be affected by storage or shipping conditions and therefore it is advisable to be assessed previously to protocol performance. The present work is unique in this matter, as the complete detailed process to obtain Ad-v of preclinical grade is explained. Amplification in permissive HEK-293 cells, purification in CsCl gradients in a period of 10 h, spectrophotometric titration of viral particles (VP) and titration of infectious units (IU), yielding batches of AdβGal, AdGFP, AdHuPA and AdMMP8, of approximately 10¹³-10¹⁴ VP and 10¹²-10¹³ IU were carried out. In vivo functionality of therapeutic AdHuPA and AdMMP8 was evidenced in rats presenting CCl₄-induced fibrosis, as more than 60% of fibrosis was eliminated in livers after systemic delivery through iliac vein in comparison with irrelevant AdβGal. Time required to accomplish the whole Ad-v production steps, including IU titration was 20 to 30 days. We conclude that production of Ad-v following standard operating procedures assuring vector functionality and the possibility to effectively evaluate experimental gene therapy results, leaving aside the use of high-cost commercial kits or sophisticated instrumentation, can be performed in a conventional laboratory of cell culture. PMID:21856222

  12. Comparison of Efficacy of Two Different Topical 0.05% Cyclosporine A Formulations in the Treatment of Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis-Related Subepithelial Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktutar, Betül N.; Uçakhan, Ömur Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial infiltrates secondary to adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis may persist for years and cause blurred vision, halos, glare, and photophobia. These infiltrates arise from immune reaction against the virus, and few studies have reported topical cyclosporine A to be effective in the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates. Herein, we describe a patient with adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis-related subepithelial infiltrates who did not respond to treatment with a new topical cyclosporine A emulsion prepared with castor oil (Depores 0.05%; Deva İlaç, Kocaeli, Turkey), while the FDA-approved nanoemulsion formulation provided improvement in symptoms and reduced the inflammatory reaction (Restasis 0.05%; Allergan, Irvine, Calif., USA). PMID:27065851

  13. Comparison of Efficacy of Two Different Topical 0.05% Cyclosporine A Formulations in the Treatment of Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis-Related Subepithelial Infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Bayraktutar, Betül N; Uçakhan, Ömur Ö

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial infiltrates secondary to adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis may persist for years and cause blurred vision, halos, glare, and photophobia. These infiltrates arise from immune reaction against the virus, and few studies have reported topical cyclosporine A to be effective in the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates. Herein, we describe a patient with adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis-related subepithelial infiltrates who did not respond to treatment with a new topical cyclosporine A emulsion prepared with castor oil (Depores 0.05%; Deva İlaç, Kocaeli, Turkey), while the FDA-approved nanoemulsion formulation provided improvement in symptoms and reduced the inflammatory reaction (Restasis 0.05%; Allergan, Irvine, Calif., USA). PMID:27065851

  14. Amelioration of carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis and portal hypertension in rat using adenoviral gene transfer of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gang; Huang, Xiang-Jun; Luo, Hong-Wu; Huang, Fei-Zhou; Liu, Xun-Yang; Wang, Yong-Heng

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether a virus constitutively expressing active Akt is useful to prevent cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). METHODS: Using cre-loxp technique, we created an Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus, in which Akt is labeled by a HA tag and its expression is driven by myr promoter. Further, through measuring enzyme levels and histological structure, we determined the efficacy of this Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus in inhibiting the development of cirrhosis induced by CCl4 in rats. Lastly, using western blotting, we examined the expression levels and/or phosphorylation status of Akt, apoptotic mediators, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and markers for hepatic stellate cells activation to understand the underlying mechanisms of protective role of this virus. RESULTS: The Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction amplification of inserted Akt gene and sequencing for full length of inserted fragment, which was consistent with the sequence reported in the GenBank. The concentrations of Ad-myr-HA-Akt and adenoviral enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) virus used in the current study were 5.5 × 1011 vp/mL. The portal vein diameter, peak velocity of blood flow, portal blood flow and congestion index were significantly increased in untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups when compared to normal control after the virus was introduced to animal through tail veil injection. In contrast, these parameters in the Akt cirrhosis group were comparable to normal control group. Compared to the normal control, the liver function (Alanine aminotransferase, Aspartate aminotransferase and Albumin) was significantly impaired in the untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups. The Akt cirrhosis group showed significant improvement of liver function when compared to the untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups. The Hyp level and portal vein pressure in Akt cirrhosis groups were also significantly lower than other cirrhosis groups

  15. A reproducible and quantifiable model of choroidal neovascularization induced by VEGF A165 after subretinal adenoviral gene transfer in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Kreppel, Florian; Beck, Susanne; Heiduschka, Peter; Brito, Veronica; Schnichels, Sven; Kochanek, Stefan; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A165 delivered using a high capacity adenoviral vector (HC Ad.VEGF-A) on vascular growth and pathological changes in the rabbit eye. To combine different detection methods of VEGF-A165 overexpression-induced neovascularization in the rabbit. Methods HC Ad.VEGF-A165 was constructed and injected at 5x106 infectious units (iu) into the subretinal space of rabbit eyes. Two and four weeks postinjection, the development of neovascularization and the expression of HC Ad-transduced VEGF-A165 protein were followed up in vivo by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiographies and ex vivo by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry Results We observed a choroidal neovascularization (CNV) with leakage in 83% of the rabbit eyes. Our findings present clear indications that there is a significant effect on the endothelial cells of the choriocapillaris after subretinal transduction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with VEGF-A165 vector. The choroidal endothelial cells were activated, adherent junctions opened, and the fenestration was minimized, while the extracellular matrix localized between the RPE and the endothelium of the choriocapillaris was enlarged toward the lumen of the vessels, inducing a deep invagination of the endothelial cells into the vessel lumen. They also proliferated and formed pathological vessels in the subretinal space. Moreover,there was an increased expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and VEGF-A accompanied by macrophage stimulation, retinal edema, and photoreceptor loss. Conclusions This is the first model of VEGF-induced CNV in the rabbit in which the pathological events following overexpression of VEGF by RPE cells have been described in detail. Many of the features of our experimental CNV resemble those observed clinically in patients having wet age-related macular degeneration. PMID:18682809

  16. Standard free droplet digital polymerase chain reaction as a new tool for the quality control of high-capacity adenoviral vectors in small-scale preparations.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Philip; Stellberger, Thorsten; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Schulz, Eric; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Doerner, Johannes; Baiker, Armin E; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-02-01

    High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdVs) are promising tools for gene therapy as well as for genetic engineering. However, one limitation of the HCAdV vector system is the complex, time-consuming, and labor-intensive production process and the following quality control procedure. Since HCAdVs are deleted for all viral coding sequences, a helper virus (HV) is needed in the production process to provide the sequences for all viral proteins in trans. For the purification procedure of HCAdV, cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation is usually performed followed by buffer exchange using dialysis or comparable methods. However, performing these steps is technically difficult, potentially error-prone, and not scalable. Here, we establish a new protocol for small-scale production of HCAdV based on commercially available adenovirus purification systems and a standard method for the quality control of final HCAdV preparations. For titration of final vector preparations, we established a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) that uses a standard free-end-point PCR in small droplets of defined volume. By using different probes, this method is capable of detecting and quantifying HCAdV and HV in one reaction independent of reference material, rendering this method attractive for accurately comparing viral titers between different laboratories. In summary, we demonstrate that it is possible to produce HCAdV in a small scale of sufficient quality and quantity to perform experiments in cell culture, and we established a reliable protocol for vector titration based on ddPCR. Our method significantly reduces time and required equipment to perform HCAdV production. In the future the ddPCR technology could be advantageous for titration of other viral vectors commonly used in gene therapy. PMID:25640117

  17. Standard Free Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction as a New Tool for the Quality Control of High-Capacity Adenoviral Vectors in Small-Scale Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Philip; Stellberger, Thorsten; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Schulz, Eric; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Doerner, Johannes; Baiker, Armin E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdVs) are promising tools for gene therapy as well as for genetic engineering. However, one limitation of the HCAdV vector system is the complex, time-consuming, and labor-intensive production process and the following quality control procedure. Since HCAdVs are deleted for all viral coding sequences, a helper virus (HV) is needed in the production process to provide the sequences for all viral proteins in trans. For the purification procedure of HCAdV, cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation is usually performed followed by buffer exchange using dialysis or comparable methods. However, performing these steps is technically difficult, potentially error-prone, and not scalable. Here, we establish a new protocol for small-scale production of HCAdV based on commercially available adenovirus purification systems and a standard method for the quality control of final HCAdV preparations. For titration of final vector preparations, we established a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) that uses a standard free-end-point PCR in small droplets of defined volume. By using different probes, this method is capable of detecting and quantifying HCAdV and HV in one reaction independent of reference material, rendering this method attractive for accurately comparing viral titers between different laboratories. In summary, we demonstrate that it is possible to produce HCAdV in a small scale of sufficient quality and quantity to perform experiments in cell culture, and we established a reliable protocol for vector titration based on ddPCR. Our method significantly reduces time and required equipment to perform HCAdV production. In the future the ddPCR technology could be advantageous for titration of other viral vectors commonly used in gene therapy. PMID:25640117

  18. Helper virus-mediated downregulation of transgene expression permits production of recalcitrant helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) that express certain transgene products are impossible to produce because the transgene product is toxic to the producer cells, especially when made in large amounts during vector production. Downregulating transgene expression from the HDAd during vector production is a way to solve this problem. In this report, we show that this can be accomplished by inserting the target sequence for the adenoviral VA RNAI into the 3’ untranslated region of the expression cassette in the HDAd. Thus during vector production, when the producer cells are coinfected with both the helper virus (HV) and the HDAd, the VA RNAI produced by the HV will target the transgene mRNA from the HDAd via the endogenous cellular RNAi pathway. Once the HDAd is produced and purified, transduction of the target cells results in unimpeded transgene expression because of the absence of HV. This simple and universal strategy permits for the robust production of otherwise recalcitrant HDAds. PMID:27331077

  19. AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED CU,ZN-SOD AND MN-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED Cu,Zn-SOD AND Mn-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. JB Smith1, PC Hartig3, MR Blanton3, KK Sulik1,2, and ES Hunter3. 1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and 2Bowles Cente...

  20. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF ADENOVIRAL TRANSDUCTION OF AN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR POSITIVE CELL LINE WITH AN MMTV-LUC REPORTER FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standardization and Validation of Adenoviral Transduction of an Androgen Receptor Positive Cell Line with an MMTV-Luc Reporter for Endocrine Screening P. Hartig, K . Bobseine,
    M. Cardon, C. Lambright and L. E. Gray, Jr. USEPA, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC...

  1. Intradermal vaccination with un-adjuvanted sub-unit vaccines triggers skin innate immunity and confers protective respiratory immunity in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Debeer, Sabine; Piras, Fabienne; Andréoni, Christine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Dubois, Bertrand

    2016-02-10

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination constitutes a promising approach to induce anti-infectious immunity. This route of immunization has mostly been studied with influenza split-virion vaccines. However, the efficacy of ID vaccination for sub-unit vaccines in relation to underlying skin innate immunity remains to be explored for wider application in humans. Relevant animal models that more closely mimic human skin immunity than the widely used mouse models are therefore necessary. Here, we show in domestic swine, which shares striking anatomic and functional properties with human skin, that a single ID delivery of pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoproteins without added adjuvant is sufficient to trigger adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to confer protection from a lethal respiratory infection with PRV. Analysis of early events at the skin injection site revealed up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and accumulation of inflammatory DC. We further show that the sustained induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes results from the combined effects of skin puncture, liquid injection in the dermis and viral antigens. These data highlight that immune protection against respiratory infection can be induced by ID vaccination with a subunit vaccine and reveal that adjuvant requirements are circumvented by the mechanical and antigenic stress caused by ID injection, which triggers innate immunity and mobilization of inflammatory DC at the immunization site. ID vaccination with sub-unit vaccines may thus represent a safe and efficient solution for protection against respiratory infections in swine and possibly also in humans, given the similarity of skin structure and function in both species. PMID:26768129

  2. INGN 201: Ad-p53, Ad5CMV-p53, Adenoviral p53, INGN 101, p53 gene therapy--Introgen, RPR/INGN 201.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    undergoing phase I trials for the potential treatment of lung, breast, ovarian, bladder, liver and brain cancers. Introgen and Aventis Pharma had signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the National Cancer Institute (NCI). NCI will sponsor clinical trials to evaluate and develop RPR/INGN 201 as a potential anticancer agent for these cancer indications. The trials conducted under a NCI-sponsored IND will evaluate RPR/INGN 201 alone and in combination with other anticancer agents. This agreement was originally signed by Rhône-Poulenc Rorer's Gencell. Introgen has completed three phase I clinical trials with INGN 201 in patients with bronchioalveolar cell lung carcinoma, ovarian cancer and recurrent glioblastomas, respectively. Intratumoural injection of RPR/INGN 201 in patients with recurrent glioblastomas was well tolerated and resulted in expression of the p53 protein. Direct administration of RPR/INGN 201 to the lower airways of patients with bronchioalveolar cell lung carcinoma resulted in symptomatic improvement and improved lung function in some patients. In February 2003, Introgen announced that the US Patent and Trademark Office has issued to The Board of Regents of The University of Texas System, patent No. 6,511,847 entitled "Recombinant p53 Adenovirus Methods and Compositions". Introgen Therapeutics is the exclusive licensee of this patent. The patent covers any adenoviral DNA molecules that encode the p53 gene positioned under the control of a promoter. Such a DNA molecule forms the genetic core of Introgen's ADVEXIN cancer therapy. Introgen's ADVEXIN therapy is now covered by up to ten separate US patents relevant to the product including compositions, therapeutic methods of administering the product in virtually any form, alone and in conjunction with the most widely used chemotherapeutic and radiation treatments, as well as its production. Introgen has a number of US patents that relate to the clinical use of ADVEXIN in cancer as

  3. Loss of Endothelial Barrier in Marfan Mice (mgR/mgR) Results in Severe Inflammation after Adenoviral Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Arif, Rawa; Weber, Antje; Zaradzki, Marcin; Richter, Karsten; Ensminger, Stephan; Robinson, Peter Nicholas; Wagner, Andreas H.; Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue. The vascular complications of Marfan syndrome have the biggest impact on life expectancy. The aorta of Marfan patients reveals degradation of elastin layers caused by increased proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study we performed adenoviral gene transfer of human tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (hTIMP-1) in aortic grafts of fibrillin-1 deficient Marfan mice (mgR/mgR) in order to reduce elastolysis. Methods We performed heterotopic infrarenal transplantation of the thoracic aorta in female mice (n = 7 per group). Before implantation, mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas (WT, C57BL/6) were transduced ex vivo with an adenoviral vector coding for human TIMP-1 (Ad.hTIMP-1) or β-galactosidase (Ad.β-Gal). As control mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas received no gene therapy. Thirty days after surgery, overexpression of the transgene was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and collagen in situ zymography. Histologic staining was performed to investigate inflammation, the neointimal index (NI), and elastin breaks. Endothelial barrier function of native not virus-exposed aortas was evaluated by perfusion of fluorescent albumin and examinations of virus-exposed tissue were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results IHC and ISZ revealed sufficient expression of the transgene. Severe cellular inflammation and intima hyperplasia were seen only in adenovirus treated mgR/mgR aortas (Ad.β-Gal, Ad.hTIMP-1 NI: 0.23; 0.43), but not in native and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT (NI: 0.01; 0.00). Compared to native mgR/mgR and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT aorta, the NI is highly significant greater in Ad.hTIMP-1 transduced mgR/mgR aorta (p = 0.001; p = 0.001). As expected, untreated Marfan grafts showed significant more elastolysis compared to WT (p = 0.001). However, elastolysis in Marfan aortas was not reduced by adenoviral overexpression of hTIMP-1

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27245510

  5. Immunogenicity without Efficacy of an Adenoviral Tuberculosis Vaccine in a Stringent Mouse Model for Immunotherapy during Treatment.

    PubMed

    Alyahya, S Anisah; Nolan, Scott T; Smith, Cara M R; Bishai, William R; Sadoff, Jerald; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate if bacterial persistence during TB drug treatment could be overcome by modulation of host immunity, we adapted a clinically-relevant model developed for the evaluation of new drugs and examined if immunotherapy with two adenoviral vaccines, Ad35-TBS (AERAS-402) and Ad26-TBS, could shorten therapy in mice. Even though immunotherapy resulted in strong splenic IFN-γ responses, no effect on bacterial replication in the lungs was seen. Multiplex assay analysis of lung samples revealed the absence of cytokine augmentation such as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2, suggesting that immunization failed to induce immunity in the lungs. In this model, we show that IFN-γ levels were not associated with protection against disease relapse. The results obtained from our study raise questions regarding the traits of protective TB immunity that are relevant for the development of future immunotherapeutic and post-exposure vaccination strategies. PMID:25996375

  6. Clinical and Antiviral Efficacy of an Ophthalmic Formulation of Dexamethasone Povidone-Iodine in a Rabbit Model of Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Christian; Capriotti, Joseph A.; Kumar, Manish; Hobden, Jeffery A.; Foster, Timothy P.; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Thompson, Hilary W.; Mahmud, Rashed; Liang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of a new formulation of topical dexamethasone 0.1%/povidone-iodine 0.4% (FST-100) in reducing clinical symptoms and infectious viral titers in a rabbit model of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Methods. Rabbit corneas were inoculated bilaterally with 2 × 106 plaque-forming-units (PFU) of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) after corneal scarification. Animals were randomized 1:1:1:1 (five rabbits per group) to FST-100, 0.5% cidofovir, tobramycin/dexamethasone (Tobradex; Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, TX) ophthalmic suspension, and balanced salt solution (BSS; Alcon Laboratories). Treatment began 12 hours after viral inoculation and continued for 7 consecutive days. The eyes were clinically scored daily for scleral inflammation (injection), ocular neovascularization, eyelid inflammation (redness), friability of vasculature, inflammatory discharge (pus), and epiphora (excessive tearing). Eye swabs were collected daily before treatment for the duration of the study. Virus was eluted from the swabs and PFU determined by titration on human A549 cells, according to standard procedures. Results. The FST-100 treatment resulted in significantly lower clinical scores (P < 0.05) than did the other treatments. The 0.5% cidofovir exhibited the most ocular toxicity compared with FST-100, tobramycin/dexamethasone, and balanced salt solution treatments. FST-100 and 0.5% cidofovir significantly (P < 0.05) reduced viral titers compared with tobramycin/dexamethasone or balanced salt solution. Conclusions. FST-100 was the most efficacious in minimizing the clinical symptoms of adenovirus infection in rabbit eyes. FST-100 and 0.5% cidofovir were both equally effective in reducing viral titers and decreasing the duration of viral shedding. By providing symptomatic relief in addition to reducing infectious virus titers, FST-100 should be a valuable addition to treatment of epidemic adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. PMID:20702820

  7. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  8. Construction and evaluation of replication-defective recombinant optimized triosephosphate isomerase adenoviral vaccination in Schistosoma japonicum challenged mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yang; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhao, Song; Tang, Jianxia; Zhang, Lu; Dai, Jianrong; Zeng, Mingtao; Lu, Shan; Zhu, Yinchang; Su, Chuan

    2014-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is an endemic, zoonotic parasitic disease that remains a public health concern in China. Development of transmission blocking veterinary vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infection is urgently needed. Replication-defective adenoviral vector is an efficient vaccine delivery system that has been widely used. Its use is associated with high levels of gene insertion and expression. It is easy to construct and prepare, and is safe. It is not known whether this delivery system can improve the protective effect of schistosome vaccination. Triosephosphate isomerase from S. japonicum (SjTPI) is a promising vaccine candidate. Thus far it has induced only partial protection in animal models and needs to be further enhanced to be effective. We constructed a replication-defective adenoviral vector-based vaccine with optimized SjTPI (rAdV-SjTPI.opt). The specific immune responses and protective efficiency in mice were evaluated. Results showed that intramuscular rAdV-SjTPI.opt induced Th1 biased immune responses in the host, while subcutaneous rAdV-SjTPI.opt induced Th2 predominant immune responses. Oral rAdV-SjTPI.opt induced low levels of immune responses and no significant protection. Intramuscular rAdV-SjTPI.opt provided a consistent and repeatable higher protective effect in mice (more than 50%). These findings may be due to the associated higher levels of specific Th1, antibody responses and partially lower level of IL-17A. This report provides a foundation for developing transmission-blocking veterinary vaccines in larger animals. PMID:24397904

  9. Adenoviral-Mediated Glial Cell Line–Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Transfer Has a Protective Effect on Sciatic Nerve Following Constriction-Induced Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  10. Induction of a Protective Heterosubtypic Immune Response Against the Influenza Virus by using Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing Hemagglutinin of the Influenza H5 Virus.

    PubMed

    Shmarov, M M; Sedova, E S; Verkhovskaya, L V; Rudneva, I A; Bogacheva, E A; Barykova, Yu A; Shcherbinin, D N; Lysenko, A A; Tutykhina, I L; Logunov, D Y; Smirnov, Yu A; Naroditsky, B S; Gintsburg, A L

    2010-04-01

    Influenza viruses are characterized by a high degree of antigenic variability, which causes the annual emergence of flu epidemics and irregularly timed pandemics caused by viruses with new antigenic and biological traits. Novel approaches to vaccination can help circumvent this problem. One of these new methods incorporates genetic vaccines based on adenoviral vectors. Recombinant adenoviral vectors which contain hemagglutinin-encoding genes from avian H5N1 and H5N2 (Ad-HA5-1 and Ad-HA5-2) influenza viruses were obtained using the AdEasy Adenoviral Vector System (Stratagene). Laboratory mice received a double intranasal vaccination with Ad-HA5-1 and Ad-HA5-2. This study demonstrates that immunization with recombinant adenoviruses bearing the Н 5 influenza virus hemagglutinin gene induces a immune response which protects immunized mice from a lethal dose of the H5 influenza virus. Moreover, it also protects the host from a lethal dose of the H1 virus, which belongs to the same clade as H5, but does not confer protection from the subtype H3 influenza virus, which belongs to a different clade. PMID:22649637

  11. A Genetically Modified Adenoviral Vector with a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Incorporated into Fiber Fibritin Chimera Prolongs Survival in Experimental Glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Kane, J Robert; Young, Jacob S; Chang, Alan L; Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A; Miska, Jason; Ahmed, Atique U; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Curiel, David T; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-09-01

    The dismal clinical context of advanced-grade glioma demands the development of novel therapeutic strategies with direct patient impact. Adenovirus-mediated virotherapy represents a potentially effective approach for glioma therapy. In this research, we generated a novel glioma-specific adenovirus by instituting more advanced genetic modifications that can maximize the efficiency and safety of therapeutic adenoviral vectors. In this regard, a glioma-specific targeted fiber was developed through the incorporation of previously published glioma-specific, phage-panned peptide (VWT peptide) on a fiber fibritin-based chimeric fiber, designated as "GliomaFF." We showed that the entry of this virus was highly restricted to glioma cells, supporting the specificity imparted by the phage-panned peptide. In addition, the stability of the targeting moiety presented by fiber fibritin structure permitted greatly enhanced infectivity. Furthermore, the replication of this virus was restricted in glioma cells by controlling expression of the E1 gene under the activity of the tumor-specific survivin promoter. Using this approach, we were able to explore the combinatorial efficacy of various adenoviral modifications that could amplify the specificity, infectivity, and exclusive replication of this therapeutic adenovirus in glioma. Finally, virotherapy with this modified virus resulted in up to 70% extended survival in an in vivo murine glioma model. These data demonstrate that this novel adenoviral vector is a safe and efficient treatment for this difficult malignancy. PMID:26058317

  12. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  13. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  14. Cloning and Large-Scale Production of High-Capacity Adenoviral Vectors Based on the Human Adenovirus Type 5.

    PubMed

    Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Zhang, Wenli; Schiwon, Maren; Bergmann, Thorsten; Solanki, Manish; Liu, Jing; Boehme, Philip; Leitner, Theo; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdV) devoid of all viral coding sequences represent one of the most advanced gene delivery vectors due to their high packaging capacity (up to 35 kb), low immunogenicity and low toxicity. However, for many laboratories the use of HCAdV is hampered by the complicated procedure for vector genome construction and virus production. Here, a detailed protocol for efficient cloning and production of HCAdV based on the plasmid pAdFTC containing the HCAdV genome is described. The construction of HCAdV genomes is based on a cloning vector system utilizing homing endonucleases (I-CeuI and PI-SceI). Any gene of interest of up to 14 kb can be subcloned into the shuttle vector pHM5, which contains a multiple cloning site flanked by I-CeuI and PI-SceI. After I-CeuI and PI-SceI-mediated release of the transgene from the shuttle vector the transgene can be inserted into the HCAdV cloning vector pAdFTC. Because of the large size of the pAdFTC plasmid and the long recognition sites of the used enzymes associated with strong DNA binding, careful handling of the cloning fragments is needed. For virus production, the HCAdV genome is released by NotI digest and transfected into a HEK293 based producer cell line stably expressing Cre recombinase. To provide all adenoviral genes for adenovirus amplification, co-infection with a helper virus containing a packing signal flanked by loxP sites is required. Pre-amplification of the vector is performed in producer cells grown on surfaces and large-scale amplification of the vector is conducted in spinner flasks with producer cells grown in suspension. For virus purification, two ultracentrifugation steps based on cesium chloride gradients are performed followed by dialysis. Here tips, tricks and shortcuts developed over the past years working with this HCAdV vector system are presented. PMID:26863087

  15. Adenoviral Vector Vaccination Induces a Conserved Program of CD8+ T Cell Memory Differentiation in Mouse and Man

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Beatrice; Sims, Stuart; Swadling, Leo; O’Hara, Geraldine; de Lara, Catherine; Baban, Dilair; Saghal, Natasha; Lee, Lian Ni; Marchi, Emanuele; Davis, Mark; Newell, Evan; Capone, Stefania; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Ellie; Klenerman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Following exposure to vaccines, antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses develop as long-term memory pools. Vaccine strategies based on adenoviral vectors, e.g., those developed for HCV, are able to induce and sustain substantial CD8+ T cell populations. How such populations evolve following vaccination remains to be defined at a transcriptional level. We addressed the transcriptional regulation of divergent CD8+ T cell memory pools induced by an adenovector encoding a model antigen (beta-galactosidase). We observe transcriptional profiles that mimic those following infection with persistent pathogens, murine and human cytomegalovirus (CMV). Key transcriptional hallmarks include upregulation of homing receptors and anti-apoptotic pathways, driven by conserved networks of transcription factors, including T-bet. In humans, an adenovirus vaccine induced similar CMV-like phenotypes and transcription factor regulation. These data clarify the core features of CD8+ T cell memory following vaccination with adenovectors and indicate a conserved pathway for memory development shared with persistent herpesviruses. PMID:26586434

  16. Balloon Catheter Delivery of Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vector Results in Sustained, Therapeutic hFIX Expression in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Liou, Aimee; Patel, Priti; Palmer, Donna; Grove, Nathan; Finegold, Milton; Piccolo, Pasquale; Donnachie, Elizabeth; Rice, Karen; Beaudet, Arthur; Mullins, Charles; Ng, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an excellent candidate for gene therapy because low levels of factor IX (FIX) (≥1%) result in clinically significant improvement of the bleeding diathesis. Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors can mediate long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. To determine the potential for HDAd-mediated liver-directed hemophilia B gene therapy, we administered an HDAd expressing hFIX into rhesus macaques through a novel and minimally invasive balloon occlusion catheter-based method that permits preferential, high-efficiency hepatocyte transduction with low, subtoxic vector doses. Animals given 1 × 1012 and 1 × 1011 virus particle (vp)/kg achieved therapeutic hFIX levels for the entire observation period (up to 1,029 days). At 3 × 1010 and 1 × 1010 vp/kg, only subtherapeutic hFIX levels were achieved which were not sustained long-term. Balloon occlusion administration of HDAd was well tolerated with negligible toxicity. Five of six animals developed inhibitors to hFIX. These results provide important information in assessing the clinical utility of HDAd for hemophilia B gene therapy. PMID:22828499

  17. Adenoviral p53 gene transfer and gemcitabine in three patients with liver metastases due to advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Christian; Fischer, Rainer; Ehninger, Gerhard; Haag, Cornelie

    2007-01-01

    Background. Current therapies for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas do not improve the life expectancy of patients. Methods. In a non-randomized pilot trail we tested whether a local therapy based upon an adenoviral gene transfer of wild type p53 in combination with gemcitabine administration would be safe in patients with liver metastases due to pancreatic carcinoma. We report on the clinical course of three patients with respect to safety, tolerability and tumor response. Results. Transient grade III toxicities occurred with fever, leucopenia, elevation of AP, ALT, AST, GGT, while grade IV toxicity occurred for bilirubin only. Laboratory tests suggested disseminated intravascular coagulation in all three patients, but fine needle biopsies of liver did not show any histological evidence of thrombus or clot formation. Progression of liver metastases was documented in one and stable disease in another patient two months after treatment. However, a major improvement with regression of the indexed lesion by 80% occurred in a third patient after a single administration of 7.5×1012 viral particles, and time to progression was extended to six months. Conclusion. The combination therapy of viral gene transfer and chemotherapy temporarily controls and diminishes tumor burden. Improvement of the toxicity profile is necessary. Further trials are warranted to improve treatment and life expectancy of patients suffering from fatal diseases such as pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:18333108

  18. Emphysematous lung destruction by cigarette smoke. The effects of latent adenoviral infection on the lung inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Meshi, Bernard; Vitalis, Timothy Z; Ionescu, Diana; Elliott, W Mark; Liu, Chun; Wang, Xiang-Dong; Hayashi, Shizu; Hogg, James C

    2002-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and emphysema are amplified by the presence of latent adenoviral (Ad) infection, and to determine whether this emphysematous process can be reversed by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment. The results confirm that in guinea pigs, chronic cigarette-smoke exposure caused lesions similar to human centrilobular emphysema. They also show that latent Ad infection combined with cigarette-smoke exposure caused an excess increase in lung volume (P < 0.001), air-space volume (P < 0.001), and lung weight (P < 0.01), and further decrease in surface-to-volume ratio (P < 0.001) compared with smoke exposure alone. RA treatment failed to reverse these emphysematous changes. Analysis of inflammatory response in parenchymal and airway tissue showed that smoking caused an increase of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) (P < 0.0002), macrophages (P < 0.001), and CD4 cells (P < 0.0009), and that latent Ad infection independently increased PMNs (P < 0.001), macrophages (P = 0.003), and CD8 cells (P < 0.001). We conclude that latent Ad infection amplifies the emphysematous lung destruction and increases the inflammatory response produced by cigarette-smoke exposure. In this study, the increase in CD4 was associated with cigarette smoke and the increase in CD8 cells with latent Ad infection. PMID:11751203

  19. Neo-islet formation in liver of diabetic mice by helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongying; Oka, Kazuhiro; Yechoor, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by T cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Until now insulin replacement is still the major therapy, because islet transplantation has been limited by donor availability and by the need for long-term immunosuppression. Induced islet neogenesis by gene transfer of Neuogenin3 (Ngn3), the islet lineage-defining specific transcription factor and Betacellulin (Btc), an islet growth factor has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are highly efficient gene transfer vector; however, early generation Ads have several disadvantages for in vivo use. Helper-dependent Ads (HDAds) are the most advanced Ads that were developed to improve the safety profile of early generation of Ads and to prolong transgene expression(1). They lack chronic toxicity because they lack viral coding sequences(2-5) and retain only Ad cis elements necessary for vector replication and packaging. This allows cloning of up to 36 kb genes. In this protocol, we describe the method to generate HDAd-Ngn3 and HDAd-Btc and to deliver these vectors into STZ-induced diabetic mice. Our results show that co-injection of HDAd-Ngn3 and HDAd-Btc induces 'neo islets' in the liver and reverses hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. PMID:23093064

  20. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as "off-the-shelf" therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  1. Prolonged mechanical support in children with severe adenoviral infections: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Punkaj; Tobias, Joseph D; Goyal, Sunali; Hervie, Peter; Harris, Jason B; Sadot, Efraim; Noviski, Natan

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus infections occur primarily in infants and children less than 5 years of age, accounting for 2% to 5% of respiratory illnesses in the pediatric population and 4% to 10% of childhood pneumonias. Although the majority of children with adenovirus disease develop mild upper respiratory tract disease, more severe disease may occur with involvement of the lower respiratory tract characterized by pneumonitis and/or small airways disease. The authors present a case series of 3 high-risk children with severe lower respiratory tract adenoviral infections. These cases demonstrate the potential for the development of severe respiratory involvement from adenovirus in infants and children with comorbid conditions and illustrate that there may be a rapid progression of the disease as well as the need, in selected circumstances, for prolonged mechanical support. We review the role of adenovirus in lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children, its potential to result in life-threatening complications in pediatric patients with comorbid conditions, and the potential life-saving role of mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in these children. PMID:21320864

  2. Hexon-modified recombinant E1-deleted adenoviral vectors as bivalent vaccine carriers for Coxsackievirus A16 and Enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Yong; Chi, Yudan; Yin, Jieyun; Yan, Lijun; Ku, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingwei; Huang, Zhong; Zhou, Dongming

    2015-09-22

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a major public health concern in Asia; more efficient vaccines against HFMD are urgently required. Adenoviral (Ad) capsids have been used widely for the presentation of foreign antigens to induce specific immune responses in the host. Here, we describe a novel bivalent vaccine for HFMD based on the hexon-modified, E1-deleted chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 68 (AdC68). The novel vaccine candidate was generated by incorporating the neutralising epitope of Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), PEP71, into hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), and a shortened neutralising epitope of Enterovirus 71 (EV71), sSP70, into HVR2 of the AdC68 hexon. In order to enhance the immunogenicity of EV71, VP1 of EV71 was cloned into the E1-region of the AdC68 vectors. The results demonstrated that these two epitopes were well presented on the virion surface and had high affinity towards specific antibodies, and VP1 of EV71 was also significantly expressed. In pre-clinical mouse models, the hexon-modified AdC68 elicited neutralising antibodies against both CA16 and EV71, which conferred protection to suckling mice against a lethal challenge of CA16 and EV71. In summary, this study demonstrates that the hexon-modified AdC68 may represent a promising bivalent vaccine carrier against EV71 and CA16 and an epitope-display platform for other pathogens. PMID:26296491

  3. Short-term Correction of Arginase Deficiency in a Neonatal Murine Model With a Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Gau, Chia-Ling; Rosenblatt, Robin A; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Lay, Fides D; Dow, Adrienne C; Livesay, Justin; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Grody, Wayne W; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy has the potential to ameliorate abnormalities before disease onset. Our gene knockout of arginase I (AI) deficiency is characterized by increasing hyperammonemia, neurological deterioration, and early death. We constructed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDV) carrying AI and examined for correction of this defect. Neonates were administered 5 × 109 viral particles/g and analyzed for survival, arginase activity, and ammonia and amino acids levels. The life expectancy of arg−/− mice increased to 27 days while controls died at 14 days with hyperammonemia and in extremis. Death correlated with a decrease in viral DNA/RNA per cell as liver mass increased. Arginase assays demonstrated that vector-injected hepatocytes had ~20% activity of heterozygotes at 2 weeks of age. Hepatic arginine and ornithine in treated mice were similar to those of saline-injected heterozygotes at 2 weeks, whereas ammonia was normal. By 26 days, arginase activity in the treated arg−/− livers declined to <10%, and arginine and ornithine increased. Ammonia levels began increasing by day 25, suggesting the cause of death to be similar to that of uninjected arg−/− mice, albeit at a later time. These studies demonstrate that the AI deficient newborn mouse can be temporarily corrected and rescued using a HDV. PMID:19367256

  4. Highly efficient transient gene expression and gene targeting in primate embryonic stem cells with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiichiro; Mitsui, Kaoru; Aizawa, Emi; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Kawase, Eihachiro; Yamagishi, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Suemori, Hirofumi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are regarded as a potentially unlimited source of cellular materials for regenerative medicine. For biological studies and clinical applications using primate ES cells, the development of a general strategy to obtain efficient gene delivery and genetic manipulation, especially gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR), would be of paramount importance. However, unlike mouse ES (mES) cells, efficient strategies for transient gene delivery and HR in hES cells have not been established. Here, we report that helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAdVs) were able to transfer genes in hES and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fasicularis) ES (cES) cells efficiently. Without losing the undifferentiated state of the ES cells, transient gene transfer efficiency was ≈100%. Using HDAdVs with homology arms, approximately one out of 10 chromosomal integrations of the vector was via HR, whereas the rate was only ≈1% with other gene delivery methods. Furthermore, in combination with negative selection, ≈45% of chromosomal integrations of the vector were targeted integrations, indicating that HDAdVs would be a powerful tool for genetic manipulation in hES cells and potentially in other types of human stem cells, such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. PMID:18768795

  5. Adenoviral delivery of the beta2-adrenoceptor gene in sepsis: a subcutaneous approach in rat for kidney protection.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akio; Imaizumi, Akira; Niimi, Ryo; Yanagawa, Yukishige; Kohsaka, Takao; Johns, Edward J

    2005-12-01

    Successful gene therapy requires gene delivery that is efficient, has an optimal route of administration and has biosafety. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the safety and applicability of the subcutaneous delivery route for adenoviral transgenes containing the human beta(2)-adrenoceptor (adeno-beta(2)-AR) and to investigate whether this approach prevented renal dysfunction in a rat model of endotoxaemic shock induced by LPS (lipopolysaccharide). Subcutaneous administration of adeno-beta(2)-AR (a total of 10(10) viral particles) significantly increased beta-AR density in the kidney, lung and liver, but was without effect on physiological and plasma biochemical parameters. Moreover, this dose of virus did not cause any of the potential toxic responses of viral administration, such as inflammation and tissue TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-alpha expression. Although the LPS challenge caused a decrease in glomerular filtration rate, fractional excretion of sodium and renal beta-AR density in all groups, the reduction in renal function was significantly less in the rats given adeno-beta(2)-AR compared with non-treated rats. Thus, although further evaluation will be required, this initial study demonstrated that the subcutaneous injection of adeno-beta(2)-AR was efficient, comparatively non-pathogenic and potentially therapeutic to deal with acute renal failure associated with sepsis. PMID:16076286

  6. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  7. The HDAC Inhibitor FK228 Enhances Adenoviral Transgene Expression by a Transduction-Independent Mechanism but Does Not Increase Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Angelika; Dzojic, Helena; Rashkova, Victoria; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Essand, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor FK228 has previously been shown to enhance adenoviral transgene expression when cells are pre-incubated with the drug. Upregulation of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR), leading to increased viral transduction, has been proposed as the main mechanism. In the present study, we found that the highest increase in transgene expression was achieved when non-toxic concentrations of FK228 were added immediately after transduction, demonstrating that the main effect by which FK228 enhances transgene expression is transduction-independent. FK228 had positive effects both on Ad5 and Ad5/f35 vectors with a variety of transgenes and promoters, indicating that FK228 works mainly by increasing transgene expression at the transcriptional level. In some cases, the effects were dramatic, as demonstrated by an increase in CD40L expression by FK228 from 0.3% to 62% when the murine prostate cancer cell line TRAMP-C2 was transduced with Ad[CD40L]. One unexpected finding was that FK228 decreased the transgene expression of an adenoviral vector with the prostate cell-specific PPT promoter in the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines LNCaP and PC-346C. This is probably a consequence of alteration of the adenocarcinoma cell lines towards a neuroendocrine differentiation after FK228 treatment. The observations in this study indicate that FK228 enhances adenoviral therapy by a transduction-independent mechanism. Furthermore, since histone deacetylase inhibitors may affect the differentiation of cells, it is important to keep in mind that the activity and specificity of tissue- and tumor-specific promoters may also be affected. PMID:21379379

  8. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  9. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  10. Genetic incorporation of HSV-1 thymidine kinase into the adenovirus protein IX for functional display on the virion

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Le, Long; Sibley, Don A.; Mathis, J. Michael; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: david.curiel@ccc.uab.edu

    2005-08-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been exploited for a wide range of gene therapy applications. Direct genetic modification of the adenovirus capsid proteins has been employed to achieve alteration of vector tropism. We have defined the carboxy-terminus of the minor capsid protein pIX as a locus capable of presenting incorporated ligands on the virus capsid surface. Thus, we sought to exploit the possibility of incorporating functional proteins at pIX. In our current study, we incorporated the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) within pIX to determine if a larger protein of this type could retain functionality in this context. Our study herein clearly demonstrates our ability to rescue viable adenoviral particles that display functional HSV-1 TK as a component of their capsid surface. DNA packaging and cytopathic effect were not affected by this genetic modification to the virus, while CAR-dependent binding was only marginally affected. Using an in vitro [{sup 3}H]-thymidine phosphorylation assay, we demonstrated that the kinase activity of the protein IX-TK fusion protein incorporated into adenoviral virions is functional. Analysis of cell killing after adenovirus infection showed that the protein IX-TK fusion protein could also serve as a therapeutic gene by rendering transduced cells sensitive to gancyclovir. Using 9-[4-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine ([{sup 18}F]-FHBG; a positron-emitting TK substrate), we demonstrated that we could detect specific cell binding and uptake of adenoviral virions containing the protein IX-TK fusion protein at 1 h post-infection. Our study herein clearly demonstrates our ability to rescue viable adenoviral particles that display functional HSV-1 TK as a component of their capsid surface. The alternative display of HSV-1 TK on the capsid may offer advantages with respect to direct functional applications of this gene product. In addition, the determination of an expanded upper limit of incorporable

  11. Comparison of the effect of adenoviral delivery of three superoxide dismutase genes against hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, M D; Katuna, M; Smutney, O M; Froh, M; Dikalova, A; Mason, R P; Samulski, R J; Thurman, R G

    2001-12-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of superoxide dismutase (SOD) overexpression in an acute model of hepatic oxidative stress. Oxidative stress was established using a warm ischemia-reperfusion model, where nearly 70% of the liver was made hypoxic by clamping the hepatic artery and a branch of the portal vein for 1 hr followed by restoration of blood flow. Animals were infected i.v. with 1 x 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU) of adenovirus containing the transgene for cytosolic Cu/Zn-SOD (Ad.SOD1), mitochondrial Mn-SOD (Ad.SOD2), extracellular Cu/Zn-SOD (Ad.SOD3), or the bacterial reporter gene for beta-galactosidase (Ad.lacZ) 3 days prior to experiments. Ad.SOD1 and Ad.SOD2 caused a three-fold increase in SOD expression and activity in liver compared to Ad.lacZ-treated control animals. Intravenous administration of Ad.SOD3 increased SOD activity slightly in serum but not in liver. Increases in serum transaminases and pathology due to ischemia-reperfusion were blunted by Ad.SOD1 and Ad.SOD2; however, extracellular SOD had no significant effect. Moreover, lipid-derived free radical adducts (a(N) = 15.65 G and a(H)(beta) = 2.78 G) were increased by ischemia-reperfusion. This effect was blunted by about 60% in Ad.SOD1- and Ad.SOD2-infected animals, but was unaffected by Ad.SOD3. However, when high doses of Ad.SOD3 (3 x 10(10) PFU) were administered. serum SOD activity was elevated three-fold and was protective against hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury under these conditions. These data demonstrate that adenoviral delivery of superoxide dismutase can effectively reduce hepatic oxidative stress. PMID:11779401

  12. Analyses of chondrogenic induction of adipose mesenchymal stem cells by combined co-stimulation mediated by adenoviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the potential to differentiate into cartilage under stimulation with some reported growth and transcriptional factors, which may constitute an alternative for cartilage replacement approaches. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro chondrogenesis of ASCs transduced with adenoviral vectors encoding insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) either alone or in combinations. Methods Aggregate cultures of characterized ovine ASCs were transduced with 100 multiplicity of infections of Ad.IGF-1, Ad.TGF-β1, Ad.FGF-2, and Ad.SOX9 alone or in combination. These were harvested at various time points for detection of cartilage-specific genes expression by quantitative real-time PCR or after 14 and 28 days for histologic and biochemical analyses detecting proteoglycans, collagens (II, I and X), and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen content, respectively. Results Expression analyses showed that co-expression of IGF-1 and FGF-2 resulted in higher significant expression levels of aggrecan, biglycan, cartilage matrix, proteoglycan, and collagen II (all P ≤0.001 at 28 days). Aggregates co-transduced with Ad.IGF-1/Ad.FGF-2 showed a selective expression of proteoglycans and collagen II, with limited expression of collagens I and × demonstrated by histological analyses, and had significantly greater glycosaminoglycan and collagen production than the positive control (P ≤0.001). Western blot analyses for this combination also demonstrated increased expression of collagen II, while expression of collagens I and × was undetectable and limited, respectively. Conclusion Combined overexpression of IGF-1/FGF-2 within ASCs enhances their chondrogenic differentiation inducing the expression of chondrogenic markers, suggesting that this combination is more beneficial than the other factors tested for the

  13. Large-Scale Production of High-Quality Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors Using Adherent Cells in Cell Factories

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Christian; Bertin, Terry K.; Mouriño, Susana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The most efficient and widely used system for generating helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) is the Cre/loxP system developed by Graham and co-workers (Parks, R.J., Chen, L., Anton, M., Sankar, U., Rudnicki, M.A., and Graham, F.L. [1996]. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 93, 13565–13570). Alternative systems have been developed for HDAd production, but all are limited by the technical complexity of a three-component vector production system for reproducibly generating large quantities of adenovirus with high infectivity and low helper virus (HV) contamination. Recently, these problems were addressed by Ng and co-workers (Palmer, D., and Ng, P. [2003]. Mol Ther. 8, 846–852), who developed an improved system that combines the use of a suspension-adapted producer cell line expressing high levels of Cre recombinase, a HV resistant to mutation, and a refined purification protocol. With this system, >1 × 1013 highly infectious vector particles are easily produced without vector genome rearrangements and having very low HV contamination levels. However, the Ng system incorporates a spinner flask culture system that involves considerable time, effort, and tissue culture medium to produce HDAds. We have an alternative system to obtain comparable quantities with equivalent quality to the spinner flask approach but requiring reduced labor and lower volumes of medium. This method utilizes a 10-chamber cell factory with adherent cells to produce high infectivity of HDAds with minimal HV contamination while improving yield and reducing technical complexity, effort, and medium requirements. This system is easily translatable to the production of clinical-grade HDAds for human trials. PMID:19719388

  14. Proteins encoded near the adenovirus late messenger RNA leader segments

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.B.; Anderson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Small fragments of adenovirus 2 DNA cloned into the single-strand phage M13 were used to select adenoviral messenger RNAs transcribed from the R-strand between map positions 16 and 30. Cell-free translation of these mRNAs produced proteins of 13.5K, 13.6K, and 11.5K, respectively encoded between the first and second segments of the tripartite major late leader, within the ''i''-leader segment, and immediately preceding the third leader segment. Partial sequence analysis of the 13.6K protein is consistent with the hypothesis that it is encoded within the i-leader segment.

  15. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. PMID:24995995

  16. Bone formation in vivo induced by Cbfa1-carrying adenoviral vectors released from a biodegradable porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Toshimasa; Kojima, Hiroko

    2011-06-01

    Overexpression of Cbfa1 (a transcription factor indispensable for osteoblastic differentiation) is expected to induce the formation of bone directly and indirectly in vivo by accelerating osteoblastic differentiation. Adenoviral vectors carrying the cDNA of Cbfa1/til-1(Adv-Cbf1) were allowed to be adsorbed onto porous blocks of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), a biodegradable ceramic, which were then implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically into bone defects. The adenoviral vectors were released sustainingly by biodegradation, providing long-term expression of the genes. Results of the subcutaneous implantation of Adv-Cbfa1-adsorbed β-TCP/osteoprogenitor cells suggest that a larger amount of bone formed in the pores of the implant than in the control material. Regarding orthotopic implantation into bone defects, the released Adv-Cbfa1 accelerated regeneration in the cortical bone, whereas it induced bone resorption in the marrow cavity. A safer gene transfer using a smaller amount of the vector was achieved using biodegradable porous β-TCP as a carrier.

  17. Inhibition of rabies virus multiplication by siRNA delivered through adenoviral vector in vitro in BHK-21 cells and in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Sonwane, Arvind A; Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Chaturvedi, V K; Singh, R P; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate antiviral potential of adenoviral vector-delivered small interfering RNA (siRNA) against rabies, recombinant, replication-defective adenoviral vectors (rAdV) encoding siRNAs targeting rabies virus (RV) polymerase (L) and nucleoprotein (N) genes were developed. The siRNAs were delivered as small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) through these vectors. Treatment of BHK-21 cells with rAdV expressing siRNA targeting L gene (rAdV-L) and N gene (rAdV-N) (100 MOI) and their subsequent infection with RV (0.001 MOI, RV PV-11), reduced RV fluorescent foci by 48.2% (mean±SEM; 48.17±0.6540, N=6) and 41.8% (mean±SEM; 41.83±0.3073, N=6), respectively, with respect to that of BHK-21 cells treated with rAdV expressing negative control siRNA (rAdV-Neg) indicating inhibition of multiplication of RV in BHK-21 cells in response to adenoviral vector mediated siRNA delivery. Also, the similar treatment of BHK-21 cells with rAdV-L and rAdV-N and similar subsequent infection of them with RV resulted in reduction in RV mRNA transcript levels for their respective targets (RV L gene for rAdV-L and N gene for rAdV-N). mRNA transcript level for RV L gene was reduced by 17.88-fold (mean±SEM; 17.88±0.06638, N=6) in cells treated with rAdV-L and that for RV N gene was reduced by 5.7-fold (mean±SEM; 5.7±0.04472, N=6), in cells treated with rAdV-N, in comparison with that in cells treated with rAdV-Neg, as analyzed by using real-time PCR. These in vitro studies showed that between these two, adenoviral vector mediated delivery of siRNA targeting RV L gene was comparatively more effective in inhibiting RV multiplication in BHK-21 cells than that of siRNA targeting RV N gene (p<0.0001). Localized treatment (intramuscular injection in masseter muscle) of mice with 10(7) plaque forming units of either rAdV-L or rAdV-N and subsequent lethal RV infection (15-20LD(50) of CVS-11) at the same site, through the same route, although resulted in 50% protection (3 out of 6 mice survived) against lethal

  18. Peri- and Postnatal Effects of Prenatal Adenoviral VEGF Gene Therapy in Growth-Restricted Sheep.

    PubMed

    Carr, David J; Wallace, Jacqueline M; Aitken, Raymond P; Milne, John S; Martin, John F; Zachary, Ian C; Peebles, Donald M; David, Anna L

    2016-06-01

    Uterine artery (UtA) adenovirus (Ad) vector-mediated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances uterine blood flow in normal sheep pregnancy and increases fetal growth in the overnourished adolescent sheep model of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Herein, we examined its impact on gestation length, neonatal survival, early postnatal growth and metabolism. Singleton-bearing ewes were evenly allocated to receive Ad.VEGF-A165 (5 × 10(10) particles/ml, 10 ml, n = 17) or saline (10 ml, n = 16) injected into each UtA at laparotomy (0.6 gestation). Fetal growth was serially monitored (blind) by ultrasound until delivery. Lambs were weighed and blood was sampled weekly and a glucose tolerance test performed (68-day postnatal age). Hepatic DNA/RNA was extracted at necropsy (83-day postnatal age) to examine methylation status of eight somatotropic axis genes. IGF1 mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, respectively. All pregnancies remained viable following Ad.VEGF-A165 treatment. Fetal abdominal circumference and renal volume were greater in the Ad.VEGF-A165 group compared with the saline group at 21/28 days (P ≤ 0.04) postinjection. At delivery, gestation length (P = 0.07), lamb birthweight (P = 0.08), umbilical girth (P = 0.06), and plasma glucose (P = 0.09) tended to be greater in Ad.VEGF-A165-treated lambs. Levels of neonatal intervention required to ensure survival was equivalent between groups. Absolute postnatal growth rate (P = 0.02), insulin area under the curve (P = 0.04) and carcass weight at necropsy (P = 0.04) were increased by Ad.VEGF-A165 treatment. There was no impact on markers of insulin sensitivity or methylation/expression of key genes involved in somatic growth. Ad.VEGF-A165 gene therapy increased fetal growth in a sheep FGR model, and lambs continued to thrive during the neonatal and early postnatal period. PMID:27103444

  19. Adenoviral-E2F-1 radiosensitizes p53{sup wild-type} and p53{sup null} human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh H.; Hachem, Paul; Khor, L.-Y.; Salem, Naji; Hunt, Kelly K.; Calkins, Peter R.; Pollack, Alan . E-mail: Alan.Pollack@fccc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: E2F-1 is a transcription factor that enhances the radiosensitivity of various cell lines by inducing apoptosis. However, there are conflicting data concerning whether this enhancement is mediated via p53 dependent pathways. Additionally, the role of E2F-1 in the response of human prostate cancer to radiation has not been well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of Adenoviral-E2F-1 (Ad-E2F-1) on the radiosensitivity of p53{sup wild-type} (LNCaP) and p53{sup null} (PC3) prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: LNCaP and PC3 cells were transduced with Ad-E2F-1, Adenoviral-Luciferase (Ad-Luc) control vector, or Adenoviral-p53 (Ad-p53). Expression of E2F-1 and p53 was examined by Western blot analysis. Annexin V and caspase 3 + 7 assays were performed to estimate the levels of apoptosis. Clonogenic survival assays were used to determine overall cell death. Statistical significance was determined by analysis of variance, using the Bonferroni method to correct for multiple comparisons. Results: Western blot analysis confirmed the efficacy of transductions with Ad-E2F-1 and Ad-p53. Ad-E2F-1 transduction significantly enhanced apoptosis and decreased clonogenic survival in both cell lines. These effects were compounded by the addition of RT. Although E2F-1-mediated radiosensitization was independent of p53 status, this effect was more pronounced in p53{sup wild-type} LNCaP cells. When PC3 cells were treated with Ad-p53 in combination with RT and Ad-E2F-1, there was at least an additive reduction in clonogenic survival. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Ad-E2F-1 significantly enhances the response of p53{sup wild-type} and p53{sup null} prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy, although radiosensitization is more pronounced in the presence of p53. Ad-E2F-1 may be a useful adjunct to radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  20. Engineering and Identifying Supercharged Proteins for Macromolecule Delivery into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David B.; Cronican, James J.; Liu, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Supercharged proteins are a class of engineered or naturally occurring proteins with unusually high net positive or negative theoretical charge. Both supernegatively and superpositively charged proteins exhibit a remarkable ability to withstand thermally or chemically induced aggregation. Superpositively charged proteins are also able to penetrate mammalian cells. Associating cargo with these proteins, such as plasmid DNA, siRNA, or other proteins, can enable the functional delivery of these macromolecules into mammalian cells both in vitro and in vivo. The potency of functional delivery in some cases can exceed that of other current methods for macromolecule delivery, including the use of cell-penetrating peptides such as Tat, and adenoviral delivery vectors. This chapter summarizes methods for engineering supercharged proteins, optimizing cell penetration, identifying naturally occurring supercharged proteins, and using these proteins for macromolecule delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:22230574

  1. New pre-pandemic influenza vaccines: an egg- and adjuvant-independent human adenoviral vector strategy induces long-lasting protective immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, M A; Jayashankar, L; Garg, S; Veguilla, V; Lu, X; Singh, N; Katz, J M; Mittal, S K; Sambhara, S

    2007-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses that are currently circulating in southeast Asia may acquire the potential to cause the next influenza pandemic. A number of alternate approaches are being pursued to generate cross-protective, dose-sparing, safe, and effective vaccines, as traditional vaccine approaches, i.e., embryonated egg-grown, are not immunogenic. We developed a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector-based, adjuvant- and egg-independent pandemic influenza vaccine strategy as a potential alternative to conventional egg-derived vaccines. In this paper, we address suboptimal dose and longevity of vaccine-induced protective immunity and demonstrate that a vaccine dose as little as 1 x 10(6) plaque-forming unit (PFU) is sufficient to induce protective immune responses against a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. Furthermore, the vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immune responses and protective immunity persisted at least for a year. PMID:17957181

  2. Adenoviral gene delivery of elafin and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor attenuates NF-kappa B-dependent inflammatory responses of human endothelial cells and macrophages to atherogenic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Peter A; Hitt, Mary; Xing, Zhou; Wang, Jun; Haslett, Chris; Riemersma, Rudolph A; Webb, David J; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2004-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting arterial vessels. Strategies to reduce the inflammatory responses of endothelial cells and macrophages may slow lesion development and prevent complications such as plaque rupture. The human protease human neutrophil elastase (HNE), oxidized low density lipoprotein, LPS, and TNF-alpha were chosen as model stimuli of arterial wall inflammation and led to production of the chemokine IL-8 in endothelial cells. To counteract the activity of HNE, we have examined the effects of adenoviral gene delivery of the anti-elastases elafin, previously demonstrated within human atheroma, and murine secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a related molecule, on the inflammatory responses of human endothelial cells and macrophages to atherogenic stimuli. We developed a technique of precomplexing adenovirus with cationic lipid to augment adenoviral infection efficiency in endothelial cells and to facilitate infection in macrophages. Elafin overexpression protected endothelial cells from HNE-induced IL-8 production and cytotoxicity. Elafin and murine SLPI also reduced endothelial IL-8 release in response to oxidized low density lipoprotein, LPS, and TNF-alpha and macrophage TNF-alpha production in response to LPS. This effect was associated with reduced activation of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB, through up-regulation of IkappaBalpha, in both cell types. Our work suggests a novel and extended anti-inflammatory role for these HNE inhibitors working as effectors of innate immunity to protect tissues against maladaptive inflammatory responses. Our findings indicate that elafin and SLPI may be gene therapy targets for the treatment of atheroma. PMID:15034071

  3. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P; Kashentseva, Elena A; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Curiel, David T; Leppla, Stephen; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2016-03-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. PMID:26740390

  4. Micro-computed tomography of pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by adenoviral gene transfer of biologically active transforming growth factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a novel tool for monitoring acute and chronic disease states in small laboratory animals. Its value for assessing progressive lung fibrosis in mice has not been reported so far. Here we examined the importance of in vivo micro-CT as non-invasive tool to assess progression of pulmonary fibrosis in mice over time. Methods Pulmonary fibrosis was induced in mice by intratracheal delivery of an adenoviral gene vector encoding biologically active TGF-ß1 (AdTGF-ß1). Respiratory gated and ungated micro-CT scans were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post pulmonary adenoviral gene or control vector delivery, and were then correlated with respective histopathology-based Ashcroft scoring of pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Visual assessment of image quality and consolidation was performed by 3 observers and a semi-automated quantification algorithm was applied to quantify aerated pulmonary volume as an inverse surrogate marker for pulmonary fibrosis. Results We found a significant correlation between classical Ashcroft scoring and micro-CT assessment using both visual assessment and the semi-automated quantification algorithm. Pulmonary fibrosis could be clearly detected in micro-CT, image quality values were higher for respiratory gated exams, although differences were not significant. For assessment of fibrosis no significant difference between respiratory gated and ungated exams was observed. Conclusions Together, we show that micro-CT is a powerful tool to assess pulmonary fibrosis in mice, using both visual assessment and semi-automated quantification algorithms. These data may be important in view of pre-clinical pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of lung fibrosis in small laboratory animals. PMID:21176193

  5. Comparison of adenovirus fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres as scaffolds for vector purification and cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A. . E-mail: mab@bcm.edu

    2006-06-05

    The direct genetic modification of adenoviral capsid proteins with new ligands is an attractive means to confer targeted tropism to adenoviral vectors. Although several capsid proteins have been reported to tolerate the genetic fusion of foreign peptides and proteins, direct comparison of cell targeting efficiencies through the different capsomeres has been lacking. Likewise, direct comparison of with one or multiple ligands has not been performed due to a lack of capsid-compatible ligands available for retargeting. Here we utilize a panel of metabolically biotinylated Ad vectors to directly compare targeted transduction through the fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres using a variety of biotinylated ligands including antibodies, transferrin, EGF, and cholera toxin B. These results clearly demonstrate that cell targeting with a variety of high affinity receptor-binding ligands is only effective when transduction is redirected through the fiber protein. In contrast, protein IX and hexon-mediated targeting by the same set of ligands failed to mediate robust vector targeting, perhaps due to aberrant trafficking at the cell surface or inside targeted cells. These data suggest that vector targeting by genetic incorporation of high affinity ligands will likely be most efficient through modification of the adenovirus fiber rather than the protein IX and hexon capsomeres. In contrast, single-step monomeric avidin affinity purification of Ad vectors using the metabolic biotinylation system is most effective through capsomeres like protein IX and hexon.

  6. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Loaded With an Oncolytic Adenovirus Suppress the Anti-adenoviral Immune Response in the Cotton Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Atique U; Rolle, Cleo E; Tyler, Matthew A; Han, Yu; Sengupta, Sadhak; Wainwright, Derek A; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Ulasov, Ilya V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2010-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviral virotherapy is an attractive treatment modality for cancer. However, following intratumoral injections, oncolytic viruses fail to efficiently migrate away from the injection site and are rapidly cleared by the immune system. We have previously demonstrated enhanced viral delivery and replicative persistence in vivo using human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as delivery vehicles. In this study, we evaluated the immune response to adenovirus (Ad)-loaded MSCs using the semipermissive cotton rat (CR) model. First, we isolated MSCs from CR bone marrow aspirates. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that CR MSCs supported the replication of Ads in vitro. Moreover, we observed similar levels of suppression of T-cell proliferation in response to mitogenic stimulation, by MSCs alone and virus-loaded MSCs. Additionally, we found that MSCs suppressed the production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) by activated T cells. In our in vivo model, CR MSCs enhanced the dissemination and persistence of Ad, compared to virus injection alone. Collectively, our data suggest that the use of MSCs as a delivery strategy for oncolytic Ad potentially offers a myriad of benefits, including improved delivery, enhanced dissemination, and increased persistence of viruses via suppression of the antiviral immune response. PMID:20588259

  7. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells loaded with an oncolytic adenovirus suppress the anti-adenoviral immune response in the cotton rat model.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Atique U; Rolle, Cleo E; Tyler, Matthew A; Han, Yu; Sengupta, Sadhak; Wainwright, Derek A; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Ulasov, Ilya V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2010-10-01

    Oncolytic adenoviral virotherapy is an attractive treatment modality for cancer. However, following intratumoral injections, oncolytic viruses fail to efficiently migrate away from the injection site and are rapidly cleared by the immune system. We have previously demonstrated enhanced viral delivery and replicative persistence in vivo using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as delivery vehicles. In this study, we evaluated the immune response to adenovirus (Ad)-loaded MSCs using the semipermissive cotton rat (CR) model. First, we isolated MSCs from CR bone marrow aspirates. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that CR MSCs supported the replication of Ads in vitro. Moreover, we observed similar levels of suppression of T-cell proliferation in response to mitogenic stimulation, by MSCs alone and virus-loaded MSCs. Additionally, we found that MSCs suppressed the production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) by activated T cells. In our in vivo model, CR MSCs enhanced the dissemination and persistence of Ad, compared to virus injection alone. Collectively, our data suggest that the use of MSCs as a delivery strategy for oncolytic Ad potentially offers a myriad of benefits, including improved delivery, enhanced dissemination, and increased persistence of viruses via suppression of the antiviral immune response. PMID:20588259

  8. Permissive environment in postnatal wounds induced by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 prevents scar formation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ashley; Kozin, Elliott D; Keswani, Sundeep G; Vaikunth, Sachin S; Katz, Anna B; Zoltick, Philip W; Favata, Michele; Radu, Antoneta P; Soslowsky, Louis J; Herlyn, Meenhard; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Wound healing in the mid-gestation fetus is scarless with minimal inflammation and a unique extracellular matrix. We have previously documented the relative lack of inflammatory cytokines in this environment. We demonstrate that interleukin (IL)-10 is highly expressed in mid-gestation human fetal skin but is absent in postnatal human skin. We hypothesize that overexpression of IL-10 in postnatal skin may replicate a permissive environment for scarless healing. To study the mechanism underlying this process we performed immunohistochemistry for IL-10 in human mid-gestation fetal and postnatal skin. We also determined if adenoviral-mediated overexpression of IL-10 could allow for scarless wound healing in a murine incisional wound model. Wounds were analyzed at 1-90 days postwounding for effects on scar formation, inflammatory response, and biomechanical properties. Ad-IL-10 reconstitutes a permissive environment for scarless healing as shown by reconstitution of a normal dermal reticular collagen pattern and distribution of dermal elements. Compared with controls, Ad-IL-10 treated wounds showed reduced inflammatory response and no difference in biomechanical parameters. Therefore, overexpression of IL-10 in postnatal wounds results in a permissive environment for scarless wound repair, possibly by replicating a fetal wound environment. PMID:18086289

  9. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-02-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  10. Developing Adenoviral Vectors Encoding Therapeutic Genes Toxic to Host Cells: Comparing Binary and Single Inducible Vectors Expressing Truncated E2F-1

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G.; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Hao, Hongying; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, H. Sam

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors are highly efficient at transferring genes into cells and are broadly used in cancer gene therapy. However, many therapeutic genes are toxic to vector host cells and thus inhibit vector production. The truncated form of E2F-1 (E2Ftr), which lacks the transactivation domain, can significantly induce cancer cell apoptosis, but is also toxic to HEK-293 cells and inhibits adenovirus replication. To overcome this, we have developed binary- and single-vector systems with a modified tetracycline-off inducible promoter to control E2Ftr expression. We compared several vectors and found that the structure of expression cassettes in vectors significantly affects E2Ftr expression. One construct expresses high levels of inducible E2Ftr and efficiently causes apoptotic cancer cell death by activation of caspase-3. The approach developed in this study may be applied in other viral vectors for encoding therapeutic genes that are toxic to their host cells and/or inhibit vector propagation. PMID:20003994

  11. Configurations of a two-tiered amplified gene expression system in adenoviral vectors designed to improve the specificity of in vivo prostate cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sato, M; Figueiredo, ML; Burton, JB; Johnson, M; Chen, M; Powell, R; Gambhir, SS; Carey, M; Wu, L

    2009-01-01

    Effective treatment for recurrent, disseminated prostate cancer is notably limited. We have developed adenoviral vectors with a prostate-specific two-step transcriptional amplification (TSTA) system that would express therapeutic genes at a robust level to target metastatic disease. The TSTA system employs the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter/enhancer to drive a potent synthetic activator, which in turn activates the expression of the therapeutic gene. In this study, we explored different configurations of this bipartite system and discovered that physical separation of the two TSTA components into E1 and E3 regions of adenovirus was able to enhance androgen regulation and cell-discriminatory expression. The TSTA vectors that express imaging reporter genes were assessed by noninvasive imaging technologies in animal models. The improved selectivity of the E1E3 configured vector was reflected in silenced ectopic expression in the lung. Significantly, the enhanced specificity of the E1E3 vector enabled the detection of lung metastasis of prostate cancer. An E1E3 TSTA vector that expresses the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene can effectively direct positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the tumor. The prostate-targeted gene delivery vectors with robust and cell-specific expression capability will advance the development of safe and effective imaging guided therapy for recurrent metastatic stages of prostate cancer. PMID:18305574

  12. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  13. Adenoviral targeting of malignant melanoma for fluorescence-guided surgery prevents recurrence in orthotopic nude-mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma requires precise resection in order to avoid metastatic recurrence. We report here that the telomerase-dependent, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-containing adenovirus OBP-401 could label malignant melanoma with GFP in situ in orthotopic mouse models. OBP-401-based fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) resulted in the complete resection of malignant melanoma in the orthotopic models, where conventional bright-light surgery (BLS) could not. High-dose administration of OBP-401 enabled FGS without residual cancer cells or recurrence, due to its dual effect of cancer-cell labeling with GFP and killing. PMID:26701857

  14. Intratracheal Instillation of High Dose Adenoviral Vectors Is Sufficient to Induce Lung Injury and Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiyuan; Chen, Tianji; Bozkanat, Melike; Ibe, Joyce Christina F.; Christman, John W.; Raj, J. Usha; Zhou, Guofei

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) vectors are common tools in gene therapy. Since Ad vectors are known to activate innate and adaptive immunity, we investigated whether intratracheal administration of Ad vectors alone is sufficient to induce lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. Methods We instilled Ad viruses ranging from 107 to 1.625×109 ifu/mouse as well as the same volume of PBS and bleomycin. 14 and 21 days after administration, we collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and mouse lung tissues. We measured the protein concentration, total and differential cell counts, and TGF-β1 production, performed Trichrome staining and Sircol assay, determined gene and protein levels of profibrotic cytokines, MMPs, and Wnt signaling proteins, and conducted TUNEL staining and co-immunofluorescence for GFP and α-SMA staining. Results Instillation of high dose Ad vectors (1.625×109 ifu/mouse) into mouse lungs induced high levels of protein content, inflammatory cells, and TGF-β1 in BALF, comparable to those in bleomycin-instilled lungs. The collagen content and mRNA levels of Col1a1, Col1a2, PCNA, and α-SMA were also increased in the lungs. Instillation of both bleomycin and Ad vectors increased expression levels of TNFα and IL-1β but not IL-10. Instillation of bleomycin but not Ad increased the expression of IL-1α, IL-13 and IL-16. Treatment with bleomycin or Ad vectors increased expression levels of integrin α1, α5, and αv, MMP9, whereas treatment with bleomycin but not Ad vectors induced MMP2 expression levels. Both bleomycin and Ad vectors induced mRNA levels of Wnt2, 2b, 5b, and Lrp6. Intratracheal instillation of Ad viruses also induced DNA damages and Ad viral infection-mediated fibrosis is not limited to the infection sites. Conclusions Our results suggest that administration of Ad vectors induces an inflammatory response, lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis in a dose dependent manner. PMID:25551570

  15. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-01

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD. PMID:16247462

  16. Competitive Inhibition of Lysine Acetyltransferase 2B by a Small Motif of the Adenoviral Oncoprotein E1A.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shasha; Liu, Ke; Chen, Yanheng; Zhang, Shijun; Lin, Juanyu; Gong, Chenfang; Jin, Quanwen; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Chen, Ruichuan; Ji, Zhiliang; Han, Aidong

    2016-07-01

    The adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) oncoprotein hijacks host cells via direct interactions with many key cellular proteins, such as KAT2B, also known as PCAF (p300/CBP associated factor). E1A binds the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain of KAT2B to repress its transcriptional activation. However, the molecular mechanism by which E1A inhibits the HAT activity is not known. Here we demonstrate that a short and relatively conserved N-terminal motif (cNM) in the intrinsically disordered E1A protein is crucial for KAT2B interaction, and inhibits its HAT activity through a direct competition with acetyl-CoA, but not its substrate histone H3. Molecular modeling together with a series of mutagenesis experiments suggests that the major helix of E1A cNM binds to a surface of the acetyl-CoA pocket of the KAT2B HAT domain. Moreover, transient expression of the cNM peptide is sufficient to inhibit KAT2B-specific H3 acetylation H3K14ac in vivo Together, our data define an essential motif cNM in N-terminal E1A as an acetyl-CoA entry blocker that directly associates with the entrance of acetyl-CoA binding pocket to block the HAT domain access to its cofactor. PMID:27143356

  17. Adenovirus Specific Pre-Immunity Induced by Natural Route of Infection Does Not Impair Transduction by Adenoviral Vaccine Vectors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; E. Maduro Bouillet, Leoneide; Dorigo, Natalia A.; Fraefel, Cornel; Bruna-Romero, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAd5V) vectors are gold standards of T-cell immunogenicity as they efficiently induce also humoral responses to exogenous antigens, in particular when used in prime-boost protocols. Some investigators have shown that pre-existing immunity to adenoviruses interferes with transduction by adenoviral vectors, but the actual extent of this interference is not known since it has been mostly studied in mice using unnatural routes of infection and virus doses. Here we studied the effects of HAd5V-specific immune responses induced by intranasal infection on the transduction efficiency of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Of interest, when HAd5V immunity was induced in mice by the natural respiratory route, the pre-existing immunity against HAd5V did not significantly interfere with the B and T-cell immune responses against the transgene products induced after a prime/boost inoculation protocol with a recombinant HAd5V-vector, as measured by ELISA and in vivo cytotoxic T-cell assays, respectively. We also correlated the levels of HAd5V-specific neutralizing antibodies (Ad5NAbs) induced in mice with the levels of Ad5NAb titers found in humans. The data indicate that approximately 60% of the human serum samples tested displayed Ad5NAb levels that could be overcome with a prime-boost vaccination protocol. These results suggest that recombinant HAd5V vectors are potentially useful for prime-boost vaccination strategies, at least when pre-existing immunity against HAd5V is at low or medium levels. PMID:26679149

  18. Preclinical Efficacy and Safety Profile of Allometrically Scaled Doses of Doxycycline Used to Turn "On" Therapeutic Transgene Expression from High-Capacity Adenoviral Vectors in a Glioma Model.

    PubMed

    VanderVeen, Nathan; Raja, Nicholas; Yi, Elizabeth; Appelman, Henry; Ng, Philip; Palmer, Donna; Zamler, Daniel; Dzaman, Marta; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most commonly occurring primary brain cancer in adults, in whom its highly infiltrative cells prevent total surgical resection, often leading to tumor recurrence and patient death. Our group has discovered a gene therapy approach for GBM that utilizes high-capacity "gutless" adenoviral vectors encoding regulatable therapeutic transgenes. The herpes simplex type 1-thymidine kinase (TK) actively kills dividing tumor cells in the brain when in the presence of the prodrug, ganciclovir (GCV), whereas the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) is an immune-stimulatory molecule under tight regulation by a tetracycline-inducible "Tet-On" activation system that induces anti-GBM immunity. As a prelude to a phase I clinical trial, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved doses of the tetracycline doxycycline (DOX) allometrically scaled for rats. DOX initiates the expression of Flt3L, which has been shown to recruit dendritic cells to the brain tumor microenvironment-an integral first step in the development of antitumor immunity. The data revealed a highly safe profile surrounding these human-equivalent doses of DOX under an identical therapeutic window as proposed in the clinical trial. This was confirmed through a neuropathological analysis, liver and kidney histopathology, detection of neutralizing antibodies, and systemic toxicities in the blood. Interestingly, we observed a significant survival advantage in rats with GBM receiving the 300 mg/day equivalent dosage of DOX versus the 200 mg/day equivalent. Additionally, rats rejected "recurrent" brain tumor threats implanted 90 days after their primary brain tumors. We also show that DOX detection within the plasma can be an indicator of optimal dosing of DOX to attain therapeutic levels. This work has significant clinical relevance for an ongoing phase I clinical trial in humans with primary GBM and for other therapeutic approaches using

  19. Phosphodiesterase 5a Inhibition with Adenoviral Short Hairpin RNA Benefits Infarcted Heart Partially through Activation of Akt Signaling Pathway and Reduction of Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhe; Zhang, Jian; Paul, Christian; Wang, Yigang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference therapy targeting phosphodiesterase 5a after myocardial infarction (MI) has been shown to mitigate post-MI heart failure. We investigated the mechanisms that underpin the beneficial effects of PDE5a inhibition through shRNA on post-MI heart failure. Methods An adenoviral vector with an shRNA sequence inserted was adopted for the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5a (Ad-shPDE5a) in vivo and in vitro. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in male C57BL/6J mice by left coronary artery ligation, and immediately after that, the Ad-shPDE5a was injected intramyocardially around the MI region and border areas. Results Four weeks post-MI, the Ad-shPDE5a-treated mice showed significant mitigation of the left ventricular (LV) dilatation and dysfunction compared to control mice. Infarction size and fibrosis were also significantly reduced in Ad-shPDE5a-treated mice. Additionally, Ad-shPDE5a treatment decreased the MI-induced inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β1, which was confirmed in vitro in Ad-shPDE5a transfected myofibroblasts cultured under oxygen glucose deprivation. Finally, Ad-shPDE5a treatment was found to activate the myocardial Akt signaling pathway in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Conclusion These findings indicate that PDE5a inhibition by Ad-shPDE5a via the Akt signal pathway could be of significant value in the design of future therapeutics for post-MI heart failure. PMID:26709517

  20. A Multi-Antigenic Adenoviral-Vectored Vaccine Improves BCG-Induced Protection of Goats against Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infection and Prevents Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Andaluz, Anna; Moll, Xavier; Martín, Maite; Nofrarías, Miquel; McShane, Helen; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Domingo, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The “One world, one health” initiative emphasizes the need for new strategies to control human and animal tuberculosis (TB) based on their shared interface. A good example would be the development of novel universal vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infection. This study uses the goat model, a natural TB host, to assess the protective effectiveness of a new vaccine candidate in combination with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Thirty-three goat kids were divided in three groups: Group 1) vaccinated with BCG (week 0), Group 2) vaccinated with BCG and boosted 8 weeks later with a recombinant adenovirus expressing the MTBC antigens Ag85A, TB10.4, TB9.8 and Acr2 (AdTBF), and Group 3) unvaccinated controls. Later on, an endobronchial challenge with a low dose of M. caprae was performed (week 15). After necropsy (week 28), the pulmonary gross pathology was quantified using high resolution Computed Tomography. Small granulomatous pulmonary lesions (< 0.5 cm diameter) were also evaluated through a comprehensive qualitative histopathological analysis. M. caprae CFU were counted from pulmonary lymph nodes. The AdTBF improved the effects of BCG reducing gross lesion volume and bacterial load, as well as increasing weight gain. The number of Ag85A-specific gamma interferon-producing memory T-cells was identified as a predictor of vaccine efficacy. Specific cellular and humoral responses were measured throughout the 13-week post-challenge period, and correlated with the severity of lesions. Unvaccinated goats exhibited the typical pathological features of active TB in humans and domestic ruminants, while vaccinated goats showed only very small lesions. The data presented in this study indicate that multi-antigenic adenoviral vectored vaccines boosts protection conferred by vaccination with BCG. PMID:24278420

  1. Long-Term Reduction of Cocaine Self-Administration in Rats Treated with Adenoviral Vector-Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase: Evidence for Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zlebnik, Natalie E; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Saykao, Amy T; Parks, Robin J; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2014-01-01

    A new pharmacokinetic approach treating cocaine addiction involves rapidly metabolizing cocaine before it reaches brain reward centers using mutated human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) or cocaine hydrolase (CocH). Recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated plasma CocH reduced the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and prevented reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior up to 6 months in rats. The present study investigated whether hdAD-CocH could decrease ongoing intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) self-administration. The hdAD-CocH vector was injected into self-administering rats, and after accumulation of plasma CocH, there was a dramatic reduction in cocaine infusions earned under a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement that lasted for the length of the study (>2 months). Pretreatment with the selective BChE and CocH inhibitor iso-OMPA (1.5 mg/kg) restored cocaine intake; therefore, the decline in self-administration was likely due to rapid CocH-mediated cocaine metabolism. Direct measurements of cocaine levels in plasma and brain samples taken after the conclusion of behavioral studies provided strong support for this conclusion. Further, rats injected with hdAD-CocH did not experience a deficit in operant responding for drug reinforcement and self-administered methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg) at control levels. Overall, these outcomes suggest that viral gene transfer can yield plasma CocH levels that effectively diminish long-term cocaine intake and may have potential treatment implications for cocaine-dependent individuals seeking to become and remain abstinent. PMID:24407266

  2. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) based real-time measurement of titer dependent cytotoxicity induced by adenoviral vectors in an IPI-2I cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jakob; Thirion, Christian; Pfaffl, Michael W

    2011-01-15

    Recombinant viral vectors are widespread tools for transfer of genetic material in various modern biotechnological applications like for example RNA interference (RNAi). However, an accurate and reproducible titer assignment represents the basic step for most downstream applications regarding a precise multiplicity of infection (MOI) adjustment. As necessary scaffold for the studies described in this work we introduce a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) based approach for viral particle measurement. Still an implicated problem concerning physiological effects is that the appliance of viral vectors is often attended by toxic effects on the individual target. To determine the critical viral dose leading to cell death we developed an electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) based assay. With ECIS technology the impedance change of a current flow through the cell culture medium in an array plate is measured in a non-invasive manner, visualizing effects like cell attachment, cell-cell contacts or proliferation. Here we describe the potential of this online measurement technique in an in vitro model using the porcine ileal epithelial cell line IPI-2I in combination with an adenoviral transfection vector (Ad5-derivate). This approach shows a clear dose-depending toxic effect, as the amount of applied virus highly correlates (p<0.001) with the level of cell death. Thus this assay offers the possibility to discriminate the minimal non-toxic dose of the individual transfection method. In addition this work suggests that the ECIS-device bears the feasibility to transfer this assay to multiple other cytotoxicological questions. PMID:20875729

  3. Long-Term Blockade of Cocaine Self-Administration and Locomotor Activation in Rats by an Adenoviral Vector-Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Smethells, John R; Swalve, Natashia; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Parks, Robin J; Greer, Adam; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2016-05-01

    A promising approach in treating cocaine abuse is to metabolize cocaine in the blood using a mutated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that functions as a cocaine hydrolase (CocH). In rats, a helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated delivery of CocH abolished ongoing cocaine use and cocaine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking for several months. This enzyme also metabolizes ghrelin, an effect that may be beneficial in maintaining healthy weights. The effect of a single hdAD-CocH vector injection was examined in rats on measures of anxiety, body weight, cocaine self-administration, and cocaine-induced locomotor activity. To examine anxiety, periadolescent rats were tested in an elevated-plus maze. Weight gain was then examined under four rodent diets. Ten months after CocH-injection, adult rats were trained to self-administer cocaine intravenously and, subsequently, cocaine-induced locomotion was tested. Viral gene transfer produced sustained plasma levels of CocH for over 13 months of testing. CocH-treated rats did not differ from controls in measures of anxiety, and only showed a transient reduction in weight gain during the first 3 weeks postinjection. However, CocH-treated rats were insensitive to cocaine. At 10 months postinjection, none of the CocH-treated rats initiated cocaine self-administration, unlike 90% of the control rats. At 13 months postinjection, CocH-treated rats showed no cocaine-induced locomotion, whereas control rats showed a dose-dependent enhancement of locomotion. CocH vector produced a long-term blockade of the rewarding and behavioral effects of cocaine in rats, emphasizing its role as a promising therapeutic intervention in cocaine abuse. PMID:26968195

  4. Adenoviral gene transfer into the normal and injured spinal cord: enhanced transgene stability by combined administration of temperature-sensitive virus and transient immune blockade.

    PubMed

    Romero, M I; Smith, G M

    1998-12-01

    This study characterized gene transfer into both normal and injured adult rat dorsal spinal cord using first (E1-/E3-) or second (E1-/E2A125/E3-, temperature-sensitive; ts) generation of replication-defective adenoviral (Ad) vectors. A novel immunosuppressive regimen aimed at blocking CD4/CD45 lymphocytic receptors was tested for improving transgene persistence. In addition, the effect of gene transfer on nociception was also evaluated. Seven days after treatment, numerous LacZ-positive cells were observed after transfection with either viral vector. By 21 days after transfection, beta-galactosidase staining was reduced and suggestive of ongoing cytopathology in both Ad-treated groups, despite the fact that the immunogenicity of LacZ/Adts appeared less when compared with that elicited by the LacZ/Ad vector. In contrast, immunosuppressed animals showed a significant (P < or = 0.05) increase in the number of LacZ-positive cells not displaying cytopathology. In these animals, a concomitant reduction in numbers of macrophages/microglia and CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes was observed. Only animals that received LacZ/Adts and immunosuppression showed transgene expression after 60 days. Similar results were observed in animals in which the L4-L5 dorsal roots were lesioned before transfection. Gene transfer into the dorsal spinal cord did not affect nociception, independent of the adenovirus vector. These results indicate that immune blockade of the CD4/CD45 lymphocytic receptors enhanced transgene stability in adult animals with normal or injured spinal cords and that persistent transgene expression in the spinal cord does not interfere with normal neural function. PMID:10023440

  5. Recombinant adenoviral expression of IL-10 protects beta cell from impairment induced by pro-inflammatory cytokine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ai-Jing; Zhu, Wei; Tian, Fei; Yan, Li-Hua; Li, Tang

    2010-11-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic immunosuppressive and immunostimulatory cytokine. In autoimmune diabetes of the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, IL-10 has exhibited paradoxical effects. Systemic IL-10 expression prevented or delayed diabetes onset in NOD mice while local expression of IL-10 did not. As antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play a central role in the generation of primary T cell responses, the direct role of this gene in pancreatic beta (β) cell is not clear. The effects of IL-10 on the protection of β cells in vitro were examined. In the present study, we examined the effects of adenovirus vector-mediated murine IL-10 (mIL-10) gene transfer to islet cell line RINm5F cells in vitro and to explore if IL-10 overexpression may prevent cytokine-mediated cytotoxicity. We had established the recombinant adenovirus vector containing mIL-10 genes (Ad-mIL-10) successfully. After infection of Ad-mIL-10, both mRNA and protein were expressed in RINm5F cells. Moreover, RINm5F cells secreted IL-10 protein into culture medium. Ad-mIL-10 prevented IL-1β-mediated nitric oxide production from β cells in vitro as well as the suppression of β cells function as determined by glucose-stimulated insulin production. Furthermore, Ad-mIL-10 gene transfer led to a profound reduction of Fas-expressing β cells and caspase-3 activity which were induced by IL-1β and the apoptotic rates of Ad-mIL-10 group were decreased. These findings show that IL-10 gene transfer to β cells may be beneficial in maintaining cells function, protecting islet cells from apoptosis-mediated by factors, which showed the potential therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:20658311

  6. Analysis of Fluorescent Proteins with a Nanoparticle Probe

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.; Eller, Michael J.; DeBord, J. Daniel; Levy, Michaella J.; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Della-Negra, Serge; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2012-01-01

    This letter presents the first application of high energy, single nanoparticle probes (e.g., 520 keV Au400 2nm NP) in the characterization of surfaces containing fluorescent proteins (e.g., GFP variants) by their co-emitted photon, electron and secondary ion signals. NP induced protein luminescence increases with the NP incident energy, is originated by the NP impact and is transferred to the protein fluorophor via electronic energy transfer. Multi-electron emission is observed per single NP impacts and their distributions are specific to the target morphology and composition. Fragment ions of protein sub-units consisting of 2–7 amino acid peptides are observed under individual NP impacts that can be correlated to the random protein orientation relative to the impact site (e.g., outer layer or “skin” of the protein). PMID:22308203

  7. Peptide-Based Technologies to Alter Adenoviral Vector Tropism: Ways and Means for Systemic Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reetz, Julia; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Pützer, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the fundamental progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of human diseases and the arrival of the post-genomic era, increasing numbers of therapeutic genes and cellular targets are available for gene therapy. Meanwhile, the most important challenge is to develop gene delivery vectors with high efficiency through target cell selectivity, in particular under in situ conditions. The most widely used vector system to transduce cells is based on adenovirus (Ad). Recent endeavors in the development of selective Ad vectors that target cells or tissues of interest and spare the alteration of all others have focused on the modification of the virus broad natural tropism. A popular way of Ad targeting is achieved by directing the vector towards distinct cellular receptors. Redirecting can be accomplished by linking custom-made peptides with specific affinity to cellular surface proteins via genetic integration, chemical coupling or bridging with dual-specific adapter molecules. Ideally, targeted vectors are incapable of entering cells via their native receptors. Such altered vectors offer new opportunities to delineate functional genomics in a natural environment and may enable efficient systemic therapeutic approaches. This review provides a summary of current state-of-the-art techniques to specifically target adenovirus-based gene delivery vectors. PMID:24699364

  8. Adenoviral gene transfer corrects the ion transport defect in the sinus epithelia of a porcine CF model.

    PubMed

    Potash, Andrea E; Wallen, Tanner J; Karp, Philip H; Ernst, Sarah; Moninger, Thomas O; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Stoltz, David A; Zabner, Joseph; Chang, Eugene H

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs spontaneously develop sinus and lung disease resembling human CF. The CF pig presents a unique opportunity to use gene transfer to test hypotheses to further understand the pathogenesis of CF sinus disease. In this study, we investigated the ion transport defect in the CF sinus and found that CF porcine sinus epithelia lack cyclic AMP (cAMP)-stimulated anion transport. We asked whether we could restore CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) current in the porcine CF sinus epithelia by gene transfer. We quantified CFTR transduction using an adenovirus expressing CFTR and green fluorescent protein (GFP). We found that as little as 7% of transduced cells restored 6% of CFTR current with 17-28% of transduced cells increasing CFTR current to 50% of non-CF levels. We also found that we could overcorrect cAMP-mediated current in non-CF epithelia. Our findings indicate that CF porcine sinus epithelia lack anion transport, and a relatively small number of cells expressing CFTR are required to rescue the ion transport phenotype. These studies support the use of the CF pig as a preclinical model for future gene therapy trials in CF sinusitis. PMID:23511247

  9. A case of autism with an interstitial deletion on 4q leading to hemizygosity for genes encoding for glutamine and glycine neurotransmitter receptor sub-units (AMPA 2, GLRA3, GLRB) and neuropeptide receptors NPY1R, NPY5R

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subhadra; Woodroffe, Abigail; Flodman, Pamela L; Mays, Lee Z; Hanouni, Mona; Modahl, Charlotte B; Steinberg-Epstein, Robin; Bocian, Maureen E; Spence, M Anne; Smith, Moyra

    2004-01-01

    Background Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by a triad of deficits: qualitative impairments in social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. Although autism is etiologically heterogeneous, family and twin studies have established a definite genetic basis. The inheritance of idiopathic autism is presumed to be complex, with many genes involved; environmental factors are also possibly contributory. The analysis of chromosome abnormalities associated with autism contributes greatly to the identification of autism candidate genes. Case presentation We describe a child with autistic disorder and an interstitial deletion on chromosome 4q. This child first presented at 12 months of age with developmental delay and minor dysmorphic features. At 4 years of age a diagnosis of Pervasive Developmental Disorder was made. At 11 years of age he met diagnostic criteria for autism. Cytogenetic studies revealed a chromosome 4q deletion. The karyotype was 46, XY del 4 (q31.3-q33). Here we report the clinical phenotype of the child and the molecular characterization of the deletion using molecular cytogenetic techniques and analysis of polymorphic markers. These studies revealed a 19 megabase deletion spanning 4q32 to 4q34. Analysis of existing polymorphic markers and new markers developed in this study revealed that the deletion arose on a paternally derived chromosome. To date 33 genes of known or inferred function are deleted as a consequence of the deletion. Among these are the AMPA 2 gene that encodes the glutamate receptor GluR2 sub-unit, GLRA3 and GLRB genes that encode glycine receptor subunits and neuropeptide Y receptor genes NPY1R and NPY5R. Conclusions The deletion in this autistic subject serves to highlight specific autism candidate genes. He is hemizygous for AMPA 2, GLRA3, GLRB, NPY1R and NPY5R. GluR2 is the major determinant of AMPA receptor structure. Glutamate receptors maintain structural

  10. Immunization with Hexon Modified Adenoviral Vectors Integrated with gp83 Epitope Provides Protection against Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Nde, Pius N.; Pratap, Siddharth; Lima, Maria F.; Villalta, Fernando; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Chagas disease is an endemic infection that affects over 8 million people throughout Latin America and now has become a global challenge. The current pharmacological treatment of patients is unsuccessful in most cases, highly toxic, and no vaccines are available. The results of inadequate treatment could lead to heart failure resulting in death. Therefore, a vaccine that elicits neutralizing antibodies mediated by cell-mediated immune responses and protection against Chagas disease is necessary. Methodology/Principal Findings The “antigen capsid-incorporation” strategy is based upon the display of the T. cruzi epitope as an integral component of the adenovirus' capsid rather than an encoded transgene. This strategy is predicted to induce a robust humoral immune response to the presented antigen, similar to the response provoked by native Ad capsid proteins. The antigen chosen was T. cruzi gp83, a ligand that is used by T. cruzi to attach to host cells to initiate infection. The gp83 epitope, recognized by the neutralizing MAb 4A4, along with His6 were incorporated into the Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) vector to generate the vector Ad5-HVR1-gp83-18 (Ad5-gp83). This vector was evaluated by molecular and immunological analyses. Vectors were injected to elicit immune responses against gp83 in mouse models. Our findings indicate that mice immunized with the vector Ad5-gp83 and challenged with a lethal dose of T. cruzi trypomastigotes confer strong immunoprotection with significant reduction in parasitemia levels, increased survival rate and induction of neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions/Significance This data demonstrates that immunization with adenovirus containing capsid-incorporated T. cruzi antigen elicits a significant anti-gp83-specific response in two different mouse models, and protection against T. cruzi infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies mediated by cell-mediated immune responses

  11. A Plasmodium Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Delivered within the Ad5 Hexon Protein Enhances the Protective Efficacy of a Protein Based Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Moreno, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A malaria vaccine is a public health priority. In order to produce an effective vaccine, a multistage approach targeting both the blood and the liver stage infection is desirable. The vaccine candidates also need to induce balanced immune responses including antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Protein-based subunit vaccines like RTS,S are able to induce strong antibody response but poor cellular reactivity. Adenoviral vectors have been effective inducing protective CD8+ T cell responses in several models including malaria; nonetheless this vaccine platform exhibits a limited induction of humoral immune responses. Two approaches have been used to improve the humoral immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus vectors, the use of heterologous prime-boost regimens with recombinant proteins or the genetic modification of the hypervariable regions (HVR) of the capsid protein hexon to express B cell epitopes of interest. In this study, we describe the development of capsid modified Ad5 vectors that express a promiscuous Plasmodium yoelii T helper epitope denominated PyT53 within the hexon HVR2 region. Several regimens were tested in mice to determine the relevance of the hexon modification in enhancing protective immune responses induced by the previously described protein-based multi-stage experimental vaccine PyCMP. A heterologous prime-boost immunization regime that combines a hexon modified vector with transgenic expression of PyCMP followed by protein immunizations resulted in the induction of robust antibody and cellular immune responses in comparison to a similar regimen that includes a vector with unmodified hexon. These differences in immunogenicity translated into a better protective efficacy against both the hepatic and red blood cell stages of P. yoelii. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a hexon modification is used to deliver a promiscuous T cell epitope. Our data support the use of such modification to enhance the immunogenicity and protective

  12. A Plasmodium Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Delivered within the Ad5 Hexon Protein Enhances the Protective Efficacy of a Protein Based Malaria Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Kashentseva, Elena A; Villegas, John Paul; Fernandez, Alejandra; Van Pelt, Amelia; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Moreno, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A malaria vaccine is a public health priority. In order to produce an effective vaccine, a multistage approach targeting both the blood and the liver stage infection is desirable. The vaccine candidates also need to induce balanced immune responses including antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Protein-based subunit vaccines like RTS,S are able to induce strong antibody response but poor cellular reactivity. Adenoviral vectors have been effective inducing protective CD8+ T cell responses in several models including malaria; nonetheless this vaccine platform exhibits a limited induction of humoral immune responses. Two approaches have been used to improve the humoral immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus vectors, the use of heterologous prime-boost regimens with recombinant proteins or the genetic modification of the hypervariable regions (HVR) of the capsid protein hexon to express B cell epitopes of interest. In this study, we describe the development of capsid modified Ad5 vectors that express a promiscuous Plasmodium yoelii T helper epitope denominated PyT53 within the hexon HVR2 region. Several regimens were tested in mice to determine the relevance of the hexon modification in enhancing protective immune responses induced by the previously described protein-based multi-stage experimental vaccine PyCMP. A heterologous prime-boost immunization regime that combines a hexon modified vector with transgenic expression of PyCMP followed by protein immunizations resulted in the induction of robust antibody and cellular immune responses in comparison to a similar regimen that includes a vector with unmodified hexon. These differences in immunogenicity translated into a better protective efficacy against both the hepatic and red blood cell stages of P. yoelii. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a hexon modification is used to deliver a promiscuous T cell epitope. Our data support the use of such modification to enhance the immunogenicity and protective

  13. Quantitative mass spectrometry measurements reveal stoichiometry of principal postsynaptic density proteins.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Mark S; Markey, Sanford P; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative studies are presented of postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions from rat cerebral cortex with the ultimate goal of defining the average copy numbers of proteins in the PSD complex. Highly specific and selective isotope dilution mass spectrometry assays were developed using isotopically labeled polypeptide concatemer internal standards. Interpretation of PSD protein stoichiometry was achieved as a molar ratio with respect to PSD-95 (SAP-90, DLG4), and subsequently, copy numbers were estimated using a consensus literature value for PSD-95. Average copy numbers for several proteins at the PSD were estimated for the first time, including those for AIDA-1, BRAGs, and densin. Major findings include evidence for the high copy number of AIDA-1 in the PSD (144 ± 30)-equivalent to that of the total GKAP family of proteins (150 ± 27)-suggesting that AIDA-1 is an element of the PSD scaffold. The average copy numbers for NMDA receptor sub-units were estimated to be 66 ± 18, 27 ± 9, and 45 ± 15, respectively, for GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B, yielding a total of 34 ± 10 NMDA channels. Estimated average copy numbers for AMPA channels and their auxiliary sub-units TARPs were 68 ± 36 and 144 ± 38, respectively, with a stoichiometry of ∼1:2, supporting the assertion that most AMPA receptors anchor to the PSD via TARP sub-units. This robust, quantitative analysis of PSD proteins improves upon and extends the list of major PSD components with assigned average copy numbers in the ongoing effort to unravel the complex molecular architecture of the PSD. PMID:25874902

  14. Cardiomyocyte degeneration with calpain deficiency reveals a critical role in protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Anita S; Diwan, Abhinav; Odley, Amy M; Hahn, Harvey S; Osinska, Hanna; Melendez, Jaime G; Robbins, Jeffrey; Lynch, Roy A; Marreez, Yehia; Dorn, Gerald W

    2007-04-13

    Regulating the balance between synthesis and proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins is essential for tissue growth and maintenance, but the critical pathways regulating protein ubiquitination and degradation are incompletely defined. Although participation of calpain calcium-activated proteases in post-necrotic myocardial autolysis is well characterized, their importance in homeostatic turnover of normal cardiac tissue is controversial. Hence, we evaluated the consequences of physiologic calpain (calcium-activated protease) activity in cultured cardiomyocytes and unstressed mouse hearts. Comparison of in vitro proteolytic activities of cardiac-expressed calpains 1 and 2 revealed calpain 1, but not calpain 2, activity at physiological calcium concentrations. Physiological calpain 1 activation was evident in adenoviral transfected cultured cardiomyocytes as proteolysis of specific substrates, generally increased protein ubiquitination, and accelerated protein turnover, that were each inhibited by coexpression of the inhibitor protein calpastatin. Conditional forced expression of calpain 1, but not calpain 2, in mouse hearts demonstrated substrate-specific proteolytic activity under basal conditions, with hyperubiquitination of cardiac proteins and increased 26S proteasome activity. Loss of myocardial calpain activity by forced expression of calpastatin diminished ubiquitination of 1 or more specific myocardial proteins, without affecting overall ubiquitination or proteasome activity, and resulted in a progressive dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by accumulation of intracellular protein aggregates, formation of autophagosomes, and degeneration of sarcomeres. Thus, calpain 1 is upstream of, and necessary for, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of a subset of myocardial proteins whose abnormal accumulation produces autophagosomes and degeneration of cardiomyocytes with functional decompensation. PMID:17332428

  15. Short communication: Altered expression of specificity protein 1 impairs milk fat synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J J; Luo, J; Xu, H F; Wang, H; Loor, J J

    2016-06-01

    Specificity protein 1 (encoded by SP1) is a novel transcription factor important for the regulation of lipid metabolism and the normal function of various hormones in model organisms. Its potential role, if any, on ruminant milk fat is unknown. Despite the lower expression of the lipolysis-related gene ATGL (by 44 and 37% respectively), both the adenoviral overexpression and the silencing of SP1 [via short interfering (si)RNA] markedly reduced cellular triacylglycerol (TAG) content (by 28 and 25%, respectively), at least in part by decreasing the expression of DGAT1 (-36% in adenovirus treatment) and DGAT2 (-81 and -87%, respectively) that are involved in TAG synthesis. Consistent with the markedly lower expression of genes related to lipid droplet formation and secretion (TIP47 by 19 and 32%, and ADFP by 25 and 25%, respectively), cellular lipid droplet content was also decreased sharply, by 9 and 8.5%, respectively, after adenoviral overexpression of SP1 or its silencing via siRNA. Overall, the results underscored a potentially important role of SP1 in maintaining milk-fat droplet synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26995134

  16. Mis-translation of a Computationally Designed Protein Yields an Exceptionally Stable Homodimer: Implications for Protein Engineering and Evolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Dantas, Gautam; Watters, Alexander L.; Lunde, Bradley; Eletr, Ziad; Isern, Nancy G.; Roseman, Toby; Lipfert, Jan; Doniach, Sebastian; Tompa, Martin; Kuhlman, Brian; Stoddard, Barry L.; Varani, Gabriele; Baker, David

    2006-10-06

    We recently used computational protein design to create an extremely stable, globular protein, Top7, with a sequence and fold not observed previously in nature. Since Top7 was created in the absence of genetic selection, it provides a rare opportunity to investigate aspects of the cellular protein production and surveillance machinery that are subject to natural selection. Here we show that a portion of the Top7 protein corresponding to the final 49 C-terminal residues is efficiently mistranslated and accumulates at high levels in E. coli. We used circular dichroism spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, small-angle x-ray scattering, analytical ultra-centrifugation, and NMR spectroscopy to show that the resulting CFr protein adopts a compact, extremely-stable, obligate, symmetric, homo-dimeric structure. Based on the solution structure, we engineered an even more stable variant of CFr by disulfide-induced covalent circularisation that should be an excellent platform for design of novel functions. The accumulation of high levels of CFr exposes the high error rate of the protein translation machinery, and the rarity of correspondingly stable fragments in natural proteins implies a stringent evolutionary pressure against protein sub-fragments that can independently fold into stable structures. The symmetric self-association between two identical mistranslated CFr sub-units to generate an extremely stable structure parallels a mechanism for natural protein-fold evolution by modular recombination of stable protein sub-structures.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Magnitude, Quality, Phenotype and Protective Capacity of SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T Cells Following Human-, Simian- and Chimpanzee-Derived Recombinant Adenoviral Vector Immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Costa, Andreia Da; Yamamoto, Ayako; Berry, Dana; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Kong, Wing-Pui; Gall, Jason G.D.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Gomez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Wyatt, Linda S.; Moss, Bernard; Morgan, Cecilia; Roederer, Mario; Bailer, Robert T.; Nabel, Gary J.; Koup, Richard A.; Seder, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are the most potent recombinant vaccines for eliciting CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity in humans; however, prior exposure from natural adenoviral infection can decrease such responses. Here we show low seroreactivity in humans against simian- (sAd11, sAd16), or chimpanzee-derived (chAd3, chAd63) compared to human-derived (rAd5, rAd28, rAd35) vectors across multiple geographic regions. We then compared the magnitude, quality, phenotype and protective capacity of CD8+ T cell responses in mice vaccinated with rAds encoding SIV Gag. Using a dose range (1 × 107 to 109 PU), we defined a hierarchy among rAd vectors based on the magnitude and protective capacity of CD8+ T cell responses, from most to least as: rAd5 and chAd3, rAd28 and sAd11, chAd63, sAd16, and rAd35. Selection of rAd vector or dose could modulate the proportion and/or frequency of IFNγ+TNFα+IL-2+ and KLRG1+CD127- CD8+ T cells, but strikingly ~30–80% of memory CD8+ T cells co-expressed CD127 and KLRG1. To further optimise CD8+ T cell responses, we assessed rAds as part of prime-boost regimens. Mice primed with rAds and boosted with NYVAC generated Gag-specific responses that approached ~60% of total CD8+ T cells at peak. Alternatively, priming with DNA or rAd28 and boosting with rAd5 or chAd3 induced robust and equivalent CD8+ T cell responses compared to prime or boost alone. Collectively, these data provide the immunologic basis for using specific rAd vectors alone or as part of prime-boost regimens to induce CD8+ T cells for rapid effector function or robust long-term memory, respectively. PMID:23390298

  18. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis as potential therapy of human malignant neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Fedele, Monica; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group I (HMGI) proteins are overexpressed in several human malignant tumors. We previously demonstrated that inhibition of HMGI synthesis prevents thyroid cell transformation. Here, we report that an adenovirus carrying the HMGI(Y) gene in an antisense orientation (Ad-Yas) induced programmed cell death of two human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell lines (ARO and FB-1), but not normal thyroid cells. The Ad-Yas virus led to death of lung, colon, and breast carcinoma cells. A control adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene did not inhibit the growth of either normal or neoplastic cells. Ad-Yas treatment of tumors induced in athymic mice by ARO cells caused a drastic reduction in tumor size. Therefore, suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis by an HMGI(Y) antisense adenoviral vector may be a useful treatment strategy in a variety of human malignant neoplasias, in which HMGI(Y) gene overexpression is a general event. PMID:10759549

  19. Interferon alpha2b gene delivery using adenoviral vector causes inhibition of tumor growth in xenograft models from a variety of cancers.

    PubMed

    Iqbal Ahmed, C M; Johnson, D E; Demers, G W; Engler, H; Howe, J A; Wills, K N; Wen, S F; Shinoda, J; Beltran, J; Nodelman, M; Machemer, T; Maneval, D C; Nagabhushan, T L; Sugarman, B J

    2001-10-01

    A recombinant adenovirus expressing human interferon alpha2b driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter, IACB, was shown to produce and secrete biologically active protein in vitro and in vivo. Intravenous administration of IACB in Buffalo rats resulted in circulating levels of biologically active human interferon at 70,000 international units/mL for up to 15 days. Distribution of interferon protein after IACB administration was different from that seen with the subcutaneous delivery of interferon protein. Higher levels of interferon protein were observed in liver and spleen after IACB delivery compared to protein delivery. The antitumor efficacy of IACB, as measured by suppression of tumor growth, was tested in athymic nude mice bearing established human tumor xenografts from different types of human cancer. Subcutaneous tumors most responsive to the intratumoral administration of IACB ranked as U87MG (glioblastoma) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia), followed by Hep 3B (hepatocellular carcinoma) and LN229 cells (glioblastoma). Intravenous administration of IACB in animals bearing U87MG or Hep 3B xenografts was also effective in suppressing tumor growth, although to a lesser extent than the intratumoral administration. IACB was also tested in a metastatic model in beige/SCID mice generated with H69 (small cell lung carcinoma) cells and was found to prolong survival in tumor-bearing animals. This suggested that interferon gene delivery can be effective in suppressing tumor growth in a wide variety of cells. PMID:11687902

  20. Recombinant Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterisation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Nephroblastoma-Overexpressed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Wilhelm; Kupper, Michael; Hoffmann, Kurt; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins, especially its prominent member, the Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) has been identified as a possible biomarker for the diagnosis of fibrotic diseases. As a downstream mediator of TGF-β1 signalling, it is involved in tissue scarring, stimulates interstitial deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, and promotes proliferation of several cell types. Another member of this family, the Nephroblastoma-Overexpressed protein (NOV/CCN3), has growth-inhibiting properties. First reports further suggest that these two CCN family members act opposite to each other in regulating extracellular matrix protein expression and reciprocally influence their own expression when over-expressed. We have established stable HEK and Flp-In-293 clones as productive sources for recombinant human CCN2/CTGF. In addition, we generated an adenoviral vector for recombinant expression of rat NOV and established protocols to purify large quantities of these CCN proteins. The identity of purified human CCN2/CTGF and rat CCN3/NOV was proven by In-gel digest followed by ESI-TOF/MS mass spectrometry. The biological activity of purified proteins was demonstrated using a Smad3-sensitive reporter gene and BrdU proliferation assay in permanent cell line EA•hy 926 cells. We further demonstrate for the first time that both recombinant CCN proteins are N-glycosylated. PMID:21209863

  1. Thymidine kinase-mediated shut down of bone morphogenetic protein-4 expression allows regulated bone production.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Barbara; Rocco, Teresa; Esposito, Maria T; Cantilena, Bruno; Gargiulo, Sara; Greco, Adelaide; Montanaro, Donatella; Brunetti, Arturo; Pastore, Lucio

    2013-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are growth factors also involved in ossification and chondrogenesis that have generated interest for their efficiency in inducing bone neo-synthesis. BMPs expression in engineered cells has been successful in stimulating osteoblastic differentiation and ectopic and orthotopic bone formation in vivo. We have previously shown that an adenoviral vector expressing bone morphogenetic protein type-4 (BMP-4) is able to efficiently drive bone formation in a rabbit model of discontinuous bone lesions. However, unregulated secretion of BMPs has also been implicated in bone overproduction and exostosis. We have constructed a replication-defective first generation adenoviral (FG-Ad) vector containing a cassette for the expression of BMP-4 associated with the Herpes Simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene (FG-B4TK) in order to shut down BMP-4 expression and, therefore, regulate bone production. TK expression does not interfere with BMP-4 ability to induce ectopic bone formation in athymic nude mice. Administration of ganciclovir blocks ectopic bone production in quadriceps muscle transduced with the FG-B4TK with no effect on the contralateral muscle transduced with a vector expressing only BMP-4. Histological findings confirmed the pro-apoptotic activity of TK and the reduction of mineralized areas in the quadriceps transduced with FG-B4TK in mice treated with ganciclovir. We have generated a system to block BMP-4 secretion by inducing apoptosis in transduced cells therefore blocking unwanted bone formation. This system is an additional tool to generate regulated amount of bone in discontinuous bone lesions and can be easily coupled with biomaterials capable of recruiting cells and generating a local bioreactor. PMID:23317056

  2. Adenoviral delivery of truncated MMP-8 fused with the hepatocyte growth factor mutant 1K1 ameliorates liver cirrhosis and promotes hepatocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinghua; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Weiwei; Tang, Jiacheng; Feng, Xu; Chen, Jiang; Liang, Yuelong; Jin, Ren’an; Xie, Anyong; Cai, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease caused by chronic liver injury, which activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cirrhosis accounts for an extensive level of morbidity and mortality worldwide, largely due to lack of effective treatment options. In this study, we have constructed a fusion protein containing matrix metal-loproteinase 8 (MMP-8) and the human growth factor mutant 1K1 (designated cMMP8-1K1) and delivered it into hepatocytes and in vivo and in cell culture via intravenous injection of fusion protein-harboring adenovirus. In doing so, we found that the cMMP8-1K1 fusion protein promotes the proliferation of hepatocytes, likely resulting from the combined inhibition of type I collagen secretion and the degradation of the ECM in the HSCs. This fusion protein was also observed to ameliorate liver cirrhosis in our mouse model. These changes appear to be linked to changes in downstream gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest a possible strategy for the treatment of liver cirrhosis and additional work is warranted. PMID:26527860

  3. Ring finger protein20 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism through protein kinase A-dependent sterol regulatory element binding protein1c degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Gha Young; Jang, Hagoon; Choe, Sung Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Kim, Jae Bum

    2014-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein1c (SREBP1c) is a key transcription factor for de novo lipogenesis during the postprandial state. During nutritional deprivation, hepatic SREBP1c is rapidly suppressed by fasting signals to prevent lipogenic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms that control SREBP1c turnover in response to fasting status are not thoroughly understood. To elucidate which factors are involved in the inactivation of SREBP1c, we attempted to identify SREBP1c-interacting proteins by mass spectrometry analysis. Since we observed that ring finger protein20 (RNF20) ubiquitin ligase was identified as one of SREBP1c-interacting proteins, we hypothesized that fasting signaling would promote SREBP1c degradation in an RNF20-dependent manner. In this work, we demonstrate that RNF20 physically interacts with SREBP1c, leading to degradation of SREBP1c via ubiquitination. In accordance with these findings, RNF20 represses the transcriptional activity of SREBP1c and turns off the expression of lipogenic genes that are targets of SREBP1c. In contrast, knockdown of RNF20 stimulates the expression of SREBP1c and lipogenic genes and induces lipogenic activity in primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase A (PKA) with glucagon or forskolin enhances the expression of RNF20 and potentiates the ubiquitination of SREBP1c via RNF20. In wild-type and db/db mice, adenoviral overexpression of RNF20 markedly suppresses FASN promoter activity and reduces the level of hepatic triglycerides, accompanied by a decrease in the hepatic lipogenic program. Here, we reveal that RNF20-induced SREBP1c ubiquitination down-regulates hepatic lipogenic activity upon PKA activation. Conclusion: RNF20 acts as a negative regulator of hepatic fatty acid metabolism through degradation of SREBP1c upon PKA activation. Knowledge regarding this process enhances our understanding of how SREBP1c is able to turn off hepatic lipid metabolism during nutritional deprivation

  4. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  5. Detection of a cellular polypeptide associated with adenovirus-coded VA RNA using in vitro labeling of proteins cross-linked to RNA.

    PubMed Central

    van Eekelen, C; Buijtels, H; Linné, T; Ohlsson, R; Philipson, L; van Venrooij, W

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet light induced RNA-protein cross-linking for identification of polypeptides interacting with RNA in intact cells (Wagenmakers et al. 1980), is limited by the intensity of the label in the proteins or in residual nucleotides remaining attached to the proteins after RNase treatment of the RNA-protein complexes. Here we report a method, where th cross-linked RNA-protein complexes are treated with RNase T1 and the T1-oligonucleotides covalently linked to the proteins are labeled in the 5' terminus using gamma-32P-ATP and T4 polynucleotide kinase. The cross-linked proteins can then readily be identified owing to the incorporated 32P label. As examples, proteins associated with polyadenylated mRNA, hnRNA and adenoviral VA RNA were identified. A protein with a molecular weight of approximately 50,000 is found associated with adenovirus-coded VA RNA. This was confirmed by binding assays, in which labeled VAI RNA is incubated with proteins from uninfected and adenovirus infected HeLa cells immobilized on nitrocellulose sheets. Images PMID:6179041

  6. Sorting of growth hormone-erythropoietin fusion proteins in rat salivary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, Yuval Zheng Changyu; Cawley, Niamh X.; Cotrim, Ana P.; Loh, Y. Peng; Baum, Bruce J.

    2008-08-15

    Neuroendocrine and exocrine cells secrete proteins in either a constitutive manner or via the regulated secretory pathway (RSP), but the specific sorting mechanisms involved are not fully understood. After gene transfer to rat salivary glands, the transgenic model proteins human growth hormone (hGH) and erythropoietin (hEpo) are secreted primarily into saliva (RSP; exocrine) and serum (constitutive; endocrine), respectively. We hypothesized that fusion of hGH at either the C-terminus or the N-terminus of hEpo would re-direct hEpo from the bloodstream into saliva. We constructed and expressed two fusion proteins, hEpo-hGH and hGH-hEpo, using serotype 5-adenoviral vectors, and delivered them to rat submandibular glands in vivo via retroductal cannulation. Both the hEpo-hGH and hGH-hEpo fusion proteins, but not hEpo alone, were secreted primarily into saliva (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0083, respectively). These in vivo studies demonstrate for the first time that hGH, in an N- as well as C-terminal position, influences the secretion of a constitutive pathway protein.

  7. Evaluation of protective immune response in mice by vaccination the recombinant adenovirus for expressing Schistosoma japonicum inhibitor apoptosis protein.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Zhu, Lihui; Luo, Rong; Dao, Jinwei; Zhao, Jiangping; Shi, Yaojun; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Feng, Xingang; Lin, Jiaojiao; Liu, Jinming; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease, and while it can be successfully treated with chemotherapy, this does not prevent reinfection with the parasite. Adenovirus vectors have been widely used for vaccine delivery, and a vaccination approach has the potential to prevent infection with Schistosoma. Here, we developed a recombinant adenoviral vector that expresses Schistosoma japonicum inhibitor apoptosis protein (Ad-SjIAP) and assessed its immunoprotective functions against schistosomiasis in mice. Murine immune responses following vaccination were investigated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), lymphocyte proliferation, and cytokine assays. The protective immunity in mice was evaluated by challenging with S. japonicum cercariae. Our results indicated that immunization with the Ad-SjIAP in mice induced a strong serum IgG response against IAP including IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b. In addition, lymphocyte proliferation experiments showed that mice treated with Ad-SjIAP significantly increased the lymphocyte response upon stimulation with recombinant Schistosoma japonicum inhibitor apoptosis protein (rSjIAP). Moreover, cytokine assays indicated that vaccination of Ad-SjIAP significantly increased the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-2 as compared to the corresponding control group. Furthermore, following the challenge with S. japonicum cercariae, the vaccine conferred moderate protection, with an average rate of 37.95% for worm reduction and 31.7% for egg reduction. Taken together, our preliminarily results suggested that schistosoma IAP may be a potential vaccine against S. japonicum and that adenoviral vectors may serve as an alternative delivery vehicle for schistosome vaccine development. PMID:25185668

  8. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  9. Pim-1 preserves mitochondrial morphology by inhibiting dynamin-related protein 1 translocation

    PubMed Central

    Din, Shabana; Mason, Matthew; Völkers, Mirko; Johnson, Bevan; Cottage, Christopher T.; Wang, Zeping; Joyo, Anya Y.; Quijada, Pearl; Erhardt, Peter; Magnuson, Nancy S.; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial morphological dynamics affect the outcome of ischemic heart damage and pathogenesis. Recently, mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has been identified as a mediator of mitochondrial morphological changes and cell death during cardiac ischemic injury. In this study, we report a unique relationship between Pim-1 activity and Drp1 regulation of mitochondrial morphology in cardiomyocytes challenged by ischemic stress. Transgenic hearts overexpressing cardiac Pim-1 display reduction of total Drp1 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of Drp1-S637, and inhibition of Drp1 localization to the mitochondria. Consistent with these findings, adenoviral-induced Pim-1 neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) retain a reticular mitochondrial phenotype after simulated ischemia (sI) and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial sequestration. Interestingly, adenovirus Pim-dominant negative NRCMs show increased expression of Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only protein p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), which has been previously shown to induce Drp1 accumulation at mitochondria and increase sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. Overexpression of the p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis–dominant negative adenovirus attenuates localization of Drp1 to mitochondria in adenovirus Pim-dominant negative NRCMs promotes reticular mitochondrial morphology and inhibits cell death during sI. Therefore, Pim-1 activity prevents Drp1 compartmentalization to the mitochondria and preserves reticular mitochondrial morphology in response to sI. PMID:23530233

  10. Induction of cellular prion protein (PrPc) under hypoxia inhibits apoptosis caused by TRAIL treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, You-Jin; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia decreases cytotoxic responses to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) protein. Cellular prion protein (PrPc) is regulated by HIF-1α in neurons. We hypothesized that PrPc is involved in hypoxia-mediated resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We found that hypoxia induced PrPc protein and inhibited TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Thus silencing of PrPc increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis under hypoxia. Overexpression of PrPc protein using an adenoviral vector inhibited TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In xenograft model in vivo, shPrPc transfected cells were more sensitive to TRAIL-induced apoptosis than in shMock transfected cells. Molecular chemo-therapy approaches based on the regulation of PrPc expression need to address anti-tumor function of TRAIL under hypoxia. Molecular chemo-therapy approaches based on the regulation of PrPc expression need to address anti-tumor function of TRAIL under hypoxia. PMID:25742790

  11. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  12. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  13. The adenoviral E1A N-terminal domain represses MYC transcription in human cancer cells by targeting both p300 and TRRAP and inhibiting MYC promoter acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers frequently arise from increased expression of proto-oncogenes, such as MYC and HER2. Understanding the cellular pathways regulating the transcription and expression of proto-oncogenes is important for targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A 243R (243 aa residues) is a viral oncoprotein that interacts with key regulators of gene transcription and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the 80 amino acid N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) can target the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 and repress HER2 in the HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Expression of E1A 1-80 induces death of SKBR3 and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed total cell RNA sequence analysis and identified MYC as the regulatory gene for cellular proliferation most strongly repressed by E1A 1-80. By RT-quantitative PCR analysis we show that repression of MYC in SKBR3 cells occurs early after expression of E1A 1-80, suggesting that MYC may be an early responder of E1A 1-80-mediated transcriptional repression. Of interest, while E1A 1-80 repression of MYC occurs in all eight human cancer cell lines examined, repression of HER2 is cell-type dependent. We demonstrate by ChIP analysis that MYC transcriptional repression by E1A 1-80 is associated with inhibition of acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16 on the MYC promoter, as well as inhibition of RNA Pol II binding to the MYC promoter. Deletion mutant analysis of E1A 1-80 suggests that both p300/CBP and TRRAP are involved in E1A 1-80 repression of MYC transcription. Further, E1A 1-80 interaction with p300/CBP and TRRAP is correlated with inhibition of H3K18 and H4K16 acetylation on the MYC promoter, respectively. Our results indicate that E1A 1-80 may target two important pathways for histone modification to repress transcription in human cancer cells.

  14. The Amphipathic Helix of Adenovirus Capsid Protein VI Contributes to Penton Release and Postentry Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ruben; Schellenberger, Pascale; Vasishtan, Daven; Aknin, Cindy; Austin, Sisley; Dacheux, Denis; Rayne, Fabienne; Siebert, Alistair; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Gruenewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear delivery of the adenoviral genome requires that the capsid cross the limiting membrane of the endocytic compartment and traverse the cytosol to reach the nucleus. This endosomal escape is initiated upon internalization and involves a highly coordinated process of partial disassembly of the entering capsid to release the membrane lytic internal capsid protein VI. Using wild-type and protein VI-mutated human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-C5), we show that capsid stability and membrane rupture are major determinants of entry-related sorting of incoming adenovirus virions. Furthermore, by using electron cryomicroscopy, as well as penton- and protein VI-specific antibodies, we show that the amphipathic helix of protein VI contributes to capsid stability by preventing premature disassembly and deployment of pentons and protein VI. Thus, the helix has a dual function in maintaining the metastable state of the capsid by preventing premature disassembly and mediating efficient membrane lysis to evade lysosomal targeting. Based on these findings and structural data from cryo-electron microscopy, we suggest a refined disassembly mechanism upon entry. IMPORTANCE In this study, we show the intricate connection of adenovirus particle stability and the entry-dependent release of the membrane-lytic capsid protein VI required for endosomal escape. We show that the amphipathic helix of the adenovirus internal protein VI is required to stabilize pentons in the particle while coinciding with penton release upon entry and that release of protein VI mediates membrane lysis, thereby preventing lysosomal sorting. We suggest that this dual functionality of protein VI ensures an optimal disassembly process by balancing the metastable state of the mature adenovirus particle. PMID:25473051

  15. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  16. Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toru; Nambara, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kazutoshi; Goto, Derek B.; Naito, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Plants accumulate storage substances such as starch, lipids and proteins in certain phases of development. Storage proteins accumulate in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and serve as a reservoir to be used in later stages of plant development. The accumulation of storage protein is thus beneficial for the survival of plants. Storage proteins are also an important source of dietary plant proteins. Here, we summarize the genome organization and regulation of gene expression of storage protein genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303197

  17. Visualizing and Quantitating the Spatiotemporal Regulation of Ras/ERK Signaling by Dual-Specificity Mitogen-Activated Protein Phosphatases (MKPs).

    PubMed

    Caunt, Christopher J; Kidger, Andrew M; Keyse, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway is critical in determining the physiological and pathophysiological outcome of signaling. Dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (DUSPs or MKPs) are key regulators of pathway activity and may also localize ERK to distinct subcellular locations. Here we present methods largely based on the use of high content microscopy to both visualize and quantitate the subcellular distribution of activated (p-ERK) and total ERK in populations of mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from mice lacking DUSP5, a nuclear ERK-specific MKP. Such methods in combination with rescue experiments using adenoviral vectors encoding wild-type and mutant forms of DUSP5 have allowed us to visualize specific defects in ERK regulation in these cells thus confirming the role of this phosphatase as both a nuclear regulator of ERK activity and localization. PMID:27514808

  18. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function. PMID:15755682

  19. Derivation of a triple mosaic adenovirus based on modification of the minor capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Yizhe; Le, Long P.; Matthews, Qiana L.; Han Tie; Wu Hongju; Curiel, David T.

    2008-08-01

    Adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX) has been shown to be a potential locale to insert targeting, imaging-related and therapeutic modalities by genetic modification. Recent evidences suggested that capsid protein mosaicism could be a promising strategy for improving the utility of Ad vector. In this study, we explored a method to genetically generate triple pIX mosaic Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) displaying three types of pIX on a single virion. pIXs were modified at their carboxy termini with a Flag sequence, a hexahistidine sequence (His{sub 6}) or a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), respectively. Western blotting analysis and fluorescence microscopy of the purified recombinant viruses indicated that all three modified pIXs were incorporated into the viral particles. Immuno-gold electron microscopy (EM) further confirmed that three types of pIX indeed co-existed on an individual virion. These results firstly validated a triple mosaic capsid configuration on pIX, and demonstrated the possibility of further radical design.

  20. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Most plant proteins are incomplete. You should eat different types of plant proteins every day to get ...

  1. Preclinical Assessment of Viral Vectored and Protein Vaccines Targeting the Duffy-Binding Protein Region II of Plasmodium Vivax

    PubMed Central

    de Cassan, Simone C.; Shakri, A. Rushdi; Llewellyn, David; Elias, Sean C.; Cho, Jee Sun; Goodman, Anna L.; Jin, Jing; Douglas, Alexander D.; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Nosten, François H.; Rénia, Laurent; Russell, Bruce; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Draper, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has largely focused on Plasmodium falciparum; however, a reawakening to the importance of Plasmodium vivax has spurred efforts to develop vaccines against this difficult to treat and at times severe form of relapsing malaria, which constitutes a significant proportion of human malaria cases worldwide. The almost complete dependence of P. vivax red blood cell invasion on the interaction of the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein region II (PvDBP_RII) with the human Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) makes this antigen an attractive vaccine candidate against blood-stage P. vivax. Here, we generated both preclinical and clinically compatible adenoviral and poxviral vectored vaccine candidates expressing the Salvador I allele of PvDBP_RII – including human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5), chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 63 (ChAd63), and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors. We report on the antibody and T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines in mice or rabbits, either used alone in a viral vectored prime-boost regime or in “mixed-modality” adenovirus prime – protein-in-­adjuvant boost regimes (using a recombinant PvDBP_RII protein antigen formulated in Montanide®ISA720 or Abisco®100 adjuvants). Antibodies induced by these regimes were found to bind to native parasite antigen from P. vivax infected Thai patients and were capable of inhibiting the binding of PvDBP_RII to its receptor DARC using an in vitro binding inhibition assay. In recent years, recombinant ChAd63 and MVA vectors have been quickly translated into human clinical trials for numerous antigens from P. falciparum as well as a growing number of other pathogens. The vectors reported here are immunogenic in small animals, elicit antibodies against PvDBP_RII, and have recently entered clinical trials, which will provide the first assessment of the safety and immunogenicity of the PvDBP_RII antigen in humans. PMID:26217340

  2. Protein Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sam K. C.

    Proteins are an abundant component in all cells, and almost all except storage proteins are important for biological functions and cell structure. Food proteins are very complex. Many have been purified and characterized. Proteins vary in molecular mass, ranging from approximately 5000 to more than a million Daltons. They are composed of elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Twenty α-amino acids are the building blocks of proteins; the amino acid residues in a protein are linked by peptide bonds. Nitrogen is the most distinguishing element present in proteins. However, nitrogen content in various food proteins ranges from 13.4 to 19.1% (1) due to the variation in the specific amino acid composition of proteins. Generally, proteins rich in basic amino acids contain more nitrogen.

  3. The Level of Protein in Milk Formula Modifies Ileal Sensitivity to LPS Later in Life in a Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    Gras-Le Guen, Christèle; Lallès, Jean-Paul; Le Huërou-Luron, Isabelle; Boudry, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Background Milk formulas have higher protein contents than human milk. This high protein level could modify the development of intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier and immune functions and have long-term consequences. Methodology/Principal findings We investigated the effect of a high protein formula on ileal microbiota and physiology during the neonatal period and later in life. Piglets were fed from 2 to 28 days of age either a normoprotein (NP, equivalent to sow milk) or a high protein formula (HP, +40% protein). Then, they received the same solid diet until 160 days. During the formula feeding period ileal microbiota implantation was accelerated in HP piglets with greater concentrations of ileal bacteria at d7 in HP than NP piglets. Epithelial barrier function was altered with a higher permeability to small and large probes in Ussing chambers in HP compared to NP piglets without difference in bacterial translocation. Infiltration of T cells was increased in HP piglets at d28. IL-1β and NF-κB sub-units mRNA levels were reduced in HP piglets at d7 and d28 respectively; plasma haptoglobin also tended to be reduced at d7. Later in life, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion in response to high doses of LPS in explants culture was reduced in HP compared to NP piglets. Levels of mRNA coding the NF-κB pathway sub-units were increased by the challenge with LPS in NP piglets, but not HP ones. Conclusions/Significance A high protein level in formula affects the postnatal development of ileal microbiota, epithelial barrier and immune function in piglets and alters ileal response to inflammatory mediators later in life. PMID:21573022

  4. Visualizing viral protein structures in cells using genetic probes for correlated light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Ellisman, Mark H; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2015-11-15

    preparation of photo-oxidized samples for TEM and serial block-face scanning EM (SBEM) for large-scale volume EM data acquisition are also presented. As an example, we discuss the recent multi-scale analysis of Adenoviral protein E4-ORF3 that reveals a new type of multi-functional polymer that disrupts multiple cellular proteins. This new capability to visualize unambiguously specific viral protein structures at high resolutions in the native cellular environment is revealing new insights into how they usurp host proteins and functions to drive pathological viral replication. PMID:26066760

  5. Phenotype of cardiomyopathy in cardiac-specific heat shock protein B8 K141N transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Sanbe, Atsushi; Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Abe, Tsutomu; Tezuka, Yu; Okada, Mizuki; Aoki, Sayuri; Tsumura, Hideki; Yamauchi, Junji; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Nishigori, Hideo; Tanoue, Akito

    2013-03-29

    A K141N missense mutation in heat shock protein (HSP) B8, which belongs to the small HSP family, causes distal hereditary motor neuropathy, which is characterized by the formation of inclusion bodies in cells. Although the HSPB8 gene causes hereditary motor neuropathy, obvious expression of HSPB8 is also observed in other tissues, such as the heart. The effects of a single mutation in HSPB8 upon the heart were analyzed using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Expression of HSPB8 K141N by adenoviral infection resulted in increased HSPB8-positive aggregates around nuclei, whereas no aggregates were observed in myocytes expressing wild-type HSPB8. HSPB8-positive aggresomes contained amyloid oligomer intermediates that were detected by a specific anti-oligomer antibody (A11). Expression of HSPB8 K141N induced slight cellular toxicity. Recombinant HSPB8 K141N protein showed reactivity against the anti-oligomer antibody, and reactivity of the mutant HSPB8 protein was much higher than that of wild-type HSPB8 protein. To extend our in vitro study, cardiac-specific HSPB8 K141N transgenic (TG) mice were generated. Echocardiography revealed that the HSPB8 K141N TG mice exhibited mild hypertrophy and apical fibrosis as well as slightly reduced cardiac function, although no phenotype was detected in wild-type HSPB8 TG mice. A single point mutation of HSPB8, such as K141N, can cause cardiac disease. PMID:23389032

  6. Cytotoxic effect of replication-competent adenoviral vectors carrying L-plastin promoter regulated E1A and cytosine deaminase genes in cancers of the breast, ovary and colon.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Hakan; Zhang, Lixin; Tang, Yucheng; Deisseroth, Albert

    2003-05-01

    Prodrug activating transcription unit gene therapy is one of several promising approaches to cancer gene therapy. Combining that approach with conditionally replication-competent viral vectors that are truly tumor specific has been an important objective of recent work. In this study, we report the construction of a new conditionally replication-competent bicistronic adenoviral vector in which the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the E1a gene are driven by the L-plastin tumor-specific promoter (AdLpCDIRESE1a). A similar vector driven by the CMV promoter has also been constructed (AdCMVCDIRESE1a) as a control. We have carried out in vitro cytotoxicity in carcinomas of the breast, ovary and colon, and in vivo efficacy studies with these vectors in an animal model of colon cancer. While the addition of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector to established cancer cell lines showed significant cytotoxicity in tumor cells derived from carcinomas of the breast (MCF-7), colon (HTB-38) and ovary (Ovcar 5), no significant toxicity was seen in explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) exposed to this vector. The addition of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) significantly increased the cytotoxicity in an additive fashion of both the AdLpCDIRESE1a and AdCMVCDIRESE1a vectors as well as that of the AdLpCD replication incompetent vector to established tumor cell lines. However, no significant cytotoxicity was observed with the addition of 5FC to explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells that had been exposed to the L-plastin-driven vectors. Studies with mixtures of infected and uninfected tumor cell lines showed that the established cancer cell lines infected with the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector generated significant toxicity to surrounding uninfected cells (the "bystander effect") even at a ratio of 0.25 of infected cells to infected + uninfected cells in the presence of 5FC. The injection of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector into subcutaneous deposits of human tumor nodules in the

  7. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  8. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows that taking whey protein in combination with strength training increases lean body mass, strength, and muscle size. ... grams/kg of whey protein in combination with strength training for 6-10 weeks. For HIV/AIDS-related ...

  9. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  10. Delivery of a Therapeutic Protein by Immune-Privileged Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Halley, Katelyn; Dyson, Emily L.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Mital, Payal; Uong, Peter M.; Dass, Brinda; Crowell, Sherry N.; Dufour, Jannette M.

    2011-01-01

    Immune-privileged Sertoli cells survive long term after allogeneic or xenogeneic transplantation without the use of immunosuppressive drugs, suggesting they could be used as a vehicle to deliver therapeutic proteins. As a model to test this, we engineered Sertoli cells to transiently produce basal levels of insulin and then examined their ability to lower blood glucose levels after transplantation into diabetic SCID mice. Mouse and porcine Sertoli cells transduced with a recombinant adenoviral vector containing furin-modified human proinsulin cDNA expressed insulin mRNA and secreted insulin protein. Transplantation of 5–20 million insulin-expressing porcine Sertoli cells into diabetic SCID mice significantly decreased blood glucose levels in a dose-dependent manner, with 20 million Sertoli cells decreasing blood glucose levels to 9.8 ± 2.7 mM. Similar results were obtained when 20 million insulin-positive, BALB/c mouse Sertoli cells were transplanted; blood glucose levels dropped to 6.3 ± 2.4 mM and remained significantly lower for 5 days. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate Sertoli cells can be engineered to produce and secrete a clinically relevant factor that has a therapeutic effect, thus supporting the concept of using immune-privileged Sertoli cells as a potential vehicle for gene therapy. PMID:20719072

  11. Haem carrier protein 1 (HCP1): Expression and functional studies in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Latunde-Dada, Gladys O; Takeuchi, Ken; Simpson, Robert J; McKie, Andrew T

    2006-12-22

    Haem released from digestion and breakdown of meat products provides an important source of dietary iron, which is readily absorbed in the proximal intestine. The recent cloning and characterization of a haem carrier protein 1 (HCP 1) has provided a candidate intestinal haem transporter. The current studies describe the expression and functional analysis of HCP1 in cultured Caco-2 cells, a commonly used model of human intestinal cells. HCP1 mRNA expression in other cell types was also studied. The uptake of (55)Fe labeled haem was determined in cells under different experimental conditions and HCP1 expression was measured by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. mRNA and protein expressions increased in Caco-2 cells transduced with HCP1 adenoviral plasmid, and consequently (55)Fe haem uptake was higher in these cells. Haem uptake was also increased in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells compared to undifferentiated cells. Preincubation of cells with desferrioxamine (DFO, to deplete cells of iron) had no effect on HCP1 expression or haem uptake. Treatment with CdCl(2) (to induce haem oxygenase, HO-1) enhanced HCP1 expression and increased haem uptake into the cells. HCP1 expression and function were found to be adaptive to the rate of haem degradation by HO-1. Furthermore, HCP1 expression in different cells implies a functional role in tissues other than the duodenum. PMID:17156779

  12. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  13. Utilization of modified surfactant-associated protein B for delivery of DNA to airway cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Baatz, J E; Bruno, M D; Ciraolo, P J; Glasser, S W; Stripp, B R; Smyth, K L; Korfhagen, T R

    1994-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lines the airway epithelium and creates a potential barrier to successful transfection of the epithelium in vivo. Based on the functional properties of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) and the fact that this protein is neither toxic nor immunogenic in the airway, we hypothesized that SP-B could be modified to deliver DNA to airway cells. We have modified native bovine SP-B by the covalent linkage of poly(lysine) (average molecular mass of 3.3 or 10 kDa) to the N terminus of SP-B and formed complexes between a test plasmid and the modified SP-B. Transfection efficiency was determined by transfection of pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (H441) in culture with the test plasmid pCPA-RSV followed by measurement of activity of the reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Transfections were performed with DNA.protein complexes using poly(lysine)10kDa-SP-B ([Lys]10kDa-SP-B) or poly(lysine)3.3kDa-SP-B ([Lys]3.3kDa-SP-B), and results were compared with transfections using unmodified poly(lysine).DNA, unmodified SP-B.DNA, or DNA only. For [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV preparations, CAT activity was readily detectable above the background of [Lys]3.3kDa-SP-B or unmodified SP-B. The SP-B-poly(lysine) conjugates were effective over a broad range of protein-to-DNA molar ratios, although they were optimal at approximately 500:1-1000:1. Transfection efficiency varied with the tested cell line but was not specific to airway cells. Addition of replication-defective adenovirus to the [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex enhanced CAT activity about 30-fold with respect to that produced by the [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex alone. This increase suggests routing of the adenoviral.[Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex through an endosomal pathway. Effects of covalent modification on the secondary structure of SP-B were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Results of FTIR indicated that the conformation of [Lys]10kDa-SP-B was

  14. Protein folds and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The classification of protein folds is necessarily based on the structural elements that distinguish domains. Classification of protein domains consists of two problems: the partition of structures into domains and the classification of domains into sets of similar structures (or folds). Although similar topologies may arise by convergent evolution, the similarity of their respective folding pathways is unknown. The discovery and the characterization of the majority of protein folds will be followed by a similar enumeration of available protein folding pathways. Consequently, understanding the intricacies of structural domains is necessary to understanding their collective folding pathways. We review the current state of the art in the field of protein domain classification and discuss methods for the systematic and comprehensive study of protein folding across protein fold space via atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we discuss our large-scale Dynameomics project, which includes simulations of representatives of all autonomous protein folds. PMID:21051320

  15. Protein kinase B/Akt activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase by increasing NO production in response to shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Boo, Y. C.; Park, H.; Maland, M. C.; Patel, R.; Pritchard, K. A. Jr; Fujio, Y.; Walsh, K.; Darley-Usmar, V.; Jo, H.

    2001-01-01

    Laminar shear stress activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) by the mechanisms involving both nitric oxide (NO) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Because protein kinase B (Akt), a downstream effector of PI3K, has been shown to phosphorylate and activate endothelial NO synthase, we hypothesized that Akt regulates shear-dependent activation of JNK by stimulating NO production. Here, we examined the role of Akt in shear-dependent NO production and JNK activation by expressing a dominant negative Akt mutant (Akt(AA)) and a constitutively active mutant (Akt(Myr)) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). As expected, pretreatment of BAEC with the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) prevented shear-dependent stimulation of Akt and NO production. Transient expression of Akt(AA) in BAEC by using a recombinant adenoviral construct inhibited the shear-dependent stimulation of NO production and JNK activation. However, transient expression of Akt(Myr) by using a recombinant adenoviral construct did not induce JNK activation. This is consistent with our previous finding that NO is required, but not sufficient on its own, to activate JNK in response to shear stress. These results and our previous findings strongly suggest that shear stress triggers activation of PI3K, Akt, and endothelial NO synthase, leading to production of NO, which (along with O(2-), which is also produced by shear) activates Ras-JNK pathway. The regulation of Akt, NO, and JNK by shear stress is likely to play a critical role in its antiatherogenic effects.

  16. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase is a molecular partner of Wolfram syndrome 1 protein, which negatively regulates its expression.

    PubMed

    Zatyka, Malgorzata; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Bellomo, Elisa A; Leadbeater, Wendy; Astuti, Dewi; Smith, Joel; Michelangeli, Frank; Rutter, Guy A; Barrett, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and diabetes mellitus. The gene responsible for the syndrome (WFS1) encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that is involved in the regulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), intracellular ion homeostasis, cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In this study, single cell Ca(2+) imaging with fura-2 and direct measurements of free cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]CYT) with adenovirally expressed luciferase confirmed a reduced and delayed rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]CYT), and additionally, diminished [ATP]CYT rises in response to elevated glucose concentrations in WFS1-depleted MIN6 cells. We also observed that sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) expression was elevated in several WFS1-depleted cell models and primary islets. We demonstrated a novel interaction between WFS1 and SERCA by co-immunoprecipitation in Cos7 cells and with endogenous proteins in human neuroblastoma cells. This interaction was reduced when cells were treated with the ER stress inducer dithiothreitol. Treatment of WFS1-depleted neuroblastoma cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 resulted in reduced accumulation of SERCA levels compared with wild-type cells. Together these results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of SERCA and provide further insights into the function of WFS1 in calcium homeostasis. PMID:25274773

  17. Co-administration of non-carrier nanoparticles boosts antigen immune response without requiring protein conjugation.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Nani; Chuan, Yap P; Seth, Arjun; Cordoba, Yoann; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-06-17

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in medicine including through new vaccine approaches. The use of nanoparticles in vaccination has, to date, focused on attaching antigen directly to or within nanoparticle structures to enhance antigen uptake by immune cells. Here we question whether antigen incorporation with the nanoparticle is actually necessary to boost vaccine effectiveness. We show that the immunogenicity of a sub-unit protein antigen was significantly boosted by formulation with silica nanoparticles even without specific conjugation of antigen to the nanoparticle. We further show that this effect was observed only for virus-sized nanoparticles (50 nm) but not for larger (1,000 nm) particles, demonstrating a pronounced effect of nanoparticle size. This non-attachment approach has potential to radically simplify the development and application of nanoparticle-based formulations, leading to safer and simpler nanoparticle applications in vaccine development. PMID:24793947

  18. Protein Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfelder, Hans

    2011-03-01

    Proteins combine properties of solids, liquids, and glasses. Schrödinger anticipated the main features of biomolecules long ago by stating that they had to be solid-like, but able to assume many different conformations. Indeed proteins can assume a gigantic number of conformational substates with the same primary sequence but different conformations. The different substates are described as craters in a very-high-dimensional energy landscape. The energy landscape is organized in a hierarchy of tiers, craters within craters within craters. Protein motions are pictured as transition between substates - jumps from crater to crater. Initially we assumed that these jumps were controlled by internal barriers between substates, but experiments have shown that nature selected a different approach. Proteins are surrounded by one to two layers of water and are embedded in a bulk solvent. Structural motions of the protein are controlled by the alpha fluctuations in the solvent surrounding the protein. Some internal motions most likely involving side chains are controlled electrostatically by beta fluctuations in the hydration shell. The dynamics of proteins is consequently dominated by the environment (H. Frauenfelder et al. PNAS 106, 5129 (2009). One can speculate that this organization permits exchange of information among biomolecules. The energy landscape is not just organized into two tiers, alpha and beta, but cryogenic experiments have revealed more tiers and protein more properties similar to that of glasses. While proteins function at ambient temperatures, cryogenic studies are necessary to understand the physics relevant for biology.

  19. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for longer times. The appearance of three distinct RET states suggested a spatially heterogeneous surface – with areas of high protein density (i.e. strongly-interacting clusters) coexisting with mobile monomers. Distinct association states exhibited characteristic behavior, i.e. partial-RET (monomer-monomer) associations were shorter-lived than complete-RET (protein-cluster) associations. While the fractional surface area covered by regions with high protein density (i.e. clusters) increased with increasing concentration, the distribution of contact times between monomers and clusters was independent of solution concentration, suggesting that associations were a local phenomenon, and independent of the global surface coverage. PMID:24274729

  20. E1A inhibits transforming growth factor-beta signaling through binding to Smad proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, A; Hanai, J; Imamura, T; Miyazono, K; Kawabata, M

    1999-10-01

    Smads form a recently identified family of proteins that mediate intracellular signaling of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta superfamily. Smads bind to DNA and act as transcriptional regulators. Smads interact with a variety of transcription factors, and the interaction is likely to determine the target specificity of gene induction. Smads also associate with transcriptional coactivators such as p300 and CBP. E1A, an adenoviral oncoprotein, inhibits TGF-beta-induced transactivation, and the ability of E1A to bind p300/CBP is required for the inhibition. Here we determined the Smad interaction domain (SID) in p300 and found that two adjacent regions are required for the interaction. One of the regions is the C/H3 domain conserved between p300 and CBP, and the other is a nonconserved region. p300 mutants containing SID inhibit transactivation by TGF-beta in a dose-dependent manner. E1A inhibits the interaction of Smad3 with a p300 mutant that contains SID but lacks the E1A binding domain. We found that E1A interacts specifically with receptor-regulated Smads, suggesting a novel mechanism whereby E1A antagonizes TGF-beta signaling. PMID:10497242

  1. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F.; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M.; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  2. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance, for replacing or supplementing milk-based infant formulas, and for reversing weight loss and increasing glutathione ( ... allergic reactions compared to infants who receive standard formula. However, taking why protein might not be helpful ...

  3. Designed protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Dirk; Treiber, Nora; Ziegler, Mathias O P; Koetter, Jochen W A; Schulze, Monika-Sarah; Schulz, Georg E

    2008-01-11

    The analysis of natural contact interfaces between protein subunits and between proteins has disclosed some general rules governing their association. We have applied these rules to produce a number of novel assemblies, demonstrating that a given protein can be engineered to form contacts at various points of its surface. Symmetry plays an important role because it defines the multiplicity of a designed contact and therefore the number of required mutations. Some of the proteins needed only a single side-chain alteration in order to associate to a higher-order complex. The mobility of the buried side chains has to be taken into account. Four assemblies have been structurally elucidated. Comparisons between the designed contacts and the results will provide useful guidelines for the development of future architectures. PMID:18187656

  4. Global quantitative proteomics reveal up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress response proteins upon depletion of eIF5A in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Park, Myung Hee

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor, eIF5A, is a translation factor essential for protein synthesis, cell growth and animal development. By use of a adenoviral eIF5A shRNA, we have achieved an effective depletion of eIF5A in HeLa cells and undertook in vivo comprehensive proteomic analyses to examine the effects of eIF5A depletion on the total proteome and to identify cellular pathways influenced by eIF5A. The proteome of HeLa cells transduced with eIF5A shRNA was compared with that of scramble shRNA-transduced counterpart by the iTRAQ method. We identified 972 proteins consistently detected in three iTRAQ experiments and 104 proteins with significantly altered levels (protein ratio ≥1.5 or ≤0.66, p-value ≤0.05) at 72 h and/or 96 h of Ad-eIF5A-shRNA transduction. The altered expression levels of key pathway proteins were validated by western blotting. Integration of functional ontology with expression data of the 104 proteins revealed specific biological processes that are prominently up- or down-regulated. Heatmap analysis and Cytoscape visualization of biological networks identified protein folding as the major cellular process affected by depletion of eIF5A. Our unbiased, quantitative, proteomic data demonstrate that the depletion of eIF5A leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress, an unfolded protein response and up-regulation of chaperone expression in HeLa cells. PMID:27180817

  5. Global quantitative proteomics reveal up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress response proteins upon depletion of eIF5A in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Park, Myung Hee

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor, eIF5A, is a translation factor essential for protein synthesis, cell growth and animal development. By use of a adenoviral eIF5A shRNA, we have achieved an effective depletion of eIF5A in HeLa cells and undertook in vivo comprehensive proteomic analyses to examine the effects of eIF5A depletion on the total proteome and to identify cellular pathways influenced by eIF5A. The proteome of HeLa cells transduced with eIF5A shRNA was compared with that of scramble shRNA-transduced counterpart by the iTRAQ method. We identified 972 proteins consistently detected in three iTRAQ experiments and 104 proteins with significantly altered levels (protein ratio ≥1.5 or ≤0.66, p-value ≤0.05) at 72 h and/or 96 h of Ad-eIF5A-shRNA transduction. The altered expression levels of key pathway proteins were validated by western blotting. Integration of functional ontology with expression data of the 104 proteins revealed specific biological processes that are prominently up- or down-regulated. Heatmap analysis and Cytoscape visualization of biological networks identified protein folding as the major cellular process affected by depletion of eIF5A. Our unbiased, quantitative, proteomic data demonstrate that the depletion of eIF5A leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress, an unfolded protein response and up-regulation of chaperone expression in HeLa cells. PMID:27180817

  6. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications. PMID:24261083

  7. Combining Viral Vectored and Protein-in-adjuvant Vaccines Against the Blood-stage Malaria Antigen AMA1: Report on a Phase 1a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Milne, Kathryn H; Rampling, Thomas W; Biswas, Sumi; Poulton, Ian D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Douglas, Alexander D; Alanine, Daniel GW; Illingworth, Joseph J; de Cassan, Simone C; Zhu, Daming; Nicosia, Alfredo; Long, Carole A; Moyle, Sarah; Berrie, Eleanor; Lawrie, Alison M; Wu, Yimin; Ellis, Ruth D; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines against difficult disease targets will require the identification of new subunit vaccination strategies that can induce and maintain effective immune responses in humans. Here we report on a phase 1a clinical trial using the AMA1 antigen from the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite delivered either as recombinant protein formulated with Alhydrogel adjuvant with and without CPG 7909, or using recombinant vectored vaccines—chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 and the orthopoxvirus MVA. A variety of promising “mixed-modality” regimens were tested. All volunteers were primed with ChAd63, and then subsequently boosted with MVA and/or protein-in-adjuvant using either an 8- or 16-week prime-boost interval. We report on the safety of these regimens, as well as the T cell, B cell, and serum antibody responses. Notably, IgG antibody responses primed by ChAd63 were comparably boosted by AMA1 protein vaccine, irrespective of whether CPG 7909 was included in the Alhydrogel adjuvant. The ability to improve the potency of a relatively weak aluminium-based adjuvant in humans, by previously priming with an adenoviral vaccine vector encoding the same antigen, thus offers a novel vaccination strategy for difficult or neglected disease targets when access to more potent adjuvants is not possible. PMID:25156127

  8. Combining viral vectored and protein-in-adjuvant vaccines against the blood-stage malaria antigen AMA1: report on a phase 1a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Milne, Kathryn H; Rampling, Thomas W; Biswas, Sumi; Poulton, Ian D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Douglas, Alexander D; Alanine, Daniel Gw; Illingworth, Joseph J; de Cassan, Simone C; Zhu, Daming; Nicosia, Alfredo; Long, Carole A; Moyle, Sarah; Berrie, Eleanor; Lawrie, Alison M; Wu, Yimin; Ellis, Ruth D; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2014-12-01

    The development of effective vaccines against difficult disease targets will require the identification of new subunit vaccination strategies that can induce and maintain effective immune responses in humans. Here we report on a phase 1a clinical trial using the AMA1 antigen from the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite delivered either as recombinant protein formulated with Alhydrogel adjuvant with and without CPG 7909, or using recombinant vectored vaccines--chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 and the orthopoxvirus MVA. A variety of promising "mixed-modality" regimens were tested. All volunteers were primed with ChAd63, and then subsequently boosted with MVA and/or protein-in-adjuvant using either an 8- or 16-week prime-boost interval. We report on the safety of these regimens, as well as the T cell, B cell, and serum antibody responses. Notably, IgG antibody responses primed by ChAd63 were comparably boosted by AMA1 protein vaccine, irrespective of whether CPG 7909 was included in the Alhydrogel adjuvant. The ability to improve the potency of a relatively weak aluminium-based adjuvant in humans, by previously priming with an adenoviral vaccine vector encoding the same antigen, thus offers a novel vaccination strategy for difficult or neglected disease targets when access to more potent adjuvants is not possible. PMID:25156127

  9. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  10. Luteinizing Hormone Receptor-Stimulated Progesterone Production by Preovulatory Granulosa Cells Requires Protein Kinase A-Dependent Activation/Dephosphorylation of the Actin Dynamizing Protein Cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Amelia B.; Maizels, Evelyn T.; Flynn, Maxfield P.; Jones, Jonathan C.; Shelden, Eric A.; Bamburg, James R.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the LH receptor (LHR) on preovulatory granulosa cells stimulates the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway to regulate expression of genes required for ovulation and luteinization. LHR signaling also initiates rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Because disruption of the actin cytoskeleton has been causally linked to steroidogenesis in various cell models, we sought to identify the cellular mechanisms that may modulate reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and to determine whether cytoskeletal reorganization is required for steroidogenesis. Herein we report that LHR signaling in preovulatory granulosa cells promotes rapid dephosphorylation of the actin-depolymerizing factor cofilin at Ser3 that is dependent on PKA. The LHR-stimulated dephosphorylation of cofilin(Ser3) switches on cofilin activity to bind actin filaments and enhance their dynamics. Basal phosphorylation of cofilin(Ser3) is mediated by active/GTP-bound Rho and downstream protein kinases; LHR signaling promotes a decrease in active/GTP-bound Rho by a PKA-dependent mechanism. LHR-dependent Rho inactivation and subsequent activation of cofilin does not involve ERK, epidermal growth factor receptor, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways downstream of PKA. To understand the biological significance of cofilin activation, preovulatory granulosa cells were transduced with a mutant cofilin adenoviral vector in which Ser3 was mutated to Glu (S-E cofilin). Inactive S-E cofilin abolished LHR-mediated reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and caused a 70% decrease in LHR-stimulated progesterone that is obligatory for ovulation. Taken together, these results show that LHR signaling via PKA activates a cofilin-regulated rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton and that active cofilin is required to initiate progesterone secretion by preovulatory granulosa cells. PMID:20610540

  11. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  12. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  13. TLR2-targeted secreted proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are protective as powdered pulmonary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tyne, Anneliese S; Chan, John Gar Yan; Shanahan, Erin R; Atmosukarto, Ines; Chan, Hak-Kim; Britton, Warwick J; West, Nicholas P

    2013-09-13

    Despite considerable research efforts towards effective treatments, tuberculosis (TB) remains a staggering burden on global health. Suitably formulated sub-unit vaccines offer potential as safe and effective generators of protective immunity. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, cutinase-like proteins (Culp) 1 and 6 and MPT83, were conjugated directly to the novel adjuvant Lipokel (Lipotek Pty Ltd), a TLR2 ligand that delivers antigen to immune cells in a self-adjuvanting context. Protein-Lipokel complexes were formulated as dry powders for pulmonary delivery directly to the lungs of mice by intra-tracheal insufflation, leading to recruitment of neutrophils and antigen presenting cell populations to the lungs at 72 h, that persisted at 7 days post immunisation. Significant increases in the frequency of activated dendritic cells were observed in the mediastinal lymph node (MLN) at 1 and 4 weeks after homologous boosting with protein-Lipokel vaccine. This was associated with the increased recruitment of effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes to the MLN and systemic antigen-specific, IFN-γ producing T-lymphocyte and IgG responses. Notably, pulmonary immunisation with either Culp1-6-Lipokel or MPT83-Lipokel powder vaccines generated protective responses in the lungs against aerosol M. tuberculosis challenge. The successful combination of TLR2-targeting and dry powder vaccine formulation, together with important practical benefits, offers potential for pulmonary vaccination against M. tuberculosis. PMID:23880366

  14. A Protective Role For Club Cell Secretory Protein-16 (CC16) In The Development of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Laucho-Contreras, Maria E.; Polverino, Francesca; Gupta, Kushagra; Taylor, Katherine L.; Kelly, Emer; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Divo, Miguel; Afshaq, Naveed; Petersen, Hans; Stripp, Barry; Pilon, Aprile L.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Celli, Bartolome R.; Owen, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Club cell secretory protein-16 (CC16) is the major secreted product of airway Club cells, but its role in the pathogenesis of COPD is unclear. We measured CC16 airway expression in humans with and without COPD and CC16 function in a cigarette smoke (CS)-induced COPD mice model. Methods Airway CC16 expression was measured in COPD patients, smokers without COPD, and non-smokers. We exposed wild-type (WT) and CC16-/- mice to CS or air for up to 6 months, and measured airway CC16 expression, pulmonary inflammation, alveolar septal cell apoptosis, airspace enlargement, airway MUC5AC expression, small airway remodeling, and pulmonary function. Results Smokers and COPD patients had reduced airway CC16 immunostaining that decreased with increasing COPD severity. Exposing mice to CS reduced airway CC16 expression. CC16-/- mice had greater CS-induced emphysema, airway remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, alveolar cell apoptosis, airway MUC5AC expression, and more compliant lungs than WT mice. These changes were associated with increased nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) activation in CC16-/- lungs. CS-induced acute pulmonary changes were reversed by adenoviral-mediated over-expression of CC16. Conclusions CC16 protects lungs from CS-induced injury by reducing lung NFκB activation. CS-induced airway CC16 deficiency increases CS-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:25700379

  15. Silk-elastinlike protein polymers improve the efficacy of adenovirus thymidine kinase enzyme prodrug therapy of head and neck tumors

    PubMed Central

    Greish, Khaled; Frandsen, Jordan; Scharff, Stephanie; Gustafson, Joshua; Cappello, Joseph; Li, Daqing; O’Malley, Bert W.; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Background Adenoviral directed enzyme prodrug therapy is a promising approach for head and neck cancer gene therapy. Challenges with this approach however are transient gene expression and dissemination of viruses to distant organs. Methods We used recombinant silk-elastinlike protein copolymer (SELP) matrices for intratumoral delivery of adenoviruses containing both thymidine kinase-1, and luciferase genes in a nude mice model of JHU-022 head and neck tumor. Hydrogels made from two SELP analogues (47K and 815K) with similar silk to elastinlike block ratios but different block lengths were studied for intratumoral viral delivery. Tumor bearing mice were followed up for tumor progression and luciferase gene expression concomitantly for five weeks. Polymer’s safety was evaluated through body weight change, blood count, liver and kidney functions in addition to gross and microscopic histological examination. Results SELP 815K analogues efficiently controlled the duration and extent of transfection in tumors for up to 5 weeks with no detectable spread to the liver. About five-fold greater reduction in tumor volume was obtained with matrix-mediated delivery compared to intra-tumoral injection of adenoviruses in saline. SELP matrix proved safe in all injected mice compared to control group. Conclusion SELP- controlled gene delivery approach could potentially improve the anticancer activity of virus-mediated gene therapy while limiting viral spread to normal organs. PMID:20603862

  16. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/. PMID:26935399

  17. The human cytomegalovirus UL11 protein interacts with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, resulting in functional paralysis of T cells.

    PubMed

    Gabaev, Ildar; Steinbrück, Lars; Pokoyski, Claudia; Pich, Andreas; Stanton, Richard J; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Schulz, Thomas F; Jacobs, Roland; Messerle, Martin; Kay-Fedorov, Penelope C

    2011-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) exerts diverse and complex effects on the immune system, not all of which have been attributed to viral genes. Acute CMV infection results in transient restrictions in T cell proliferative ability, which can impair the control of the virus and increase the risk of secondary infections in patients with weakened or immature immune systems. In a search for new immunomodulatory proteins, we investigated the UL11 protein, a member of the CMV RL11 family. This protein family is defined by the RL11 domain, which has homology to immunoglobulin domains and adenoviral immunomodulatory proteins. We show that pUL11 is expressed on the cell surface and induces intercellular interactions with leukocytes. This was demonstrated to be due to the interaction of pUL11 with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, identified by mass spectrometry analysis of pUL11-associated proteins. CD45 expression is sufficient to mediate the interaction with pUL11 and is required for pUL11 binding to T cells, indicating that pUL11 is a specific CD45 ligand. CD45 has a pivotal function regulating T cell signaling thresholds; in its absence, the Src family kinase Lck is inactive and signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR) is therefore shut off. In the presence of pUL11, several CD45-mediated functions were inhibited. The induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple signaling proteins upon TCR stimulation was reduced and T cell proliferation was impaired. We therefore conclude that pUL11 has immunosuppressive properties, and that disruption of T cell function via inhibition of CD45 is a previously unknown immunomodulatory strategy of CMV. PMID:22174689

  18. Regulation of Endothelial Barrier Function by TGF-β type I Receptor ALK5: Potential Role of Contractile Mechanisms and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Antonov, Alexander S.; Antonova, Galina N.; Fujii, Makiko; Dijke, Peter ten; Handa, Vaishali; Catravas, John D.; Verin, Alexander D.

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute lung inflammation by controlling endothelial monolayer permeability. TGF-β1 regulates endothelial cell (EC) functions via two distinct receptors, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) and activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5). The precise roles of ALK1 and ALK5 in the regulation of TGF-β1-induced lung endothelium dysfunction remain mostly unknown. We now report that adenoviral infection with constitutively active ALK5 (caALK5), but not caALK1, induces EC retraction and that this receptor predominantly controls EC permeability. We demonstrate that ubiquitinated ALK5 and phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 (phospho-Hsp27) specifically accumulate in the cytoskeleton fraction, which parallels with microtubule collapse, cortical actin disassembly and increased EC permeability. We have found that ALK1 and ALK5 interact with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Moreover, the Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol (RA) prevents accumulation of ubiquitinated caALK5 and phospho-Hsp27 in the cytoskeletal fraction and restore the decreased EC permeability induced by caALK5. We hypothesize that specific translocation of ubiquitinated ALK5 receptor into the cytoskeleton compartment due to its lack of degradation is the mechanism that causes the divergence of caALK1 and caALK5 signaling. PMID:21465483

  19. Woodchuck hepatitis virus core antigen-based DNA and protein vaccines induce qualitatively different immune responses that affect T cell recall responses and antiviral effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ejuan; Kosinska, Anna D; Ma, Zhiyong; Dietze, Kirsten K; Xu, Yang; Meng, Zhongji; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Junzhong; Wang, Baoju; Dittmer, Ulf; Roggendorf, Michael; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji

    2015-01-15

    T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity was considered to play a dominant role in viral clearance of hepadnaviral infection. However, pre-primed Th2 type responses were able to efficiently control hepadnaviral infection in animal models. We investigated how pre-primed Th1/2 responses control hepadnaviral replication using the newly established mouse models. DNA (pWHcIm, pCTLA-4-C) and protein vaccines based on the nucleocapsid protein (WHcAg) of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) primed specific immune responses with distinct features. The pre-primed responses determined the characteristics of recall responses if challenged with a WHcAg-expressing adenoviral vector. Vaccination with pWHcIm and pCTLA4-C facilitated viral control in the hydrodynamic injection model and reduced WHV loads by about 3 and 2 logs in WHV-transgenic mice, respectively, despite of different kinetics of specific CD8+ T cell responses. Thus, pre-primed Th2-biased responses facilitate the development of CD8+ T cell responses in mice compared with naïve controls and thereby confer better viral control. PMID:25462346

  20. TM4SF1: a tetraspanin-like protein necessary for nanopodia formation and endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zukauskas, Andrew; Merley, Anne; Li, Dan; Ang, Lay-Hong; Sciuto, Tracey E; Salman, Samantha; Dvorak, Ann M; Dvorak, Harold F; Jaminet, Shou-Ching Shih

    2011-09-01

    Transmembrane-4-L-six-family-1 (TM4SF1) is a tetraspanin-like membrane protein that is highly and selectively expressed by cultured endothelial cells (EC) and, in vivo, by EC lining angiogenic tumor blood vessels. TM4SF1 is necessary for the formation of unusually long (up to a 50 μm), thin (~100-300 nm wide), F-actin-poor EC cell projections that we term 'nanopodia'. Immunostaining of nanopodia at both the light and electron microsopic levels localized TM4SF1 in a regularly spaced, banded pattern, forming TM4FS1-enriched domains. Live cell imaging of GFP-transduced HUVEC demonstrated that EC project nanopodia as they migrate and interact with neighboring cells. When TM4SF1 mRNA levels in EC were increased from the normal ~90 mRNA copies/cell to ~400 copies/cell through adenoviral transduction, EC projected more and longer nanopodia from the entire cell circumference but were unable to polarize or migrate effectively. When fibroblasts, which normally express TM4SF1 at ~5 copies/cell, were transduced to express TM4SF1 at EC-like levels, they formed typical TM4SF1-banded nanopodia, and broadened, EC-like lamellipodia. Mass-spectrometry demonstrated that TM4SF1 interacted with myosin-10 and β-actin, proteins involved in filopodia formation and cell migration. In summary, TM4SF1, like genuine tetraspanins, serves as a molecular organizer that interacts with membrane and cytoskeleton-associated proteins and uniquely initiates the formation of nanopodia and facilitates cell polarization and migration. PMID:21626280

  1. TM4SF1: A tetraspanin-like protein necessary for nanopodia formation and endothelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zukauskas, Andrew; Merley, Anne; Li, Dan; Ang, Lay-Hong; Sciuto, Tracey E.; Salman, Samantha; Dvorak, Ann M.; Dvorak, Harold F.; Jaminet, Shou-Ching S.

    2012-01-01

    Transmembrane-4-L-six-family-1 (TM4SF1) is a tetraspanin-like membrane protein that is highly and selectively expressed by cultured endothelial cells (EC) and, in vivo, by EC lining angiogenic tumor blood vessels. TM4SF1 is necessary for the formation of unusually long (up to a 50 µm), thin (~ 100–300 nm wide), F-actin-poor EC cell projections that we term ‘nanopodia’. Immunostaining of nanopodia at both the light and electron microsopic levels localized TM4SF1 in a regularly spaced, banded pattern, forming TM4FS1-enriched domains (TMED). Live cell imaging of GFP-transduced HUVEC demonstrated that EC project nanopodia as they migrate and interact with neighboring cells. When TM4SF1 mRNA levels in EC were increased from the normal ~90 mRNA copies/cell to ~400 copies/cell through adenoviral transduction, EC projected more and longer nanopodia from the entire cell circumference but were unable to polarize or migrate effectively. When fibroblasts, which normally express TM4SF1 at ~5 copies/cell, were transduced to express TM4SF1 at EC-like levels, they formed typical TM4SF1-banded nanopodia, and broadened, EC-like lamellipodia. Mass-spectrophotometry demonstrated that TM4SF1 interacted with myosin-10 and β-actin, proteins involved in filopodia formation and cell migration. In summary, TM4SF1, like genuine tetraspanins, serves as a molecular organizer that interacts with membrane and cytoskeleton-associated proteins and uniquely initiates the formation of nanopodia and facilitates cell polarization and migration. PMID:21626280

  2. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  3. Regulation of amino acid transporters by adenoviral-mediated human insulin-like growth factor-1 in a mouse model of placental insufficiency in vivo and the human trophoblast line BeWo in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jones, H.; Crombleholme, T.; Habli, M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that over-expression of human insulin-like growth factor-11 (hIGF-1) in the placenta corrects fetal weight deficits in mouse, rat, and rabbit models of intrauterine growth restriction without changes in placental weight. The underlying mechanisms of this effect have not been elucidated. To investigate the effect of intra-placental IGF-1 over-expression on placental function we examined amino acid transporter expression and localization in both a mouse model of placental Insufficiency (PI) and a model of human trophoblast, the BeWo Choriocarcinoma cell line. For in vitro human studies, BeWo Choriocarcinoma cells were maintained in F12 complete medium + 10%FBS. Cells were incubated in serum-free control media ± Ad-IGF-1 or Ad-LacZ for 48 h. MOIs of 10:1 and 100:1 were utilized. In BeWo, transfection efficiency was 100% at an MOI of 100:1 and Ad-IGF-1 significantly increased IGF-1 secretion, proliferation and invasion but reduced apoptosis compared to controls. In vitro, amino acid uptake was increased following Ad-IGF-1 treatment and associated with significantly increased RNA expression of SNAT1, 2, LAT1 and 4F2hc. Only SNAT2 protein expression was increased but LAT1 showed relocalization from a perinuclear location to the cytoplasm and cell membrane. For in vivo studies, timed-pregnant animals were divided into four groups on day 18; sham-operated controls, uterine artery branch ligation (UABL), UABL + Ad-hIGF-1 (108 PFU), UABL + Ad-LacZ (108 PFU). At gestational day 20, pups and placentas were harvested by C-section. Only LAT1 mRNA expression changed, showing that a reduced expression of the transporter levels in the PI model could be partially rectified with Ad-hIGF1 treatment. At the protein level, System L was reduced in PI but remained at control levels following Ad-hIGF1. The System A isoforms were differentially regulated with SNAT2 expression diminished but SNAT1 increased in PI and Ad-hIGF1 groups. Enhanced

  4. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  5. Effect of prolonged intravenous glucose and essential amino acid infusion on nitrogen balance, muscle protein degradation and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene expression in calves

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Fouzia; Crompton, Leslie A; Scaife, Jes R; Lomax, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusions of glucose and amino acids increase both nitrogen balance and muscle accretion. We hypothesised that co-infusion of glucose (to stimulate insulin) and essential amino acids (EAA) would act additively to improve nitrogen balance by decreasing muscle protein degradation in association with alterations in muscle expression of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. Methods We examined the effect of a 5 day intravenous infusions of saline, glucose, EAA and glucose + EAA, on urinary nitrogen excretion and muscle protein degradation. We carried out the study in 6 restrained calves since ruminants offer the advantage that muscle protein degradation can be assessed by excretion of 3 methyl-histidine and multiple muscle biopsies can be taken from the same animal. On the final day of infusion blood samples were taken for hormone and metabolite measurement and muscle biopsies for expression of ubiquitin, the 14-kDa E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, and proteasome sub-units C2 and C8. Results On day 5 of glucose infusion, plasma glucose, insulin and IGF-1 concentrations were increased while urea nitrogen excretion and myofibrillar protein degradation was decreased. Co-infusion of glucose + EAA prevented the loss of urinary nitrogen observed with EAA infusions alone and enhanced the increase in plasma IGF-1 concentration but there was no synergistic effect of glucose + EAA on the decrease in myofibrillar protein degradation. Muscle mRNA expression of the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, 14-kDa E2 and proteasome sub-unit C2 were significantly decreased, after glucose but not amino acid infusions, and there was no further response to the combined infusions of glucose + EAA. Conclusion Prolonged glucose infusion decreases myofibrillar protein degradation, prevents the excretion of infused EAA, and acts additively with EAA to increase plasma IGF-1 and improve net nitrogen balance. There was no evidence of synergistic effects between

  6. Prostate Androgen-Regulated Mucin-Like protein 1: A Novel Regulator of Progesterone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Yeon; Jang, Hyein; Curry, Thomas E.; Sakamoto, Aiko

    2013-01-01

    The LH surge reprograms preovulatory follicular cells to become terminally differentiated luteal cells which produce high levels of progesterone and become resistant to apoptosis. PARM1 (prostate androgen regulated mucin-like protein 1) has been implicated in cell differentiation and cell survival in nonovarian cells, but little is known about PARM1 in the ovary. This study demonstrated that the LH surge induced a dramatic increase in Parm1 expression in periovulatory follicles and newly forming CL in both cycling and immature rat models. We further demonstrated that hCG increases Parm1 expression in granulosa cell cultures. The in vitro up-regulation of Parm1 expression was mediated by hCG-activated multiple signaling pathways and transcriptional activation of this gene. Parm1 knockdown increased the viability of cultured granulosa cells but resulted in a decrease in progesterone levels. The inhibitory effect of Parm1 silencing on progesterone was reversed by adenoviral mediated add-back expression of Parm1. Parm1 silencing had little effect on the expression of genes involved in progesterone biosynthesis and metabolism such as Scarb1, Ldlr, Vldlr, Scp2, Star, Cyp11a1, Hsd3b, and Srd5a1, while decreasing the expression of Akr1c3. Analyses of culture media steroid levels revealed that Parm1 knockdown had no effect on pregnenolone levels, while resulting in time-dependent decreases in progesterone and 20α-dihydroprogesterone and accelerated accumulation of 5α-pregnanediol. This study revealed that the up-regulation of Parm1 expression promotes progesterone and 20α-dihydroprogesterone accumulation in luteinizing granulosa cells by inhibiting progesterone catabolism to 5α-pregnanediol. PARM1 contributes to ovulation and/or luteal function by acting as a novel regulator of progesterone metabolism. PMID:24085821

  7. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  8. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  9. Suppression of mitochondrial respiration through recruitment of p160 myb binding protein to PGC-1α: modulation by p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Melina; Rhee, James; St-Pierre, Julie; Handschin, Christoph; Puigserver, Pere; Lin, Jiandie; Jäeger, Sibylle; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator PPAR gamma coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) is a key regulator of metabolic processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration in muscle and gluconeogenesis in liver. Reduced levels of PGC-1α in humans have been associated with type II diabetes. PGC-1α contains a negative regulatory domain that attenuates its transcriptional activity. This negative regulation is removed by phosphorylation of PGC-1α by p38 MAPK, an important kinase downstream of cytokine signaling in muscle and β-adrenergic signaling in brown fat. We describe here the identification of p160 myb binding protein (p160MBP) as a repressor of PGC-1α. The binding and repression of PGC-1α by p160MBP is disrupted by p38 MAPK phosphorylation of PGC-1α. Adenoviral expression of p160MBP in myoblasts strongly reduces PGC-1α's ability to stimulate mitochondrial respiration and the expression of the genes of the electron transport system. This repression does not require removal of PGC-1α from chromatin, suggesting that p160MBP is or recruits a direct transcriptional suppressor. Overall, these data indicate that p160MBP is a powerful negative regulator of PGC-1α function and provide a molecular mechanism for the activation of PGC-1α by p38 MAPK. The discovery of p160MBP as a PGC-1α regulator has important implications for the understanding of energy balance and diabetes. PMID:14744933

  10. Inhibition of hepatic phosphatidylcholine synthesis by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside is independent of AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, René L; Lingrell, Susanne; Dyck, Jason R B; Vance, Dennis E

    2007-02-16

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr), a commonly used indirect activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), inhibits phosphatidylcholine (PC) biosynthesis in freshly isolated hepatocytes. In all nucleated mammalian cells, PC is synthesized from choline via the Kennedy (CDP-choline) pathway. The purpose of our study was to provide direct evidence that AMPK regulates phospholipid biosynthesis and to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which AMPK inhibits hepatic PC synthesis. Incubations of hepatocytes with AICAr resulted in a dose-dependent activation of AMPK and inhibition of PC biosynthesis. Surprisingly, adenoviral delivery of constitutively active AMPK did not alter PC biosynthesis. In addition, expression of dominant negative mutants of AMPK was unable to block the AICAr-dependent inhibition of PC biosynthesis, indicating that AICAr was acting independently of AMPK activation. Determination of aqueous intermediates of the CDP-choline pathway indicated that choline kinase, the first enzyme in the pathway, was inhibited by AICAr administration. Flux through the CDP-choline pathway was directly correlated to the level of intracellular ATP concentrations. Therefore, it is possible that inhibition of PC biosynthesis is another process by which the cell can reduce ATP consumption in times of energetic stress. However, unlike cholesterol and triacylglycerol biosynthesis, PC production is not regulated by AMPK. PMID:17179149

  11. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  12. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  13. Liver Fatty acid binding protein (L-Fabp) modulates murine stellate cell activation and diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Anping; Tang, Youcai; Davis, Victoria; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Kennedy, Susan M.; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Newberry, Elizabeth P.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is crucial to the development of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Quiescent HSCs contain lipid droplets (LDs), whose depletion upon activation induces a fibrogenic gene program. Here we show that liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-Fabp), an abundant cytosolic protein that modulates fatty acid (FA) metabolism in enterocytes and hepatocytes also modulates HSC FA utilization and in turn regulates the fibrogenic program. L-Fabp expression decreased 10-fold following HSC activation, concomitant with depletion of LDs. Primary HSCs isolated from L-FABP−/− mice contain fewer LDs than wild type (WT) HSCs, and exhibit upregulated expression of genes involved in HSC activation. Adenoviral L-Fabp transduction inhibited activation of passaged WT HSCs and increased both the expression of prolipogenic genes and also augmented intracellular lipid accumulation, including triglyceride and FA, predominantly palmitate. Freshly isolated HSCs from L-FABP−/− mice correspondingly exhibited decreased palmitate in the free FA pool. To investigate whether L-FABP deletion promotes HSC activation in vivo, we fed L-FABP−/− and WT mice a high fat diet supplemented with trans-fatty acids and fructose (TFF). TFF-fed L-FABP−/− mice exhibited reduced hepatic steatosis along with decreased LD abundance and size compared to WT mice. In addition, TFF-fed L-FABP−/− mice exhibited decreased hepatic fibrosis, with reduced expression of fibrogenic genes, compared to WT mice. Conclusion L-FABP deletion attenuates both diet-induced hepatic steatosis and fibrogenesis, despite the observation that L-Fabp paradoxically promotes FA and LD accumulation and inhibits HSC activation in vitro. These findings highlight the importance of cell-specific modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism in promoting fibrogenesis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:23401290

  14. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Drie, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery. PMID:21272445

  15. Split-Protein Systems: Beyond Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Sujan S.; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-01-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome [1], a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, E. coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  16. Split-protein systems: beyond binary protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-12-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome (Stumpf et al., 2008), a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, Escherichia coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  17. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number ...

  18. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  19. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract to absorb proteins ( protein-losing enteropathy ) Malnutrition Kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome Scarring of the ... may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone marrow ...

  20. Domains mediate protein-protein interactions and nucleate protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Costa, S; Cesareni, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell physiology is governed by an intricate mesh of physical and functional links among proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites. The recent information flood coming from large-scale genomic and proteomic approaches allows us to foresee the possibility of compiling an exhaustive list of the molecules present within a cell, enriched with quantitative information on concentration and cellular localization. Moreover, several high-throughput experimental and computational techniques have been devised to map all the protein interactions occurring in a living cell. So far, such maps have been drawn as graphs where nodes represent proteins and edges represent interactions. However, this representation does not take into account the intrinsically modular nature of proteins and thus fails in providing an effective description of the determinants of binding. Since proteins are composed of domains that often confer on proteins their binding capabilities, a more informative description of the interaction network would detail, for each pair of interacting proteins in the network, which domains mediate the binding. Understanding how protein domains combine to mediate protein interactions would allow one to add important features to the protein interaction network, making it possible to discriminate between simultaneously occurring and mutually exclusive interactions. This objective can be achieved by experimentally characterizing domain recognition specificity or by analyzing the frequency of co-occurring domains in proteins that do interact. Such approaches allow gaining insights on the topology of complexes with unknown three-dimensional structure, thus opening the prospect of adopting a more rational strategy in developing drugs designed to selectively target specific protein interactions. PMID:18491061

  1. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  2. Protein sensing with engineered protein nanopores*

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohammad M.; Movileanu, Liviu

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanopores is a powerful new frontier in single-molecule sciences. Nanopores have been used effectively in exploring various biophysical features of small polypeptides and proteins, such as their folding state and structure, ligand interactions, and enzymatic activity. In particular, the α-hemolysin protein pore (αHL) has been used extensively for the detection, characterization and analysis of polypeptides, because this protein nanopore is highly robust, versatile and tractable under various experimental conditions. Inspired by the mechanisms of protein translocation across the outer membrane translocases of mitochondria, we have shown the ability to use nanopore-probe techniques in controlling a single protein using engineered αHL pores. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation of αHL protein nanopores. Moreover, we demonstrate that placing attractive electrostatic traps is instrumental in tackling single-molecule stochastic sensing of folded proteins. PMID:22528256

  3. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  4. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  5. Assembly of juxtaparanodes in myelinating DRG culture: Differential clustering of the Kv1/Caspr2 complex and scaffolding protein 4.1B.

    PubMed

    Hivert, Bruno; Pinatel, Delphine; Labasque, Marilyne; Tricaud, Nicolas; Goutebroze, Laurence; Faivre-Sarrailh, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    The precise distribution of ion channels at the nodes of Ranvier is essential for the efficient propagation of action potentials along myelinated axons. The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.1/1.2 are clustered at the juxtaparanodes in association with the cell adhesion molecules, Caspr2 and TAG-1 and the scaffolding protein 4.1B. In the present study, we set up myelinating cultures of DRG neurons and Schwann cells to look through the formation of juxtaparanodes in vitro. We showed that the Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels were first enriched at paranodes before being restricted to distal paranodes and juxtaparanodes. In addition, the Kv1 channels displayed an asymmetric expression enriched at the distal juxtaparanodes. Caspr2 was strongly co-localized with Kv1.2 whereas the scaffolding protein 4.1B was preferentially recruited at paranodes while being present at juxtaparanodes too. Kv1.2/Caspr2 but not 4.1B, also transiently accumulated within the nodal region both in myelinated cultures and developing sciatic nerves. Studying cultures and sciatic nerves from 4.1B KO mice, we further showed that 4.1B is required for the proper targeting of Caspr2 early during myelination. Moreover, using adenoviral-mediated expression of Caspr-GFP and photobleaching experiments, we analyzed the stability of paranodal junctions and showed that the lateral stability of paranodal Caspr was not altered in 4.1B KO mice indicating that 4.1B is not required for the assembly and stability of the paranodal junctions. Thus, developing an adapted culture paradigm, we provide new insights into the dynamic and differential distribution of Kv1 channels and associated proteins during myelination. GLIA 2016;64:840-852. PMID:26840208

  6. Conditional Deletion of Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-Containing Protein 2 (Phd2) Gene Reveals Its Essential Role in Chondrocyte Function and Endochondral Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaohong; Xing, Weirong; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Schulte, Jan; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic growth plate cartilage requires hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-mediated pathways to maintain chondrocyte survival and differentiation. HIF proteins are tightly regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (Phd2)-mediated proteosomal degradation. We conditionally disrupted the Phd2 gene in chondrocytes by crossing Phd2 floxed mice with type 2 collagen-α1-Cre transgenic mice and found massive increases (>50%) in the trabecular bone mass of long bones and lumbar vertebra of the Phd2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice caused by significant increases in trabecular number and thickness and reductions in trabecular separation. Cortical thickness and tissue mineral density at the femoral middiaphysis of the cKO mice were also significantly increased. Dynamic histomorphometric analyses revealed increased longitudinal length and osteoid surface per bone surface in the primary spongiosa of the cKO mice, suggesting elevated conversion rate from hypertrophic chondrocytes to mineralized bone matrix as well as increased bone formation in the primary spongiosa. In the secondary spongiosa, bone formation measured by mineralizing surface per bone surface and mineral apposition rate were not changed, but resorption was slightly reduced. Increases in the mRNA levels of SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9, osterix (Osx), type 2 collagen, aggrecan, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, and glycolytic enzymes in the growth plate of cKO mice were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased HIF-1α protein level in the hypertrophic chondrocytes of cKO mice. Infection of chondrocytes isolated from Phd2 floxed mice with adenoviral Cre resulted in similar gene expression patterns as observed in the cKO growth plate chondrocytes. Our findings indicate that Phd2 suppresses endochondral bone formation, in part, via HIF-dependent mechanisms in mice. PMID:26562260

  7. Natural selection of adaptive mutations in non-structural genes increases trans-encapsidation of hepatitis C virus replicons lacking envelope protein genes.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Carole; Helle, François; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; François, Catherine; Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2013-05-01

    A trans-packaging system for hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons lacking envelope glycoproteins was developed. The replicons were efficiently encapsidated into infectious particles after expression in trans of homologous HCV envelope proteins under the control of an adenoviral vector. Interestingly, expression in trans of core or core, p7 and NS2 with envelope proteins did not enhance trans-encapsidation. Expression of heterologous envelope proteins, in the presence or absence of heterologous core, p7 and NS2, did not rescue single-round infectious particle production. To increase the titre of homologous, single-round infectious particles in our system, successive cycles of trans-encapsidation and infection were performed. Four cycles resulted in a 100-fold increase in the yield of particles. Sequence analysis revealed a total of 16 potential adaptive mutations in two independent experiments. Except for a core mutation in one experiment, all the mutations were located in non-structural regions mainly in NS5A (four in domain III and two near the junction with the NS5B gene). Reverse genetics studies suggested that D2437A and S2443T adaptive mutations, which are located at the NS5A-B cleavage site did not affect viral replication, but enhanced the single-round infectious particles assembly only in trans-encapsidation model. In conclusion, our trans-encapsidation system enables the production of HCV single-round infectious particles. This system is adaptable and can positively select variants. The adapted variants promote trans-encapsidation and should constitute a valuable tool in the development of replicon-based HCV vaccines. PMID:23288424

  8. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  9. Sorghum and millet proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum and millet proteins are an important source of dietary protein for significant numbers of people living throughout Africa and parts of Asia. Compared to other food proteins, such as those found in milk, eggs and wheat, little is known about the functionality of sorghum and millet proteins. ...

  10. Whey protein fractionation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated whey protein products from cheese whey, such as whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI), contain more than seven different types of proteins: alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulins (Igs), lactoferrin ...

  11. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... protein. The basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help your body repair cells and make new ones. Protein is also important for growth and development in children, teens, and pregnant women.

  12. Techniques in protein methylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Cheng, Donghang; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-01-01

    Proteins can be methylated on the side-chain nitrogens of arginine and lysine residues or on carboxy-termini. Protein methylation is a way of subtly changing the primary sequence of a peptide so that it can encode more information. This common posttranslational modification is implicated in the regulation of a variety of processes including protein trafficking, transcription and protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we will use the arginine methyltransferases to illustrate different approaches that have been developed to assess protein methylation. Both in vivo and in vitro methylation techniques are described, and the use of small molecule inhibitors of protein methylation will be demonstrated. PMID:15173617

  13. Compartmental modelling of the pharmacokinetics of a breast cancer resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Mike J; Yates, James T W; Jones, Kevin; Wood, Gemma; Coleman, Tanya

    2011-11-01

    A mathematical model for the pharmacokinetics of Hoechst 33342 following administration into a culture medium containing a population of transfected cells (HEK293 hBCRP) with a potent breast cancer resistance protein inhibitor, Fumitremorgin C (FTC), present is described. FTC is reported to almost completely annul resistance mediated by BCRP in vitro. This non-linear compartmental model has seven macroscopic sub-units, with 14 rate parameters. It describes the relationship between the concentration of Hoechst 33342 and FTC, initially spiked in the medium, and the observed change in fluorescence due to Hoechst 33342 binding to DNA. Structural identifiability analysis has been performed using two methods, one based on the similarity transformation/exhaustive modelling approach and the other based on the differential algebra approach. The analyses demonstrated that all models derived are uniquely identifiable for the experiments/observations available. A kinetic modelling software package, namely FACSIMILE (MPCA Software, UK), was used for parameter fitting and to obtain numerical solutions for the system equations. Model fits gave very good agreement with in vitro data provided by AstraZeneca across a variety of experimental scenarios. PMID:20971524

  14. Biochemical Approaches for Discovering Protein-Protein Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein-protein interactions or protein complexes are indigenous to nearly all cellular processes, ranging from metabolism to structure. Elucidating both individual protein associations and complex protein interaction networks, while challenging, is an essential goal of functional genomics. For ex...

  15. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  16. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  17. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  18. Designing Fluorinated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Marsh, E N G

    2016-01-01

    As methods to incorporate noncanonical amino acid residues into proteins have become more powerful, interest in their use to modify the physical and biological properties of proteins and enzymes has increased. This chapter discusses the use of highly fluorinated analogs of hydrophobic amino acids, for example, hexafluoroleucine, in protein design. In particular, fluorinated residues have proven to be generally effective in increasing the thermodynamic stability of proteins. The chapter provides an overview of the different fluorinated amino acids that have been used in protein design and the various methods available for producing fluorinated proteins. It discusses model proteins systems into which highly fluorinated amino acids have been introduced and the reasons why fluorinated residues are generally stabilizing, with particular reference to thermodynamic and structural studies from our laboratory. Lastly, details of the methodology we have developed to measure the thermodynamic stability of oligomeric fluorinated proteins are presented, as this may be generally applicable to many proteins. PMID:27586337

  19. Stem cells as delivery vehicles for oncolytic adenoviral virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kranzler, Justin; Tyler, Matthew A; Sonabend, Adam M; Ulasov, Ilya V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary intracranial tumor in humans. Despite continued advances in cancer therapy, the outcome for patients diagnosed with this disease remains bleak. Novel treatments involving the use of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) to target malignant brain tumors have undergone extensive research and proven to be a promising mode of glioblastoma therapy. CRAds are genetically manipulated to replicate within tumor cells, exhibiting a high degree of infectivity, cytotoxicity, and transgene expression. While the use of various CRAds has been deemed safe for intracranial injection in preclinical trials, a significant therapeutic effect has yet to be seen in patients. This shortcoming stems from the distribution limitations involved with local delivery of virolytic agents. To enhance this modality of treatment, stem cells have been explored as cellular vehicles in virotherapy applications, given that they possess an intrinsic tropism for malignant brain tumors. Stem cell loaded CRAd delivery offers a more specific and effective method of targeting disseminated tumor cells and forms the basis for this review. PMID:19860653

  20. Stem Cells as Delivery Vehicles for Oncolytic Adenoviral Virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kranzler, Justin; Tyler, Matthew A.; Sonabend, Adam M.; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary intracranial tumor in humans. Despite continued advances in cancer therapy, the outcome for patients diagnosed with this disease remains bleak. Novel treatments involving the use of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) to target malignant brain tumors have undergone extensive research and proven to be a promising mode of glioblastoma therapy. CRAds are genetically manipulated to replicate within tumor cells, exhibiting a high degree of infectivity, cytotoxicity, and transgene expression. While the use of various CRAds has been deemed safe for intracranial injection in preclinical trials, a significant therapeutic effect has yet to be seen in patients. This shortcoming stems from the distribution limitations involved with local delivery of virolytic agents. To enhance this modality of treatment, stem cells have been explored as cellular vehicles in virotherapy applications, given that they possess an intrinsic tropism for malignant brain tumors. Stem cell loaded CRAd delivery offers a more specific and effective method of targeting disseminated tumor cells and forms the basis for this review. PMID:19860653

  1. Adenoviral hepatitis in a female bearded dragon (Amphibolurus barbatus).

    PubMed

    Julian, A F; Durham, P J

    1982-05-01

    A female bearded dragon (Amphibolurus barbatus) died following intermittent periods of inappetance. No significant gross lesions were found at autopsy, but histological examination revealed disordered liver architecture with numerous foci of coagulative necrosis. Eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions were present in many hepatocytes, some epithelial cells of the bile ductules and occasional epithelial cells of renal tubes and glomeruli. Large numbers of viral particles within many nuclei, associated with the intranuclear inclusion were demonstrated by electronmicroscopy. Similar particles, sometimes in paracrystalline arrays, were also seen within membrane-bound vesicles located next to the nuclei and to a lesser degree within the cytoplasm and extracellular spaces. The virus was considered to be an adenovirus on the basis of its size, morphology, site of formation and lack of envelopment. It was considered to he the cause of the hepatitis. PMID:16030866

  2. Linearized oncolytic adenoviral plasmid DNA delivered by bioreducible polymers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaesung; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Nam, Hye Yeong; Lee, Jung-Sun; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2011-01-01

    As an effort to overcome limits of adenovirus (Ad) as a systemic delivery vector for cancer therapy, we developed a novel system using oncolytic Ad plasmid DNA with two bioreducible polymers: arginine-grafted bioreducible poly(disulfide amine)polymer (ABP) and PEG5k-conjugated ABP (ABP5k) in expectation of oncolytic effect caused by progeny viral production followed by replication. The linearized Ad DNAs for active viral replication polyplexed with each polymer were able to replicate only in humancancer cells and produce progeny viruses. The non-immunogenic polymers delivering the DNAs markedly elicited to evade the innate and adaptive immune response. The biodistribution ratio of the polyplexes administered systemically was approximately 99% decreased in liver when compared with naked Ad. Moreover, tumor-to-liver ratio of the Ad DNA delivered by ABP or ABP5k was significantly elevated at 229- or 419-fold greater than that of naked Ad, respectively. The ABP5k improved the chance of the DNA to localize within tumor versus liver with 1.8-fold increased ratio. In conclusion, the innovative and simple system for delivering oncolytic Ad plasmid DNA with the bioreducible polymers, skipping time-consuming steps such as generation and characterization of oncolytic Ad vectors, can be utilized as an alternative approach for cancer therapy. PMID:22207073

  3. Combined distemper-adenoviral pneumonia in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Tovar, Luis E.; Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Valdez-Nava, Yazel; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M.; Zárate-Ramos, Juan J.; López, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    A 3 1/2-month-old pug with oculonasal discharge and seizures was submitted for postmortem examination. Grossly, the lungs had cranioventral consolidation, and microscopically, 2 distinct types of inclusion bodies compatible with Canine distemper virus and Canine adenovirus type 2. Presence of both viruses was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining. PMID:17616064

  4. Combined distemper-adenoviral pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tovar, Luis E; Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Valdez-Nava, Yazel; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M; Zárate-Ramos, Juan J; López, Alfonso

    2007-06-01

    A 3 1/2-month-old pug with oculonasal discharge and seizures was submitted for postmortem examination. Grossly, the lungs had cranioventral consolidation, and microscopically, 2 distinct types of inclusion bodies compatible with Canine distemper virus and Canine adenovirus type 2. Presence of both viruses was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining. PMID:17616064

  5. Microscopic evidence of adenoviral infection in a muskrat in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Web, D M; Woods, L W

    2001-07-01

    A wild muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) found moribund in Illinois (USA) had minimal meningitis and pleuritis, probably of bacterial origin. There were large, basophilic, intranuclear inclusion bodies within scattered enterocytes. The inclusions were microscopically typical of those produced by adenoviruses, and ultrastructurally were intranuclear paracrystalline arrays of virus particles with characteristics of adenoviruses. The significance of the adenovirus infection in this muskrat is unknown. PMID:11504243

  6. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  7. PINT: Protein-protein Interactions Thermodynamic Database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M D Shaji; Gromiha, M Michael

    2006-01-01

    The first release of Protein-protein Interactions Thermodynamic Database (PINT) contains >1500 data of several thermodynamic parameters along with sequence and structural information, experimental conditions and literature information. Each entry contains numerical data for the free energy change, dissociation constant, association constant, enthalpy change, heat capacity change and so on of the interacting proteins upon binding, which are important for understanding the mechanism of protein-protein interactions. PINT also includes the name and source of the proteins involved in binding, their Protein Information Resource, SWISS-PROT and Protein Data Bank (PDB) codes, secondary structure and solvent accessibility of residues at mutant positions, measuring methods, experimental conditions, such as buffers, ions and additives, and literature information. A WWW interface facilitates users to search data based on various conditions, feasibility to select the terms for output and different sorting options. Further, PINT is cross-linked with other related databases, PIR, SWISS-PROT, PDB and NCBI PUBMED literature database. The database is freely available at http://www.bioinfodatabase.com/pint/index.html. PMID:16381844

  8. Recruitment of histone methyltransferase G9a mediates transcriptional repression of Fgf21 gene by E4BP4 protein.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Buelow, Katie; Guha, Anirvan; Arthurs, Blake; Brady, Hugh J M; Yin, Lei

    2013-02-22

    The liver responds to fasting-refeeding cycles by reprogramming expression of metabolic genes. Fasting potently induces one of the key hepatic hormones, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), to promote lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis, whereas refeeding suppresses its expression. We previously reported that the basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 (E4 binding protein 4) represses Fgf21 expression and disrupts its circadian oscillations in cultured hepatocytes. However, the epigenetic mechanism for E4BP4-dependent suppression of Fgf21 has not yet been addressed. Here we present evidence that histone methyltransferase G9a mediates E4BP4-dependent repression of Fgf21 during refeeding by promoting repressive histone modification. We find that Fgf21 expression is up-regulated in E4bp4 knock-out mouse liver. We demonstrate that the G9a-specific inhibitor BIX01294 abolishes suppression of the Fgf21 promoter activity by E4BP4, whereas overexpression of E4bp4 leads to increased levels of dimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) around the Fgf21 promoter region. Furthermore, we also show that E4BP4 interacts with G9a, and knockdown of G9a blocks repression of Fgf21 promoter activity and expression in cells overexpressing E4bp4. A G9a mutant lacking catalytic activity, due to deletion of the SET domain, fails to inhibit the Fgf21 promoter activity. Importantly, acute hepatic knockdown by adenoviral shRNA targeting G9a abolishes Fgf21 repression by refeeding, concomitant with decreased levels of H3K9me2 around the Fgf21 promoter region. In summary, we show that G9a mediates E4BP4-dependent suppression of hepatic Fgf21 by enhancing histone methylation (H3K9me2) of the Fgf21 promoter. PMID:23283977

  9. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  10. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  11. Cas5d Protein Processes Pre-crRNA and Assembles into a Cascade-like Interference Complex in Subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR-Cas System

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Haitjema, Charles; Liu, Xueqi; Ding, Fran; Wang, Hongwei; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-10

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), together with an operon of CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, form an RNA-based prokaryotic immune system against exogenous genetic elements. Cas5 family proteins are found in several type I CRISPR-Cas systems. Here, we report the molecular function of subtype I-C/Dvulg Cas5d from Bacillus halodurans. We show that Cas5d cleaves pre-crRNA into unit length by recognizing both the hairpin structure and the 3 single stranded sequence in the CRISPR repeat region. Cas5d structure reveals a ferredoxin domain-based architecture and a catalytic triad formed by Y46, K116, and H117 residues. We further show that after pre-crRNA processing, Cas5d assembles with crRNA, Csd1, and Csd2 proteins to form a multi-sub-unit interference complex similar to Escherichia coli Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense) in architecture. Our results suggest that formation of a crRNA-presenting Cascade-like complex is likely a common theme among type I CRISPR subtypes.

  12. Transforming growth factor β1 inhibits bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-7 signaling via upregulation of Ski-related novel protein N (SnoN): possible mechanism for the failure of BMP therapy?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) play a key role in bone formation. Consequently, it was expected that topical application of recombinant human (rh)BMP-2 and rhBMP-7 would improve the healing of complex fractures. However, up to 36% of fracture patients do not respond to this therapy. There are hints that a systemic increase in transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) interferes with beneficial BMP effects. Therefore, in the present work we investigated the influence of rhTGFβ1 on rhBMP signaling in primary human osteoblasts, with the aim of more specifically delineating the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Methods BMP signaling was detected by adenoviral Smad-binding-element-reporter assays. Gene expression was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and confirmed at the protein level by western blot. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity was determined using a test kit. Data sets were compared by one-way analysis of variance. Results Our findings showed that Smad1/5/8-mediated rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 signaling is completely blocked by rhTGFβ1. We then investigated expression levels of genes involved in BMP signaling and regulation (for example, Smad1/5/8, TGFβ receptors type I and II, noggin, sclerostin, BMP and activin receptor membrane bound inhibitor (BAMBI), v-ski sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Ski), Ski-related novel protein N (SnoN) and Smad ubiquitination regulatory factors (Smurfs)) and confirmed the expression of regulated genes at the protein level. Smad7 and SnoN were significantly induced by rhTGFβ1 treatment while expression of Smad1, Smad6, TGFβRII and activin receptor-like kinase 1 (Alk1) was reduced. Elevated SnoN expression was accompanied by increased HDAC activity. Addition of an HDAC inhibitor, namely valproic acid, fully abolished the inhibitory effect of rhTGFβ1 on rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 signaling. Conclusions rhTGFβ1 effectively blocks rhBMP signaling in osteoblasts. As possible mechanism, we

  13. Protein C blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in the body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... history of blood clots. Protein C helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  14. Protein S blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in your body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... family history of blood clots. Protein S helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  15. Protein electrophoresis - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... nephropathy Kidney failure Multiple myeloma Nephrotic syndrome Acute urinary tract infection Risks There are no risks associated with this ... Primary amyloidosis Protein in diet Protein urine test Urinary tract infection - adults Update Date 5/29/2014 Updated by: ...

  16. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Amiot, A

    2015-07-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare syndrome of gastrointestinal protein loss. The primary causes can be classified into lymphatic leakage due to increased interstitial pressure and increased leakage of protein-rich fluids due to erosive or non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and peripheral oedema. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy is most commonly based on the determination of fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance. Most protein-losing enteropathy cases are the result of either lymphatic obstruction or a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and cardiac diseases, while primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is less common. Treatment of protein-losing enteropathy targets the underlying disease but also includes dietary modification, such as high-protein and low-fat diet along with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. PMID:25618488

  17. Learning about Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, and protecting you from disease. All About Amino Acids When you eat foods that contain protein, the ... called amino (say: uh-MEE-no) acids. The amino acids then can be reused to make the proteins ...

  18. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  19. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. PMID:21406855

  20. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) inhibits the intestinal-like differentiation of monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spoettl, T; Hausmann, M; Herlyn, M; Gunckel, M; Dirmeier, A; Falk, W; Herfarth, H; Schoelmerich, J; Rogler, G

    2006-01-01

    Monocytes (MO) migrating into normal, non-inflamed intestinal mucosa undergo a specific differentiation resulting in a non-reactive, tolerogenic intestinal macrophage (IMAC). Recently we demonstrated the differentiation of MO into an intestinal-like macrophage (MAC) phenotype in vitro in a three-dimensional cell culture model (multi-cellular spheroid or MCS model). In the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in addition to normal IMAC, a reactive MAC population as well as increased levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is found. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of MCP-1 on the differentiation of MO into IMAC. MCS were generated from adenovirally transfected HT-29 cells overexpressing MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP-3α) or non-transfected controls and co-cultured with freshly elutriated blood MO. After 7 days of co-culture MCS were harvested, and expression of the surface antigens CD33 and CD14 as well as the intracellular MAC marker CD68 was determined by flow-cytometry or immunohistochemistry. MCP-1 and MIP-3α expression by HT-29 cells in the MCS was increased by transfection at the time of MCS formation. In contrast to MIP-3α, MCP-1 overexpression induced a massive migration of MO into the three-dimensional aggregates. Differentiation of IMAC was disturbed in MCP-1-transfected MCS compared to experiments with non-transfected control aggregates, or the MIP-3α-transfected MCS, as indicated by high CD14 expression of MO/IMAC cultured inside the MCP-1-transfected MCS, as shown by immunohistochemistry and FACS analysis. Neutralization of MCP-1 was followed by an almost complete absence of monocyte migration into the MCS. MCP-1 induced migration of MO into three-dimensional spheroids generated from HT-29 cells and inhibited intestinal-like differentiation of blood MO into IMAC. It may be speculated that MCP-1 could play a role in the disturbed IMAC differentiation in IBD mucosa. PMID

  1. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) inhibits the intestinal-like differentiation of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Spoettl, T; Hausmann, M; Herlyn, M; Gunckel, M; Dirmeier, A; Falk, W; Herfarth, H; Schoelmerich, J; Rogler, G

    2006-07-01

    Monocytes (MO) migrating into normal, non-inflamed intestinal mucosa undergo a specific differentiation resulting in a non-reactive, tolerogenic intestinal macrophage (IMAC). Recently we demonstrated the differentiation of MO into an intestinal-like macrophage (MAC) phenotype in vitro in a three-dimensional cell culture model (multi-cellular spheroid or MCS model). In the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in addition to normal IMAC, a reactive MAC population as well as increased levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is found. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of MCP-1 on the differentiation of MO into IMAC. MCS were generated from adenovirally transfected HT-29 cells overexpressing MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP-3alpha) or non-transfected controls and co-cultured with freshly elutriated blood MO. After 7 days of co-culture MCS were harvested, and expression of the surface antigens CD33 and CD14 as well as the intracellular MAC marker CD68 was determined by flow-cytometry or immunohistochemistry. MCP-1 and MIP-3alpha expression by HT-29 cells in the MCS was increased by transfection at the time of MCS formation. In contrast to MIP-3alpha, MCP-1 overexpression induced a massive migration of MO into the three-dimensional aggregates. Differentiation of IMAC was disturbed in MCP-1-transfected MCS compared to experiments with non-transfected control aggregates, or the MIP-3alpha-transfected MCS, as indicated by high CD14 expression of MO/IMAC cultured inside the MCP-1-transfected MCS, as shown by immunohistochemistry and FACS analysis. Neutralization of MCP-1 was followed by an almost complete absence of monocyte migration into the MCS. MCP-1 induced migration of MO into three-dimensional spheroids generated from HT-29 cells and inhibited intestinal-like differentiation of blood MO into IMAC. It may be speculated that MCP-1 could play a role in the disturbed IMAC differentiation in IBD mucosa

  2. Stepwise Loss of Fluorescent Core Protein V from Human Adenovirus during Entry into Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Puntener, Daniel; Engelke, Martin F.; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Strunze, Sten; Wilhelm, Corinne; Greber, Urs F.

    2011-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (Ads) replicate and assemble particles in the nucleus. They organize a linear double-strand DNA genome into a condensed core with about 180 nucleosomes, by the viral proteins VII (pVII), pX, and pV attaching the DNA to the capsid. Using reverse genetics, we generated a novel, nonconditionally replicating Ad reporter by inserting green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the amino terminus of pV. Purified Ad2-GFP-pV virions had an oversized complete genome and incorporated about 38 GFP-pV molecules per virion, which is about 25% of the pV levels in Ad2. GFP-pV cofractionated with the DNA core, like pV, and newly synthesized GFP-pV had a subcellular localization indistinguishable from that of pV, indicating that GFP-pV is a valid reporter for pV. Ad2-GFP-pV completed the replication cycle, although at lower yields than Ad2. Incoming GFP-pV (or pV) was not imported into the nucleus. Virions lost GFP-pV at two points during the infection process: at entry into the cytosol and at the nuclear pore complex, where capsids disassemble. Disassembled capsids, positive for the conformation-specific antihexon antibody R70, were devoid of GFP-pV. The loss of GFP-pV was reduced by the macrolide antibiotic leptomycin B (LMB), which blocks nuclear export and adenovirus attachment to the nuclear pore complex. LMB inhibited the appearance of R70 epitopes on Ad2 and Ad2-GFP-pV, indicating that the loss of GFP-pV from Ad2-GFP-pV is an authentic step in the adenovirus uncoating program. Ad2-GFP-pV is genetically complete and hence enables detailed analyses of infection and spreading dynamics in cells and model organisms or assessment of oncolytic adenoviral potential. PMID:21047958

  3. Understanding protein folding: small proteins in silico.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Olav; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-01-01

    Recent improvements in methodology and increased computer power now allow atomistic computer simulations of protein folding. We briefly review several advanced Monte Carlo algorithms that have contributed to this development. Details of folding simulations of three designed mini proteins are shown. Adding global translations and rotations has allowed us to handle multiple chains and to simulate the aggregation of six beta-amyloid fragments. In a different line of research we have developed several algorithms to predict local features from sequence. In an outlook we sketch how such biasing could extend the application spectrum of Monte Carlo simulations to structure prediction of larger proteins. PMID:18036571

  4. Imaging Protein-protein Interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seegar, Tom; Barton, William

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are a hallmark of all essential cellular processes. However, many of these interactions are transient, or energetically weak, preventing their identification and analysis through traditional biochemical methods such as co-immunoprecipitation. In this regard, the genetically encodable fluorescent proteins (GFP, RFP, etc.) and their associated overlapping fluorescence spectrum have revolutionized our ability to monitor weak interactions in vivo using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)1-3. Here, we detail our use of a FRET-based proximity assay for monitoring receptor-receptor interactions on the endothelial cell surface. PMID:20972411

  5. Aroclor 1254, a developmental neurotoxicant, alters energy metabolism- and intracellular signaling-associated protein networks in rat cerebellum and hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Osorio, Cristina; Royland, Joyce E.; Ramabhadran, Ram; Alzate, Oscar

    2011-11-15

    The vast literature on the mode of action of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) indicates that PCBs are a unique model for understanding the mechanisms of toxicity of environmental mixtures of persistent chemicals. PCBs have been shown to adversely affect psychomotor function and learning and memory in humans. Although the molecular mechanisms for PCB effects are unclear, several studies indicate that the disruption of Ca{sup 2+}-mediated signal transduction plays significant roles in PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Culminating events in signal transduction pathways include the regulation of gene and protein expression, which affects the growth and function of the nervous system. Our previous studies showed changes in gene expression related to signal transduction and neuronal growth. In this study, protein expression following developmental exposure to PCB is examined. Pregnant rats (Long Evans) were dosed with 0.0 or 6.0 mg/kg/day of Aroclor-1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21, and the cerebellum and hippocampus from PND14 animals were analyzed to determine Aroclor 1254-induced differential protein expression. Two proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the cerebellum following PCB exposure while 18 proteins were differentially expressed in the hippocampus. These proteins are related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP synthase, sub unit {beta} (ATP5B), creatine kinase, and malate dehydrogenase), calcium signaling (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1) and ryanodine receptor type II (RyR2)), and growth of the nervous system (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4 (DPYSL4), valosin-containing protein (VCP)). Results suggest that Aroclor 1254-like persistent chemicals may alter energy metabolism and intracellular signaling, which might result in developmental neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed brain proteomic analysis of rats exposed to the neurotoxicant

  6. CSF myelin basic protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF myelin basic protein is a test to measure the level of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The CSF ... less than 4 ng/mL of myelin basic protein in the CSF. Normal value ranges may vary ...

  7. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  8. Palmitoylation of Hedgehog proteins.

    PubMed

    Buglino, John A; Resh, Marilyn D

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are secreted signaling proteins that contain amide-linked palmitate at the N-terminus and cholesterol at the C-terminus. Palmitoylation of Hh proteins is critical for effective long- and short-range signaling. The palmitoylation reaction occurs during transit of Hh through the secretory pathway, most likely in the lumen of the ER. Attachment of palmitate to Hh proteins is independent of cholesterol modification and autoprocessing and is catalyzed by Hhat (Hedgehog acyltransferase). Hhat is a member of the membrane bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, a subgroup of multipass membrane proteins that catalyze transfer of fatty acyl groups to lipids and proteins. Several classes of secreted proteins have recently been shown to be substrates for MBOAT acyltransferases, including Hh proteins and Spitz (palmitoylated by Hhat), Wg/Wnt proteins (modified with palmitate and/or palmitoleate by Porcupine) and ghrelin (octanoylated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase). These findings highlight protein fatty acylation as a mechanism that not only influences membrane binding of intracellular proteins but also regulates the signaling range and efficacy of secreted proteins. PMID:22391306

  9. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    Normal value ranges are: Total protein: 6.4 to 8.3 g/dL (grams per deciliter) Albumin: 3.5 to 5.0 g/dL Alpha-1 ... Decreased total protein may indicate: Abnormal loss of protein from the digestive tract or the inability of the digestive tract ...

  10. CSF total protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 mg/dL. Note: mg/dL = ...

  11. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  12. Texturized dairy proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey prote...

  13. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  14. Protein - Which is Best?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  15. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  16. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  17. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  18. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  19. Selective Precipitation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-01-01

    Selective precipitation of proteins can be used as a bulk method to recover the majority of proteins from a crude lysate, as a selective method to fractionate a subset of proteins from a protein solution, or as a very specific method to recover a single protein of interest from a purification step. This unit describes a number of methods suitable for selective precipitation. In each of the protocols that are outlined, the physical or chemical basis of the precipitation process, the parameters that can be varied for optimization, and the basic steps for developing an optimized precipitation are described. PMID:26836410

  20. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  1. Mechanism of protein decarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Ming; Marcocci, Lucia; Das, Dividutta; Wang, Xinhong; Luo, Haibei; Zungu-Edmondson, Makhosazane; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2013-12-01

    Ligand/receptor stimulation of cells promotes protein carbonylation that is followed by the decarbonylation process, which might involve thiol-dependent reduction (C.M. Wong et al., Circ. Res. 102:301-318; 2008). This study further investigated the properties of this protein decarbonylation mechanism. We found that the thiol-mediated reduction of protein carbonyls is dependent on heat-labile biologic components. Cysteine and glutathione were efficient substrates for decarbonylation. Thiols decreased the protein carbonyl content, as detected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, but not the levels of malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. Mass spectrometry identified proteins that undergo thiol-dependent decarbonylation, which include peroxiredoxins. Peroxiredoxin-2 and -6 were carbonylated and subsequently decarbonylated in response to the ligand/receptor stimulation of cells. siRNA knockdown of glutaredoxin inhibited the decarbonylation of peroxiredoxin. These results strengthen the concept that thiol-dependent decarbonylation defines the kinetics of protein carbonylation signaling. PMID:24044890

  2. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  3. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  5. Phage display of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kościelska, K; Kiczak, L; Kasztura, M; Wesołowska, O; Otlewski, J

    1998-01-01

    In recent years the phage display approach has become an increasingly popular method in protein research. This method enables the presentation of large peptide and protein libraries on the surface of phage particles from which molecules of desired functional property(ies) can be rapidly selected. The great advantage of this method is a direct linkage between an observed phenotype and encapsulated genotype, which allows fast determination of selected sequences. The phage display approach is a powerful tool in generating highly potent biomolecules, including: search for specific antibodies, determining enzyme specificity, exploring protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, minimizing proteins, introducing new functions into different protein scaffolds, and searching sequence space of protein folding. In this article many examples are given to illustrate that this technique can be used in different fields of protein science. The phage display has a potential of the natural evolution and its possibilities are far beyond rational prediction. Assuming that we can design the selection agents and conditions we should be able to engineer any desired protein function or feature. PMID:9918498

  6. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK)-dependent Phosphorylation of Y-Box-binding Protein 1 (YB-1) Enhances Gene Expression in Granulosa Cells in Response to Follicle-stimulating Hormone (FSH).

    PubMed

    Donaubauer, Elyse M; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary E

    2016-06-01

    Within the ovarian follicle, immature oocytes are surrounded and supported by granulosa cells (GCs). Stimulation of GCs by FSH leads to their proliferation and differentiation, events that are necessary for fertility. FSH activates multiple signaling pathways to regulate genes necessary for follicular maturation. Herein, we investigated the role of Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) within GCs. YB-1 is a nucleic acid binding protein that regulates transcription and translation. Our results show that FSH promotes an increase in the phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) within 15 min that is maintained at significantly increased levels until ∼8 h post treatment. FSH-stimulated phosphorylation of YB-1(Ser(102)) is prevented by pretreatment of GCs with the PKA-selective inhibitor PKA inhibitor (PKI), the MEK inhibitor PD98059, or the ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK-2) inhibitor BI-D1870. Thus, phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) is PKA-, ERK-, and RSK-2-dependent. However, pretreatment of GCs with the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitor tautomycin increased phosphorylation of YB-1(Ser(102)) in the absence of FSH; FSH did not further increase YB-1(Ser(102)) phosphorylation. This result suggests that the major effect of RSK-2 is to inhibit PP1 rather than to directly phosphorylate YB-1 on Ser(102) YB-1 coimmunoprecipitated with PP1β catalytic subunit and RSK-2. Transduction of GCs with the dephospho-adenoviral-YB-1(S102A) mutant prevented the induction by FSH of Egfr, Cyp19a1, Inha, Lhcgr, Cyp11a1, Hsd17b1, and Pappa mRNAs and estradiol-17β production. Collectively, our results reveal that phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) via the ERK/RSK-2 signaling pathway is necessary for FSH-mediated expression of target genes required for maturation of follicles to a preovulatory phenotype. PMID:27080258

  7. Energy design for protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ravikant, D. V. S.; Elber, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Proteins bind to other proteins efficiently and specifically to carry on many cell functions such as signaling, activation, transport, enzymatic reactions, and more. To determine the geometry and strength of binding of a protein pair, an energy function is required. An algorithm to design an optimal energy function, based on empirical data of protein complexes, is proposed and applied. Emphasis is made on negative design in which incorrect geometries are presented to the algorithm that learns to avoid them. For the docking problem the search for plausible geometries can be performed exhaustively. The possible geometries of the complex are generated on a grid with the help of a fast Fourier transform algorithm. A novel formulation of negative design makes it possible to investigate iteratively hundreds of millions of negative examples while monotonically improving the quality of the potential. Experimental structures for 640 protein complexes are used to generate positive and negative examples for learning parameters. The algorithm designed in this work finds the correct binding structure as the lowest energy minimum in 318 cases of the 640 examples. Further benchmarks on independent sets confirm the significant capacity of the scoring function to recognize correct modes of interactions. PMID:21842951

  8. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  9. Protein-protein docking with backbone flexibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chu; Bradley, Philip; Baker, David

    2007-10-19

    Computational protein-protein docking methods currently can create models with atomic accuracy for protein complexes provided that the conformational changes upon association are restricted to the side chains. However, it remains very challenging to account for backbone conformational changes during docking, and most current methods inherently keep monomer backbones rigid for algorithmic simplicity and computational efficiency. Here we present a reformulation of the Rosetta docking method that incorporates explicit backbone flexibility in protein-protein docking. The new method is based on a "fold-tree" representation of the molecular system, which seamlessly integrates internal torsional degrees of freedom and rigid-body degrees of freedom. Problems with internal flexible regions ranging from one or more loops or hinge regions to all of one or both partners can be readily treated using appropriately constructed fold trees. The explicit treatment of backbone flexibility improves both sampling in the vicinity of the native docked conformation and the energetic discrimination between near-native and incorrect models. PMID:17825317

  10. Energy design for protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikant, D. V. S.; Elber, Ron

    2011-08-01

    Proteins bind to other proteins efficiently and specifically to carry on many cell functions such as signaling, activation, transport, enzymatic reactions, and more. To determine the geometry and strength of binding of a protein pair, an energy function is required. An algorithm to design an optimal energy function, based on empirical data of protein complexes, is proposed and applied. Emphasis is made on negative design in which incorrect geometries are presented to the algorithm that learns to avoid them. For the docking problem the search for plausible geometries can be performed exhaustively. The possible geometries of the complex are generated on a grid with the help of a fast Fourier transform algorithm. A novel formulation of negative design makes it possible to investigate iteratively hundreds of millions of negative examples while monotonically improving the quality of the potential. Experimental structures for 640 protein complexes are used to generate positive and negative examples for learning parameters. The algorithm designed in this work finds the correct binding structure as the lowest energy minimum in 318 cases of the 640 examples. Further benchmarks on independent sets confirm the significant capacity of the scoring function to recognize correct modes of interactions.

  11. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation. PMID:26172624

  12. Electrophoretic separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakavarti, Bulbul; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoresis is used to separate complex mixtures of proteins (e.g., from cells, subcellular fractions, column fractions, or immunoprecipitates), to investigate subunit compositions, and to verify homogeneity of protein samples. It can also serve to purify proteins for use in further applications. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proteins migrate in response to an electrical field through pores in a polyacrylamide gel matrix; pore size decreases with increasing acrylamide concentration. The combination of pore size and protein charge, size, and shape determines the migration rate of the protein. In this unit, the standard Laemmli method is described for discontinuous gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, i.e., in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). PMID:19066548

  13. Outer membrane protein purification.

    PubMed

    Arigita, C; Jiskoot, W; Graaf, M R; Kersten, G F

    2001-01-01

    The major outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from Neisseria meningitidis, which are expressed at high levels, are subdivided in five classes based on molecular weight (1,2) (see Table 1). Table 1 Major Meningococcal Outer-Membrane Proteins Outer-membrane proteins Name Molecular maass Function/characteristics Class 1 PorA 44-47 kDa Porin Class 2/3 PorB 37-42 kDa Porin Class 4 Rmp Reductionmodifiableprotein, unknown Class 5 Opa 26-30 kDa Adhesion,opacity protein Opc 25 kDa Invasion, opacity protein Iron-regulated proteins Mirp 37 kDa Iron acquisition (?);majoriron-regulatedprotein FrpB 70 kDa Ferric enterobactin receptor (also FetA) Adapted from ref. (1). PMID:21336748

  14. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  15. Principles of Flexible Protein-Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Andrusier, Nelly; Mashiach, Efrat; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J.

    2008-01-01

    Treating flexibility in molecular docking is a major challenge in cell biology research. Here we describe the background and the principles of existing flexible protein-protein docking methods, focusing on the algorithms and their rational. We describe how protein flexibility is treated in different stages of the docking process: in the preprocessing stage, rigid and flexible parts are identified and their possible conformations are modeled. This preprocessing provides information for the subsequent docking and refinement stages. In the docking stage, an ensemble of pre-generated conformations or the identified rigid domains may be docked separately. In the refinement stage, small-scale movements of the backbone and side-chains are modeled and the binding orientation is improved by rigid-body adjustments. For clarity of presentation, we divide the different methods into categories. This should allow the reader to focus on the most suitable method for a particular docking problem. PMID:18655061

  16. Antimicrobial proteins: From old proteins, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Valerie J; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A

    2015-12-01

    This review describes the main types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) synthesised by crustaceans, primarily those identified in shrimp, crayfish, crab and lobster. It includes an overview of their range of microbicidal activities and the current landscape of our understanding of their gene expression patterns in different body tissues. It further summarises how their expression might change following various types of immune challenges. The review further considers proteins or protein fragments from crustaceans that have antimicrobial properties but are more usually associated with other biological functions, or are derived from such proteins. It discusses how these unconventional AMPs might be generated at, or delivered to, sites of infection and how they might contribute to crustacean host defence in vivo. It also highlights recent work that is starting to reveal the extent of multi-functionality displayed by some decapod AMPs, particularly their participation in other aspects of host protection. Examples of such activities include proteinase inhibition, phagocytosis, antiviral activity and haematopoiesis. PMID:26320628

  17. Elastic proteins and elastomeric protein alloys.

    PubMed

    Aghaei-Ghareh-Bolagh, Behnaz; Mithieux, Suzanne M; Weiss, Anthony S

    2016-06-01

    The elastomeric proteins elastin and resilin have been used extensively in the fabrication of biomaterials for tissue engineering applications due to their unique mechanical and biological properties. Tropoelastin is the soluble monomer component of elastin. Tropoelastin and resilin are both highly elastic with high resilience, substantial extensibility, high durability and low energy loss, which makes them excellent candidates for the fabrication of elastic tissues that demand regular and repetitive movement like the skin, lung, blood vessels, muscles and vocal folds. Combinations of these proteins with silk fibroin further enhance their biomechanical and biological properties leading to a new class of protein alloy materials with versatile properties. In this review, the properties of tropoelastin-based and resilin-based biomaterials with and without silk are described in concert with examples of their applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26780495

  18. Effects of electron beam irradiation on chemical composition, antinutritional factors, ruminal degradation and in vitro protein digestibility of canola meal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghinejad-Roudbaneh, M.; Ebrahimi, S. R.; Azizi, S.; Shawrang, P.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of electron beam (EB) irradiation at doses of 15, 30 and 45 kGy on the nutritional value of canola meal. The phytic acid and total glucosinolate content of EB-irradiated canola meal decreased as irradiation doses increased ( P<0.01). From in situ results, irradiation of canola meal at doses of 45 kGy decreased ( P<0.05) the effective degradibility of crude protein (CP) by 14%, compared with an untreated sample. In vitro CP digestibility of EB-irradiated canola meal at doses of 15 and 30 kGy was improved ( P<0.05). Electrophoresis results showed that napin and cruciferin sub-units of 30 and 45 kGy EB-irradiated canola meal were more resistant to degradation, compared with an untreated sample. Electron beam irradiation was effective in protecting CP from ruminal degradation and reducing antinutritional factors of irradiated canola meal.

  19. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell, Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC) uses a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for macromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of macromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystallized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  20. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  1. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  2. Computer Models of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Marc Pusey (seated) and Dr. Craig Kundrot use computers to analyze x-ray maps and generate three-dimensional models of protein structures. With this information, scientists at Marshall Space Flight Center can learn how proteins are made and how they work. The computer screen depicts a proten structure as a ball-and-stick model. Other models depict the actual volume occupied by the atoms, or the ribbon-like structures that are crucial to a protein's function.

  3. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  4. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3. PMID:26510391

  5. Biomolecular membrane protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Bolla, Jani; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2012-07-01

    Integral membrane proteins comprise approximately 30% of the sequenced genomes, and there is an immediate need for their high-resolution structural information. Currently, the most reliable approach to obtain these structures is X-ray crystallography. However, obtaining crystals of membrane proteins that diffract to high resolution appears to be quite challenging, and remains a major obstacle in structural determination. This brief review summarizes a variety of methodologies for use in crystallizing these membrane proteins. Hopefully, by introducing the available methods, techniques, and providing a general understanding of membrane proteins, a rational decision can be made about now to crystallize these complex materials.

  6. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  7. Consensus protein design.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Benjamin T; Buckle, Ashley M

    2016-07-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  8. Prediction of protein-protein interactions based on protein-protein correlation using least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Huang, De-Shuang; Zhang, Lei; Han, Kyungsook; Deng, Suping; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to transform protein sequences into the feature vectors, several works have been done, such as computing auto covariance (AC), conjoint triad (CT), local descriptor (LD), moran autocorrelation (MA), normalized moreaubroto autocorrelation (NMB) and so on. In this paper, we shall adopt these transformation methods to encode the proteins, respectively, where AC, CT, LD, MA and NMB are all represented by '+' in a unified manner. A new method, i.e. the combination of least squares regression with '+' (abbreviated as LSR(+)), will be introduced for encoding a protein-protein correlation-based feature representation and an interacting protein pair. Thus there are totally five different combinations for LSR(+), i.e. LSRAC, LSRCT, LSRLD, LSRMA and LSRNMB. As a result, we combined a support vector machine (SVM) approach with LSR(+) to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI) and PPI networks. The proposed method has been applied on four datasets, i.e. Saaccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Homo sapiens and Caenorhabditis elegans. The experimental results demonstrate that all LSR(+) methods outperform many existing representative algorithms. Therefore, LSR(+) is a powerful tool to characterize the protein-protein correlations and to infer PPI, whilst keeping high performance on prediction of PPI networks. PMID:25059329

  9. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  10. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator.

    PubMed

    Tina, K G; Bhadra, R; Srinivasan, N

    2007-07-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic-aromatic interactions, aromatic-sulphur interactions and cation-pi interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar-apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside. PMID:17584791

  11. Glycolipid transfer proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rhoderick E.; Mattjus, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Glycolipid transfer proteins (GLTPs) are small (24 kD), soluble, ubiquitous proteins characterized by their ability to accelerate the intermembrane transfer of glycolipids in vitro. GLTP specificity encompasses both sphingoid- and glycerol-based glycolipids, but with a strict requirement that the initial sugar residue be beta-linked to the hydrophobic lipid backbone. The 3D protein structures of GLTP reveal liganded structures with unique lipid binding modes. The biochemical properties of GLTP action at the membrane surface have been studied rather comprehensively, but the biological role of GLTP remains enigmatic. What is clear is that GLTP differs distinctly from other known glycolipid-binding proteins, such as nonspecific lipid transfer proteins, lysosomal sphingolipid activator proteins, lectins, lung surfactant proteins as well as other lipid binding/transfer proteins. Based on the unique conformational architecture that targets GLTP to membranes and enables glycolipid binding, GLTP is now considered the prototypical and founding member of a new protein superfamily in eukaryotes. PMID:17320476

  12. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases.

    PubMed

    Shorter, James

    2016-05-15

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  13. Cellulose synthase interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities. PMID:21150290

  14. Consensus protein design

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  15. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    PubMed

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups. PMID:25338074

  16. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  17. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  18. Oxidative stress-mediated, post-translational loss of MafA protein as a contributing mechanism to loss of insulin gene expression in glucotoxic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jamie S; Stein, Roland; Robertson, R Paul

    2005-03-25

    Glucose toxicity in pancreatic islet beta cells causes loss of insulin gene expression, content, and secretion due to loss of binding of transcription factors, most notably PDX-1 and RIPE-3b1 activator, to the promoter region of the insulin gene. Recently, RIPE-3b1 activator was cloned and identified as the mammalian homologue of avian MafA/Maf-L (MafA). This enabled us to carry out more extensive studies of the role of MafA in glucotoxicity than were hitherto possible. Northern analysis of glucotoxic HIT-T15 cells revealed normal amounts of MafA mRNA, but Western analysis demonstrated a 97 +/- 1% reduction in MafA protein (p < 0.0001). The proteasome is a likely site for MafA degradation as lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, caused an accumulation of MafA protein. Antioxidants have previously been shown to prevent the adverse effects of glucose toxicity on beta cell function both in vivo and in vitro. In the current study, chronic culturing of HIT-T15 cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented loss of MafA protein (late passage = 18.9 +/- 10.4% of early passage, p < 0.001; late passage with NAC = 68.7 +/- 19.7% of early passage, p = not significant) and loss of DNA binding (late passage = 63.7 +/- 9% of early passage, p < 0.02; late passage with NAC = 116 +/- 10% of early passage, p = not significant). Additionally, transient transfection of PDX-1 or MafA cDNA into glucotoxic cells increased PDX-1 and MafA protein levels and individually increased insulin promoter activity (untreated = 34%, PDX-1 = 70%, MafA = 78%; percentage of activity of early passage cells), whereas the combined transfection of MafA and PDX-1 completely restored insulin promoter activity. This recovery of promoter activity following transient transfection had no effect on endogenous insulin mRNA. However, adenoviral infection of MafA and PDX-1 significantly increased endogenous insulin mRNA levels by 93% (121 +/- 9 versus 233 +/- 18 density light units; n = 5

  19. Protein metabolism and requirements.

    PubMed

    Biolo, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adaptation to critical illness includes insulin resistance, accelerated proteolysis, and increased release of glutamine and the other amino acids. Such amino acid efflux from skeletal muscle provides precursors for protein synthesis and energy fuel to the liver and to the rapidly dividing cells of the intestinal mucosa and the immune system. From these adaptation mechanisms, severe muscle wasting, glutamine depletion, and hyperglycemia, with increased patient morbidity and mortality, may ensue. Protein/amino acid nutrition, through either enteral or parenteral routes, plays a pivotal role in treatment of metabolic abnormalities in critical illness. In contrast to energy requirement, which can be accurately assessed by indirect calorimetry, methods to determine individual protein/amino acid needs are not currently available. In critical illness, a decreased ability of protein/amino acid intake to promote body protein synthesis is defined as anabolic resistance. This abnormality leads to increased protein/amino acid requirement and relative inefficiency of nutritional interventions. In addition to stress mediators, immobility and physical inactivity are key determinants of anabolic resistance. The development of mobility protocols in the intensive care unit should be encouraged to enhance the efficacy of nutrition. In critical illness, protein/amino acid requirement has been defined as the intake level associated with the lowest rate of catabolism. The optimal protein-sparing effects in patients receiving adequate energy are achieved when protein/amino acids are administered at rates between 1.3 and 1.5 g/kg/day. Extra glutamine supplementation is required in conditions of severe systemic inflammatory response. Protein requirement increases during hypocaloric feeding and in patients with acute renal failure on continuous renal replacement therapy. Evidence suggests that receiving adequate protein/amino acid intake may be more important than achieving

  20. Binding Efficiency of Protein-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Day, Eric S.; Cote, Shaun M.; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    We examine the relationship between binding affinity and interface size for reversible protein-protein interactions (PPI), using cytokines from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and their receptors as a test case. Using surface plasmon resonance, we measured single-site binding affinities for the large receptor TNFR1 binding to its ligands TNFα (KD = 1.4 ± 0.4 nM) and lymphotoxin-α (KD = 50 ± 10 nM), and also for the small receptor Fn14 binding to TWEAK (KD = 70 ± 10 nM). We additionally assembled data for all other TNF/TNFR family complexes for which reliable single site binding affinities have been reported. We used these values to calculate the binding efficiency – defined as binding energy per Å2 of surface area buried at the contact interface – for the nine of these complexes for which co-crystal structures are available, and compared the results to those for a set of 144 protein-protein complexes with published affinity values. The results show that the most efficient PPI complexes generate ~20 cal.mol−1/Å2 of binding energy. A minimum contact area of ~500 Å2 is required for a stable complex, required to generate sufficient interaction energy to pay the entropic cost of co-localizing two proteins from 1 M solution. The most compact and efficient TNF/TNFR complex was BAFF/BR3, which achieved ~80% of the maximum achievable binding efficiency. Other small receptors also gave high binding efficiencies, while the larger receptors generated only 44-49% of this limit despite interacting primarily through just a single small domain. The results provide new insight into how much binding energy can be generated by a PPI interface of a given size, and establish a quantitative method to predict how large a natural or engineered contact interface must be to achieve a given level of binding affinity. PMID:23088250

  1. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery. PMID:25815400

  2. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Michael H.; Squire, Christopher J.; Mercer, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK) are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range. PMID:25690795

  3. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  4. Proteins and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, H.

    1997-12-31

    The structure, the energy landscape, and the dynamics of proteins and glasses are similar. Both types of systems display characteristic nonexponential time dependencies of relaxation phenomena. Experiments suggest that both, proteins and glasses, are heterogeneous and that this fact causes the observed time dependence. This result is discussed in terms of the rough energy landscape characteristic of complex systems.

  5. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented. PMID:27444727

  6. The AVIT protein family

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Alexandra; Winklmayr, Martina; Lepperdinger, Günther; Kreil, Günther

    2003-01-01

    Homologues of a protein originally isolated from snake venom and frog skin secretions are present in many vertebrate species. They contain 80–90 amino acids, 10 of which are cysteines with identical spacing. Various names have been given to these proteins, such as mamba intestinal protein 1 (MIT1), Bv8 (Bombina variegata molecular mass ∼8 kDa), prokineticins and endocrine-gland vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF). Their amino-terminal sequences are identical, and so we propose that the sequence of their first four residues, AVIT, is used as a name for this family. From a comparison of the sequences, two types of AVIT proteins can be discerned. These proteins seem to be distributed widely in mammalian tissues and are known to bind to G-protein-coupled receptors. Members of this family have been shown to stimulate contraction of the guinea pig ileum, to cause hyperalgesia after injection into rats and to be active as specific growth factors. Moreover, the messenger RNA level of one of these AVIT proteins changes rhythmically in the region of the brain known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This shows that members of this new family of small proteins are involved in diverse biological processes. PMID:12728244

  7. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  8. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  9. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates the entire process, so

  10. Proteins, fluctuations and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Chen, Guo; Fenimore, Paul W

    2008-01-01

    Glasses, supercooled liquids, and proteins share common properties, in particular the existence of two different types of fluctuations, {alpha} and {beta}. While the effect of the {alpha} fluctuations on proteins has been known for a few years, the effect of {beta} fluctuations has not been understood. By comparing neutron scattering data on the protein myoglobin with the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell measured by dielectric spectroscopy we show that the internal protein motions are slaved to these fluctuations. We also show that there is no 'dynamic transition' in proteins near 200 K. The rapid increase in the mean square displacement with temperature in many neutron scattering experiments is quantitatively predicted by the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell.

  11. Structures of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Henderson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In reviewing the structures of membrane proteins determined up to the end of 2009, we present in words and pictures the most informative examples from each family. We group the structures together according to their function and architecture to provide an overview of the major principles and variations on the most common themes. The first structures, determined 20 years ago, were those of naturally abundant proteins with limited conformational variability, and each membrane protein structure determined was a major landmark. With the advent of complete genome sequences and efficient expression systems, there has been an explosion in the rate of membrane protein structure determination, with many classes represented. New structures are published every month and more than 150 unique membrane protein structures have been determined. This review analyses the reasons for this success, discusses the challenges that still lie ahead, and presents a concise summary of the key achievements with illustrated examples selected from each class. PMID:20667175

  12. Protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  13. Proteins in unexpected locations.

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, N R

    1996-01-01

    Members of all classes of proteins--cytoskeletal components, secreted growth factors, glycolytic enzymes, kinases, transcription factors, chaperones, transmembrane proteins, and extracellular matrix proteins--have been identified in cellular compartments other than their conventional sites of action. Some of these proteins are expressed as distinct compartment-specific isoforms, have novel mechanisms for intercompartmental translocation, have distinct endogenous biological actions within each compartment, and are regulated in a compartment-specific manner as a function of physiologic state. The possibility that many, if not most, proteins have distinct roles in more than one cellular compartment has implications for the evolution of cell organization and may be important for understanding pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer. PMID:8862516

  14. Shifting p53-induced senescence to cell death by TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3) gene through posttranslational modification of p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ok Ran; Ryu, Min Sook; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Cellular senescence and apoptosis can be regulated by p53 activity, although the underlying mechanism of the switch between the two events remains largely unknown. Cells exposed to cancer chemotherapy can escape to senescence phenotype rather than undergoing apoptosis. By employing adenoviral transduction of p53 or TIS21 genes, we observed shifting of p53 induced-senescence to apoptosis in EJ bladder cancer cells, which express H-RasV12 and mutant p53; transduction of p53 increased H-RasV12 expression along with senescence phenotypes, whereas coexpression with TIS21 (p53+TIS21) induced cell death rather than senescence. The TIS21-mediated switch of senescence to apoptosis was accompanied by nuclear translocation of p53 protein and its modifications on Ser-15 and Ser-46 phosphorylation and acetylations on Lys-120, -320, -373 and -382 residues. Mechanistically, TIS21(/BTG2) regulated posttranslational modification of p53 via enhancing miR34a and Bax expressions as opposed to inhibiting SIRT1 and Bcl2 expression. At the same time, TIS21 increased APAF-1 and p53AIP1 expressions, but inhibited the interaction of p53 with iASPP. In vitro tumorigenicity was significantly reduced in the p53+TIS21 expresser through inhibiting micro-colony proliferation by TIS21. Effect of TIS21 on the regulation of p53 activity was confirmed by knockdown of TIS21 expression by RNA interference. Therefore, we suggest TIS21 expression as an endogenous cell death inducer at the downstream of p53 gene, which might be useful for intractable cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27208501

  15. Effect of adenovirus-mediated RNA interference on endogenous microRNAs in a mouse model of multidrug resistance protein 2 gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Narvaiza, Iñigo; Aparicio, Oscar; Vera, María; Razquin, Nerea; Bortolanza, Sergia; Prieto, Jesús; Fortes, Puri

    2006-12-01

    RNA interference with viral vectors that express short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) has emerged as a powerful tool for functional genomics and therapeutic purposes. However, little is known about shRNA in vivo processing, accumulation, functional kinetics, and side effects related to shRNA saturation of the cellular gene silencing machinery. Therefore, we constructed first-generation recombinant adenoviruses encoding different shRNAs against murine ATP-binding cassette multidrug resistance protein 2 (Abcc2), which is involved in liver transport of bilirubin to bile, and analyzed Abcc2 silencing kinetics. C57/BL6 mice injected with these viruses showed significant impairment of Abcc2 function for up to 3 weeks, as reflected by increased serum bilirubin levels. The lack of Abcc2 function correlated with a specific reduction of Abcc2 mRNA and with high levels of processed shRNAs targeting Abcc2. Inhibition was lost at longer times postinfection, correlating with a decrease in the accumulation of processed shRNAs. This finding suggests that a minimal amount of processed shRNAs is required for efficient silencing in vivo. This system was also used to evaluate the effect of shRNA expression on the saturation of silencing factors. Saturation of the cellular silencing processing machinery alters the accumulation and functionality of endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and pre-miRNAs. However, expression of functional exogenous shRNAs did not change the levels of endogenous miRNAs or their precursors. In summary, this work shows that adenoviral vectors can deliver sufficient shRNAs to mediate inhibition of gene expression without saturating the silencing machinery. PMID:17020948

  16. Roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, DUSP1, in feedback control of inflammatory gene expression and repression by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  17. Follistatin-like 1, a secreted muscle protein, promotes endothelial cell function and revascularization in ischemic tissue through a nitric-oxide synthase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Noriyuki; Oshima, Yuichi; Ohashi, Koji; Higuchi, Akiko; Ikegami, Chiaki; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Walsh, Kenneth

    2008-11-21

    Myogenic Akt signaling coordinates blood vessel recruitment with normal tissue growth. Here, we investigated the role of Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) in the regulation of endothelial cell function and blood vessel growth in muscle. Transgenic Akt1 overexpression in skeletal muscle led to myofiber growth that was coupled to an increase in muscle capillary density. Myogenic Akt signaling or ischemic hind limb surgery led to the induction of Fstl1 in muscle and increased circulating levels of Fstl1. Intramuscular administration of an adenoviral vector expressing Fstl1 (Ad-Fstl1) accelerated flow recovery and increased capillary density in the ischemic hind limbs of wild-type mice, and this was associated with an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at residue Ser-1179. In cultured endothelial cells, Ad-Fstl1 stimulated migration and differentiation into network structures and inhibited apoptosis under conditions of serum deprivation. These cell responses were associated with the activating phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. Conversely, transduction with dominant-negative Akt or LY294002 blocked Fstl1-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation and inhibited Fstl1-stimulated cellular responses. Treatment with the eNOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester also reduced endothelial cell migration and differentiation induced by Ad-Fstl1. The stimulatory effect of Ad-Fstl1 on ischemic limb reperfusion was abolished in mice lacking eNOS. These data indicate that Fstl1 is a secreted muscle protein or myokine that can function to promote endothelial cell function and stimulates revascularization in response to ischemic insult through its ability to activate Akt-eNOS signaling. PMID:18718903

  18. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  19. The centrality of cancer proteins in human protein-protein interaction network: a revisit.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Xie, Luyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Topological analysis of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has been widely applied to the investigation on cancer mechanisms. However, there is still a debate on whether cancer proteins exhibit more topological centrality compared to the other proteins in the human PPI network. To resolve this debate, we first identified four sets of human proteins, and then mapped these proteins into the yeast PPI network by homologous genes. Finally, we compared these proteins' properties in human and yeast PPI networks. Experiments over two real datasets demonstrated that cancer proteins tend to have higher degree and smaller clustering coefficient than non-cancer proteins. Experimental results also validated that cancer proteins have larger betweenness centrality compared to the other proteins on the STRING dataset. However, on the BioGRID dataset, the average betweenness centrality of cancer proteins is larger than that of disease and control proteins, but smaller than that of essential proteins. PMID:24878726

  20. Protein Regulation in Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Yaffe, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYCells must respond to a diverse, complex, and ever-changing mix of signals, using a fairly limited set of parts. Changes in protein level, protein localization, protein activity, and protein-protein interactions are critical aspects of signal transduction, allowing cells to respond highly specifically to a nearly limitless set of cues and also to vary the sensitivity, duration, and dynamics of the response. Signal-dependent changes in levels of gene expression and protein synthesis play an important role in regulation of protein levels, whereas posttranslational modifications of proteins regulate their degradation, localization, and functional interactions. Protein ubiquitylation, for example, can direct proteins to the proteasome for degradation or provide a signal that regulates their interactions and/or location within the cell. Similarly, protein phosphorylation by specific kinases is a key mechanism for augmenting protein activity and relaying signals to other proteins that possess domains that recognize the phosphorylated residues. PMID:27252361

  1. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  2. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  3. PSC: protein surface classification

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25 857 functional surfaces identified from 24 170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided. PMID:22669905

  4. Structure Prediction of Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Weng, Zhiping

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for biological function. They directly and indirectly influence the biological systems of which they are a part. Antibodies bind with antigens to detect and stop viruses and other infectious agents. Cell signaling is performed in many cases through the interactions between proteins. Many diseases involve protein-protein interactions on some level, including cancer and prion diseases.

  5. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin. The major storage protein of leguminous plants and a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. It is studied in efforts to enhance nutritional value of proteins through protein engineerings. It is isolated from Jack Bean because of it's potential as a nutritional substance. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Alex McPherson.

  6. Type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase directly inhibits HER2 activation of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Miaolin; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Min; Qian, Hai; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphorylation/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Since human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has a similar molecular structure to EGFR, the present study was designed to investigate whether PKG II also inhibits HER2 activation. The human gastric cancer cell line HGC‑27 was infected with an adenoviral construct encoding cDNA of PKG II (Ad‑PKG II) to increase the expression of PKG II and treated with 8‑(4‑chlorophenylthio)guanosine‑3',5'‑cyclic monophosphate (8‑pCPT‑cGMP) to activate the kinase. Western blotting was performed to detect the tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation of HER2. Co‑immunoprecipitation was performed in order to determine the binding between PKG II and HER2. In addition, a QuikChange Lightning Site‑Directed Mutagenesis kit was used to mutate threonine 686 of HER2 to glutamic acid or alanine. The results demonstrated that EGF treatment increased the tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) of HER2. Increasing the PKG II activity of HGC‑27 cells through infection with Ad‑PKG II and stimulation with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP inhibited the EGF‑induced tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of HER2. PKG II bound directly with HER2 and caused phosphorylation of threonine 686. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to alanine, which could not be phosphorylated by PKG II, the inhibitory effect of PKG II on the activation of HER2 was eradicated. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to glutamic acid, which mimicked the phosphorylation of this site, treatment with EGF had no stimulating effect on tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of the mutant HER2. The results suggested that PKG II inhibits EGF‑induced activation of HER2 through binding with and causing threonine 686 phosphorylation of this oncogenic protein. PMID:26676300

  7. E1A Blocks Hyperphosphorylation of p130 and p107 without Affecting the Phosphorylation Status of the Retinoblastoma Protein

    PubMed Central

    Parreño, Matilde; Garriga, Judit; Limón, Ana; Mayol, Xavier; Beck, George R.; Moran, Elizabeth; Graña, Xavier

    2000-01-01

    The phosphorylation status of the pRB family of growth suppressor proteins is regulated in a cell cycle entry-, progression-, and exit-dependent manner in normal cells. We have shown previously that p130, a member of this family, exhibits patterns of phosphorylated forms associated with various cell growth and differentiation stages. However, human 293 cells, which are transformed cells that express the adenoviral oncoproteins E1A and E1B, exhibit an abnormal pattern of p130 phosphorylated forms. Here we report that, unlike pRB, the phosphorylation status of both p130 and p107 is not modulated during the cell cycle in 293 cells as it is in other cells. Conditional overexpression of individual G1/S cyclins in 293 cells does not alter the phosphorylation status of p130, suggesting that the expression of E1A and/or E1B blocks hyperphosphorylation of p130. In agreement with these observations, transient cotransfection of vectors expressing E1A 12S, but not E1B, in combination with pocket proteins into U-2 OS cells blocks hyperphosphorylation of both p130 and p107. However, the phosphorylation status of pRB is not altered by cotransfection of E1A 12S vectors. Moreover, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts stably expressing E1A 12S also exhibit a block in hyperphosphorylation of endogenous p130 and p107. Direct binding of E1A to p130 and p107 is not required for the phosphorylation block since E1A 12S mutants defective in binding to the pRB family also block hyperphosphorylation of p130 and p107. Our data reported here identify a novel function of E1A, which affects p130 and p107 but does not affect pRB. Since E1A does not bind the hyperphosphorylated forms of p130, this function of E1A might prevent the existence of “free” hyperphosphorylated p130, which could act as a CDK inhibitor. PMID:10708433

  8. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell (standing), Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC),and Marc Pusey of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) use a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for marcromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of marcromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystalized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  9. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  10. Piezoelectric allostery of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins.

  11. Emerging fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Enterina, Jhon Ralph; Wu, Lanshi; Campbell, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the Aequorea jellyfish green FP (GFP), are firmly established as fundamental tools that enable a wide variety of biological studies. Specifically, FPs can serve as versatile genetically encoded markers for tracking proteins, organelles, or whole cells, and as the basis for construction of biosensors that can be used to visualize a growing array of biochemical events in cells and tissues. In this review we will focus on emerging applications of FPs that represent unprecedented new directions for the field. These emerging applications include new strategies for using FPs in biosensing applications, and innovative ways of using FPs to manipulate protein function or gene expression. PMID:26043278

  12. Piezoelectric allostery of protein.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins. PMID:27575163

  13. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2007-10-02

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  14. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  15. Evolution of proteins.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of proteins from living organisms are dealt with. The structure of proteins is first discussed; the variation in this structure from one biological group to another is illustrated by the first halves of the sequences of cytochrome c, and a phylogenetic tree is derived from the cytochrome c data. The relative geological times associated with the events of this tree are discussed. Errors which occur in the duplication of cells during the evolutionary process are examined. Particular attention is given to evolution of mutant proteins, globins, ferredoxin, and transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNA's). Finally, a general outline of biological evolution is presented.

  16. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  17. A Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Jason M.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Sharp, Julia L.; White, Amanda M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.

    2008-07-01

    The Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities (BEPro3) is a software tool for estimating probabilities of protein-protein association between bait and prey protein pairs using data from multiple-bait, multiple-replicate, protein pull-down LC-MS assay experiments. BEPro3 is open source software that runs on both Windows XP and Mac OS 10.4 or newer versions, and is freely available from http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/BEPro3.

  18. Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Selective Inhibition of Rac GTPase versus Global Suppression of Rho Family GTPases Is Mediated by Alterations in Distinct Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascades*

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Ramaswami, Sai Anandi; Bouchard, Ron J.; Aktories, Klaus; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases play integral roles in neuronal differentiation and survival. We have shown previously that Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB), an inhibitor of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, induces apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). In this study, we compared the effects of ToxB to a selective inhibitor of the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors Tiam1 and Trio (NSC23766). In a manner similar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis associated with enhanced caspase-3 activation and reduced phosphorylation of the Rac effector p21-activated kinase. In contrast to ToxB, caspase inhibitors do not protect CGNs from targeted inhibition of Rac. Also dissimilar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac does not inhibit MEK1/2/ERK1/2 or activate JNK/c-Jun. Instead, targeted inhibition of Rac suppresses distinct MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent signaling cascades known to regulate the localization and expression of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bad. Adenoviral expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK5 is sufficient to attenuate neuronal cell death induced by selective inhibition of Rac with NSC23766 but not apoptosis induced by global inhibition of Rho GTPases with ToxB. Collectively, these data demonstrate that global suppression of Rho family GTPases with ToxB causes a loss of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and activation of JNK/c-Jun, resulting in diminished degradation and enhanced transcription of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bim. In contrast, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis by repressing unique MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent prosurvival pathways, ultimately leading to enhanced expression, dephosphorylation, and mitochondrial localization of proapoptotic Bad. PMID:25666619

  19. Neuronal apoptosis induced by selective inhibition of Rac GTPase versus global suppression of Rho family GTPases is mediated by alterations in distinct mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R; Ramaswami, Sai Anandi; Bouchard, Ron J; Aktories, Klaus; Linseman, Daniel A

    2015-04-10

    Rho family GTPases play integral roles in neuronal differentiation and survival. We have shown previously that Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB), an inhibitor of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, induces apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). In this study, we compared the effects of ToxB to a selective inhibitor of the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors Tiam1 and Trio (NSC23766). In a manner similar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis associated with enhanced caspase-3 activation and reduced phosphorylation of the Rac effector p21-activated kinase. In contrast to ToxB, caspase inhibitors do not protect CGNs from targeted inhibition of Rac. Also dissimilar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac does not inhibit MEK1/2/ERK1/2 or activate JNK/c-Jun. Instead, targeted inhibition of Rac suppresses distinct MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent signaling cascades known to regulate the localization and expression of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bad. Adenoviral expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK5 is sufficient to attenuate neuronal cell death induced by selective inhibition of Rac with NSC23766 but not apoptosis induced by global inhibition of Rho GTPases with ToxB. Collectively, these data demonstrate that global suppression of Rho family GTPases with ToxB causes a loss of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and activation of JNK/c-Jun, resulting in diminished degradation and enhanced transcription of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bim. In contrast, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis by repressing unique MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent prosurvival pathways, ultimately leading to enhanced expression, dephosphorylation, and mitochondrial localization of proapoptotic Bad. PMID:25666619

  20. Interactive protein manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  1. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  2. Engineered Proteins for Bioelectrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Muhammad Safwan; Rehman, Jawad Ur; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-06-01

    It is only in the past two decades that excellent protein engineering tools have begun to meet parallel advances in materials chemistry, nanofabrication, and electronics. This is revealing scenarios from which synthetic enzymes can emerge, which were previously impossible, as well as interfaces with novel electrode materials. That means the control of the protein structure, electron transport pathway, and electrode surface can usher us into a new era of bioelectrochemistry. This article reviews the principle of electron transfer (ET) and considers how its application at the electrode, within the protein, and at a redox group is directing key advances in the understanding of protein structure to create systems that exhibit better efficiency and unique bioelectrochemistry.

  3. Protein Model Database

    SciTech Connect

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  4. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  5. Untying knots in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2010-10-13

    A shoelace can be readily untied by pulling its ends rather than its loops. Attempting to untie a native knot in a protein can also succeed or fail depending on where one pulls. However, thermal fluctuations induced by the surrounding water affect conformations stochastically and may add to the uncertainty of the outcome. When the protein is pulled by the termini, the knot can only get tightened, and any attempt at untying results in failure. We show that, by pulling specific amino acids, one may easily retract a terminal segment of the backbone from the knotting loop and untangle the knot. At still other amino acids, the outcome of pulling can go either way. We study the dependence of the untying probability on the way the protein is grasped, the pulling speed, and the temperature. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying this dependence is critical for a successful experimental realization of protein knot untying. PMID:20857930

  6. Membrane Protein Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Punta, Marco; Forrest, Lucy R.; Bigelow, Henry; Kernytsky, Andrew; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    We survey computational approaches that tackle membrane protein structure and function prediction. While describing the main ideas that have led to the development of the most relevant and novel methods, we also discuss pitfalls, provide practical hints and highlight the challenges that remain. The methods covered include: sequence alignment, motif search, functional residue identification, transmembrane segment and protein topology predictions, homology and ab initio modeling. Overall, predictions of functional and structural features of membrane proteins are improving, although progress is hampered by the limited amount of high-resolution experimental information available. While predictions of transmembrane segments and protein topology rank among the most accurate methods in computational biology, more attention and effort will be required in the future to ameliorate database search, homology and ab initio modeling. PMID:17367718

  7. Bence-Jones protein - quantitative

    MedlinePlus

    Immunoglobulin light chains - urine; Urine Bence-Jones protein ... Bence-Jones proteins are a part of regular antibodies called light chains. These proteins are not normally in urine. Sometimes, when ...

  8. Protein Nitrogen Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The protein content of foods can be determined by numerous methods. The Kjeldahl method and the nitrogen combustion (Dumas) method for protein analysis are based on nitrogen determination. Both methods are official for the purposes of nutrition labeling of foods. While the Kjeldahl method has been used widely for over a hundred years, the recent availability of automated instrumentation for the Dumas method in many cases is replacing use of the Kjeldahl method.

  9. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  10. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  11. Protein conducting nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsman, Anke; Krüger, Vivien; Bartsch, Philipp; Honigmann, Alf; Schmidt, Oliver; Rao, Sanjana; Meisinger, Christof; Wagner, Richard

    2010-11-01

    About 50% of the cellular proteins have to be transported into or across cellular membranes. This transport is an essential step in the protein biosynthesis. In eukaryotic cells secretory proteins are transported into the endoplasmic reticulum before they are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane. Almost all proteins of the endosymbiotic organelles chloroplasts and mitochondria are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and posttranslationally imported. Genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches led to rather detailed knowledge on the composition of the translocon-complexes which catalyze the membrane transport of the preproteins. Comprehensive concepts on the targeting and membrane transport of polypeptides emerged, however little detail on the molecular nature and mechanisms of the protein translocation channels comprising nanopores has been achieved. In this paper we will highlight recent developments of the diverse protein translocation systems and focus particularly on the common biophysical properties and functions of the protein conducting nanopores. We also provide a first analysis of the interaction between the genuine protein conducting nanopore Tom40SC as well as a mutant Tom40SC (\\mathrm {S}_{54} \\to E ) containing an additional negative charge at the channel vestibule and one of its native substrates, CoxIV, a mitochondrial targeting peptide. The polypeptide induced a voltage-dependent increase in the frequency of channel closure of Tom40SC corresponding to a voltage-dependent association rate, which was even more pronounced for the Tom40SC S54E mutant. The corresponding dwelltime reflecting association/transport of the peptide could be determined with \\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}} \\cong 1.1 ms for the wildtype, whereas the mutant Tom40SC S54E displayed a biphasic dwelltime distribution (\\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}}^1 \\cong 0.4 ms \\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}}^2 \\cong 4.6 ms).

  12. Cotton and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.; Gaither, Kari A.; Castro, Nathan J.

    2006-06-30

    The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, it may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.

  13. Stretching to Understand Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2007-03-01

    Mechanical stretching of single proteins has been studied experimentally for about 50 proteins yielding a variety of force patterns and values of the peak forces. We have performed a theoretical survey of 7749 proteins of known native structure and map out the landscape of possible dynamical behaviors unders stretching at constant speed. The model used is constructed based on the native geometry. It is solved by methods of molecular dynamics and validated by comparing the theoretical predictions to experimental results. We characterize the distribution of peak forces and on correlations with the system size and with the structure classification as characterized by the CATH scheme. We identify proteins with the biggest forces and show that they belong to few topology classes. We determine which protein segments act as mechanical clamps and show that, in most cases, they correspond to long stretches of parallel beta-strands, but other mechanisms are also possible. We then consider stretching by fluid flows. We show that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  14. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  15. Use of protein-protein interactions in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Sholukh, M; Korpela, T

    2001-10-30

    Biospecific recognition between proteins is a phenomenon that can be exploited for designing affinity-chromatographic purification systems for proteins. In principle, the approach is straightforward, and there are usually many alternative ways, since a protein can be always found which binds specifically enough to the desired protein. Routine immunoaffinity chromatography utilizes the recognition of antigenic epitopes by antibodies. However, forces involved in protein-protein interactions as well the forces keeping the three-dimensional structures of proteins intact are complicated, and proteins are easily unfolded by various factors with unpredictable results. Because of this and because of the generally high association strength between proteins, the correct adjustment of binding forces between an immobilized protein and the protein to be purified as well as the release of bound proteins in biologically active form from affinity complexes are the main problem. Affinity systems involving interactions like enzyme-enzyme, subunit-oligomer, protein-antibody, protein-chaperone and the specific features involved in each case are presented as examples. This article also aims to sketch prospects for further development of the use of protein-protein interactions for the purification of proteins. PMID:11694271

  16. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  17. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  18. Va