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Sample records for adhesion molecule-5 occurs

  1. Structural study of the N-glycans of intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (telencephalin).

    PubMed

    Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Funatsu, Osamu; Nakaya, Syu-ichi; Morita, Akinori; Ikekita, Masahiko

    2009-12-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5, telencephalin) is a dendritically polarized membrane glycoprotein expressed in tissues distinct from those expressing other ICAMs. Here, we determined the N-glycan structure of ICAM-5 purified from adult rat brain and compared it with that of other ICAMs. N-glycans were released by N-glycosidase F digestion and labeled with p-amino benzoic octylester (ABOE). ABOE-labeled glycans were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. The N-glycans obtained from rat brain ICAM-5 consisted of approximately 85% neutral, 10.2% sialylated-only, 2.8% sulfated-only, and 1.2% sialylated and sulfated glycans. Compared with the N-glycan structures of human ICAM-1 expressed in CHO cells, HEK cells, or mouse myeloma cells and ICAM-3 isolated from human T-cells, rat brain ICAM-5 had less highly branched glycans, sialylated glycans, and N-acetyllactosamine structures. In contrast, high-mannose-type N-glycans and Lewis X were more commonly found in rat brain ICAM-5 than in human ICAM-1 expressed in CHO cells, HEK cells, or mouse myeloma cells and ICAM-3 isolated from human T-cells. In addition, sulfated glycans contained GlcNAc 6-O-sulfate on the non-reducing terminal side. Our data will be important for the elucidation of the roles of the N-glycans expressed in neural cells, including those present on ICAM-5. PMID:19733219

  2. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  3. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  4. The Subcellular Localization of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-5 (Telencephalin) in the Visual Cortex is not Developmentally Regulated in the Absence of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Emily A.; Tremblay, Marie-Eve; Gahmberg, Carl G.; Tian, Li; Majewska, Ania K.

    2013-01-01

    The telencephalon-associated intercellular adhesion molecule 5 (Telencephalin; ICAM-5) regulates dendritic morphology in the developing brain. In vitro studies have shown that ICAM-5 is predominantly found within dendrites and immature dendritic protrusions, with reduced expression in mushroom spines, suggesting that ICAM-5 downregulation is critical for the maturation of synaptic structures. However, developmental expression of ICAM-5 has not been explored in depth at the ultrastructural level in intact brain tissue. To investigate the ultrastructural localization of ICAM-5 with transmission electron microscopy, we performed immunoperoxidase histochemistry for ICAM-5 in mouse visual cortex at postnatal day (P)14, a period of intense synaptogenesis, and at P28, when synapses mature. We observed the expected ICAM-5 expression in dendritic protrusions and shafts at both P14 and P28. ICAM-5 expression in these dendritic protrusions decreased in prevalence with developmental age to become predominantly localized to dendritic shafts by P28. To further understand the relationship between ICAM-5 and the endopeptidase metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which mediates ICAM-5 cleavage following glutamate activation during postnatal development, we also explored ICAM-5 expression in MMP-9 null animals. This analysis revealed a similar expression of ICAM-5 in dendritic elements at P14 and P28; however an increased prevalence of ICAM-5 was noted in dendritic protrusions at P28 in the MMP-9 null animals, indicating that in the absence of MMP-9, there is no developmental shift in ICAM-5 subcellular localization. Our ultrastructural observations shed light on possible functions mediated by ICAM-5 and their regulation by extracellular proteases. PMID:23897576

  5. Modulation of FAK and Src adhesion signaling occurs independently of adhesion complex composition.

    PubMed

    Horton, Edward R; Humphries, Jonathan D; Stutchbury, Ben; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Ballestrem, Christoph; Barry, Simon T; Humphries, Martin J

    2016-02-01

    Integrin adhesion complexes (IACs) form mechanochemical connections between the extracellular matrix and actin cytoskeleton and mediate phenotypic responses via posttranslational modifications. Here, we investigate the modularity and robustness of the IAC network to pharmacological perturbation of the key IAC signaling components focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. FAK inhibition using AZ13256675 blocked FAK(Y397) phosphorylation but did not alter IAC composition, as reported by mass spectrometry. IAC composition was also insensitive to Src inhibition using AZD0530 alone or in combination with FAK inhibition. In contrast, kinase inhibition substantially reduced phosphorylation within IACs, cell migration and proliferation. Furthermore using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that FAK inhibition increased the exchange rate of a phosphotyrosine (pY) reporter (dSH2) at IACs. These data demonstrate that kinase-dependent signal propagation through IACs is independent of gross changes in IAC composition. Together, these findings demonstrate a general separation between the composition of IACs and their ability to relay pY-dependent signals. PMID:26833789

  6. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  7. Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Asthma Model Occurs Independently of Secretion of β1 Integrins in Airway Wall and Focal Adhesions Proteins Down Regulation.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Santos, Mayra; Carbajal, Verónica; Tellez-Jiménez, Olivia; Martínez-Cordero, Erasmo; Ruiz, Victor; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Lascurain, Ricardo; Santibañez-Salgado, Alfredo; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca

    2016-10-01

    The extracellular domains of some membrane proteins can be shed from the cell. A similar phenomenon occurs with β1 integrins (α1β1 and α2β1) in guinea pig. The putative role of β1 integrin subunit alterations due to shedding in airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an allergic asthma model was evaluated. Guinea pigs were sensitized and challenged with antigen. Antigenic challenges induced bronchoobstruction and hyperresponsiveness at the third antigenic challenge. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectronmicroscopy studies showed that the cytosolic and extracellular domains of the β1 integrin subunit shared the same distribution in airway structures in both groups. Various polypeptides with similar molecular weights were detected with both the cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit antibodies in isolated airway myocytes and the connective tissue that surrounds the ASM bundle. Flow cytometry and Western blot studies showed that the expression of cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit domains in ASM was similar between groups. An increment of ITGB1 mRNA in ASM was observed in the asthma model group. RACE-PCR of ITGB1 in ASM did not show splicing variants. The expression levels of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and paxillin diminished in the asthma model, but not talin. The levels of phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) at Thr(696) increased in asthma model. Our work suggests that β1 integrin is secreted in guinea pig airway wall. This secretion is not altered in asthma model; nevertheless, β1 integrin cytodomain assembly proteins in focal cell adhesions in which ILK and paxillin are involved are altered in asthma model. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2385-2396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26969873

  8. A Naturally Occurring Single-Residue Mutation in the Translocator Domain of Neisseria meningitidis NhhA Affects Trimerization, Surface Localization, and Adhesive Capabilities▿†

    PubMed Central

    Echenique-Rivera, Hebert; Brunelli, Brunella; Scarselli, Maria; Taddei, Anna Rita; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Serruto, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis NhhA (Neisseria hia/hsf homologue A) is an oligomeric outer membrane protein belonging to the family of trimeric autotransporter adhesins. NhhA mediates the interaction of N. meningitidis with human epithelial cells and components of the extracellular matrix. The recombinant protein is able to induce bactericidal antibodies and hence has also been considered a potential vaccine candidate. In this study, we analyzed the production of NhhA in a large panel of N. meningitidis strains belonging to different serogroups and clonal complexes. We found that trimeric NhhA was produced at different levels by the various strains tested. In some strains belonging to the clonal complex ST41/44, the protein is detectable only as a monomer. Sequencing of the nhhA gene and generation of complementing strains in different genetic backgrounds have proved that a single mutation (Gly to Asp) in the translocator domain affected both trimerization and surface localization of NhhA. In vitro infection assays showed that this mutation impairs meningococcal NhhA-mediated adhesion, suggesting that strains carrying the mutation may rely on different strategies or molecules to mediate interaction with host cells. Finally, we demonstrated that N. meningitidis ST41/44 strains producing the mutated form did not induce killing mediated by NhhA-specific bactericidal antibodies. Our data help to elucidate the secretion mechanisms of trimeric autotransporters and to understand the contribution of NhhA in the evolutionary process of host-Neisseria interactions. Also, they might have important implications for the evaluation of NhhA as a vaccine candidate. PMID:21844231

  9. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  10. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  11. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  12. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  13. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  14. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Saintclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of preparing aromatic polyamide-acids for use as adhesives is described. An equimolar quantity of an aromatic dianhydride is added to a stirred solution of an aromatic diamine in a water or alcohol-miscible ether solvent to obtain a viscous polymer solution. The polymeric-acid intermediate polymer does not become insoluble but directly forms a smooth viscous polymer solution. These polyamic-acid polymers are converted, by heating in the range of 200-300 C and with pressure, to form polyimides with excellent adhesive properties.

  15. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  16. Increased erythrocyte adhesion to VCAM-1 during pulsatile flow: Application of a microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    White, Jennell; Lancelot, Moira; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hines, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by microvascular occlusion mediated by adhesive interactions of sickle erythrocytes (SSRBCs) to the endothelium. Most in vitro flow adhesion assays measure SSRBC adhesion during continuous flow, although in vivo SSRBC adhesive interactions occur during pulsatile flow. Using a well-plate microfluidic flow adhesion system, we demonstrate that isolated SSRBCs adhere to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) at greater levels during pulsatile versus continuous flow. A significant increase in adhesive interactions was observed between all pulse frequencies 1 Hz to 2 Hz (60–120 beats/min) when compared to non-pulsatile flow. Adhesion of isolated SSRBCs and whole blood during pulsatile flow was unaffected by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition, and exposure of SSRBCs to pulsatile flow did not affect the intrinsic adhesive properties of SSRBCs. The cell type responsible for increased adhesion of whole blood varied from patient to patient. We conclude that low flow periods of the pulse cycle allow more adhesive interactions between sickle erythrocytes and VCAM-1, and sickle erythrocyte adhesion in the context of whole blood may better reflect physiologic cellular interactions. The microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay used in this study may have applications for clinical assessment of sickle erythrocyte adhesion during pulsatile flow. PMID:24898561

  17. Clinical Recommendation: Labial Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Janice L; Romano, Mary E; Quint, Elisabeth H

    2015-10-01

    Labial adhesions, also known as labial agglutination, are a common finding in prepubertal adolescents. They are defined as fusion of the labia minora in the midline or are termed vulvar adhesions when they occur below the labia minora (inner labia). Patients are often asymptomatic but might present with genitourinary complaints. The decision for treatment is based on symptoms. The mainstay of treatment in asymptomatic patients is conservative, with careful attention to vulvar hygiene and reassurance to parents. In symptomatic patients, topical treatment with estrogen and/or steroid cream is often curative. Less often, corrective surgery is necessary. Recurrence is common until a patient goes through puberty. These recommendations are intended for pediatric and gynecologic health care providers who care for pediatric and adolescent girls to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26162697

  18. Naturally occurring chemical carcinogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are chemicals found in nature which have unique pharmacological effects. Humans are exposed to many of these bioactive naturally occurring chemicals via the air breathed, the water drunk and the food eaten. Exposure also occurs in clinical settings. Naturally occurring chemicals ...

  19. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  20. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  1. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  2. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  3. Adhesion as a weapon in microbial competition

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Jonas; Nadell, Carey D; Bassler, Bonnie L; Foster, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Microbes attach to surfaces and form dense communities known as biofilms, which are central to how microbes live and influence humans. The key defining feature of biofilms is adhesion, whereby cells attach to one another and to surfaces, via attachment factors and extracellular polymers. While adhesion is known to be important for the initial stages of biofilm formation, its function within biofilm communities has not been studied. Here we utilise an individual-based model of microbial groups to study the evolution of adhesion. While adhering to a surface can enable cells to remain in a biofilm, consideration of within-biofilm competition reveals a potential cost to adhesion: immobility. Highly adhesive cells that are resistant to movement face being buried and starved at the base of the biofilm. However, we find that when growth occurs at the base of a biofilm, adhesion allows cells to capture substratum territory and force less adhesive, competing cells out of the system. This process may be particularly important when cells grow on a host epithelial surface. We test the predictions of our model using the enteric pathogen Vibrio cholerae, which produces an extracellular matrix important for biofilm formation. Flow cell experiments indicate that matrix-secreting cells are highly adhesive and form expanding clusters that remove non-secreting cells from the population, as predicted by our simulations. Our study shows how simple physical properties, such as adhesion, can be critical to understanding evolution and competition within microbial communities. PMID:25290505

  4. Co-Occurring Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care of You Top Ten Freshman Year Issues Alcohol, Substance Abuse and Depression Winter Break Survival Tips for College Students Implementing ... supporters and consumers in the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring ... In Crisis? Call ...

  5. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  6. Epidural lysis of adhesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E; Hurley, Robert W; Cohen, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  7. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  8. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  9. Quantitation of Endothelial Cell Adhesiveness In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Donna J.; Raj, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    One of the cardinal processes of inflammation is the infiltration of immune cells from the lumen of the blood vessel to the surrounding tissue. This occurs when endothelial cells, which line blood vessels, become adhesive to circulating immune cells such as monocytes. In vitro measurement of this adhesiveness has until now been done by quantifying the total number of monocytes that adhere to an endothelial layer either as a direct count or by indirect measurement of the fluorescence of adherent monocytes. While such measurements do indicate the average adhesiveness of the endothelial cell population, they are confounded by a number of factors, such as cell number, and do not reveal the proportion of endothelial cells that are actually adhesive. Here we describe and demonstrate a method which allows the enumeration of adhesive cells within a tested population of endothelial monolayer. Endothelial cells are grown on glass coverslips and following desired treatment are challenged with monocytes (that may be fluorescently labeled). After incubation, a rinsing procedure, involving multiple rounds of immersion and draining, the cells are fixed. Adhesive endothelial cells, which are surrounded by monocytes are readily identified and enumerated, giving an adhesion index that reveals the actual proportion of endothelial cells within the population that are adhesive. PMID:26132714

  10. [PROPHYLAXIS OF AN ACUTE ADHESIVE ILEUS RECURRENCE].

    PubMed

    Evtushenko, D A

    2015-10-01

    The results of treatment of 56 patients were studied, in whom for adhesive abdominal disease, complicated by an acute adhesive ileus (AAI), the adhesiolysis with intraabdominal introduction of antiadhesive measures, named Mezogel, Defensal were conducted, as well as in 42 patients, operated on in emergency for AAI, using a routine method. Application of videolaparoscopy gives a possibility to control the adhesive process in the early postoperative period, what is necessary for prophylaxis of the adhesive disease occurence. Application of the apparatus, we have elaborated, permitted to conduct a precisional viscerolysis due to good visualization of organs, pathologically changed and healthy tissues. Application of the procedures elaborated for prophylaxis of the AAI recurrence have promoted the reduction of risk for the AAI occurence down to 1.8%, and of disorders of the gut contents transit in terms up to 1 yr - to 3.6%. PMID:26946653

  11. Hierarchical bioinspired adhesive surfaces-a review.

    PubMed

    Brodoceanu, D; Bauer, C T; Kroner, E; Arzt, E; Kraus, T

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary adherence and climbing agility of geckos on rough surfaces has been attributed to the multiscale hierarchical structures on their feet. Hundreds of thousands of elastic hairs called setae, each of which split into several spatulae, create a large number of contact points that generate substantial adhesion through van der Waals interactions. The hierarchical architecture provides increased structural compliance on surfaces with roughness features ranging from micrometers to millimeters. We review synthetic adhesion surfaces that mimic the naturally occurring hierarchy with an emphasis on microfabrication strategies, material choice and the adhesive performance achieved. PMID:27529743

  12. "Naturally occurring asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnard, F.; Lahondère, D.; Blein, O.; Lahfid, A.; Wille, G.

    2012-04-01

    The term asbestos refers to six silicate minerals from amphibole and serpentine groups. By definition, it consists in bundles of thin and flexible long fibers, with high-tensile strength, and chemical and heat resistance. In contrast to asbestos found within commercial products and mining, the specific term ''naturally occurring asbestos'' (NOA) refers to asbestiform minerals occurring within rocks or soils that can be released by human activities or weathering processes. The fact that the exposure to asbestos is related to lung pathologies is now widely demonstrated (e.g. asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer). However, if health risks associated with exposure to NOA exist, they are not yet well documented. The crystallization of natural asbestos occurs in specific Mg-rich lithologies associated with peculiar structural and metamorphic conditions. By recognizing and combining such specific geologic criteria, the presence or the absence of asbestos in bedrock terrains can be reasonably predicted and maps of NOA hazard can be drawn. We present here new results of geological mapping and petrological study concerning the evaluation of the NOA hazard in the Alps and Corsica, in France. The three folds approach consists in (1) a determination of lithologies with potential NOA from a bibliographic compilation and extraction of target zones from a geological geodatabase (2) a geological mapping of the target zones followed by a petrological characterization of sampled asbestiform minerals in the laboratory (optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy technics), and (3) the drawing of the final map of NOA hazard, at regional-scale. Occurrence criteria can be retained as follows: 1. NOA are abundant in the internal zones of the Alps and Corsica, especially within ophiolitic complexes. Natural asbestos are mostly concentrated within ultramafic rocks but can also occur within basic lithologies such as Mg-metagabbros, metabasalts and meta-pillow-lavas, 2. Asbestos

  13. Penile adhesion: the hidden complication of circumcision.

    PubMed

    Gracely-Kilgore, K A

    1984-05-01

    A penile or prepuce adhesion can occur after a circumcision if the remaining skin is not retracted after the circumcision has healed. When a circumcision is done, tissue which would normally be intact is split. Unless proper care is taken, the epithelium of the inner prepuce at the point where the foreskin was removed can reattach to the epithelium of the glans. The result of this is a penile adhesion. Usually the adhesions can be released by simple retraction. Sometimes, however, the fusion is so complete that simple retraction will not work, and the child must be referred to a urologist. Another problem is that smegma or bacteria can collect under the adhesion if it covers the preputial cavity and cause infection. Professionals must look for this problem, and parents must be taught how to care for the normal circumcised penis so that penile adhesions do not develop. This article discusses the formation and identification of penile adhesions, the process by which adhesions can be released, when a referral to a urologist is necessary and the proper care for the circumcised penis. PMID:6728346

  14. Strategies to Minimize Adhesion Formation After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lazarou, George; Mondesir, Carlene; Wei, Kai; Khullar, Poonan; Ogden, Lorna

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the potential for postoperative laparoscopic adhesion formation utilizing either monopolar cautery or ultrasonic energy and to determine whether there is added benefit with the addition of a suspension of hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose in saline versus saline alone. Methods: Injuries were induced in rabbits by using monopolar cautery on 1 uterine horn and adjacent sidewall and ultrasonic energy on the opposite. Hyaluronate/ carboxymethylcellulose or saline was added to every other animal. Autopsies were performed after 3 weeks. Clinical and pathologic scoring of adhesions was performed by blinded investigators. Results: A very significant difference occurred in pathologic adhesion scores favoring the ultrasonic scalpel when the animals were treated with saline. However, a borderline significant difference was found in pathologic scores favoring the ultrasonic scalpel compared to the monopolar cautery. There was no significant difference in clinical adhesion scores between the 2 modalities. No significant difference in either score was found with the addition of hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose or saline with either instrument. Conclusion: No benefit was found for adhesion prevention with hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose. Although no reduction was achieved in clinical adhesions, the ultrasonic scalpel resulted in fewer histologic signs of tissue inflammation in the early postoperative period, suggesting that further clinical adhesions might develop over time with cautery. PMID:21985723

  15. Labial adhesions in pubertal girls.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Roy Kallol; Sonika, Agarwal; Charu, Chanana; Sunesh, Kumar; Neena, Malhotra

    2006-01-01

    Labial adhesions after puberty are rare and are usually the result of chronic inflammation, urinary tract infection, hypoestrogenism or surgical procedures leading to vulval trauma. Sexual abuse leading to labial adhesions is extremely rare in girls who have attained menarche. Complete vulval fusion can rarely occur without any evidence of hypoestrogenism. We address this rare entity in three young pubertal girls wherein one had a history of genital trauma, the second had a history of surgical intervention due to urinary retention and the last one had a history of sexual abuse. All patients had history of genital trauma in common. Accepted management of this condition is adhesiolysis followed by application of estrogen cream in the postoperative period. PMID:16189695

  16. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  17. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  18. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    PubMed

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning. PMID:3086679

  19. Naturally Occurring Food Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Laurie C.; Matulka, Ray A.; Burdock, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States. PMID:22069686

  20. Assay of Adhesion Under Shear Stress for the Study of T Lymphocyte-Adhesion Molecule Interactions.

    PubMed

    Strazza, Marianne; Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Peled, Michael; Mor, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Overall, T cell adhesion is a critical component of function, contributing to the distinct processes of cellular recruitment to sites of inflammation and interaction with antigen presenting cells (APC) in the formation of immunological synapses. These two contexts of T cell adhesion differ in that T cell-APC interactions can be considered static, while T cell-blood vessel interactions are challenged by the shear stress generated by circulation itself. T cell-APC interactions are classified as static in that the two cellular partners are static relative to each other. Usually, this interaction occurs within the lymph nodes. As a T cell interacts with the blood vessel wall, the cells arrest and must resist the generated shear stress.(1,2) These differences highlight the need to better understand static adhesion and adhesion under flow conditions as two distinct regulatory processes. The regulation of T cell adhesion can be most succinctly described as controlling the affinity state of integrin molecules expressed on the cell surface, and thereby regulating the interaction of integrins with the adhesion molecule ligands expressed on the surface of the interacting cell. Our current understanding of the regulation of integrin affinity states comes from often simplistic in vitro model systems. The assay of adhesion using flow conditions described here allows for the visualization and accurate quantification of T cell-epithelial cell interactions in real time following a stimulus. An adhesion under flow assay can be applied to studies of adhesion signaling within T cells following treatment with inhibitory or stimulatory substances. Additionally, this assay can be expanded beyond T cell signaling to any adhesive leukocyte population and any integrin-adhesion molecule pair. PMID:27404581

  1. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  2. Microtubule-dependent modulation of adhesion complex composition.

    PubMed

    Ng, Daniel H J; Humphries, Jonathan D; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angélique; Humphries, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule network regulates the turnover of integrin-containing adhesion complexes to stimulate cell migration. Disruption of the microtubule network results in an enlargement of adhesion complex size due to increased RhoA-stimulated actomyosin contractility, and inhibition of adhesion complex turnover; however, the microtubule-dependent changes in adhesion complex composition have not been studied in a global, unbiased manner. Here we used label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine adhesion complex changes that occur upon microtubule disruption with nocodazole. Nocodazole-treated cells displayed an increased abundance of the majority of known adhesion complex components, but no change in the levels of the fibronectin-binding α5β1 integrin. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed these findings, but revealed a change in localisation of adhesion complex components. Specifically, in untreated cells, α5-integrin co-localised with vinculin at peripherally located focal adhesions and with tensin at centrally located fibrillar adhesions. In nocodazole-treated cells, however, α5-integrin was found in both peripherally located and centrally located adhesion complexes that contained both vinculin and tensin, suggesting a switch in the maturation state of adhesion complexes to favour focal adhesions. Moreover, the switch to focal adhesions was confirmed to be force-dependent as inhibition of cell contractility with the Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, prevented the nocodazole-induced conversion. These results highlight a complex interplay between the microtubule cytoskeleton, adhesion complex maturation state and intracellular contractile force, and provide a resource for future adhesion signaling studies. The proteomics data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001183. PMID:25526367

  3. Adhesion of germlings of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed Central

    Doss, R P; Potter, S W; Soeldner, A H; Christian, J K; Fukunaga, L E

    1995-01-01

    Adhesion of conidia and germlings of the facultative plant parasite Botrytis cinerea occurs in two distinct stages. The first stage, which occurs immediately upon hydration of conidia and is characterized by relatively weak adhesive forces, appears to involve hydrophobic interactions (R. P. Doss, S. W. Potter, G. A. Chastagner, and J. K. Christian, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 59:1786-1791, 1993). The second stage of adhesion, delayed adhesion, occurs after viable conidia have been incubated for several hours under conditions that promote germination. At this time, the germlings attach strongly to either hydrophobic or hydrophilic substrata. Delayed adhesion involves secretion of an ensheating film that remains attached to the substratum upon physical removal of the germlings. This fungal sheath, which can be visualized by using interference-contrast light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, or atomic force microscopy, is 25 to 60 nm thick in the region immediately adjacent to the germ tubes. Germlings are resistant to removal by boiling or by treatment with a number of hydrolytic enzymes, 2.0 M periodic acid, or 1.0 M sulfuric acid. They are readily removed by brief exposure to 1.25 N NaOH. A base-soluble material that adheres to culture flask walls in short-term liquid cultures of B. cinerea is composed of glucose (about 30%), galactosamine (about 3%), and protein (30 to 44%). PMID:7887606

  4. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    incorporated into dental adhesive systems to provide the appropriate environment in which dentin MMP collagen degradation is inhibited and mineral growth can occur. PMID:25227634

  5. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    incorporated into dental adhesive systems to provide the appropriate environment in which dentin MMP collagen degradation is inhibited and mineral growth can occur. PMID:25227634

  6. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles. PMID:20844908

  7. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  8. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  9. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  10. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  11. Stress analysis of adhesive bonded stiffener plates and double joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuceoglu, U.; Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The general problem of adhesive bonded stiffener plates and double joints of dissimilar orthotropic adherends with transverse shear deformations are analyzed. Adhesive layers are assumed to be of an isotropic, elastic and relatively flexible material. It is shown that the stress distributions in the adhesive layers are very much dependent on the bending deformations in adherends. Also, it is found that, in the adhesive layer, maximum transverse normal stress is, in many cases, larger than the longitudinal shear stress and that both occur at the edge of the joint. The general method of solution developed is applied to several practical examples.

  12. Adhesion of Nongerminated Botrytis cinerea Conidia to Several Substrata †

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Robert P.; Potter, Sandra W.; Chastagner, Gary A; Christian, James K.

    1993-01-01

    Conidia of the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea adhered to tomato cuticle and to certain other substrata immediately upon hydration. This immediate adhesion occurred with both living and nonliving conidia. Adhesion was not consistently influenced by several lectins, sugars, or salts or by protease treatment, but it was strongly inhibited by ionic or nonionic detergents. With glass and oxidized polyethylene, substrata whose surface hydrophobicities could be conveniently varied, there was a direct relationship between water contact angle and percent adhesion. Immediate adhesion did not involve specific conidial attachment structures, although the surfaces of attached conidia were altered by contact with a substratum. Freshly harvested conidia were very hydrophobic, with more than 97% partitioning into the organic layer when subjected to a phase distribution test. Percent adhesion of germinated conidia was larger than that of nongerminated conidia. Evidence suggests that immediate adhesion of conidia of B. cinerea depends, at least in part, on hydrophobic interactions between the conidia and substratum. Images PMID:16348954

  13. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  14. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  15. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  16. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  17. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  18. High temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace and electronics industries have an ever increasing need for higher performance materials. In recent years, linear aromatic polyimides have been proven to be a superior class of materials for various applications in these industries. The use of this class of polymers as adhesives is continuing to increase. Several NASA Langley developed polyimides show considerable promise as adhesives because of their high glass transition temperatures, thermal stability, resistance to solvents/water, and their potential for cost effective manufacture.

  19. Dual-axis MEMS force sensors for gecko adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ginel Corina

    Dual-axis piezoresistive microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) force sensors were used to investigate the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of gecko hairs, called setae. These hairs are part of a fantastic, robust dry adhesive. Their adhesion is highly angle-dependent, with both the "pitch" and "roll" orientation angles playing a role. This anisotropy in adhesion properties is critical for locomotion, as it enables detachment of the gecko's foot with limited pull-off force. Many synthetic mimics of the gecko adhesive are isotropic. This work on the anisotropy of natural setae will inform future work on synthetic dry adhesives. A dual-axis microscale force sensor was needed to study single seta adhesive forces, which are stronger parallel to a substrate than perpendicular. Piezoresistive silicon cantilevers that separately detect lateral and normal forces applied at the tip were used. The fabrication process and rigorous characterization of new devices are reported. A novel calibration method was developed that uses resonant frequency measurements in concert with finite element models to correct for the expected variability of critical dimensions. These corrected models were used to predict the stiffnesses of each cantilever, and thus improve the accuracy of force measurements made with these sensors. This calibration technique was also validated by direct measurement of the dual-axis cantilever stiffnesses using a reference cantilever. The adhesion force of a single gecko seta is dramatically enhanced by proper orientation. The dual-axis cantilevers were used to measure two components of force between a substrate and a Gekko gecko seta. Lateral adhesion was highest with the stalk oriented parallel to the surface at 0° pitch. Adhesion decreased smoothly as the pitch angle of the stalk was increased, until detachment or no adhesion occurred at approximately 30°. To display enhanced adhesion, the splayed tuft at the end of the seta needed to be only

  20. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  1. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, J.R.

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  2. Cell adhesion molecules mediate radiation-induced leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D; Kuchibhotla, J; Wyble, C

    1996-11-15

    The predominant early histological changes in irradiated tissues are edema and leukocyte infiltration. Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are required for the extravasation of leukocytes from the circulation. To study the role of CAMs in the pathogenesis of radiation-mediated inflammation, we quantified the expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 glycoproteins on the surface of irradiated human endothelial cells. We found that E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression increased after irradiation, whereas there was no increased expression of other cytokine-inducible adhesion molecules (P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). We found a dose- and time-dependent increase in radiation-induced expression of both E-selectin and ICAM-1. Furthermore, the threshold dose for E-selectin expression was 1 Gy, whereas the threshold dose for ICAM-1 synthesis was 5 Gy of X-rays. Northern blot analysis of RNA from irradiated endothelial cells demonstrated that ICAM-1 is expressed at 3-6 h following irradiation. No de novo protein synthesis was required for increased ICAM-1 mRNA expression. The 1.1-kb segment of the 5' untranslated region of the ICAM-1 gene was sufficient for X-ray induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene expression. We measured whether ICAM-1 mediates adhesion of leukocyte to the irradiated endothelium and found that leukocyte adhesion occurred concurrently with ICAM-1 induction. Radiation-mediated leukocyte adhesion was prevented by anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibodies. These data indicate that ICAM-1 participates in the inflammatory response to ionizing radiation. Moreover, radiation induction of these CAMs occurs in the absence of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 production. PMID:8912850

  3. Adhesion molecules in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S C; Banks, R E; Haidar, A; Gearing, A J; Hemingway, I K; Ibbotson, S H; Dixon, M F; Axon, A T

    1995-01-01

    The ability of leucocytes to adhere to endothelium is essential for leucocyte migration into inflammatory sites. Some of these adhesion molecules are released from the cell surface and can be detected in serum. The soluble adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), E selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) were studied in the serum of patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and healthy controls. A second blood sample was taken from patients with active disease after one month of treatment and a third two months after remission was achieved. Tissue expression of the same adhesion molecules was studied by immunohistology. Circulating VCAM-1 concentrations were significantly higher in patients with active ulcerative colitis (n = 11, median = 165 U/ml) compared with patients with inactive ulcerative colitis (n = 10, median = 117 U/ml, p < 0.005), active Crohn's disease (n = 12, median = 124 U/ml, p < 0.02), and controls (n = 90, median = 50 U/ml, p < 0.0001). Within each disease group there were no significant differences in E selectin or ICAM-1 concentrations between the active and inactive states, however, patients with active Crohn's disease had significantly higher ICAM-1 concentrations (n = 12, median = 273 ng/ml) than controls (n = 28, median = 168, p < 0.003). VCAM-1 concentrations fell significantly from pretreatment values to remission in active ulcerative colitis (p < 0.01). In Crohn's disease there was a significant fall in ICAM-1 both during treatment (p < 0.01) and two months after remission (p < 0.02). Vascular expression of ICAM-1 occurred more often and was more intense in inflamed tissue sections from patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease than from controls. Vascular labelling with antibody to E selectin also occurred more often in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. In conclusion, increased circulating concentrations of selected adhesion molecules are associated with

  4. Optimizing Scale Adhesion on Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    To improve scale adhesion, single crystal superalloys have been desulfurized to levels below 1 ppmw by hydrogen annealing. A transition to fully adherent behavior has been shown to occur at a sulfur level of about 0.2 ppmw, as demonstrated for PWA 1480, PWA 1484, and Rene N5 single crystal superalloys in 1100-1150 C cyclic oxidation tests up to 2000 h. Small additions of yttrium (15 ppmw) also have been effective in producing adhesion for sulfur contents of about 5 ppmw. Thus the critical Y/S ratio required for adhesion was on the order of 3-to-1 by weight (1-to-1 atomic), in agreement with values estimated from solubility products for yttrium sulfides. While hydrogen annealing greatly improved an undoped alloy, yielding <= 0.01 ppmw S, it also produced benefits for Y-doped alloys without measurably reducing the sulfur content.

  5. Design guidelines for use of adhesives and organic coatings in hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, S. V.; Licari, J. J.; Perkins, K. L.; Schramm, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the reliability of organic adhesives in hybrid microcircuits. The objectives were twofold: (1) to identify and investigate problem areas that could result from the use of organic adhesives and (2) to develop evaluation tests to quantify the extent to which these problems occur for commercially available adhesives. Efforts were focused on electrically conductive adhesives. Also, a study was made to evaluate selected organic coatings for contamination protection for hybrid microcircuits.

  6. Flexibilized copolyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Two copolyimides, LARC-STPI and STPI-LARC-2, with flexible backbones were processed and characterized as adhesives. The processability and adhesive properties were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the three polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to water-boil and to thermal aging at 204 C for up to 1000 hours. The three adhesive systems possess exceptional lap shear strengths at room temperature and elevated temperatures both before and after thermal exposure. LARC-STPI, because of its high glass transition temperature provided high lap shear strengths up to 260 C. After water-boil, LARC-TPI exhibited the highest lap shear strengths at room temperature and 177 C, whereas the LARC-STPI retained a higher percentage of its original strength when tested at 204 C. These flexible thermoplastic copolyimides show considerable potential as adhesives based on this study and because of the ease of preparation with low cost, commercially available materials.

  7. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  8. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  9. Bacterial Adhesion at Synthetic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, D.; Smart, C. A.; Alexander, C.; Vulfson, E. N.

    1999-01-01

    A systematic investigation into the effect of surface chemistry on bacterial adhesion was carried out. In particular, a number of physicochemical factors important in defining the surface at the molecular level were assessed for their effect on the adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. The primary experiments involved the grafting of groups varying in hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, chain length, and chemical functionality onto glass substrates such that the surfaces were homogeneous and densely packed with functional groups. All of the surfaces were found to be chemically well defined, and their measured surface energies varied from 15 to 41 mJ · m−2. Protein adsorption experiments were performed with 3H-labelled bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c prior to bacterial attachment studies. Hydrophilic uncharged surfaces showed the greatest resistance to protein adsorption; however, our studies also showed that the effectiveness of poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO) polymers was not simply a result of its hydrophilicity and molecular weight alone. The adsorption of the two proteins approximately correlated with short-term cell adhesion, and bacterial attachment for L. monocytogenes and E. coli also correlated with the chemistry of the underlying substrate. However, for S. aureus and S. typhimurium a different pattern of attachment occurred, suggesting a dissimilar mechanism of cell attachment, although high-molecular-weight PEO was still the least-cell-adsorbing surface. The implications of this for in vivo attachment of cells suggest that hydrophilic passivating groups may be the best method for preventing cell adsorption to synthetic substrates provided they can be grafted uniformly and in sufficient density at the surface. PMID:10543814

  10. Thermodynamics of capillary adhesion between rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M P; de Boer, P C T

    2007-07-01

    According to the Dupré equation, the work of adhesion is equal to the surface energy difference in the separated versus the joined materials minus an interfacial energy term. However, if a liquid is at the interface between two solid materials, evaporation or condensation takes place under equilibrium conditions. The resulting matter exchange is accompanied by heat flow, and can reduce or increase the work of adhesion. Accounting for the energies requires an open-system control volume analysis based on the first law of thermodynamics. Depending on whether evaporation or condensation occurs during separation, a work term that is negative or positive must be added to the surface energy term to calculate the work of adhesion. We develop and apply this energy balance to several different interface geometries and compare the work of adhesion to the surface energy created. The model geometries include a sphere on a flat with limiting approximations and also with an exact solution, a circular disc, and a combination of these representing a rough interface. For the sphere on a flat, the work of adhesion is one half the surface energy created if equilibrium is maintained during the pull-off process. PMID:17368659

  11. Characterizing cell adhesion by using micropipette aspiration.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brenna; Babataheri, Avin; Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I; Husson, Julien

    2015-07-21

    We have developed a technique to directly quantify cell-substrate adhesion force using micropipette aspiration. The micropipette is positioned perpendicular to the surface of an adherent cell and a constant-rate aspiration pressure is applied. Since the micropipette diameter and the aspiration pressure are our control parameters, we have direct knowledge of the aspiration force, whereas the cell behavior is monitored either in brightfield or interference reflection microscopy. This setup thus allows us to explore a range of geometric parameters, such as projected cell area, adhesion area, or pipette size, as well as dynamical parameters such as the loading rate. We find that cell detachment is a well-defined event occurring at a critical aspiration pressure, and that the detachment force scales with the cell adhesion area (for a given micropipette diameter and loading rate), which defines a critical stress. Taking into account the cell adhesion area, intrinsic parameters of the adhesion bonds, and the loading rate, a minimal model provides an expression for the critical stress that helps rationalize our experimental results. PMID:26200857

  12. Characterizing Cell Adhesion by Using Micropipette Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brenna; Babataheri, Avin; Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I.; Husson, Julien

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a technique to directly quantify cell-substrate adhesion force using micropipette aspiration. The micropipette is positioned perpendicular to the surface of an adherent cell and a constant-rate aspiration pressure is applied. Since the micropipette diameter and the aspiration pressure are our control parameters, we have direct knowledge of the aspiration force, whereas the cell behavior is monitored either in brightfield or interference reflection microscopy. This setup thus allows us to explore a range of geometric parameters, such as projected cell area, adhesion area, or pipette size, as well as dynamical parameters such as the loading rate. We find that cell detachment is a well-defined event occurring at a critical aspiration pressure, and that the detachment force scales with the cell adhesion area (for a given micropipette diameter and loading rate), which defines a critical stress. Taking into account the cell adhesion area, intrinsic parameters of the adhesion bonds, and the loading rate, a minimal model provides an expression for the critical stress that helps rationalize our experimental results. PMID:26200857

  13. Protein mediated membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    Adhesion in the context of mechanical attachment, signaling, and movement in cellular dynamics is mediated by the kinetic interactions between membrane-embedded proteins in an aqueous environment. Here, we present a minimal theoretical framework for the dynamics of membrane adhesion that accounts for the kinetics of protein binding, the elastic deformation of the membrane, and the hydrodynamics of squeeze flow in the membrane gap. We analyze the resulting equations using scaling estimates to characterize the spatiotemporal features of the adhesive patterning and corroborate them using numerical simulations. In addition to characterizing aspects of cellular dynamics, our results might also be applicable to a range of phenomena in physical chemistry and materials science where flow, deformation, and kinetics are coupled to each other in slender geometries.

  14. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  15. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  16. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  17. Timer cover adhesive optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Carleton, J.J. II.

    1992-03-17

    The implementation of PROCODE as the data acquisition system for processing timers has required some modifications to the method of identifying timer assemblies. PROCODE requires machine-readable labelling of the assemblies. This report describes a series of experiments to find an adhesive that would keep labels attached to timers regardless of the condition of their surface when the label was applied and regardless of the heat, vibration, and shock they endured afterwards. The effect of the variation of these experimental factors on the performance of the adhesive was determined by using a Taguchi experimental design.

  18. Adhesive transfer of thin viscoelastic films.

    PubMed

    Shull, Kenneth R; Martin, Elizabeth F; Drzal, Peter L; Hersam, Mark C; Markowitz, Alison R; McSwain, Rachel L

    2005-01-01

    Micellar suspensions of acrylic diblock copolymers are excellent model materials for studying the adhesive transfer of viscoelastic solids. The micellar structure is maintained in films with a variety of thicknesses, giving films with a well-defined structure and viscoelastic character. Thin films were cast onto elastomeric silicone substrates from micellar suspensions in butanol, and the adhesive interactions between these coated elastomeric substrates and a rigid indenter were quantified. By controlling the adhesive properties of the film/indenter and film/substrate interfaces we were able to obtain very clean transfer of the film from the substrate to the portion of the glass indenter with which the film was in contact. Adhesive failure at the film/substrate interface occurs when the film/indenter interface is able to support an applied energy release rate that is sufficient to result in cavity nucleation at the film/substrate interface. Cavity formation is rapidly followed by delamination of the entire region under the indenter. The final stage in the transfer process involves the failure of the film that bridges the indenter and the elastomeric substrate. This film is remarkably robust and is extended to three times its original width prior to failure. Failure of this film occurs at the periphery of the indenter, giving a transferred film that conforms to the original contact area between the indenter and the coated substrate. PMID:15620300

  19. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  20. Computed tomography analysis of wood-adhesive bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzel, Gunter Georg Rolf

    The importance of wood bonding increased in the last decades due to the increased usage of wood composites whose performance depends to a large extent on the adhesive penetration and subsequent bonding of the adherends. The presented research used XMT (x-ray microtomography) to perform a non-destructive, three-dimensional analysis of the adhesive bondline and wood-structure of Southern yellow pine, Douglas-fir and yellow-poplar samples. A phenol-formaldehyde adhesive was used. The sodium hydroxide catalyst was replaced with rubidium hydroxide during resin formulation. This was done to improve the image contrast. The reconstructions of the wood structure of Southern yellow pine showed tracheids, rays, fusiform rays, resin canals and pits. On the Douglas-fir sample tracheids, pits and rays were displayed clearly. The yellow-poplar images showed vessels, fibers, bordered pits, scalariform sieve plates and rays. The renderings of the adhesive-bondline of Southern yellow pine proved the dominant role of tracheids for the adhesive flow and showed rays as a secondary pathway of adhesive flow. The results revealed no adhesive flow occured through bordered pits, while simple pits permitted some adhesive flow through ray parenchyma. The results for Douglas-fir showed a similar result; the tracheids were the predominant path of adhesive penetration, while rays played a secondary role and no adhesive flow through the pit aperture was visible. The adhesive flow through the microstructure of yellow-poplar wood occured mainly through vessels and also through rays, but no adhesive flow through the pits was directly observed. The segmentation of the images in three phases: void space, cell wall substance and adhesive, enabled the calculation of the effective bondline thickness based on the adhesive, as well as the volumetric measurement of all three elements and their share on the sample volume. Subsequent experiments showed that the exposure of the Southern yellow pine and yellow

  1. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  2. Adept Adhesion Reduction Solution

    MedlinePlus

    ... icodextrin. The fluid is used during or after laparoscopic gynecological surgery to separate and protect tissues and decrease the number of new adhesions after surgery. Adept® is supplied sterile, in a single-use bag. How does it work? During surgery, ...

  3. Adhesion molecules and receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesion molecules are necessary for leukocyte trafficking and differentiation. They serve to initiate cell-cell interactions under conditions of shear, and they sustain the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions needed for cellular locomotion. They also can serve directly as signaling molecules act...

  4. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  5. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  6. Adhesion testing of aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobo, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesion testing appeared to offer a less burdensome alternative to replace some of the dynamometer tests. Accordingly, test results and data were requested from retreaders who had used adhesion testing.

  7. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  8. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  9. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service. [supersonic cruise aircraft research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different Ti-6Al-4V surface treatments were investigated for each of 10 candidate resins. Primers (two for each resin) were studied for appropriate cure and thickness and initial evaluation of bond joints began using various combinations of the adhesive resins and surface treatments. Surface failure areas of bonded titanium coupons were analyzed by electron microscopy and surface chemical analysis techniques. Results of surface characterization and failure analysis are described for lap shear bond joints occurring with adhesive systems consisting of: (1) LARC-13 adhesive, Pasa jell surface treatment; (2) LARC-13 adhesive, 10 volt CAA treatment; (3) PPQ adhesive, 10 volt CAA treatment; and (4) PPQ adhesive, 5 volt CAA treatment. The failure analysis concentrated on the 10,000 hr 505K (450 F) exposed specimens which exhibited adhesive failure. Environmental exposure data being generated on the PPQ-10 volt CAA and the LARC-TPI-10 volt CAA adhesive systems is included.

  10. Adhesion of Cellulolytic Ruminal Bacteria to Barley Straw

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Siva; Wallace, R. J.; Ørskov, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesion of the cellulolytic ruminal bacteria Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Fibrobacter succinogenes to barley straw was measured by incubating bacterial suspensions with hammer-milled straw for 30 min, filtering the mixtures through sintered glass filters, and measuring the optical densities of the filtrates. Maximum adhesion of both species occurred at pH 6.0 and during mid- to late-exponential phase. Adhesion was saturable at 33 and 23 mg (dry weight) g of straw−1 for R. flavefaciens and F. succinogenes, respectively. Methyl cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose inhibited adhesion by 24 to 33%. Competition between species was determined by measuring characteristic cell-associated enzyme activities in filtrates of mixtures incubated with straw; p-nitrophenyl-β-d-lactopyranoside hydrolysis was used as a marker for F. succinogenes, while either β-xylosidase or carboxymethyl cellulase was used for R. flavefaciens, depending on the other species present. R. flavefaciens had no influence on F. succinogenes adhesion, and F. succinogenes had only a minor (<20%) effect on R. flavefaciens adhesion. The noncellulolytic ruminal bacteria Bacteroides ruminicola and Selenomonas ruminantium had no influence on adhesion of either cellulolytic species, although these organisms also adhered to the straw. We concluded that R. flavefaciens and F. succinogenes have separate, specific adhesion sites on barley straw that are not obscured by competition with non-cellulolytic species. PMID:16348278

  11. Labial adhesion in children at the Jos University Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Ephraim; Ocheke, Amaka Ngozi; Samuels, Nathaniel E. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Labial adhesion is one of the most common reasons for gynaecologic consultations in children. We sought to determine the prevalence of labial adhesions, mode of presentation and treatment in children at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of labial adhesions in children from January 2004 to December 2013. Data on paediatric gynaecological consultations, and labial adhesions were retrieved from the gynaecological clinic and the theatre records. The case notes of those with labial adhesions were retrieved and the relevant data extracted. Results: The total number of paediatric patients seen at the gynaecology clinic over the study period was 379 and 25 had labial adhesion (6.6%). The majority (88%) presented in the first 2 years of life, all the patients were asymptomatic, and 2 (8%) had surgical separation of the adhesions while the rest were managed conservatively. A total of 5 (20%) came for follow-up. While 2 (8%) came a week later following surgical management, 3 (12%) came back more than 6 months later due to recurrence following conservative management. Conclusion: Labial adhesions account for significant proportion of paediatric gynaecologic consultations. They are usually asymptomatic, occur in the first 2 years of life and frequently managed conservatively. PMID:27251516

  12. Focal Adhesion Kinase-Dependent Regulation of Adhesive Force Involves Vinculin Recruitment to Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Steven K.; García, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    Background information Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an essential non-receptor tyrosine kinase, plays pivotal roles in migratory responses, adhesive signaling, and mechanotransduction. FAK-dependent regulation of cell migration involves focal adhesion turnover dynamics as well as actin cytoskeleton polymerization and lamellipodia protrusion. Whereas roles for FAK in migratory and mechanosensing responses have been established, the contributions of FAK to the generation of adhesive forces are not well understood. Results Using FAK-null cells expressing wild-type and mutant FAK under an inducible tetracycline promoter, we analyzed the role of FAK in the generation of steady-state adhesive forces using micropatterned substrates and a hydrodynamic adhesion assay. FAK expression reduced steady-state strength by 30% compared to FAK-null cells. FAK expression reduced vinculin localization to focal adhesions by 35% independently from changes in integrin binding and localization of talin and paxillin. RNAi knockdown of vinculin abrogated the FAK-dependent differences in adhesive force. FAK-dependent changes in vinculin localization and adhesive force were confirmed in human primary fibroblasts with FAK knocked down by RNAi. The autophosphorylation Y397 and kinase domain Y576/Y577 sites were differentially required for FAK-mediated adhesive responses. Conclusions We demonstrate that FAK reduces steady-state adhesion strength by modulating vinculin recruitment to focal adhesions. These findings provide insights into the role of FAK in mechanical interactions between a cell and the extracellular matrix. PMID:19883375

  13. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:24575424

  14. Environmentally compliant adhesive joining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Adhesive joining offers one method of assembling products. Advantages of adhesive joining/assembly include distribution of applied forces, lighter weight, appealing appearance, etc. Selecting environmentally safe adhesive materials and accompanying processes is paramount in today`s business climate if a company wants to be environmentally conscious and stay in business. Four areas of adhesive joining (adhesive formulation and selection, surface preparation, adhesive bonding process, waste and pollution generation/cleanup/management) all need to be carefully evaluated before adhesive joining is selected for commercial as well as military products. Designing for six sigma quality must also be addressed in today`s global economy. This requires material suppliers and product manufacturers to work even closer together.

  15. Avalanche in adhesion. [interfacial separation between two Ni crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John R.; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    Consider surfaces being brought into contact. It is proposed that atomic layers can collapse or avalanche together when the interfacial spacing falls below a critical distance. This causes a discontinuous drop in the adhesive binding energy. Avalanche can occur regardless of the stiffness of external supports. A simple understanding of the origin of this phenomenon is provided. A numerical calculation has been carried out for adhesion in Ni. A new wear mechanism due to avalanche is suggested.

  16. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  17. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  18. Adhesion of D. discoideum on Hydrophobic Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Ploscariu, Nicoleta

    2015-03-01

    Adhesion by amoeboid cells, such as D. discoideum, is poorly understood but critical for other behaviors such as phagocytosis and migration. Furthermore, both leucocytes and breast cancer cells employ the amoeboid mode of movement at various points in their life-cycles. Hence, improved knowledge of amoeboid adhesion may lead to be new strategies for controlling other important cellular processes. This study regards adhesion by D. discoideum on silanized glass substrates. Reflection interference contrast microscopy is used in conjunction with other methods to determine the contact angle, cell-medium interfacial energy, and adhesion energy of these cells. The contact angle of individual cells settling under gravity onto a substrate is observed to increase as the size of the contact patch increases. This behavior occurs on slower time-scales than expected for the settling of inert vesicles. The implications of this observation on the nature of the underlying forces will be discussed. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-646966.

  19. Adhesion and Thin-Film Module Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; Jorgenson, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Among the infrequently measured but essential properties for thin-film (T-F) module reliability are the interlayer adhesion and cohesion within a layer. These can be cell contact layers to glass, contact layers to the semiconductor, encapsulant to cell, glass, or backsheet, etc. We use an Instron mechanical testing unit to measure peel strengths at 90deg or 180deg and, in some cases, a scratch and tape pull test to evaluate inter-cell layer adhesion strengths. We present peel strength data for test specimens laminated from the three T-F technologies, before and after damp heat, and in one instance at elevated temperatures. On laminated T-F cell samples, failure can occur uniformly at any one of the many interfaces, or non-uniformly across the peel area at more than one interface. Some peel strengths are Lt1 N/mm. This is far below the normal ethylene vinyl acetate/glass interface values of >10 N/mm. We measure a wide range of adhesion strengths and suggest that adhesion measured under higher temperature and relative humidity conditions is more relevant for module reliability.

  20. Development of Screenable Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2003-11-29

    An industrial research area of high activity in recent years has been the development of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) products that do not interfere with the processing of post-consumer waste. The problem of PSA contamination is arguably the most important technical challenge in expanding the use of recycled fiber. The presence of PSAs in recovered paper creates problems that reduce the efficiency of recycling and papermaking operations and diminish product quality. The widespread use of PSAs engineered to avoid these problems, often referred to as environmentally benign PSAs, could greatly increase the commercial viability of utilizing secondary fiber. Much of the research efforts in this area have focused on the development of PSAs that are designed for enhanced removal with cleaning equipment currently utilized by recycling plants. Most removal occurs at the pressure screens with the size and shape of residual contaminants in the process being the primary criteria for their separation. A viable approach for developing environmentally benign PSAs is their reformulation to inhibit fragmentation. The reduction of adhesives to small particles occurs almost exclusively during repulping; a process in which water and mechanical energy are used to swell and reduce paper products to their constituent fiber. Engineering PSA products to promote the formation of larger adhesive particles during repulping will greatly enhance their removal and reduce or eliminate their impact on the recycling process.

  1. The Role of Glottal Surface Adhesion on Vocal Folds Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is a very thin mucus layer and covers the vocal fold (VF) surface. Adhesion mediated by the ASL occurs during phonation as the VFs separate after collision. Such adhesion is hypothesized to determine voice quality and health. However, biomechanical insights into the adhesive processes during VF oscillation are lacking. Here, a computational study is reported on self-sustained VF vibration involving contact and adhesion. The VF structural model and the glottal airflow are considered fully three-dimensional. The mechanical behavior of the ASL is described through a constitutive traction–separation law where mucosal cohesive strength, cohesive energy and rupture length enter. Cohesive energy values considered are bound below by the cohesive energy of water at standard temperature and pressure. Cohesive strength values considered are bound above by prior reported data on the adhesive strength of mucosal surface of rat small intestine. This model introduces a mechanical length scale into the analysis. The sensitivity of various aspects of VF dynamics such as flow-declination rate, VF separation under adhesive condition and formation of multiple local fluid bridges is determined in relation to specific ASL adhesive properties. It is found that for the ASL considered here, the characteristics of the VF separation process are of debond type. Instabilities lead to the breakup of the bond area into several smaller bond patches. Such finding is consistent with in-vivo observations. PMID:25034504

  2. JKR adhesion in cylindrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Narayan; Farris, T. N.; Chandrasekar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Planar JKR adhesive solutions use the half-plane assumption and do not permit calculation of indenter approach or visualization of adhesive force-displacement curves unless the contact is periodic. By considering a conforming cylindrical contact and using an arc crack analogy, we obtain closed-form indenter approach and load-contact size relations for a planar adhesive problem. The contact pressure distribution is also obtained in closed-form. The solutions reduce to known cases in both the adhesion-free and small-contact solution ( Barquins, 1988) limits. The cylindrical system shows two distinct regimes of adhesive behavior; in particular, contact sizes exceeding the critical (maximum) size seen in adhesionless contacts are possible. The effects of contact confinement on adhesive behavior are investigated. Some special cases are considered, including contact with an initial neat-fit and the detachment of a rubbery cylinder from a rigid cradle. A comparison of the cylindrical solution with the half-plane adhesive solution is carried out, and it indicates that the latter typically underestimates the adherence force. The cylindrical adhesive system is novel in that it possesses stable contact states that may not be attained even on applying an infinite load in the absence of adhesion.

  3. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  4. Characterization of mode I and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  5. Characterization of mode 1 and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  6. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2015-06-24

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m{sup −2} and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface.

  7. Stickiness--some fundamentals of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cyprien

    2002-12-01

    We review some adhesion mechanisms that have been understood in the field of synthetic adhesives, and more precisely for adhesives that adhere instantaneously (a property named tackiness) and whose adhesive strength usually depends on the applied pressure (pressure-sensitive adhesives). The discussion includes effects of surface roughness, elasticity, cavitation, viscous and elastic fingering, substrate flexibility. PMID:21680396

  8. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate. PMID:26167951

  9. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  10. Arachnids Secrete a Fluid over Their Adhesive Pads

    PubMed Central

    Peattie, Anne M.; Dirks, Jan-Henning; Henriques, Sérgio; Federle, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background Many arachnids possess adhesive pads on their feet that help them climb smooth surfaces and capture prey. Spider and gecko adhesives have converged on a branched, hairy structure, which theoretically allows them to adhere solely by dry (solid-solid) intermolecular interactions. Indeed, the consensus in the literature is that spiders and their smooth-padded relatives, the solifugids, adhere without the aid of a secretion. Methodology and Principal Findings We investigated the adhesive contact zone of living spiders, solifugids and mites using interference reflection microscopy, which allows the detection of thin liquid films. Like insects, all the arachnids we studied left behind hydrophobic fluid footprints on glass (mean refractive index: 1.48–1.50; contact angle: 3.7–11.2°). Fluid was not always secreted continuously, suggesting that pads can function in both wet and dry modes. We measured the attachment forces of single adhesive setae from tarantulas (Grammostola rosea) by attaching them to a bending beam with a known spring constant and filming the resulting deflection. Individual spider setae showed a lower static friction at rest (26%±2.8 SE of the peak friction) than single gecko setae (Thecadactylus rapicauda; 96%±1.7 SE). This may be explained by the fact that spider setae continued to release fluid after isolation from the animal, lubricating the contact zone. Significance This finding implies that tarsal secretions occur within all major groups of terrestrial arthropods with adhesive pads. The presence of liquid in an adhesive contact zone has important consequences for attachment performance, improving adhesion to rough surfaces and introducing rate-dependent effects. Our results leave geckos and anoles as the only known representatives of truly dry adhesive pads in nature. Engineers seeking biological inspiration for synthetic adhesives should consider whether model species with fluid secretions are appropriate to their design goals

  11. CADM1 Controls Actin Cytoskeleton Assembly and Regulates Extracellular Matrix Adhesion in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moiseeva, Elena P.; Straatman, Kees R.; Leyland, Mark L.; Bradding, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs) to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion. PMID:24465823

  12. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  13. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  14. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  15. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  19. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Three Self-etching Adhesives: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yadala, Chandrashekhar; Gaddam, Rajkumar; Arya, Siddarth; Baburamreddy, K V; Raju, V Ramakrishnam; Varma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine and compare the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with Adper Promt self-etching adhesive (3M ESPE), Xeno III self-etching adhesive (DENSPLY), Transbond plus self-etching adhesive (3M) with that of conversional bonding procedure, and to calculate the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Materials and Methods: Totally, 60 maxillary premolar teeth were collected, and divided into Group I (Blue): Transbond™ XT primer, Group II (Purple): Adper™ Prompt™ self-etching adhesive, Group III (Orange): Xeno III® self-etching adhesive, Group IV (Pink): Tranbond™ Plus self-etching adhesive. Results: The results of the study showed there was no statistical significance in the shear bond strength according to an analysis of variance (P = 0.207) of the four groups. The mean shear bond strength of Groups I, II, III, IV were 14.56 ± 2.97 Megapascals (MPa), 12.62 ± 2.48 MPa, 13.27 ± 3.16, and 12.64 ± 2.56, respectively. Chi-square comparison for the ARI indicated that there was a significant difference (P = 0.003) between the groups. Conclusion: All the four self-etching adhesives showed clinically acceptable mean shear bond strength. The ARI score showed a self-etching adhesive the debonding occurred more within the adhesive interface leaving less composite adhesive on the tooth surface making it easy to clean up. PMID:26229371

  20. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  1. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  2. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  3. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  4. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  5. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    PubMed

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1994-04-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rests, interocclusal clearance and cingulum stops is equally important. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. The retention does not depend on one single factor, but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 80% can be obtained. PMID:11830965

  6. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  7. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications. PMID:25841348

  8. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  9. Superhydrophobic nanocomposite surface topography and ice adhesion.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander; Yeong, Yong Han; Steele, Adam; Bayer, Ilker S; Loth, Eric

    2014-06-25

    A method to reduce the surface roughness of a spray-casted polyurethane/silica/fluoroacrylic superhydrophobic nanocomposite coating was demonstrated. By changing the main slurry carrier fluid, fluoropolymer medium, surface pretreatment, and spray parameters, we achieved arithmetic surface roughness values of 8.7, 2.7, and 1.6 μm on three test surfaces. The three surfaces displayed superhydrophobic performance with modest variations in skewness and kurtosis. The arithmetic roughness level of 1.6 μm is the smoothest superhydrophobic surface yet produced with these spray-based techniques. These three nanocomposite surfaces, along with a polished aluminum surface, were impacted with a supercooled water spray in icing conditions, and after ice accretion occurred, each was subjected to a pressurized tensile test to measure ice-adhesion. All three superhydrophobic surfaces showed lower ice adhesion than that of the polished aluminum surface. Interestingly, the intermediate roughness surface yielded the best performance, which suggests that high kurtosis and shorter autocorrelation lengths improve performance. The most ice-phobic nanocomposite showed a 60% reduction in ice-adhesion strength when compared to polished aluminum. PMID:24914617

  10. Use of cyanoacrylate adhesives in general surgery.

    PubMed

    García Cerdá, David; Ballester, Antonio Martín; Aliena-Valero, Alicia; Carabén-Redaño, Anna; Lloris, José M

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a review of the use of cyanoacrylate adhesives (CA) in general surgery and digestive surgery, studies the mechanisms of action and interactions of CAs in adherent tissues, and compiles data on the latest experimental and clinical applications. More than seven million traumatic injuries are estimated to occur every year, and between 26 and 90 million surgical procedures using different techniques are performed to close the resulting wounds. Traditional methods not only are both useful and effective, but also have some drawbacks. This review covers a considerable number of surgical procedures for which CAs had satisfactory results. The adhesive facilitated the healing of very diverse tissues, such as solid organs, vascular tissue or the abdominal wall. In other cases, no significant differences were found when CA was compared to traditional methods, with the adhesive standing out as a simple and reliable solution. The number of procedures in which CA was detrimental was very low. This review also collects and describes these. In conclusion, the surgical fields and procedures in which CA was successfully used are highly diverse. This review will allow physicians to determine which techniques were first used experimentally, but finally settled in clinical practice as feasible alternatives to standard treatments. PMID:25344231

  11. Bacterial Adhesion: Seen Any Good Biofilms Lately?

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, W. Michael

    2002-01-01

    The process of surface adhesion and biofilm development is a survival strategy employed by virtually all bacteria and refined over millions of years. This process is designed to anchor microorganisms in a nutritionally advantageous environment and to permit their escape to greener pastures when essential growth factors have been exhausted. Bacterial attachment to a surface can be divided into several distinct phases, including primary and reversible adhesion, secondary and irreversible adhesion, and biofilm formation. Each of these phases is ultimately controlled by the expression of one or more gene products. Ultrastructurally, the mature bacterial biofilm resembles an underwater coral reef containing pyramidal or mushroom-shaped microcolonies of organisms embedded within an extracellular glycocalyx, with channels and cavities to allow the exchange of nutrients and waste. The biofilm protects its inhabitants from predators, dehydration, biocides, and other environmental extremes while regulating population growth and diversity through primitive cell signals. From a physiological standpoint, surface-bound bacteria behave quite differently from their planktonic counterparts. Recognizing that bacteria naturally occur as surface-bound and often polymicrobic communities, the practice of performing antimicrobial susceptibility tests using pure cultures and in a planktonic growth mode should be questioned. That this model does not reflect conditions found in nature might help explain the difficulties encountered in the management and treatment of biomedical implant infections. PMID:11932228

  12. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  13. Fatigue crack propagation at polymer adhesive interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Delamination of polymer adhesive interfaces often occurs due to slow crack growth under either monotonic or cyclic loading. The author`s previous research showed that moisture-assisted crack growth at epoxy/glass and epoxy acrylate/glass interfaces under monotonic loading was directly related to the applied energy release rate and relative humidity and that cyclic loading could enhance crack growth. The purpose of the present research is to compare crack growth along epoxy acrylate/glass and epoxy/PMMA interfaces under monotonic and cyclic loading.

  14. Detecting change as it occurs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radok, Uwe; Brown, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally climate changes have been detected from long series of observations and long after they have happened. Our 'inverse sequential' procedure, for detecting change as soon as it occurs, describes the existing or most recent data by their frequency distribution. Its parameter(s) are estimated both from the existing set of observations and from the same set augmented by 1,2,....j new observations. Individual-value probability products ('likelihoods') are used to form ratios which yield two probabilities for erroneously accepting the existing parameter(s) as valid for the augmented data set, and vice versa. A genuine parameter change is signaled when these probabilities (or a more stable compound probability) show a progressive decrease. New parameter values can then be estimated from the new observations alone using standard statistical techniques. The inverse sequential procedure will be illustrated for global annual mean temperatures (assumed normally distributed), and for annual numbers of North Atlantic hurricanes (assumed to represent Poisson distributions). The procedure was developed, but not yet tested, for linear or exponential trends, and for chi-squared means or degrees of freedom, a special measure of autocorrelation.

  15. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  16. Plasticizers Increase Adhesion of the Deteriogenic Fungus Aureobasidium pullulans to Polyvinyl Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jeremy S.; Van der Mei, Henny C.; Nixon, Marianne; Eastwood, Ian M.; Greenhalgh, Malcolm; Read, Simon J.; Robson, Geoffrey D.; Handley, Pauline S.

    1999-01-01

    Initial adhesion of fungi to plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) may determine subsequent colonization and biodeterioration processes. The deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans was used to investigate the physicochemical nature of adhesion to both unplasticized PVC (uPVC) and pPVC containing the plasticizers dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and dioctyl adipate (DOA). A quantitative adhesion assay using image analysis identified fundamental differences in the mechanism of adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to these substrata. Adhesion to pPVC was greater than that to uPVC by a maximum of 280% after a 4-h incubation with 108 blastospores ml−1. That plasticizers enhance adhesion to PVC was confirmed by incorporating a dispersion of both DOA and DOP into the blastospore suspension. Adhesion to uPVC was increased by up to 308% in the presence of the dispersed plasticizers. Hydrophobic interactions were found to dominate adhesion to uPVC because (i) a strong positive correlation was observed between substratum hydrophobicity (measured by using a dynamic contact angle analyzer) and adhesion to a range of unplasticized polymers including uPVC, and (ii) neither the pH nor the electrolyte concentration of the suspension buffer, both of which influence electrostatic interactions, affected adhesion to uPVC. In contrast, adhesion to pPVC is principally controlled by electrostatic interactions. Enhanced adhesion to pPVC occurred despite a relative reduction of 13° in the water contact angle of pPVC compared to that of uPVC. Furthermore, adhesion to pPVC was strongly dependent on both the pH and electrolyte concentration of the suspension medium, reaching maximum levels at pH 8 and with an electrolyte concentration of 10 mM NaCl. Plasticization with DOP and DOA therefore increases adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to pPVC through an interaction mediated by electrostatic forces. PMID:10427051

  17. Determining graphene adhesion via substrate-regulated morphology of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Li, Teng

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the adhesion between graphene and other materials is crucial for achieving more reliable graphene-based applications in electronic devices and nanocomposites. The ultra-thin profile of graphene, however, poses a significant challenge to direct measurement of its adhesion property using conventional approaches. We show that there is a strong correlation between the morphology of graphene on a compliant substrate with patterned surface and the graphene-substrate adhesion. We establish an analytic model to quantitatively determine such a strong correlation. Results show that, depending on the graphene-substrate adhesion, number of graphene layers, and substrate stiffness, graphene exhibits two distinct types of morphology: (I) graphene remains bonded to the substrate and corrugates to an amplitude up to that of the substrate surface patterns; (II) graphene debonds from the substrate and remains flat on top of the substrate surface patterns. The sharp transition between these two types of graphene morphology occurs at a critical adhesion between the graphene and the compliant substrate material. These results potentially open up a feasible pathway to measuring the adhesion property of graphene.

  18. Electrostatic adhesion of multiple non-uniformly charged dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, B. A.; Whitney, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle adhesion measurements can be as much as one order of magnitude higher than theoretical calculations. This discrepancy has ignited a debate as to the nature of the physics occurring with microscopic particle adhesion. Attempts to bring calculations closer to measured results have produced models that include multiple particle interactions, dielectric polarization, and non-uniform charge. Individually, each of these models can only produce a 2× to 5× enhancement in predicted adhesion force over simple Coulombic attraction. In this correspondence, an analytical model of electrostatic particle forces is developed, which allows for independent assignment of dielectric constant and non-uniform surface charge distribution to an arbitrary number of particles. Because the model can include an image plane, it is ideal for electrostatic adhesion calculations. Application to a monolayer of printed toner particles predicts nearly an order of magnitude increase in adhesion force over Coulombic attraction. These results are the first analytical results to place predictions of charged particle adhesion on the same order of magnitude with measurements.

  19. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  20. Adhesive Performance of Biomimetic Adhesive-Coated Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John L.; Vollenweider, Laura; Xu, Fangmin; Lee, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical repair of a discontinuity in traumatized or degenerated soft tissues is traditionally accomplished using sutures. A current trend is to reinforce this primary repair with surgical grafts, meshes, or patches secured with perforating mechanical devices (i.e., sutures, staples, or tacks). These fixation methods frequently lead to chronic pain and mesh detachment. We developed a series of biodegradable adhesive polymers that are synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), composed of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-derivatives, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polycaprolactone (PCL). These polymers can be cast into films, and their mechanical properties, extent of swelling, and degradation rate can be tailored through the composition of the polymers as well as blending with additives. When coated onto a biologic mesh used for hernia repair, these adhesive constructs demonstrated adhesive strengths significantly higher than fibrin glue. With further development, a pre-coated bioadhesive mesh may represent a new surgical option for soft tissue repair. PMID:20919699

  1. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  2. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  3. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  4. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  5. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  6. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  7. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  8. Wear mechanism based on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Various concepts concerning wear mechanisms and deformation behavior observed in the sliding wear track are surveyed. The mechanisms for wear fragment formation is discussed on the basis of adhesion. The wear process under unlubricated sliding conditions is explained in relation to the concept of adhesion at the interface during the sliding process. The mechanism for tearing away the surface layer from the contact area and forming the sliding track contour is explained by assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory.

  9. Advances in light curing adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Andy

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a new family of light curing adhesives containing a new reactive additive previously not used in optical grade light curing adhesives are obtained with the addition of functionalized cellulositics. Outgassing as low as 10-6 grams/gram has been observed based on headspace sampling. Other additives have lowered the shrinkage rates of positioning adhesives from near 1 percent to less than 0.1 percent with fractional, percentage movements over thermal range of -40 degrees C to +200 degrees C.

  10. Drug release and adhesive properties of crospovidone-containing matrix patches based on polyisobutene and acrylic adhesives.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Martin; Fussnegger, Bernhard; Bodmeier, Roland

    2010-12-23

    Ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel were insoluble in blends of high:medium:low molecular weight polyisobutene adhesives (ratio: 1:5:0, 1:5:2 and 1:5:4) but soluble in acrylic adhesives (Durotak 87-202A, Durotak 87-2074 and Durotak 87-2677). The incorporation of drug adsorbates onto crospovidone into the polyisobutene blends yielded crystal-free patches. The drug release from these patches was independent of polyisobutene's molecular weight distribution, probably because the drug release occurred mainly through fluid filled channels. By contrast, the drug release from acrylic adhesives was independent of whether the patches contained pure drugs or drug adsorbates onto crospovidone. A higher degree of saturation (or supersaturation) in these systems resulted in a higher thermodynamic activity of the drugs and hence a higher drug release. The crystal-free acrylic and polyisobutene patches did not show drug recrystallization after 3 months at 25°C/60 RH and 40°C/75 RH. The adhesive properties of polyisobutene patches were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The area under the curve of force-distance curves recorded with the texture analyzer correlated well with the in vivo skin adhesion. The elongation at detachment showed the same trend as the in vivo matrix creep. Crospovidone contents ≤ 30% had no detrimental effect on the adhesive properties of the patches. PMID:20883778

  11. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    PubMed

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1990-01-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. To ensure an adequate retention over a number of years different factors have to be considered. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin (Panavia Ex) are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rets, interocclusal clearance of 0.4 mm and cingulum stops is equally important. Care should be taken not to remove all the enamel in the cervical region in preparing a mini chamfer. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Teeth with a different mobility should not be included in the same bridge. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. Only an exact impression, a precise model and a reliable casting technique will provide a metal frame with an optimal marginal adaptation and a close fit. The retention does not depend on one single factor but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 90% can be obtained. PMID:2077574

  12. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  13. Effect of Forming Speed on Plastic Bending of Adhesively Bonded Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Michihiro; Yoshida, Fusahito

    Using highly ductile acrylic adhesive, the present authors proposed a new technique of plastic bending of adhesively bonded sheet metals. In this process, the suppression of large transverse shear deformation occurring in the adhesive layer, which in some cases would induce the geometrical imperfection (so-called ‘gull-wing bend') and the delamination of the sheet, is one of the most important technical issues. In the present work, the effect of forming speed on bending deformation was investigated. From experimental observations in V-bending experiments of adhesively bonded aluminium sheets, as well as the corresponding numerical simulations which consider the viscoplasticity nature of the adhesive resin, it was found that the large shear deformation and ‘gull-wing bend' are successfully suppressed by high-speed forming since the deformation resistance of the adhesive resin becomes higher at a high strain rate.

  14. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kozowyk, P R B; Langejans, G H J; Poulis, J A

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  15. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  16. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2010-01-08

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  17. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2008-03-26

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  18. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  19. Retinoids induce integrin-independent lymphocyte adhesion through RAR-α nuclear receptor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jianming; Metts, Meagan E.; Nasser, Taj A.; McGoldrick, Liam J.; Bridges, Lance C.

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Transcription and translation are required for retinoid-induced lymphocyte adhesion. • RAR activation is sufficient to induced lymphocyte cell adhesion. • Vitamin D derivatives inhibit RAR-prompted lymphocyte adhesion. • Adhesion occurs through a novel binding site within ADAM disintegrin domains. • RARα is a key nuclear receptor for retinoid-dependent lymphocyte cell adhesion. - Abstract: Oxidative metabolites of vitamin A, in particular all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), have emerged as key factors in immunity by specifying the localization of immune cells to the gut. Although it is appreciated that isomers of retinoic acid activate the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) family of nuclear receptors to elicit cellular changes, the molecular details of retinoic acid action remain poorly defined in immune processes. Here we employ a battery of agonists and antagonists to delineate the specific nuclear receptors utilized by retinoids to evoke lymphocyte cell adhesion to ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) protein family members. We report that RAR agonism is sufficient to promote immune cell adhesion in both immortal and primary immune cells. Interestingly, adhesion occurs independent of integrin function, and mutant studies demonstrate that atRA-induced adhesion to ADAM members required a distinct binding interface(s) as compared to integrin recognition. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids as well as 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a vitamin D metabolite that prompts immune cell trafficking to the skin, potently inhibited the observed adhesion. Finally, our data establish that induced adhesion was specifically attributable to the RAR-α receptor isotype. The current study provides novel molecular resolution as to which nuclear receptors transduce retinoid exposure into immune cell adhesion.

  20. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  1. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  2. An adhesion barrier may induce peritonitis and abscess after laparoscopy-assisted myomectomy with vaginal extraction: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ma-Lee; Huang, Lee-Wen; Chang, Jier-Zen; Hwang, Jian-Loung; Pan, Hun-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Following a myomectomy, postoperative adhesions occur in many patients. Although laparoscopy has been shown to decrease the development of adhesions compared to laparotomy, adhesions still occur. There are several commercially available adhesion barriers but these are not designed to be easily applied during laparoscopic surgery. In this study, we report a case involving a 34-year-old patient who developed pelvic peritonitis and abscess without an obvious etiology; this might have been related to the off-label use of a bioabsorbable membrane converted into a slurry during recent surgery. Surgeons should be aware of such complications, which might be attributed to this product. PMID:19940487

  3. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings. PMID:26618537

  4. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  5. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  6. Elastocapilllarity in insect adhesion: the case of beetle adhesive hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernay, Sophie; Gilet, Tristan; Lambert, Pierre; Federle, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The feet of many insects are covered with dense arrays of hair-like structures called setae. Liquid capillary bridges at the tip of these micrometric structures are responsible for the controlled adhesion of the insect on a large variety of substrates. The resulting adhesion force can exceed several times the body weight of the insect. The high aspect-ratio of setae suggests that flexibility is a key ingredient in this capillary-based adhesion mechanism. There is indeed a strong coupling between their elastic deformation and the shape of the liquid meniscus. In this experimental work, we observe and quantify the local deflection of dock beetle seta tips under perpendicular loading using interference microscopy. Our results are then interpreted in the light of an analytic model of elastocapillarity. This research has been funded by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  7. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  8. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  9. Efficacy of New Adhesion Promoters on Compromised Hypocalcified Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Kishore Mayakuntla Sai; Aileni, Kaladhar Reddy; Sashidhar, Nagam Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The amount of technological progress occurred in the last few years has brought an add up to the benefits of bonding in Orthodontics. Research-based findings have constantly led to the development of new materials that are aimed to simplify the clinical procedures like bonding of brackets to compromised enamel surfaces. Hence, the present study is aimed to assess the bond strength of orthodontic brackets on fluorosed enamel using adhesion promoters. Aim To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded on fluorosed enamel using conventional Transbond XT and new adhesion promoters such as Enhance LC and All Bond 3. Materials and Methods The study involved 90 non carious, extracted teeth with mild to moderate fluorosis randomly divided into 3 Groups. In Group - I (control group) the teeth were bonded with conventional Transbond XT and cured with LED light. In Group - II Enhance LC was applied to fluorosed enamel before bonding and in Group - III All Bond 3 was used. Shear bond strength was tested by using Universal testing Instron machine. ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey’s tests were used to compare shear bond strength. Adhesive remnant on the tooth was assessed and scored using adhesive remnant index (ARI). Results Results showed a reduced SBS values (9.43MPa ±3.03) with conventional Transbond XT on fluorosed enamel. Among the adhesion boosters used Enhance LC illustrated lesser SBS values (12.03 MPa ± 4.42) compared with All Bond 3 (14.38MPa ±4.92). ARI showed bond failure at bracket resin interface in group I & group II and at enamel resin interface in group III although statistically insignificant. Conclusion It was concluded that using adhesion boosters on fluorosed enamel showed higher bond strength compared to the control group. Among the two adhesion promoters used All Bond 3 expressed highest bond strength compared to Enhance LC although statistically insignificant. PMID:26393196

  10. High performance Cu adhesion coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.W.; Viehbeck, A.; Chen, W.R.; Ree, M.

    1996-12-31

    Poly(arylene ether benzimidazole) (PAEBI) is a high performance thermoplastic polymer with imidazole functional groups forming the polymer backbone structure. It is proposed that upon coating PAEBI onto a copper surface the imidazole groups of PAEBI form a bond with or chelate to the copper surface resulting in strong adhesion between the copper and polymer. Adhesion of PAEBI to other polymers such as poly(biphenyl dianhydride-p-phenylene diamine) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide is also quite good and stable. The resulting locus of failure as studied by XPS and IR indicates that PAEBI gives strong cohesive adhesion to copper. Due to its good adhesion and mechanical properties, PAEBI can be used in fabricating thin film semiconductor packages such as multichip module dielectric (MCM-D) structures. In these applications, a thin PAEBI coating is applied directly to a wiring layer for enhancing adhesion to both the copper wiring and the polymer dielectric surface. In addition, a thin layer of PAEBI can also function as a protection layer for the copper wiring, eliminating the need for Cr or Ni barrier metallurgies and thus significantly reducing the number of process steps.

  11. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  12. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  13. Capillarity-based switchable adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Michael J.; Steen, Paul H.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing inspiration from the adhesion abilities of a leaf beetle found in nature, we have engineered a switchable adhesion device. The device combines two concepts: The surface tension force from a large number of small liquid bridges can be significant (capillarity-based adhesion) and these contacts can be quickly made or broken with electronic control (switchable). The device grabs or releases a substrate in a fraction of a second via a low-voltage pulse that drives electroosmotic flow. Energy consumption is minimal because both the grabbed and released states are stable equilibria that persist with no energy added to the system. Notably, the device maintains the integrity of an array of hundreds to thousands of distinct interfaces during active reconfiguration from droplets to bridges and back, despite the natural tendency of the liquid toward coalescence. We demonstrate the scaling of adhesion strength with the inverse of liquid contact size. This suggests that strengths approaching those of permanent bonding adhesives are possible as feature size is scaled down. In addition, controllability is fast and efficient because the attachment time and required voltage also scale down favorably. The device features compact size, no solid moving parts, and is made of common materials. PMID:20133725

  14. Laboratory evaluation of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1992-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of resin materials to acid-conditioned enamel is a clinically proven technique in preventative, restorative, and orthodontic procedures. Laboratory evaluations of etched-enamel resin bonding have shown excellent bond strengths and the virtual elimination of marginal microleakage. Adhesion to dentin has been more of a challenge. Earlier-generation dentin bonding systems did not yield high bond strengths in the laboratory or prevent marginal microleakage. Newer-generation adhesive systems generally use a dentin conditioner to modify or remove the smear layer and a subsequent application of an adhesive resin bonding agent. Laboratory evaluations of newer systems have shown bond strengths that approach or actually exceed that of etched enamel resin bonding. Bond strengths have improved with the evolution of dentin bonding systems, and microleakage from the cementum/dentin margin has been significantly reduced or prevented with the newer systems. Although laboratory testing of adhesive systems provides a mechanism to screen and compare newly developed systems, clinical trials are essential to document long-term clinical performance. PMID:1470553

  15. A fracture mechanics approach for designing adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was undertaken to determine if the adhesive debond initiation stress could be predicted for arbitrary joint geometries. The analysis was based upon a threshold total strain-energy-release rate (Gth) concept. Two bonded systems were tested: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with either EC-3445 or FM-300 adhesive. The Gth for each adhesive was determined from cracked-lap-shear (CLS) specimens by initiation tests. Finite-element analyses of various tapered CLS specimen geometries predicted the specimen stress at which the total strain-energy-release rate (GT) equaled Gth at the joint tip. Experiments verified the predictions. The approach described herein predicts the maximum stress at which an adhesive joint can be cycled yet not debond. Furthermore, total strain-energy-release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding and debond initiation in structural adhesives. In addition, debond initiation and growth were found to occur with virtually no peel stress present.

  16. Frog tongue acts as muscle-powered adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-09-01

    Frogs are well known to capture fast-moving prey by flicking their sticky tongues out of the mouth. This tongue projection behaviour happens extremely fast which makes frog tongues a biological high-speed adhesive system. The processes at the interface between tongue and prey, and thus the mechanism of adhesion, however, are completely unknown. Here, we captured the contact mechanics of frog tongues by filming tongue adhesion at 2000 frames per second through an illuminated glass. We found that the tongue rolls over the target during attachment. However, during the pulling phase, the tongue retractor muscle acts perpendicular to the target surface and thus prevents peeling during tongue retraction. When the tongue detaches, mucus fibrils form between the tongue and the target. Fibrils commonly occur in pressure-sensitive adhesives, and thus frog tongues might be a biological analogue to these engineered materials. The fibrils in frog tongues are related to the presence of microscopic papillae on the surface. Together with a layer of nanoscale fibres underneath the tongue epithelium, these surface papillae will make the tongue adaptable to asperities. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we are able to integrate anatomy and function to explain the processes during adhesion in frog tongues. PMID:26473054

  17. Frog tongue acts as muscle-powered adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Frogs are well known to capture fast-moving prey by flicking their sticky tongues out of the mouth. This tongue projection behaviour happens extremely fast which makes frog tongues a biological high-speed adhesive system. The processes at the interface between tongue and prey, and thus the mechanism of adhesion, however, are completely unknown. Here, we captured the contact mechanics of frog tongues by filming tongue adhesion at 2000 frames per second through an illuminated glass. We found that the tongue rolls over the target during attachment. However, during the pulling phase, the tongue retractor muscle acts perpendicular to the target surface and thus prevents peeling during tongue retraction. When the tongue detaches, mucus fibrils form between the tongue and the target. Fibrils commonly occur in pressure-sensitive adhesives, and thus frog tongues might be a biological analogue to these engineered materials. The fibrils in frog tongues are related to the presence of microscopic papillae on the surface. Together with a layer of nanoscale fibres underneath the tongue epithelium, these surface papillae will make the tongue adaptable to asperities. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we are able to integrate anatomy and function to explain the processes during adhesion in frog tongues. PMID:26473054

  18. Apicobasal polarity controls lymphocyte adhesion to hepatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; Alvarez-Varela, Adrián; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Feito, Jorge; Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; Muntané, Jordi; Sandoval, Pilar; Majano, Pedro L; Correas, Isabel; Alonso, Miguel A; Millán, Jaime

    2014-09-25

    Loss of apicobasal polarity is a hallmark of epithelial pathologies. Leukocyte infiltration and crosstalk with dysfunctional epithelial barriers are crucial for the inflammatory response. Here, we show that apicobasal architecture regulates the adhesion between hepatic epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Polarized hepatocytes and epithelium from bile ducts segregate the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) adhesion receptor onto their apical, microvilli-rich membranes, which are less accessible by circulating immune cells. Upon cell depolarization, hepatic ICAM-1 becomes exposed and increases lymphocyte binding. Polarized hepatic cells prevent ICAM-1 exposure to lymphocytes by redirecting basolateral ICAM-1 to apical domains. Loss of ICAM-1 polarity occurs in human inflammatory liver diseases and can be induced by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We propose that adhesion receptor polarization is a parenchymal immune checkpoint that allows functional epithelium to hamper leukocyte binding. This contributes to the haptotactic guidance of leukocytes toward neighboring damaged or chronically inflamed epithelial cells that expose their adhesion machinery. PMID:25242329

  19. Blister Test for Measurements of Adhesion and Adhesion Degradation of Organic Polymers on AA2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon Troconis, Brendy Carolina

    cleaning/desmutting and conversion coating (CC) on the adhesion strength of acetoacetate to AA2024-T3 and the effects of improper water rinse temperature after cleaner were assessed using the BT. The results showed that pretreatments improve the adhesion strength of acetoacetate primer on AA2024-T3, but the comparative behavior depends on the specific treatment. Process control is of paramount importance for the performance of acetoacetate coated systems applied on AA2024-T3. The lack of thermal activity in the water rinse after cleaning step produces deleterious effects on the adhesion and blistering resistance of CC. Finally, a test sample incorporating a coated and scribed Al alloy panel and uncoated through-hole fasteners (Ti, SS316, AA2024-T3) was designed to provide accelerated response during atmospheric corrosion testing in the field (long-term beach exposure) or in laboratory chambers (ASTM B117). The results after only three weeks of exposure to ASTM B117 correlated well with long-term beach exposure, allowing rapid ranking of different coating systems. Of the fastener materials studied, visual observation and volume lost determination indicated that the worst attack occurred near SS316 fasteners its effect was explained by Scanning Kelvin Probe measurements and the available cathodic current measured in chloride solution.

  20. Simvastatin disrupts cytoskeleton and decreases cardiac fibroblast adhesion, migration and viability.

    PubMed

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Avalos, Yennifer; Garcia, Lorena; Chiong, Mario; Olmedo, Ivonne; Catalán, Mabel; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2012-03-29

    Statins reduce the isoprenoids farnesyl and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, essential intermediates, which control a diversity of cellular events such as cytoskeleton integrity, adhesion, migration and viability. Cardiac fibroblasts are the major non-myocyte cell constituent in the normal heart, and play a key role in the maintenance of extracellular matrix. The effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast processes previously mentioned remain unknown. Our aims were to investigate the effects of simvastatin on cytoskeleton structure and focal adhesion complex assembly and their relationships with cell adhesion, migration and viability in cultured cardiac fibroblasts. To this end, cells were treated with simvastatin for 24 h and changes in actin cytoskeleton, levels of vimentin and paxillin as well as their subcellular localization were analyzed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Cell adhesion to plastic or collagen coated dishes, migration in Transwell chambers, and cell viability were analyzed after simvastatin treatment. Our results show that simvastatin disrupts actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion complex evaluated by phalloidin stain and immunocytochemistry for paxillin and vinculin. All these effects occurred by a cholesterol synthesis-independent mechanism. Simvastatin decreased cell adhesion, migration and viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, simvastatin decreased angiotensin II-induced phospho-paxillin levels and cell adhesion. We concluded that simvastatin disrupts cytoskeleton integrity and focal adhesion complex assembly in cultured cardiac fibroblasts by a cholesterol-independent mechanism and consequently decreases cell migration, adhesion and viability. PMID:22306966

  1. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  2. Potential of the adhesion of bacteria isolated from drinking water to materials.

    PubMed

    Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel; Oliveira, Rosário; Vieira, Maria João

    2007-04-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria (11 genera, 14 species, 25 putative strains) were isolated from drinking water, identified either biochemically or by partial 16s rDNA gene sequencing and their adherence characteristics were determined by two methods: i. thermodynamic prediction of adhesion potential by measuring hydrophobicity (contact angle measurements) and ii. by measuring adherence to eight different substrata (ASI 304 and 316 stainless steel, copper, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone and glass). All the test organisms were hydrophilic and inter-species variation in hydrophobicity occurred only for Comamonas acidovorans. Stainless steel 304 (SS 304), copper, polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and silicone thermodynamically favoured adhesion for the majority of test strains (>18/25), whilst adhesion was generally less thermodynamically favorable for stainless steel 316 (SS 316), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass. The predictability of thermodynamic adhesion test methods was validated by comparison with 24-well microtiter plate assays using nine reference strains and three adhesion surfaces (SS 316, PVC and PE). Results for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Burkolderia cepacia and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia sp. 2 were congruent between both methods whilst they differed for the other bacteria to at least one material. Only A. calcoaceticus had strongly adherent properties to the three tested surfaces. Strain variation in adhesion ability was detected only for Sphingomonas capsulata. Analysis of adhesion demonstrated that in addition to physicochemical surface properties of bacterium and substratum, biological factors are involved in early adhesion processes, suggesting that reliance on thermodynamic approaches alone may not accurately predict adhesion capacity. PMID:17440920

  3. Adherence performances of pressure sensitive adhesives on a model viscoelastic synthetic film: a tool for the understanding of adhesion on the human skin.

    PubMed

    Renvoise, Julien; Burlot, Delphine; Marin, Gérard; Derail, Christophe

    2009-02-23

    This work deals with the rheological behavior and adherence properties of pressure sensitive adhesive formulations dedicated to medical applications. We have developed a specific viscoelastic substrate which mimics adhesion on human skin to measure the adherence properties of PSAs when they are stuck on the human skin. By comparing peeling results of PSAs, dedicated to medical applications, stuck on human skin and on this viscoelastic substrate we show that this substrate, based on a blend of natural proteins, presents a better representation of the interactions occurring at the skin/adhesive interface than conventional substrates used for peel test (i.e. glass and steel). PMID:18992309

  4. UV curable pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA`s) have become a ubiquitous element in our society, so much so, that the relative status of a society can be determined by the per capita consumption of PSA`s. We discuss new monomers as components of PSA formulations which enable adhesion to be achieved on a variety of substrates. Since solventless coating systems are desirable, the UV PSA market is of utmost importance to meeting the strict environmental guidelines now being imposed worldwide. In addition, highly ethoxylated monomers have shown promise in water dispersed PSA formulations, and a self-emulsifying acrylate monomer has been developed to offer dispersive abilities without using traditional emulsifying agents. This talk will focus on the effects of the materials described on properties of adhesive strength and shear strength in UV PSA formulations.

  5. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  6. Liposome adhesion generates traction stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, Michael P.; Voituriez, Raphaël; Joanny, Jean-François; Nassoy, Pierre; Sykes, Cécile; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical forces generated by cells modulate global shape changes required for essential life processes, such as polarization, division and spreading. Although the contribution of the cytoskeleton to cellular force generation is widely recognized, the role of the membrane is considered to be restricted to passively transmitting forces. Therefore, the mechanisms by which the membrane can directly contribute to cell tension are overlooked and poorly understood. To address this, we directly measure the stresses generated during liposome adhesion. We find that liposome spreading generates large traction stresses on compliant substrates. These stresses can be understood as the equilibration of internal, hydrostatic pressures generated by the enhanced membrane tension built up during adhesion. These results underscore the role of membranes in the generation of mechanical stresses on cellular length scales and that the modulation of hydrostatic pressure due to membrane tension and adhesion can be channelled to perform mechanical work on the environment.

  7. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  8. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  9. Silk Fibroin Aqueous-Based Adhesives Inspired by Mussel Adhesive Proteins.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kelly A; Roberts, Dane C; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-11

    Silk fibroin from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori is a naturally occurring biopolymer with charged hydrophilic terminal regions that end-cap a hydrophobic core consisting of repeating sequences of glycine, alanine, and serine residues. Taking inspiration from mussels that produce proteins rich in L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) to adhere to a variety of organic and inorganic surfaces, the silk fibroin was functionalized with catechol groups. Silk fibroin was selected for its high molecular weight, tunable mechanical and degradation properties, aqueous processability, and wide availability. The synthesis of catechol-functionalized silk fibroin polymers containing varying amounts of hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG, 5000 g/mol) side chains was carried out to balance silk hydrophobicity with PEG hydrophilicity. The efficiency of the catechol functionalization reaction did not vary with PEG conjugation over the range studied, although tuning the amount of PEG conjugated was essential for aqueous solubility. Adhesive bonding and cell compatibility of the resulting materials were investigated, where it was found that incorporating as little as 6 wt % PEG prior to catechol functionalization resulted in complete aqueous solubility of the catechol conjugates and increased adhesive strength compared with silk lacking catechol functionalization. Furthermore, PEG-silk fibroin conjugates maintained their ability to form β-sheet secondary structures, which can be exploited to reduce swelling. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) proliferated on the silks, regardless of PEG and catechol conjugation. These materials represent a protein-based approach to catechol-based adhesives, which we envision may find applicability as biodegradable adhesives and sealants. PMID:26674175

  10. Polymer-Solid Interface Connectivity and Adhesion: Design of a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Shana P.; Wool, Richard P.

    2007-03-01

    Adhesion at polymer-solid interfaces was explored for a new bio-based PSA in terms of sticker groups φX on the polymer, receptor groups φY on the solid and the strength of the X-Y acid-base interaction, χ. The polymer-solid interface models of Gong, Lee and Wool were extended with new percolation models of entanglements and interface strength to determine the optimal sticker group concentration φ*X. For the general case where φY and χ are constant, it is predicted that when φX<φ*X, the peel strength behaves as G1c˜φX/φ*X and the locus of failure is adhesive between the polymer and the solid. However, when φX>φ*X, failure occurs cohesively in a polymer-polymer interface adjacent to the solid and the strength decreases as G1c˜φ*X/φX. The switch from adhesive to cohesive failure can be understood in terms of the changes in the chain conformations of the adhered chains and their decreasing interpenetration X with the bulk chains, via X˜1/r, where r = χφXφY. The optimal value of φX which maximizes the adhesion and determines the mode of failure is given by φ*X 0.07/C, and for typical values of the characteristic ratio C in the range 7-10, φ*X 1% mole fraction, corresponding to about 2 sticker groups per critical entanglement length Mc. Supported by USDA

  11. Osteoblast adhesion to orthopaedic implant alloys: effects of cell adhesion molecules and diamond-like carbon coating.

    PubMed

    Kornu, R; Maloney, W J; Kelly, M A; Smith, R L

    1996-11-01

    In total joint arthroplasty, long-term outcomes depend in part on the biocompatibility of implant alloys. This study analyzed effects of surface finish and diamond-like carbon coating on osteoblast cell adhesion to polished titanium-aluminum-vanadium and polished or grit-blasted cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. Osteoblast binding was tested in the presence and absence of the cell adhesion proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin and was quantified by measurement of DNA content. Although adherence occurred in serum-free medium, maximal osteoblast binding required serum and was similar for titanium and cobalt alloys at 2 and 12 hours. With the grit-blasted cobalt alloy, cell binding was reduced 48% (p < 0.05) by 24 hours. Coating the alloys with diamond-like carbon did not alter osteoblast adhesion, whereas fibronectin pretreatment increased cell binding 2.6-fold (p < 0.05). In contrast, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and laminin did not enhance cell adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that cell adhesion proteins can modify cell binding to orthopaedic alloys. Although osteoblast binding was not affected by the presence of diamond-like carbon, this coating substance may influence other longer term processes, such as bone formation, and deserves further study. PMID:8982128

  12. Osteoblast adhesion to orthopaedic implant alloys: Effects of cell adhesion molecules and diamond-like carbon coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kornu, R.; Kelly, M.A.; Smith, R.L.; Maloney, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    In total joint arthroplasty, long-term outcomes depend in part on the biocompatibility of implant alloys. This study analyzed effects of surface finish and diamond-like carbon coating on osteoblast cell adhesion to polished titanium-aluminum-vanadium and polished or grit-blasted cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. Osteoblast binding was tested in the presence and absence of the cell adhesion proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin and was quantified by measurement of DNA content. Although adherence occurred in serum-free medium, maximal osteoblast binding required serum and was similar for titanium and cobalt alloys at 2 and 12 hours. With the grit-blasted cobalt alloy, cell binding was reduced 48% (p < 0.05) by 24 hours. Coating the alloys with diamond-like carbon did not alter osteoblast adhesion, whereas fibronectin pretreatment increased cell binding 2.6-fold (p < 0.05). In contrast, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and laminin did not enhance cell adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that cell adhesion proteins can modify cell binding to orthopaedic alloys. Although osteoblast binding was not affected by the presence of diamond-like carbon, this coating substance may influence other longer term processes, such as bone formation, and deserves further study. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  14. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  15. Direct observation of microbial adhesion to membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sunny; Guillen, Greg; Hoek, Eric M V

    2005-09-01

    Direct microscopic observation and an interfacial force model were used to better understand and control microbial adhesion to polymeric ultrafiltration membranes. The model was used to predict a "critical flux", below which cells deposited reversibly, and direct observation was used to visually quantify cell deposition and removal. In preliminary direct observation experiments, permeate reversal (backpulsing) was more effective than cross-flow hydrodynamics at removing deposited cells. In experiments conducted below the critical flux, no cell accumulation was observed over repeated forward-reverse filtration cycles; however, a small fraction of cells deposited irreversibly regardless of the flux, membrane, or solution chemistry. The fraction of irreversibly deposited cells was consistent with the equilibrium surface coverage attained without permeation (i.e., due to heterogeneous adsorption). Although steric forces were not invoked to establish a critical flux, when operating above the critical flux, a balance between permeation drag and steric repulsion appeared to determine the strength of adhesion of cells to membranes. Direct observation also confirmed that above the critical flux fouling occurred and pressure losses accumulated over several backpulse cycles, whereas below the critical flux there were no observable pressure losses or fouling. PMID:16190200

  16. Effects of tethered chains on adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sides, Scott; Grest, Gary; Stevens, Mark

    2001-03-01

    We study adhesion between a polymer melt and substrate due to chemically attached polymer chains on the substrate surface. We have performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of temperature, crosslink density, tethered chain density (Σ), tethered chain length (N_t), tensile pull velocity (v) and chain stiffness on the adhesive failure mechanisms of pullout and/or scission of the tethered chains. We observe a crossover from pure chain pullout to chain scission as Nt and v are increased. The value of Nt at which this crossover occurs is comparable to the chain entanglement length for the coarse-grained model used. Experiments and simulations have shown that the energy required to separate a polymer melt from a substrate increases considerably if the formation of large voids, or crazing can be initiated in the melt. The onset of crazing depends on the temperature and the interaction strength of the substrate with the melt. We also present data illustrating the additional effects of tethered chains on crazing mechanisms.

  17. Human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases cell-to-cell adhesion and surface expression of adhesion-promoting surface glycoproteins on mature granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Arnaout, M A; Wang, E A; Clark, S C; Sieff, C A

    1986-01-01

    Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit migration of mature granulocytes and to enhance their antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We found that human recombinant GM-CSF also enhanced granulocyte-granulocyte adhesion and increased by two- to threefold the surface expression of Mo1 and LeuM5 (P150, 95), two members of a family of leukocyte adhesion molecules (Leu-CAM). Increased Mo1 surface expression occurred within 15 min at 37 degrees C and was maximal at the migration inhibitory concentration of 500 pM. One-half maximal rise in the expression of Mo1 on the cell surface occurred at 5 pM. The chemotactic peptide f-Met-Leu-Phe produced a comparable rise in surface Mo1 with one-half maximal expression occurring at 7 nM. Both GM-CSF and f-Met-Leu-Phe produced optimal granulocyte-granulocyte adhesion at 500 pM and 100 nM, respectively. This adhesion-promoting effect induced by either stimulus was inhibited by a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against Mo1 antigen. These data indicate that GM-CSF promotes cell-to-cell adhesion, presumably through enhanced expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. This mechanism may explain, in part, the known effects of GM-CSF on the function of mature granulocytes. Images PMID:3090106

  18. Nonlinear adhesive behavior effects in a cracked orthotropic sheet stiffened by a semi-infinite orthotropic sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    The stress-intensity factors are determined for a cracked orthotropic sheet adhesively bonded to an orthotropic stringer where the adhesive layer is modeled with a nonlinear stress-strain curve. By the use of Green's functions and the complex variable theory of orthotropic elasticity, a set of integral equations is obtained. The integral equations are replaced by an equivalent set of algebraic equations, which are solved to obtain the shear stress distribution in the adhesive layer, with which the crack-tip stress-intensity factors are found. When the adhesive was modeled with a nonlinear stress-strain curve, the peak shear stresses in the adhesive were considerably reduced in comparison to the solution for the linear elastic adhesive. This resulted in increases in the stress-intensity factors for the nonlinear adhesive solution compared to the linear adhesive solution. The nonlinear adhesive has no significant effect on the stress-intensity factor unless the near crack tip is beneath the stringer. It is assumed that the adhesive bond remains intact and it is predicted that onset of adhesive failure occurs at decreasing levels of applied stress as the crack propagates beneath the stringer.

  19. Nonlinear adhesive behavior effects in a cracked orthotropic sheet stiffened by a semi-infinite orthotropic sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stress-intensity factors are determined for a cracked orthotropic sheet adhesively bonded to an orthotropic stringer where the adhesive layer is modeled with a nonlinear stress-strain curve. By the use of Green's functions and the complex variable theory of orthotropic elasticity, a set of integral equations is obtained. The integral equations are replaced by an equivalent set of algebraic equations, which are solved to obtain the shear stress distribution in the adhesive layer, with which the crack-tip stress-intensity factors are found. When the adhesive was modeled with a nonlinear stress-strain curve, the peak shear stresses in the adhesive were considerably reduced in comparison to the solution for the linear elastic adhesive. This resulted in increases in the stress-intensity factors for the nonlinear adhesive solution compared to the linear adhesive solution. The nonlinear adhesive has no significant effect on the stress-intensity factor unless the near crack tip is beneath the stringer. It is assumed that the adhesive bond remains intact and it is predicted that onset of adhesive failure occurs at decreasing levels of applied stress as the crack propagates beneath the stringer.

  20. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    PubMed

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins. PMID:18727911

  1. Fluorescence Reveals Contamination From Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolia, William

    1992-01-01

    Contamination of nearby surfaces from ingredients in some adhesive materials detected by ultraviolet illumination and observation of resulting fluorescence. Identification of contaminants via telltale fluorescence not new; rather, significance lies in method of implementation and potential extension to wider variety of materials and applications.

  2. New adhesive withstands temperature extremes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Seidenberg, B.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive, developed for high-temperature components aboard satellites, is useful at both high and low temperatures and exhibits low-vacuum volatility and low shrinkage. System uses polyfunctional epoxy with high aromatic content, low equivalent weight, and more compact polymer than conventional bisphenol A tape.

  3. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  4. Photoresist substrate having robust adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.

    2005-07-26

    A substrate material for LIGA applications w hose general composition is Ti/Cu/Ti/SiO.sub.2. The SiO.sub.2 is preferably applied to the Ti/Cu/Ti wafer as a sputtered coating, typically about 100 nm thick. This substrate composition provides improved adhesion for epoxy-based photoresist materials, and particularly the photoresist material SU-8.

  5. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  6. Microfluidic adhesion induced by subsurface microstructures.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2007-10-12

    Natural adhesives in the feet of different arthropods and vertebrates show strong adhesion as well as excellent reusability. Whereas the hierarchical structures on the surface are known to have a substantial effect on adhesion, the role of subsurface structures such as the network of microchannels has not been studied. Inspired by these bioadhesives, we generated elastomeric layers with embedded air- or oil-filled microchannels. These adhesives showed remarkable enhancement of adhesion ( approximately 30 times), which results from the crack-arresting properties of the microchannels, together with the surface stresses caused by the capillary force. The importance of the thickness of the adhesive layer, channel diameter, interchannel spacing, and vertical position within the adhesive has been examined for developing an optimal design of this microfluidic adhesive. PMID:17932295

  7. Adhesion and friction behavior of group 4 elements germanium, silicon, tin, and lead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Adhesion and friction studies were conducted with thin films of the group IV elements silicon, germanium, tin, and lead ion plated on the nickel (011) substrate. The mating surface was gold (111). Contacts were made for the elements in the clean state and with oxygen present. Adhesion and friction experiments were conducted at very light loads of 1 to 10 g. Sliding was at a speed of 0.7 mm/min. Friction results indicate that the more covalently bonded elements silicon and germanium exhibit lower adhesion and friction than the more metallic bonded tin and lead. The adhesion of gold to germanium was observed, and recrystallization of the transferred gold occurred. Plastic flow of germanium was seen with sliding. Oxygen reduced, but did not eliminate, the adhesion observed with germanium and silicon.

  8. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment. PMID:24240901

  9. Alterations in cell adhesion proteins and cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesive junction is specialized intercellular structure composed of cell adhesion proteins. They are essential to connect adjacent heart muscle cell and make heart contraction effectively and properly. Clinical and genetic studies have revealed close relationship between cell adhesive proteins and the occurrence of various cardiomyopathies. Here we will review recent development on the disease phenotype, potential cellular and molecular mechanism related to cell adhesion molecules, with particular disease pathogenesis learned from genetic manipulated murine models. PMID:24944760

  10. 21 CFR 175.105 - Adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adhesives. 175.105 Section 175.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives §...

  11. 21 CFR 175.105 - Adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adhesives. 175.105 Section 175.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives §...

  12. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  13. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape....

  14. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape....

  15. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Dryden, Daniel M.; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; French, Roger H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor–Winterton approximation and the Young–Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air. PMID:26109635

  16. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Dryden, Daniel M; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A; Niewiarowski, Peter H; French, Roger H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-07-01

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor-Winterton approximation and the Young-Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air. PMID:26109635

  17. Endothelial cell proliferation and monocyte adhesion to atherosclerotic lesions of white carneau pigeons.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R. G.; Lewis, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Two of the early changes that occur at sites of developing atherosclerotic lesions in pigeon aortas are monocyte adhesion and endothelial proliferation. We characterized these events in the abdominal aortas of lesion-free young pigeons and in mature birds that developed either naturally occurring or cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Compared with mature animals, very young (7-day-old) pigeons had elevated endothelial cell labeling with 3H-thymidine in normal regions of aorta as quantitated by scanning electron microscopy. All regions of atherosclerosis exhibited at least a fivefold increase in both monocyte adhesion and endothelial proliferation. Adhesion and proliferation were highest at the developing edge of lesions. When naturally occurring lesions of 5-year-old birds were compared with lesions of younger birds fed a 0.5% cholesterol-supplemented diet for either 15 or 52 weeks, monocyte adhesion and endothelial cell proliferation were found to be similar. The same parameters were studied after regression of atherosclerosis in pigeons fed 0.5% cholesterol-supplemented diet for 1 year, followed by cholesterol-free diet for 2, 6, or 11 months. The regression regimen resulted in significant reduction in both monocyte adhesion and endothelial proliferation at lesion sites. It is concluded that progressing atherosclerotic lesions, whether occurring naturally or exacerbated by cholesterol feeding, have similar and significant increases in monocyte adhesion and endothelial cell proliferation. Regression of atherosclerotic lesions is accompanied by a decrease in these two cellular events. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3777132

  18. Nature of the adhesion bond between epoxy adhesive and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren', V. I.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Savitskii, A. V.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Sytov, V. V.; Sytov, V. A.

    2014-03-01

    The potential difference that appears in the epoxy resin located between two grade 3 steel plates is studied. One of them is stored in epoxy resin to reach equilibrium, and the second plate is coated with an asprepared mixture of epoxy resin with a hardener. It is found that the potential difference decreases in time because of charge transfer by Fe2+ ions through epoxy resin. The luminescence and infrared absorption spectra of the epoxy adhesive on the grade 3 steel surface are recorded. An analysis of these spectra shows that Fe2+ ions penetrate into the as-prepared mixture of epoxy resin with the hardener, and interact with CN groups in the mixture, and form coordination compounds. As a result, a diffusion layer saturated by the coordination compounds forms at the interface between the steel and the adhesive.

  19. Bovicin HC5 and nisin reduce Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to polystyrene and change the hydrophobicity profile and Gibbs free energy of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Martins, Mayra Carla de Freitas; Nogueira, Guilherme Bicalho; Mantovani, Hilário Cuquetto; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often multidrug-resistant that not only causes a variety of human diseases, but also is able to survive on biotic and abiotic surfaces through biofilm communities. The best way to inhibit biofilm establishment is to prevent cell adhesion. In the present study, subinhibitory concentrations of the bacteriocins bovicin HC5 and nisin were tested for their capability to interfere with the adhesion of S. aureus to polystyrene. Subinhibitory dosages of the bacteriocins reduced cell adhesion and this occurred probably due to changes in the hydrophobicity of the bacterial cell and polystyrene surfaces. After treatment with bovicin HC5 and nisin, the surfaces became more hydrophilic and the free energy of adhesion (∆G(adhesion)) between bacteria and the polystyrene surface was unfavorable. The transcriptional level of selected genes was assessed by RT-qPCR approach, revealing that the bacteriocins affected the expression of some important biofilm associated genes (icaD, fnbA, and clfB) and rnaIII, which is involved in the quorum sensing mechanism. The conditioning of food-contact surfaces with bacteriocins can be an innovative and powerful strategy to prevent biofilms in the food industry. The results are relevant for food safety as they indicate that bovicin HC5 and nisin can inhibit bacterial adhesion and consequent biofilm establishment, since cell adhesion precedes biofilm formation. PMID:25173449

  20. α-Actinin-4 Enhances Colorectal Cancer Cell Invasion by Suppressing Focal Adhesion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tesshi; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2015-01-01

    α-Actinins (ACTNs) are known to crosslink actin filaments at focal adhesions in migrating cells. Among the four isoforms of mammalian ACTNs, ACTN1 and ACTN4 are ubiquitously expressed. Recently, ACTN4 was reported to enhance cancer cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. However, the mechanism by which ACTN4 drives these malignant phenotypes remains unclear. Here, we show that ACTN4, but not ACTN1, induces the formation of immature focal adhesions in DLD-1 cells, leading to the rapid turnover of focal adhesions. Interestingly, zyxin (ZYX) assembly to focal adhesions was markedly decreased in ACTN4-expressing DLD-1 cells, while the recruitment of paxillin (PAX) occurred normally. On the other hand, in ACTN1-expressing DLD-1 cells, PAX and ZYX were normally recruited to focal adhesions, suggesting that ACTN4 specifically impairs focal adhesion maturation by inhibiting the recruitment of ZYX to focal complexes. Using purified recombinant proteins, we found that ZYX binding to ACTN4 was defective under conditions where ZYX binding to ACTN1 was observed. Furthermore, Matrigel invasion of SW480 cells that express high endogenous levels of ACTN4 protein was inhibited by ectopic expression of ACTN1. Altogether, our results suggest that ZYX defective binding to ACTN4, which occupies focal adhesions instead of ACTN1, induces the formation of immature focal adhesions, resulting in the enhancement of cell motility and invasion. PMID:25860875

  1. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  2. Factors Predicting Adhesion between Renal Capsule and Perinephric Adipose Tissue in Partial Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kurahashi, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Yuko; Wada, Koichiro; Sasaki, Katsumi; Araki, Motoo; Ebara, Shin; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-04-01

    In minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN), it is important to preoperatively predict the degree of difficulty of tumor resection. When severe adhesions occur between the renal capsule and perinephric adipose tissue, detachment can be difficult. Preoperative prediction of adhesion is thought to be useful in the selection of surgical procedure. Subjects were 63 patients of a single surgeon who had received MIPN between April 2008 and August 2013 at Okayama University Hospital. Of these patients, this study followed 47 in whom the presence or absence of adhesions between the renal capsule and perinephric adipose tissue was confirmed using intraoperative videos. Data collected included: sex, BMI, CT finding (presence of fi broids in perinephric adipose tissue), comorbidities and lifestyle. Adhesion was observed in 7 patients (14.9%). The mean operative time was 291.6 min in the adhesion group, and 226.3 min in the group without. The increased time in the adhesions group was significant (p<0.05). Predictive factors were a positive CT finding for fibroid structure and comorbidity of hypertension (p<0.05). In MIPN, difficulty of surgery can be affected by the presence of adhesion of the perinephric adipose tissue. Predicting such adhesion from preoperative CT is thus important. PMID:27094831

  3. Ceramic adhesive restorations and biomimetic dentistry: tissue preservation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Tirlet, Gil; Crescenzo, Hélène; Crescenzo, Dider; Bazos, Panaghiotis

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to sophisticated adhesive techniques in contemporary dentistry, and the development of composite and ceramic materials, it is possible to reproduce a biomimetic match between substitution materials and natural teeth substrates. Biomimetics or bio-emulation allows for the association of two fundamental parameters at the heart of current therapeutic treatments: tissue preservation and adhesion. This contemporary concept makes the retention of the integrity of the maximum amount of dental tissue possible, while offering exceptional clinical longevity, and maximum esthetic results. It permits the conservation of the biological, esthetic, biomechanical and functional properties of enamel and dentin. Today, it is clearly possible to develop preparations allowing for the conservation of the enamel and dentin in order to bond partial restorations in the anterior and posterior sectors therefore limiting, as Professor Urs Belser from Geneva indicates, "the replacement of previous deficient crowns and devitalized teeth whose conservation are justified but whose residual structural state are insufficient for reliable bonding."1 This article not only addresses ceramic adhesive restoration in the anterior area, the ambassadors of biomimetic dentistry, but also highlights the possibility of occasionally integrating one or two restorations at the heart of the smile as a complement to extensive rehabilitations that require more invasive treatment. PMID:25126616

  4. Bio-inspired adhesion: local chemical environments impact adhesive stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Rapp, Michael V.; Yu, Jing; Wei, Wei; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2014-03-01

    3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) is an amino acid that is naturally synthesized by marine mussels and exhibits the unique ability to strongly bind to surfaces in aqueous environments. However, the Dopa functional group undergoes auto-oxidation to a non-adhesive quinone form in neutral to basic pH conditions, limiting the utilization of Dopa in biomedical applications. In this work, we performed direct surface force measurements with in situ electrochemical control across a Dopa-rich native mussel foot protein (mfp-5), as well as three simplified model peptide sequences. We find that the neighboring peptide residues can significantly impact the redox stability of Dopa functional groups, with lysine residues imparting a substantial degree of Dopa redox stabilization. Surprisingly, the local chemical environments only minimally impact the magnitude of the adhesion forces measured between molecularly-smooth mica and gold surfaces. Our results provide molecular level insight into approaches that can be used to mitigate the detrimental impact of Dopa auto-oxidation, thus suggesting new molecular design strategies for improving the performance of Dopa-based underwater adhesives.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of cell adhesion and nuclear envelope nano-topography in cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    The cell death mechanisms of necrosis and apoptosis generate biochemical and morphological changes in different manners. However, the changes that occur in cell adhesion and nuclear envelope (NE) topography, during necrosis and apoptosis, are not yet fully understood. Here, we show the different alterations in cell adhesion function, as well as the topographical changes occurring to the NE, during the necrotic and apoptotic cell death process, using the xCELLigence system and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Studies using xCELLigence technology and AFM have shown that necrotic cell death induced the expansion of the cell adhesion area, but did not affect the speed of cell adhesion. Necrotic nuclei showed a round shape and presence of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Moreover, we found that the process of necrosis in combination with apoptosis (termed nepoptosis here) resulted in the reduction of the cell adhesion area and cell adhesion speed through the activation of caspases. Our findings showed, for the first time, a successful characterization of NE topography and cell adhesion during necrosis and apoptosis, which may be of importance for the understanding of cell death and might aid the design of future drug delivery methods for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26490051

  6. Structural and functional analysis of cell adhesion and nuclear envelope nano-topography in cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    The cell death mechanisms of necrosis and apoptosis generate biochemical and morphological changes in different manners. However, the changes that occur in cell adhesion and nuclear envelope (NE) topography, during necrosis and apoptosis, are not yet fully understood. Here, we show the different alterations in cell adhesion function, as well as the topographical changes occurring to the NE, during the necrotic and apoptotic cell death process, using the xCELLigence system and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Studies using xCELLigence technology and AFM have shown that necrotic cell death induced the expansion of the cell adhesion area, but did not affect the speed of cell adhesion. Necrotic nuclei showed a round shape and presence of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Moreover, we found that the process of necrosis in combination with apoptosis (termed nepoptosis here) resulted in the reduction of the cell adhesion area and cell adhesion speed through the activation of caspases. Our findings showed, for the first time, a successful characterization of NE topography and cell adhesion during necrosis and apoptosis, which may be of importance for the understanding of cell death and might aid the design of future drug delivery methods for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26490051

  7. Adhesives for the composite wood panel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, G.S.; Klareich, F.; Exstrum, B.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a market and technology analysis of current fossil-fuel-based adhesives for the composite wood panel industry. It is also a study of the potential for, and technology of, less-energy-intensive biomass-derived adhesives for use in the industry. Adhesives manufacturer and production account for a significant portion of overall wood panel industry energy use as well as overall production costs, and the wood panel industry consumes about 25% of the total U.S. adhesives production. Significant savings might be realized if current fossil-fuel-based resins could be replaced with alternative biomass-derived adhesives.

  8. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  9. Viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper an adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

  10. Viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1980-01-01

    An adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads, namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

  11. Multiparticle adhesive dynamics: Hydrodynamic recruitment of rolling leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    The slow rolling motion of leukocytes along the walls of blood vessels mediated by specific receptor-ligand adhesion is important in inflammation and occurs in postcapillary venules over a wide range of wall shear stresses and vessel diameters. The ability of hydrodynamic collisions between cells to induce capture of free-stream leukocytes to a selectin-bearing surface under shear flow was studied experimentally by using a cell-free assay. It was found that carbohydrate-coated spherical beads, representing model leukocytes, tend to attach to the adhesive wall 4–5 cell diameters up- or downstream of a slowly rolling or stationary adhesive bead. A key feature of such “hydrodynamic recruitment” is that only glancing, indirect collisions occurring close to the plane will result in downstream attachment. A direct numerical simulation of cell capture and rolling that includes multiparticle hydrodynamic interactions is shown to reproduce the observed behavior accurately. The theory predicts that hydrodynamic recruitment will occur in the absence of buoyancy effects and over a range of shear rates, suggesting that the mechanism may be important in vivo. This theory is supported by measurements of leukocyte capture in vivo using the hamster cheek pouch model. PMID:11752440

  12. A nano-cheese-cutter to directly measure interfacial adhesion of freestanding nano-fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Najem, Johnny F.; Wong, Shing-Chung; Wan, Kai-tak

    2012-01-01

    A nano-cheese-cutter is fabricated to directly measure the adhesion between two freestanding nano-fibers. A single electrospun fiber is attached to the free end of an atomic force microscope cantilever, while a similar fiber is similarly prepared on a mica substrate in an orthogonal direction. External load is applied to deform the two fibers into complementary V-shapes, and the force measurement allows the elastic modulus to be determined. At a critical tensile load, "pull-off" occurs when the adhering fibers spontaneously detach from each other, yielding the interfacial adhesion energy. Loading-unloading cycles are performed to investigate repeated adhesion-detachment and surface degradation.

  13. The effects of inherent flaws on the time and rate dependent failure of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancaktar, E.; Padgilwar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Inherent flaws, as well as the effects of rate and time, are shown by tests on viscoelastic adhesive-bonded single lap joints to be as critical in joint failure as environmental and stress concentration effects, with random inherent flaws and loading rate changes resulting in an up to 40% reduction in joint strength. It is also found that the asymptotic creep stress, below which no delayed failure may occur, may under creep loading be as much as 45% less than maximum adhesive strength. Attention is given to test results for the case of titanium-LARC-3 adhesive single-lap specimens.

  14. The effectiveness of dentine adhesives as demonstrated by dye penetration and SEM investigations.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, S M; Pearson, G J

    1990-07-01

    A previous investigation identified three types of cuspal movement that occur as a result of polymerization shrinkage when extracted molar teeth are filled with a microfine or hybrid composite used in conjunction with a dentine adhesive. That investigation was extended further by dye penetration and SEM studies of the margin, involving assessment of the degree of dye penetration and marginal integrity around the restoration. These studies indicate that there may be a failure of the adhesive bond between tooth and composite/adhesive complex which correlates with little or no cuspal movement. Failure within the tooth structure itself was also observed in a number of cases. PMID:2213330

  15. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  16. Nanocapillary Adhesion between Parallel Plates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study capillary adhesion from a nanometer scale liquid bridge between two parallel flat solid surfaces. The capillary force, Fcap, and the meniscus shape of the bridge are computed as the separation between the solid surfaces, h, is varied. Macroscopic theory predicts the meniscus shape and the contribution of liquid/vapor interfacial tension to Fcap quite accurately for separations as small as two or three molecular diameters (1-2 nm). However, the total capillary force differs in sign and magnitude from macroscopic theory for h ≲ 5 nm (8-10 diameters) because of molecular layering that is not included in macroscopic theory. For these small separations, the pressure tensor in the fluid becomes anisotropic. The components in the plane of the surface vary smoothly and are consistent with theory based on the macroscopic surface tension. Capillary adhesion is affected by only the perpendicular component, which has strong oscillations as the molecular layering changes. PMID:27413872

  17. Particle adhesion in powder coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Wankum, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Williams, S.; Banerjee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Electrostatic powder coating is a widely used industrial painting process. It has three major advantages: (1) it provides high quality durable finish, (2) the process is environmentally friendly and does not require the use of organic solvents, and (3) it is economically competitive. The adhesion of electrostatically deposited polymer paint particles on the grounded conducting substrate depends upon many parameters: (a) particle size and shape distributions, (b) electrostatic charge distributions, (c) electrical resistivity, (d) dielectric strength of the particles, (e) thickness of the powder film, (f) presence and severity of the back corona, and (g) the conductivity and surface properties of the substrate. The authors present a model on the forces of deposition and adhesion of corona charged particles on conducting substrates.

  18. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-13 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples.

  19. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-43 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples. Previously announced in STAR as N83-18910

  20. Host Selection of Microbiota via Differential Adhesion.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Kirstie; Schluter, Jonas; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Smith, Adrian L; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-04-13

    The host epithelium is the critical interface with microbial communities, but the mechanisms by which the host regulates these communities are poorly understood. Here we develop the hypothesis that hosts use differential adhesion to select for and against particular members of their microbiota. We use an established computational, individual-based model to study the impact of host factors that regulate adhesion at the epithelial surface. Our simulations predict that host-mediated adhesion can increase the competitive advantage of microbes and create ecological refugia for slow-growing species. We show how positive selection via adhesion can be transformed into negative selection if the host secretes large quantities of a matrix such as mucus. Our work predicts that adhesion is a powerful mechanism for both positive and negative selection within the microbiota. We discuss molecules-mucus glycans and IgA-that affect microbe adhesion and identify testable predictions of the adhesion-as-selection model. PMID:27053168

  1. Adhesive mechanisms in cephalopods: a review.

    PubMed

    von Byern, Janek; Klepal, Waltraud

    2006-01-01

    Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pair (Sepia), in the dorsal epidermis (Euprymna), or in the dorsal mantle side and partly on the fins (Idiosepius). Adhesion in Sepia is induced by suction of dermal structures on the mantle, while for Nautilus, Euprymna and Idiosepius adhesion is probably achieved by chemical substances. Histochemical studies indicate that in Nautilus and Idiosepius secretory cells that appear to be involved in adhesion stain for carbohydrates and protein, whilst in Euprymna only carbohydrates are detectable. De-adhesion is either achieved by muscle contraction of the tentacles and mantle (Nautilus and Sepia) or by secretion of substances (Euprymna). The de-adhesive mechanism used by Idiosepius remains unknown. PMID:17110356

  2. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  3. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  4. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  5. Structural Polymorphism and Thin Film Transistor Behavior in the Fullerene Framework Molecule 5,6;11,12-di-o-Phenylenetetracene.

    PubMed

    Wombacher, Tobias; Gassmann, Andrea; Foro, Sabine; von Seggern, Heinz; Schneider, Jörg J

    2016-05-10

    The molecular structure of the hydrocarbon 5,6;11,12-di-o-phenylenetetracene (DOPT), its material characterization and evaluation of electronic properties is reported for the first time. A single-crystal X-ray study reveals two different motifs of intramolecular overlap with herringbone-type arrangement displaying either face-to-edge or co-facial face-to-face packing depicting intensive π-π interactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations underpin that a favorable electronic transport mechanism occurs by a charge hopping process due to a π-bond overlap in the DOPT polymorph with co-facial arene orientation. The performance of polycrystalline DOPT films as active organic semiconducting layer in a state-of-the-art organic field effect transistor (OFET) device was evaluated and proves to be film thickness dependent. For 40 nm layer thickness it displays a saturation hole mobility (μhole ) of up to 0.01 cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) and an on/off-ratio (Ion /Ioff ) of 1.5×10(3) . PMID:27061761

  6. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.' PMID:27186047

  7. Adhesive evaluation of new polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, Terry L.; Progar, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    During the past 10 to 15 years, the Materials Division at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed several novel high temperature polyimide adhesives for anticipated needs of the aerospace industry. These developments have resulted from fundamental studies of structure-property relationships in polyimides. Recent research at LaRC has involved the synthesis and evaluation of copolyimides which incorporate both flexibilizing bridging groups and meta-linked benzene rings. The purpose was to develop systems based on low cost, readily available monomers. Two of these copolyimides evaluated as adhesives for bonding titanium alloy, Ti(6Al-4V), are identified as LARC-STPI and STPI-LARC-2. Lap shear strength (LSS) measurements were used to determine the strength and durability of the adhesive materials. LSS results are presented for LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI lap shear specimens thermally exposed in air at 232 C for up to 5000 hrs. LARC-TPI was shown to perform better than the copolymer LARC-STPI which exhibited poor thermooxidative performance possibly due to the amines used which would tend to oxidize easier than the benzophenone system in LARC-TPI.

  8. [Adhesion to the antiretroviral treatment].

    PubMed

    Carballo, M

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the therapy antiretroviral is to improve the quality of life and the survival of the persons affected by the VIH through the suppression of the viral replication. Nevertheless one of the present problems is the resistant apparition of stumps to the new medicines caused by an incorrect management of the therapeutic plan; by an incorrect adhesion of the personal processing. Since the therapeutic success will depend, among others factors, and of important form of the degree of implication and commitment of the person affected, is a matter of identifying prematurely the possible situations concomitants (personal factors and of addiction, psycho-social, related to the processing and its possible secondary effects, associated factors to the own illness or even to the relation professional-patient) that can interfere in a correct adhesion. For it is necessary of the interaction multidisciplinary of the welfare team, and fundamental the work of nursing at the moment of to detect the possible determinant factors and the intervention definition of strategies arrived at by consensus with the own person, that they promote it or it improve. The quantification of the degree of adhesion (measure in %) values through various direct and indirect methods and should keep in mind in it takes of therapeutic decisions being able to come to be advised the suspension of the processing until obtaining to conscience to the person affected of the importance of a correct therapeutic compliance. PMID:15672996

  9. Adhesion and Thin-Film Module Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2006-05-01

    Among the infrequently measured but essential properties for thin-film (T-F) module reliability are the interlayer adhesion and cohesion within a layer. These can be cell contact layers to glass, contact layers to the semiconductor, encapsulant to cell, glass, or backsheet, etc. We use an Instron mechanical testing unit to measure peel strengths at 90{sup o} or 180{sup o} and, in some cases, a scratch and tape pull test to evaluate inter-cell layer adhesion strengths. We present peel strength data for test specimens laminated from the three T-F technologies, before and after damp heat, and in one instance at elevated temperatures. On laminated T-F cell samples, failure can occur uniformly at any one of the many interfaces, or non-uniformly across the peel area at more than one interface. Some peel strengths are << 1 N/mm. This is far below the normal Instron mechanical testing unit Instron mechanical testing unit; glass interface values of >10 N/mm. We measure a wide range of adhesion strengths and suggest that adhesion measured under higher temperature and relative humidity conditions is more relevant for module reliability.

  10. Mechanisms of platelet adhesion to the basal lamina.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, T. W.; Benditt, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    The human glomerular basal lamina (HGBL) is composed of collagenous and noncollagenous glycoproteins. We assessed the role played by each costituent in platelet-basal-lamina interaction by selective cleavage and removal of each component by clostridial collagenase or by pepsin. When noncollagenous proteins are removed from HGBL, human platelets exhibit littel reactivity toward the residual collagen framework of the isolated basal lamina. With the noncollagen matrix of basal lamina, after removal of the bulk of the collagen, platelet adhesion and spreading proceed normally in the presence of divalent cations, similar to what occurs on intact basal lamina. No platelet degranulation or aggregation is observed. The results indicate that the basal lamina collagen, even in its native packing arrangement, lacks affinity for platelet adhesion and is incapable of triggering platelet release reactions. Platelet adhesion and spreading on the basal lamina appears to depend primarily on the presence of the noncollagen components and to require divalent cations. The data suggest the presence on platelets of receptors for basal lamina distinct from those for interstitial collagens. These receptors activate a unique modulation of platelet behavior, ie, adhesion and spreading without degranulation. A difference in biologic function of the basal lamina and interstitial collagens is apparent in these experiments. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:210672

  11. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Peters, P. D.; Hendricks, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation, selection, and demonstration of structural adhesive systems for supersonic cruise research applications, and establishment of environmental durability of selected systems for up to 20,000 hours is described. Ten candidate adhesives were initially evaluated. During screening and evaluation, these candidates were narrowed to three of the most promising for environmental durability testing. The three adhesives were LARC-13, PPQ, and NR056X. The LARC-13 was eliminated because of a lack of stability at 505 K. The NRO56X was removed from the market. The LARC-TPI was added after preliminary evaluation and an abbreviated screening test. Only PPQ and LARC-TPI remained as the reasonable candidates late into the durability testing. Large area bond panels were fabricated to demonstrate the processibility of the selected systems. Specifications were prepared to assure control over critical material and process parameters. Surface characterization concentrated primarily upon titanium surface treatments of 10 volt chronic acid anodize, 5 volt chromic acid anodize and PASA-JELL. Failure analysis was conducted on lap shear adhesive bond failures which occurred in PPQ and LARC-13 test specimens after 10,000 hours at 505 K.

  12. Cell adhesion defines the topology of endocytosis and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grossier, Jean-Philippe; Xouri, Georgia; Goud, Bruno; Schauer, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Preferred sites of endocytosis have been observed in various cell types, but whether they occur randomly or are linked to cellular cues is debated. Here, we quantified the sites of endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells whose adhesion geometry was defined by micropatterns. 3D probabilistic density maps revealed that Tfn was enriched in adhesive sites during uptake, whereas EGF endocytosis was restricted to the dorsal cellular surface. This spatial separation was not due to distributions of corresponding receptors but was regulated by uptake mechanisms. Asymmetric uptake of Tfn resulted from the enrichment of clathrin and adaptor protein 2 at adhesive areas. Asymmetry in EGF uptake was strongly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and led to asymmetry in EGF receptor activation. Mild alteration of actin dynamics abolished asymmetry in EGF uptake and decreased EGF-induced downstream signaling, suggesting that cellular adhesion cues influence signal propagation. We propose that restriction of endocytosis at distinct sites allows cells to sense their environment in an “outside-in” mechanism. PMID:24366944

  13. A novel composite-to-composite adhesive bond mechanism.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Naotake; Sakamoto, Tominori; Kubota, Yuya; Kondo, Yoshie; Momoi, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if adhesion between various resin composites can occur by a chelation reaction of elemental ions. The surface composition of four commercially available resin composites (Beautifil II, Clearfil AP-X, Estelite Σ Quick and Solare) were measured by X-ray fluorescence analysis. Composite-to-composite adhesion with conventional silane coupling treatment was compared to self-etching primer treatment and evaluated by conventional shear bond strength testing. Our results detected Strontium and Barium (alkaline metallic earth ions) on the surface of Beautifil II and Clearfil AP-X resins. The shear bond strength values of self-etching primer treatments of Beautifil II and Clearfil AP-X was significantly higher than Estelite Σ Quick and Solare. Our data suggest that self-etching primer treatment is effective for adhesion of resin composites, depending on their filler composition, due to the chelation adhesion reaction between the acidic monomer and incorporated alkaline metal ions. PMID:21778602

  14. Micromanipulation of adhesion of phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate-stimulated T lymphocytes to planar membranes containing intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed Central

    Tözeren, A; Mackie, L H; Lawrence, M B; Chan, P Y; Dustin, M L; Springer, T A

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical and experimental methodology to determine the physical strength of cell adhesion to a planar membrane containing one set of adhesion molecules. In particular, the T lymphocyte adhesion due to the interaction of the lymphocyte function associated molecule 1 on the surface of the cell, with its counter-receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), on the planar membrane, was investigated. A micromanipulation method and mathematical analysis of cell deformation were used to determine (a) the area of conjugation between the cell and the substrate and (b) the energy that must be supplied to detach a unit area of the cell membrane from its substrate. T lymphocytes stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) conjugated strongly with the planar membrane containing purified ICAM-1. The T lymphocytes attached to the planar membrane deviated occasionally from their round configuration by extending pseudopods but without changing the size of the contact area. These adherent cells were dramatically deformed and then detached when pulled away from the planar membrane by a micropipette. Detachment occurred by a gradual decrease in the radius of the contact area. The physical strength of adhesion between a PMA-stimulated T lymphocyte and a planar membrane containing 1,000 ICAM-1 molecules/micron 2 was comparable to the strength of adhesion between a cytotoxic T cell and its target cell. The comparison of the adhesive energy density, measured at constant cell shape, with the model predictions suggests that the physical strength of cell adhesion may increase significantly when the adhesion bonds in the contact area are immobilized by the actin cytoskeleton. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:1358239

  15. Swelling equilibrium of dentin adhesive polymers formed on the water-adhesive phase boundary: Experiments and micromechanical model

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    During their application to the wet, oral environment, dentin adhesives can experience phase separation and composition change which can compromise the quality of the hybrid layer formed at the dentin-adhesive interface. The chemical composition of polymer phases formed in the hybrid layer can be represented using a ternary water-adhesive phase diagram. In this paper, these polymer phases have been characterized using a suite of mechanical tests and swelling experiments. The experimental results were evaluated using granular micromechanics based model that incorporates poro-mechanical effects and polymer-solvent thermodynamics. The variation of the model parameters and model-predicted polymer properties has been studied as a function of composition along the phase boundary. The resulting structure-property correlations provide insight into interactions occurring at the molecular level in the saturated polymer system. These correlations can be used for modeling the mechanical behavior of hybrid layer, and are expected to aid in the design and improvement of water-compatible dentin adhesive polymers. PMID:24076070

  16. Swelling equilibrium of dentin adhesive polymers formed on the water-adhesive phase boundary: experiments and micromechanical model.

    PubMed

    Misra, A; Parthasarathy, R; Ye, Q; Singh, V; Spencer, P

    2014-01-01

    During their application to the wet, oral environment, dentin adhesives can experience phase separation and composition change, which can compromise the quality of the hybrid layer formed at the dentin-adhesive interface. The chemical composition of polymer phases formed in the hybrid layer can be represented using a ternary water-adhesive phase diagram. In this paper, these polymer phases are characterized using a suite of mechanical tests and swelling experiments. The experimental results were evaluated using a granular micromechanics-based model incorporating poro-mechanical effects and polymer-solvent thermodynamics. The variation in the model parameters and model-predicted polymer properties was studied as a function of composition along the phase boundary. The resulting structure-property correlations provide insight into interactions occurring at the molecular level in the saturated polymer system. These correlations can be used for modeling the mechanical behavior of the hybrid layer, and are expected to aid in the design and improvement of water-compatible dentin adhesive polymers. PMID:24076070

  17. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sergé, Arnauld

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors, and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation, and metastasis. PMID:27200348

  18. A Chemomechanical Model of Matrix and Nuclear Rigidity Regulation of Focal Adhesion Size.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Lin, Yuan; Driscoll, Tristian P; Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Cukierman, Edna; Mauck, Robert L; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a chemomechanical model describing the growth dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion structures (i.e., focal adhesions (FAs)) is developed. We show that there are three regimes for FA evolution depending on their size. Specifically, nascent adhesions with initial lengths below a critical value that are yet to engage in actin fibers will dissolve, whereas bigger ones will grow into mature FAs with a steady state size. In adhesions where growth surpasses the steady state size, disassembly will occur until their sizes are reduced to the equilibrium state. This finding arises from the fact that polymerization of adhesion proteins is force-dependent. Under actomyosin contraction, individual integrin bonds within small FAs (i.e., nascent adhesions or focal complexes) must transmit higher loads while the phenomenon of stress concentration occurs at the edge of large adhesion patches. As such, an effective stiffness of the FA-extracellular matrix complex that is either too small or too large will be relatively low, resulting in a limited actomyosin pulling force developed at the edge that is insufficient to prevent disassembly. Furthermore, it is found that a stiffer extracellular matrix and/or nucleus, as well as a stronger chemomechanical feedback, will induce larger adhesions along with a higher level of contraction force. Interestingly, switching the extracellular side from an elastic half-space, corresponding to some widely used in vitro gel substrates, to a one-dimensional fiber (as in the case of cells anchoring to a fibrous scaffold in vivo) does not qualitative change these conclusions. Our model predictions are in good agreement with a variety of experimental observations obtained in this study as well as those reported in the literature. Furthermore, this new model, to our knowledge, provides a framework with which to understand how both intracellular and extracellular perturbations lead to changes in adhesion structure number and size. PMID:26536258

  19. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sergé, Arnauld

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors, and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation, and metastasis. PMID:27200348

  20. Hearing loss in workers exposed to epoxy adhesives and noise: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsiao-Yu; Shie, Ruei-Hao; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Epoxy adhesives contain organic solvents and are widely used in industry. The hazardous effects of epoxy adhesives remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of hearing loss among workers exposed to epoxy adhesives and noise. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 182 stone workers who were exposed to both epoxy adhesives and noise, 89 stone workers who were exposed to noise only, and 43 workers from the administrative staff who had not been exposed to adhesives or noise. We obtained demographic data, occupational history and medical history through face-to-face interviews and arranged physical examinations and pure-tone audiometric tests. We also conducted walk-through surveys in the stone industry. A total of 40 representative noise assessments were conducted in 15 workplaces. Air sampling was conducted at 40 workplaces, and volatile organic compounds were analysed using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) TO-15 method. Results The mean sound pressure level was 87.7 dBA (SD 9.9). The prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss was considerably increased in the stone workers exposed to epoxy adhesives (42%) compared with the stone workers who were not exposed to epoxy adhesives (21%) and the administrative staff group (9.3%). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that exposure to epoxy adhesives significantly increased the risk of hearing loss between 2 and 6 kHz after adjusting for age. Significant interactions between epoxy adhesives and noise and hearing impairment were observed at 3, 4 and 6 kHz. Conclusions Epoxy adhesives exacerbate hearing impairment in noisy environments, with the main impacts occurring in the middle and high frequencies. PMID:26892792

  1. Localized adhesion of monocytes to human atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated in vitro: implications for atherogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, R. N.; Johnson-Tidey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Blood-derived macrophages in the arterial intima are a characteristic feature of active atherosclerotic plaques. Adherent monocytes on the luminal surface and increased adhesion molecules on the endothelium have suggested that specific molecular mechanisms are involved in monocyte/macrophage traffic into the arterial wall. Adhesion of human monocytes and related cell lines was therefore studied in vitro to histological sections of human plaques. At 37 degrees C, these cells bound selectively to the plaques. Binding to the endothelium occurred and was also present extensively in the diseased intima. Inhibition studies showed that the endothelial and general intimal binding had largely similar molecular properties. Strong inhibition was produced by antibodies to the monocyte-specific adhesion molecule CD14, to beta2 integrins, and to ICAM-1. Likewise, a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence was strongly inhibitory, suggesting that binding of leukocyte integrins to arterial extracellular matrix was synergistic with cell-cell interactions. A P-selectin antibody was exceptional in giving selective inhibition of endothelial adhesion, which correlates with the specific endothelial localization of this adhesion molecule. These results show that monocytes adhere to atherosclerotic plaques through the focal activation of multiple arterial wall adhesion molecules, confirming the adhesion hypothesis. A positive feedback theory for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be suggested, based on the ability of macrophages in the wall to activate the endothelium, induce adhesion molecules, and facilitate additional monocyte entry. The adhesion assay provides a means for the identification of adhesion inhibitors with therapeutic potential. Images Figure 2 PMID:8686764

  2. Effect of carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid gelatin on preventing postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation and promoting healing in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Lin, Long-Xiang; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Huang, Dan; Sun, Yu-Long

    2016-05-01

    Adhesions often occur after abdominal surgery. It could cause chronic pelvic pain, intestinal obstruction, and infertility. A hydrogel biomaterial, carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid gelatin (cd-HA gelatin), has been successfully used to reduce adhesion formation after flexor tendon grafting. This study investigated the efficacy of cd-HA gelatin in preventing postsurgical peritoneal adhesions in a rat model. The surgical traumas were created on the underlying muscle of the abdominal wall and the serosal layer of the cecum. The wounds were covered with or without cd-HA gelatin. Animals were euthanized at day 14 after surgery. Adhesion formation was assessed with adhesion degree and adhesion breaking strength. The healing of abdominal wall was evaluated with biomechanical testing and histological analysis. The adhesions occurred in all rats (n = 12) without cd-HA gelatin treatment. The application of cd-HA gelatin significantly reduced the adhesion rate from 100% to 58%. The decrease of adhesion breaking strength also manifested that cd-HA gelatin could reduce postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Moreover, it was found that cd-HA gelatin was a safe material and could promote tissue healing. The cd-HA gelatin hydrogel could reduce the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions without adversely effects on wound healing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1175-1181, 2016. PMID:26749008

  3. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  4. WHERE DOES WATERBORNE GIARDIASIS OCCUR, AND WHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 60 outbreaks of waterborne giardiasis occurred in the United States between 1965 and 1982, mainly in the Northeast, the Rocky Mountain states, and the Pacific states. Outbreaks most often occurred as a result of inadequate or interrupted treatment. Disinfection problems and ...

  5. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  6. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G.; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J.R.; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  7. Experimental Investigation of Optimal Adhesion of Mushroomlike Elastomer Microfibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Song, Sukho; Sitti, Metin

    2015-09-22

    Optimal fiber designs for the maximal pull-off force have been indispensable for increasing the attachment performance of recently introduced gecko-inspired reversible micro/nanofibrillar adhesives. There are several theoretical studies on such optimal designs; however, due to the lack of three-dimensional (3D) fabrication techniques that can fabricate such optimal designs in 3D, there have not been many experimental investigations on this challenge. In this study, we benefitted from recent advances in two-photon lithography techniques to fabricate mushroomlike polyurethane elastomer fibers with different aspect ratios of tip to stalk diameter (β) and tip wedge angles (θ) to investigate the effect of these two parameters on the pull-off force. We found similar trends to those predicted theoretically. We found that β has an impact on the slope of the force-displacement curve while both β and θ play a role in the stress distribution and crack propagation. We found that these effects are coupled and the optimal set of parameters also depends on the fiber material. This is the first experimental verification of such optimal designs proposed for mushroomlike microfibers. This experimental approach could be used to evaluate a wide range of complex microstructured adhesive designs suggested in the literature and optimize them. PMID:26322396

  8. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  9. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at −2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives. PMID:26282730

  10. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  11. Mussel-Inspired Adhesives and Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce P.; Messersmith, P.B.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Waite, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Mussels attach to solid surfaces in the sea. Their adhesion must be rapid, strong, and tough, or else they will be dislodged and dashed to pieces by the next incoming wave. Given the dearth of synthetic adhesives for wet polar surfaces, much effort has been directed to characterizing and mimicking essential features of the adhesive chemistry practiced by mussels. Studies of these organisms have uncovered important adaptive strategies that help to circumvent the high dielectric and solvation properties of water that typically frustrate adhesion. In a chemical vein, the adhesive proteins of mussels are heavily decorated with Dopa, a catecholic functionality. Various synthetic polymers have been functionalized with catechols to provide diverse adhesive, sealant, coating, and anchoring properties, particularly for critical biomedical applications. PMID:22058660

  12. [Prevention of intrauterine adhesions after hysteroscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Revaux, A; Ducarme, G; Luton, D

    2008-03-01

    Intrauterine adhesions are the most frequent complications after hysteroscopic surgery in women of reproductive age. The prevalence of intrauterine adhesions after hysteroscopic surgery is correlated to intrauterine pathology (myoma, polyp, or adhesions). Few clinical trials have demonstrated the efficiency of barrier agents developed in order to prevent adhesions after operative hysteroscopy. Adhesion barriers are mechanic agent (intrauterine device), fluid agents (Seprafilm, Hyalobarrier) and postoperative systemic treatment (estroprogestative treatment). In this article, we evaluate the efficiency of these barrier agents for adhesion prevention in hysteroscopic surgery, undertaking a review of clinical trials published. The most frequent published studies evaluate the anatomic efficiency of antiadhesion agents after hysteroscopic surgery in order to evaluate the fertility. Data are still insufficient to evaluate them for clinical use. There is a need for other randomised controlled trials. PMID:18308609

  13. Adhesive bonding of carbon and ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kravetskii, G.A.; Anikin, L.T.; Demin, A.V.; Butyrin, G.M.

    1995-12-01

    On the basis of phenol resins and high-melting powder fillers, adhesives for bonding carbon and ceramic materials have been developed at NIIGRAFIT that allow adhesively bonded parts to be used at temperatures as high as 1500 to 1800{degrees}C, Some properties of those adhesives are covered in. The present paper describes results of recent investigations of the heat- and corrosion-resistance of the NIIGRAFIT`s adhesives. As the subjects of investigations were taken adhesives differing in the powder filler composition. Moreover, one adhesive (SVK) was subjected to a preliminary heat treatment (1200{degrees}C, 1 h, Ar) to fully complete the interaction processes between powder components and a binder coke.

  14. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  15. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  16. Adhesive for solar control film

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, H.J.

    1984-01-31

    A water-activatable adhesive useful for adhering a solar film, polyester (polyethylene terephthalate) film, to glass or to metal substrates. The adhesive comprises the reacted product of (A) gamma-isocyanatopropyltriethoxy silane, containing a free isocyanate (NCO) group, and (B) a thermoplastic polyester formed by reacting (i) a dibasic acid selected from the group consisting of terephthalic acid, isophthalic acid and hexahydrophthalic acid, and mixtures thereof, with (ii) a polymethylene glycol of the formula HO(CH/sub 2/) /SUB x/ OH where x is an integer from 2 to 10, neopentyl glycol and glycerin, and mixtures thereof, and (iii) an aliphatic dibasic acid selected from the group consisting of those having the formula HOOC(CH/sub 2/) /SUB n/ COOH where n is an integer from 1 to 8, and mixtures of such acids, whereby substantially no free NCO remains in the adhesive. Solar film is used for absorbing and/or reflecting solar radiation. Solar film can be a single sheet of polyester dyed sufficiently to absorb the glare of bright sunlight, or it can be a single sheet of polyester, on one side of which a reflective metal (most often aluminum) is deposited in an amount which can be totally reflective or in an amount which still allows visible light transmission and over which a protective coating is deposited, or it can be a laminated structure of the reflective film adhered to a clear or dyed polyester film by which means the reflective metal is sandwiched between two layers of polyester film, or it can be a laminated structure of a reflective film to a polyolefin film.

  17. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  18. Compound Charpy specimens by adhesive joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, M. M.; Hammad, F. H.; Pachur, D.; Britz, L.

    1992-03-01

    Compound (reconstituted) Charpy specimens were manufactured by an adhesive joining method in which each half of a previously tested specimen formed the central section of a new testpiece. 29 adhesives were screened to select the most suitable. Compound specimens were precracked and used as minature fracture mechanics specimens and tested in both 3-point static bending and impact. The results are in good agreement with those of conventional specimens. Recommendations for the most appropriate commercial adhesive for hot cell operations are given.

  19. Prevention of peritendinous adhesions with electrospun polyethylene glycol/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Shih-Hsien; Shalumon, K T; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative adhesion formation is the major complication that could occur after acute tendon surgery. The application of an anti-adhesive membrane at the post-surgical site is deemed as a potential way to solve this problem by preventing adhesive fibrotic tissue development. In this study, we fabricated electrospun composite poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/poly(caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibrous membrane (NFM) to prevent peritendinous adhesions, which could act as a barrier between the tendon and surrounding tissues, without interrupting mass transfer and normal tendon gliding. PCL/PEG NFMs of 0% PEG (PCL), 25% PEG (25PECL), 50% PEG (50PECL) and 75% PEG (75PECL) were prepared and characterized for physico-chemical properties. The PCL NFM shows the lowest protein permeability while 25PECL NFM exhibited the largest fiber diameter, smallest pore size and the largest ultimate stress and strain. The 75PECL NFM had the lowest water contact angle and the highest Young's modulus. In vitro cell adhesion and migration experiments with fibroblasts indicate that all NFMs could prevent cell penetration, with 75PECL NFM having the least cell attachment. In vivo application of 75PECL NFM on the repaired site of rabbit flexor tendon rupture model demonstrated improved efficacy compared with the PCL NFM and a commercial anti-adhesion barrier (Seprafilm™), from gross observation, histological analysis and functional assays. We concluded that 75PECL NFM could function as an effective anti-adhesion membrane after tendon surgery in a clinical setting. PMID:26115533

  20. Experimental strategies for the identification and characterization of adhesive proteins in animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Elise; Maldonado, Barbara; Ladurner, Peter; Flammang, Patrick; Santos, Romana

    2015-02-01

    Adhesive secretions occur in both aquatic and terrestrial animals, in which they perform diverse functions. Biological adhesives can therefore be remarkably complex and involve a large range of components with different functions and interactions. However, being mainly protein based, biological adhesives can be characterized by classical molecular methods. This review compiles experimental strategies that were successfully used to identify, characterize and obtain the full-length sequence of adhesive proteins from nine biological models: echinoderms, barnacles, tubeworms, mussels, sticklebacks, slugs, velvet worms, spiders and ticks. A brief description and practical examples are given for a variety of tools used to study adhesive molecules at different levels from genes to secreted proteins. In most studies, proteins, extracted from secreted materials or from adhesive organs, are analysed for the presence of post-translational modifications and submitted to peptide sequencing. The peptide sequences are then used directly for a BLAST search in genomic or transcriptomic databases, or to design degenerate primers to perform RT-PCR, both allowing the recovery of the sequence of the cDNA coding for the investigated protein. These sequences can then be used for functional validation and recombinant production. In recent years, the dual proteomic and transcriptomic approach has emerged as the best way leading to the identification of novel adhesive proteins and retrieval of their complete sequences. PMID:25657842

  1. Experimental strategies for the identification and characterization of adhesive proteins in animals: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hennebert, Elise; Maldonado, Barbara; Ladurner, Peter; Flammang, Patrick; Santos, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive secretions occur in both aquatic and terrestrial animals, in which they perform diverse functions. Biological adhesives can therefore be remarkably complex and involve a large range of components with different functions and interactions. However, being mainly protein based, biological adhesives can be characterized by classical molecular methods. This review compiles experimental strategies that were successfully used to identify, characterize and obtain the full-length sequence of adhesive proteins from nine biological models: echinoderms, barnacles, tubeworms, mussels, sticklebacks, slugs, velvet worms, spiders and ticks. A brief description and practical examples are given for a variety of tools used to study adhesive molecules at different levels from genes to secreted proteins. In most studies, proteins, extracted from secreted materials or from adhesive organs, are analysed for the presence of post-translational modifications and submitted to peptide sequencing. The peptide sequences are then used directly for a BLAST search in genomic or transcriptomic databases, or to design degenerate primers to perform RT-PCR, both allowing the recovery of the sequence of the cDNA coding for the investigated protein. These sequences can then be used for functional validation and recombinant production. In recent years, the dual proteomic and transcriptomic approach has emerged as the best way leading to the identification of novel adhesive proteins and retrieval of their complete sequences. PMID:25657842

  2. Minimal adhesion surface area in tangentially loaded digital contacts.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Hayward, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    The stick-to-slip transition of a fingertip in contact with a planar surface does not occur instantaneously. As the tangential load increases, portions of the skin adhere while others slip, giving rise to an evolution of the contact state, termed partial slip. We develop a quasi-static model that predicts that if the coefficient of kinetic friction is larger than the coefficient of static friction, then the stuck surface area diminishes as the tangential load increases until reaching a 'minimal adhesion surface area' where it vanishes abruptly. This phenomenon was observed in recently measured finger-slip image data (André et al., 2011) that were processed by an optic flow detection algorithm. We examined the results of 10 trials. Four of them exhibited the minimal adhesion surface area phenomenon, four of them did not, and two were inconclusive. PMID:21774936

  3. Structural adhesives for missile external protection material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, F. L.; Garzolini, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Two basic rubber materials are examined as possible external substrate protection materials (EPM) for missiles. The analysis provided a data base for selection of the optimum adhesives which are compatible with the substrate, loads applied and predicted bondline temperatures. Under the test conditions, EA934/NA was found to be the optimum adhesive to bond VAMAC 2273 and/or NBR/EPDM 9969A to aluminum substrate. The optimum adhesive for composite structures was EA956. Both of these adhesives are two-part epoxy systems with a pot life of approximately two hours. Further research is suggested on field repair criteria, nuclear hardness and survivability effects on bondline, and ageing effects.

  4. Computational Contact Formulations for Soft Body Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Roger A.

    This article gives an overview of adhesive contact for soft bodies and focuses on a general computational framework that is suitable for treating a large class of adhesion problems. The contact formulation is based on a non-linear continuum approach that is capable of describing bodies down to length scales of several nanometers. Several finite element formulations are presented, that introduce various approximations in order to increase the computational efficiency. The approaches are illustrated by several examples throughout the text. These include carbon nanotube interaction, adhesion of spheres, nanoindentation, thin film peeling, gecko adhesion and self-cleaning surface mechanisms.

  5. Investigation of package sealing using organic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic study was performed to evaluate the suitability of adhesives for sealing hybrid packages. Selected adhesives were screened on the basis of their ability to seal gold-plated Kovar butterfly-type packages that retain their seal integrity after individual exposures to increasingly severe temperature-humidity environments. Tests were also run using thermal shock, temperature cycling, mechanical shock and temperature aging. The four best adhesives were determined and further tested in a 60 C/98% RH environment and continuously monitored in regard to moisture content. Results are given, however, none of the tested adhesives passed all the tests.

  6. Denture Adhesives in Prosthodontics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P Ranjith; Shajahan, P A; Mathew, Jyothis; Koruthu, Anil; Aravind, Prasad; Ahammed, M Fazeel

    2015-01-01

    The use of denture adhesives is common among denture wearers, and it is also prescribed by many dentists. Prescribing denture adhesives has been viewed by many prosthodontists as a means of compensating for any defects in the fabrication procedures. Denture adhesives add to the retention and thereby improve chewing ability, reduce any instability, provide comfort and eliminate the accumulation of food debris beneath the dentures. Consequently, they increase the patient’s sense of security and satisfaction. However, obtaining the advice of the dental practitioner prior to the use of adhesives is a must. PMID:26225115

  7. Adhesive strength of autologous fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Hirozane, K; Kamiya, A

    2000-03-01

    To establish an easy and rapid method for measuring the adhesive strength of fibrin glue and to clarify the factor(s) most affecting the strength, a study was made on the effect of the concentration of plasma components on the strength of cryoprecipitate (Cryo) prepared from a subject's own autologous plasma to be used as fibrin glue. The adhesive strength of the Cryo was measured with various supporting materials instead of animal skin using a tester of tension and compression. The results were as follows: (1) the strength of Cryo applied to ground flat glass (4 cm2) was significantly greater than that applied to clear glass, clear plastic, or smooth and flat wood chips; (2) the adhesive strength of Cryo depended on the concentration of thrombin with the optimal concentration being 50 units/ml; (3) the concentration of CaCl2 did not affect the adhesive strength of Cryo; (4) the adhesive reaction was dependent on the temperature and the adhesive strength more quickly reached a steady state at 37 degrees C than at lower temperature; (5) the adhesive strength was correlated well with the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. These results indicate that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be easily and quickly evaluated using a tester and ground glass with thrombin at 50 units/ml, and that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be predicted from the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. PMID:10726885

  8. Effect of water absorption on pollen adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Carson Meredith, J

    2015-03-15

    Pollens possess a thin liquid coating, pollenkitt, which plays a major role in adhesion by forming capillary menisci at interfaces. Unfortunately, the influence of humidity on pollenkitt properties and capillary adhesion is unknown. Because humidity varies widely in the environment, the answers have important implications for better understanding plant reproduction, allergy and asthma, and pollen as atmospheric condensation nuclei. Here, pollenkitt-mediated adhesion of sunflower pollen to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was measured as a function of humidity. The results quantify for the first time the significant water absorption of pollenkitt and the resulting complex dependence of adhesion on humidity. On hydrophilic Si, adhesion increased with increasing RH for pollens with or without pollenkitt, up to 200nN at 70% RH. In contrast, on hydrophobic PS, adhesion of pollenkitt-free pollen is independent of RH. Surprisingly, when pollenkitt was present adhesion forces on hydrophobic PS first increased with RH up to a maximum value at 35% RH (∼160nN), and then decreased with further increases in RH. Independent measurement of pollenkitt properties is used with models of capillary adhesion to show that humidity-dependent changes in pollenkitt wetting and viscosity are responsible for this complex adhesion behavior. PMID:25524008

  9. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  10. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-11-15

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions.

  11. Extended Maxwell Garnett formalism for composite adhesives for microwave-assisted adhesion of polymer surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, B.; Lakhtakia, A. )

    1993-01-01

    Adhesives with dielectric loss are needed for microwave-assisted joining of polymeric substances. The dielectric loss in an otherwise suitable adhesive may be enhanced by doping it with fine metallic particles. Here we use a recently extended Maxwell Garnett formalism to estimate the complex dielectric constant of a metal-doped composite adhesive, with specific focus on the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of the composite adhesive. 14 refs.

  12. The Molecular Basis of Leukocyte Adhesion Involving Phosphatidic Acid and Phospholipase D*

    PubMed Central

    Speranza, Francis; Mahankali, Madhu; Henkels, Karen M.; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Defining how leukocytes adhere to solid surfaces, such as capillary beds, and the subsequent migration through the extracellular matrix, is a central biological issue. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) and its enzymatic reaction product, phosphatidic acid (PA), regulate cell adhesion of immune cells (macrophages and neutrophils) to collagen and have defined the underlying molecular mechanism in a spatio-temporal manner that coincides with PLD activity timing. A rapid (t½ = 4 min) and transient activation of the PLD1 isoform occurs upon adhesion, and a slower (t½ = 7.5 min) but prolonged (>30 min) activation occurs for PLD2. Importantly, PA directly binds to actin-related protein 3 (Arp3) at EC50 = 22 nm, whereas control phosphatidylcholine did not bind. PA-activated Arp3 hastens actin nucleation with a kinetics of t½ = 3 min at 300 nm (compared with controls of no PA, t½ = 5 min). Thus, PLD and PA are intrinsic components of cell adhesion, which reinforce each other in a positive feedback loop and react from cues from their respective solid substrates. In nascent adhesion, PLD1 is key, whereas a sustained adhesion in mature or established focal points is dependent upon PLD2, PA, and Arp3. A prolonged adhesion could effectively counteract the reversible intrinsic nature of this cellular process and constitute a key player in chronic inflammation. PMID:25187519

  13. Misfit effects in adhesion calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitker, Jurgen; Srolovitz, David J.

    1998-03-01

    The work of adhesion of bimaterial interfaces is commonly computed using quantum mechanical methods in which the two materials are strained into coherency. There is no relaxation of the coherency by the formation of an array of interfacial misfit dislocations, contrary to what is commonly observed for essentially all systems other than very thin films. In this paper, we investigate the errors introduced into the work of adhesion associated with the assumption of coherency. Series of atomistic simulations in two and three dimensions are performed using a simple Lennard-Jones-type model potential. We demonstrate that the assumption of coherency introduces errors that increase rapidly with misfit (for small misfit) and can easily be of the order of several tens of percent. We trace the source of these errors to the neglect of the elastic fields of misfit dislocations and to the variation in the number of bonds per unit interfacial area with misfit when coherency is assumed. Suggestions are made to minimize and/or correct for this error.

  14. A new angle on clinging in geckos: incline, not substrate, triggers the deployment of the adhesive system.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony P; Higham, Timothy E

    2009-10-22

    Lizards commonly climb in complex three-dimensional habitats, and gekkotans are particularly adept at doing this by using an intricate adhesive system involving setae on the ventral surface of their digits. However, it is not clear whether geckos always deploy their adhesive system, given that doing so may result in decreased (i.e. reduction in speed) locomotor performance. Here, we investigate circumstances under which the adhesive apparatus of clinging geckos becomes operative, and examine the potential trade-offs between speed and clinging. We quantify locomotor kinematics of a gecko with adhesive capabilities (Tarentola mauritanica) and one without (Eublepharis macularius). Whereas, somewhat unusually, E. macularius did not suffer a decrease in locomotor performance with an increase in incline, T. mauritanica exhibited a significant decrease in speed between the level and a 10 degrees incline. We demonstrate that this results from the combined influence of slope and the deployment of the adhesive system. All individuals kept their digits hyperextended on the level, but three of the six individuals deployed their adhesive system on the 10 degrees incline, and they exhibited the greatest decrease in velocity. The deployment of the adhesive system was dependent on incline, not surface texture (600 grit sandpaper and Plexiglas), despite slippage occurring on the level Plexiglas substrate. Our results highlight the type of sensory feedback (gravity) necessary for deployment of the adhesive system, and the trade-offs associated with adhesion. PMID:19656797

  15. Large-area patterning of the tackiness of a nanocomposite adhesive by sintering of nanoparticles under IR radiation.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Robert S; Dupin, Damien; Siband, Elodie; Ouzineb, Keltoum; Keddie, Joseph L

    2013-03-01

    We present a simple technique to switch off the tack adhesion in selected areas of a colloidal nanocomposite adhesive. It is made from a blend of soft colloidal polymer particles and hard copolymer nanoparticles. In regions that are exposed to IR radiation, the nanoparticles sinter together to form a percolating skeleton, which hardens and stiffens the adhesive. The tack adhesion is lost locally. Masks can be made from silicone-coated disks, such as coins. Under the masks, adhesive island regions are defined with the surrounding regions being a nontacky coating. When optimizing the nanocomposite's adhesive properties, the addition of the hard nanoparticles raises the elastic modulus of the adhesive significantly, but adhesion is not lost because the yield point remains relatively low. During probe-tack testing, the soft polymer phases yield and enable fibrillation. After heating under IR radiation, the storage modulus increases by a factor of 5, and the yield point increases nearly by a factor of 6, such that yielding and fibrillation do not occur in the probe-tack testing. Hence, the adhesion is lost. Loading and unloading experiments indicate that a rigid skeleton is created when the nanoparticles sinter together, and it fractures under moderate strains. This patterning method is relatively simple and fast to execute. It is widely applicable to other blends of thermoplastic hard nanoparticles and larger soft particles. PMID:23429909

  16. ST elevation occurring during stress testing

    PubMed Central

    Malouf, Diana; Mugmon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    A case is presented of significant reversible ST elevation occurring during treadmill testing, and the coronary anatomy and subsequent course are described, indicating that ischemia is a potential cause of this electrocardiographic finding. PMID:27124164

  17. Human external ophthalmomyiasis occurring in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Levett, P N; Brooker, L; Reifer, C; Prussia, P R; Eberhard, M L

    2004-06-01

    Human infection with the sheep nasal botfly Oestrus ovis occurs sporadically. In most cases, there is a history of a strike in the eye by the adult fly. Human O. ovis has been reported rarely from the Americas. We report the first case of O. ovis infection in the Caribbean region, which occurred in an urban area of Barbados. The patient responded to removal of the larvae from the conjunctiva and symptomatic treatment. PMID:15352754

  18. Mechanical properties of methacrylate-based model dentin adhesives: effect of loading rate and moisture exposure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanical behavior of model methacrylate-based dentin adhesives under conditions that simulate the wet oral environment. A series of monotonic and creep experiments were performed on rectangular beam samples of dentin adhesive in three-point bending configuration under different moisture conditions. The monotonic test results show a significant effect of loading rate on the failure strength and the linear limit (yield point) of the stress-strain response. In addition, these tests show that the failure strength is low, and the failure occurs at a smaller deformation when the test is performed under continuously changing moisture conditions. The creep test results show that under constant moisture conditions, the model dentin adhesives can have a viscoelastic response under certain low loading levels. However, when the moisture conditions vary under the same low loading levels, the dentin adhesives have an anomalous creep response accompanied by large secondary creep and high strain accumulation. PMID:23744598

  19. Surface characterization and adhesion of oxygen plasma-modified LARC-TPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, J. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    LARC-TPI, an aromatic thermoplastic polyimide, was exposed to an oxygen plasma as a surface pretreatment for adhesive bonding. Chemical and physical changes which occurred in the polyimide surface as a result of the plasma treatment were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IR-RAS), contact-angle analysis, ellipsometry, and high resolution SEM. A 180-deg peel test with an acrylate-based pressure sensitive adhesive as a flexible adherent was utilized to study the interactions of the plasma-treated polyimide surface with other polymeric materials. The surface characterization and adhesion testing results showed that the oxygen plasma treatment, while creating a more hydrophilic, polar surface, also caused chain scission, resulting in the formation of a weak boundary layer which inhibited adhesion.

  20. Nondestructive inspection in adhesive-bonded joint CFRP using pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, P. H.; Webb, S. C.; Peters, K. J.

    2013-05-01

    Many forms of damages in fiber reinforcement polymer (FRP) composites are difficult to detect because they occurs in subsurface layers of the composites. One challenging need for inspection capabilities is in adhesively bonded joints between composite components, a common location of premature failure in aerospace structures. This paper investigates pulsed phase thermography (PPT) imaging of fatigue damage in these adhesively bonded joints. Simulated defects were created to calibrate parameters for fatigue loading conditions, PPT imaging parameters, and a damage sizing algorithm for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) single lap joints. Afterwards, lap joint specimens were fabricated with varying quality of manufacturing. PPT imaging of the pristine specimens revealed defects such as air bubbles, adhesive thickness variations, and weak bonding surface between the laminate and adhesive. Next, fatigue testing was performed and acquired PPT imaging data identified fatigue induced damage prior to final failure cycles. After failure of each sample, those images were confirmed by visual inspections of failure surface.

  1. Endothelial cell adhesion in real time. Measurements in vitro by tandem scanning confocal image analysis.

    PubMed

    Davies, P F; Robotewskyj, A; Griem, M L

    1993-06-01

    Real time measurements of cell-substratum adhesion in endothelial cells were obtained by tandem scanning confocal microscopy of sites of focal contact (focal adhesions) at the abluminal cell surface. Focal contact sites were sharply defined (low radiance levels) in the living cell such that the images could be enhanced, digitized, and isolated from other cellular detail. Sites of focal contact are the principal determinant of cell-substratum adhesion. Measurements of (a) the focal contact area and (b) the closeness of contact (inverse radiance) were used to nominally define the adhesion of a single cell or field of cells, and to record spontaneous and induced changes of cell adhesion in real time. The topography of focal contacts was estimated by calculating separation distances from radiance values using a calibration technique based on interference ring optics. While slightly closer contact was noted between the cell membrane and substratum at or near the center of each focal contact, separation distances throughout the adhesion regions were always < 50 nm. Subtraction of consecutive images revealed continuous spontaneous remodeling of individual focal adhesions in unperturbed cells during periods of < 1 min. Despite extensive remodeling of focal contact sites, however, cell adhesion calculated for an entire cell over extended periods varied by < 10%. When cytoskeletal stability was impaired by exposure to cytochalasin or when cells were exposed to proteolytic enzyme, endothelial adhesion declined rapidly. Such changes were recorded at the level of single cells, groups of cells, and at single focal adhesions. In both unperturbed and manipulated cells, the dynamics of remodeling and cell adhesion characteristics varied greatly between individual sites within the same cell; disappearance of existing sites and appearance of new ones often occurred within minutes while adjacent sites underwent minimal remodelling. Tandem scanning confocal microscopy image analysis of

  2. Strategies to Minimize Adhesions to Intraperitoneally Placed Mesh in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Lucia; Chandratnam, Edward; Turingan, Isidro; Hawthorne, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions to mesh/tacks in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair are often cited as reasons not to adopt its evidence-based superiority over conventional open methods. This pilot study assessed the occurrence of adhesions to full-sized Polypropylene and Gore-tex DualMesh Plus meshes and the possibility for adhesion prevention using fibrin sealant. Methods: Two 10-cm to 15-cm pieces of mesh were placed and fixed laparoscopically in pigs (25kg to 55kg). Group I: 2 animals with Polypropylene mesh on one side and DualMesh on other side. Group II: 2 animals with DualMesh on each side with fibrin sealant applied to the periphery of mesh and staples to one side. Group III: 1 animal with 2 pieces of Polypropylene mesh with fibrin sealant applied to the entire mesh. All animals underwent laparoscopy 3 months later to assess the extent of adhesions, and full-thickness specimens were removed for histological evaluation. Results: More Polypropylene mesh was involved in adhesions than DualMesh. However, with the DualMesh involved in adhesions, more of the surface area was involved in forming adhesions than with Polypropylene mesh. None of the implanted DualMesh had visceral adhesions, while 2 out of 3 Polypropylene meshes had adhesions to both the liver and spleen but none to the bowel. Implanted Polypropylene mesh with fibrin sealant had no adhesions. DualMesh had shrunk more significantly than Polypropylene mesh. Histological evaluation showed absence of acute inflammatory response, significantly more chronic inflammatory response to DualMesh compared to Polypropylene and complete mesothelialization with both meshes. There was extensive collagen deposition between Polypropylene mesh fibers, while fibrosis occurred on both sides of DualMesh with synovial metaplasia over its peritoneal surface akin to encapsulation. Conclusions: DualMesh caused fewer omental and visceral adhesions than Polypropylene mesh did. Fibrin sealant eliminated adhesions to DualMesh and

  3. Development and characterization of amorphous acrylate networks for use as switchable adhesives inspired from shapememory behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhera, Nishant

    induced switchable adhesion and water induced switchable adhesion of patterned acrylate surfaces was investigated. The viscoelastic energy dissipation occurring during the detachment phase was shown to dramatically increase adhesion under both thermally induced and water induced conditions. This effect was most pre-dominant at the glass transition temperature of the material. Increase in pre-load force and unloading velocity were also shown to increase the adhesive capability of the patterned acrylate SMPs.

  4. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175... Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives. Pressure-sensitive adhesives may be safely used as the... prescribed conditions: (a) Pressure-sensitive adhesives prepared from one or a mixture of two or more of...

  5. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  6. Modeling of adhesion in tablet compression - I. atomic force microscopy and molecular simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Li, T.; Bateman, S. D.; Erck, R.; Morris, K. R.; Energy Technology; Purdue Univ.; Novartis Pharmaceutical Corp.

    2003-04-01

    Adhesion problems during tablet manufacturing have been observed to be dependent on many formulation and process factors including the run time on the tablet press. Consequently, problems due to sticking may only become apparent towards the end of the development process when a prolonged run on the tablet press is attempted for the first time. It would be beneficial to predict in a relative sense if a formulation or new chemical entity has the potential for adhesion problems early in the development process. It was hypothesized that favorable intermolecular interaction between the drug molecules and the punch face is the first step or criterion in the adhesion process. Therefore, the rank order of adhesion during tablet compression should follow the rank order of these energies of interaction. The adhesion phenomenon was investigated using molecular simulations and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three model compounds were chosen from a family of profen compounds. Silicon nitride AFM tips were modified by coating a 20-nm iron layer on the surfaces by sputter coating. Profen flat surfaces were made by melting and recrystallization. The modified AFM probe and each profen surface were immersed in the corresponding profen saturated water during force measurements using AFM. The work of adhesion between iron and ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and flurbiprofen in vacuum were determined to be -184.1, -2469.3, -17.3 mJ {center_dot} m-2, respectively. The rank order of the work of adhesion between iron and profen compounds decreased in the order: ketoprofen > ibuprofen > flurbiprofen. The rank order of interaction between the drug molecules and the iron superlattice as predicted by molecular simulation using Cerius2 is in agreement with the AFM measurements. It has been demonstrated that Atomic Force Microscopy is a powerful tool in studying the adhesion phenomena between organic drug compounds and metal surface. The study has provided insight into the adhesion problems

  7. The effect of saliva decontamination procedures on dentin bond strength after universal adhesive curing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayang; Hong, Sungok; Choi, Yoorina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of multiple decontamination procedures for salivary contamination after curing of a universal adhesive on dentin bond strength according to its etch modes. Materials and Methods Forty-two extracted bovine incisors were trimmed by exposing the labial dentin surfaces and embedded in cylindrical molds. A universal adhesive (All-Bond Universal, Bisco) was used. The teeth were randomly divided into groups according to etch mode and decontamination procedure. The adhesive was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions for a given etch mode. With the exception of the control groups, the cured adhesive was contaminated with saliva for 20 sec. In the self-etch group, the teeth were divided into three groups: control, decontamination with rinsing and drying, and decontamination with rinsing, drying, and adhesive. In the etch-and-rinse group, the teeth were divided into four groups: control, decontamination with rinsing and drying, decontamination with rinsing, drying, and adhesive, and decontamination with rinsing, drying, re-etching, and reapplication of adhesive. A composite resin (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE) was used for filling and was cured on the treated surfaces. Shear bond strength was measured, and failure modes were evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variation and Tukey's HSD test. Results The etch-and-rinse subgroup that was decontaminated by rinse, drying, re-etching, and reapplication of adhesive showed a significantly higher bond strength. Conclusions When salivary contamination occurs after curing of the universal adhesive, additional etching improves the bond strength to dentin. PMID:26587416

  8. Evaluation of progestogens for postoperative adhesion prevention.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, P J; Quigley, M M; Held, B

    1984-10-01

    Progesterone (P) has been shown to have potent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Previous reports have suggested that the use of P decreases postoperative adhesion formation. To further evaluate the role of pharmacologic doses of progestogens in adhesion prevention, 42 mature New Zealand White rabbits underwent standardized injuries to the uterine horns, fimbriae, and pelvic peritoneum and received one of six treatments. Group S had intraperitoneal placement of normal saline (0.9%); group H received intraperitoneal placement of 32% dextran 70; group IM-P received intramuscular P-in-oil 10 days before and after laparotomy in addition to intraperitoneal saline; group IP-P had intraperitoneal placement of an aqueous P suspension; group DP received medroxyprogesterone acetate intraperitoneally; and group C received no intramuscular or intraperitoneal adhesion-prevention agents. The animals were sacrificed 6 weeks after laparotomy, and the adhesions were scored. Intraperitoneal saline (group S) significantly reduced the amount of adhesions when compared with the control group (C) (P less than 0.05). No significant difference was observed when group S was compared with group H. Intramuscular P added to saline (group IM-P) did not cause further reduction in adhesions when compared with group S. Both group IP-P and group DP had more adhesions than did group S (P less than 0.01). These data fail to support previous claims regarding adhesion prevention by the use of locally or parenterally administered progestogens. PMID:6237937

  9. Molecular Adhesion between Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular adhesion between the major constituents of cartilage extracellular matrix, namely, the highly negatively charged proteoglycan aggrecan and the type II/IX/XI fibrillar collagen network, in simulated physiological conditions. Colloidal force spectroscopy was applied to measure the maximum adhesion force and total adhesion energy between aggrecan end-attached spherical tips (end radius R ≈ 2.5 μm) and trypsin-treated cartilage disks with undamaged collagen networks. Studies were carried out in various aqueous solutions to reveal the physical factors that govern aggrecan–collagen adhesion. Increasing both ionic strength and [Ca2+] significantly increased adhesion, highlighting the importance of electrostatic repulsion and Ca2+-mediated ion bridging effects. In addition, we probed how partial enzymatic degradation of the collagen network, which simulates osteoarthritic conditions, affects the aggrecan–collagen interactions. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in aggrecan–collagen adhesion even when there were no detectable changes at the macro- or microscales. It is hypothesized that the aggrecan–collagen adhesion, together with aggrecan–aggrecan self-adhesion, works synergistically to determine the local molecular deformability and energy dissipation of the cartilage matrix, in turn, affecting its macroscopic tissue properties. PMID:24491174

  10. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  11. Adhesion force studies of nanofibers and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xing, Malcolm; Zhong, Wen; Xu, Xiuling; Thomson, Douglas

    2010-07-20

    Surface adhesion between nanofibers and nanoparticles has attracted attention for potential biomedical applications, but the measurement has not been reported. Adhesion forces were measured using a polystyrene (PS) nanoparticle attached to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip/probe. Electrospun PS nanofibers of different diameters were tapped with the probe to study the effect of fiber diameters on adhesion force. Both AFM experiments and numerical models suggest that the adhesion force increases with increased fiber diameters. Numerical models further demonstrated that local deformation of the fiber surface, including the flattening of surface asperities and the nanofiber wrapping around the particle during contact, may have a significant impact on the adhesion force. The adhesion forces are in the order of 100 nN, much smaller than the adhesion forces of the gecko foot hair, but much larger than that of the receptor-ligand pair, antibody-antigen pair, and single-stranded DNA from a substrate. Adhesion forces of nanofibers with roughness were predicted by numerical analysis. This study is expected to provide approaches and information useful in the design of nanomedicine and scaffold based on nanofibers for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20552953

  12. Polyurethane adhesive with improved high temperature properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A polyurethane resin with paste activator, capable of providing useful bond strengths over the temperature range of -184 C to 149 C, is described. The adhesive system has a pot life of over one hour. Tensile shear strength ratings are given for various adhesive formulations.

  13. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel; Detry, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. PMID:22147959

  14. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products. PMID:26892897

  15. ISOLATION OF INTEGRIN-BASED ADHESION COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew C.; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angelique; Robertson, Joseph; Paul, Nikki R.; Ng, Daniel H. J.; Askari, Janet A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of cells with their extracellular environment is facilitated by cell surface adhesion receptors, such as integrins, which play important roles in both normal development and the onset of pathologies. Engagement of integrins with their ligands in the extracellular matrix, or counter receptors on other cells, initiates the intracellular assembly of a wide variety of proteins into adhesion complexes such as focal contacts, focal adhesions and fibrillar adhesions. The proteins recruited to these complexes mediate bidirectional signalling across the plasma membrane and as such help to coordinate and / or modulate the multitude of physical or chemical signals to which the cell is subjected. The protocols in this unit describe two approaches for the isolation or enrichment of proteins contained within integrin-associated adhesion complexes together with their local plasma membrane / cytosolic environments from cells in culture. In the first protocol integrin-associated adhesion structures are affinity isolated using microbeads coated with extracellular ligands or antibodies. The second protocol describes the isolation of ventral membrane preparations that are enriched for adhesion complex structures. The protocols permit the determination of adhesion complex components by subsequent downstream analysis by Western blotting or mass spectrometry. PMID:25727331

  16. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification....

  18. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification....

  19. Adhesions and Adhesiolysis: The Role of Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kavic, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Adhesions commonly result from abdominal and pelvic surgical procedures and may result in intestinal obstruction, infertility, chronic pain, or complicate subsequent operations. Laparoscopy produces less peritoneal trauma than does conventional laparotomy and may result in decreased adhesion formation. We present a review of the available data on laparoscopy and adhesion formation, as well as laparoscopic adhesiolysis. We also review current adjuvant techniques that may be used by practicing laparoscopists to prevent adhesion formation. Database: A Medline search using “adhesions,” “adhesiolysis,” and “laparoscopy” as key words was performed for English-language articles. Further references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each work. Discussion: The majority of studies indicate that laparoscopy may reduce postoperative adhesion formation relative to laparotomy. However, laparoscopy by itself does not appear to eliminate adhesions completely. A variety of adjuvant materials are available to surgeons, and the most recent investigation has demonstrated significant potential for intraperitoneal barriers. Newer technologies continue to evolve and should result in clinically relevant reductions in adhesion formation. PMID:12113430

  20. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Takahashi, Kunio; Sato, Chiaki

    2015-12-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified.

  1. Adhesion hysteresis of silane coated microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    2000-04-17

    The authors have developed a new experimental approach for measuring hysteresis in the adhesion between micromachined surfaces. By accurately modeling the deformations in cantilever beams that are subject to combined interfacial adhesion and applied electrostatic forces, they determine adhesion energies for advancing and receding contacts. They draw on this new method to examine adhesion hysteresis for silane coated micromachined structures and found significant hysteresis for surfaces that were exposed to high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Atomic force microscopy studies of these surfaces showed spontaneous formation of agglomerates that they interpreted as silages that have irreversibly transformed from uniform surface layers at low RH to isolated vesicles at high RH. They used contact deformation models to show that the compliance of these vesicles could reasonably account for the adhesion hysteresis that develops at high RH as the surfaces are forced into contact by an externally applied load.

  2. Coating to enhance metal-polymer adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathi, A.; Mahulikar, D.

    1996-12-31

    An ultra-thin electroplated coating has been developed to enhance adhesion of metals to polymers. The coating was developed for microelectronic packaging applications where it greatly improves adhesion of metal leadframes to plastic molding compounds. Recent tests show that the coating enhances adhesion of different metals to other types of adhesives as well and may thus have wider applicability. Results of adhesion tests with this coating, as well as its other characteristics such as corrosion resistance, are discussed. The coating is a very thin transparent electroplated coating containing zinc and chromium. It has been found to be effective on a variety of metal surfaces including copper alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Al alloys, stainless steel, silver, nickel, Pd/Ni and Ni-Sn. Contact resistance measurements show that the coating has little or no effect on electrical resistivity.

  3. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  4. [Adhesive and hemagglutinating properties of lactobacilli].

    PubMed

    Brilis, V I; Brilene, T A; Lentsner, Kh P; Lentsner, A A

    1982-09-01

    The study of the adhesive and hemagglutinating properties of the strains of different Lactobacillus species isolated from the human digestive tract and sour milk products were carried out. 49 strains of 9 Lactobacillus species were studied; of these, 10 strains had been isolated from saliva, 11 strains from feces, 7 strains from milk and 5 strains from sour cream. 11 collection strains and 2 strains used in the production of lactobacterin served as controls. Adhesion was studied in vitro on human red blood cells used as a model. Red blood cells used in the experiments had been taken from 23 donors aged 25-52 years. Lactobacilli were found to have certain inter and intraspecific differences in their adhesiveness. The adhesiveness of the lactobacilli isolated from human feces was considerably greater than that of the strains isolated from sour milk products and of the collection strains. Only the strains of lactobacilli with low adhesiveness possessed pronounced hemagglutinating properties. PMID:7148229

  5. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  6. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-06-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients.

  7. Adhesion, friction and micromechanical properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and micromechanical properties of ceramics, both in monolithic and coating form, are reviewed. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials, and metals. For the simplicity of discussion, the tribological properties of concern in the processes are separated into two parts. The first part discusses the pull-off force (adhesion) and the shear force required to break the interfacial junctions between contacting surfaces. The role of chemical bonding in adhesion and friction, and the effects of surface contaminant films and temperature on tribological response with respect to adhesion and friction are discussed. The second part deals with abrasion of ceramics. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The scratch technique of determining the critical load needed to fracture interfacial adhesive bonds of ceramic deposited on substrates is also addressed.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion deficiency type 1 leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that causes the immune system ...

  9. Adhesion Awareness: A National Survey of Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Schreinemacher, Marc H. F.; ten Broek, Richard P.; Bakkum, Erica A.; van Goor, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Background Postoperative adhesions are the most frequent complication of abdominal surgery, leading to high morbidity, mortality, and costs. However, the problem seems to be neglected by surgeons for largely unknown reasons. Methods A survey assessing knowledge and personal opinion about the extent and impact of adhesions was sent to all Dutch surgeons and surgical trainees. The informed-consent process and application of antiadhesive agents were questioned in addition. Results The response rate was 34.4%. Two thirds of all respondents (67.7%) agreed that adhesions exert a clinically relevant, negative effect. A negative perception of adhesions correlated with a positive attitude regarding adhesion prevention (ρ = 0.182, p < 0.001). However, underestimation of the extent and impact of adhesions resulted in low knowledge scores (mean test score 37.6%). Lower scores correlated with more uncertainty about indications for antiadhesive agents which, in turn, correlated with never having used any of these agents (ρ = 0.140, p = 0.002; ρ = 0.095, p = 0.035; respectively). Four in 10 respondents (40.9%) indicated that they never inform patients on adhesions and only 9.8% informed patients routinely. A majority of surgeons (55.9%) used antiadhesive agents in the past, but only a minority (13.4%) did in the previous year. Of trainees, 82.1% foresaw an increase in the use of antiadhesive agents compared to 64.5% of surgeons (p < 0.001). Conclusions The magnitude of the problem of postoperative adhesions is underestimated and informed consent is provided inadequately by Dutch surgeons. Exerting adhesion prevention is related to the perception of and knowledge about adhesions. PMID:20814678

  10. The effect of various naturally occurring metal-binding compounds on the electrochemical behavior of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.C.; McCafferty, E.

    1996-01-01

    Naturally occurring biological molecules are of considerable interest as possible corrosion inhibitors because of increased attention on the development of environmentally compatible, nonpolluting corrosion inhibitors. A hydroxamate yeast siderophore (rhodotorulic acid), a catecholate bacterial siderophore (parabactin), an adhesive protein from the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, and two metal-binding compounds isolated from the tomato and sunflower roots, namely, chlorogenic and caffeic acid, respectively, were adsorbed from solution onto pure aluminum (99.9995%) and their effect on the critical pitting potential and polarization resistance in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl was measured. These measurements were made using anodic polarization and ac impedance spectroscopy. The catechol-containing siderophore has an inhibitive effect on the critical pitting potential of aluminum in 0.1 M NaCl and increases the polarization resistance of the metal over time. The adhesive protein from the blue mussel is also effective in inhibiting the pitting of aluminum.

  11. The corrosion inhibition of iron and aluminum by various naturally occurring biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Hansen, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Biological polymers that exhibit a strong affinity for metal surfaces are increasingly becoming the focus of research toward the development of environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors. This paper deals with the use of various naturally occurring organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors for iron or aluminum. Among the organic molecules considered are catecholate and hydroxamate siderophores isolated from bacteria, the adhesive protein from the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L, and caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. FTIR analysis, anodic polarization curves, and AC impedance measurements were used to determine the adsorption and effectiveness of the various organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors. Parabactin, a catecholate siderophore, was effective in inhibiting both the corrosion of iron in hydrochloric acid and the pitting of aluminum in 0.1 M sodium chloride. The adhesive protein from the blue mussel was also effective in inhibiting the pitting of aluminum.

  12. The coffee diterpene kahweol inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Ji Young; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang . E-mail: hgjeong@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Endothelial cells produce adhesion molecules after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. These adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kahweol, a coffee-specific diterpene. This study examined the effects of kahweol on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. Kahweol inhibited the adhesion of TNF{alpha}-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF{alpha}-induced protein and mRNA expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Furthermore, kahweol inhibited the TNF{alpha}-induced JAK2-PI3K/Akt-NF-{kappa}B activation pathway in these cells. Overall, kahweol has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic activities, which occurs partly by down-regulating the pathway that affects the expression and interaction of the cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells.

  13. Phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins by protein kinase C correlates with leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Valmu, L; Autero, M; Siljander, P; Patarroyo, M; Gahmberg, C G

    1991-11-01

    Adhesion of activated leukocytes to cells is of critical functional importance. The adhesion is known to be mediated mainly by the CD11/CD18 integrins, also known as leukocytic cell adhesion molecules, or Leu-CAM. We have now studied the phosphorylation of Leu-CAM by protein kinase C and the correlation of phosphorylation with the generation of the adhesive phenotype among human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes during cell activation. We here show that a good correlation exists between the phosphorylation of the beta subunit of Leu-CAM (CD18), and the extent of cell-to-cell adhesion. The phosphorylated CD18 subunit was associated with both CD11a and CD11b. Purified protein kinase C was able to phosphorylate the beta subunit of isolated Leu-CAM in vitro. The phosphorylation occurred mainly on serine residues. PMID:1682156

  14. Young Children's Reports of when Learning Occurred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Connie M.; Bartsch, Karen; Nunez, Narina

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated young children's reports of when learning occurred. A total of 96 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds were recruited from suburban preschools and elementary schools. The children learned an animal fact and a body movement. A week later, children learned another animal fact and another body movement and then answered questions about…

  15. Phonetic Recalibration Only Occurs in Speech Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vroomen, Jean; Baart, Martijn

    2009-01-01

    Upon hearing an ambiguous speech sound dubbed onto lipread speech, listeners adjust their phonetic categories in accordance with the lipread information (recalibration) that tells what the phoneme should be. Here we used sine wave speech (SWS) to show that this tuning effect occurs if the SWS sounds are perceived as speech, but not if the sounds…

  16. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical impact. Experimental data in animal models have suggested that CO2 pneumoperitoneum can cause acute peritoneal inflammation during laparoscopy depending on the insufflation pressure and the surgery duration. Broad peritoneal cavity protection by the insufflation of a low-temperature humidified gas mixture of CO2, N2O and O2 seems to represent the best approach for reducing peritoneal inflammation due to pneumoperitoneum. However, these experimental data have not had a significant impact on the modification of laparoscopic instrumentation. In contrast, surgeons should train themselves to perform laparoscopy quickly, and they should complete their learning curves before testing chemical anti-adhesive agents and anti-adhesion barriers. Chemical anti-adhesive agents have the potential to exert broad peritoneal cavity protection against adhesion formation, but when these agents are used alone, the concentrations needed to prevent adhesions are too high and could cause major post-operative side effects. Anti-adhesion barriers have been used mainly in open surgery, but some clinical data from laparoscopic surgeries are already available. Sprays, gels, and fluid barriers are easier to apply in laparoscopic surgery than solid barriers. Results have been encouraging with solid barriers, spray barriers, and gel barriers, but they have been ambiguous with fluid barriers. Moreover, when barriers have been used alone, the maximum protection against adhesion formation has been no greater than

  17. The adhesion of oxygen-plasma treated poly(ethylene) and poly(ethylene terephthlate) films

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, S.L.; Kinloch, A.J.; Watts, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of low-pressure oxygen-plasma treatment on the surfaces of poly(ethylene) (PE) and poly(ethylene terephthlate) (PET) films and its influence on the adhesion of PE/PET laminates were assessed. The 90{degree} peel test was used to estimate the adhesive fracture energy, G{sub c} for the laminates. XPS, SEM and AFM were used to analyse the treated films and fracture surfaces. Significant improvements in bond strength occurred within very short treatment times (5s at 50W) with the maximum adhesion occurring after 300s. For longer treatment times the bond strengths decrease slightly. G{sub c} values were found to be low when PET was the peel arm. When PE was the peel arm, the G{sub c} values were substantially larger using the current analysis.

  18. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur. PMID:18670583

  19. Ion-beam-enhanced adhesion in the electronic stopping region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. E.; Qiu, Y.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ion beams in the electronic stopping region to improve the adhesion of insulators to other materials is described. In particular, the bonding of Au films to Teflon, ferrite, and SiO2 was improved by bombarding them with He and Cl, respectively. Improvements in bonding were also observed for Au on glass, Au and Cu on sapphire, and Si3N4 on Si. The mechanism is apparently associated with sputtering and track forming processes occurring in the electronic stopping region. Some applications are discussed.

  20. Surface Physicochemistry and Ionic Strength Affects eDNA’s Role in Bacterial Adhesion to Abiotic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Regina, Viduthalai R.; Lokanathan, Arcot R.; Modrzyński, Jakub J.; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important structural component of biofilms formed by many bacteria, but few reports have focused on its role in initial cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of eDNA in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces, and determine to which extent eDNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised with different chemistries resulting in variable hydrophobicity and charge. Cell adhesion experiments were carried out at three different ionic strengths. Removal of eDNA from S. xylosus cells by DNase treatment did not alter the zeta potential, but rendered the cells more hydrophilic. DNase treatment impaired adhesion of cells to glass surfaces, but the adhesive properties of S. xylosus were regained within 30 minutes if DNase was not continuously present, implying a continuous release of eDNA in the culture. Removal of eDNA lowered the adhesion of S. xylosus to all surfaces chemistries tested, but not at all ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength. The adhesive properties of eDNA in mediating initial adhesion of S. xylosus is thus highly versatile, but also dependent on the physicochemical properties of the surface and ionic strength of the surrounding medium. PMID:25122477

  1. Young children's reports of when learning occurred.

    PubMed

    Tang, Connie M; Bartsch, Karen; Nunez, Narina

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated young children's reports of when learning occurred. A total of 96 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds were recruited from suburban preschools and elementary schools. The children learned an animal fact and a body movement. A week later, children learned another animal fact and another body movement and then answered questions about when the different learning events occurred. Responses of children who responded correctly to control questions about time supported the hypothesis that temporal distance questions would elicit more correct responses than would temporal location questions. Partial support was also found for the hypothesis that behavior learning would generate more correct reports than would fact learning. Implications for characterizations of children's developing understanding of knowledge and for applications of those characterizations in education and eyewitness testimony are discussed. PMID:17346740

  2. Changes in joint laxity occurring during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Calguneri, M; Bird, H A; Wright, V

    1982-01-01

    We have studied changes in peripheral joint laxity occurring during pregnancy in 68 females using both the finger hyperextensometer to quantify laxity at the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger and Beighton et al.'s modification of the Carter and Wilkinson scoring system. Although the latter system recorded no change, the more sensitive hyperextensometer demonstrated a significant increase in joint laxity during the last trimester of pregnancy (0.02 greater than p greater than 0.01) over the readings from the same individuals after parturition. When primigravidae and multigravidae were compared, a highly significant increase in laxity was found in women having their second baby over those having their first (0.01 greater than p greater than 0.001), though no further increase in laxity occurred in subsequent pregnancies. PMID:7073339

  3. Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Sitti, Metin; Cusick, Brian; Aksak, Burak; Nese, Alper; Lee, Hyung-il; Dong, Hongchen; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2009-10-01

    This work reports on repeatable adhesive materials prepared by controlled grafting of dangling hetero chains from polymer elastomers. The dangling chain elastomer system was prepared by grafting poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) chains from prefunctionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer networks using atom transfer radical polymerization. To study the effects of chain growth and network strain as they relate to network adhesion mechanics, various lengths of PBA chains with degree of polymerizations (DP) of 65, 281, 508, and 1200 were incorporated into the PDMS matrix. PBA chains with a DP value of 281 grafted from a flat PDMS substrate showed the highest (approximately 3.5-fold) enhancement of nano- and macroscale adhesion relative to a flat raw (ungrafted and not prefunctionalized) PDMS substrate. Moreover, to study the effect of PBA dangling chains on adhesion in fibrillar elastomer structures inspired by gecko foot hairs, a dip-transfer fabrication method was used to graft PBA chains with a DP value of 296 from the tip endings of mushroom-shaped PDMS micropillars. A PBA chain covered micropillar array showed macroscale adhesion enhancement up to approximately 7 times relative to the flat ungrafted prefunctionalized PDMS control substrate, showing additional nonoptimized approximately 2-fold adhesion enhancement due to fibrillar structuring and mushroom-shaped tip ending. These dangling hetero chains on elastomer micro-/nanofibrillar structures may provide a novel fabrication platform for multilength scale, repeatable, and high-strength fibrillar adhesives inspired by gecko foot hairs. PMID:20355863

  4. Tissue Mechanics and Adhesion during Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Shawky, Joseph H.; Davidson, Lance A.

    2014-01-01

    During development cells interact mechanically with their microenvironment through cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. Many proteins involved in these adhesions serve both mechanical and signaling roles. In this review we will focus on the mechanical roles of these proteins and their complexes in transmitting force or stress from cell to cell or from cell to the extracellular matrix. As forces operate against tissues they establish tissue architecture, extracellular matrix assembly, and pattern cell shapes. As tissues become more established, adhesions play a major role integrating cells with the mechanics of their local environment. Adhesions may serve as both a molecular-specific glue, holding defined populations of cells together, and as a lubricant, allowing tissues to slide past one another. We review the biophysical principles and experimental tools used to study adhesion so that we may aid efforts to understand how adhesions guide these movements and integrate their signaling functions with mechanical function. As we conclude we review efforts to develop predictive models of adhesion that can be used to interpret experiments and guide future efforts to control and direct the process of tissue self-assembly during development. PMID:25512299

  5. Adhesion in ceramics and magnetic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a metal or a polymeric material such as a magnetic medium, strong bonds form between the materials. For ceramic-to-metal contacts, adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. Hardness of metals plays a much more important role in adhesion and friction than does the surface energy of metals. Adhesion, friction, surface energy, and hardness of a metal are all related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. An increase in shear modulus results in a decrease in area of contact that is greater than the corresponding increase in surface energy (the fond energy) with shear modulus. Consequently, the adhesion and friction decrease with increasing shear modulus. For ceramics in contact with polymeric magnetic tapes, environment is extremely important. For example, a nitrogen environment reduces adhesion and friction when ferrite contacts polymeric tape, whereas a vacuum environment strengthens the ferrite-to-tape adhesion and increases friction. Adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the particle loading of the tape. An increase in magnetic particle concentration increases the complex modulus of the tape, and a lower real area of contact and lower friction result.

  6. Thrombospondin-induced adhesion of human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, G P; Kowalska, M A

    1991-01-01

    Washed human unactivated platelets attached and spread on thrombospondin (TSP)-coated microtiter plates. Platelet adhesion was promoted by divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ as compared to buffer having all divalent cations complexed with EDTA. TSP-dependent adhesion was inhibited by anti-TSP fab fragments, an anti-TSP monoclonal antibody, an RGD-containing peptide, complex-specific anti-glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa monoclonal antibodies (A2A9 or AP-2) and anti-VLA-2 monoclonal antibodies (6F1 and Gi9), but not by rabbit preimmune fab fragments, mouse IgG, an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibodies against either the human vitronectin receptor, glycocalicin, or GPIV. At saturating concentrations, anti-GPIIb-IIIa inhibited adhesion by 40-60%. Glanzman's thrombasthenic platelets, which lack GPIIb-IIIa, adhered to TSP to the same extent as anti-GPIIb-IIIa-treated normal platelets or 40-60% as well as untreated normal platelets. Antibody 6F1 (5-10 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet adhesion of both normal and thrombasthenic platelets by 84-100%. Both VLA-2 antibodies also inhibited collagen-induced platelet adhesion, but had no effect on fibronectin-induced adhesion of normal platelets. These data indicate that platelets specifically adhere to TSP and that this adhesion is mediated through GPIIb-IIIa and/or VLA-2. Images PMID:2010551

  7. Synthesis of Naturally Occurring Tropones and Tropolones

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Song, Wangze; Schienebeck, Casi M.; Zhang, Min; Tang, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Tropones and tropolones are an important class of seven-membered non-benzenoid aromatic compounds. They can be prepared directly by oxidation of seven-membered rings. They can also be derived from cyclization or cycloaddition of appropriate precursors followed by elimination or rearrangement. This review discusses the types of naturally occurring tropones and tropolones and outlines important methods developed for the synthesis of tropone and tropolone natural products. PMID:25400298

  8. Naturally Occuring Fish Poisons from Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Jonathan G.; Burton, Robert A.; Wood, Steven G.; Owen, Noel L.

    2004-10-01

    Since prehistoric times, cultures throughout the world have used piscicidal (fish poisoning) plants for fishing. In recent times, scientists have identified many of the plant compounds responsible for killing the fish and have found that these compounds possess other important biological properties, such as insecticidal and anti-cancer activities. This article reviews some of the chemical research that has been performed on naturally occurring fish poisons, including plant sources, methods of use, toxicity, and mechanisms of action of piscicides.

  9. Evaluation of a Linear Cumulative Damage Failure Model for Epoxy Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David E.; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia; Macon, David; Totman, Peter; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a significant amount of work has been conducted to provide more complex and accurate material models for use in the evaluation of adhesive bondlines. Some of this has been prompted by recent studies into the effects of residual stresses on the integrity of bondlines. Several techniques have been developed for the analysis of bondline residual stresses. Key to these analyses is the criterion that is used for predicting failure. Residual stress loading of an adhesive bondline can occur over the life of the component. For many bonded systems, this can be several years. It is impractical to directly characterize failure of adhesive bondlines under a constant load for several years. Therefore, alternative approaches for predictions of bondline failures are required. In the past, cumulative damage failure models have been developed. These models have ranged from very simple to very complex. This paper documents the generation and evaluation of some of the most simple linear damage accumulation tensile failure models for an epoxy adhesive. This paper shows how several variations on the failure model were generated and presents an evaluation of the accuracy of these failure models in predicting creep failure of the adhesive. The paper shows that a simple failure model can be generated from short-term failure data for accurate predictions of long-term adhesive performance.

  10. Discolouration of orthodontic adhesives caused by food dyes and ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Faltermeier, Andreas; Rosentritt, Martin; Reicheneder, Claudia; Behr, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Enamel discolouration after debonding of orthodontic attachments could occur because of irreversible penetration of resin tags into the enamel structure. Adhesives could discolour because of food dyes or ultraviolet irradiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the colour stability of adhesives during ultraviolet irradiation and exposure to food colourants. Four different adhesives were exposed in a Suntest CPS+ ageing device to a xenon lamp to simulate natural daylight (Transbond XT, Enlight, RelyX Unicem, and Meron Plus AC). Tomato ketchup, Coca Cola, and tea were chosen as the food colourants. After 72 hours of exposure, colour measurements were performed by means of a spectrophotometer according to the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* system and colour changes (DeltaE*) were computed. Statistical differences were investigated using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Friedman test. Unsatisfactory colour stability after in vitro exposure to food colourants and ultraviolet light was observed for the conventional adhesive systems, Transbond XT and Enlight. RelyX Unicem showed the least colour change and the resin-reinforced glass-ionomer cement (GIC), Meron Plus AC, the greatest colour change. The investigated adhesives seem to be susceptible to both internal and external discolouration. These in vitro findings indicate that the tested conventional adhesive systems reveal unsatisfactory colour stability which should be improved to avoid enamel discolouration. PMID:17873146

  11. The effect of pretreatment on adhesive strength of Cu-plated liquid crystal polymer (LCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Meisheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Ding, Dongyan; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Copper metallization on LCP was carried out by means of electroless plating followed by electroplating and the effect of pretreatment on the adhesive strength of the Cu-plated LCP was investigated in detail. Compared with the other etching agents used here, potassium permanganate was found to be the most effective and the optimum etching time is 20 min. With potassium permanganate as the etching agent, the adhesive strength could reach 12.08 MPa, which is much higher than the reported maximum adhesive strength (lower than 8.0 MPa). XPS spectra of LCP film indicated that hydrophilic groups were introduced into the LCP surface by etching, creating a nanometer-scale surface roughness and improving the wettability between copper and LCP. SEM and AFM observations revealed that the distinctly increased adhesive strength could be attributed to the improved wetting and the mechanical interlocking effect. The failure mode of Cu-plated LCP film was found to be dependent on the etching time. When the etching time was short, the failure mode of Cu-plated LCP film was mainly adhesive. As the etching time increased, cohesive failure gradually occurred, causing an adhesive/cohesive mixed failure mode.

  12. Adhesion of actinomyces isolates to experimental pellicles.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, D; Kopec, L K; Bowen, W H

    1993-06-01

    The ability of oral bacteria to adhere to surfaces is associated with their pathogenicity. Actinomyces can adhere to pellicle and cells through extracellular fimbriae. Research on adhesion of actinomyces has been conducted with use of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated with mammalian-derived salivary constituents, whereas the bacterial-derived components of the acquired pellicle have been largely ignored. The influence of the cell-free bacterial enzyme, glucosyltransferase (GTF), on adhesion of human and rodent isolates of Actinomyces viscosus was examined. Cell-free GTF was adsorbed onto parotid saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA). Next, A. viscosus was exposed to the pellicle following the synthesis of glucan formed in situ by GTF. Glucans formed on the pellicle served as binding sites for adhesion of a rodent strain of A. viscosus. Conversely, the presence of in situ glucans on sHA reduced the adhesion of human isolates of A. viscosus compared with their adhesion to sHA. Adhesion of the rodent strains may be facilitated through a dextran-binding protein, since the rodent strains aggregated in the presence of dextrans and mutan. The human isolates were not aggregated by dextran or mutan. Pellicle harboring A. viscosus rodent strains interfered with the subsequent adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to the bacterial-coated pellicle. In contrast, the adhesion of S. mutans to pellicle was not decreased when the pellicle was pre-exposed to a human isolate of A. viscosus. The experimental data suggest that human and the rodent isolates of A. viscosus have distinct glucan adhesion properties.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8496474

  13. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive.

    PubMed

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone. PMID:24451392

  14. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone. PMID:24451392

  15. Discriminatory bio-adhesion over nano-patterned polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gon, Saugata

    1000/mum 2) was required for fibrinogen adsorption while a greater density comprised the adhesion threshold for albumin. Surface compositions between these two thresholds discriminated binding of the two proteins. The binding behavior of the two proteins from a mixture was well anticipated by the single- protein binding behaviors of the individual proteins. The mechanism for protein capture was shown to be multivalent: protein adhesion always occurred for averages spacings of the adhesive patches smaller than the dimensions of the protein of interest. For some backfill brush architectures, the spacing between the patches at the threshold for protein capture clearly corresponded to the major dimension of the target protein. For more dense PEG brush backfills however, larger adhesion thresholds were observed, corresponding to greater numbers of patches involved with the adhesion of each protein molecule. . The thesis demonstrates the tuning of the position of the adhesion thresholds, using fibrinogen as a model protein, using variations in brush properties and ionic strength. The directions of the trends indicate that the brushes do indeed exert steric repulsions toward the proteins while the attractions are electrostatic in nature. The surfaces also demonstrated sharp adhesion thresholds for S. Aureus bacteria, at smaller concentrations of adhesive surfaces elements than those needed for the protein capture. The results suggest that bacteria may be captured while proteins are rejected from these surfaces, and there may be potential to discriminate different bacterial types. Such discrimination from protein-containing bacterial suspensions was investigated briefly in this thesis using S. Aureus and fibrinogen as a model mixture. However, due to binding of fibrinogen to the bacterial surface, the separation did not succeed. It is still expected, however, that these surfaces could be used to selectively capture bacteria in the presence of non-interacting proteins. The

  16. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  17. Large bowel obstruction secondary to adhesive bands.

    PubMed

    El-Masry, Nabil S; Geevarghese, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Large bowel obstruction (LBO) is most commonly due to malignancy, volvulus, hernia, diverticular disease and inflammatory bowel disease. LBO due to adhesions is unusual. A literature review was conducted which revealed that only a few such cases have been reported. We report two cases of LBO secondary to adhesions in patients, one with and one without a past abdominal surgical history. We highlight that while rare, the aetiology of LBO secondary to adhesions must be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with obstructive symptoms. PMID:25650387

  18. Method of making thermally removable adhesives

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.

    2004-11-30

    A method of making a thermally-removable adhesive is provided where a bismaleimide compound, a monomeric furan compound, containing an oxirane group an amine curative are mixed together at an elevated temperature of greater than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a homogeneous solution, which, when cooled to less than approximately 70.degree. C., simultaneously initiates a Diels-Alder reaction between the furan and the bismaleimide and a epoxy curing reaction between the amine curative and the oxirane group to form a thermally-removable adhesive. Subsequent heating to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. causes the adhesive to melt and allows separation of adhered pieces.

  19. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  20. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  1. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Fathi, Zakaryae; Wei, Jianghua

    1998-01-01

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy.

  2. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-08-25

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  3. Effects of a Temperature-Sensitive, Anti-Adhesive Agent on the Reduction of Adhesion in a Rabbit Laminectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Woo; Cho, Tae Koo; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ryu, Je Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective A common cause of failure in laminectomy surgery is when epidural, peridural, or perineural adhesion occurs postoperatively. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a temperature-sensitive, anti-adhesive agent (TSAA agent), Guardix-SG®, as a mechanical barrier for the prevention or reduction of peridural scar adhesion in a rabbit laminectomy model. Methods Twenty-six mature rabbits were used for this study. Each rabbit underwent two separate laminectomies at lumbar vertebrae L3 and L6, left empty (the control group) and applied 2 mL of the TSAA agent (the experimental group), respectively. Invasive scar formation or inflammation after laminectomy was quantitatively evaluated by measuring the thickness of the dura, the distance from the surface of dura to the scar tissues, the number of inflammatory cells in the scar tissues at the laminectomy site, and the concentration of collagen in histological sections. Results At 6 weeks postsurgery, the dura was significantly thinner and the distance from the surface of dura to the scar tissues was greater in the experimental group than in the control group (p=0.04 and p=0.01). The number of inflammatory cells was not significantly different in the two groups (p=0.08), although the mean number of inflammatory cells was relatively lower in the experimental group than in the control group. Conclusion The current study suggests that the TSAA agent, Guardix-SG®, could be useful as an interpositional physical barrier after laminectomy for the prevention or reduction of adhesion. PMID:27226857

  4. Proanthocyanidins Alter Adhesive/Dentin Bonding Strengths when Included in a Bonding System

    PubMed Central

    Hechler, Benjamin; Yao, Xiaomei; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of proanthocyanidins (PA) incorporation into a bonding system on dentin/adhesive bond stability following long-term storage in buffer and collagenase. Methods Human dentin surfaces were bonded with no PA (0-PA), PA incorporated in the primer (PA-primer), or PA incorporated in the adhesive (PA-adhesive), and composite build-ups were created. Following sectioning into beams, bonded specimens were stored in buffer or collagenase for 0, 1, 4, 26, or 52 weeks before being tested for microtensile bond strength (μTBS). ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc were performed. Fractured surfaces were viewed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Both bonding system and storage time but not storage medium significantly affected μTBS. Initially, 0-PA and PA-primer were superior to PA-adhesive, and after 1 week both PA groups were inferior to 0-PA. However, after 4 weeks PA-adhesive had significantly increased and 0-PA significantly decreased such that all three groups were equal. Thereafter, both PA-primer/adhesive groups trended with an increase (the 0-PA group remaing consistent) such that at 52 weeks PA-primer samples were significantly stronger (p < 0.001) or nearly so (p = 0.08) when compared to 0-PA samples. SEM revealed that initial fractures tended to occur at the middle/bottom of the hybrid layer for 0-PA and PA-primer groups but at the top of the hybrid layer/in the adhesive for PA-adhesive. After 4 weeks, however, all groups fractured similarly at the middle/bottom of the hybrid layer. Clinical Significance PA incorporation into a bonding system significantly alters interfacial bonding strengths, and its incorporation may stabilize the interface and protect degradation over time under clinical conditions. PMID:23243975

  5. Formation of focal adhesion-stress fibre complexes coordinated by adhesive and non-adhesive surface domains.

    PubMed

    Zimerman, B; Arnold, M; Ulmer, J; Blümmel, J; Besser, A; Spatz, J P; Geiger, B

    2004-04-01

    Cell motility consists of repeating cycles of protrusion of a leading edge in the direction of migration, attachment of the advancing membrane to the matrix, and pulling of the trailing edge forward. In this dynamic process there is a major role for the cytoskeleton, which drives the protrusive events via polymerisation of actin in the lamellipodium, followed by actomyosin contractility. To study the transition of the actin cytoskeleton from a 'protrusive' to 'retractive' form, we have monitored the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibres during cell migration on a micro-patterned surface. This surface consisted of parallel arrays of 2 microm-wide, fibronectin-coated gold stripes, separated by non-adhesive (poly(ethylene glycol)-coated) glass areas with variable width, ranging from 4-12 microm. Monitoring the spreading of motile cells indicated that cell spreading was equally effective along and across the adhesive stripes, as long as the non-adhesive spaces between them did not exceed 6 microm. When the width of the PEG region was 8 microm or more, cells became highly polarised upon spreading, and failed to reach the neighboring adhesive stripes. It was also noted that as soon as the protruding lamella successfully crossed the PEG-coated area and reached an adhesive region, the organisation of actin in that area was transformed from a diffuse meshwork into a bundle, oriented perpendicularly to the stripes and anchored at its ends in focal adhesions. This transition depends on actomyosin-based contractility and is apparently triggered by the adhesion to the rigid fibronectin surface. PMID:16475844

  6. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Theodore L.; River, Bryan H.; Murmanis, Lidija L.; Christiansen, Alfred W.

    1988-01-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross section finger joint was the subject of a multi-disciplinary investigation. The primary objectives were to identify the failure mechanisms which occurred during the finger joint test and to provide avenues for general improvements in the design and fabrication of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures.

  7. Naturally occurring products in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Sankari, Leena S.; Malathi, L.; Krupaa, Jayasri R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been used for the treatment of various diseases and are becoming an important research area for drug discovery. These products, especially phytochemicals have been extensively studies and have exhibited anti-carcinogenic activities by interfering with the initiation, development and progression of cancer through the modulation of various mechanisms including cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. This concept is gaining attention because it is a cost-effective alternative to cancer treatment. In this article, we have discussed some of the naturally occurring products used in cancer treatment. PMID:26015704

  8. Naturally occurring anti M complicating ABO grouping.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Safoorah; Dantes, Roelyn; Varghese, Sunu; Al Hakawati, Imadeddin

    2011-01-01

    Anti M is considered a naturally occurring antibody that is usually active at temperatures below 37°C and is thus of no clinical significance. This antibody, if present in an individual, can lead to a discrepancy between forward and reverse ABO grouping and thus creates diagnostic difficulties for blood bank staff. We report a case of a 58-year-old lady who had an unexpected reaction in reverse grouping due to anti M that posed a problem for us in the interpretation of results of her blood group. We also reviewed the literature to find out the significance of such discrepancy in blood grouping. PMID:21393909

  9. Vaginal epithelial cells regulate membrane adhesiveness to co-ordinate bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Younes, Jessica A; Klappe, Karin; Kok, Jan Willem; Busscher, Henk J; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal epithelium is colonized by different bacterial strains and species. The bacterial composition of vaginal biofilms controls the balance between health and disease. Little is known about the relative contribution of the epithelial and bacterial cell surfaces to bacterial adhesion and whether and how adhesion is regulated over cell membrane regions. Here, we show that bacterial adhesion forces with cell membrane regions not located above the nucleus are stronger than with regions above the nucleus both for vaginal pathogens and different commensal and probiotic lactobacillus strains involved in health. Importantly, adhesion force ratios over membrane regions away from and above the nucleus coincided with the ratios between numbers of adhering bacteria over both regions. Bacterial adhesion forces were dramatically decreased by depleting the epithelial cell membrane of cholesterol or sub-membrane cortical actin. Thus, epithelial cells can regulate membrane regions to which bacterial adhesion is discouraged, possibly to protect the nucleus. PMID:26477544

  10. Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pernet, Olivier; Pohl, Christine; Ainouze, Michelle; Kweder, Hasan; Buckland, Robin

    2009-12-20

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic biosafety level 4 paramyxovirus that emerged recently in Asia with high mortality in man. NiV is a member, with Hendra virus (HeV), of the Henipavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family. Although NiV entry, like that of other paramyxoviruses, is believed to occur via pH-independent fusion with the host cell's plasma membrane we present evidence that entry can occur by an endocytic pathway. The NiV receptor ephrinB2 has receptor kinase activity and we find that ephrinB2's cytoplasmic domain is required for entry but is dispensable for post-entry viral spread. The mutation of a single tyrosine residue (Y304F) in ephrinB2's cytoplasmic tail abrogates NiV entry. Moreover, our results show that NiV entry is inhibited by constructions and drugs specific for the endocytic pathway of macropinocytosis. Our findings could potentially permit the rapid development of novel low-cost antiviral treatments not only for NiV but also HeV.

  11. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Video S1. Detachment of a S. pyogenes cell chain from glass substrate. The cantilever is approached on the outermost adherent cell of a chain and four bacteria were then sequentially detached. The sequential cell detachment suddenly stopped after four bacteria. This possibly occurred because bacteria-glass interactions became too strong or the maximal probe retraction was reached. The cells spontaneously detached from the cantilever flipping back on the surface. Fig. S1. (A) Adhesion force-distance and (B) adhesion force-detaching work correlation of E.coli on PLL for setpoints of 1 and 10 nN. Circle: 1 nN setpoint, square: 10 nN. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06495j

  12. Adhesion and removal of glass, silica and PSL particles from silicon dioxide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiangwei

    plastic deformation of PSL particles occurs than that described by current models. It is shown that the plastic response results from the fact that the adhesion force is large enough to exceed the yield strength of PSL particles.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  14. Chemistry technology: Adhesives and plastics: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Technical information on chemical formulations for improving and/or producing adhesives is presented. Data are also reported on polymeric plastics with special characteristics or those plastics that were produced by innovative means.

  15. Recent Advances in Nanostructured Biomimetic Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras; Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The relatively large size of the gecko and its ability to climb a multitude of structures with ease has often been cited as the inspiration upon which the field of dry adhesives is based. Since 2010, there have been many advances in the field of dry adhesives with much of the new research focusing on developing nanoscale and hierarchical features in a concentrated effort to develop synthetic gecko-like dry adhesives which are strong, durable, and self-cleaning. A brief overview of the geckos and the hairs which it uses to adhere to many different surfaces is provided before delving into the current methods and materials used to fabricate synthetic gecko hairs. A summary of the recently published literature on bio-inspired, nanostructured dry adhesives is presented with an emphasis being placed on fabrication techniques. PMID:25023409

  16. Thread-Pull Test Of Curing Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Hardness (and degree of cure) of adhesive layer measured by pulling previously inserted thread out of layer. Strength of bond measured directly on assembly rather than on samples, which can be misleading.

  17. NREL Turning Biomass into Adhesives and Plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and it's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing technology to make wood adhesives from sawdust, bark, or other biomass (plant materials or wastes derived from them).

  18. Adhesive wafer bonding for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, Viorel; Glinsner, Thomas; Mittendorfer, Gerald; Wieder, Bernhard; Lindner, Paul

    2003-04-01

    Low temperature wafer bonding is a powerful technique for MEMS/MOEMS devices fabrication and packaging. Among the low temperature processes adhesive bonding focuses a high technological interest. Adhesive wafer bonding is a bonding approach using an intermediate layer for bonding (e.g. glass, polymers, resists, polyimides). The main advantages of this method are: surface planarization, encapsulation of structures on the wafer surface, particle compensation and decrease of annealing temperature after bonding. This paper presents results on adhesive bonding using spin-on glass and Benzocyclobutene (BCB) from Dow Chemicals. The advantages of using adhesive bonding for MEMS applications will be illustrated be presenting a technology of fabricating GaAs-on-Si substrates (up to 150 mm diameter) and results on BCB bonding of Si wafers (200 mm diameter).

  19. TOWARD MINIMALLY ADHESIVE SURFACES UTILIZING SILOXANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three types of siloxane-based network polymers have been investigated for their surface properties towards potential applications as minimally adhesive coatings. A filled poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer, RTV it, has been studied to determine surface weldability and stabil...

  20. Micropatterning cell adhesion on polyacrylamide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Guo, Wei-Hui; Rape, Andrew; Wang, Yu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Cell shape and substrate rigidity play critical roles in regulating cell behaviors and fate. Controlling cell shape on elastic adhesive materials holds great promise for creating a physiologically relevant culture environment for basic and translational research and clinical applications. However, it has been technically challenging to create high-quality adhesive patterns on compliant substrates. We have developed an efficient and economical method to create precise micron-scaled adhesive patterns on the surface of a hydrogel (Rape et al., Biomaterials 32:2043-2051, 2011). This method will facilitate the research on traction force generation, cellular mechanotransduction, and tissue engineering, where precise controls of both materials rigidity and adhesive patterns are important. PMID:23955741

  1. Ins and Outs of Microbial Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virji, Mumtaz

    Microbial adhesion is generally a complex process, involving multiple adhesins on a single microbe and their respective target receptors on host cells. In some situations, various adhesins of a microbe may co-operate in an apparently hierarchical and sequential manner whereby the first adhesive event triggers the target cell to express receptors for additional microbial adhesins. In other instances, adhesins may act in concert leading to high avidity interactions, often a prelude to cellular invasion and tissue penetration. Mechanisms used to target the host include both lectin-like interactions and protein-protein interactions; the latter are often highly specific for the host or a tissue within the host. This reflective chapter aims to offer a point of view on microbial adhesion by presenting some experiences and thoughts especially related to respiratory pathogens and explore if there can be any future hope of controlling bacterial infections via preventing adhesion or invasion stages of microbial pathogenesis.

  2. A Naturally-Occurring Transcript Variant of MARCO Reveals the SRCR Domain is Critical for Function

    PubMed Central

    Novakowski, Kyle E.; Huynh, Angela; Han, SeongJun; Dorrington, Michael G.; Yin, Charles; Tu, Zhongyuan; Pelka, Peter; Whyte, Peter; Guarné, Alba; Sakamoto, Kaori; Bowdish, Dawn M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a Class A Scavenger Receptor (cA-SR) that recognizes and phagocytoses of a wide variety of pathogens. Most cA-SRs that contain a C-terminal Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich (SRCR) domain use the proximal collagenous domain to bind ligands. In contrast, for the role of the SRCR domain of MARCO in phagocytosis, adhesion and pro-inflammatory signalling is less clear. The discovery of a naturally-occurring transcript variant lacking the SRCR domain, MARCOII, provided the opportunity to study the role of the SRCR domain of MARCO. We tested whether the SRCR domain is required for ligand binding, promoting downstream signalling, and enhancing cellular adhesion. Unlike cells expressing full-length MARCO, ligand binding was abolished in MARCOII-expressing cells. Furthermore, co-expression of MARCO and MARCOII impaired phagocytic function, indicating that MARCOII acts as a dominant negative variant. Unlike MARCO, expression of MARCOII did not enhance Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2)-mediated pro-inflammatory signalling in response to bacterial stimulation. MARCO-expressing cells were more adherent and exhibited a dendritic-like phenotype, while MARCOII-expressing cells were less adherent and did not exhibit changes in morphology. These data suggest the SRCR domain of MARCO is the key domain in modulating ligand binding, enhancing downstream pro-inflammatory signalling, and MARCO-mediated cellular adhesion. PMID:26888252

  3. Relationships between water wettability and ice adhesion.

    PubMed

    Meuler, Adam J; Smith, J David; Varanasi, Kripa K; Mabry, Joseph M; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2010-11-01

    Ice formation and accretion may hinder the operation of many systems critical to national infrastructure, including airplanes, power lines, windmills, ships, and telecommunications equipment. Yet despite the pervasiveness of the icing problem, the fundamentals of ice adhesion have received relatively little attention in the scientific literature and it is not widely understood which attributes must be tuned to systematically design "icephobic" surfaces that are resistant to icing. Here we probe the relationships between advancing/receding water contact angles and the strength of ice adhesion to bare steel and twenty-one different test coatings (∼200-300 nm thick) applied to the nominally smooth steel discs. Contact angles are measured using a commercially available goniometer, whereas the average strengths of ice adhesion are evaluated with a custom-built laboratory-scale adhesion apparatus. The coatings investigated comprise commercially available polymers and fluorinated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (fluorodecyl POSS), a low-surface-energy additive known to enhance liquid repellency. Ice adhesion strength correlates strongly with the practical work of adhesion required to remove a liquid water drop from each test surface (i.e., with the quantity [1 + cos θ(rec)]), and the average strength of ice adhesion was reduced by as much as a factor of 4.2 when bare steel discs were coated with fluorodecyl POSS-containing materials. We argue that any further appreciable reduction in ice adhesion strength will require textured surfaces, as no known materials exhibit receding water contact angles on smooth/flat surfaces that are significantly above those reported here (i.e., the values of [1 + cos θ(rec)] reported here have essentially reached a minimum for known materials). PMID:20949900

  4. Cryogenic adhesives and sealants: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.; Olien, N. A.

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of primary documents containing original experimental data on the properties of adhesives and sealants at cryogenic temperatures are presented. The most important references mentioned in each document are cited. In addition, a brief annotation is given for documents considered secondary in nature, such as republications or variations of original reports, progress reports leading to final reports included as primary documents, and experimental data on adhesive properties at temperatures between about 130 K and room temperature.

  5. Pseudoelastic deformation during nanoscale adhesive contact formation.

    PubMed

    Mordehai, Dan; Rabkin, Eugen; Srolovitz, David J

    2011-08-26

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to demonstrate that adhesive contact formation through classical jump to contact is mediated by extensive dislocation activity in metallic nanoparticles. The dislocations generated during jump to contact are completely annihilated by the completion of the adhesive contact, leaving the nanoparticles dislocation-free. This rapid and efficient jump to contact process is pseudoelastic, rather than purely elastic or plastic. PMID:21929255

  6. New pressure-sensitive silicone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiffer, J. L.; Stoops, W. E., Jr.; St. Clair, T. L.; Watkins, V. E., Jr.; Kelly, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Adhesive for high or low temperatures does not stretch severely under load. It is produced by combining intermediate-molecular-weight pressure sensitive adhesive which does not cure with silicone resin that cures with catalyst to rubbery tack-free state. Blend of silicone tackifier and cured rubbery silicone requires no solvents in either atmospheric or vacuum environments. Ratio of ingredients varies for different degrees of tack, creep resistance, and tensile strength.

  7. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities. PMID:25105533

  8. Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Progar, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

  9. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175... Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives. Pressure-sensitive... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Pressure-sensitive adhesives prepared from one or...

  10. 21 CFR 878.3750 - External prosthesis adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External prosthesis adhesive. 878.3750 Section 878.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... adhesive. (a) Identification. An external prosthesis adhesive is a silicone-type adhesive intended to...

  11. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives....

  12. 21 CFR 878.3750 - External prosthesis adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External prosthesis adhesive. 878.3750 Section 878.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... adhesive. (a) Identification. An external prosthesis adhesive is a silicone-type adhesive intended to...

  13. Force transmission during adhesion-independent migration.

    PubMed

    Bergert, Martin; Erzberger, Anna; Desai, Ravi A; Aspalter, Irene M; Oates, Andrew C; Charras, Guillaume; Salbreux, Guillaume; Paluch, Ewa K

    2015-04-01

    When cells move using integrin-based focal adhesions, they pull in the direction of motion with large, ∼100 Pa, stresses that contract the substrate. Integrin-mediated adhesions, however, are not required for in vivo confined migration. During focal adhesion-free migration, the transmission of propelling forces, and their magnitude and orientation, are not understood. Here, we combine theory and experiments to investigate the forces involved in adhesion-free migration. Using a non-adherent blebbing cell line as a model, we show that actin cortex flows drive cell movement through nonspecific substrate friction. Strikingly, the forces propelling the cell forward are several orders of magnitude lower than during focal-adhesion-based motility. Moreover, the force distribution in adhesion-free migration is inverted: it acts to expand, rather than contract, the substrate in the direction of motion. This fundamentally different mode of force transmission may have implications for cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions during migration in vivo. PMID:25774834

  14. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  15. Fibroblasts adhesion on ion beam modified polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švorčík, V.; Tomášová, P.; Dvořánková, B.; Hnatowicz, V.; Ochsner, R.; Ryssel, H.

    2004-02-01

    Polyethylene (PE) was irradiated with 15 keV O +, P + and Ar + ions to the fluences from 3 × 10 12 to 1 × 10 15 cm -2. The changes of surface structure and polarity and oxygen concentration were examined on pristine and as-irradiated PE. The in vitro adhesion of rat 3T3 fibroblasts on the modified PE was evaluated 24 h after inoculation. Degradation of PE is manifested by the creation of conjugated double bonds and oxidation of the PE main chain. It was proved that the implanted P atoms are chemically bound onto degraded polymer chain. Wettability of the polymer surface is affected by the structure and composition of the modified surface layer. In comparison with pristine PE (i) higher cell adhesion is observed on implanted PE and (ii) the cells cultivated on implanted PE are larger and their adherence is significantly more homogeneous. The enhancement of 3T3 cells adhesion is highest and smallest for PE implanted with O + and Ar + ions, respectively. Highest cell adhesion was observed on PE implanted to the fluence of 1 × 10 13 cm -2 regardless of the ion specie. It was shown that the cell adhesion is related to the wettability of the PE surface and that there exists an optimal wettability with respect to the cell adhesion.

  16. Adhesion of colloidal particles on modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Volodymyr; Papastavrou, Georg

    2012-12-01

    The adhesion between colloidal silica particles and modified electrodes has been studied by direct force measurements with the colloidal probe technique based on the atomic force microscope (AFM). The combination of potentiostatic control of gold electrodes and chemical modification of their surface with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) allows for the decoupling of forces due to the electrical double layers and functional groups at the solid/liquid interface. Adhesion on such electrodes can be tuned over a large range using the externally applied potential and the aqueous solution's ionic strength. By utilizing cantilevers with a high force constant, it is possible to separate the various contributions to adhesion in an unambiguous manner. These contributions comprise diffuse-layer overlap, van der Waals forces, solvent exclusion, and electrocapillarity. A quantitative description of the observed adhesion forces is obtained by taking into account the surface roughness of the silica particle. The main component of the adhesion forces originates from the overlap of the electrical double layers, which is tuned by the external potential. By contrast, effects due to electrocapillarity are of only minor importance. Based on our quantitative analysis, a new approach is proposed that allows tuning of the adhesion force as a function of the externally applied potential. We expect this approach to have important applications for the design of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), the development of electrochemical sensors, and the application of micro- and nanomanipulation. PMID:23072548

  17. Yielding Elastic Tethers Stabilize Robust Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Matt J.; Luo, Jonathon P.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds. PMID:25473833

  18. Bistability of Cell Adhesion in Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Efremov, Artem; Cao, Jianshu

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays a central role in multicellular organisms helping to maintain their integrity and homeostasis. This complex process involves many different types of adhesion proteins, and synergetic behavior of these proteins during cell adhesion is frequently observed in experiments. A well-known example is the cooperation of rolling and stationary adhesion proteins during the leukocytes extravasation. Despite the fact that such cooperation is vital for proper functioning of the immune system, its origin is not fully understood. In this study we constructed a simple analytic model of the interaction between a leukocyte and the blood vessel wall in shear flow. The model predicts existence of cell adhesion bistability, which results from a tug-of-war between two kinetic processes taking place in the cell-wall contact area—bond formation and rupture. Based on the model results, we suggest an interpretation of several cytoadhesion experiments and propose a simple explanation of the existing synergy between rolling and stationary adhesion proteins, which is vital for effective cell adherence to the blood vessel walls in living organisms. PMID:21889439

  19. Plasma treatment of polymers for improved adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Kelber, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of plasma treatments of polymer surfaces for improved adhesion are reviewed: noble and reactive gas treatment of fluoropolymers; noble and reactive treatment of polyolefins, and plasma-induced amination of polymer fibers. The plasma induced surface chemical and morphological changes are discussed, as are the mechanisms of adhesion to polymeric adhesives, particularly epoxy. Noble gas plasma etching of flouropolymers produces a partially defluorinated, textured surface. The mechanical interlocking of this textured surface is the primary cause of improved adhesion to epoxy. Reactive gas plasmas also induce defluorination, but oxygen containing gases cause continual ablation of the fluoropolymer surface. Noble and reactive gas (exept for hydrogen) etching of polyolefins results in surface oxidation and improved adhesion via hydrogen bonding of these oxygen containing groups across the interface. The introduction of amine groups to a polymer surface by amonia or amine plasma treatment generally results in improved adhesion to epoxy. However, amine-epoxy ring interactions can be severely effected by steric factors due to chemical groups surrounding the amine. 41 refs.

  20. Enhanced adhesion of diamond coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhido

    potential layers identified: TiN and TiC. Crystalline diamond coatings are subsequently deposited on these layers by hot filament CVD. A large grained TiC coating with a relatively rough surface was found to provide the best adhesion to the diamond layer. As judged qualitatively by the extent of spallation adjacent to hardness indentation, this intermediate layer performs better than similar TiC layers reported in the literature. The residual stresses in the diamond coatings are analysed using Raman microprobe spectroscopy, and compared with the predictions of the analytical model. The adhesion of the diamond coatings on various substrates with and without an intermediate layer of TiC is quantitatively evaluated by measuring the length of the delamination crack surrounding through-thickness holes in the coating and comparing with the relationship derived between crack length and strain energy release rate. The measured adherence on WC-Co substrates, as characterised by the critical strain energy release rate for growth of the delamination crack, was found to be significantly higher in the presence of the TiC intermediate layer developed during the course of this work.

  1. Brittle-tough transitions during crack growth in toughened adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoules, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The use of structural adhesives in automotive applications relies on an effective understanding of their performance under crash conditions. In particular, there is considerable potential for mechanics-based modeling of the interaction between an adhesive layer and the adherends, to replace current empirical approaches to design. Since energy dissipation during a crash, mediated by plastic deformation of the structure, is a primary consideration for automotive applications, traditional approaches of fracture mechanics are not appropriate. Cohesive-zone models that use two fracture parameters - cohesive strength and toughness - have been shown to provide a method for quantitative mechanics analysis. Combined numerical and experimental techniques have been developed to deduce the toughness and strength parameters of adhesive layers, allowing qualitative modeling of the performance of adhesive joints. These techniques have been used to study the failure of joints, formed from a toughened adhesive and sheet metal, over a wide range of loading rates. Two fracture modes are observed: quasi-static crack growth and dynamic crack growth. The quasi-static crack growth is associated with a toughened mode of failure; the dynamic crack growth is associated with a more brittle mode of failure. The results of the experiments and analyses indicate that the fracture parameters for quasi-static crack growth in this toughened system are essentially rate independent, and that quasi-static crack growth can occur even at the highest crack velocities. Effects of rate appear to be limited to the ease with which a transition to dynamic fracture could be triggered. This transition appears to be stochastic in nature, and it does not appear to be associated with the attainment of any critical value for crack velocity or loading rate. Fracture-mechanics models exist in the literature for brittle-ductile transitions in rate-dependent polymers, which rely on rate dependent values of toughness

  2. Design guidelines for hybrid microcircuits; organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were studied to acquire an adequate information base to generate a guideline document for the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specific areas covered include: (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives; (2) effects of long term aging at 150C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives; (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics; (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive; (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters; (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives; and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  3. Investigation of chitosan-phenolics systems as wood adhesives.

    PubMed

    Peshkova, Svetlana; Li, Kaichang

    2003-04-24

    Chitosan-phenolics systems were investigated as wood adhesives. Adhesion between two pieces of wood veneer developed only when all three components-chitosan, a phenolic compound, and laccase-were present. For the adhesive systems containing a phenolic compound with only one phenolic hydroxyl group, adhesive strengths were highly dependent upon the chemical structures of phenolic compounds used in the system and the relative oxidation rates of the phenolic compounds by laccase. The adhesive strengths were also directly related to the viscosity of the adhesive systems. However, for the adhesive systems containing a phenolic compound with two or three phenolic hydroxyl groups adjacent to each other, no correlations among adhesive strengths, relative oxidation rates of the phenolic compounds by laccase, and viscosities were observed. The adhesion mechanisms of these chitosan-phenolics systems were proposed to be similar to those of mussel adhesive proteins. PMID:12697397

  4. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  5. The effect of aspect ratio on adhesion and stiffness for soft elastic fibres

    PubMed Central

    Aksak, Burak; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Sitti, Metin

    2011-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the pull-off stress and stiffness of soft elastic fibres is studied using elasticity and numerical analysis. The adhesive interface between a soft fibre and a smooth rigid surface is modelled using the Dugdale–Barenblatt model. Numerical simulations show that, while pull-off stress increases with decreasing aspect ratio, fibres get stiffer. Also, for sufficiently low aspect ratio fibres, failure occurs via the growth of internal cracks and pull-off stress approaches the intrinsic adhesive strength. Experiments carried out with various aspect ratio polyurethane elastomer fibres are consistent with the numerical simulations. PMID:21227962

  6. Contribution from pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Gilbert

    1996-03-01

    The successful use of many security papers, foils and films depends on the technology of chemical fastening systems -- especially pressure sensitive adhesives. These are adhesives activated not by heat or by the evaporation of water or some other solvent, but simply by the act of application -- by pressure. These adhesives provide the means whereby laminations, substrates and seals are made effective. In addition to their physical properties these adhesives are often required to possess optical properties to allow the security materials to be visibly active and indeed the adhesive system may itself contribute as a carrier for a variety of security materials. Recent advances in adhesives chemistry have made it possible to achieve virtually all the required physical performance characteristics combined with a choice of optical properties ranging from total opacity to invisibility and including controlled translucency and tinting. The implications for security printing and packaging are important. Opacity is easy to achieve, for example by loading the adhesive with aluminum powder, by the selection of totally opaque materials like metallized film or by various printing processes. But achieving transparency is a different matter, and transparency is mandatory for applications involving the protection of documents, photographs, etc. with a clear film over-laminate. Obvious examples would be for passports, visas and other personal identification. But some security devices may themselves require protection; for example holograms or embossings. And transparency in the test laboratory is not enough. The Australian driving licence is stuck to the windshield, so the transparency of the adhesive must be sustained over long periods without deterioration due to prolonged u/v exposure, climatic conditions or aging. The commercial label market has helped to push the technology forward. There is a strong demand for the 'no-label look' for packaging of clear plastic and glass

  7. Pressure-sensitive adhesives for transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Tan; Pfister

    1999-02-01

    Adhesives are a critical component in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) devices. In addition to the usual requirements of functional adhesive properties, adhesives for TDD applications must have good biocompatibility with the skin, chemical compatibility with the drug, various components of the formulation, and provide consistent, effective delivery of the drug. This review discusses the three most commonly used adhesives (polyisobutylenes, polyacrylates and silicones) in TDD devices, and provides an update on recently introduced TDD products and recent developments of new adhesives. PMID:10234208

  8. Adhesives for the composite wood panel industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, G.S.; Klareich, F.; Exstrum, B.

    1986-01-13

    Significant energy savings could be realized if current fossil fuel-based resins could be replaced with alternative biomass-derived adhesives. Hence, a program was performed to analyze the current wood panel adhesives market, identify both domestic and international R and D efforts in the area of biomass-derived alternative adhesives that might serve as substitutes for conventional fossil fuel-based adhesives, and assess the technical and economic factors that will influence commercial success of these alternative adhesives.

  9. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose

  10. Medicinal significance of naturally occurring cyclotetrapeptides.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Muna Ali

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive natural products are serendipitous drug candidates, which stimulate synthetic approaches for improving and supporting drug discovery and development. Therefore, the search for bioactive metabolites from different natural sources continues to play an important role in fashioning new medicinal agents. Several cyclic peptides were produced by organisms, such as β-defensins, gramicidin S, and tyrocidine A, and exhibited a wide range of bioactivities, such as antiviral activity against HIV-1, influenza A viruses, or antibacterial activity. Cyclic tetrapeptides are a class of natural products that were found to have a broad range of biological activities, promising pharmacokinetic properties, as well as interesting conformational dynamics and ability of slow inter-conversion to several different structures. Cyclooligopeptides, particularly medium ring-sized peptides, were obtained from marine microorganisms and exhibited a wide range of pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial and anti-dinoflagellate activities, cytotoxicity, and inhibitory activity against enzyme sortase B. Most of the naturally occurring cyclotetrapeptides are obtained from fungi. Some natural cyclic tetrapeptides were found to inhibit histone deacetylase (HDAC), which regulate the expression of genes. These compounds are very useful as cancer therapeutics. Various analogues of the natural cyclotetrapeptides were successfully synthesized to find novel lead compounds for pharmacological and biotechnological applications. Therefore, in this review, previously reported novel natural cyclotetrapeptides are briefly discussed, along with their important biological activities as drug candidates, together with their promising therapeutic properties. Moreover, their future perspective in drug discovery as potential therapeutic agents will be determined. PMID:27300506

  11. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Commonly Occurring Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a collection of very complex diseases that share many traits while differing in many ways as well. This makes a universal cure difficult to attain, and it highlights the importance of understanding each type of cancer at a molecular level. Although many strides have been made in identifying the genetic causes for some cancers, we now understand that simple changes in the primary DNA sequence cannot explain the many steps that are necessary to turn a normal cell into a rouge cancer cell. In recent years, some research has shifted to focusing on detailing epigenetic contributions to the development and progression of cancer. These changes occur apart from primary genomic sequences and include DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNA expression. Since these epigenetic modifications are reversible, drugs targeting epigenetic changes are becoming more common in clinical settings. Daily discoveries elucidating these complex epigenetic processes are leading to advances in the field of cancer research. These advances, however, come at a rapid and often overwhelming pace. This review specifically summarizes the main epigenetic mechanisms currently documented in solid tumors common in the United States and Europe. PMID:22519822

  12. Naturally occurring hydroxytyrosol: synthesis and anticancer potential.

    PubMed

    Bernini, R; Merendino, N; Romani, A; Velotti, F

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiological and animal studies have suggested that polyphenols, a group of secondary plant metabolites occurring mainly in the plant kingdom, may have a protective effect against some chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer. Polyphenols are part of the human diet, being present in vegetal food and beverages. Among them, an olive biophenol named hydroxytyrosol [2-(3,4- dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol, HTyr] has recently received particular attention because of its antioxidant, antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities, which have the potential to specifically counteract all cancer hallmarks, thus representing the expectant biological activities underlying the anti-tumor properties of this polyphenol. After a description of the synthetic procedures to prepare pure HTyr, this review takes into consideration the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of HTyr as the result of its antioxidant, antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. In particular, the review is focused on the current knowledge of the main cellular and molecular mechanisms used by HTyr to affect carcinogenesis, highlighting the specific oncogenic and inflammatory signaling pathways potentially targeted by HTyr. PMID:23244583

  13. Does Shear Thickening Occur in Semisolid Metals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Helen V.; Favier, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    In the various forms of semisolid processing such as thixoforming and thixoforging, the entry into the die occurs in a fraction of a second so it is the transient rheological behavior which governs the initial stages of flow. In experiments in the literature, this rheological behavior is probed through applying rapid transitions in shear rate under isothermal conditions. There is contradictory evidence as to whether the behavior during these transitions is shear thinning or shear thickening, although it is clear that once in the die the material is thinning. Here the data in the literature are reanalyzed to obtain a rationalization of the contradictions which has not previously been available. It is argued that if a suspension is initially in a disagglomerated state ( i.e., one which is initially sheared), the instantaneous behavior with a jump-up in shear rate is shear thickening (even if the long-term steady-state behavior is shear thinning) provided the fraction solid is greater than about 0.36 and the final shear rate at the end of the jump is greater than about 100 s-1. If the jump-up in shear rate is made from rest then yield masks the shear thickening.

  14. Adhesion of latex films. Influence of surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Charmeau, J.Y.; Kientz, E.; Holl, Y.

    1996-12-31

    In the applications of film forming latexes in paint, paper, coating, adhesive, textile industries, one of the most important property of latex films is adhesion onto a support. From the point of view of adhesion, latex films have two specificities. The first one arises from the particular structure of the film which is usually not homogeneous but retains to a certain extent the memory of the particles it was made from. These structure effects are clearly apparent when one compares mechanical or adhesion properties of pure latex films and of films of the same polymers but prepared from a solution. Latex films show higher Young`s moduli and lower adhesion properties than solution films. The second specificity of latex films comes from the presence of the surfactant which was used in the synthesis and as stabilizer for the latex. Most industrial latexes contain low amounts of surfactant, typically in the range 0.1 to 2-3 wt%. However, being usually incompatible with the polymer, the surfactant is not homogeneously distributed in the film. It tends to segregate towards the film-air or film-support interfaces or to form domains in the bulk of the film. Distribution of surfactants in latex films has been studied by several authors. The influence of the surfactant on adhesion, as well as on other properties, is thus potentially very important. This article presents the results of the authors investigation of surfactant effects on adhesion properties of latex films. To the authors knowledge, there is no other example, in the open literature, of this kind of study.

  15. Direct observation of microcavitation in underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructure.

    PubMed

    Heepe, Lars; Kovalev, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report on experiments aimed at testing the cavitation hypothesis [Varenberg, M.; Gorb, S. J. R. Soc., Interface 2008, 5, 383-385] proposed to explain the strong underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructures (MSAMSs). For this purpose, we measured the pull-off forces of individual MSAMSs by detaching them from a glass substrate under different wetting conditions and simultaneously video recording the detachment behavior at very high temporal resolution (54,000-100,000 fps). Although microcavitation was observed during the detachment of individual MSAMSs, which was a consequence of water inclusions present at the glass-MSAMS contact interface subjected to negative pressure (tension), the pull-off forces were consistently lower, around 50%, of those measured under ambient conditions. This result supports the assumption that the recently observed strong underwater adhesion of MSAMS is due to an air layer between individual MSAMSs [Kizilkan, E.; Heepe, L.; Gorb, S. N. Underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructure: An air-entrapment effect. In Biological and biomimetic adhesives: Challenges and opportunities; Santos, R.; Aldred, N.; Gorb, S. N.; Flammang, P., Eds.; The Royal Society of Chemistry: Cambridge, U.K., 2013; pp 65-71] rather than by cavitation. These results obtained due to the high-speed visualisation of the contact behavior at nanoscale-confined interfaces allow for a microscopic understanding of the underwater adhesion of MSAMSs and may aid in further development of artificial adhesive microstructures for applications in predominantly liquid environments. PMID:24991528

  16. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  17. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N; Patil, Navinkumar J; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  18. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  19. Nanorough titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus via nano adhesion points.

    PubMed

    Lüdecke, Claudia; Roth, Martin; Yu, Wenqi; Horn, Uwe; Bossert, Jörg; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Microbial adhesion to natural and synthetic materials surfaces is a key issue e.g. in food industry, sewage treatment and most importantly in the biomedical field. The current development and progress in nanoscale structuring of materials surfaces to control microbial adhesion requires an advanced understanding of the microbe-material-interaction. This study aimed to investigate the nanostructure of the microbe-material-interface and link it to microbial adhesion kinetics as function of titanium surface nanoroughness to gain new insight into controlling microbial adhesion via materials' surface nanoroughness. Adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was statistically significantly reduced (p≤0.05) by 55.6 % and 40.5 %, respectively, on physical vapor deposited titanium thin films with a nanoroughness of 6nm and the lowest surface peak density compared to 2nm with the highest surface peak density. Cross-sectioning of the microbial cells with a focused ion beam (FIB) and SEM imaging provided for the first time direct insight into the titanium-microbe-interface. High resolution SEM micrographs gave evidence that the surface peaks are the loci of initial contact between the microbial cells and the material's surface. In a qualitative model we propose that the initial microbial adhesion on nanorough surfaces is controlled by the titanium surface peak density via nano adhesion points. This new understanding will help towards the design of materials surfaces for controlling microbial adhesion. PMID:27288816

  20. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  1. Differential dormancy of co-occurring copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, Mark D.; Drits, Aleksandr V.; Elizabeth Clarke, M.; Plourde, Stéphane

    1998-08-01

    Four species of planktonic calanoid copepods that co-occur in the California Current System ( Eucalanus californicus Johnson, Rhincalanus nasutus Giesbrecht, Calanus pacificus californicus Brodsky, and Metridia pacifica Brodsky) were investigated for evidence of seasonal dormancy in the San Diego Trough. Indices used to differentiate actively growing from dormant animals included developmental stage structure and vertical distribution; activity of aerobic metabolic enzymes (Citrate Synthase and the Electron Transfer System complex); investment in depot lipids (wax esters and triacylglycerols); in situ grazing activity from gut fluorescence; and egg production rates in simulated in situ conditions. None of the 4 species exhibited a canonical calanoid pattern of winter dormancy - i.e., synchronous developmental arrest as copepodid stage V, descent into deep waters, reduced metabolism, and lack of winter reproduction. Instead, Calanus pacificus californicus has a biphasic life history in this region, with an actively reproducing segment of the population in surface waters overlying a deep dormant segment in winter. Eucalanus californicus is dormant as both adult females and copepodid V's, although winter females respond relatively rapidly to elevated food and temperature conditions; they begin feeding and producing eggs within 2-3 days. Rhincalanus nasutus appears to enter dormancy as adult females, although the evidence is equivocal. Metridia pacifica shows no evidence of dormancy, with sustained active feeding, diel vertical migration behavior, and elevated activity of metabolic enzymes in December as well as in June. The four species also differ markedly in water content, classes of storage lipids, and specific activity of Citrate Synthase. These results suggest that copepod dormancy traits and structural composition reflect diverse adaptations to regional environmental conditions rather than a uniform, canonical series of traits that remain invariant among taxa

  2. Effects of wall shear stress and its gradient on tumor cell adhesion in curved microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, W. W.; Cai, B.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to vessel walls in the microcirculation is one critical step in cancer metastasis. In this paper, the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere at the microvessels with localized shear stresses and their gradients, such as in the curved microvessels, was examined both experimentally and computationally. Our in vivo experiments were performed on the microvessels (post-capillary venules, 30–50 μm diameter) of rat mesentery. A straight or curved microvessel was cannulated and perfused with tumor cells by a glass micropipette at a velocity of ~1mm/s. At less than 10 min after perfusion, there was a significant difference in cell adhesion to the straight and curved vessel walls. In 60 min, the averaged adhesion rate in the curved vessels (n = 14) was ~1.5-fold of that in the straight vessels (n = 19). In 51 curved segments, 45% of cell adhesion was initiated at the inner side, 25% at outer side, and 30% at both sides of the curved vessels. To investigate the mechanical mechanism by which tumor cells prefer adhering at curved sites, we performed a computational study, in which the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method, and the tumor cell dynamics was governed by the Newton’s law of translation and rotation. A modified adhesive dynamics model that included the influence of wall shear stress/gradient on the association/dissociation rates of tumor celladhesion was proposed, in which the positive wall shear stress/gradient jump would enhance tumor cell adhesion while the negative wall shear stress/gradient jump would weaken tumor cell adhesion. It was found that the wall shear stress/gradient, over a threshold, had significant contribution to tumor cell adhesion by activating or inactivating cell adhesion molecules. Our results elucidated why the tumor cell adhesion prefers to occur at the positive curvature of curved microvessels with very low Reynolds number (in the order of 10−2) laminar flow. PMID:21818636

  3. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  4. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    PubMed

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides. PMID:26250681

  5. The effect of polyethylene glycol adhesion barrier (Spray Gel) on preventing peritoneal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Dasiran, F; Eryilmaz, R; Isik, A; Okan, I; Somay, A; Sahin, M

    2015-01-01

    The prominent cells in the late phase of wound healing during proliferation and matrix deposition are fibroblasts. Foreign materials in the operation site like prosthesis prolong the inflammation and induce fibroblast proliferation (8). 3 different prostheses used in this study induced chronic inflammation and fibrosis and provided an effective repair. Dense and thick adhesions due to fibrosis also induced strong adhesions to omentum and small intestine if only polypropylene mesh used for hernia repair. However, there was no difference between SprayGel treated polypropylene mesh and Sepramesh when compared for fibrosis. It also prevents the intraabdominal adhesion formation. It is nontoxic, sticky adherent, non- immigrant and easy to use both in open and laparoscopic surgeries. This experimental study revealed that polyethyleneglycol applied polypropylene mesh accomplishes hernia repair with significantly less adhesion formation than polypropylene mesh alone while securing a remarkable economy than adhesion barrier coated dual meshes (Tab. 6, Fig. 7, Ref. 23). Text in PDF www.elis.sk. PMID:26084740

  6. Role of alloying elements in adhesive transfer and friction of copper-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in a vacuum with binary-copper alloy riders sliding against a conventional bearing-steel surface with normal residual oxides present. The binary alloys contained 1 atomic percent of various alloying elements. Auger spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor the adhesive transfer of the copper alloys to the bearing-steel surface. A relation was found to exist between adhesive transfer and the reaction potential and free energy of formation of the alloying element in the copper. The more chemically active the element and the more stable its oxide, the greater was the adhesive transfer and wear of the copper alloy. Transfer occurred in all the alloys except copper-gold after relatively few (25) passes across the steel surface.

  7. Improved Adhesion of Gold Thin Films Evaporated on Polymer Resin: Applications for Sensing Surfaces and MEMS

    PubMed Central

    Moazzez, Behrang; O'Brien, Stacey M.; Merschrod S., Erika F.

    2013-01-01

    We present and analyze a method to improve the morphology and mechanical properties of gold thin films for use in optical sensors or other settings where good adhesion of gold to a substrate is of importance and where controlled topography/roughness is key. To improve the adhesion of thermally evaporated gold thin films, we introduce a gold deposition step on SU-8 photoresist prior to UV exposure but after the pre-bake step of SU-8 processing. Shrinkage and distribution of residual stresses, which occur during cross-linking of the SU-8 polymer layer in the post-exposure baking step, are responsible for the higher adhesion of the top gold film to the post-deposition cured SU-8 sublayer. The SU-8 underlayer can also be used to tune the resulting gold film morphology. Our promoter-free protocol is easily integrated with existing sensor microfabrication processes. PMID:23760086

  8. Investigation Of Adhesion Formation In New Stainless Steel Trim Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Robert E.; Bukowski, Julia V.; Goble, William M.

    2013-04-16

    Examination of proof test data for new (not previously installed) stainless steel (SS) trim spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) reveals that adhesions form between the seat and disc in about 46% of all such SOPRV. The forces needed to overcome these adhesions can be sufficiently large to cause the SOPRV to fail its proof test (FPT) prior to installation. Furthermore, a significant percentage of SOPRV which are found to FPT are also found to ''fail to open'' (FTO) meaning they would not relief excess pressure in the event of an overpressure event. The cases where adhesions result in FTO or FPT appear to be confined to SOPRV with diameters < 1 in and set pressures < 150 psig and the FTO are estimated to occur in 0.31% to 2.00% of this subpopulation of SS trim SOPRV. The reliability and safety implications of these finding for end-users who do not perform pre-installation testing of SOPRV are discussed.

  9. Experimental determination of thermal and adhesion stress in particle filled thermoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vollenberg, P.; Heikens, D.; Ladan, H.C.B.

    1988-12-01

    The phenomena of dewetting in filled thermoplastics were studied by light microscopy and were correlated with variations in the slope of stress-strain diagrams in constant strain rate tests. In such diagrams, kinks in the plots were found to correspond to the dewetting stress. The corresponding local stress at a filler particle is then equal to the sum of the thermal compressive stress and the adhesion stress. It was shown that the adhesion stress was proportional to the reciprocal root of the particle radius. Also, values of dewetting stress predicted for inorganic particles with radii smaller than 2-4 micrometers are higher than the stresses at which crazes and shear-bands are formed near such particles, indicating that dewetting will not occur in those cases, and adhesion aids may be superfluous. 10 references.

  10. Adhesion of CO2 on hydrated mineral surfaces and its implications to geologic carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Clarens, A. F.; Tao, Z.; Persily, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Most mineral surfaces are water wetting, which has important implications for the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids, such as CO2, through porous media. In this work, contact angle experiments were carried out wherein unusual wetting behavior was observed between mineral surfaces and liquid or supercritical CO2 under certain geochemical conditions. This behavior can be understood in the context of adhesion between the CO2 and the mineral surface. When adhesion occurs, the wettability characteristics of the surfaces are significantly altered. More importantly, the CO2 exhibits a strong affinity for the surface and is highly resistant to shear forces in the aqueous phase. A static pendant drop method was used on a variety of polished mineral surfaces to measure contact angles. The composition of the aqueous phase (e.g., pH, ionic strength) and the characteristics of the mineral surface (e.g., composition, roughness), were evaluated to understand their impact on the prevalence of adhesion. Pressure and temperature conditions were selected to represent those that would be prevalent in geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) or during leakage from target repositories. Adhesion was widely observed on phlogopite mica, silica, and calcite surfaces with roughness on the order of ~10 nanometers. CO2 exhibited no adhesion on mineral surfaces with higher roughness (e.g., quartz). On smoother surfaces, the CO2 is thought to have more effective contact area with the mineral, enabling the weak van der Waals forces that drive most adhesion processes. Brine chemistry also had an important role in controlling CO2 adhesion. Increases in CO2 partial pressure and ionic strength both increased the incidence of adhesion. The addition of strong acid or strong base permanently inhibited the development of adhesion. These results suggest that the development of adhesion between the CO2 and the mineral surface is dependent on the integrity and thickness of the hydration layer between the CO2

  11. Injury and adhesion formation following ovarian wedge resection with different thermal surgical modalities.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, N; Isaacson, K; Flotte, T; Schiff, I; Anderson, R R

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the role of bleeding, acute thermal damage, and charring in adhesion formation. Postoperative adhesions were compared following ovarian wedge resection in 48 rabbits using different lasers, electrosurgery, and scalpel. Twelve ovaries were sectioned per modality, in randomized pairs. Acute thermal injury as assessed by histology, bleeding, and charring differed among the modalities used. Adhesions were assessed 4 weeks later, by an investigator completely blinded of the treatment protocol. The adhesion scores were 11.6 +/- 8.0 with pulsed Er:YAG laser; 11.9 +/- 7.5 with scalpel; 8.3 +/- 9.3 with electrocautery; 6.7 +/- 8.8 with a continuous (c.w.) Nd:YAG laser; 5.3 +/- 4.8 with c.w. CO2 laser; 3.1 +/- 2.7 with pulsed CO2 laser; 1.7 +/- 1.8 with pulsed Ho:YAG laser; and 0.8 +/- 1.5 in the control (no resection) group. Ho:YAG, Nd:YAG, and electrocautery were completely hemostatic. Bleeding was minimal with the CO2 lasers. Er:YAG and scalpel caused maximum bleeding, requiring hemostatic measures to prevent exsanguination. Charring occurred with electrocautery, CO2 laser, and Nd:YAG laser. Bleeding and charring correlated with adhesion formation, but the histological depth of thermal damage did not. The Ho:YAG laser is a hemostatic, fiber-optic compatible laser causing significantly fewer adhesions (P < 0.04) than scalpel, electrocautery, Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, and c.w. CO2 lasers. Clinical use of the Ho:YAG laser, and the role of carbonization in promoting adhesions, deserve further study. PMID:8515673

  12. The first EGF domain of coagulation factor IX attenuates cell adhesion and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomomi; Kitano, Hisataka; Mamiya, Atsushi; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Hidai, Chiaki

    2016-07-01

    Coagulation factor IX (FIX) is an essential plasma protein for blood coagulation. The first epidermal growth factor (EGF) motif of FIX (EGF-F9) has been reported to attenuate cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of this motif on cell adhesion and apoptosis. Treatment with a recombinant EGF-F9 attenuated cell adhesion to the ECM within 10 min. De-adhesion assays with native FIX recombinant FIX deletion mutant proteins suggested that the de-adhesion activity of EGF-F9 requires the same process of FIX activation as that which occurs for coagulation activity. The recombinant EGF-F9 increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity release into the medium and increased the number of cells stained with annexin V and activated caspase-3, by 8.8- and 2.7-fold respectively, indicating that EGF-F9 induced apoptosis. Activated caspase-3 increased very rapidly after only 5 min of administration of recombinant EGF-F9. Treatment with EGF-F9 increased the level of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not that of phosphorylated MAPK 44/42 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibitors of caspase-3 suppressed the release of LDH. Caspase-3 inhibitors also suppressed the attenuation of cell adhesion and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by EGF-F9. Our data indicated that EGF-F9 activated signals for apoptosis and induced de-adhesion in a caspase-3 dependent manner. PMID:27129300

  13. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (p<0.05) in ARI score was detected between the 0.5-min and 4.0-min delay groups with more adhesive remaining on the bracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  14. Reduction of peritoneal adhesions by sustained and local administration of epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Uguralp, S; Akin, M; Karabulut, A Bay; Harma, B; Kiziltay, Aysel; Kiran, T R; Hasirci, N

    2008-02-01

    Previous studies have shown epidermal growth factor (EGF) facilitate peritoneal membrane healing by augmenting cell adhesion and migration. The objective of this study was to show the effect of sustained and local administration of EGF on peritoneal adhesion. Fourty-two rats were divided into six groups: control 7 and 14, gelatin 7 and 14, and EGF 7 and 14. Adhesions were created by scraping the cecum with mesh gause followed by application of absolute alcohol and placement of silk suture in the parietal peritoneum. The anterior walls of the intestines were covered with 5 x 5 cm unloaded, and EGF loaded gelatin films in the gelatin and EGF groups, respectively. The rats were killed on days 7 and 14 to assess the adhesion occurring, and for biochemical examination. The mean adhesion grades of EGF groups were significantly lower than in the other groups (P < 0.008). The mean adenosine deaminase (ADA) measurements of EGF 7 group were lower than in the gelatin 7 and control 7 groups but the difference was not significant (P > 0.008). The mean ADA measurements in the 14 days groups were as follows: control 14 < EGF 14 < gelatin 14 groups. The mean ADA measurements between 14 days groups did not significantly differ from each other (P > 0.008). The mean hydroxyproline measurements did not differ among the groups (P > 0.008). EGF decreased intestinal adhesion in our study. EGF has important roles in DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Further studies are required to determine the exact mechanism by which EGF lowers the efficiency of intestinal adhesion. PMID:17985134

  15. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  16. The influence of instrumental parameters on the adhesion force in a flat-on-flat contact geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Arzu; Wormeester, Herbert; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2014-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to measure the adhesion force between a flat Si(0 0 1) wafer and a micrometer sized flat silicon AFM tip. Force-distance curves have been recorded at different setpoints in order to elucidate their individual effect on the derived adhesion force. No dependence of the derived adhesion force on the applied load has been detected, making sure that no plastic changes in the morphology of either tip and/or sample occur. Other setpoints as the residence time of the tip at the substrate, the relative humidity, the size of the tip and the retraction velocity of the tip have been varied systematically. We have found that the adhesion force depends strongly on the velocity of the z-piezo and the tip size while, at least within the 0.5-41 s time window, the residence time does not have any measurable effect on the adhesion force. The time scale of the retraction varies between 0.2 and 25 s. The increase of the adhesion force with increasing retraction speed is ascribed to the viscous force. Finally, the adhesion force increases with increasing relative humidity.

  17. Probing adhesion forces at the molecular scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.C.; Houston, J.E.; Michalske, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of adhesion forces at the molecular scale, such as those discussed here, are necessary to understand macroscopic boundary-layer behavior such as adhesion, friction, wear, lubrication, and many other important phenomena. The authors` recent interfacial force microscopy (IFM) studies have provided detailed information about the mechanical response of both self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films and the underlying substrates. In addition, they recently demonstrated that the IFM is useful for studying the chemical nature of such films. In this talk, the authors discuss a new method for studying surface interactions and chemical reactions using the IFM. To quantitatively measure the work of adhesion and bond energies between two organic thin films, they modify both a Au substrate and a Au probe with self-assembling organomercaptan molecules having either the same or different end groups (-CH{sub 3}, -NH{sub 2}, and -COOH), and then analyze the force-versus-displacement curves (force profiles) that result from the approach to contact of the two surfaces. Their results show that the magnitude of the adhesive forces measured between methyl-methyl interactions are in excellent agreement with van der Waals calculations using Lifshitz theory and previous experimentally determined values. Moreover, the measured peak adhesive forces scale as expected for van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, and acid-base interactions.

  18. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives. PMID:26513350

  19. Actin Foci Adhesion of D. discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Paneru, Govind

    2014-03-01

    Amoeboid migration is a fast (10 μm min-1) integrin-independent mode of migration that is important with D. discoideum, leukocytes, and breast cancer cells. It is poorly understood, but depends on the establishment of adhesive contacts to the substrate where the cell transmits traction forces. In pre-aggregative D. discoideum, a model system for learning about amoeboid migration, these adhesive contacts are discrete complexes that are known as actin-foci. They have an area of ~ 0.5 μm2 and a lifetime of ~ 20 s. This talk will present measurements of the adhesive character of actin foci that have been obtained using a submicron force transducer that was designed for this purpose. Results on the rupture stresses and lifetimes of individual acting foci under nano-newton level forces will be described in the context of a general theory for cellular adhesion. This theory depends on, essentially, three cellular properties: the membrane-medium surface tension, the number density of adhesion receptors in the membrane, and the receptor-substrate potential energy surface. Therefore, the use of the transducer to determine the surface tension will be presented, as well.

  20. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  1. Elasto-capillarity in insect fibrillar adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gernay, Sophie; Federle, Walter; Lambert, Pierre; Gilet, Tristan

    2016-08-01

    The manipulation of microscopic objects is challenging because of high adhesion forces, which render macroscopic gripping strategies unsuitable. Adhesive footpads of climbing insects could reveal principles relevant for micro-grippers, as they are able to attach and detach rapidly during locomotion. However, the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. In this work, we characterize the geometry and contact formation of the adhesive setae of dock beetles (Gastrophysa viridula) by interference reflection microscopy. We compare our experimental results to the model of an elastic beam loaded with capillary forces. Fitting the model to experimental data yielded not only estimates for seta adhesion and compliance in agreement with previous direct measurements, but also previously unknown parameters such as the volume of the fluid meniscus and the bending stiffness of the tip. In addition to confirming the primary role of surface tension for insect adhesion, our investigation reveals marked differences in geometry and compliance between the three main kinds of seta tips in leaf beetles. PMID:27488250

  2. Shear-enhanced adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Rusconi, Roberto; Shen, Yi; Forsyth, Alison; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first step in the development of surface-associated communities known as biofilms, which are the cause of many problems in medical devices and industrial water systems. However the underlying mechanisms of initial bacterial attachment are not fully understood. We have investigated the effects of hydrodynamics on the probability of adsorption and detachment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 on model surfaces under flow, in straight microfluidic channels, and measured the distribution of bacteria residence time as a function of the shear rate. Our main discovery is a counter-intuitive enhanced adhesion as the shear stress is increased over a wide range of shear rates. In order to identify the origin of this phenomenon, we have performed experiments with several mutant strains. Our results show that shear-enhanced adhesion is not regulated by primary surface organelles, and that this process is not specific to a certain type of surface, but rather appears a general feature of the adhesive behavior of P. aeruginosa. These results suggest that shear-induced adhesion could be a very widespread strategy in nature.

  3. High-temperature Adhesive Development and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hale, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    High-temperature adhesive systems are evaluated for short and long-term stability at temperatures ranging from 232C to 427C. The resins selected for characterization include: NASA Langley developed polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ), and commercially available polyimides (PI). The primary method of bond testing is single lap shear. The PPQ candidates are evaluated on 6A1-4V titanium adherends with chromic acid anodize and phosphate fluoride etch surface preparations. The remaining adhesives are evaluated on 15-5 PH stainless steel with a sulfuric acid anodize surface preparation. Preliminary data indicate that the PPQ adhesives tested have stability to 3000 hours at 450F with chromic acid anodize surface preparation. Additional studies are continuing to attempt to improve the PPQ's high-performance by formulating adhesive films with a boron filler and utilizing the phosphate fluoride surface preparation on titanium. Evaluation of the polyimide candidates on stainless-steel adherends indicates that the FM-35 (American Cyanamid), PMR-15 (U.S. Polymeric/Ferro), TRW partially fluorinated polyimide and NR 150B2S6X (DuPont) adhesives show sufficient promise to justify additional testing.

  4. Adhesive curing options for photonic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Steven C.; Hubert, Manfred; Tam, Robin

    2002-06-01

    Varying the intensity of illumination used to cure photoactivated adhesives has been applied in medical and dental applications to improve the performance of polymer materials. For example, it has been observed that dental polymer composite materials express reduced shrinkage, important for durability of non-amalgam restorations, by introducing a phased time-intensity cure schedule. This work identified that curing conditions could influence the final properties of materials, and suggested the possibility of extending the characteristics that could be influenced beyond shrinkage to humidity resistance, Tg, outgassing and other important material properties. Obviously, these results have important ramifications for the photonic industry, with current efforts focused on improved manufacturing techniques. Improvement in low cost packaging solutions, including adhesives, will have to be made to bring the component cost down to address the needs of Metro and similar markets. However, there are perceived problems with the widespread use of adhesives, the most prevalent of these involving long term durability of the bond. Devices are typically aligned to sub-micron precision using active feedback and then must be locked in position to maintain performance. In contrast to traditional fastening methods, adhesive bonding is a highly attractive option due to the ease of deployment, lower equipment costs, and improved flexibility. Moreover, using methods analogous to those employed in dental applications, materials properties of photonic adhesives may be tailored using a programmed cure approach.

  5. The differential adhesion hypothesis: a direct evaluation.

    PubMed

    Foty, Ramsey A; Steinberg, Malcolm S

    2005-02-01

    The differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH), advanced in the 1960s, proposed that the liquid-like tissue-spreading and cell segregation phenomena of development arise from tissue surface tensions that in turn arise from differences in intercellular adhesiveness. Our earlier measurements of liquid-like cell aggregate surface tensions have shown that, without exception, a cell aggregate of lower surface tension tends to envelop one of higher surface tension to which it adheres. We here measure the surface tensions of L cell aggregates transfected to express N-, P- or E-cadherin in varied, measured amounts. We report that in these aggregates, in which cadherins are essentially the only cell-cell adhesion molecules, the aggregate surface tensions are a direct, linear function of cadherin expression level. Taken together with our earlier results, the conclusion follows that the liquid-like morphogenetic cell and tissue rearrangements of cell sorting, tissue spreading and segregation represent self-assembly processes guided by the diminution of adhesive-free energy as cells tend to maximize their mutual binding. This conclusion relates to the physics governing these morphogenetic phenomena and applies independently of issues such as the specificities of intercellular adhesives. PMID:15649477

  6. Information Needs While A Disaster Is Occurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    that rainfall intensity at their homes might be less than the intensity up in the mountains where the debris flows would start. Nor did they know that debris flows travel too quickly to be outrun. These and many other examples indicate need for social and natural scientists to increase awareness of what to expect when the disaster strikes. This information must be solidly understood before the event occurs - while a disaster is unfolding there are no teachable moments. Case studies indicate that even those who come into a disaster well educated about the phenomenon can struggle to apply what they know when the real situation is at hand. In addition, psychological studies confirm diminished ability to comprehend information at times of stress.

  7. Rate-dependent frictional adhesion in natural and synthetic gecko setae

    PubMed Central

    Gravish, Nick; Wilkinson, Matt; Sponberg, Simon; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noe; Soto, Daniel; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Broide, Michael; Cutkosky, Mark; Creton, Costantino; Autumn, Kellar

    2010-01-01

    Geckos owe their remarkable stickiness to millions of dry, hard setae on their toes. In this study, we discovered that gecko setae stick more strongly the faster they slide, and do not wear out after 30 000 cycles. This is surprising because friction between dry, hard, macroscopic materials typically decreases at the onset of sliding, and as velocity increases, friction continues to decrease because of a reduction in the number of interfacial contacts, due in part to wear. Gecko setae did not exhibit the decrease in adhesion or friction characteristic of a transition from static to kinetic contact mechanics. Instead, friction and adhesion forces increased at the onset of sliding and continued to increase with shear speed from 500 nm s−1 to 158 mm s−1. To explain how apparently fluid-like, wear-free dynamic friction and adhesion occur macroscopically in a dry, hard solid, we proposed a model based on a population of nanoscopic stick–slip events. In the model, contact elements are either in static contact or in the process of slipping to a new static contact. If stick–slip events are uncorrelated, the model further predicted that contact forces should increase to a critical velocity (V*) and then decrease at velocities greater than V*. We hypothesized that, like natural gecko setae, but unlike any conventional adhesive, gecko-like synthetic adhesives (GSAs) could adhere while sliding. To test the generality of our results and the validity of our model, we fabricated a GSA using a hard silicone polymer. While sliding, the GSA exhibited steady-state adhesion and velocity dependence similar to that of gecko setae. Observations at the interface indicated that macroscopically smooth sliding of the GSA emerged from randomly occurring stick–slip events in the population of flexible fibrils, confirming our model predictions. PMID:19493896

  8. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  9. Atomic scale enhancement of the adhesion of beryllium films to carbon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1995-12-01

    We have used 200 keV carbon ions to enhance the adhesion of 240-nm thick Be films to polished, vitreous carbon substrates. Adhesion of the as-deposited films was below that necessary to pass the scotch-tape test. Carbon ion fluences less than 1.6x10{sup 14} C/cm{sup 2} were sufficient to ensure the passage of the tape test without affecting the optical properties of the films. Adhesion failure of the as-deposited film was attributed to an inner oxide layer between the Be and the carbon. Because this oxide ({approximately}5 nm of BeO) was not measurably changed by the irradiation process, these results are consistent with adhesion enhancement occurring on the atomic scale at the interface between the inner oxide and the carbon substrate. This conclusion was supported by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) data, and potential adhesion mechanisms are discussed with consideration of relative contributions from electronic and nuclear stopping.

  10. Geckos significantly alter foot orientation to facilitate adhesion during downhill locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V.; Higham, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Geckos employ their adhesive system when moving up an incline, but the directionality of the system may limit function on downhill surfaces. Here, we use a generalist gecko to test whether limb modulation occurs on downhill slopes to allow geckos to take advantage of their adhesive system. We examined three-dimensional limb kinematics for geckos moving up and down a 45° slope. Remarkably, the hind limbs were rotated posteriorly on declines, resulting in digit III of the pes facing a more posterior direction (opposite to the direction of travel). No significant changes in limb orientation were found in any other condition. This pes rotation leads to a dramatic shift in foot function that facilitates the use of the adhesive system as a brake/stabilizer during downhill locomotion and, although this rotation is not unique to geckos, it is significant for the deployment of adhesion. Adhesion is not just advantageous for uphill locomotion but can be employed to help deal with the effects of gravity during downhill locomotion, highlighting the incredible multi-functionality of this key innovation. PMID:25319816

  11. Specific adhesion of glycophorin liposomes to a lectin surface in shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Wattenbarger, M R; Graves, D J; Lauffenburger, D A

    1990-01-01

    The adhesion of cells to other cells or to surfaces by receptor-ligand binding in a shear field is an important aspect of many different biological processes and various cell separation techniques. The purpose of this study was to observe the adhesion of model cells with receptor molecules embedded in their surfaces to a ligand-coated surface under well-defined flow conditions in a parallel plate flow chamber. Liposomes containing glycophorin were used as the model cells to permit a variation in the adhesion parameters and then to observe the effect on adhesion. A mathematical model for cell sedimentation was created to predict the deposition time and the velocity preceding adhesion for the selection of experimental operating conditions and the methods useful for data analysis. The likelihood of cell attachment was represented by a quantity called the sticking probability which was defined as the inverse of the number of times a liposome made contact with the surface before attachment occurred. The sticking probability decreased as the cell receptor concentration was lowered from approximately 10(4) to 10(2) receptors per 4-microns diam liposome and as the shear rate increased from 5 to 22 s-1. The effect of the wall shear rate and particle diameter on detachment of liposomes from a surface was also observed. PMID:2344463

  12. Clusterin promotes the aggregation and adhesion of renal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Silkensen, J R; Skubitz, K M; Skubitz, A P; Chmielewski, D H; Manivel, J C; Dvergsten, J A; Rosenberg, M E

    1995-01-01

    The function of clusterin, a heterodimeric glycoprotein markedly induced in renal and other organ injuries, is unclear. Since renal injury is accompanied by alterations in cell attachment, it is possible that clusterin functions to promote cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions. In this study, a single cell suspension of renal epithelial (LLC-PK1) cells was treated with purified human clusterin, resulting in time- and dose-dependent cell aggregation. Electron microscopy of the cell aggregates demonstrated cell junction and lumen formation. To determine the effect of clusterin on cell adhesion, tissue culture plates were coated with clusterin, fibronectin, PBS, or albumin. Clusterin and fibronectin promoted cell adhesion to the same extent. The adhesion to clusterin was dose dependent and specific, as a monoclonal antibody against clusterin inhibited cell adhesion to clusterin but not fibronectin. Perterbations of the cytoskeleton may underlie the alterations in cell attachment which occur in renal injury. Induction of clusterin mRNA was seen after disruption of both microtubules and microfilaments and after inhibition of cell-substratum interactions. In conclusion, clusterin is a potent renal epithelial cell aggregation and adhesion molecule. We speculate that clusterin functions to promote cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions which are perturbed in the setting of renal injury, thereby preserving the integrity of the renal epithelial barrier. Images PMID:8675630

  13. Adhesion-Induced Phase Behavior of Two-Component Membranes and Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rouhiparkouhi, Tahereh; Weikl, Thomas R.; Discher, Dennis E.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The interplay of adhesion and phase separation is studied theoretically for two-component membranes that can phase separate into two fluid phases such as liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Many adhesion geometries provide two different environments for these membranes and then partition the membranes into two segments that differ in their composition. Examples are provided by adhering vesicles, by hole- or pore-spanning membranes, and by membranes supported by chemically patterned surfaces. Generalizing a lattice model for binary mixtures to these adhesion geometries, we show that the phase behavior of the adhering membranes depends, apart from composition and temperature, on two additional parameters, the area fraction of one membrane segment and the affinity contrast between the two segments. For the generic case of non-vanishing affinity contrast, the adhering membranes undergo two distinct phase transitions and the phase diagrams in the composition/temperature plane have a generic topology that consists of two two-phase coexistence regions separated by an intermediate one-phase region. As a consequence, phase separation and domain formation is predicted to occur separately in each of the two membrane segments but not in both segments simultaneously. Furthermore, adhesion is also predicted to suppress the phase separation process for certain regions of the phase diagrams. These generic features of the adhesion-induced phase behavior are accessible to experiment. PMID:23340655

  14. Adaptive simplification and the evolution of gecko locomotion: Morphological and biomechanical consequences of losing adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V.; Collins, Clint E.; Hulsey, C. Darrin; Russell, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Innovations permit the diversification of lineages, but they may also impose functional constraints on behaviors such as locomotion. Thus, it is not surprising that secondary simplification of novel locomotory traits has occurred several times among vertebrates and could potentially lead to exceptional divergence when constraints are relaxed. For example, the gecko adhesive system is a remarkable innovation that permits locomotion on surfaces unavailable to other animals, but has been lost or simplified in species that have reverted to a terrestrial lifestyle. We examined the functional and morphological consequences of this adaptive simplification in the Pachydactylus radiation of geckos, which exhibits multiple unambiguous losses or bouts of simplification of the adhesive system. We found that the rates of morphological and 3D locomotor kinematic evolution are elevated in those species that have simplified or lost adhesive capabilities. This finding suggests that the constraints associated with adhesion have been circumvented, permitting these species to either run faster or burrow. The association between a terrestrial lifestyle and the loss/reduction of adhesion suggests a direct link between morphology, biomechanics, and ecology. PMID:25548182

  15. Thermal Characterization of Epoxy Adhesive by Hotfire Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.; Haddock, M. Reed; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes subscale solid-rocket motor hot-fire testing of epoxy adhesives in flame surface bondlines to evaluate heat-affected depth, char depth and ablation rate. Hot-fire testing is part of an adhesive down-selection program on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle to provide additional confidence in the down-selected adhesives. The current nozzle structural adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Prior to hot-fire testing, adhesives were tested for chemical, physical and mechanical properties, which resulted in the selection of two potential replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's TIGA 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. Hot-fire testing consisted of four forty-pound charge (FPC) motors fabricated in configurations that would allow side-by-side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives with the current RSRM adhesives. Results of the FPC motor testing show that: 1) the phenolic char depths on radial bondlines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used, 2) the replacement candidate adhesive char depths are equivalent to the char depths of the current adhesives, 3) the heat-affected depths of the candidate and current adhesives are equivalent, and 4) the ablation rates for both replacement adhesives were equivalent to the current adhesives.

  16. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A−1/4. We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A−1/50. Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm2 of adhesive per hand. PMID:25411404

  17. Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson

    2006-08-01

    A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for “stick built” structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tiedowns. This project was

  18. Water based adhesive primers on aluminum substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wightman, J.P.; Mori, S.

    1996-12-31

    The number of aluminum alloy bonding applications has been increasing recently in the automobile industry. Primer coating of aluminum substrates is one of the main processes used to promote bond performance. Solvent based organic primers have been used for a long time but environmental regulations now require the substitution of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by alternate materials such as water based adhesive primers. However, the bond strengths obtained with many water based primers are generally lower than for solvent based ones. Water based primers which have some reactive functional groups have been proposed recently but such primers require special treatment. This paper describes a study conducted to optimize bond strength using a water based adhesive as a primer in the adhesive bonding of anodized aluminum.

  19. [Inhibition of neutrophil adhesion by pectic galacturonans].

    PubMed

    Popov, S V; Ovodova, R G; Popova, G Iu; Nikitina, I R; Ovodov, Iu S

    2007-01-01

    The inhibition of the adhesion of neutrophils to fibronectin by the fragments of the main galacturonan chain of the following pectins was demonstrated: comaruman from the marsh cinquefoil Comarum polustre, bergenan from the Siberian tea Bergenia crassifolia, lemnan from the duckweed Lemna minor, zosteran from the seagrass Zostera marina, and citrus pectin. The parent pectins, except for comaruman, did not affect the cell adhesion. Galacturonans prepared from the starting pectins by acidic hydrolysis were shown to reduce the neutrophil adhesion stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (1.625 microM) and dithiothreitol (0.5 mM) at a concentration of 50-200 microg/ml. The presence of carbohydrate chains with molecular masses higher than 300, from 100 to 300, and from 50 to 100 kDa in the galacturonan fractions was proved by membrane ultrafiltration. PMID:17375675

  20. Enhanced adhesion from high energy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, B. T.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Qui, Y.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    It has been found that the adhesion of thin metal films on insulators, semiconductors, and metals could be improved by subjecting the material to a high-energy ion bombardment. Griffith et al. (1982) have first suggested a use of this technique with insulators. The present investigation has the objective to determine the mechanism for the adhesion enhancement. A description is presented of a preliminary transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of thinned bonded samples of silver on silicon using electron diffraction. It is found that irradiation of a variety of thin film-substrate combinations by heavy ion beams will provide a remarkable improvement in the adherence of the film. The evidence for the mechanism involved in the enhancement of adhesion is discussed.

  1. Optimizing ultrasonic imaging for adhesively bonded plates

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, Mike; Hart, Scot; Harris-Weiel, David; Meyer, R. L.; Claytor, T. N.

    2004-01-01

    Bonded materials are used in many critical applications, making it important to determine the state of the adhesive during service or aging. It is also of importance, in many cases, to determine if the adhesive has uniformly and completely covered the area to be joined. Through dual transducer scanning, focused and unfocused transducers, and immersion scanning, the uniformity and adherence of a visco-elastic material can be evaluated. In this report, ultrasonic scanning parameters will be optimized experimentally with guidance from simulation tools including Wave 2000 pro and Imagine 3D. We explored optimizing the contrast ratio by varying the interrogation frequency and also by adjusting the distance between the transducer and bond line. An improvement in contrast should also increase the ability to detect differences in compositions and viscosity of the bonded layer. By maximizing the contrast the quality of the visco-elastic bond can be determined, and imperfections detected before adhesive failure.

  2. Surface tension and deformation in soft adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Katharine

    Modern contact mechanics was originally developed to account for the competition between adhesion and elasticity for relatively stiff deformable materials like rubber, but much softer sticky materials are ubiquitous in biology, engineering, and everyday consumer products. In such soft materials, the solid surface tension can also play an important role in resisting shape change, and significantly modify the physics of contact with soft matter. We report indentation and pull-off experiments that bring small, rigid spheres into adhesive contact with compliant silicone gel substrates, varying both the surface functionalization of the spheres and the bulk elastic properties of the gels. We map the resulting deformation profiles using optical microscopy and image analysis. We examine the substrate geometry in light of capillary and elastic theories in order to explore the interplay of surface tension and bulk elasticity in governing soft adhesion.

  3. Friction, adhesion, and elasticity of graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunley, D. Patrick; Flynn, Tyler J.; Dodson, Tom; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Boland, Mathias J.; Strachan, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Frictional, adhesive, and elastic characteristics of graphene edges are determined through lateral force microscopy. Measurements reveal a significant local frictional increase at exposed graphene edges, whereas a single overlapping layer of graphene removes this local frictional increase. Comparison of lateral force and atomic force microscopy measurements shows that local forces on the probe are successfully modeled with a vertical adhesion in the vicinity of the atomic-scale graphene steps which also provides a new low-load calibration method. Lateral force microscopy performed with carefully maintained low-adhesion probes shows evidence of elastic straining of graphene edges. Estimates of the energy stored of this observed elastic response is consistent with out-of-plane bending of the graphene edge.

  4. A multiscale modeling approach to adhesive contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, KangQi; Wang, WeiDong; Zhu, YingMin; Zhang, XiuYan

    2011-09-01

    In order to model the adhesive contact across different length scales, a multiscale approach is developed and used to study the adhesive contact behaviors between a rigid cylinder and an elastic face-centered cubic (FCC) substrate. The approach combines an atomistic treatment of the interfacial region with an elastic mechanics method description of the continuum region. The two regions are connected by a coupling region where nodes of the continuum region are refined to atoms of the atomistic region. Moreover, the elastic constants of FCC crystals are obtained directly from the Lennard-Jones potential to describe the elastic response characteristics of the continuum region, which ensures the consistency of material proprieties between atomistic and continuum regions. The multiscale approach is examined by comparing it with the pure MD simulation, and the results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach agrees well with the MD method in studying the adhesive contact behaviors.

  5. Coatings for rubber bonding and paint adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, M. S.; Petschel, M.

    1997-08-01

    Conversion coatings form an important base for the adhesion of paint to metal substrates and for the bonding of rubber to metal parts. Four types of conversion coatings were assessed as base treatments for the bonding of rubber to steel and for the corrosion protection of metal substrates under paint: amorphous iron phosphate, heavy zinc phosphate, and three types of modified zinc phosphates that utilized one or more metal cations in addition to zinc. When applied, these conversion coatings formed a thin film over the metal substrate that was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and chemical methods. The performance of the coatings was assessed using physical methods such as dry adhesion, conical mandrel, impact, and stress adhesion for the rubber-bonded parts, and by corrosion resistance methods such as humidity, salt spray, and cyclic corrosion. Coating characterization and performance were correlated.

  6. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Konjic, Ferid; Idrizovic, Enes; Hasukic, Ismar; Jahic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions are the reason for bowel obstruction in 80% of the cases. In well selected patients the adhesive ileus laparoscopic treatment has multiple advantages which include the shorter hospitalization period, earlier food taking, and less postoperative morbidity rate. Case report: Here we have a patient in the age of 35 hospitalized at the clinic due to occlusive symptoms. Two years before an opened appendectomy had been performed on him. He underwent the treatment of exploration laparoscopy and laparoscopic adhesiolysis. Dilated small bowel loops connected with the anterior abdominal wall in the ileocecal region by adhesions were found intraoperatively and then resected harmonically with scalpel. One strangulation around which a small bowel loop was wrapped around was found and dissected. Postoperative course was normal. PMID:27041815

  7. Adhesive capsulitis of the hip: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Colin G; Raynor, Brett; Lowe, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the hip (ACH) is a rare clinical entity. Similar to adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, ACH is characterized by a painful decrease in active and passive range of motion as synovial inflammation in the acute stages of the disease progresses to capsular fibrosis in the chronic stages. Once other diagnoses have been ruled out, management of ACH is tailored to reduce inflammation in the acute stages with NSAIDs, intra-articular steroid injections, and targeted physical therapy while biomechanical dysfunction in the spine, hip, sacroiliac joint, or lower limb joints is addressed. In chronic stages of the disease, intervention should focus on decreasing the progression of fibrotic changes and regaining range of motion through aggressive physical therapy. Interventions described for chronic ACH include manipulation under anesthesia; pressure dilatation; and open or arthroscopic synovectomy, lysis of adhesions, and capsular release. Surgical intervention should be considered only after failure of a minimum 3-month course of nonsurgical treatment. PMID:24292931

  8. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  9. In situ cross-linkable hyaluronic acid hydrogels prevent post-operative abdominal adhesions in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Yoon; Highley, Christopher B; Bellas, Evangelia; Ito, Taichi; Marini, Robert; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2006-09-01

    We studied the efficacy of an in situ cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogel (HAX) in preventing post-surgical peritoneal adhesions, using a rabbit sidewall defect-cecum abrasion model. Two cross-linkable precursors were prepared by modifying hyaluronic acid with adipic dihydrazide and aldehyde, respectively. The hydrogel precursors cross-linked to form a flexible hydrogel upon mixing. The hydrogel was biodegradable and provided a durable physical barrier, which was highly effective in reducing the formation of post-operative adhesions. Ten out of 12 animals in the untreated control group developed fibrous adhesions requiring sharp dissection, while only 2 out of 8 animals treated with HAX gels showed such adhesions, and those occurred in locations that were not covered by the hydrogel. We also studied means by which gel degradation time can be modulated by varying the precursor concentration and molecular weight. PMID:16750564

  10. Clinical status of ten dentin adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Verschueren, M; Gladys, S; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1994-11-01

    Laboratory testing of dentin adhesive systems still requires corroboration by long-term clinical trials for their ultimate clinical effectiveness to be validated. The objective of this clinical investigation was to evaluate, retrospectively, the clinical effectiveness of earlier-investigated dentin adhesive systems (Scotchbond, Gluma, Clearfil New Bond, Scotchbond 2, Tenure, and Tripton), and to compare their clinical results with those obtained with four modern total-etch adhesive systems (Bayer exp. 1 and 2, Clearfil Liner Bond System, and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose). In total, 1177 Class V cervical lesions in the teeth of 346 patients were restored following two cavity designs: In Group A, enamel was neither beveled nor intentionally etched, as per ADA guidelines; in Group B, adjacent enamel was beveled and conditioned. Clinical retention rates definitely indicated the improved clinical efficacy of the newest dentin adhesives over the earlier systems. With regard to adhesion strategy, adhesive systems that removed the smear layer and concurrently demineralized the dentin surface layer performed clinically better than systems that modified the disorderly layer of smear debris without complete removal. Hybridization by resin interdiffusion into the exposed dentinal collagen layer, combined with attachment of resin tags into the opened dentin tubules, appeared to be essential for reliable dentin bonding but might be insufficient by itself. The additional formation of an elastic bonding area as a polymerization shrinkage absorber and the use of a microfine restorative composite apparently guaranteed an efficient clinical result. The perfect one-year retention recorded for Clearfil Liner Bond System and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose must be confirmed at later recalls. PMID:7983255

  11. High-Temperature Adhesive Strain Gage Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have developed a unique strain gage and adhesive system for measuring the mechanical properties of polymers and polymer composites at elevated temperatures. This system overcomes some of the problems encountered in using commercial strain gages and adhesives. For example, typical commercial strain gage adhesives require a postcure at temperatures substantially higher than the maximum test temperature. The exposure of the specimen to this temperature may affect subsequent results, and in some cases may be higher than the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. In addition, although typical commercial strain gages can be used for short times at temperatures up to 370 C, their long-term use is limited to 230 C. This precludes their use for testing some high-temperature polyimides near their maximum temperature capability. Lewis' strain gage and adhesive system consists of a nonencapsulated, unbacked gage grid that is bonded directly to the polymer after the specimen has been cured but prior to the normal postcure cycle. The gage is applied with an adhesive specially formulated to cure under the specimen postcure conditions. Special handling, mounting, and electrical connection procedures were developed, and a fixture was designed to calibrate each strain gage after it was applied to a specimen. A variety of tests was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the gages at elevated temperatures on PMR-15 neat resin and titanium specimens. For these tests, which included static tension, thermal exposure, and creep tests, the gage and adhesive system performed within normal strain gage specifications at 315 C. An example of the performance characteristics of the gage can be seen in the figure, which compares the strain gage measurement on a polyimide specimen at 315 C with an extensometer measurement.

  12. Molecular mechanics of mussel adhesion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussel foot protein (mfp), a natural glue produced by marine mussel, is an intriguing material because of its superior ability for adhesion in various environments. For example, a very small amount of this material is sufficient to affix a mussel to a substrate in water, providing structural support under extreme forces caused by the dynamic effects of waves. Towards a more complete understanding of its strength and underwater workability, it is necessary to understand the microscropic mechanisms by which the protein structure interacts with various substrates. However, none of the mussel proteins' structure is known, preventing us from directly using atomistic modeling to probe their structural and mechanical properties. Here we use an advanced molecular sampling technique to identify the molecular structures of two mussel foot proteins (mfp-3 and mfp-5) and use those structures to study their mechanics of adhesion, which is then incorporated into a continuum model. We calculate the adhesion energy of the mussel foot protein on a silica substrate, compute the adhesion strength based on results obtained from molecular modeling, and compare with experimental data. Our results show good agreement with experimental measurements, which validates the multiscale model. We find that the molecular structure of the folded mussel foot protein (ultimately defined by its genetic sequence) favors strong adhesion to substrates, where L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (or DOPA) protein subunits work in a cooperative manner to enhance adhesion. Our experimental data suggests a peak attachment force of 0.4±0.1 N, which compares favorably with the prediction from the multiscale model of Fc=0.21-0.33 N. The principles learnt from those results could guide the fabrication of new interfacial materials (e.g. composites) to integrate organic with inorganic surfaces in an effective manner.

  13. Treatment of adhesive capsulitis: a review

    PubMed Central

    D’Orsi, Giovanni Maria; Via, Alessio Giai; Frizziero, Antonio; Oliva, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adhesive capsulitis is a condition “difficult to define, difficult to treat and difficult to explain from the point of view of pathology”. This Codman’s assertion is still actual because of a variable nomenclature, an inconsistent reporting of disease staging and many types of treatment. There is no consensus on how the best way best to manage patients with this condition, so we want to provide an evidence-based overview regarding the effectiveness of conservative and surgical interventions to treat adhesive capsulitis. PMID:23738277

  14. Surgical Adhesives in Facial Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Dean M; Chung, Victor K; Cappelle, Quintin M

    2016-06-01

    In facial plastic surgery, attaining hemostasis may require adjuncts to traditional surgical techniques. Fibrin tissue adhesives have broad applications in surgery and are particularly useful when addressing the soft tissue encountered in facial plastic surgery. Beyond hemostasis, tissue adhesion and enhanced wound healing are reported benefits associated with a decrease in operating time, necessity for drains and pressure dressings, and incidence of wound healing complications. These products are clinically accessible to most physicians who perform facial plastic surgery, including skin grafts, flaps, rhytidectomy, and endoscopic forehead lift. PMID:27267012

  15. [Investigation on bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Zhu; Cui, Yu-Dong; Zhu, Zhan-Bo; Cao, Hong-Wei; Piao, Fan-Ze

    2006-10-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is autosomal recessive disease. The pathogeny of BLAD is genic mutation of CD18-integrins on the leukocyte. In order to know the carrier and occurrence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) among cows age from one to six years old in China, 1,000 cows were investigated by means of amplifying a CD18 gene fragment via reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by restriction digestion with Taq I. Results showed that 19 cows were BLAD carriers, indicating that the BLAD carrier rate was 1.9 percent. In addition, one cow was found to have BLAD. PMID:17035180

  16. Effects of military environments on optical adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, David H.; Vazirani, Hargovind N.; Xu, Antai

    1993-09-01

    The military environment imposes harsh conditions on adhesives. These conditions differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from typical civilian environments. Military systems must withstand exposure to moisture, temperature extremes, sunlight/ultraviolet radiation and other climatic stresses that are far in excess of what would be expected for commercial applications. Additionally, civilian products rarely consider issues such as fungus susceptibility, resistance to jet fuels and de-icing solvents, or resistance to chemical warfare agents and their decontaminants. The effect of military environments on both the optical and mechanical properties of optical adhesives are discussed for avionic display applications.

  17. Addition polyimide adhesives containing various end groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    Addition polyimode oligomers have been synthesized from 3,3 prime, 4,4 prime-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride and 3,3 prime-methylenedianiline using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as end-caps. The nominal 1300 molecular weight imide prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents, melt-flow and cure properties, glass transition temperature, and thermal stability on heating in an air atmosphere. Adhesive strengths of the polyimides were obtained both at ambient and elevated temperatures before and after aging at 232 C. Properties of the novel addition polyimides were compared to a known nadic end-capped adhesive, LARC-13.

  18. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  19. Analysis of adhesively bonded composite lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.; Kuruppu, M.; Kelly, D.

    1994-12-31

    A new nonlinear formulation is developed for the governing equations for the shear and peel stresses in adhesively bonded composite double lap joints. The new formulation allows arbitrary nonlinear stress-strain characteristics in both shear and peel behavior. The equations are numerically integrated using a shooting technique and Newton-Raphson method behind a user friendly interface. The failure loads are predicted by utilizing the maximum stress criterion, interlaminar delamination and the energy density failure criteria. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effect of the nonlinear adhesive behavior on the stress distribution and predict the failure load and the associated mode.

  20. Disturbed Homeostasis of Lung Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 During Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Laudes, Ines J.; Guo, Ren-Feng; Riedemann, Niels C.; Speyer, Cecilia; Craig, Ron; Sarma, J. Vidya; Ward, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice was associated with perturbations in vascular adhesion molecules. In CLP mice, lung vascular binding of 125I-monoclonal antibodies to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 revealed sharp increases in binding of anti-ICAM-1 and significantly reduced binding of anti-VCAM-1. In whole lung homogenates, intense ICAM-1 up-regulation was found (both in mRNA and in protein levels) during sepsis, whereas very little increase in VCAM-1 could be measured although some increased mRNA was found. During CLP soluble VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1) and soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) appeared in the serum. When mouse dermal microvascular endothelial cells (MDMECs) were incubated with serum from CLP mice, constitutive endothelial VCAM-1 fell in association with the appearance of sVCAM-1 in the supernatant fluids. Under the same conditions, ICAM-1 cell content increased in MDMECs. When MDMECs were evaluated for leukocyte adhesion, exposure to CLP serum caused increased adhesion of neutrophils and decreased adhesion of macrophages and T cells. The progressive build-up in lung myeloperoxidase after CLP was ICAM-1-dependent and independent of VLA-4 and VCAM-1. These data suggest that sepsis disturbs endothelial homeostasis, greatly favoring neutrophil adhesion in the lung microvasculature, thereby putting the lung at increased risk of injury. PMID:15039231

  1. Beetle adhesive hairs differ in stiffness and stickiness: in vivo adhesion measurements on individual setae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James M. R.; Federle, Walter

    2011-05-01

    Leaf beetles are able to climb on smooth and rough surfaces using arrays of micron-sized adhesive hairs (setae) of varying morphology. We report the first in vivo adhesive force measurements of individual setae in the beetle Gastrophysa viridula, using a smooth polystyrene substrate attached to a glass capillary micro-cantilever. The beetles possess three distinct adhesive pads on each leg which differ in function and setal morphology. Visualisation of pull-offs allowed forces to be measured for each tarsal hair type. Male discoidal hairs adhered with the highest forces (919 ± 104 nN, mean ± SE), followed by spatulate (582 ± 59 nN) and pointed (127 ± 19 nN) hairs. Discoidal hairs were stiffer in the normal direction (0.693 ± 0.111 N m-1) than spatulate (0.364 ± 0.039 N m-1) or pointed (0.192 ± 0.044 N m-1) hairs. The greater adhesion on smooth surfaces and the higher stability of discoidal hairs help male beetles to achieve strong adhesion on the elytra of females during copulation. A comparison of pull-off forces measured for single setae and whole pads (arrays) revealed comparable levels of adhesive stress. This suggests that beetles are able to achieve equal load sharing across their adhesive pads so that detachment through peeling is prevented.

  2. Differential adhesiveness between blood and marrow leukemic cells having similar pattern of VLA adhesion molecule expression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, X; Anglaret, B; Bailly, M; Maritaz, O; Magaud, J P; Archimbaud, E

    1998-10-01

    Functional adhesion of blood and marrow leukemic cells from 14 acute myeloid leukemia patients presenting with hyperleukocytosis was evaluated by performing cytoadhesion assays on purified (extracellular matrix proteins) and non-purified supports (MRC5 fibroblastic cell line). Results, in 30-min chromium release assay, show a mean +/- S.D. adhesion to fibronectin, collagen, and laminin respectively of 30 +/- 17%, 20 +/- 13%, 25 +/- 17% for blood leukemic cells and 18 +/- 11%, 11 +/- 10%, 11 +/- 8% for marrow leukemic cells. These differences between blood and marrow cells were statistically significant (respectively P = 0.005, P = 0.01 and P = 0.002), while no difference was noted regarding adhesion to non-purified supports. The higher adhesion of blood blast cells to purified supports was observed regardless of CD34 expression. No significant difference was observed in the expression of cell surface VLA-molecules (CD29, CD49b, CD49d, CD49e, CD49f) between blood and marrow blast cells. The addition of GM-CSF or G-CSF induced increased adhesion of marrow blasts and decreased adhesion of blood blasts leading to a loss of the difference between blood and marrow cells. In a 60-min chromium release assay, marrow blasts adhered even more than blood leukemic cells to fibronectin. In contrast, marrow blasts from 'aleukemic' acute myeloid leukemia patients did not show any modification regarding their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins when co-cultured with growth factors. PMID:9766756

  3. Dancing to Another Tune—Adhesive Moonlighting Proteins in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kainulainen, Veera; Korhonen, Timo K.

    2014-01-01

    Biological moonlighting refers to proteins which express more than one function. Moonlighting proteins occur in pathogenic and commensal as well as in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The canonical functions of moonlighting proteins are in essential cellular processes, i.e., glycolysis, protein synthesis, chaperone activity, and nucleic acid stability, and their moonlighting functions include binding to host epithelial and phagocytic cells, subepithelia, cytoskeleton as well as to mucins and circulating proteins of the immune and hemostatic systems. Sequences of the moonlighting proteins do not contain known motifs for surface export or anchoring, and it has remained open whether bacterial moonlighting proteins are actively secreted to the cell wall or whether they are released from traumatized cells and then rebind onto the bacteria. In lactobacilli, ionic interactions with lipoteichoic acids and with cell division sites are important for surface localization of the proteins. Moonlighting proteins represent an abundant class of bacterial adhesins that are part of bacterial interactions with the environment and in responses to environmental changes. Multifunctionality in bacterial surface proteins appears common: the canonical adhesion proteins fimbriae express also nonadhesive functions, whereas the mobility organelles flagella as well as surface proteases express adhesive functions. PMID:24833341

  4. Cell adhesion and guidance by micropost-array chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Paul; Quah, Soo-Kim; Danowski, Kristine L.

    2002-06-01

    An array of ~50,000 individual polymeric micropost sensors was patterned across a glass coverslip by a photoimprint lithographic technique. Individual micropost sensors were ~3-micrometers tall and ~8-micrometers wide. The O2-sensitive micropost array sensors (MPASs) comprised a ruthenium complex encapsulated in a gas permeable photopolymerizable siloxane. The pH-sensitive MPASs comprised a fluorescein conjugate encapsulated in a photocrosslinkable poly(vinyl alcohol)-based polymer. PO2 and pH were quantitated by acquiring MPAS luminescence images with an epifluorescence microscope/charge coupled device imaging system. O2-sensitive MPASs displayed linear Stern-Volmer quenching behavior with a maximum Io/I of ~8.6. pH-sensitive MPASs displayed sigmoidal calibration curves with a pKa of ~5.8. The adhesion of undifferentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells across these two polymeric surface types was investigated. The greatest PC12 cell proliferation and adhesion occurred across the poly(vinyl alcohol)-based micropost arrays relative to planar poly(vinyl alcohol)-based surfaces and both patterned and planar siloxane surfaces. An additional advantage of the patterned MPAS layers relative to planar sensing layers was the ability to direct the growth of biological cells. Preliminary data is presented whereby nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells grew neurite-like processes that extended along paths defined by the micropost architecture.

  5. Ionizing radiation induces human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Behrends, U; Peter, R U; Hintermeier-Knabe, R; Eissner, G; Holler, E; Bornkamm, G W; Caughman, S W; Degitz, K

    1994-11-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays a central role in various inflammatory reactions and its expression is readily induced by inflammatory stimuli such as cytokines or ultraviolet irradiation. We have investigated the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on human ICAM-1 expression in human cell lines and skin cultures. ICAM-1 mRNA levels in HL60, HaCaT, and HeLa cells were elevated at 3-6 h after irradiation and increased with doses from 10-40 Gy. The rapid induction of ICAM-1 occurred at the level of transcription, was independent of de novo protein synthesis, and did not involve autocrine stimuli including tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1. IR also induced ICAM-1 cell surface expression within 24 h. Immunohistologic analysis of cultured human split skin revealed ICAM-1 upregulation on epidermal keratinocytes and dermal microvascular endothelial cells 24 h after exposure to 6 Gy. In conclusion, we propose ICAM-1 as an important radiation-induced enhancer of immunologic cell adhesion, which contributes to inflammatory reactions after local and total body irradiation. PMID:7963663

  6. Adhesion of single crystals on modified surfaces in crystallization fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Moriz; Augustin, Wolfgang; Scholl, Stephan

    2012-12-01

    In crystallization fouling it has been observed that during a certain initial phase the fouling is formed by a non-uniform layer consisting of a population of single crystals. These single crystals are frequently formed by inverse soluble salts such as CaCO3. During heterogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous growth an interfacial area between the crystal and the heat transfer surface occurs. The development of this interfacial area is the reason for the adhesion of each single crystal and of all individual crystals, once a uniform layer has been built up. The emerging interfacial area is intrinsic to the heterogeneous nucleation of crystals and can be explained by the thermodynamic principle of the minimum of the Gibbs free energy. In this study CaCO3 crystals were grown heterogeneously on untreated and on modified surfaces inside a flow channel. An untreated stainless steel (AISI 304) surface was used as a reference. Following surface modifications were investigated: enameled and electropolished stainless steel as well as diamond-like-carbon based coatings on stainless steel substrate. The adhesion was measured through a novel measurement technique using a micromanipulator to shear off single crystals from the substrate which was fixed to a spring table inside a SEM.

  7. Capillary adhesion between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2008-08-01

    I study how the contact area and the work of adhesion between two elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces depend on the relative humidity. The surfaces are assumed to be hydrophilic, and capillary bridges form at the interface between the solids. For elastically hard solids with relatively smooth surfaces, the area of real contact and therefore also the sliding friction are maximal when there is just enough liquid to fill out the interfacial space between the solids, which typically occurs for dK≈3hrms, where dK is the height of the capillary bridge and hrms the root-mean-square roughness of the (combined) surface roughness profile. For elastically soft solids, the area of real contact is maximal for very low humidity (i.e. small dK), where the capillary bridges are able to pull the solids into nearly complete contact. In both cases, the work of adhesion is maximal (and equal to 2γcosθ, where γ is the liquid surface tension and θ the liquid-solid contact angle) when d_{\\mathrm {K}} \\gg h_{\\mathrm {rms}} , corresponding to high relative humidity.

  8. Adhesive strength of medical polymer on anodic oxide nanostructures fabricated on biomedical β-type titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Hieda, Junko; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Mohri, Tomoyoshi; Hanawa, Takao

    2014-03-01

    Anodic oxide nanostructures (nanopores and nanotubes) were fabricated on a biomedical β-type titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ), by anodization in order to improve the adhesive strength of a medical polymer, segmented polyurethane (SPU), to TNTZ. TNTZ was anodized in 1.0M H3PO4 solution with 0.5 mass% NaF using a direct-current power supply at a voltage of 20V. A nanoporous structure is formed on TNTZ in the first stage of anodization, and the formation of a nanotube structure occurs subsequently beneath the nanoporous structure. The nanostructures formed on TNTZ by anodization for less than 3,600s exhibit higher adhesive strengths than those formed at longer anodization times. The adhesive strength of the SPU coating on the nanoporous structure formed on top of TNTZ by anodization for 1,200s improves by 144% compared to that of the SPU coating on as-polished TNTZ with a mirror surface. The adhesive strength of the SPU coating on the nanotube structure formed on TNTZ by anodization for 3,600s increases by 50%. These improvements in the adhesive strength of SPU are the result of an anchor effect introduced by the nanostructures formed by anodization. Fracture occurs at the interface of the nanoporous structure and the SPU coating layer. In contrast, in the case that SPU coating has been performed on the nanotube structure, fracture occurs inside the nanotubes. PMID:24433910

  9. Adhesive bonding of super-elastic titanium-nickel alloy castings with a phosphate metal conditioner and an acrylic adhesive.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Tanoue, N; Yanagida, H; Atsuta, M; Koike, M; Yoneyama, T

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the bonding characteristics of super-elastic titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni) alloy castings. Disk specimens were cast from a Ti-Ni alloy (Ti-50.85Ni mol%) using an arc centrifugal casting machine. High-purity titanium and nickel specimens were also prepared as experimental references. The specimens were air-abraded with alumina, and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C & B). A metal conditioner containing a phosphate monomer (Cesead II Opaque Primer) was also used for priming the specimens. Post-thermocycling average bond strengths (MPa) of the primed groups were 41.5 for Ti-Ni, 30.4 for Ti and 19.5 for Ni, whereas those of the unprimed groups were 21.6 for Ti, 19.3 for Ti-Ni and 9.3 for Ni. Application of the phosphate conditioner elevated the bond strengths of all alloy/metals (P < 0.05). X-ray fluorescence analysis revealed that nickel was attached to the debonded resin surface of the resin-to-nickel bonded specimen, indicating that corrosion of high-purity nickel occurred at the resin-nickel interface. Durable bonding to super-elastic Ti-Ni alloy castings can be achieved with a combination of a phosphate metal conditioner and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin. PMID:12787464

  10. Size-dependent adhesion energy of shape-selected Pd and Pt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Behafarid, F.; Cuenya, B. Roldan

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamically stable shape-selected Pt and Pd nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via inverse micelle encapsulation and a subsequent thermal treatment in vacuum above 1000 °C. The majority of the Pd NPs imaged via scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) had a truncated octahedron shape with (111) top and interfacial facets, while the Pt NPs were found to adopt a variety of shapes. For NPs of identical shape for both material systems, the NP-support adhesion energy calculated based on STM data was found to be size-dependent, with large NPs (e.g. ~6 nm) having lower adhesion energies than smaller NPs (e.g. ~1 nm). This phenomenon was rationalized based on support-induced strain that for larger NPs favors the formation of lattice dislocations at the interface rather than a lattice distortion that may propagate through the smaller NPs. In addition, identically prepared Pt NPs of the same shape were found to display a lower adhesion energy compared to Pd NPs. While in both cases, a transition from a lattice distortion to interface dislocations is expected to occur with increasing NP size, the higher elastic energy in Pt leads to a lower transition size, which in turn lowers the adhesion energy of Pt NPs compared to Pd.Thermodynamically stable shape-selected Pt and Pd nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via inverse micelle encapsulation and a subsequent thermal treatment in vacuum above 1000 °C. The majority of the Pd NPs imaged via scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) had a truncated octahedron shape with (111) top and interfacial facets, while the Pt NPs were found to adopt a variety of shapes. For NPs of identical shape for both material systems, the NP-support adhesion energy calculated based on STM data was found to be size-dependent, with large NPs (e.g. ~6 nm) having lower adhesion energies than smaller NPs (e.g. ~1 nm). This phenomenon was rationalized based on support-induced strain that for larger NPs favors the formation of lattice dislocations at the

  11. Nitrogen starvation affects bacterial adhesion to soil

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Maria Tereza; Nascimento, Antônio Galvão; Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Tótola, Marcos Rogério

    2008-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the bioremediation of subsoil environments based on bioaugmentation is the transport of selected microorganisms to the contaminated zones. The characterization of the physiological responses of the inoculated microorganisms to starvation, especially the evaluation of characteristics that affect the adhesion of the cells to soil particles, is fundamental to anticipate the success or failure of bioaugmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on cell surface hydrophobicity and cell adhesion to soil particles by bacterial strains previously characterized as able to use benzene, toluene or xilenes as carbon and energy sources. The strains LBBMA 18-T (non-identified), Arthrobacter aurescens LBBMA 98, Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201, and Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1 were used in the experiments. Cultivation of the cells in nitrogen-deficient medium caused a significant reduction of the adhesion to soil particles by all the four strains. Nitrogen starvation also reduced significantly the strength of cell adhesion to the soil particles, except for Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1. Two of the four strains showed significant reduction in cell surface hydrophobicity. It is inferred that the efficiency of bacterial transport through soils might be potentially increased by nitrogen starvation. PMID:24031246

  12. Towards a chemistry of cohesion and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M. E.; Donovan, M. M.; MacLaren, J. M.; Clougherty, D. P.

    Modern chemistry frequently describes the structure and reaction dynamics of molecules in terms of the general principle of “competition for bonds”; consequently, bonding forms the basis of the language of chemistry. The actual models used to represent these bonds are frequently system specific. Organic reactions are described in terms of bonds based on pairs of atomic valence electrons. Reactions of inorganic coordination complexes are described in terms of bonds based on a molecular orbital representation. In analogy to those chemistries, a representation for a bond and bond strength, suitable for describing the cohesive and adhesive properties of all classes of materials, is introduced. This representation proves to yield an explanation for the observed cohesive properties of a specific class of materials (cleavage in bcc metals), and it also provides a framework for exploring and analyzing the more complex phenomena of cohesion and adhesion, such as environmentally-induced embrittlement. A complete chemistry of cohesion and adhesion will require the demonstration that the specific bonding model used can form the basis for consistent interpretations for a wealth of experimental phenomena beyond environmentally-induced embrittlement; thus, as presented, this model does not provide a complete chemistry of cohesion and adhesion, but does embody the first steps in that direction.

  13. Cure-rate data for silicone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C.; Fisher, A.

    1978-01-01

    Report describes work with concentrations down to 0.07 percent and is useful when applying adhesives in terrestrial and space applications. Cured Silicone retains low-outgassing properties as well as its snap, elongation, and resilience. Tests for hardness of silicone material also showed good results. No gross hysteresis observable on recovery from stretching nor was there any decrease in hardness.

  14. Underwater Adhesives Retrofit Pipelines with Advanced Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Houston-based Astro Technology Inc. used a partnership with Johnson Space Center to pioneer an advanced fiber-optic monitoring system for offshore oil pipelines. The company's underwater adhesives allow it to retrofit older deepwater systems in order to measure pressure, temperature, strain, and flow properties, giving energy companies crucial data in real time and significantly decreasing the risk of a catastrophe.

  15. Si/Cu Interface Structure and Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John

    2006-03-01

    An ab initio investigation of the Si(111)/Cu(111) interfacial atomic structure and adhesion is reported [1]. Misfit dislocations appear naturally, as do hcp interfacial silicide phases that vary with temperature. The silicides form in the interface even at relatively low temperatures. These results are consistent with available experimental data. [1] Xiao-Gang Wang, John Smith, Physical Review Letters 95, 156102 (2005).

  16. Adhesion networks of cnidarians: a postgenomic view.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Richard P; Adams, Josephine C

    2014-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-cell adhesion systems are fundamental to the multicellularity of metazoans. Members of phylum Cnidaria were classified historically by their radial symmetry as an outgroup to bilaterian animals. Experimental study of Hydra and jellyfish has fascinated zoologists for many years. Laboratory studies, based on dissection, biochemical isolations, or perturbations of the living organism, have identified the ECM layer of cnidarians (mesoglea) and its components as important determinants of stem cell properties, cell migration and differentiation, tissue morphogenesis, repair, and regeneration. Studies of the ultrastructure and functions of intercellular gap and septate junctions identified parallel roles for these structures in intercellular communication and morphogenesis. More recently, the sequenced genomes of sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, Hydra magnipapillata, and coral Acropora digitifera have opened up a new frame of reference for analyzing the cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion molecules of cnidarians and examining their conservation with bilaterians. This chapter integrates a review of literature on the structure and functions of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion systems in cnidarians with current analyses of genome-encoded repertoires of adhesion molecules. The postgenomic perspective provides a fresh view on fundamental similarities between cnidarian and bilaterian animals and is impelling wider adoption of species from phylum Cnidaria as model organisms. PMID:24411175

  17. High Temperature Adhesives for Bonding Kapton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, A. K.; Slemp, W. S.; Stclair, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental polyimide resins were developed and evaluated as potential high temperature adhesives for bonding Kapton polyimide film. Lap shear strengths of Kapton/Kapton bonds were obtained as a function of test temperature, adherend thickness, and long term aging at 575K (575 F) in vacuum. Glass transition temperatures of the polyimide/Kapton bondlines were monitored by thermomechanical analysis.

  18. Performance of thermal adhesives in forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling is critical for the life and performance of electronic equipment. In most cases cooling may be achieved by natural convection but forced convection may be necessary for high wattage applications. Use of conventional type heat sinks may not be feasible from the viewpoint of specific applications and the costs involved. In a heat sink, fins can be attached to the well by ultrasonic welding, by soldering, or with a number of industrially available thermal adhesives. In this paper, the author investigates the heat transfer characteristics of several adhesives and compares them with ultrasonic welding and theoretically calculated values. This experiment was conducted in an air flow chamber. Heat was generated by using heaters mounted on the well. Thermstrate foil, Uniset A401, and Aremco 571 adhesives were tested along with an ultrasonically welded sample. Ultrasonic welding performed far better than the adhesives and Thermstrate foil. This type of experiment can be adapted for a laboratory exercise in an upper level heat transfer course. It gives students an exposure to industrial applications that help them appreciate the importance of the course material.

  19. Guest editorial, special issue on biobased adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article is a preface for a special issue that showcases significant developments on adhesives made with biorenewable materials, such as agricultural crops (soybean, corn), plant extractives (bark, tannins), and marine sources (mussels). This collection of pioneering studies and reviews on bioba...

  20. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.