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Sample records for adnexal lymphoma oal

  1. Treatment options for ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL)

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Victoria Mary Lendrum

    2009-01-01

    Most lymphomas that involve the ocular adnexal structure are low grade, B cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The treatment depends upon the grade and stage of the disease. High grade lymhoma requires treatment with systemic chemotherapy whereas the localized low grade (extranodal marginal zone lymphoma) can be successfully managed with local radiotherapy. Chlamydia psittaci infection is associated with low grade ocular lymphoma; however there is wide geographic variation in the strength of this association. Blanket antibiotic therapy is not advised unless there is proof of an infective agent. The monoclonal antibody, rituximab, may be successful for CD20 positive lymphoma, although it is likely that rituximab will have better long-term results when used in combination with systemic chemotherapy. PMID:20054418

  2. Ocular Adnexal Lymphoma Presenting with Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Shuchi; Corrêa, Zélia M.; Karim, Nagla; Medlin, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Context: Elderly patients with visual loss often have age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataract as common causes of visual loss. Other less common etiologies should be considered, especially in those presenting with systemic associations. Case Report: The patient discussed in our review is an 80-year-old female, with a history of diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration who presented with a sudden deterioration of vision. While this was initially attributed to diabetic retinopathy, she was eventually noted to have a salmon patch lesion in her conjunctiva, diagnosed on biopsy to be a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Conclusion: Because of the significant rate of disseminated disease among patients with lymphomas in the orbit that carries a worse prognosis, early diagnosis is essential to promote better overall survival of these patients. We describe here a patient diagnosed with conjunctival lymphoma associated with pronounced visual loss and review the literature on this subject. PMID:27011948

  3. Ocular adnexal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a review of epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi, Roxana; Schymura, Maria J; Nayak, Seema; Coles, F Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Ocular adnexal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), the most common form of ophthalmic NHL, has a unique incidence pattern showing a steady and rapid increase in the past few decades, nearly equal rates among both genders, and predominance among Asians/Pacific Islanders. No major cause for ocular adnexal NHL has been identified, although infectious agents, immune disorders and genetic/epigenetic factors have all been implicated in its etiology. Identifying putative risk factors and biologic mechanisms leading to carcinogenesis in ocular adnexal NHL may enable implementation of effective preventive and/or therapeutic approaches for this malignancy. This article summarizes current knowledge on epidemiology of ocular adnexal NHL and the role of various potential risk factors in its etiology. PMID:23976898

  4. Chlamydophila psittaci-negative ocular adnexal marginal zone lymphomas express self polyreactive B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D; Bhatt, S; Lu, X; Guo, F; Veelken, H; Hsu, D K; Liu, F-T; Alvarez Cubela, S; Kunkalla, K; Vega, F; Chapman-Fredricks, J R; Lossos, I S

    2015-07-01

    The pathogenesis of Chlamydophila psittaci-negative ocular adnexal extranodal marginal zone lymphomas (OAEMZLs) is poorly understood. OAEMZLs are monoclonal tumors expressing a biased repertoire of mutated surface immunoglobulins. Antigenic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) may have a role in the pathogenesis of these lymphomas. We have analyzed the reactivity of recombinant OAEMZL immunoglobulins. OAEMZL antibodies reacted with self-human antigens, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, HEp-2 immunofluorescence and human protein microarrays. All the analyzed recombinant antibodies (rAbs) exhibited polyreactivity by comprehensive protein array antibody reactivity and some rAbs also demonstrated rheumatoid factor activity. The identity of several reactive antigens was confirmed by microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The tested rAbs frequently reacted with shared intracellular and extracellular self-antigens (for example, galectin-3). Furthermore, these self-antigens induced BCR signaling in B cells expressing cognate surface immunoglobulins derived from OAEMZLs. These findings indicate that interactions between self-antigens and cognate OAEMZL tumor-derived BCRs are functional, inducing intracellular signaling. Overall, our findings suggest that self-antigen-induced BCR stimulation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of C. psittaci-negative OAEMZLs. PMID:25676418

  5. Molecular and Genomic Aberrations in Chlamydophila psittaci Negative Ocular Adnexal Marginal Zone Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Daxing; Ikpatt, Offiong F; Dubovy, Sander R; Lossos, Chen; Natkunam, Yasodha; Chapman-Fredricks, Jennifer R.; Fan, Yao-Shan; Lossos, Izidore S.

    2013-01-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of ocular adnexal extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (OAEMZL) are still unknown and the association with Chlamydophila psittaci (C. psittaci) has been shown in only some geographic regions. Herein we comprehensively examined the frequency of chromosomal translocations as well as CARD11, MYD88 (L265P) and A20 mutations /deletions in 45 C. psittaci negative OAEMZLs. t(14;18)(q32;q21) IGH-MALT1 and t(11;18)(q21;q21) API2-MALT1 were not detected in any of the analyzed tumors while 3 tumors harbored IGH translocations to an unidentified partner. CARD11 mutations were not found in all the analyzed tumors while MYD88 L265P mutation was detected in 3 (6.7%) tumors. A20 mutations and deletions were each detected in 7(15.6%) and 6(13.3%) of the tumors, respectively. Therefore, the observed genetic aberrations could account for the activation of NF-kB signaling pathway in only a minority of the cases. Further studies are needed to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of OAEMZL. PMID:23720088

  6. Comprehensive genomic profiling of orbital and ocular adnexal lymphomas identifies frequent alterations in MYD88 and chromatin modifiers: new routes to targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Cani, Andi K; Soliman, Moaaz; Hovelson, Daniel H; Liu, Chia-Jen; McDaniel, Andrew S; Haller, Michaela J; Bratley, Jarred V; Rahrig, Samantha E; Li, Qiang; Briceño, César A; Tomlins, Scott A; Rao, Rajesh C

    2016-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the orbit and ocular adnexa is the most common primary orbital malignancy. Treatments for low- (extra-nodal marginal zone and follicular lymphomas) and high-grade (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) are associated with local and vision-threatening toxicities. High-grade lymphomas relapse frequently and exhibit poor survival rates. Despite advances in genomic profiling and precision medicine, orbital and ocular adnexal lymphomas remain poorly characterized molecularly. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) profiling of 38 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital and ocular adnexal lymphomas obtained from a single-center using a panel targeting near-term, clinically relevant genes. Potentially actionable mutations and copy number alterations were prioritized based on gain- and loss-of-function analyses, and catalogued, approved, and investigational therapies. Of 36 informative samples, including marginal zone lymphomas (n=20), follicular lymphomas (n=9), and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (n=7), 53% harbored a prioritized alteration (median=1, range 0-5/sample). MYD88 was the most frequently altered gene in our cohort, with potentially clinically relevant hotspot gain-of-function mutations identified in 71% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 25% of marginal zone lymphomas. Prioritized alterations in epigenetic modulators were common and included gain-of-function EZH2 and loss-of-function ARID1A mutations (14% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 22% of follicular lymphomas contained alterations in each of these two genes). Single prioritized alterations were also identified in the histone methyltransferases KMT2B (follicular lymphoma) and KMT3B (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma). Loss-of-function mutations and copy number alterations in the tumor suppressors TP53 (diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphoma), CDKN2A (diffuse large B-cell and marginal zone lymphoma), PTEN (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma), ATM (diffuse large B

  7. Primary cutaneous extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the eyelid skin: Diagnostic clues and distinction from other ocular adnexal diseases.

    PubMed

    Stagner, Anna M; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old man developed a rubbery thickening and erythema of his left lateral upper and lower eyelids and lateral canthus over several months. He was treated for an extended period of time for blepharitis and chalazia. Incisional biopsy eventually disclosed microscopically a hypercellular lymphoid population sparing the epidermis that surrounded adnexal structures and infiltrated between orbicularis muscle fibers. Immunohistochemically, the lesion was found to be composed of neoplastic, kappa-restricted B cells with an equal number of reactive T cells and small reactive follicles. The diagnosis was a primary cutaneous extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the eyelid skin (EMZL). We review the distinguishing clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical features of cutaneous EMZL and contrast those with EMZL of other ocular adnexal sites. Also offered is a differential diagnosis of cutaneous lymphomas of the eyelid skin, which are predominately T-cell lesions. PMID:26545575

  8. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Ken; Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Tobinai, Kensei; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56 years (range, 18-85 years). The median dose administered was 30 Gy (range, 30-46 Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9 years (range, 0.9-22 years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ≥4 cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12 years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract.

  9. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo; Azumi, Atsushi; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22-85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  10. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have ... immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as Swollen, painless ...

  11. [Lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Lohri, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Although malignant lymphoma is split in over 60 distinct entities, four of them, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular-, Hodgkin's- and mantle cell lymphoma constitute more than half of all new cases. A recent major revision of the Ann Arbor staging system restricts the suffix “A” and “B” just to Hodgkin's lymphoma. Bone marrow exams are abandonned in Hodgkin's and restricted in DLBCL. PET exams at different time points are crucial. PET guided therapy will lead to a reduction of the use of chemo- and radiation therapy. Many new targeted drugs have been introduced. Their therapeutic index is impressive as is their price tag. The radiation and chemotherapy free treatment of malignant lymphoma is within reach. PMID:26732717

  12. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... group of blood cancers that develop in the lymphatic system. The two main types are Hodgkin lymphoma and ... Is a type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system Generally develops in the lymph nodes and lymphatic ...

  13. Anterior Orbit and Adnexal Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Al Hussain, Hailah; Edward, Deepak P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe six cases of anterior orbital and adnexal amyloidosis and to report on proteomic analysis to characterize the nature of amyloid in archived biopsies in two cases. Materials and Methods: The clinical features, radiological findings, pathology, and outcome of six patients with anterior orbit and adnexal amyloidosis were retrieved from the medical records. The biochemical nature of the amyloid was determined using liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy archived paraffin-embedded tissue in two cases. Results: Of the six cases, three had unilateral localized anterior orbit and lacrimal gland involvement. Four of the six patients were female with an average duration of 12.8 years from the time of onset to presentation eyelid infiltration by amyloid caused ptosis in five cases. CT scan in patients with lacrimal gland involvement (n = 3) demonstrated calcified deformable anterior orbital masses and on pathological exmaintionamyloid and calcific deposits replaced the lacrimal gland acini. Ptosis repair was performed in three patients with good outcomes. One patient required repeated debulking of the mass and one patient had recurrenct disease. Proteomic analysis revealed polyclonal IgG-associated amyloid deposition in one patient and AL kappa amyloid in the second patient. Conclusion: Amyloidosis of the anterior orbit and lacrimal gland can present with a wide spectrum of findings with good outcomes after surgical excision. The nature of amyloid material can be precisely determined in archival pathology blocks using diagnostic proteomic analysis. PMID:24014979

  14. Diagnosis and Management of Adnexal Masses.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Wendy S; Marks, Sarah Tully

    2016-04-15

    Adnexal masses can have gynecologic or nongynecologic etiologies, ranging from normal luteal cysts to ovarian cancer to bowel abscesses. Women who report abdominal or pelvic pain, increased abdominal size or bloating, difficulty eating, or rapid satiety that occurs more than 12 times per month in less than a year should be evaluated for ovarian cancer. Pelvic examination has low sensitivity for detecting an adnexal mass; negative pelvic examination findings in a symptomatic woman should not deter further workup. Ectopic pregnancy must be ruled out in women of reproductive age. A cancer antigen 125 (CA 125) test may assist in the evaluation of an adnexal mass in appropriate patients. CA 125 levels are elevated in conditions other than ovarian cancer. Because substantial overlap in CA 125 levels between pre- and postmenopausal women may occur, this level alone is not recommended for differentiating between a benign and a malignant adnexal mass. Transvaginal ultrasonography is the first choice for imaging of an adnexal mass. Large mass size, complexity, projections, septation, irregularity, or bilaterality may indicate cancer. If disease is suspected outside of the ovary, computed tomography may be indicated; magnetic resonance imaging may better show malignant characteristics in the ovary. Serial ultrasonography and periodic measurement of CA 125 levels may help in differentiating between benign or potentially malignant adnexal masses. If an adnexal mass larger than 6 cm is found on ultrasonography, or if findings persist longer than 12 weeks, referral to a gynecologist or gynecologic oncologist is indicated. PMID:27175840

  15. The Role of Infectious Agents in the Etiology of Ocular Adnexal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Varun; Shen, Defen; Sieving, Pamela C.; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2008-01-01

    Given the fact that infectious agents contribute to around 18% of human cancers worldwide, it would seem prudent to explore their role in neoplasms of the ocular adnexa: primary malignancies of the conjunctiva, lacrimal glands, eyelids, and orbit. By elucidating the mechanisms by which infectious agents contribute to oncogenesis, the management, treatment, and prevention of these neoplasms may one day parallel what is already in place for cancers such as cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Antibiotic treatment and vaccines against infectious agents may herald a future with a curtailed role for traditional therapies of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Unlike other malignancies for which large epidemiological studies are available, analyzing ocular adnexal neoplasms is challenging as they are relatively rare. Additionally, putative infectious agents seemingly display an immense geographic variation that has led to much debate regarding the relative importance of one organism versus another. This review discusses the pathogenetic role of several microorganisms in different ocular adnexal malignancies, including human papilloma virus in conjunctival papilloma and squamous cell carcinoma, human immunodeficiency virus in conjunctival squamous carcinoma, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus or human herpes simplex virus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8) in conjunctival Kaposi sarcoma, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori,), Chlamydia, and hepatitis C virus in ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. Unlike cervical cancer where a single infectious agent, human papilloma virus, is found in greater than 99% of lesions, multiple organisms may play a role in the etiology of certain ocular adnexal neoplasms by acting through similar mechanisms of oncogenesis, including chronic antigenic stimulation and the action of infectious oncogenes. However, similar to other human malignancies

  16. A case of conjunctival follicular lymphoma mimicking mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Abd Al-Kader, Lamia; Sato, Yasuharu; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Ohshima, Koh-Ichi; Sogabe, Yuka; Fujii, Kazuhiro; Iwaki, Noriko; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Ocular adnexal lymphoma may involve the eyelids, conjunctiva, orbital tissue, or lacrimal structures. The majority are non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma type. Follicular lymphomas represent a small percentage of ocular adnexa lymphomas, particularly in Japan. We report a 68-year-old female patient who presented with a salmon pink patch-like lesion of the left conjunctiva, suspected of being (MALT) lymphoma. However, histologic and immunohistologic examinations were consistent with follicular lymphoma. This case demonstrates the importance of considering such rare lymphomas when making a diagnosis of ocular adnexal lymphoid neoplasms. [J Clin Exp Hematop 53(1): 49-52, 2013]. PMID:23801133

  17. Bilateral ovarian Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, L; Medina Ramos, N; García Rodríguez, R; Barber, M A; Arias, M D; García, J A

    2009-01-01

    Primary ovarian lymphoma is a rare entity. We submit a case of a 34-year-old black patient presenting with a bilateral adnexal tumor. She underwent hysterectomy with double salpingo-oophorectomy followed by polychemotherapy treatment. Histology confirmed Epstein-Barr virus-positive bilateral Burkitt's lymphoma. The patient died from septic shock after a month of treatment. Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma has a predilection for the female genital tract, manifesting itself clinically as a pelvic mass and less frequently as a menstrual disorder. It is a rare entity in our environment but should be kept in mind when treating patients of African origin. PMID:19480266

  18. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma following radiotherapy in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, A.; Seidman, D.S.; Trau, H.; Tsur, H. )

    1991-04-01

    A 36-year-old man was treated by radiotherapy for tinea capitis many years before discovery of microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC). Because of patient's refusal of any surgical intervention, we were able to follow the natural course of this tumor for 13 years. This case emphasizes the typical slow development of (MAC). The implication of the association of MAC and radiotherapy are discussed.

  19. Adnexal torsion: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kirsten J; Miller, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Adnexal torsion is one of a few gynecologic surgical emergencies. Misdiagnosis or delay in treatment can have permanent sequelae including loss of an ovary with effect on future fertility, peritonitis, and even death. A PubMed search was performed between 1985 and 2012 for reviews, comparative studies, and case reports to provide a review of the epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, common laboratory and imaging findings, and treatments of adnexal torsion. Common symptoms of torsion include pain, nausea, and vomiting, with associated abdominal or pelvic tenderness, and may differ in premenarchal and pregnant patients. Laboratory and imaging findings including ultrasound with Doppler analysis, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can assist in making the diagnosis but should not trump clinical judgment; normal Doppler flow can be observed in up to 60% of adnexal torsion cases. Treatment depends on the individual patient but commonly includes detorsion, even if the adnexae initially seem necrotic, with removal of any associated cysts or salpingo-oophorectomy, because recurrence rates are higher with detorsion alone or detorsion with only cyst aspiration. PMID:24126258

  20. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    With a lifetime risk of 1% and 700 new cases per year, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the seventh most frequent type of cancer in Denmark. The incidence of NHL has increased considerably in Western countries over the last decades; consequently, NHL is an increasing clinical problem. Ophthalmic lymphoma, (lymphoma localized in the ocular region, i.e. eyelid, conjunctiva, lacrimal sac, lacrimal gland, orbit, or intraocularly) is relatively uncommon, accounting for 5%-10% of all extranodal lymphomas. It is, however, the most common orbital malignancy. The purpose of this thesis was to review specimens from all Danish patients with a diagnosis of ophthalmic lymphoma during the period 1980-2005, in order to determine the distribution of lymphoma subtypes, and the incidence- and time trends in incidence for ophthalmic lymphoma. Furthermore, an extended analysis of the most frequent subtype, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT lymphoma), was done to analyse clinical factors and cytogenetic changes with influence on prognosis. A total of 228 Danish patients with a biopsy-reviewed verified diagnosis of ocular adnexal-, orbital-, or intraocular lymphoma were identified. We found that more than 50% of orbital- and ocular adnexal lymphomas were of the MALT lymphoma subtype, whereas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) predominated intraocularly (Sjo et al. 2008a). Furthermore, lymphoma arising in the lacrimal sac was surprisingly predominantly DLBCL (Sjo et al. 2006). Incidence rates were highly dependent on patient age. There was an increase in incidence rates for the whole population from 1980 to 2005, corresponding to an annual average increase of 3.4% (Sjo et al. 2008a). MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region was found in 116 patients (Sjo et al. 2008b). One third of patients had a relapse or progression of disease after initial therapy and relapses were frequently found at extra-ocular sites. Overall survival, however, was not significantly poorer for patients

  1. Adnexal mass evaluation in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A

    2001-08-01

    Female patients who have stable vital signs presenting to the emergency department with abdominopelvic pain and an adnexal mass can be extremely difficult to manage. However, by performing a rapid problem-oriented history and physical with emphasis on the age of patient, menstrual history, and pelvic exam, a detailed differential diagnosis can be compiled. With the addition of a complete blood count and HCG, if appropriate, and a CA-125 for your consultant, additional information can be obtained while a ultrasound examination is being performed. With the above information, consultation and disposition should be readily accomplished. PMID:11554288

  2. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: May Mimic Adnexal Mass.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, Yasam Kemal; Tatar, Zeynep; Batmaz, Gonca; Erken, Aslihan

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs occur in the entire gastrointestinal tract and may also arise from the retroperitoneum, omentum and mesenteries. They are originated from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells (Cajal's interstitial cells) and range from benign tumors to sarcomas at all sites of occurrence. Diagnosis of GIST could be deceptive because of their similarity in appearance to gynecological neoplasms. We would like to present a case of a woman with GIST in the small intestine giving a imprint of an adnexal mass was diagnosed correctly during surgery. The diagnosis and treatment of GIST has been reformed over the past years. It is crucial to separate GISTs from possible misdiagnosis because their prognosis and treatment could be unlike clearly. The purpose of this case is to evaluate this rarely seen clinical entity, and thus, make some contribution to the literature. PMID:26383211

  3. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: May Mimic Adnexal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal; Tatar, Zeynep; Batmaz, Gonca; Erken, Aslihan

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs occur in the entire gastrointestinal tract and may also arise from the retroperitoneum, omentum and mesenteries. They are originated from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells (Cajal’s interstitial cells) and range from benign tumors to sarcomas at all sites of occurrence. Diagnosis of GIST could be deceptive because of their similarity in appearance to gynecological neoplasms. We would like to present a case of a woman with GIST in the small intestine giving a imprint of an adnexal mass was diagnosed correctly during surgery. The diagnosis and treatment of GIST has been reformed over the past years. It is crucial to separate GISTs from possible misdiagnosis because their prognosis and treatment could be unlike clearly. The purpose of this case is to evaluate this rarely seen clinical entity, and thus, make some contribution to the literature. PMID:26383211

  4. Rituximab as Single Agent in Primary MALT Lymphoma of the Ocular Adnexa

    PubMed Central

    Annibali, Ombretta; Chiodi, Francesca; Sarlo, Chiara; Cortes, Magdalena; Quaranta-Leoni, Francesco M.; Quattrocchi, Carlo; Bianchi, Antonella; Bonini, Stefano; Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas are the first cause of primary ocular malignancies, and among them the most common are MALT Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas. Recently systemic immunotherapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody has been investigated as first-line treatment; however, the optimal management for MALT Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas is still unknown. The present study evaluated retrospectively the outcome of seven consecutive patients with primary MALT Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas, of whom six were treated with single agent Rituximab. All patients received 6 cycles of Rituximab 375 mg/mq every 3 weeks intravenously. The overall response rate was 100%; four patients (67%) achieved a Complete Remission, and two (33%) achieved a partial response. In four patients an additional Rituximab maintenance every 2-3 months was given for two years. After a median follow-up of 29 months (range 8–34), no recurrences were observed, without of therapy- or disease-related severe adverse events. None of the patients needed additional radiotherapy or other treatments. Rituximab as a single agent is highly effective and tolerable in first-line treatment of primary MALT Ocular adnexal Lymphomas. Furthermore, durable responses are achievable with the same-agent maintenance. Rituximab can be considered the agent of choice in the management of an indolent disease in whom the “quality of life” matter is of primary importance. PMID:26425558

  5. Isolated adnexal torsion in a 20-week spontaneous twin pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kahramanoglu, Ilker; Eroglu, Vasfiye; Turan, Hasan; Kaval, Gizem; Sal, Veysel; Tokgozoglu, Nedim

    2016-01-01

    Background Adnexal torsion can be a life-threatning condition in pregnancy, while the risk of late diagnosis is increased, in second and third trimester in particular. Laparoscopy is an effective approach in diagnosis and treatment of adnexal torsion. However, entry to abdomen may be challenging in more advanced pregnancies. Case report Herein, we report a case of adnexal torsion during 20th week of twin pregnancy, which was detorsioned laparoscopically. The woman delivered healthy infants at her 36th week of pregnancy. Discussion Adnexal torsion as a cause of acute abdomen may be kept in mind in pregnants, even if there is no predisposing factor. Laparoscopy may be performed safely in 2nd trimester for acute abdomen. PMID:27129134

  6. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  7. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  8. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  9. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  10. Single-Site Laparoscopic Management of a Large Adnexal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Scribner, Dennis R.; Weiss, Patrice M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Single-site laparoscopy is gaining acceptance in many surgical fields including gynecology. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the technique and outcome for removing a large adnexal mass through a single site. Case Description: A 41-y-old female was referred to gynecology oncology for increased abdominal girth for 3 mo. An ultrasound confirmed a benign-appearing, 37-cm left adnexal mass. The mass was removed through a single-site laparoscopic incision with the aid of drainage and a morcellator. The operating time was 84 min. The patient was discharged 2 h and 35 min later with full return to normal activity in 5 d. Conclusion: Large, benign-appearing adnexal masses can be managed safely with superior cosmetic results using single-site laparoscopy. PMID:23925036

  11. Ovarian function, reproduction, and later operations following adnexal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ranney, B; Chastain, D

    1978-05-01

    Among 3102 patients who had major gynecologic operations, only 223 (7.18%) needed adnexal operations during which reproductive potential was preserved. Operations involved ovaries (156), tubes (55), and embryologic cysts (32). After recovery 53.69% of these patients had viable babies (64.46% of patients under age 30). Patients were examined up to 28 years after operations, an average 11.32 years. When last examined. most patients still retained physiologic evidence of ovarian hormonal function; 20 patients had passed through spontaneous menopause, at an average age of 49.4 years. Fifty-two patients needed subsequent pelvic operations, but only 7 for possibly related conditions (4 repeat tubal pregnancies and 3 cyst-adenomas). All but one twisted adnexal mass, with gangrene, originated as a paramesonephric duct cyst. Seventeen adnexal operations were associated with pregnancy: 15 mothers had healthy babies, and 2 aborted. Details concerning numbers and characteristics of specific lesions are included in the paper. PMID:652198

  12. Fertility following laparoscopic management of benign adnexal cysts.

    PubMed

    Canis, M; Bassil, S; Wattiez, A; Pouly, J L; Manhes, H; Mage, G; Bruhat, M A

    1992-04-01

    Fertility following laparoscopic treatment of benign adnexal cysts without ovarian suture was studied retrospectively. Patients with endometriomas or who were previously infertile were excluded. Thirty-eight patients treated conservatively were included, 10 after partial resection of functional cysts, 23 after an ovarian cystectomy and six after treatment of a paraovarian cyst. One patient had two cysts. The overall intrauterine pregnancy rate was 92%; one patient had an ectopic pregnancy (2.6%). From these results, we conclude that fertility following laparoscopic treatment of adnexal cysts appears to be normal. Technical guidelines to improve laparoscopic cystectomy are proposed. PMID:1387882

  13. Spectrum of cutaneous and soft tissue lesions in two Carney complex patients-adnexal induction versus authentic adnexal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kacerovska, Denisa; Requena, Luis; Michal, Michal; Grossmann, Petr; Treskova, Inka; Roucka, Patrik; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2012-10-01

    Two unusual Carney complex patients are described. In one of them, several cutaneous biopsies revealed myxoid lesions that were rather more close to authentic adnexal neoplasms with myxoid stroma than to a "myxoma with an epithelial component." These included lesions resembling trichofolliculoma, infundibular cyst, and trichodiscoma. Additionally, 1 soft tissue myxoma was unique in the sense that it greatly resembled a cardiac myxoma, begging the question whether this could represent an embolus from the patient's cardiac myxoma. Given the large size and complexity and heterogeneity of the cutaneous lesions, the authors suggest that these may represent authentic cutaneous neoplasms accompanied by myxoid stroma and not adnexal elements induced by the stroma. However, the latter mechanism is well recognized and demonstrated by our second patient in whom adnexal-type elements in the cutaneous lesion were clearly induced by the myxoid stroma but were unusually complex by manifesting panfollicular and also sebaceous differentiation. PMID:22588545

  14. Burkitt lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma is a very fast growing form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma . Causes Burkitt lymphoma was first discovered in children ... CT scan References National Cancer Institute: PDQ Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date last ...

  15. A pelvic retroperitoneal Schwannoma presenting as an adnexal mass.

    PubMed

    Khatib, R A; Khalil, A M; Saba, M I; Aswad, N K; Mroueh, A M

    1994-05-01

    Solitary nerve sheath tumors such as benign schwannomas arising in the pelvic retroperitoneum are infrequently reported. We report a case of a benign retroperitoneal pelvic schwannoma that presented with pelvic pain and an adnexal mass. Complete surgical excision was achieved only after transection of the S1 nerve root on the left side. The adjacent vascular and urinary channels sustained no injuries and the patient had minimal neurologic deficit. PMID:8188087

  16. Added Value of Assessing Adnexal Masses with Advanced MRI Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Thomassin-Naggara, I.; Balvay, D.; Rockall, A.; Carette, M. F.; Ballester, M.; Darai, E.; Bazot, M.

    2015-01-01

    This review will present the added value of perfusion and diffusion MR sequences to characterize adnexal masses. These two functional MR techniques are readily available in routine clinical practice. We will describe the acquisition parameters and a method of analysis to optimize their added value compared with conventional images. We will then propose a model of interpretation that combines the anatomical and morphological information from conventional MRI sequences with the functional information provided by perfusion and diffusion weighted sequences. PMID:26413542

  17. Orbital MALT lymphoma, abdominal hodgkin lymphoma, and systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma develop sequentially in one patient.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Ichimura, Kouichi; Shinagawa, Katsuji

    2012-01-01

    In February 2002, a 42-year-old woman developed ocular adnexal extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), MALT lymphoma, in the bilateral orbits involving lacrimal glands. She underwent 30 Gy external beam irradiation to the orbital lesions on both sides. She was well until November 2008 when she developed abdominal lymphadenopathy and transabdominal excisional biopsy showed mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma at stage II. She underwent standard combination chemotherapy. In July 2010, she developed systemic lymphadenopathy and was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by cervical lymph node biopsy. She underwent rituximab monotherapy and finally allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in October 2010, but died of renal failure in February 2011. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene gave rise to dominant discrete fragments of the same size between the orbital lesion with MALT lymphoma in 2002 and the cervical lymph node lesion with DLBCL in 2010. The sequential development of MALT lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and DLBCL in the long-term course of this patient suggests the common origin of the neoplastic cells, changing their pathological faces in response to irradiation and combination chemotherapy. PMID:22706530

  18. Clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment of marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma).

    PubMed

    Raderer, Markus; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) accounts for 7% to 8% of newly diagnosed lymphomas. Because of its association with infectious causes, such as Helicobacter pylori (HP) or Chlamydophila psittaci (CP), and autoimmune diseases, it has become the paradigm of an antigen-driven malignancy. MALT lymphoma usually displays an indolent course, and watch-and-wait strategies are justified initially in a certain percentage of patients. In patients with gastric MALT lymphoma or ocular adnexal MALT lymphoma, antibiotic therapy against HP or CP, respectively, is the first-line management of choice, resulting in lymphoma response rates from 75% to 80% after HP eradication and from 33% to 65% after antibiotic therapy for CP. In patients who have localized disease that is refractory to antibiotics, radiation is widely applied in various centers with excellent local control, whereas systemic therapies are increasingly being applied, at least in Europe, because of the potentially systemic nature of the disease. Therefore, the objective of this review is to briefly summarize the clinicopathologic characteristics of this distinct type of lymphoma along with current data on management strategies. PMID:26773441

  19. 76 FR 16350 - Medical Devices; Ovarian Adnexal Mass Assessment Score Test System; Labeling; Black Box Restrictions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Medical Devices; Ovarian Adnexal Mass... regulation classifying ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test systems to restrict these devices so that a... mass assessment score test system into class II (special controls). DATES: Submit either electronic...

  20. Investigation and Management of Adnexal Masses in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cavaco-Gomes, João; Jorge Moreira, Cátia; Rocha, Anabela; Mota, Raquel; Paiva, Vera; Costa, Antónia

    2016-01-01

    Adnexal masses can be found in 0.19 to 8.8% of all pregnancies. Most masses are functional and asymptomatic and up to 70% resolve spontaneously in the second trimester. The main predictors of persistence are the size (>5 cm) and the imagiological morphocomplexity. Those that persist carry a low risk of malignancy (0 to 10%). Most malignant masses are diagnosed at early stages and more than 50% are borderline epithelial neoplasms. Ultrasound is the preferred method to stratify the risk of complications and malignancy, allowing medical approach planning. Pregnancy and some gestational disorders may modify the levels of tumor markers, whereby their interpretation during pregnancy should be cautious. Large masses are at increased risk of torsion, rupture, and dystocia. When surgery is indicated, laparoscopy is a safe technique and should ideally be carried out in the second trimester of pregnancy. PMID:27119043

  1. Clinical management of incidental findings on pelvic adnexal masses.

    PubMed

    Dias, Daniel Spadoto; Bueloni-Dias, Flávia Neves; Delmanto, Armando; Tonon, Ângela Favorito Santarém; Tayfour, Najla Mohamad; Traiman, Paulo; Dias, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Due to widespread use of pelvic and transvaginal ultrasound in routine gynecological evaluation, the incidental finding of adnexal masses has led to discussions about management in asymptomatic patients regarding the risk of ovarian cancer. Transvaginal ultrasonography remains the modality of choice in the evaluation of suspicious characteristics. The combined analysis of ultrasound morphological parameters with Doppler study, serum carcinoma antigen 125 and investigation of a symptom index may improve diagnosis. Surgical approach should be considered whenever there are suspicious images, rapid growth of cysts, changes in the appearance compared to the initial evaluation or when the patient has symptoms. Future studies on genetic and molecular mechanisms may help explain the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer, improving early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26603011

  2. Dermoscopy of Skin Adnexal Neoplasms:A Continuous Challenge.

    PubMed

    di Meo, Nicola; Stinco, Giuseppe; Gatti, Alessandro; Fadel, Mattia; Vichi, Silvia; Trevisan, Giusto

    2016-06-01

    Dear Editor, Apocrine hidradenoma is a rare benign adnexal tumor related to the more common poroma, as they both originate from sweat glands. Hidradenoma usually has an eccrine differentiation, but an apocrine differentiation is possible. Due to its rarity and non-specific clinical appearance it is difficult to differentiate it from other malignant cutaneous lesions. In this challenging task, dermatoscopy could be particularly helpful to better describe, recognize, and differentiate these lesions. Unfortunately, the literature offers only few dermatoscopic descriptions of this rare cutaneous neoplasm. A 70-year-old woman in fair general condition was referred to our Department for an asymptomatic 10×8 mm single nodule on her left scapula. This nodule was red, dome shaped, well circumscribed, firm, and mildly tender (Figure 1). The patient reported that it had been present since approximately 7 months. The lesion was neither painful nor itchy and there was no bleeding. A skin examination did not show any other lesions with the same features or other suspicious lesions. Dermatoscopy revealed milky-pinkish areas with dotted vessels, linear-irregular vessels, and hairpin vessels: some of these aspects can also be found in amelanotic melanoma (1). There were also homogeneous blue areas similar to lacunae, characteristic but not exclusive to vascular or sarcomatous neoplasms and basal cell carcinoma (1,2). Furthermore, small ulcerations covered by an amber crust were identified, which can usually be found in basal cell carcinoma. Regarding the background of the lesion, we noticed peculiar, translucent, pinkish, soft, large lobular areas (Figure 2). On the basis of this analysis, we suspected an atypical presentation of a basal cell carcinoma, an amelanotic melanoma, or a sarcomatous skin neoplasm. A metastasis of an unknown solid tumor was also taken into consideration. The histological examination revealed an adnexal neoplasm and specifically an apocrine hidradenoma

  3. Case report: Ovarian cavernous haemangioma presenting as a heavily calcified adnexal mass.

    PubMed

    Kim, M Y; Rha, S E; Oh, S N; Lee, Y J; Jung, E S; Byun, J Y

    2008-11-01

    Haemangioma is an extremely rare tumour of the ovary. We describe the CT and MRI findings of a heavily calcified ovarian haemangioma in a 69-year-old woman presenting with adnexal torsion. CT showed a well-circumscribed mass with extensive punctate calcifications, located posterior to the uterus. MR images showed dark signal intensities of the mass on both T(1) and T(2) weighted images, with poor enhancement of the mass on contrast-enhanced T(1) weighted images. MR images also demonstrated a beak-like protrusion from the adnexal mass, representing the adnexal torsion. This is the first case report of a heavily calcified ovarian haemangioma in the English literature. Although rare, ovarian haemangioma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a heavily calcified adnexal mass. PMID:18941040

  4. Histomorphological and Immunohistochemical Reappraisal of Cutaneous Adnexal Tumours: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Uroos; Malaviya, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diagnosing adnexal tumours of the skin is a challenge due to their wide variety, infrequent occurrence in practice, and confusing morphological picture. Aims and Objectives. The present study aims to observe the spectrum of adnexal tumours at our institute and to evaluate them based on histomorphological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical methods either alone or in combination for proper identification and classification. Materials and Methods. A partly retrospective and partly prospective study was conducted on adnexal skin tumours over a period of 6 years. Relevant clinical profile was recorded. Histopathological examination was carried out and special stains were applied as and when required. Immunohistochemistry was performed where diagnosis with routine stains was not possible. Results. A total of 150 skin tumour biopsies were received. There were 87 keratotic tumours, 39 adnexal tumours, and 24 melanocytic tumours. Amongst the adnexal tumours, 51.3% eccrine, 30.8% follicular, and 17.9% sebaceous tumours were seen. In five cases, histological diagnosis was troublesome where immunohistochemistry helped in making final diagnosis. Limitations. The sample size is small. Conclusion. Histomorphology is confirmatory in majority of the adnexal tumours but few rare lesions that mimic internal malignancy require a panel of immunomarkers to rule out other possible differentials. PMID:27034895

  5. [Cutaneous lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Beyeler, M; Burg, G; Dummer, R

    2004-10-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas are uncommon. They must be distinguished from secondary skin manifestations of primary nodal lymphomas. Primary cutaneous lymphomas are divided into B-cell- and T-cell cutaneous lymphoma and commonly have good prognosis. Therapy is based on the stage of the disease. Since cure is not possible, the aim of treatment is to control the disease and reduce symptoms. A variety of new and promising therapeutic modalities have been introduced in recent years. PMID:15349694

  6. Eccrine or apocrine poroma? Six poromas with divergent adnexal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Harvell, J D; Kerschmann, R L; LeBoit, P E

    1996-02-01

    We describe six cases of benign eccrine poroma-like neoplasms with divergent adnexal differentiation. Four cases exhibited sebaceous differentiation in the form of individual or clustered sebocytes with or without sebaceous ducts. One case showed both sebaceous and hair follicle differentiation, and one case showed sebaceous and possible apocrine secretory differentiation. Clinically, most were skin-colored, red, or purple papules or nodules. One patient had a preoperative diagnosis of Bowen's disease, with an erythematous plaque. None recurred following biopsy. Previous reports of similar lesions have suggested a possible role for human papilloma virus (HPV) in their pathogenesis; however, immunohistochemical staining for HPV structural antigens was negative in all six of these cases. Similarities to previously reported cases of eccrine poroma-like neoplasms with sebaceous differentiation are discussed. Given the evidence of sebaceous and follicular differentiation seen in this study and the common embryologic origin of follicular, sebaceous, and apocrine structures, it follows that at least some benign neoplastic proliferations with histopathologic features of "eccrine" poroma could be of apocrine origin. PMID:8721584

  7. The O-(Al2) centre in topaz and its relation to the blue colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, D. N.; Guedes, K. J.; Pinheiro, M. V. B.; Schweizer, S.; Spaeth, J.-M.; Krambrock, K.

    2005-01-01

    Colour-enhanced blue topaz is one of the most traded gemstones. Naturally very rare, mostly topaz is irradiated by neutrons, electrons, gamma radiation and combinations of them. The colour centre is still not identified. It was speculated that it is related to a Si dangling bond defect occupied by two electrons with spin S = 0. We investigated natural blue as well as colourless topaz from different regions in Brazil by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The results are compared with neutron and gamma-irradiated blue topaz. By EPR two paramagnetic defects are identified in all samples: (i) the peroxy radical (O2-) measured at room temperature and (ii) an (O-) hole centre interacting with two equivalent Al neighbours measured at low temperature. Blue samples show an absorption band centred at 620 nm which is responsible for the blue colour. From our investigation we find that the O-(Al2) hole centre has nearly the same thermal stability as the optical absorption band. However, we cannot say whether it is responsible for the absorption band and the blue colour. We suggest that at least it plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the blue colour.

  8. Skin adnexal neoplasms—part 2: An approach to tumours of cutaneous sweat glands

    PubMed Central

    Obaidat, Nidal A; Alsaad, Khaled O; Ghazarian, Danny

    2007-01-01

    Tumours of cutaneous sweat glands are uncommon, with a wide histological spectrum, complex classification and many different terms often used to describe the same tumour. Furthermore, many eccrine/apocrine lesions coexist within hamartomas or within lesions with composite/mixed differentiation. In addition to the eccrine and apocrine glands, two other skin sweat glands have recently been described: the apoeccrine and the mammary‐like glands of the anogenital area. In this review (the second of two articles on skin adnexal neoplasms), common as well as important benign and malignant lesions of cutaneous sweat glands are described, and a summary for differentiating primary adnexal neoplasms from metastatic carcinoma is outlined, striving to maintain a common and acceptable terminology in this complex subject. Composite/mixed adnexal tumours are also discussed briefly. PMID:16882695

  9. Benign Vulvar Adnexal Tumours - A 5 year Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tiwana, Kanwardeep Kaur; Nibhoria, Sarita; Kaur, Harpreet; Bajaj, Akanksha; Phutela, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Despite of the fact that the vulva contains a high density of apocrine and anogenital mammary glands in addition to eccrine glands and folliculosebaceous units, the benign vulvar adnexal tumours are rare. Though the varied clinical presentation and diverse histopathological spectrum of vulvar neoplasms has amazed the pathologists, only few studies have been reported in literature. The present five year study consists of only five cases of benign vulvar neoplasms depicting their rarity. Hidradenoma papilliferum and syringoma were the most common entities followed by Chondroid syringoma. The aim of our study is to explore and highlight the histopathological diversity of benign vulvar adnexal tumours reflecting the relative frequency of these structures. PMID:27047567

  10. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  11. The spectrum of MALT lymphoma at different sites: biological and therapeutic relevance.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Emanuele; Bertoni, Francesco

    2016-04-28

    Extranodal marginal zone (MZ) B-cell lymphomas of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) arise from lymphoid populations that are induced by chronic inflammation in extranodal sites. The best evidence of an etiopathogenetic link is provided by the association between Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis and gastric MALT lymphoma. Indeed, successful eradication of this microorganism with antibiotics can be followed by gastric MALT lymphoma regression in most cases. Other microbial agents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MZ lymphoma arising at different sites. Apart from gastric MALT lymphoma, antibiotic therapies have been adequately tested only in ocular adnexal MALT lymphomas where upfront doxycycline may be a reasonable and effective initial treatment of patients with Chlamydophila psittaci-positive lymphoma before considering more aggressive strategies. In all other instances, antibiotic treatment of nongastric lymphomas remains investigational. Indeed, there is no clear consensus for the treatment of patients with gastric MALT lymphoma requiring further treatment beyond H pylori eradication or with extensive disease. Both radiotherapy and systemic treatments with chemotherapy and anti-CD20 antibodies are efficacious and thus the experience of individual centers and each patient's preferences in terms of adverse effects are important parameters in the decision process. PMID:26989205

  12. Immunohistochemical study of calretinin in normal skin and cutaneous adnexal proliferations.

    PubMed

    González-Guerra, Elena; Kutzner, Heinz; Rutten, Arno; Requena, Luis

    2012-07-01

    Calretinin is a calcium-binding protein member of the EF-hand family. The presence of calretinin has been demonstrated in certain stages of the cellular cycle in a wide variety of normal and neoplastic tissues. The main aims of our study were (1) to investigate what structures of the normal skin and cutaneous adnexal proliferations express immunoreactivity for calretinin and (2) to determine the value of immunohistochemical expression for calretinin as a marker for follicular, sebaceous, apocrine, and eccrine differentiation in cutaneous adnexal proliferations. We studied 139 biopsy specimens, including 10 cases of normal skin of different locations and 129 benign and malignant cutaneous adnexal proliferations. In normal skin, we found that calretinin is expressed in the innermost cell layer of the outer root sheath in anagen hair follicle, in both the duct and sebolemma of the sebaceous gland, in the secretory portion of eccrine glands, and in mast cells of the stroma. In cutaneous adnexal proliferations, we found strong immunoreactivity for calretinin in tricholemmal cysts, tricholemmomas/inverted follicular keratoses, tumors of follicular infundibulum, and in some basal cell carcinomas. Focal positivity was also seen in trichoadenomas, trichoblastomas/trichoepitheliomas, pilomatricomas, proliferating tricholemmal tumors, pilar sheath acanthomas, trichofolliculomas, follicular hybrid cysts, cutaneous mixed tumors, steatocystomas, sebaceous hyperplasias, and sebaceomas. These results demonstrate that immunohistochemical study for calretinin may be helpful to identify the innermost cell layer of the outer root sheath in anagen hair follicle and the cutaneous adnexal proliferations showing differentiation toward this structure. Calretinin immunoreactivity supports eccrine differentiation in some sweat gland neoplasms, and it is also useful in identifying neoplasms with ductal sebaceous differentiation. PMID:22343111

  13. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. Patients who have a weakened immune system are at high risk of primary lymphoma of the ...

  14. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  15. Burkitt lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... is closely associated with the Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ), the main cause of infectious mononucleosis . The North ... form of Burkitt lymphoma is not linked to EBV. People with HIV have an increased risk for ...

  16. Evaluation of mine fires due to spontaneous combustion in the mechanized faces of Middle Anatolian Lignite mine (OAL), case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gueyagueler, T.; Karaman, H.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper fires due to spontaneous combustion in Middle Anatolian Lignite mine (OAL) which is the first fully mechanized underground lignite mine in Turkey, are studied. Since the installation of mechanization, due to spontaneous heating, four panel fires namely, AO1, AO2, AO3 and AO4 have broken out. During these fires, the concentrations of carbon monoxide, methane and the velocity of air are measured continuously by the Micro Minos Environmental monitoring system. For each fire, the environment where fire has started is examined and the possible causes of the fire are investigated. Also the precautions taken to extinguish the fire at different stages are described and the importance of the early detection of mine fire are discussed together with the limitations of the monitoring system the practical difficulties observed during the fire.

  17. Ultrasound Image Discrimination between Benign and Malignant Adnexal Masses Based on a Neural Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Aramendía-Vidaurreta, Verónica; Cabeza, Rafael; Villanueva, Arantxa; Navallas, Javier; Alcázar, Juan Luis

    2016-03-01

    The discrimination between benign and malignant adnexal masses in ultrasound images represents one of the most challenging problems in gynecologic practice. In the study described here, a new method for automatic discrimination of adnexal masses based on a neural networks approach was tested. The proposed method first calculates seven different types of characteristics (local binary pattern, fractal dimension, entropy, invariant moments, gray level co-occurrence matrix, law texture energy and Gabor wavelet) from ultrasound images of the ovary, from which several features are extracted and collected together with the clinical patient age. The proposed technique was validated using 106 benign and 39 malignant images obtained from 145 patients, corresponding to its probability of appearance in general population. On evaluation of the classifier, an accuracy of 98.78%, sensitivity of 98.50%, specificity of 98.90% and area under the curve of 0.997 were calculated. PMID:26715189

  18. Cutaneous Epitheliotropic T-Cell Lymphoma in a Marsh Rice Rat (Oryzomys palustris)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan F; Bekkevold, Christine M; Aguirre, J Ignacio; Andrutis, Karl; Reinhard, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Published reports of spontaneous neoplasia in marsh rice rats (Oryzomys palustris) are sparse. We report here a case of cutaneous epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma in a 14-mo-old marsh rice rat that involved the ear pinnae, with dissemination to the liver and spleen. Histologically, the thickened ear pinnae showed diffuse infiltration of neoplastic lymphocytes into the epidermis, dermis, and adnexal skin structures, with Pautrier microaggregations present in the epidermis. In addition, neoplastic lymphocytes were observed infiltrating and disrupting the architecture of the liver and spleen. Neoplastic lymphocytes were strongly positive for the T-cell marker CD3 but were negative for the B-cell markers CD19 and CD20. These histologic and immunohistochemical features are consistent with an epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma, as previously reported in other species, including humans. To our knowledge, this report represents the first published case of spontaneous cutaneous epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma in a marsh rice rat. PMID:26473345

  19. Ultrasound follow up of an adnexal mass has the potential to save lives.

    PubMed

    Ormsby, Eleanor L; Pavlik, Edward J; van Nagell, John R

    2015-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is among the most dreaded cancers since it is often found at a late stage where the opportunity for extended survival is poor. Ultrasound has been utilized in several ovarian cancer screening trials in asymptomatic women in order to detect ovarian cancer at early stages where survival rates are high. Efforts to improve screening for ovarian cancer are ongoing. While ovarian cancer screening in asymptomatic women is not recommended for clinical application currently, the care of women with adnexal masses found by ultrasound in clinical practice can benefit from close evaluation of the evidence obtained from large prospective ovarian cancer screening trials and by relating this evidence to recent advances in the understanding of different types of ovarian cancer. Post-menopausal women who have an adnexal mass discovered by ultrasound have a much higher risk of developing ovarian cancer than women with normal ultrasound. The preponderance of reported evidence indicates that ultrasound monitoring of an adnexal mass is safe, cost effective and can achieve an improved positive predictive value in detecting ovarian cancer when ovarian abnormalities resolve during surveillance. Proposals to arbitrarily discontinue ultrasound monitoring can negatively impact patient care and generate medical-legal actions, especially because there is no evidence to support safe discontinuation. In this review, we outline a rationale for continuing ultrasound surveillance of ovarian abnormalities. PMID:26116103

  20. Laparoscopic surgery for treating adnexal masses during the first trimester of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Minig, Lucas; Otaño, Lucas; Cruz, Pilar; Patrono, María Guadalupe; Botazzi, Cecilia; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic surgery for treating adnexal masses during the first trimester of pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: An observational study of a prospective collection of data of all pregnant women who underwent laparoscopic surgery for adnexal masses during the first trimester of pregnancy between January 1999 and November 2012 at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Italian Hospital of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina was performed. RESULTS: A total of 13 women were included. The median (range) gestational age at the moment of surgical procedure was 7 weeks (range: 5-12 weeks). The main indication of surgery was cyst torsion in four cases (30.7%) and rupture of ovarian cysts in four cases (30.7%). Other indications included persistent ovarian cyst in three patients (23%) and heterotopic pregnancy in two cases (15.3%). Neither surgical complications nor spontaneous abortions occurred in any of the cases and the post-operative period was uneventful in all the cases. No cases of intrauterine growth retardation, preterm delivery, congenital defects, or neonatal complications were registered. CONCLUSION: The treatment of complicated adnexal masses by laparoscopic surgery during the first trimester of pregnancy appears to be a safe procedure both for the mother and for the foetus. Additional research on a larger number of cases is still needed to support these conclusions. PMID:26917915

  1. Usefulness of T2*-weighted MRI in the detection of adnexal torsion

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Shimpei; Kojima, Toshihisa; Furui, Tatsuro; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background The usefulness of T2*-weighted (T2*W) imaging for the detection of adnexal torsion has yet to be determined. Purpose To assess the usefulness of T2*W imaging for detecting and differentiating adnexal torsion. Material and Methods Eight patients with eight ovaries with torsion and 44 patients with 72 ovaries without torsion were included in this study. All patients underwent 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including T2*W images. The frequency and distribution of hypointensity on T2*W images were compared between ovaries with torsion and ovaries without torsion. Results Hypointensity on T2*W images was significantly more frequent in ovaries with torsion than in ovaries without torsion (75% vs. 36%; P < 0.05). Among patients with hypointensity on T2*W images, the frequency of diffuse hypointensity was significantly higher in ovaries with torsion than in ovaries without torsion (83% vs. 0%; P < 0.01); whereas the frequency of focal hypointensity was significantly lower in ovaries with torsion than in ovaries without torsion (17% vs. 100%; P < 0.01). Conclusion The presence and distribution of hypointensity on T2*W images may play a supplementary role in the detection of adnexal torsion. PMID:27478621

  2. Role of Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology as a Diagnostic Tool in Orbital and Adnexal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Lubna; Malukani, Kamal; Malaiya, Siddharth; Yeshwante, Prashant; Ishrat, Saba; Nandedkar, Shirish S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of fine needle aspiration (FNAC) as a diagnostic tool in cases of orbital and ocular adnexal masses. Cytological findings were correlated with histopathological diagnosis wherever possible. Methods: FNAC was performed in 29 patients of different age groups presenting with orbital and ocular adnexal masses. Patients were evaluated clinically and investigated by non-invasive techniques before fine needle aspiration of the masses. Smears were analyzed by a cytologist in all cases. Further, results of cytology were compared with the histopathological diagnosis. Results: The age of patients ranged from 1 to 68 years (mean: 29.79±19.29). There were 14 males and 15 females with a male to female ratio of 0.93:1. Out of 29 cases, 26 aspirates were cellular. Cellularity was insufficient in three (10.34%) aspirates. Out of 26 cellular aspirates, 11 were non-neoplastic while 15 were neoplastic on cytology. Subsequent histopathologic examination was done in 21/26 cases. Concordance rate of FNAC in orbital and ocular adnexal mass lesions with respect to the precise histologic diagnosis was 90%. Conclusion: When properly used in well-indicated patients (in cases where a diagnosis cannot be made by clinical and imaging findings alone), FNAC of orbital and periorbital lesions is an invaluable and suitable adjunct diagnostic technique that necessitates close cooperation between the ophthalmologist and cytologist. However, nondiagnostic aspirates may sometimes be obtained, and an inconclusive FNAC should not always be ignored. PMID:27621787

  3. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 8,500 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.5% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 193,545 people living with Hodgkin lymphoma in ...

  5. Cathodo- and photoluminescence of (H3O)Al3(SO4)2(OH)6:Cu synthesized under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Y.; Iwata, N.; Hatsuse, T.; Okamoto, T.; Takata, M.

    2011-03-01

    Copper-doped hydronium alunite ((H3O)Al3(SO4)2(OH)6:Cu) was synthesized under hydrothermal conditions (240 °C, 60 min) from copper nitrate and aluminium nitrate solutions mixed with elemental sulfur. SEM and XRD measurements revealed that pseudocubic crystals of hydronium alunite and a small amount of boehmite rods coexisted in the resultant product. XPS measurements revealed the presence of monovalent copper (Cu+). Blue cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence were observed at about 414 and 419 nm, respectively. Two photoluminescence excitation bands were found at 295 and 325 nm. The excitation and emission processes for photoluminescence may involve the 3d10leftrightarrow3d94s1 transition of the Cu+ ion. (H3O)Al3(SO4)2(OH)6:Cu has the potential to be used as a blue luminescent phosphor for both electron beam and ultraviolet irradiation.

  6. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system . The lymphatic system is a part of the body's immune system. ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer cells form in the lymphatic system and start to grow. Most of the time, ...

  7. Potential harms outweigh benefits of indefinite monitoring of stable adnexal masses.

    PubMed

    Suh-Burgmann, Elizabeth; Kinney, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The management of women with asymptomatic adnexal masses should aim to balance potential benefit with potential harm. While masses with highly worrisome features or other signs of malignancy should be referred for surgery, the vast majority of masses have an indeterminate or benign appearance and are candidates for observation. Evidence supports the use of initial short-term serial ultrasound in distinguishing between benign and malignant masses. However, benefit from prolonged, potentially life-long monitoring of stable masses has not been demonstrated. Since the goal of monitoring an adnexal mass is to observe for worrisome growth or increasing complexity as an indicator of malignancy, if the mass remains stable, the likelihood of malignancy and therefore, the potential benefit of observation wanes with time. The recognition that Type 2 high grade serous cancers, which are responsible for the majority of deaths from ovarian cancer, arise from fallopian tube rather than ovarian precursors, further diminishes the likelihood that monitoring a stable ovarian mass will lead to early diagnosis of high grade disease. While some Type 1 cancers may develop from ovarian precursors, the available data suggest that any measurable benefit of monitoring known lesions for detection of these cancers is realized within the first year of observation. The argument in favor of indefinite, potentially life-long monitoring of stable masses also fails to adequately account for the risks of perpetual imaging, which include the risk of incidental findings, an increased likelihood of unnecessary surgery, patient anxiety and cost. It is not always better to order a test than not order a test. Given the absence of evidence of benefit, observation of stable small adnexal masses should be limited in duration in order to minimize potential harms. PMID:26363476

  8. Comparison of Adnexal Mass in Women Undergoing Mass Excision During the Antepartum Period and Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Saghafi, Nafiseh; Roodsary, Zohreh Yousefi; Kadkhodaeian, Sima; Mofrad, Maliheh Hasanzadeh; Farahabadi, Elham Hosseini; Hoseinyfarahabady, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The frequency of adnexal masses in pregnant women ranges from 0.1% to 4%. Selecting the right approach to manage the subsequent intervention remains one of the most controversial challenges among gynecologists. Our aim in this cross-sectional study was to clarify the clinical-pathological differences among the adnexal masses that are excised during either the antepartum period or cesarean section (CS). Methods In this study, we assessed 11,000 pregnancy cases referred to the Qaem Hospital in the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran, between 2010 and 2014. In total, 53 pregnant women with adnexal masses (other than non-gynecological mass and ectopic pregnancy) were selected for further investigation. We divided patients into two groups (group A and group B). Patients of group A had a diagnosed tumor that was excised antepartum while patients in group B had a mass taken out during CS. We then assembled data based on maternal age, parity, gestational age, surgery type, delivery mode, size and location of the tumor, complications, presentations, histopathological diagnosis, and ultrasonography findings for further analysis. Results The major proportion of masses (62.3%) were excised during CS whereas the remainder (37.7%) were removed antepartum. The mean size of the detected tumor for benign and malignant cases was 10.0 cm and 13.8 cm in group A, and 8.0 cm and 9.3 cm in group B, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference observed between patients in the two groups regarding the benign/malignant status of the mass (p = 0.008), its size (p = 0.019) and simplicity/complexity (p = 0.004). Conclusions The rate of malignant tumors was considerably higher in women who had antepartum mass excision compared to those with mass resection during CS. Also, tumors were larger (and more complex) in patients in group A compared to group B. PMID:27162593

  9. Cavernous hemangioma presenting as a right adnexal mass in a child.

    PubMed

    Correa-Rivas, María S; Colón-González, Gloria; Lugo-Vicente, Humberto

    2003-09-01

    This is the case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a right adnexal mass and vague abdominal symptoms since seven months prior to her hospital admission for surgery. CT-scan and sonographic images were those of a benign lesion, probably ovarian torsion or infarction. Serum tumoral markers were normal. A right salpingo-oophorectomy and appendectomy were performed. Pathology examination revealed a cavernous hemangioma of the ovary. The clinicopathologic presentation of this unusual benign ovarian tumor is discussed. PMID:14619460

  10. Preoperative Evaluation of Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm Index in Prediction of Malignancy of Adnexal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Farah; Honarvar, Zahra; Yaraghi, Mansoore; Yaseri, Mehdi; Arab, Maliheh; Hosseini, Maryamsadat; Ashrafgangoi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Differentiation between benign and malignant ovarian neoplasms is essential to create a system for patient referrals. Objectives: The aim of the present prospective trial was to analyze the value of the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) in prediction of adnexal masses malignancy in pre- and post-menopause women before operation. Materials and Methods: Preoperative serum samples were tested for CA125 and HE4 using fully automated methods (Abbott architect) and gained best cutoff. The ROMA index was analyzed in 99 patients (including 68 pre-menopause and 31 menopause) with adnexal masses referred to Imam Hossein Hospital/Tehran/Iran and had been scheduled for operation. The pathological results showed 43 cases (22 menopause) with malignant adnexal masses and 56 cases (9 menopauses) with benign adnexal masses. Demographical data, clinical symptoms and the ROMA index were separately analyzed and contrasted in benign and malignant in both menopause and pre-menopause patients. Results: The only significant difference was the older age of the malignant group vs. benign group (P = 0.001) regarding demographic findings. As concerns the clinical symptoms, presence of abdominal discomfort in pre-diagnosis period was the only significant parameter in malignant group (P = 0.001). Additionally, data analysis of patients as a total group showed that specificity (96.4%), positive predictive value (PPV) (94.1%), area under the curve (AUC) (0.907), and diagnostic accuracy (DA) (86.9%) of the ROMA were higher than HE4 (91.1%, 85.7%, 0.857 and 81.8%. respectively) and CA125 (87.9%, 67.3%, 0.828 and 75.8%, respectively) alone. Besides, negative predictive value (NPV) (86.4%) and sensitivity (86.1%) of CA125 were higher than HE4 (79.7% and 69.8%, respectively). In contrast, specificity of HE4 (91.1%) was higher than CA125 (67.9%). Data analysis of patients as two groups (pre and post menopause groups) showed the same results. Conclusions: Specificity, DA and AUC of

  11. Cystic acantholytic dyskeratosis of the vulva: An unusual presentation of a follicular adnexal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Kara Melissa Tiangco; Junkins-Hopkins, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Acantholytic dyskeratosis (AD) is a histologic pattern seen in Darier's disease or dyskeratosis follicularis, warty dyskeratoma, and transient AD. This pattern is characterized by suprabasilar clefting, acantholysis, and formation of corps ronds and grains. We present a case of AD that is unique based on its genital location and cystic architecture. A 53-year-old woman presented with an otherwise asymptomatic cyst on her left vulva of uncertain duration. On microscopic examination, there were fragments of cystic epithelium with areas of hypergranulosis, acantholysis, corps ronds, and corps grains formation. These features are felt by the authors to be a unique presentation of a follicular adnexal neoplasm. PMID:27559500

  12. The Value of Ultrasound Monitoring of Adnexal Masses for Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Suh-Burgmann, Elizabeth; Kinney, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Although ultrasound has so far been found to be ineffective as a screening tool for ovarian cancer, it is commonly used as a means of evaluating or following ovarian or adnexal masses once they are detected. We review the use of serial ultrasound for the management of adnexal masses and propose an approach to monitoring based on an understanding of the overall risk of cancer among the population in question and an assessment of how the potential benefit of monitoring compares with potential risk. In our approach, masses that are symptomatic, large (>10 cm), associated with an elevated CA 125 level or overt signs of malignancy, or that are determined to have a worrisome appearance by stringent ultrasound criteria should be evaluated surgically. Women with masses that have none of these characteristics should be offered monitoring. Short-term initial ultrasound monitoring carries significant potential benefit in terms of aiding detection of early malignancy and avoidance of unnecessary surgery. However, if a mass remains stable but persistent, the potential benefit of ongoing monitoring wanes with time, whereas the potential harms, in terms of patient anxiety, cost, and the risk of incidental findings and unnecessary surgery increase. Therefore, monitoring of stable lesions should be limited in duration in order to limit potential harms from overtreatment and overdiagnosis. PMID:26904503

  13. The Value of Ultrasound Monitoring of Adnexal Masses for Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suh-Burgmann, Elizabeth; Kinney, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Although ultrasound has so far been found to be ineffective as a screening tool for ovarian cancer, it is commonly used as a means of evaluating or following ovarian or adnexal masses once they are detected. We review the use of serial ultrasound for the management of adnexal masses and propose an approach to monitoring based on an understanding of the overall risk of cancer among the population in question and an assessment of how the potential benefit of monitoring compares with potential risk. In our approach, masses that are symptomatic, large (>10 cm), associated with an elevated CA 125 level or overt signs of malignancy, or that are determined to have a worrisome appearance by stringent ultrasound criteria should be evaluated surgically. Women with masses that have none of these characteristics should be offered monitoring. Short-term initial ultrasound monitoring carries significant potential benefit in terms of aiding detection of early malignancy and avoidance of unnecessary surgery. However, if a mass remains stable but persistent, the potential benefit of ongoing monitoring wanes with time, whereas the potential harms, in terms of patient anxiety, cost, and the risk of incidental findings and unnecessary surgery increase. Therefore, monitoring of stable lesions should be limited in duration in order to limit potential harms from overtreatment and overdiagnosis. PMID:26904503

  14. Rare Skin Adnexal and Melanocytic Tumors Arising in Ovarian Mature Cystic Teratomas: A Report of 3 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Moulla, Alexandra A; Magdy, Nesreen; Francis, Nicholas; Taube, Janis; Ronnett, Brigitte M; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2016-09-01

    Mature teratoma of the ovary is the most common primary ovarian tumor accounting for 15% (10%-20%) of all ovarian neoplasms. Skin and skin adnexal structures are the most common elements identified in mature teratomas. Benign and malignant skin tumors can arise in ovarian teratomas, the most common being epithelial tumors. Melanocytic and adnexal tumors developing in a teratoma are rare and can be easily overlooked. We report 3 cases and review melanocytic and skin adnexal tumors encountered in ovarian teratomas. PMID:26974995

  15. Adnexal Torsion

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdomen (abdominal cavity) and the tissues lining it. Did You Know... The ovary sometimes twists, causing sudden, ... is removed (called oophorectomy). Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Noncancerous Gynecologic ...

  16. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored. PMID:27265605

  17. Pelvic Castleman's disease presenting as an adnexal tumor in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisun; Paek, Jiheum; Lee, Yong Hee; Kong, Tae Wook; Chang, Suk-Joon; Ryu, Hee-Sug

    2015-07-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare benign disorder of unknown etiology characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissues. Seventy percent of this tumor occurs in the mediastinum and it is seldom found in neck, pancreas or pelvis. We report a case of asymptomatic pelvic CD initially presenting as an adnexal tumor in a 27-year-old woman. Initial transvaginal sonography revealed 7-cm-sized hyperechoic mass adjacent to the right ovary and the following abdominal computed tomography scanning showed the same sized mass located on the right extraperitoneal pelvic cavity. Laparoscopic mass excision was performed without any complication and pathological diagnosis was made as CD. CD should be included in the differential diagnosis of female pelvic masses which are noted in the pelvic cavity. In this report, we review the clinicopathological findings in a presentation of CD. PMID:26217605

  18. Adnexal Incarceration in a Posterior Pelvic Peritoneal Defect Mimics Ovarian Torsion.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Amanda M; Hope, Erica R; Phippen, Neil T

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for suspected ovarian torsion sometimes reveals unexpected sources of pelvic pain, such as internal hernias, adhesions, or anatomic defects. A 23-year-old nulligravida with Alagille syndrome was taken to the operating room with suspected ovarian torsion. Intraoperatively, the right adnexa bulged out of a right-sided, posterior peritoneal cleft that incarcerated most of the enlarged ovary. No ovarian torsion was identified. The left adnexa appeared to be normal; however, it dwelled within a left-sided posterior peritoneal cleft. The bilateral posterior peritoneal defects that housed the adnexa were likely of congenital etiology. Although adnexal incarceration is a rare finding at surgery for suspected ovarian torsion, it should be part of the differential diagnosis when evaluating acute pelvic pain. PMID:26044591

  19. Cutaneous adnexal neoplasms in biopsy specimens processed in the Department of Pathology, University of Malaya.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, P; Looi, L M

    1996-07-01

    A review of consecutive biopsies of adnexal tumours from 112 patients, received by the Department of Pathology, University of Malaya, over a 13-year period was undertaken. The age range of the patients was from 1 to 84 years, with a mean of 29.8 years. Thirty-three (32%) patients were under 20 years of age. There were 68 females with a male to female ratio of 1.0:1.5. In 105 cases (93.7%), the neoplasm was solitary. The tumour measured less than 2 cm in the largest dimension in 103 cases (92%). The common sites of occurrence were the head and neck region (59%) and extremities (25%). Neoplasms of hair follicle origin accounted for 63.4% (71 cases) of all lesions. Intra-tumour deposition of amyloid was noted in one of the 14 cases of trichoepithelioma. PMID:8893922

  20. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... called primary cutaneous ALCL and follows a less aggressive course. In almost all cases of primary cutaneous ... kinase (ALK). While both lymphomas are treated as aggressive lymphomas, the prognosis for ALCL depends on whether ...

  1. Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chicago Medicine Supported through grants from: ©2013 Lymphoma Research Foundation Getting the Facts is published by the Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) for the purpose of informing and educating ...

  2. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  3. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  4. Pathology of Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heckendorn, Emily; Auerbach, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the pathology of extranodal lymphoma is presented. The emphasis of this presentation is on the classification system of extranodal lymphomas, including both B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, based on their morphology, phenotype, and molecular alterations. PMID:27265600

  5. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-20

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Single Port Transumbilical Laparoscopic Surgery versus Conventional Laparoscopic Surgery for Benign Adnexal Masses: A Retrospective Study of Feasibility and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si-Yun; Yin, Ling; Guan, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, Bing-Bing; Zhang, Yan; Delgado, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Single port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) is an innovative approach that is rapidly gaining recognition worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and safety of SPLS compared to conventional laparoscopic surgery for the treatment of benign adnexal masses. Methods: In total, 99 patients who underwent SPLS for benign adnexal masses between December 2013 and March 2015 were compared to a nonrandomized control group comprising 104 conventional laparoscopic adnexal surgeries that were performed during the same period. We retrospectively analyzed multiple clinical characteristics and operative outcomes of all the patients, including age, body mass index, size and pathological type of ovarian mass, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), duration of postoperative hospital stay, etc. Results: No significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding preoperative baseline characteristics. However, the pathological results between the two groups were found to be slightly different. The most common pathological type in the SPLS group was mature cystic teratoma, whereas endometrioma was more commonly seen in the control group. Otherwise, the two groups had comparable surgical outcomes, including the median operation time (51 min vs. 52 min, P = 0.909), the median decreased level of hemoglobin from preoperation to postoperation day 3 (10 g/L vs. 10 g/L, P = 0.795), and the median duration of postoperative hospital stay (3 days vs. 3 days, P = 0.168). In SPLS groups, the median EBL and the anal exsufflation time were significantly less than those of the conventional group (5 ml vs. 10 ml, P < 0.001; 10 h vs. 22 h, P < 0.001). Conclusions: SPLS is a feasible and safe approach for the treatment of benign adnexal masses. Further study is required to better determine whether SPLS has significant benefits compared to conventional techniques. PMID:27231167

  7. Cystic adnexal mass in a 16-year-old female: Ovarian pathology or complication of a Müllerian anomaly?

    PubMed Central

    Santacana-Laffitte, Guido; Ruiz, Lorell; Pedrogo, Yasmin; Colon, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 16 Final Diagnosis: Pelvic mass Symptoms: None Medication: None Clinical Procedure: CT • MRI Specialty: Diagnostic radiology • pediatrics Objective: Unusual presentation of unknown etiology, Rare disease, Mistake in diagnosis Background: Müllerian anomalies encompass a wide variety of malformations in the female genital tract, usually associated with renal and anorectal malformations. Of these anomalies, approximately 11% are uterus didelphys, which occurs when midline fusion of the müllerian ducts is arrested to a variable extent. Case Report: We report the case of a 16-year-old female with uterine didelphys, jejunal malrotation, hematometra, hematosalpinx, and bilateral subcentimeter homogenous circular cystic-like renal lesions, who initially presented with left lower quadrant abdominal pain, non-bloody vomiting, and a history of irregular menstrual periods. Initial CT was confusing for an adnexal cystic mass, but further imaging disclosed the above müllerian anomalies. Conclusions: Müllerian anomalies may mimic other, more common, adnexal lesions; thus, adequate evaluation of suspicious cystic adnexal masses with multiple and advanced imaging modalities such as MRI is essential for adequate diagnosis and management. PMID:23826455

  8. AT13387 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  9. Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma

  10. Single-Incision Single-Instrument Adnexal Surgery in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Loux, Tara; Falk, Gavin A.; Gaffley, Michaela; Ortega, Stephanie; Ramos, Carmen; Malvezzi, Leopoldo; Knight, Colin G.; Burnweit, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pediatric surgeons often practice pediatric gynecology. The single-incision single-instrument (SISI) technique used for appendectomy is applicable in gynecologic surgery. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients undergoing pelvic surgery from 2008 to 2013. SISI utilized a 12 mm transumbilical trocar and an operating endoscope. The adnexa can be detorsed intracorporeally or extracorporealized via the umbilicus for lesion removal. Results. We performed 271 ovarian or paraovarian surgeries in 258 patients. In 147 (54%), the initial approach was SISI; 75 cases (51%) were completed in patients aged from 1 day to 19.9 years and weighing 4.7 to 117 kg. Conversion to standard laparoscopy was due to contralateral oophoropexy, solid mass, inability to mobilize the adnexa, large mass, bleeding, adhesions, or better visualization. When SISI surgery was converted to Pfannenstiel, the principal reason was a solid mass. SISI surgery was significantly shorter than standard laparoscopy. There were no major complications and the overall cohort had an 11% minor complication rate. Conclusion. SISI adnexal surgery is safe, quick, inexpensive, and effective in pediatric patients. SISI was successful in over half the patients in whom it was attempted and offers a scarless result. If unsuccessful, the majority of cases can be completed with standard multiport laparoscopy. PMID:26557994

  11. Adnexal germ cell carcinoma with bone metastases in pregnant women: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Tenorio-Guadalupe, María Del Rosario; Arsentales-Montalva, Valeria; Yonz-Buendía, Yessabell Sonia; Fiestas-Saldarriaga, Fabián; Pimentel-Álvarez, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell carcinoma during pregnancy is rare. However, its detection has increased due to the use of ultrasound fetal monitoring in the antenatal care program. In this article, we present the case of a Germ cell carcinoma during pregnancy is rare. However, its detection has increased due to the use of ultrasound fetal monitoring in the antenatal care program. In this article, we present the case of a pregnant 27-year-old diagnosed with an adnexal germ cell carcinoma at six weeks of gestation, whose initial approach was local resection (suboptimal cytoreduction). Four weeks after surgery, the patient presented with grade IV peripheral neuropathy in the lower limbs; magnetic resonance imaging scan indicated an infiltrative lesion at D5. The local medical board decided on chemotherapy starting on the 19th week of gestation. The rest of the pregnancy period was uneventful and the patient had a cesarean section at 34 weeks of gestation and a live newborn with no complications. Unfortunately, four days after caesarean section, the patient died of a septic shock with respiratory focus. PMID:27602713

  12. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists cancer ... in Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma Adcetris (Brentuximab Vedotin) Ambochlorin ( ...

  13. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression. PMID:25864863

  14. Direct detection of neutral metal atoms in electron-stimulated desorption: Al from CH{sub 3}O/Al(111) - velocity distribution and absolute yield

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, J.E.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Jones, P.L.

    1994-06-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption of neutral aluminum from the system CH{sub 3}O/Al(111) has been directly monitored via quasiresonant photoionization with 193 nm excimer laser light and confirmed by two-step resonant ionization, utilizing the Al 3d {sup 2}D manifold. Velocity distribution measurements for the neutral Al peak at {approximately} 800 m/s for 1 keV incident electron energy. An absolute yield of 3.2 x 10{sup {minus}6} Al atoms/electron was determined by comparison with sputtering measurements in the same apparatus. This is the first observation of electron-stimulated metal desorption from adsorbate-covered metallic surfaces.

  15. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Klumb, Claudete E; Barber, Glen N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10‐year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36%) and mature (64%) cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B‐cell phenotype and 19% of the T‐cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central‐west region. The distribution by age groups was 15–18 years old, 33%; 11–14 years old, 26%; 6–10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B‐cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%), followed by diffuse large B‐cell lymphomas (24%). In the mature T‐cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK‐positive was the most prevalent (57%), followed by peripheral T‐cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%). In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%). Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions. PMID:21340214

  16. Primary Musculoskeletal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Primary lymphoma of bone and soft tissue is rare and almost invariably of B-cell origin. Osseous lymphoma usually reveals aggressive bone destruction and associated soft tissue extension. Soft tissue involvement is optimally depicted by MR imaging. Cortical destruction allowing communication between the intraosseous and soft tissue components may be subtle with small striations of extension. Lymphoma of the deep soft tissues usually reveals long cones of intramuscular or intermuscular tumor again best depicted by MR imaging. Cutaneous or subcutaneous lymphoma demonstrates multiple nodules and plaquelike thickening. PMID:27265608

  17. Lymphoma Microenvironment and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mina L; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Understanding of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment is poised to expand in the era of next-generation sequencing studies of the tumor cells themselves. Successful therapies of the future will rely on deeper appreciation of the interactions between elements of the microenvironment. Although the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of tumor cells in lymphomas has progressed faster than most other solid organ tumors, concrete advancements in understanding the lymphoma microenvironment have been fewer. This article explores the composition of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment; its role in immune surveillance, evasion, and drug resistance; and its potential role in the development of targeted therapies. PMID:26940270

  18. Lenalidomide and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  19. GATA3 Expression in Normal Skin and in Benign and Malignant Epidermal and Cutaneous Adnexal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    de Peralta-Venturina, Mariza N.; Balzer, Bonnie L.; Frishberg, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Initial investigations reported GATA3 to be a sensitive and relatively specific marker for mammary and urothelial carcinomas. Recently, GATA3 expression has been described in several other epithelial tumors. However, there has been only limited investigation of GATA3 expression in cutaneous epithelial tumors. The objective of this study was to examine the immunohistochemical expression of GATA3 in a wide variety of cutaneous epithelial neoplasms. GATA3 expression was evaluated in 99 benign and 63 malignant cutaneous epithelial tumors. GATA3 was consistently and usually strongly expressed in clear cell acanthoma, trichofolliculoma, trichoepithelioma, trichilemmoma, sebaceous adenoma, sebaceoma, apocrine hidrocystoma, apocrine tubular papillary adenoma, hidradenoma papilliferum, and syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Hidradenomas exhibited variable positive staining. Most poromas, syringomas, chondroid syringomas, cylindromas, and spiradenomas were negative or only focally and weakly positive. Focal staining was present in all pilomatrixomas. Thirteen of 14 basal cell carcinomas, 21 of 24 squamous carcinomas, and all 6 sebaceous carcinomas exhibited positive staining. The 1 apocrine carcinoma, both mucinous carcinomas, and 2 of 3 microcystic adnexal carcinomas also exhibited positive staining, whereas the 1 eccrine porocarcinoma and the 1 adenoid cystic carcinoma were negative. One of 11 Merkel cell carcinomas exhibited focal weak staining. Our findings demonstrate that GATA3 is expressed in a wide variety of benign and malignant cutaneous epithelial neoplasms. In addition to carcinomas of breast and urothelial origin and other more recently described GATA3-positive tumors, the differential diagnosis of a metastatic tumor of unknown primary origin that expresses GATA3 should also include a carcinoma of cutaneous epithelial origin. PMID:26595821

  20. Primary alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of fallopian tube masquerading as a unilateral adnexal mass: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Nisreen Abu; Alqaisy, Amin; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a high-grade sarcoma that predominantly affects children, and rarely, the adult population. RMS demonstrates three major histologic variants: Embryonal, alveolar, and pleomorphic. A limited number of documented pure RMS cases of the gynecologic organs in adult women are found in the literature. Of these reports, the fallopian tube (FT) is reported as the primary site in only three cases, those included one of embryonal and two of the pleomorphic histologic variants. Herein, we report the first case of alveolar RMS arising in the FT of an adult woman and presenting as a unilateral adnexal mass. PMID:26549082

  1. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    DOEpatents

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  2. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  3. Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) versus conventional laparoscopic surgery for adnexal preservation: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yeon Jean; Kim, Mi-La; Lee, Soo Yoon; Lee, Hee Suk; Kim, Joo Myoung; Joo, Kwan Young

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the operative outcomes, postoperative pain, and subsequent convalescence after laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) or conventional laparoscopic surgery for adnexal preservation. Study design From December 2009 to September 2010, 63 patients underwent LESS (n = 33) or a conventional laparoscopic surgery (n = 30) for cyst enucleation. The overall operative outcomes including postoperative pain measurement using the visual analog scale (VAS) were evaluated (time points 6, 24, and 24 hours). The convalescence data included data obtained from questionnaires on the need for analgesics and on patient-reported time to recovery end points. Results The preoperative characteristics did not significantly differ between the two groups. The postoperative hemoglobin drop was higher in the LESS group than in the conventional laparoscopic surgery group (P = 0.048). Postoperative pain at each VAS time point, oral analgesic requirement, intramuscular analgesic requirement, and the number of days until return to work were similar in both groups. Conclusion In adnexa-preserving surgery performed in reproductive-age women, the operative outcomes, including satisfaction of the patients and convalescence after surgery, are comparable for LESS and conventional laparoscopy. LESS may be a feasible and a promising alternative method for scarless abdominal surgery in the treatment of young women with adnexal cysts PMID:22448110

  4. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  5. Angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, D; Berti, E

    2015-02-01

    Under the generic diagnosis of angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas are included several subtypes of lymphomas histopathologically characterized either by the predominantly endovascular-endoluminal presence of neoplastic lymphocytes of B-T or NK/T cell origin, or by a pathologic process centered around a blood vessels secondarily infiltrated and invaded by the spreading infiltrate. This group of lymphoproliferative disorders is heterogeneous regarding phenotype, but they share common features that are multiorgan involvement, worse prognosis, and, frequently Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic integration. At onset, some of these rare lymphomas, e.g. intravascular large cell lymphoma or lymphomatoid granulomatosis (Liebow dieases), are misdiagnosed as inflammatory diseases. The actual treatments of these disorders are based upon chemotherapy and/or chemotherapy plus bone marrow transplantation with variable results. Therapeutic approaches for EBV related angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas, similarly to those employed for other viral induced lymphoproliferative disease would comprise the employment of chemotherapy together with drugs able to interfere with viral infection. Such an approach has been used in rare cases of EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly, a lymphoproliferative disorders which development is linked to immunosuppression due to senescence. The present review will focus on intravascular and angiocentric lymphomas providing histopathologic, immunophenotypical and molecular data useful to overcome to a specific diagnosis and to differentiate them from other lymphoproliferative disorders showing a secondary vascular engulfment and infiltration and some vasculitides showing overlapping histopathologic features. PMID:25531150

  6. Pathological characteristics of oral lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, N; Kurihara, K

    1982-06-01

    Nine cases of oral extranodal lymphomas are described. Histologically, 6 cases were histiocytic, 2 lymphocytic and 1 Burkitt's lymphoma. According to the criteria of the Japanese Lymphoma Study Group, 8 cases seemingly belonged to the B-cell lymphoma classification, and one was unclassified. Geographical differences in the distribution of oral extranodal lymphomas between Japan and western countries were surveyed. A review of our cases and those in the literature revealed no significant difference in sex, age, frequency of B-cell lymphomas or site of predilection. In Japan, histiocytic lymphomas were the most common type of extranodal oral lymphomas. The most prevalent type of oral extranodal lymphomas in western countries could not be determined from the literature. PMID:6808100

  7. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH3O/Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. E.; Whitten, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Jones, P. L.

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition (sup 2)S(sub 1/2) (512753/cm) yields to the left (sup 2)P(sup 0)J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH3O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al(+) by (1) isotopic substitution of C-13 in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the DJ-2 (J = 3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at approximately 32436/cm and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of approximately x 10(exp -6) Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component.

  8. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following treatment. Occasionally, cancer may return, and follow-up appointments with your cancer specialist can help you catch it early if it does. Your doctor will also watch for any late side effects of your treatment. After Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  9. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... The cancer may be low grade (slow growing), intermediate grade, or high grade (fast growing). NHL is ... Accessed March 2, 2015. National Cancer Institute: PDQ Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer ...

  10. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  11. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  12. Primary Lymphoma of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Hahn, Jee Sook; Suh, Chang Ok; Yang, Woo Ick

    2002-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There is yet no systematical evaluation of primary lymphoma of bone in Korea. Here we report our experience of sixteen cases with primary lymphoma of bone focusing on the survival. Methods: Sixteen cases, collected for 13 years, were evaluated on the clinical presentation, histologic subtype, stage and treatment outcomes of the primary bone lymphoma. Results: The most common presenting complaint was bone pain. Malignant lymphoma of bone involved a wide variety of sites, the most prevalent site of which in this study was the spine. Most of the cases were in the diffuse large B-cell category. The clinical stage of lymphoma was IEA in two cases, IIEA in three cases, IVEA in five cases and IVEB in three cases. All treated cases received systemic chemotherapy and ten cases among them were treated with combined modality therapy. Median overall survival was not reached after median follow-up period of 28 months and five-year overall survival rate was 54%. Conclusion: More promising therapeutic strategies are needed for survival improvement on more accumulated cases. PMID:12298430

  13. HIV infection and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, K L; Miller, R F; Dogan, A

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein–Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV‐positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved. PMID:18042692

  14. [Difficulties in differential diagnosis of adnexal masses during pregnancy: the role of greyscale and color doppler sonography].

    PubMed

    Czekierdowski, A; Bednarek, W; Rogowska, W; Kotarski, J

    2001-12-01

    We have attempted to determine the accuracy of greyscale and color Doppler ultrasound in the differentiation of adnexal masses in pregnancy. The studied group included 2245 pregnant women from low risk population. Following criteria were evaluated: maximal diameter and volume of the tumor, echogenicity, presence of septa and papillary projections in grey scale sonography. Color Doppler analysis included blood vessel presence and arrangement and blood flow characteristics with the use of pulsatility (PI), resistive (RI) and systolic/diastolic (S/D) indices. Preoperative CA-125 serum levels were available in 11 patients. In 66 (2.94%) patients adnexal tumors were detected during routine ultrasound scan at the end of the first trimester. Twenty-seven masses (1.2%) persisted beyond 16 weeks of gestation and were subsequently surgically removed. Pathological diagnosis confirmed 19 serous cystadenomas, 4 endometriomas and 2 dermoids, one pedunculated myoma and one fibrothecoma. Mean size of the tumors was 79 Jmm (range: 43-245 mm), mean volume 166. lml (range: 30-1320 ml). Doppler indices values presented as mean, SD and range were as follows: PI = 1.26 +/- 0.71 (range: 0.57-3.84); RI = 0.61 +/- 0.15 (range: 0.33-0.89) and S/D = 2.62 +/- 0.98 (range: 1.17-4.91). Median serum concentration of CA-125 was 17 IU/ml (range: 8.4-1247 IU/ml). Only 3 of these women had elevated (> 35 IU/ml) levels: 2 endometriomas (344 IU/ml and 1247 IU/ml) and one myoma (37 IU/ml), respectively. Based on the sonographic findings two solid tumors were incorrectly classified as probably malignant (fibrothecoma and subserous myoma). Negative predictive value of ultrasound diagnosis in the studied population was therefore 92.6% (25 of 27). We conclude that although prenatal sonography has the potential to correctly classify most of adnexal masses, caution in risk assessment is needed especially when persistent solid tumor is found. PMID:11883264

  15. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma in a non-Caucasian patient: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JINGXIN; YANG, SHIPING; CHEN, JIMIN; LIAO, TIANAN; DENG, WEI; LI, WEIZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC) is extremely rare among Asians, with the majority of cases presenting in Caucasian individuals. The current study describes the case of a 38-year-old Chinese woman who presented with a 10 year history of a mass in the upper lip. A biopsy resulted in a diagnosis of MAC. The patient underwent complete surgical resection and the tumor was successfully excised. During 6 months of follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first Chinese case to be reported in the English literature, and is presented with the aim of increasing the awareness and aiding in the management of MAC in non-Caucasian populations. PMID:27073500

  17. A female adnexal tumor of probable Wolffian origin showing positive O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Jung; Yun, Min Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Female adnexal tumor of probable Wolffian origin (FATWO) is a rare disease entity that arises from the mesonephric duct system. FATWO is different than other gynecological cancers in terms of embryology. Here, we describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with malignant FATWO. The patient underwent explorative laparotomy and surgical staging after a frozen section revealed malignancy. Detailed examination of the pathologic findings were consistent with FATWO. Counseling and further testing were provided to the patient to assess the risk of germline mutation and epigenetic change. An O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene methylation test was positive, and all other tests were normal. This is the first study to report a case of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation with FATWO in Korea. PMID:27462603

  18. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  19. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Unfavorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  20. Obatoclax and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Aggressive Relapsed or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Phase evolution of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O gels in synthetic aluminosilicate binders.

    PubMed

    Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Gehman, John D; van Deventer, Jannie S J; Provis, John L

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates the production of stoichiometrically controlled alkali-aluminosilicate gels ('geopolymers') via alkali-activation of high-purity synthetic amorphous aluminosilicate powders. This method provides for the first time a process by which the chemistry of aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials may be accurately simulated by pure synthetic systems, allowing elucidation of physicochemical phenomena controlling alkali-aluminosilicate gel formation which has until now been impeded by the inability to isolate and control key variables. Phase evolution and nanostructural development of these materials are examined using advanced characterisation techniques, including solid state MAS NMR spectroscopy probing (29)Si, (27)Al and (23)Na nuclei. Gel stoichiometry and the reaction kinetics which control phase evolution are shown to be strongly dependent on the chemical composition of the reaction mix, while the main reaction product is a Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O type gel comprised of aluminium and silicon tetrahedra linked via oxygen bridges, with sodium taking on a charge balancing function. The alkali-aluminosilicate gels produced in this study constitute a chemically simplified model system which provides a novel research tool for the study of phase evolution and microstructural development in these systems. Novel insight of physicochemical phenomena governing geopolymer gel formation suggests that intricate control over time-dependent geopolymer physical properties can be attained through a careful precursor mix design. Chemical composition of the main N-A-S-H type gel reaction product as well as the reaction kinetics governing its formation are closely related to the Si/Al ratio of the precursor, with increased Al content leading to an increased rate of reaction and a decreased Si/Al ratio in the N-A-S-H type gel. This has significant implications for geopolymer mix design for industrial applications. PMID:26911317

  2. Towards an evidence-based approach for diagnosis and management of adnexal masses: findings of the International Ovarian Tumour Analysis (IOTA) studies

    PubMed Central

    Kaijser, J.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst the outcomes for patients with ovarian cancer clearly benefit from centralised, comprehensive care in dedicated cancer centres, unfortunately the majority of patients still do not receive appropriate specialist treatment. Any improvement in the accuracy of current triaging and referral pathways whether using new imaging tests or biomarkers would therefore be of value in order to optimise the appropriate selection of patients for such care. An analysis of current evidence shows that such tests are now available, but still await recognition, acceptance and widespread adoption. It is therefore to be hoped that present guidance relating to the classification of ovarian masses will soon become more “evidence-based”. These promising tests include the International Ovarian Tumour Analysis (IOTA) LR2 model and ultrasound-based Simple Rules (SR). Based on a comprehensive recent meta-analysis both currently offer the optimal “evidence-based” approach to discriminating between cancer and benign conditions in women with adnexal tumours needing surgery. LR2 and SR are reliable tests having been shown to maintain a high sensitivity for cancer after independent external and temporal validation by the IOTA group in the hands of examiners with various levels of ultrasound expertise. They also offer more accurate triage compared to the existing Risk of Malignancy Index (RMI). The development of the IOTA ADNEX model represents an important step forward towards more individualised patient care in this area. ADNEX is a novel test that enables the more specific subtyping of adnexal cancers (i.e. borderline, stage 1 invasive, stage II-IV invasive, and secondary metastatic malignant tumours) and shares similar levels of accuracy to IOTA LR2 and SR for basic discrimination between cancer and benign disease. The IOTA study has made significant progress in relation to the classification of adnexal masses, however what is now needed is to see if these or new diagnostic tools

  3. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping . E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K.; Silver, Barbara; Li Sigui; Hua Ling; Mauch, Peter M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  4. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fasola, Carolina E.; Jones, Jennifer C.; Huang, Derek D.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse.

  6. Follicular Lymphoma Diagnosed With Medical Thoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sumera R; Lee, Paul J; Ghasemi, Mitra; Sosa, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas may present with a recurrent pleural effusion, usually with involvement of other thoracic or extrathoracic sites. Lymphomas typically presenting with pleural disease include primary effusion lymphoma and pyothorax-associated lymphoma. We describe an unusual case of recurrent pleural effusion secondary to follicular lymphoma with no other known extrathoracic involvement at the time of diagnosis. PMID:26496088

  7. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  8. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 72,580 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 20,150 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 569,536 people living with non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  9. A comparison of clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic surgery for adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Chung, Dawn; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic (TML) surgery for treatment of adnexal tumors. Methods Medical records were reviewed for patients undergoing surgery for benign adnexal tumors between January 2008 and April 2012 at our institution. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon. Clinical and surgical outcomes for patients undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port were compared with those patients undergoing TML surgery. Results A review of 129 patient cases undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port and 100 patient cases undergoing TML surgery revealed no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two groups. The median operative time was shorter in the LESS group using Glove port at 44 minutes (range, 19-126 minutes) than the TML group at 49 minutes (range, 20-196 minutes) (P=0.0007). There were no significant differences between in the duration of postoperative hospital stay, change in hemoglobin levels, pain score or the rate of complications between the LESS and TML groups. Conclusion LESS surgery showed comparable clinical and surgical outcomes to TML surgery, and required less operative time. Future prospective trials are warranted to further define the benefits of LESS surgery for adnexal tumor treatment. PMID:25264529

  10. Pathogenesis of AIDS lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Herndier, B G; Kaplan, L D; McGrath, M S

    1994-08-01

    The AIDS-associated lymphomas represent a heterogeneous set of disease processes. The largest histologic subset of lymphomas is the large-cell lymphomas, which represent a spectrum of disease processes ranging from monomorphic monoclonal B-cell proliferations to very polymorphic and polyclonal mixtures of B cells, T cells and macrophages. The next most frequent class of systemic lymphoma are the small non-cleaved cell or Burkitt's-like lymphomas. These are relatively monomorphic, monoclonal malignant B-cell proliferations. The final subset of lymphomas, which are likely to become more common as the AIDS epidemic progresses, are the primary CNS lymphomas, which are expansions of EBV-immortalized B cells. The high incidence of tumor-associated EBV in the CNS lymphomas makes these lesions somewhat analogous to an opportunistic EBV infection. In HIV disease there is a long lag after infection before the appearance of clinical manifestations of impaired T-cell immunity. During this period, both appropriate B-cell proliferation in response to antigen (including the ubiquitous HIV) and abnormal B-cell proliferation (autoimmune, dysregulated) occur as the follicular architecture is disrupted by the virus and potential APC are exposed and/or infected with HIV. The destruction of FDC or the involution of their processes could interfere with the elimination by apoptosis of low-avidity B-cell clones. Antigen-competent B cells with pre-existing chromosomal translocations such as the t(8;14) (c-myc, IgH) would have a selective growth advantage in this setting. Figure 9 shows a schematic representation of prelymphomatous and lymphomagenic events as they are projected to occur. A similar pathogenetic scheme has been postulated for follicular B-cell lymphomas: PCR studies have demonstrated that a pool of t(14;18) (IgH;bcl-2) B-cells are present in lymph nodes featuring follicular hyperplasia. In response to antigen (the evidence favoring antigen drive is extensive hypersomatic

  11. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  12. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Adcetris ( ...

  13. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. Canine cutaneous epitheliotropic lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) is a proliferative disorder of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P. F.; Olivry, T.; Naydan, D.

    1994-01-01

    Canine epitheliotropic lymphoma (mycosis fungoides [MF]) is a spontaneous neoplasm of skin and mucous membranes that occurs in old dogs (mean age 11 years) and has no breed predilection. The lesions evolve from a patch-plaque stage with prominent epitheliotropism into a tumor stage in which distant metastasis is observed. Unlike human MF, epitheliotropism of the lymphoid infiltrate is still prominent in tumor stage lesions. Tropism of the lymphoid infiltrate for adnexal structures, especially hair follicles and apocrine sweat glands, was marked in all clinical stages of canine MF. Twenty-three cases of MF were subjected to extensive immunophenotypic analysis in which reagents specific for canine leukocyte antigens and fresh frozen tissue sections of the canine lesions were used. Canine MF proved to be a T cell lymphoma in which the epitheliotropic lymphocytes consistently expressed CD3 (22 cases) and CD8 (19 cases); CD3+CD4-CD8- lymphocytes predominated in the remaining 4 cases. In this regard, canine MF clearly differed from human MF in which a CD4 immunophenotype predominates in the T cell infiltrate. Lack of expression of CD45RA by epitheliotropic T cells and intense expression of a beta 1 integrin (VLA-4-like) suggested that T cells in canine MF belonged to the memory subpopulation, as has been suggested for T cells in human MF. Pan-T cell antigen loss or discordant expression also proved useful as phenotypic indicators of neoplasia in canine MF. Loss of CD5 was observed in epitheliotropic T cells in 63% of cases. Discordance of neoplastic T cell Thy-1 expression was frequently observed between epithelial and dermal or submucosal compartments. We conclude that canine MF still represents a useful spontaneous animal disease model of human cutaneous T cell lymphoma, despite the immunophenotypic differences, which may reflect operational differences between human and canine skin-associated lymphoid tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure

  15. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  16. Follicular lymphoma of the submandibular salivary gland

    PubMed Central

    Shashidara, R.; Prasad, Priyanka R.; Jaishankar; Joseph, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomas are neoplastic diseases of lymph nodes. Lymphoma of the salivary gland is rare accounting for less than 5% of lymphomas overall. Furthermore, lymphomas arising in the submandibular gland are reported to comprise 916% of all salivary gland lymphomas. Among lymphomas originating from salivary glands, the ratio of follicular lymphoma is very low. They can also be seen in the lymph nodes of the salivary glands which is an uncommon presentation. Here, we present a case follicular lymphoma which presented as a salivary gland tumour. PMID:25364171

  17. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  18. Ixazomib Citrate and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Indolent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  19. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ≥ 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  20. Imaging of Extranodal Genitourinary Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rohena-Quinquilla, Iván R; Lattin, Grant E; Wolfman, Darcy

    2016-07-01

    The genitourinary (GU) system is commonly affected by disseminated lymphoma. Rarely, lymphoma can originate from and remain localized to one of the GU organs and thus presents as primary extranodal disease. Up to 40% of lymphomas present as extranodal disease, with only 3% having the GU system as the primary site of involvement. This article describes and correlates the radiologic and pathologic features of extranodal lymphomatous disease affecting the GU system with specific focus on the kidneys, adrenal glands, testicles, and ovaries. Lymphoma of the uterine body and cervix, external female genitalia, urinary bladder, and prostate gland is briefly discussed. PMID:27265606

  1. Canine lymphoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M

    2016-06-01

    Canine lymphoma (cL) is a common type of neoplasia in dogs with an estimated incidence rate of 20-100 cases per 100,000 dogs and is in many respects comparable to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in humans. Although the exact cause is unknown, environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are thought to play an important role. cL is not a single disease, and a wide variation in clinical presentations and histological subtypes is recognized. Despite this potential variation, most dogs present with generalized lymphadenopathy (multicentric form) and intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, more commonly of B-cell origin. The most common paraneoplastic sign is hypercalcemia that is associated with the T-cell immunophenotype. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice and a doxorubicin-based multidrug protocol is currently the standard of care. A complete remission is obtained for most dogs and lasts for a median period of 7-10 months, resulting in a median survival of 10-14 months. Many prognostic factors have been reported, but stage, immunophenotype, tumor grade, and response to chemotherapy appear of particular importance. Failure to respond to chemotherapy suggests drug resistance, which can be partly attributed to the expression of drug transporters of the ABC-transporter superfamily, including P-gp and BCRP. Ultimately, most lymphomas will become drug resistant and the development of treatments aimed at reversing drug resistance or alternative treatment modalities (e.g. immunotherapy and targeted therapy) are of major importance. This review aims to summarize the relevant data on cL, as well as to provide an update of the recent literature. PMID:26953614

  2. Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mediastinal Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  3. Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  6. MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-22

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Geldanamycin Analogue in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  9. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2014-01-01

    Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB) is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18)(q21: 21). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment. PMID:24511310

  11. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult

  13. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Soo; Kang, Dong Young; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin homing T cells that vary considerably in clinical presentation, histologic appearance, immunophenotype, and prognosis. This paper addresses the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in Asians with respect to clinical-epidemiologic and histopathological features. Compared with Western countries, Asia usually has higher rates of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis T-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and lower rates of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Among many variants of mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented lesions, pityriasis lichenoides-like lesions, and ichthyosiform lesions are more prevalent in Asia than in the West. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is endemic in southwestern Japan especially in the Kyushu island. The clinicopathologic characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma vary according to geography, and this may be ascribed to genetic and environmental etiologic factors. PMID:22844610

  15. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in asians.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Soo; Kang, Dong Young; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin homing T cells that vary considerably in clinical presentation, histologic appearance, immunophenotype, and prognosis. This paper addresses the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in Asians with respect to clinical-epidemiologic and histopathological features. Compared with Western countries, Asia usually has higher rates of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis T-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and lower rates of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Among many variants of mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented lesions, pityriasis lichenoides-like lesions, and ichthyosiform lesions are more prevalent in Asia than in the West. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is endemic in southwestern Japan especially in the Kyushu island. The clinicopathologic characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma vary according to geography, and this may be ascribed to genetic and environmental etiologic factors. PMID:22844610

  16. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Study of ADCT-301 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Hodgkin Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinaemia; Lymphoma,T-cell Cutaneous; Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral

  18. Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-08

    HIV Infection; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  19. Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-31

    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

  20. 27Al magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance satellite transition spectroscopy of glasses in the system K2O-Al2O3-SiO2.

    PubMed

    Mundus, C; Müller-Warmuth, W

    1995-10-01

    27Al magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance satellite transition spectroscopy at 78 MHz has been applied to determine (true) chemical shift and quadrupole coupling parameters of glasses in the system K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 with 60-80 mol% SiO2 and K2O concentrations between 0 and 24 mol%. The powdered crystalline aluminosilicates andalusite and sillimanite have also been examined. In the glasses, all Al appears to be tetrahedrally bound in the aluminosilicate network unless x = mol% K2O:mol% Al2O3 becomes extremely small. Upon decreasing x the distortion of the tetrahedral Al(OSi)4 units increases in steps, and possible explanations are discussed. Six-coordinated aluminum observed for x < 0.2 is connected with the occurrence of interstitial Al3+ ions which charge-compensate the AlO4 units in addition to K+. PMID:8748646

  1. Primary Extranodal Lymphoma of the Thorax.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, Seth J; Franks, Teri J; Galvin, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphomas represent a pathologically heterogeneous group of disorders that often share imaging features, which include peribronchovascular nodules and masses or areas of nonresolving consolidation. Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma is an extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma seen in younger patients that has imaging and pathologic features that demonstrate some degree of overlap with Hodgkin lymphoma. Primary lymphomas of the pleural space are rare and associated with concomitant viral infections. PMID:27265602

  2. Ibrutinib or Idelalisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  3. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  4. Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Chan Yoon; Seymour, John F; Wang, Michael L

    2016-04-10

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an uncommon subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma previously considered to have a poor prognosis. Large gains were made in the first decade of the new century when clinical trials established the importance of high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell rescue and high-dose cytarabine in younger patients and the benefits of maintenance rituximab and bendamustine in older patients. In particular, greater depth of understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of MCL has resulted in an explosion of specifically targeted new efficacious agents. In particular, agents recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration include the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, immunomodulator lenalidomide, and Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. We review recent advances in the understanding of MCL biology and outline our recommended approach to therapy, including choice of chemoimmunotherapy, the role of stem-cell transplantation, and mechanism-based targeted therapies, on the basis of a synthesis of the data from published clinical trials. PMID:26755518

  5. Primary hepatic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Padhan, Rajesh Kumar; Das, Prasenjit; Shalimar

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder confined to the liver without evidence of involvement of spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow or other lymphoid structures. This is in contrast to Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) that often involves the liver as a secondary manifestation. PHL is a rare disease and constitutes 0.016% of all cases of NHL. PHL typically occurs in middle aged men, and usually the chief presenting symptoms are non specific which includes right upper quadrant pain, B symptoms like fever and weight loss and constitutional symptoms. Most frequent physical finding is hepatomegaly which occurs in 75% of patients. Jaundice is rare and present only in less than 5% of patients. Majority of PHL originates from B cells. The blood investigations and imaging findings are nonspecific. Histopathology is essential and confirms the diagnosis. Treatment modalities include combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The prognosis without therapy is grim. The prognosis and management of PHL is different from hepatocellular carcinoma or metastatic disease, hence it is essential to differentiate it from these diseases. The purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis before implementing therapeutic plan for any hepatic space occupying lesion in liver. PMID:26591949

  6. Lymphoma relapse presenting as neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, My; Awad, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare neurological manifestation of lymphoma characterized by malignant lymphoma cells infiltrating cranial or peripheral nerve, or their roots. We present the first reported Australian case of a patient whose initial presentation of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma was NL. Our case highlights that clinical and imaging findings of NL often mimic other neuropathies, and hence presents unique challenges that may lead to delayed diagnosis and management. We emphasize the importance of considering NL in the differential diagnosis and combining imaging with other diagnostic modalities such as lumbar puncture (LP) to aid in the diagnosis of NL particularly where there is acute neurological deterioration. PMID:26889293

  7. Primary lymphoma of the gallbladder.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E. P.; Lazda, E.; Grant, D.; Davis, J.

    1993-01-01

    A case of primary lymphoma of the gallbladder is described which is rare in the medical literature. A 76 year old man presented with acute cholecystitis and septicaemia. Investigation showed a lung abscess and a gallbladder mass. The mass was thought to be an empyema and cholecystostomy was performed. Biopsy of the gallbladder wall showed high-grade B cell lymphoma. The patient unfortunately succumbed to overwhelming septicaemia in the postoperative period. Postmortem examination confirmed primary lymphoma of the gallbladder without dissemination. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8415351

  8. Cutaneous epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma with systemic dissemination in a dog.

    PubMed

    Mineshige, Takayuki; Kawarai, Shinpei; Yauchi, Takahiro; Segawa, Kazuhito; Neo, Sakurako; Sugahara, Go; Kamiie, Junichi; Hisasue, Masaharu; Shirota, Kinji

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma (CETL) is characterized by neoplastic T-cell infiltration of the epidermis, adnexal structures, and oral mucosa. The objective of this report was to describe the pathological findings of a canine case of terminal-stage CETL. A 10-year-old, mixed-breed, neutered male dog was presented with erosion of the oral mucosa and mucocutaneous junction. The dog was diagnosed with CETL with no evidence of metastasis. Despite chemotherapy, the dog was re-presented with oral pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, and died 17 months after the first visit to the hospital. A complete autopsy was performed. Histologic examination of the primary lesion and systemic organs was performed. Gross examination revealed an advanced-stage oral lesion. Distinct tumor formation was not observed in the primary sites and systemic organs. Histologically, the primary oral lesion was characterized by massive intraepithelial infiltration of a large number of neoplastic lymphocytes. The neoplastic cells in the metastatic sites also showed exclusive epitheliotropic proliferation in organs, including the trachea, tonsils, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, anal mucosa, liver, pancreas, kidneys, urinary bladder, prostate gland, ear canals, and auricular and ventral skin. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were positive for CD3 and negative for CD20 as well as CD79α, supporting a diagnosis of CETL with systemic dissemination. In canine CETL with systemic signs, systemic metastasis should be considered even without evident mass formation. Neoplastic lymphocytes of CETL showed distinct epitheliotropism even in the systemic metastatic sites. PMID:26951331

  9. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  10. The Contribution of Qualitative CEUS to the Determination of Malignancy in Adnexal Masses, Indeterminate on Conventional US – A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinling; Mao, Yongjiang; Zheng, Rongqin; Zheng, Zhijuan; Huang, Zeping; Huang, Dongmei; Zhang, Jing; Dai, Qing; Zhou, Xiaodong; Wen, Yanling

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of qualitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in discrimination of adnexal masses which were undetermined by conventional ultrasound (US). A total of 120 patients underwent transabdominal CEUS. The initial enhancement time and intensity compared with the uterine myometrium, contrast agent distribution patterns and dynamic changes of enhancement were assessed. The sensitivity (Sen), specificity (Spe), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), accuracy (ACC) and Youden’s index were calculated for contrast variables. The gold standard was the histological diagnosis. There were 48 malignant tumors and 72 benign tumors. The enhancement features of malignant masses were different from benign ones. Earlier or simultaneous enhancement with inhomogeneous enhancement yielded the highest capability in differential diagnosis, and Sen, Spe, PPV, NPV, ACC, Youden’s index was 89.6%, 97.2%, 93.2%, 95.6%, 93.3%, and 0.88, respectively. The qualitative evaluation of CEUS is useful in the differential diagnosis of adnexal masses where conventional US is indeterminate. PMID:24736589

  11. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  12. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-21

    Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  13. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  14. Anti-CD22 CAR-T Therapy for CD19-refractory or Resistant Lymphoma Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  15. A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. Gemcitabine and Bendamustine in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-19

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC Gene Mutation; Plasmablastic Lymphoma

  18. [Pulmonary alterations in Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jóna, Ádám; Illés, Árpád; Szemes, Katalin; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2016-01-31

    Most of Hodgkin lymphoma patients survive due to combined chemo/radiotherapy. Improved survival brings long-term side effects to the front, which may determine the patients' subsequent quality of life and expected lifetime. This manuscript aims to analyze lung manifestations of Hodgkin lymphoma and treatment related pulmonary complications, demonstrated with own cases. The lung involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma is often secondary, and primary pulmonary involvement is very rare. The authors found 8-12% of lung involvement among their patients. Side effects of treatment consist of pulmonary infections in conjuction with immunosuppression, while on the other hand bleomycin and chest irradiation as part of current standard of care induced pneumonitis and fibrosis are reported. The pulmonary involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma may cause differential diagnostic difficulty. Lung involvement could modify stage and consequently treatment, and the development of side effects might determine later quality of life and expected lifetime. Therefore, identification of lung involvement is crucial. PMID:26801361

  19. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Cardiac Sarcoidosis Masked by Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Takashige; Hattori, Hidetoshi; Serizawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Uto, Kenta; Momose, Mitsuru; Kameyama, Kaori; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2016-08-01

    There is an association between sarcoidosis and lymphoma, termed "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome." Sarcoidosis is generally detected before lymphoma, but it could present after or even concurrently with the diagnosis of lymphoma. We describe a patient presenting with ventricular tachycardia and lymphadenopathy. A diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma was made histologically. The patient responded to treatment, but had persistent (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake in the lymph nodes and heart on follow-up positron emission tomography. Second biopsies of lymph node and endomyocardial both confirmed sarcoidosis. This finding suggests that we should maintain a high degree of suspicion for cardiac sarcoidosis in lymphoma patients. PMID:27094123

  1. Burkitt Lymphoma: beyond discoveries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1958 in Uganda, Burkitt lymphoma (BL) attracted interest worldwide following reports of its uneven geographic distribution and rapidly fatal clinical course. Both suggested infectious etiology and curability. Seminal discoveries followed in quick succession. Viral etiology – due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) – was confirmed. Chromosomal translocations, involving cellular MYC, a protooncogene, were discovered, shown to be a hallmark of BL, and central to the genetic basis of cancer. Cure of BL using combination chemotherapy was demonstrated. Unfortunately, civil disturbance in Africa disrupted BL research and blunted its impact on education and oncology care in Africa. Important questions went unanswered. The risk of BL due to malaria or EBV was not quantified. Efforts to answer whether BL could be prevented – by preventing malaria or early EBV infection – were abandoned. The mechanism of malaria in BL is unknown. In Africa, BL remains mostly fatal and diagnosis is still made clinically. Unprecedented advances in molecular, genomics and proteomic technologies, promising to unlock mysteries of cancers, have re-awakened interest in BL. With return of stability to Africa, the unanswered questions about BL are re-attracting global interest. This interest now includes exploiting the knowledge gained about genetics, proteomics, and bioinformatics to enable the development of targeted less toxic treatment for BL; and simpler methods to diagnose BL with high accuracy and sensitivity. The articles in the Burkitt Lymphoma (BL): Beyond Discoveries in Infectious Agents and Cancer highlight BL as priority. Authors explore etiology, pathology, pathogenesis of BL, and whether knowledge gained in the studies of BL can catalyze sustainable cancer services in one of the world’s poorest served regions. PMID:24079372

  2. Agatolimod Sodium, Rituximab, and Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  4. Study of ADCT-402 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lineage Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Memory-enriched CAR-T Cells Immunotherapy for B Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  8. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  9. Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma or Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Intraocular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Retinal Lymphoma

  11. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. Gray zone lymphomas in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiayuan; Greffe, Brian; Cook, Bruce; Giller, Roger; Graham, Douglas K; McGranahan, Amy N; Wang, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Gray zone lymphomas are defined as lymphoid malignancies that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular investigations have been performed. The 2008 World Health Organization Classification proposed 2 gray zone lesions: (1) B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma and (2) B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. These gray zone lesions are rare, especially in pediatric patients, and create a great challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because this differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this manuscript, we report 2 cases of pediatric patients with gray zone lymphoma and review clinicopathologic features, treatment options, and outcomes of this uncommon tumor. PMID:20331368

  13. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. Gastrointestinal Lymphoma: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Somwaru, Alexander S; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Levine, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Extranodal lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms that can affect every abdominal organ, with distinctive pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features. The radiologic findings are closely related to the underlying pathophysiology, and an understanding of these characteristic features should facilitate recognition of extranodal lymphoma and its various subtypes. Within the abdomen, lymphoma is found most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach. This article presents the findings in gastrointestinal tract lymphoma. PMID:27265607

  16. 17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstr

  17. Primary Testicular Pre-B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Mohammad Forat; Jenabzadeh, Alireza; Hosseini, Somayeh; Massumi, Roghayeh

    2016-01-01

    Primary testicular lymphoblastic lymphoma is a rare entity. We report a case of a 13-year-old boy referred with unilateral testicular swelling. After preliminary work-up orchiectomy was performed Histopathology detected primary testicular lymphoblastic lymphoma. Lymphoblastic lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of testicular masses in children. PMID:27170920

  18. Primary Testicular Pre-B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Binesh, Fariba; Yazdi, Mohammad Forat; Jenabzadeh, Alireza; Hosseini, Somayeh; Massumi, Roghayeh

    2016-01-01

    Primary testicular lymphoblastic lymphoma is a rare entity. We report a case of a 13-year-old boy referred with unilateral testicular swelling. After preliminary work-up orchiectomy was performed Histopathology detected primary testicular lymphoblastic lymphoma. Lymphoblastic lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of testicular masses in children. PMID:27170920

  19. Rituximab and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-08-11

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Viral Studies in Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Araujo, Iguaracyra; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, composed of a monomorphic population of medium-sized B cells with a high proliferation rate and a consistent MYC translocation. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with BL with different frequencies depending on the clinical variant. Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), infects a wide range of normal cells, having a well-established role in the pathogenesis of various neoplasms, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) and MCD-associated plasmablastic lymphoma. In secondary immunodeficiencies, such as HIV-1 infection and organ transplantation, HHV-8 is considered an opportunistic pathogen linked to the development of lymphomas in patients with AIDS and HIV+ patients. We studied the association of EBV and HHV-8 by immunohistochemical analysis, in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction in a large number of well-characterized BLs. EBV was present in 45.0% of all BL cases with higher incidence in the pediatric group; most cases were EBV type A. We found no association of BL with HHV-8 in EBV+ BL or in EBV–cases, including the HIV+ BL group. PMID:18628086

  1. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  3. Emerging immunotherapy in pediatric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Erker, Craig; Harker-Murray, Paul; Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma collectively are the third most common cancer diagnosed in children each year. For children who relapse or have refractory disease, outcomes remain poor. Immunotherapy has recently emerged as a novel approach to treat hematologic malignancies. The field has been rapidly expanding over the past few years broadening its armamentarium which now includes monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates and cellular therapies including bispecific T-cell engagers and chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells. Many of these agents are in their infancy stages and only beginning to make their mark on lymphoma treatment while others have begun to show promising efficacy in relapsed disease. In this review, the authors provide an overview of current and emerging immunotherapies in the field of pediatric lymphoma. PMID:26616565

  4. Management of lymphoma in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hodby, K; Fields, P A

    2009-01-01

    One in every thousand pregnancies is complicated by a concurrent diagnosis of cancer. Lymphoma is currently the fourth most common malignancy diagnosed during pregnancy and its incidence is rising. The diagnosis and management of any malignancy during pregnancy is clearly a clinical and emotional minefield for both patients and health-care professionals. The major challenge is to optimize medical treatment offered to the mother, while limiting the impact on the fetus. Given the relative rarity of the situation, current practice is guided by case reports and personal experience of management of similar patients. Our centre has a large and busy lymphoma practice, and has cared for several women diagnosed with a variety of subtypes of lymphoma over the years. This review aims to summarize current opinion about best practice regarding these patients and discusses options available from the current literature.

  5. Treatment of nasal microcystic adnexal carcinoma with an expanded rotational forehead skin flap: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RONG-RONG; ZHAO, QI-MING; ZHANG, XU-DONG; GAN, JING-BING

    2015-01-01

    Microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC) is a rare and locally aggressive adenocarcinoma with low-grade malignancy. The present study describes the first reported case and treatment of a Chinese male with a MAC located on the nasal dorsum and nosewing. A 44-year-old man presented with a nasal deformity caused by local repeated infections following an accidental injury to the nose 20 years previously. The nose had been injured by a brick, and treatment at a local hospital 12 years previously had resulted in a nasal scar and a gradually enlarging mass. A physical examination revealed a hypertrophic deformity of the nose and an indurated scar plaque, measuring 2.0×2.0 cm, on the nasal dorsum and nosewing. Microscopic examination revealed a tumor consisting of solid cell nests and a cystic structure with a capsular space. In addition, ductal cells of an adnexal cell origin were visible in the outer epithelium. The medial portion exhibited a microductal structure and invasion of deeper tissues without evident atypia. The tumor cells presented normal nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios and minimal mitotic activity. Pathological examination verified that the tumor was a MAC of low-grade malignancy. A complete surgical resection was performed via Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), and reconstruction was achieved using an expanded rotational forehead skin flap. No tumor recurrence was detected after a three-year follow-up period. Therefore, for effective treatment of similar MAC cases, complete surgical resection using MMS is recommended, and successful reconstruction may be achieved using an expanded skin flap. PMID:26622465

  6. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Oblimersen and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. An unusual case of composite lymphoma involving chronic lymphocytic leukemia follicular lymphoma and Hodgkin disease.

    PubMed

    Copur, M Sitki; Ledakis, Peter; Novinski, Daniel; Fu, Kai; Hutchins, Mark; Frankforter, Scot; Mleczko, Kris; Sanger, Warren G; Chan, Wing C

    2004-05-01

    Composite lymphomas constitute the presence of two different types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma at the same anatomic site. We report an unusual case of a 73-year-old woman who initially presented with a composite lymphoma of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and follicular lymphoma. After 5 years of follow-up and intermittent treatment, she developed Hodgkin disease with diffuse liver involvement. Biopsy of the liver showed Reed-Sternberg cells with typical morphology and immunophenotype. While fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses for t(14;18) were positive in the lymph node tissue with follicular lymphoma, we were unable to show the same in the liver biopsy specimen. Here, we describe the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic features of this unusual composite lymphoma case involving CLL and follicular lymphoma, with the subsequent development of a Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:15291370

  9. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. [Cutaneous lymphomas: new entities and rare variants].

    PubMed

    Kempf, W; Mitteldorf, C

    2015-02-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are the second most common group of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Recently several new variants and entities have been described but have not yet become part of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. These forms include the granulomatous form of mycosis fungoides, which is associated with a poorer prognosis, as well as indolent CD8+ lymphoproliferations on the head and at acral localizations. Within the group of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, new histological types of lymphomatoid papulosis have been identified, such as type D (CD8+ epidermotropic) and type E (angioinvasive) which simulate aggressive lymphomas. Cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a prognostically heterogeneous group of cutaneous lymphomas. The cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma are very aggressive neoplasms, whereas cutaneous CD4+ small to medium-sized T-cell lymphoma in its solitary or localized form represents an indolent lymphoproliferation: the terminology, histogenesis and differentiation from nodular T-cell pseudolymphoma are still a matter of debate. Among B-cell lymphomas, disorders associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are discussed focusing on EBV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly and EBV-associated mucocutaneous ulcer. This review describes the clinical, histological and immunophenotypic features of new and rare entities and variants of cutaneous lymphomas and highlights the impact of the clinicopathological correlation in the diagnostic process. PMID:25589355

  12. Microwave Dielectric Properties of TiO2-Added Li2ZnTi3O8 Ceramics Doped with Li2O-Al2O3-B2O3 Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-xiang; Qin, Zhen-jun; Tang, Bin; Zhang, Shu-ren; Chang, Geng; Li, Hao; Chen, He-tuo; Yang, Han; Li, Jun-shan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Li2O-Al2O3-B2O3 (LAB) glass addition on phase composition, microstructure and the microwave dielectric properties of Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramics with TiO2 were investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and a vector network analyzer. With the addition of 17 mol% TiO2 on Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramics, the temperature coefficient of the resonant frequency ( τ ƒ) value could be adjusted to +3.3 ppm/°C. When a small amount of LAB glass was added to the Li2ZnTi3O8 + 17 mol% TiO2 materials, the sintering temperature could be significantly lowered from 1160°C to 900°C. With increasing the LAB glass, the Q × f value first increased and then decreased. Typically, the 1 wt.% LAB glass-added Li2ZnTi3O8 + 17 mol% TiO2 ceramics sintered at 900°C for 4 h had good microwave dielectric properties with ɛr = 26.8, Q × f = 28,000 GHz and τ ƒ = + 2.5 ppm/°C, which made it a promising ceramic for LTCC technology application.

  13. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  14. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  15. Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

  16. Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL)-Like Lymphoma in a Child With Congenital Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lam, Grace K S; Abdelhaleem, Mohamed; Somers, Gino R; Roifman, Chaim; Read, Stanley; Abla, Oussama

    2016-09-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare lymphoma that occurs more frequently in immunocompromised adults and has a poor survival. We report a 9-year-old female with combined immunodeficiency with an Epstein-Barr virus positive/human herpes virus 8 negative PEL-like lymphoma. The treatment with systemic chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, zidovudine, and interferon-α failed to control disease progression. This is the first reported pediatric case of PEL-like lymphoma. Increased diagnostic awareness and more effective treatment strategies are needed for this rare lymphoma. PMID:27186682

  17. Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage

  20. Computational diagnosis of canine lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkes, E. M.; Alexandrakis, I.; Slater, K.; Tuli, R.; Gorban, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    One out of four dogs will develop cancer in their lifetime and 20% of those will be lymphoma cases. PetScreen developed a lymphoma blood test using serum samples collected from several veterinary practices. The samples were fractionated and analysed by mass spectrometry. Two protein peaks, with the highest diagnostic power, were selected and further identified as acute phase proteins, C-Reactive Protein and Haptoglobin. Data mining methods were then applied to the collected data for the development of an online computer-assisted veterinary diagnostic tool. The generated software can be used as a diagnostic, monitoring and screening tool. Initially, the diagnosis of lymphoma was formulated as a classification problem and then later refined as a lymphoma risk estimation. Three methods, decision trees, kNN and probability density evaluation, were used for classification and risk estimation and several preprocessing approaches were implemented to create the diagnostic system. For the differential diagnosis the best solution gave a sensitivity and specificity of 83.5% and 77%, respectively (using three input features, CRP, Haptoglobin and standard clinical symptom). For the screening task, the decision tree method provided the best result, with sensitivity and specificity of 81.4% and >99%, respectively (using the same input features). Furthermore, the development and application of new techniques for the generation of risk maps allowed their user-friendly visualization.

  1. [Mediterranean lymphoma mimicking Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Jouini, S; Ayadi, K; Mokrani, A; Wachuku, E; Hmouda, H; Gourdie, R

    2001-07-01

    We report an uncommon localization of mediterranean lymphoma of the terminal ileum in a 28 year-old male patient. Ultrasound and Computed Tomography showed moderate regular and symmetrical intestinal wall thickening simulating Crohn's disease. We highlight the role of computed tomography in the diagnosis, staging and detection of complications. PMID:11507451

  2. Cytomegalovirus retinitis mimicking intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gooi, Patrick; Farmer, James; Hurley, Bernard; Brodbaker, Elliott

    2008-12-01

    We present a case of an unusual retinal infiltrate requiring retinal biopsy for definitive diagnosis. A 62-year-old man with treated lymphoma presented with decreased vision in the right eye associated with a white retinal lesion, which extended inferonasally from an edematous disc. Intraocular lymphoma was considered as a diagnosis; thus, the patient was managed with vitrectomy and retinal biopsy. Cytological analysis of the vitreous aspirate could not rule out a lymphoproliferative disorder. The microbial analysis was negative. Histology of the lesion showed extensive necrosis and large cells with prominent nucleoli. To rule out lymphoma, a battery of immunostains was performed and all were negative. However the limited amount of tissue was exhausted in the process. Subsequently, a hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) slide was destained, on which a CMV immunostain was performed. This revealed positivity in the nuclei and intranuclear inclusions within the large atypical cells. A diagnosis of CMV retinitis was made. Retinal biopsy may provide a definitive diagnosis and direct patient care toward intravenous gancyclovir in the case of CMV or toward radiation and chemotherapy for intraocular lymphoma. When faced with a limited amount of tissue, destaining regular H/E slides is a possible avenue to performing additional immunohistochemical studies. PMID:19668455

  3. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  5. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Low-Grade Follicular Lymphoma, Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia, or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. [Malignant Lymphoma of the Brain, and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    A differential diagnosis of acute and subacute progressive dementias includes malignant lymphoma of the brain. We reviewed primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL), lymphomatosis cerebri, and the relapse and invasion of systemic lymphomas. PCNSL is confined to the central nervous system; the infiltration and compression by the lymphoma result in adverse neurological symptoms. IVL is a rare form of malignant lymphoma that is characterized by the proliferation of primarily B-cell type lymphoma cells within the blood vessels of various organs. This causes ischemia and results in the associated neurological symptoms. Medical history and neuroimaging studies provide crucial informations to distinguish the lymphomas from other diseases that cause dementia, such an Alzheimer's disease. MRI imaging of the brain using contrast agent, and the biopsy of diseased tissues are essential for the diagnosis of the lymphomas. A histopathological examination is the most effective way to diagnose malignant lymphomas of the brain. Presently, the treatment of choice for PCNSL is the intravenous administration of high dose methotrexate with and without radiation therapy. Futhermore, Rituximab-containing chemotherapy has proved to greatly improve the prognosis of IVL. A better outcome can be achieved with the earlier diagnosis and treatment of the malignant lymphoma of the brain. PMID:27056856

  8. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  9. Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic

  10. Rituximab With or Without Yttrium Y-90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma

  11. What's New in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for non-Hodgkin lymphoma What’s new in non-Hodgkin lymphoma research and treatment? Research ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma is focused on looking at new and better ways to treat this disease. Chemotherapy ...

  12. Isolated subglottic lymphoma: an interesting cause of dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Yardley, M P; Chui, P

    1993-01-01

    Isolated laryngeal lymphomas are exceedingly rare tumours: they tend to be greyish submucosal swellings and to respond well to radiotherapy. A case of subglottic lymphoma is presented, along with a review of previously reported cases of subglottic lymphomas. PMID:8461251

  13. What Are the Key Statistics about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for non-Hodgkin lymphoma? What are the key statistics about non-Hodgkin lymphoma? Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) ... coming years. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  14. Bortezomib and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma Who Have Previously Undergone Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  15. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  16. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Rituximab and Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  18. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T

  19. Bortezomib, Ifosfamide, and Vinorelbine Tartrate in Treating Young Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma That is Recurrent or Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  20. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy After Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk, Intermediate-Grade, B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  1. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Idelalisib in Japanese Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (With or Without Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia); Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  2. Primary Gastric Burkitt’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Swarupa; Mehta, Anurag; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Anila; Louis, A. Robert; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Saxena, Upasna; Simson, David K.; Dewan, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    The primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, although rare, is among the most common extra-nodal lymphomas, considering that gastric lymphomas are more common than intestinal lymphomas. Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma that is typically endemic in Africa, while non-endemic cases are found in the rest of the world. Primary gastric BL is extremely rare and only around 50 cases have been reported worldwide. Here we present the case of a young HIV-negative male, who was referred to our department with a stage IV gastric BL. He was planned for palliative chemotherapy, but after the first cycle of chemotherapy he succumbed to the progression of the disease. PMID:25568743

  3. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin

  5. Bilateral conjunctival follicular lymphoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Wall, Palak B; Traboulsi, Elias I; Hsi, Eric D; Singh, Arun D

    2015-04-01

    Follicular lymphoma is exceedingly rare in children. We present the case of a 10-year-old patient with a conjunctival lesion on the left eye who later developed a similar lesion on the right eye. Excisional biopsy of the left eye lesion revealed follicular lymphoma. The patient was treated with systemic rituximab. To our knowledge, only 4 other cases of pediatric conjunctival follicular lymphoma have been reported, all of which were isolated lesions that were treated with excisional biopsy alone. PMID:25824110

  6. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  7. Primary effusion lymphoma presenting as a cutaneous intravascular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Xian, Rena R.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.; Taube, Janis M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare and aggressive lymphoma that arises in the context of immunosuppression and is characterized by co-infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus-8/Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV). It was originally described as arising in body cavity effusions, but presentation as a mass lesion (extracavitary PEL) is now recognized. Here, we describe a case of PEL with an initial presentation as an intravascular lymphoma with associated skin lesions. The patient was a 53-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who presented with fevers, weight loss and skin lesions concerning for Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed no evidence of KS; however, dermal vessels contained large atypical cells that expressed CD31 and plasma cell markers but lacked most B- and T-cell antigens. The atypical cells expressed EBV and HHV-8. The patient subsequently developed a malignant pleural effusion containing the same neoplastic cell population. The findings in this case highlight the potential for unusual intravascular presentations of PEL in the skin as well as the importance of pursuing microscopic diagnosis of skin lesions in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:25355615

  8. Conjunctival Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Darshak S.; Rundle, Paul; Salvi, Sachin M.; Fernando, Malee; Mudhar, Hardeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) represents an uncommon variant of T-cell lymphomas and most often presents insidiously with systemic symptoms. This report constitutes the first documented case of conjunctival AITL, masquerading as nodular episcleritis, and describes both the clinical and pathological findings. Furthermore, conjunctival T-cell lymphoma in general remains a rare occurrence, and a survey of previously reported cases reveals a wide variation in clinical presentation. A high index of suspicion, thorough examination and conjunctival biopsy are essential to reaching the diagnosis of conjunctival lymphoma. PMID:27231687

  9. Conjunctival Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Darshak S; Rundle, Paul; Salvi, Sachin M; Fernando, Malee; Mudhar, Hardeep Singh

    2015-02-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) represents an uncommon variant of T-cell lymphomas and most often presents insidiously with systemic symptoms. This report constitutes the first documented case of conjunctival AITL, masquerading as nodular episcleritis, and describes both the clinical and pathological findings. Furthermore, conjunctival T-cell lymphoma in general remains a rare occurrence, and a survey of previously reported cases reveals a wide variation in clinical presentation. A high index of suspicion, thorough examination and conjunctival biopsy are essential to reaching the diagnosis of conjunctival lymphoma. PMID:27231687

  10. [Oral Burkitt lymphoma in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Chbicheb, S; Hakkou, F; El Wady, W

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of Burkitt lymphoma of the jaws in an immunocompetent adolescent, revealed by intraoral swelling. An orthopantomogram showed multiple osteolytic lesions. Biopsy revealed Burkitt lymphoma. The disease was treated with chemotherapy. Complete remission was attained 15 months after the end of treatment. Burkitt lymphomas accounts for 30-40% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in children, with diagnosis confirmed by histology. Immunophenotyping completes the diagnosis by identifying the presence of B markers. Chemotherapy is currently the main treatment of BL, because of the high chemosensitivity of the tumor and its low radiosensitivity. Overall survival in localized stages is close to 100%. PMID:22285713