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Sample records for adopt haemophilus influenzae

  1. About Haemophilus influenzae Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... one that most people are familiar with is Haemophilus influenzae type b, or Hib. There’s a vaccine that can prevent disease caused by Hib, but not the other types of Haemophilus influenzae . Types of Infection Haemophilus influenzae Can Cause Infections ...

  2. Haemophilus influenza organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prior to the widespread use of the H. influenza vaccine). The large red-colored objects are cells in the spinal fluid. A vaccine to prevent infection by Haemophilus influenza (type B) is available as one of the ...

  3. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Haemophilus Influenzae type b Page Content Article Body If you’re like many parents, you may have been unfamiliar with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections until your pediatrician recommended a vaccine ...

  4. Accelerating Policy Decisions to Adopt Haemophilus influenzae Type b Vaccine: A Global, Multivariable Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Jessica C.; Stack, Meghan L.; Richmond, Marcie R.; Bear, Allyson P.; Hajjeh, Rana A.; Bishai, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Adoption of new and underutilized vaccines by national immunization programs is an essential step towards reducing child mortality. Policy decisions to adopt new vaccines in high mortality countries often lag behind decisions in high-income countries. Using the case of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, this paper endeavors to explain these delays through the analysis of country-level economic, epidemiological, programmatic and policy-related factors, as well as the role of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI Alliance). Methods and Findings Data for 147 countries from 1990 to 2007 were analyzed in accelerated failure time models to identify factors that are associated with the time to decision to adopt Hib vaccine. In multivariable models that control for Gross National Income, region, and burden of Hib disease, the receipt of GAVI support speeded the time to decision by a factor of 0.37 (95% CI 0.18–0.76), or 63%. The presence of two or more neighboring country adopters accelerated decisions to adopt by a factor of 0.50 (95% CI 0.33–0.75). For each 1% increase in vaccine price, decisions to adopt are delayed by a factor of 1.02 (95% CI 1.00–1.04). Global recommendations and local studies were not associated with time to decision. Conclusions This study substantiates previous findings related to vaccine price and presents new evidence to suggest that GAVI eligibility is associated with accelerated decisions to adopt Hib vaccine. The influence of neighboring country decisions was also highly significant, suggesting that approaches to support the adoption of new vaccines should consider supply- and demand-side factors. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:20305714

  5. HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZA DISEASES SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Haemophilus Influenzae System at NIP compiles information on all U.S. Haemophilus influenzae invasive disease cases reported to CDC via NETSS since 1991 (managed by EPO and NIP), or via active surveillance in several locales since 1989 (managed by NCIP). Information collected...

  6. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of severe Haemophilus influenza infections, such as sepsis and meningitis, has declined substantially since the introduction of the H. influenzae serotype b vaccine. However, the H. influenzae type b vaccine fails to protect against nontypeable H. influenzae strains, which have become increasingly frequent causes of invasive disease, especially among children and the elderly. We summarize recent literature supporting the emergence of invasive nontypeable H. influenzae and describe mechanisms that may explain its increasing prevalence over the past 2 decades. PMID:26407156

  7. Antimicrobial Resistance in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Tristram, Stephen; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major community-acquired pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Meningitis and bacteremia due to type b strains occur in areas where the protein-conjugated type b vaccine is not in use, whereas nontypeable strains are major causes of otitis media, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and pneumonia. Antibiotic resistance in this organism is more diverse and widespread than is commonly appreciated. Intrinsic efflux resistance mechanisms limit the activity of the macrolides, azalides, and ketolides. β-Lactamase production is highly prevalent worldwide and is associated with resistance to ampicillin and amoxicillin. Strains with alterations in penicillin binding proteins, particularly PBP3 (β-lactamase negative ampicillin resistant and β-lactamase positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistant), are increasing in prevalence, particularly in Japan, with increasing resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and many cephalosporins, limiting the efficacy of expanded-spectrum cephalosporins against meningitis and of many oral cephalosporins against other diseases. Most strains remain susceptible to the carbapenems, which are not affected by penicillin binding protein changes, and the quinolones. The activity of many oral agents is limited by pharmacokinetics achieved with administration by this route, and the susceptibility of isolates based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters is reviewed. PMID:17428889

  8. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # Start of Search Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ...

  9. Glycerophosphorylcholine regulates Haemophilus influenzae glpQ gene expression.

    PubMed

    Alrousan, Enas; Fan, Xin

    2015-05-01

    An important virulence strategy adopted by Haemophilus influenzae to establish a niche on the mucosal surface of the host is the phosphorylcholine (ChoP) decoration of its lipopolysaccharides, which promotes adherence to the host cells. Haemophilus influenzae is able to use glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) from host for ChoP synthesis. Utilization of GPC requires glpQ, which encodes a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme. In this study, we investigate the transcriptional regulation of glpQ gene using real-time PCR and transcriptional fusion of H. influenzae glpQ promoter to the Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene. The glpQ promoter activities were examined under environmental conditions including changes in temperature, oxygen, high salt and minimal growth medium. Our data showed that under room temperature and anaerobic conditions, the glpQ gene expression levels were significantly higher than under other growth conditions. In addition, the glpQ gene expression levels were upregulated in the presence of GPC. These results suggest that H. influenzae may upregulate glpQ expression in response to different environments it encounters during infection, from the airway surfaces (room temperature) to deep tissues (anaerobic). Upregulation of glpQ by GPC may allow efficient use of abundant GPC from mammalian cells by H. influenzae as a source of nutrient and for ChoP decoration of lipopolysaccharide that facilitates bacterial adhesion to host cells and growth during infection. PMID:25837816

  10. Culture and PCR Detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous Children with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Binks, M. J.; Grimwood, K.; Chang, A. B.; Leach, A. J.; Smith-Vaughan, H.

    2012-01-01

    A PCR for protein D (hpd#3) was used to differentiate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) from Haemophilus haemolyticus. While 90% of nasopharyngeal specimens and 100% of lower-airway specimens from 84 Indigenous Australian children with bronchiectasis had phenotypic NTHI isolates confirmed as H. influenzae, only 39% of oropharyngeal specimens with phenotypic NTHI had H. influenzae. The nasopharynx is therefore the preferred site for NTHI colonization studies, and NTHI is confirmed as an important lower-airway pathogen. PMID:22553240

  11. Simple sequence repeats in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Power, Peter M; Sweetman, W A; Gallacher, N J; Woodhall, M R; Kumar, G A; Moxon, E R; Hood, D W

    2009-03-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSRs) of DNA are subject to high rates of mutation and are important mediators of adaptation in Haemophilus influenzae. Previous studies of the Rd KW20 genome identified the primacy of tetranucleotide SSRs in mediating phase variation (the rapid reversible switching of gene expression) of surface exposed structures such as lipopolysaccharide. The recent sequencing of the genomes of multiple strains of H. influenzae allowed the comparison of the SSRs (repeat units of one to nine nucleotides in length) in detail across four complete H. influenzae genomes and then comparison with a further 12 genomes when they became available. The SSR loci were broadly classified into three groups: (1) those that did not vary; (2) those for which some variation between strains was observed but this could not be linked to variation of gene expression; and (3) those that both varied and were located in regions consistent with mediating phase variable gene expression. Comparative analysis of 988 SSR associated loci confirmed that tetranucleotide repeats were the major mediators of phase variation and extended the repertoire of known tetranucleotide SSR loci by identifying ten previously uncharacterised tetranucleotide SSR loci with the potential to mediate phase variation which were unequally distributed across the H. influenzae pan-genome. Further, analysis of non-tetranucleotide SSR in the 16 strains revealed a number of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, pentanucleotide, heptanucleotide, and octanucleotide SSRs which were consistent with these tracts mediating phase variation. This study substantiates previous findings as to the important role that tetranucleotide SSRs play in H. influenzae biology. Two Brazilian isolates showed the most variation in their complement of SSRs suggesting the possibility of geographic and phenotypic influences on SSR distribution. PMID:19095084

  12. Evaluation of new biomarker genes for differentiating Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Theodore, M Jordan; Anderson, Raydel D; Wang, Xin; Katz, Lee S; Vuong, Jeni T; Bell, Melissa E; Juni, Billie A; Lowther, Sara A; Lynfield, Ruth; MacNeil, Jessica R; Mayer, Leonard W

    2012-04-01

    PCR detecting the protein D (hpd) and fuculose kinase (fucK) genes showed high sensitivity and specificity for identifying Haemophilus influenzae and differentiating it from H. haemolyticus. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated two distinct groups for H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus. PMID:22301020

  13. Identifying Haemophilus haemolyticus and Haemophilus influenzae by SYBR Green real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Latham, Roger; Zhang, Bowen; Tristram, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    SYBR Green real time PCR assays for protein D (hpd), fuculose kinase (fucK) and [Cu, Zn]-superoxide dismutase (sodC) were designed for use in an algorithm for the identification of Haemophilus influenzae and H. haemolyticus. When tested on 127 H. influenzae and 60 H. haemolyticus all isolates were identified correctly. PMID:25753676

  14. Evaluation of New Biomarker Genes for Differentiating Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Raydel D.; Wang, Xin; Katz, Lee S.; Vuong, Jeni T.; Bell, Melissa E.; Juni, Billie A.; Lowther, Sara A.; Lynfield, Ruth; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    PCR detecting the protein D (hpd) and fuculose kinase (fucK) genes showed high sensitivity and specificity for identifying Haemophilus influenzae and differentiating it from H. haemolyticus. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated two distinct groups for H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus. PMID:22301020

  15. Population Structure in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Nathan C.; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) frequently colonize the human pharynx asymptomatically, and are an important cause of otitis media in children. Past studies have identified typeable H. influenzae as being clonal, but the population structure of NTHi has not been extensively characterized. The research presented here investigated the diversity and population structure in a well-characterized collection of NTHi isolated from the middle ears of children with otitis media or the pharynges of healthy children in three disparate geographic regions. Multilocus sequence typing identified 109 unique sequence types among 170 commensal and otitis media-associated NTHi isolates from Finland, Israel, and the US. The largest clonal complex contained only five sequence types, indicating a high level of genetic diversity. The eBURST v3, ClonalFrame 1.1, and structure 2.3.3 programs were used to further characterize diversity and population structure from the sequence typing data. Little clustering was apparent by either disease state (otitis media or commensalism) or geography in the ClonalFrame phylogeny. Population structure was clearly evident, with support for eight populations when all 170 isolates were analyzed. Interestingly, one population contained only commensal isolates, while two others consisted solely of otitis media isolates, suggesting associations between population structure and disease. PMID:23266487

  16. Molecular tools for differentiation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Janessa; Richmond, Peter C.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Haemophilus haemolyticus are closely related bacteria that reside in the upper respiratory tract. NTHi is associated with respiratory tract infections that frequently result in antibiotic prescription whilst H. haemolyticus is rarely associated with disease. NTHi and H. haemolyticus can be indistinguishable by traditional culture methods and molecular differentiation has proven difficult. This current review chronologically summarizes the molecular approaches that have been developed for differentiation of NTHi from H. haemolyticus, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each target and/or technique. We also provide suggestions for the development of new tools that would be suitable for clinical and research laboratories. PMID:25520712

  17. Haemophilus influenzae triggers autophagy in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; Reyes-Picaso, Carolina; Garcés-Pérez, Miriam S; Jardón-Serrano, Cynthia V; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    The MAP-LC3 system regulates the intracellular formation of autophagy-associated vacuoles. These vacuoles contain the LC3 protein; thus it has been utilized as a marker to identify autophagosomes. The aim of our study was to investigate whether Haemophilus influenzae strains and their supernatants could activate autophagy in human larynx carcinoma cell line (HEp-2). We demonstrate that higher expression of the LC3B-II protein was induced, particularly by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) 49766 and by supernatants, containing <50 kDa proteins, of both strains. Ultrastructural studies demonstrate vacuoles with a double membrane and/or membrane material inside, showing similar features to those of autophagic vacuoles. Together, our findings demonstrate that H. influenzae strains and their supernatants trigger an autophagic process. PMID:26537814

  18. A PCR–High-Resolution Melt Assay for Rapid Differentiation of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Michael J.; Beissbarth, Jemima; Hare, Kim M.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a PCR–high-resolution melt (PCR-HRM) assay to discriminate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonies from Haemophilus haemolyticus. This method is rapid and robust, with 96% sensitivity and 92% specificity compared to the hpd#3 assay. PCR-HRM is ideal for high-throughput screening for NTHi surveillance and clinical trials. PMID:24478508

  19. Maternal and neonatal sepsis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type d.

    PubMed

    Warren, S; Tristram, S; Bradbury, R S

    2010-03-01

    A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted to hospital with signs of sepsis and threatened pre-term labour. The premature neonate also showed signs of sepsis. Haemophilus influenzae biotype III was cultured from a midstream urine sample taken from the mother, maternal placental swabs and neonatal blood cultures. The placental and neonatal isolates were both found to be serotype d by PCR, and were indistinguishable by PFGE. PMID:19926730

  20. Inducible repair system in Haemophilus influenzae unaccompanied by mutation. [uv

    SciTech Connect

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1980-07-01

    Weigle reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated HPlc1 phage was observed after ultraviolet or mitomycin C treatment of Haemophilus influenzae cells. The amount of reactivation was considerably increased when the treated cells were incubated in growth medium before infection. The presence of chloramphenicol during this incubation abolished the reactivation. No mutation of this phage accompanied the reactivation. When cells were treated so as to produce a maximal reactivation of phage, neither reactivation nor mutation of cells was observed. It is concluded that H. influenzae has an inducible repair system that is not accompanied by mutation.

  1. Haemophilus influenzae Outer Membrane Protein P6 Molecular Characterization May Not Differentiate All Strains of H. Influenzae from H. haemolyticus▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Arthur; Adlowitz, Diana G.; Yellamatty, Edna; Pichichero, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Distinguishing nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates by outer membrane protein (OMP) P6 gene sequencing is complicated by sequence variants in isolates. Further testing using RapID NH and multilocus sequence analysis may not help identify some isolates. Translated OMP P6 gene sequences are not conserved among all isolates presumed to be H. influenzae. PMID:20686092

  2. Low occurrence of 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus' misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in cystic fibrosis respiratory specimens, and frequent recurrence of persistent H. influenzae clones despite antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Fenger, Mette G; Ridderberg, Winnie; Olesen, Hanne V; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-12-01

    Non-influenzae commensal Haemophilus species of low pathogenicity may be difficult to discriminate from Haemophilus influenzae. We investigated the level of misidentifications in respiratory specimens from cystic fibrosis patients and evaluated the colonisation dynamics of genuine H. influenzae isolates. One hundred and ninety-two presumptive H. influenzae isolates were re-examined by assessment of marker genes sodC and fucK, and isolates with aberrant genotypes were subjected to multilocus sequence typing. Misidentifications (3%) were mainly caused by failure to identify porphyrin-synthesising strains, and only a single strain (0.5%) could be classified as 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus'. Sequential isolates of confirmed H. influenzae isolates from individual patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Despite the routine prescription of antimicrobial therapy, the majority of H. influenzae isolates were identical with at least one of the strains cultured from the two preceding positive samples from the same patient. PMID:23177564

  3. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Disease, Europe, 1996–2006

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Mary P.E.; Heath, Paul T.; von Gottberg, Anne; Chandra, Manosree; Ramsay, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    An international collaboration was established in 1996 to monitor the impact of routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination on invasive H. influenzae disease; 14 countries routinely serotype all clinical isolates. Of the 10,081 invasive H. influenzae infections reported during 1996–2006, 4,466 (44%, incidence 0.28 infections/100,000 population) were due to noncapsulated H. influenzae (ncHi); 2,836 (28%, 0.15/100,000), to Hib; and 690 (7%, 0.036/100,000), to non–b encapsulated H. influenzae. Invasive ncHi infections occurred in older persons more often than Hib (median age 58 years vs. 5 years, p<0.0001) and were associated with higher case-fatality ratios (12% vs. 4%, p<0.0001), particularly in infants (17% vs. 3%, p<0.0001). Among non-b encapsulated H. influenzae, types f (72%) and e (21%) were responsible for almost all cases; the overall case-fatality rate was 9%. Thus, the incidence of invasive non–type b H. influenzae is now higher than that of Hib and is associated with higher case fatality. PMID:20202421

  4. Antigenic diversity of lipooligosaccharides of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnari, A A; Gupta, M R; Dudas, K C; Murphy, T F; Apicella, M A

    1987-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae are an antigenically heterogeneous group of macromolecules. Immunodiffusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition studies with phenol-water-extracted LOS and absorbed antisera specific for the oligosaccharide portion of the LOS identified six LOS strain-specific antigens. To facilitate screening large numbers of strains to search for LOS antigenic heterogeneity, a system utilizing proteinase K whole cell digests in Western blots was developed. Seventy-two nontypable H. influenzae LOS extracts were analyzed in this Western blot assay. Thirty-seven of these extracts could be segregated into 10 antigenically distinct LOS groups based on immunologic recognition by one or more of the rabbit antisera. Thirty-five of the strains did not contain these LOS antigens. These results demonstrate that antigenic differences exist among the LOS of nontypable H. influenzae strains, and this heterogeneity has the potential to be used to establish an LOS-based serogrouping system. Images PMID:3549563

  5. Structure and Function of the Haemophilus influenzae Autotransporters

    PubMed Central

    Spahich, Nicole A.; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    Autotransporters are a large class of proteins that are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and are almost universally implicated in virulence. These proteins consist of a C-terminal β-domain that is embedded in the outer membrane and an N-terminal domain that is exposed on the bacterial surface and is endowed with effector function. In this article, we review and compare the structural and functional characteristics of the Haemophilus influenzae IgA1 protease and Hap monomeric autotransporters and the H. influenzae Hia and Hsf trimeric autotransporters. All of these proteins play a role in colonization of the upper respiratory tract and in the pathogenesis of H. influenzae disease. PMID:22919571

  6. Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... influenzae type b (Hib) disease is a serious disease caused by bacteria. It usually affects children under 5 years old. It can also affect adults with certain medical conditions.Your child can get Hib disease by being around other children or adults who ...

  7. Airway dysbiosis: Haemophilus influenzae and Tropheryma in poorly controlled asthma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jodie L; Daly, Joshua; Baines, Katherine J; Yang, Ian A; Upham, John W; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra; James, Alan L; Hugenholtz, Philip; Willner, Dana; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways where bacteria may act as protagonists of chronic inflammation. Little is known about the relation of airway inflammation to the presence of specific bacterial taxa. We sought to describe the sputum microbiome in adults with poorly controlled asthma.DNA was extracted from induced sputum and microbial communities were profiled using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial species were characterised, and the relationship between microbial populations, asthma inflammatory subtypes and other covariates was explored. Real-time PCR was used to identify Tropheryma whipplei and Haemophilus influenzae in sputum.Adults with neutrophilic asthma had reduced bacterial diversity and species richness. Tropheryma was identified and confirmed with real-time PCR in 12 (40%) participants. Haemophilus occurred most often in a group of younger atopic males with an increased proportion of neutrophils. PCR confirmed the presence of H. influenzae in 35 (76%) participants with poorly controlled asthma.There are phenotype-specific alterations to the airway microbiome in asthma. Reduced bacterial diversity combined with a high prevalence of H. influenzae was observed in neutrophilic asthma, whereas eosinophilic asthma had abundant T. whipplei. PMID:26647445

  8. Viability and growth of clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Flournoy, D J; Jones, J B

    1985-08-01

    Studies were done on clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae to investigate viability and determine the effects of disc-agar diffusion (DAD) medium modification on antimicrobial susceptibility results. Most isolates were viable for two days in distilled water, up to a week on chocolate agar and months when frozen in skim milk at -70 degrees C. Differences in viability were not related to biotype, serotype, beta-lactamase production or site of isolation of isolates. Several medium modifications resulted in better growth of isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by DAD, but the zone sizes of inhibition differed from those of the recommended medium. PMID:3877620

  9. Metabolic versatility in Haemophilus influenzae: a metabolomic and genomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Dk Seti Maimonah Pg; Schirra, Horst; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a host adapted human pathogen known to contribute to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the upper and lower respiratory tract as well as the middle ear. At the sites of infection as well as during growth as a commensal the environmental conditions encountered by H. influenzae will vary significantly, especially in terms of oxygen availability, however, the mechanisms by which the bacteria can adapt their metabolism to cope with such changes have not been studied in detail. Using targeted metabolomics the spectrum of metabolites produced during growth of H. influenzae on glucose in RPMI-based medium was found to change from acetate as the main product during aerobic growth to formate as the major product during anaerobic growth. This change in end-product is likely caused by a switch in the major route of pyruvate degradation. Neither lactate nor succinate or fumarate were major products of H. influenzae growth under any condition studied. Gene expression studies and enzyme activity data revealed that despite an identical genetic makeup and very similar metabolite production profiles, H. influenzae strain Rd appeared to favor glucose degradation via the pentose phosphate pathway, while strain 2019, a clinical isolate, showed higher expression of enzymes involved in glycolysis. Components of the respiratory chain were most highly expressed during microaerophilic and anaerobic growth in both strains, but again clear differences existed in the expression of genes associated e.g., with NADH oxidation, nitrate and nitrite reduction in the two strains studied. Together our results indicate that H. influenzae uses a specialized type of metabolism that could be termed “respiration assisted fermentation” where the respiratory chain likely serves to alleviate redox imbalances caused by incomplete glucose oxidation, and at the same time provides a means of converting a variety of compounds including nitrite and nitrate that arise as part

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bijlmer, H A; van Alphen, L; Geelen-van den Broek, L; Greenwood, B M; Valkenburg, H A; Dankert, J

    1992-01-01

    One hundred two invasive and 64 noninvasive isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were collected in the course of a 2-year prospective field study on the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis in The Gambia. The isolates were serotyped, biotyped, and subtyped by outer membrane protein (OMP) profile analysis (OMP subtyping). H. influenzae meningitis was found to be caused by serotype b (95%). In invasive disease, serotype a, although present in the throat of healthy children, caused only occasionally (5.9%) disease. The distribution of biotypes of H. influenzae appeared to be very similar to that found outside The Gambia. A distinct pattern of OMP subtypes, different from other parts of the world, is prevalent in H. influenzae type b (Hib) in The Gambia. OMP subtypes 2, 4, 5, 8, and 9 were observed to be predominant. These subtypes, except subtype 2, have not been described. L subtypes (subtypes 2, 4, and 8) were associated with invasive disease, whereas non-L subtypes (subtypes 5 and 9) were found more often in healthy carriers (P less than 0.001). A significant difference in geographical distribution was found in subtypes of noninvasive Hib strains (P less than 0.05). We conclude that in The Gambia H. influenzae invasive disease is caused mainly by type b strains with a limited number of OMP subtypes, which are different from the subtypes found elsewhere in the world. These data are important for the surveillance of Hib disease in developing countries and are baseline data for a Hib polyribosyl-ribitolphosphate-conjugated vaccine trial in The Gambia. Alternative Hib OMP vaccines should include a set of representative OMPs. Images PMID:1537907

  11. Metabolic versatility in Haemophilus influenzae: a metabolomic and genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Othman, Dk Seti Maimonah Pg; Schirra, Horst; McEwan, Alastair G; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a host adapted human pathogen known to contribute to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the upper and lower respiratory tract as well as the middle ear. At the sites of infection as well as during growth as a commensal the environmental conditions encountered by H. influenzae will vary significantly, especially in terms of oxygen availability, however, the mechanisms by which the bacteria can adapt their metabolism to cope with such changes have not been studied in detail. Using targeted metabolomics the spectrum of metabolites produced during growth of H. influenzae on glucose in RPMI-based medium was found to change from acetate as the main product during aerobic growth to formate as the major product during anaerobic growth. This change in end-product is likely caused by a switch in the major route of pyruvate degradation. Neither lactate nor succinate or fumarate were major products of H. influenzae growth under any condition studied. Gene expression studies and enzyme activity data revealed that despite an identical genetic makeup and very similar metabolite production profiles, H. influenzae strain Rd appeared to favor glucose degradation via the pentose phosphate pathway, while strain 2019, a clinical isolate, showed higher expression of enzymes involved in glycolysis. Components of the respiratory chain were most highly expressed during microaerophilic and anaerobic growth in both strains, but again clear differences existed in the expression of genes associated e.g., with NADH oxidation, nitrate and nitrite reduction in the two strains studied. Together our results indicate that H. influenzae uses a specialized type of metabolism that could be termed "respiration assisted fermentation" where the respiratory chain likely serves to alleviate redox imbalances caused by incomplete glucose oxidation, and at the same time provides a means of converting a variety of compounds including nitrite and nitrate that arise as part of

  12. [Surveillance of Haemophilus influenzae serotypes in Argentina from 2005 to 2010 during the Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine era].

    PubMed

    Efron, Adriana M; Moscoloni, María A; Reijtman, Vanesa R; Regueira, Mabel

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in the immunization programs of many countries has greatly reduced this invasive disease and the carriage caused by this serotype, also increasing other capsular types and non-capsular isolations. There were 313 isolations of H. influenzae under study, which were recovered from a sterile site coming from pediatric and adult patients carrying the invasive disease. Patients were treated at 90 different hospitals belonging to the Red Nacional de Laboratorios para Meningitis e Infecciones Respiratorias Agudas Bacterianas (National Lab Network for Meningitis and Acute Bacterial Respiratory Infections) from 2005 to 2010 for the following disorders: pneumonia, 40.3% (n=126), meningitis, 30.0% (n=94) and bacteremia, 26.5% (n=83). In pediatric patients (n=279), the highest frequency of isolations corresponded to children under the age of 2 years, 74.5% (n=208). Regarding type distribution, 61.3% corresponded to non-capsular H. influenzae (n=192), 20.1% to type b (n=63), 11.2% to type a (n=35), 4.8% to type f, and 2.6% to other types. Capsular H. influenzae was predominant in meningitis whereas non-capsular H. influenzae in pneumonia and bacteremia. The biotype was determined in 306 isolations. The totality (100%) of type a (n=35) was biotype II whereas 66.7% of type b (n=63) was biotype I. Slide agglutination and PCR tests were used in 220 isolations. There was a match of 0.982 (IC: 0.92-1.00) between them. During the last year, there was a great increase in type b, showing the importance of clinical and laboratory-based surveillance of the invasive disease caused by H. influenzae. PMID:24401777

  13. The relationship between biofilm formations and capsule in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Kida, Yutaka; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kaji, Chiharu; Sakai, Yoshiro; Watanabe, Kiwao; Furumoto, Akitsugu; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the biofilm formation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and H. influenzae type b (Hib) clinical isolates, we conducted the following study. Serotyping and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify β-lactamase-negative ampicillin (ABPC)-susceptible (BLNAS), β-lactamase-negative ABPC-resistant (BLNAR), TEM-1 type β-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant (BLPAR)-NTHi, and Hib. Biofilm formation was investigated by microtiter biofilm assay, as well as visually observation with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in a continuous-flow chamber. As a result, totally 99 strains were investigated, and were classified into 4 groups which were 26 gBLNAS, 22 gBLNAR, 28 gBLPAR-NTHi and 23 Hib strains. The mean OD600 in the microtiter biofilm assay of gBLNAS, gBLNAR, gBLPAR-NTHi, and Hib strains were 0.57, 0.50, 0.34, and 0.08, respectively. NTHi strains were similar in terms of biofilm formations, which were observed by SEM and CLSM. Five Hib strains with the alternated type b cap loci showed significantly increased biofilm production than the other Hib strains. In conclusion, gBLNAS, gBLNAR, and gBLPAR-NTHi strains were more capable to produce biofilms compared to Hib strains. Our data suggested that resistant status may not be a key factor but capsule seemed to play an important role in H. influenzae biofilm formation. PMID:24560562

  14. Lineage-specific Virulence Determinants of Haemophilus influenzae Biogroup aegyptius

    PubMed Central

    Strouts, Fiona R.; Power, Peter; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Corton, Nicola; van Tonder, Andries; Quail, Michael A.; Langford, Paul R.; Hudson, Michael J.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    An emergent clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (Hae) is responsible for outbreaks of Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF). First recorded in Brazil in 1984, the so-called BPF clone of Hae caused a fulminant disease that started with conjunctivitis but developed into septicemic shock; mortality rates were as high as 70%. To identify virulence determinants, we conducted a pan-genomic analysis. Sequencing of the genomes of the BPF clone strain F3031 and a noninvasive conjunctivitis strain, F3047, and comparison of these sequences with 5 other complete H. influenzae genomes showed that >77% of the F3031 genome is shared among all H. influenzae strains. Delineation of the Hae accessory genome enabled characterization of 163 predicted protein-coding genes; identified differences in established autotransporter adhesins; and revealed a suite of novel adhesins unique to Hae, including novel trimeric autotransporter adhesins and 4 new fimbrial operons. These novel adhesins might play a critical role in host–pathogen interactions. PMID:22377449

  15. Probable acute disseminated encephalomyelitis due to Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Pedro; Ribeiro, Manuel; Pereira, João; Ferreira, Carla; Jordão, Maria José; Almeida, Fátima

    2008-05-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male on long-term steroid therapy for minimal lesion glomerulopathy who, after an upper respiratory infection, presented with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis. Twenty-four hours later he developed depression of consciousness which progressed to coma and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple lesions (hyperintense on T2 and slightly hypointense on Tl) involving mainly white matter suggestive of inflammation. MRI features were compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), although a differential diagnosis included cerebritis or vasculitis, secondary to bacterial meningitis. The patient was treated with high-dose steroids which resulted in a gradual improvement followed by complete clinical recovery. We propose a diagnosis of ADEM was the best diagnosis because of the radiological features and response to steroids. The occurrence of ADEM associated with acute meningitis, however rare, represents an important diagnostic challenge for the clinician. PMID:18355336

  16. Genome Scanning in Haemophilus influenzae for Identification of Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Karl A.; Chovan, Linda; Hessler, Paul

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a method for identifying essential genes by using an in vitro transposition system, with a small (975 bp) insertional element containing an antibiotic resistance cassette, and mapping these inserts relative to the deduced open reading frames of Haemophilus influenzae by PCR and Southern analysis. Putative essential genes are identified by two methods: mutation exclusion or zero time analysis. Mutation exclusion consists of growing an insertional library and identifying open reading frames that do not contain insertional elements: in a growing population of bacteria, insertions in essential genes are excluded. Zero time analysis consists of monitoring the fate of individual insertions after transformation in a growing culture: the loss of inserts in essential genes is observed over time. Both methods of analysis permit the identification of genes required for bacterial survival. Details of the mutant library construction and the mapping strategy, examples of mutant exclusion, and zero time analysis are presented. PMID:10438768

  17. Whole-Genome Sequences of Nonencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae Strains Isolated in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Giufrè, Maria; De Chiara, Matteo; Censini, Stefano; Guidotti, Silvia; Torricelli, Giulia; De Angelis, Gabriella; Cardines, Rita; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Muzzi, Alessandro; Soriani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen involved in invasive disease. Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of 11 nonencapsulated H. influenzae (ncHi) strains isolated from both invasive disease and healthy carriers in Italy. This genomic information will enrich our understanding of the molecular basis of ncHi pathogenesis. PMID:25814593

  18. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Manitoba, Canada, in the postvaccination era.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Raymond S W; Mubareka, Samira; Sill, Michelle L; Wylie, John; Skinner, Stuart; Law, Dennis K S

    2006-04-01

    Fifty-two Haemophilus influenzae isolates from patients with invasive disease in the province of Manitoba, Canada, were examined for serotype, biotype, genotype, and antibiotic susceptibility. Half of the 52 isolates were found to be serotype a, and 38.5% (20 isolates) were found to be nonserotypeable (NST). There were only three serotype b strains and one each for serotypes c, d, and f. All 26 serotype a isolates belonged to biotype II and demonstrated identical or highly similar DNA fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. An analysis of these isolates by multilocus sequence typing showed that they belong to the clonal complex ST-23. While 69% (18 of 26) of the serotype a cases were found in males, only 9 (45%) of the 20 patients with NST isolates were males. Twenty (77%) of the 26 serotype a isolates were from patients who were influenzae disease, with the majority of invasive H. influenzae isolates being associated with serotype a and NST strains. PMID:16597886

  19. Application of multilocus enzyme gel electrophoresis to Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Porras, O; Caugant, D A; Lagergård, T; Svanborg-Edén, C

    1986-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was adapted to the study of Haemophilus influenzae. Protein extracts from sonicated whole bacteria were subjected to starch gel electrophoresis. After staining with substrates, the position of each isoenzyme (electromorph) was registered. Each isolate was assigned an electrophoretic type (ET) by the combination of electromorphs for the enzymes stained. Twenty-seven enzymes were tested; 12 were expressed in H. influenzae. Six enzymes were selected for subsequent study: malate dehydrogenase (MDH), phenylalanylleucine peptidase (PE2), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PG), adenylate kinase (AK), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6P), and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI). They were polymorphic and occurred in all isolates. Six electromorphs were found for PE2, G6P, and PGI, five for MDH, four for 6PG, and three for AK. PE2, G6P, and PGI contributed most of the ET resolution (48 of 49 ETs). Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis showed several advantages over previous typing techniques. An ET could be assigned to both typable and nontypable (NT) isolates. The technique was powerful in resolving differences among isolates. The 94 isolates comprised 49 ETs, five biotypes, and six capsular types and NT isolates. Strains known to be related expressed the same ET, e.g., RAB b+ and b-, ET12; Ma a+ and a-, ET1. ET variability among type b isolates was low; 26 of 28 clinical isolates expressed ET14; 2 of 28 expressed ET13 and ET15, differing from ET14 by one electromorph each. In contrast, the 47 NT isolates comprised 38 different ETs. No ETs were shared between non-type b capsulated strains and type b or NT strains. Interestingly, five NT isolates expressed the same ET as type b strains. (iv) Strains of the same capsular type but different biotypes expressed different ETs. ET determinations will thus be useful in studying the epidemiology and evolution of H. influenzae. Images PMID:3522433

  20. Frequent oligonucleotides and peptides of the Haemophilus influenzae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Mrázek, J; Campbell, A M

    1996-01-01

    The complete Haemophilus influenzae genome (1.83 Mb, Rd strain) provides opportunities for characterizing global genomic inhomogeneities and for detecting important sequence signals. Along these lines, new methods for identifying frequent words (oligonucleotides and/or peptides) and their distributions are applied to the H.influenzae genome with some comparisons and contrasts made with frequent words of other bacterial genomes. Three major classes of frequent oligonucleotides stand out: (i) oligos related to the familiar uptake signal sequences (USSs), AAGTGCGGT (USS+) and its inverted complement (USS-), (ii) multiple tetranucleotide iterations and (iii) intergenic dyad sequences (ISDs) found as AAGCCCACCCTAC and its dyad form. The USS+ and USS- occur in almost equal counts, are remarkably evenly spaced around the genome, and appear predominantly in the same reading frame of protein coding domains (USS+ translated to Ser-Ala-Val, USS- translated to Thr-Ala-Leu). These observations suggest that USSs contribute to global genomic functions, for example, in replication and/or repair processes, or as membrane attachment sites, or as sequences helping to pack DNA. The long tetranucleotide iterations, virtually unique to H.influenzae (i.e., unknown in other prokaryotes), through polymerase slippage during replication and/or homologous recombination may produce subpopulations expressing alternative proteins. The 13 bp frequent IDS words, invariably intergenic, occur mostly in clusters and provide potential for complex secondary structures suggesting that these sequences may be important signals for regulating the activity of their flanking genes. The frequent oligopeptides of H.influenzae are principally of two kinds--those induced by oligonucleotide frequent words (USSs, tetranucleotide iterations), and those associated with ATP or GTP binding sites that are generally composed of three motifs: the A-box which contributes to delineating the binding pocket; the B-box which

  1. Transformation of Natural Genetic Variation into Haemophilus Influenzae Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Shumilina, Svetlana; Hall, Ira M.; Redfield, Rosemary J.

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria are able to efficiently bind and take up double-stranded DNA fragments, and the resulting natural transformation shapes bacterial genomes, transmits antibiotic resistance, and allows escape from immune surveillance. The genomes of many competent pathogens show evidence of extensive historical recombination between lineages, but the actual recombination events have not been well characterized. We used DNA from a clinical isolate of Haemophilus influenzae to transform competent cells of a laboratory strain. To identify which of the ∼40,000 polymorphic differences had recombined into the genomes of four transformed clones, their genomes and their donor and recipient parents were deep sequenced to high coverage. Each clone was found to contain ∼1000 donor polymorphisms in 3–6 contiguous runs (8.1±4.5 kb in length) that collectively comprised ∼1–3% of each transformed chromosome. Seven donor-specific insertions and deletions were also acquired as parts of larger donor segments, but the presence of other structural variation flanking 12 of 32 recombination breakpoints suggested that these often disrupt the progress of recombination events. This is the first genome-wide analysis of chromosomes directly transformed with DNA from a divergent genotype, connecting experimental studies of transformation with the high levels of natural genetic variation found in isolates of the same species. PMID:21829353

  2. Clinical and microbiological features of Haemophilus influenzae vulvovaginitis in young girls

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Slack, M P E

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To define the clinical and microbiological features of vulvovaginitis in prepubertal girls whose genital swabs yielded Haemophilus influenzae. Methods: Laboratory based study and retrospective collection of clinical data from the requesting doctors. Results: Thirty eight isolates of non-capsulate Haemophilus influenzae and one of H parainfluenzae were isolated from 32 girls aged 18 months to 11 years. No other pathogens, such as β haemolytic streptococci or yeasts, were present with H influenzae. The most common biotype was biotype II, comprising 57% of the 26 isolates biotyped. Six children had more than one episode of vulvovaginitis caused by H influenzae and a total of 14 children had recurrent vaginal symptoms. Conclusion: Children who have H influenzae vulvovaginitis are at risk of recurrent symptoms. Biotype II is the one most commonly associated with this condition. PMID:12461068

  3. In vitro capability of faropenem to select for resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2008-02-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  4. Innate Immune Responses are Enhanced in Pigs After Sequential Infection with Influenza Virus and Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) infection alone causes significant disease characterized by respiratory distress and poor growth. However, SIV also plays a significant role in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC), though the mechanism in which this occurs is not clearly defined. Haemophilus pa...

  5. Activities of HMR 3787 and RU 64399 Compared with Those of Four Other Agents against Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae

    PubMed Central

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Clark, Catherine; Bryskier, Andre; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2003-01-01

    Activities of HMR 3787, a new 2-fluoroketolide, and its (des)-fluor derivative, RU 64399, were tested against 111 Haemophilus influenzae and 26 H. parainfluenzae strains and compared with those of telithromycin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. HMR 3787 and RU 64399 MICs were comparable with those of azithromycin but were less affected by incubation in CO2. Time-kill studies of 12 strains showed that HMR 3787, RU 64399, and telithromycin were bactericidal against all strains after 24 h at two times the MIC. PMID:12499225

  6. [Urinary tract infection caused by Haemophilus influenzae in 3 children with uropathies].

    PubMed

    Allard, L; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Champion, G

    2012-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in children but Haemophilus is rarely involved. In our institution, only 3 children below the age of 15 years presented with UTI due to Haemophilus influenzae between January 2010 and October 2011. These children had typical symptoms of UTI: fever, abdominal pain and dysuria. In all 3 patients, standard urinalysis remained negative, but H. influenzae was found after bacterial growth in special media, i.e., blood agar (or chocolate agar). These patients had abnormalities of the urinary tract. The first patient, a 5-year-old girl, had a right ureteropelvic junction syndrome found after her UTI. The second, a 4-year-old girl, had a bilateral ureteral duplication found after many UTIs. The third, a 2-month-old boy, had a right ureteropelvic junction syndrome that had been diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound. In our hospital, during the study period, the prevalence of UTI caused by Haemophilus was 0.02% of all pediatric UTIs. There are few reports in the literature on UTI caused by Haemophilus in children (<1%): they are frequently associated with urinary tract abnormalities. The bacterium is not able to grow in usual media, so that when there is a clinical UTI with Gram negative bacilli on the direct exam but not found in the culture, an infection with Haemophilus should be discussed, and blood agar used, which is all the more important when there are underlying abnormalities of the urinary tract. PMID:22795780

  7. Diversity of the P2 protein among nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J; Grass, S; Jeanteur, D; Munson, R S

    1994-01-01

    The genes for outer membrane protein P2 of four nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae strains were cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequences were compared with the outer membrane protein P2 sequence from H. influenzae type b MinnA and the sequences of P2 from three additional nontypeable H. influenzae strains. The sequences were 76 to 94% identical. The sequences had regions with considerable variability separated by regions which were highly conserved. The variable regions mapped to putative surface-exposed loops of the protein. PMID:8188390

  8. The tryptophanase gene cluster of Haemophilus influenzae type b: evidence for horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Martin, K; Morlin, G; Smith, A; Nordyke, A; Eisenstark, A; Golomb, M

    1998-01-01

    Among strains of Haemophilus influenzae, the ability to catabolize tryptophan (as detected by indole production) varies and is correlated with pathogenicity. Tryptophan catabolism is widespread (70 to 75%) among harmless respiratory isolates but is nearly universal (94 to 100%) among strains causing serious disease, including meningitis. As a first step in investigating the relationship between tryptophan catabolism and virulence, we have identified genes in pathogenic H. influenzae which are homologous to the tryptophanase (tna) operon of Escherichia coli. The tna genes are located on a 3.1-kb fragment between nlpD and mutS in the H. influenzae type b (Eagan) genome, are flanked by 43-bp direct repeats of an uptake signal sequence downstream from nlpD, and appear to have been inserted as a mobile unit within this sequence. The organization of this insertion is reminiscent of pathogenicity islands. The tna cluster is found at the same map location in all indole-positive strains of H. influenzae surveyed and is absent from reference type d and e genomes. In contrast to H. influenzae, most other Haemophilus species lack tna genes. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that the tna cluster was acquired by intergeneric lateral transfer, either by H. influenzae or a recent ancestor, and that E. coli may have acquired its tnaA gene from a related source. Genomes of virulent H. influenzae resemble those of pathogenic enterics in having an island of laterally transferred DNA next to mutS. PMID:9422600

  9. Haemophilus influenzae serotype a as a cause of serious invasive infections.

    PubMed

    Ulanova, Marina; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae, particularly H influenzae serotype b (Hib), is an important pathogen that causes serious diseases like meningitis and septicaemia. Since the introduction of Hib conjugate vaccines in the 1990s, the epidemiology of invasive H influenzae disease has changed substantially, with most infections now caused by non-Hib strains. We discuss the importance of H influenzae serotype a (Hia) as a cause of serious morbidity and mortality and its global epidemiology, clinical presentation, microbiology, immunology, prevention, and control. Much like Hib, the capsule of Hia is an important virulence factor contributing to the development of invasive disease. Molecular typing of Hia has identified distinct clonal groups, with some linked to severe disease and high case-fatality rates. Similarities between Hia and Hib capsules, their clinical presentation, and immunology of infection suggest that a bivalent Hia-Hib capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine could offer protection against these two important serotypes of H influenzae. PMID:24268829

  10. Major subtypes of invasive Haemophilus influenzae from 1983 to 1985 in Atlanta, Ga.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J A; Pigott, N; Cochi, S L; Facklam, R R

    1990-01-01

    We compared outer membrane protein (OMP) patterns of Haemophilus influenzae isolated in metropolitan Atlanta, Ga., from July 1983 to June 1985. Of 74 randomly selected H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates (24% of the total number of H. influenzae, and 32% of the total number of H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates), 66 (89.2%) had the same OMP pattern. Of the remaining eight, five (6.7%) had an identical OMP pattern. The other three isolates had separate and distinct patterns. A greater diversity of OMP patterns was found with H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, and nonserotypeable H. influenzae. Of the 18 H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, isolates (5.8% of the total number of H. influenzae isolates), 1 had an OMP pattern similar to that of the predominate biotype I OMP type, 6 (33% of the biotype II) had the same pattern, and 11 had heterogeneous patterns. Of the 19 recoverable, nonserotypeable biotype II isolates (6.8% of the total number of H. influenzae), 18 had different OMP patterns, and no pattern was similar to those observed with serotype b. These findings indicate that most H. influenzae strains isolated during this 2-year period were indistinguishable by serotype, biotype, or OMP patterns. Images PMID:2191007

  11. Distribution and Diversity of hmw1A Among Invasive Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shahini Shams Abadi, Milad; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Vaziri, Farzam; Davari, Mehdi; Fateh, Abolfazl; Pourazar, Shahin; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Ghazanfari, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) begins with adhesion to the rhinopharyngeal mucosa. Almost 38–80% of NTHi clinical isolates produce proteins that belong to the High Molecular Weight (HMW) family of adhesins, which are believed to facilitate colonization. Methods: In the present study, the prevalence of hmwA, which encodes the HMW adhesin, was determined for a collection of 32 NTHi isolates. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) was performed to advance our understanding of hmwA binding sequence diversity. Results: The results demonstrated that hmwA was detected in 61% of NTHi isolates. According to RFLP, isolates were divided into three groups. Conclusion: Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that some strains of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae infect some specific areas more than other parts. PMID:27141269

  12. Functional characterization of UvrD helicases from Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchika; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori are major bacterial pathogens that face high levels of genotoxic stress within their host. UvrD, a ubiquitous bacterial helicase that plays important roles in multiple DNA metabolic pathways, is essential for genome stability and might, therefore, be crucial in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis. In this study, the functional characterization of UvrD helicase from Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori is reported. UvrD from Haemophilus influenzae (HiUvrD) and Helicobacter pylori (HpUvrD) exhibit strong single-stranded DNA-specific ATPase and 3'-5' helicase activities. Mutation of highly conserved arginine (R288) in HiUvrD and glutamate (E206) in HpUvrD abrogated their activities. Both the proteins were able to bind and unwind a variety of DNA structures including duplexes with strand discontinuities and branches, three- and four-way junctions that underpin their role in DNA replication, repair and recombination. HiUvrD required a minimum of 12 nucleotides, whereas HpUvrD preferred 20 or more nucleotides of 3'-single-stranded DNA tail for efficient unwinding of duplex DNA. Interestingly, HpUvrD was able to hydrolyze and utilize GTP for its helicase activity although not as effectively as ATP, which has not been reported to date for UvrD characterized from other organisms. HiUvrD and HpUvrD were found to exist predominantly as monomers in solution together with multimeric forms. Noticeably, deletion of distal C-terminal 48 amino acid residues disrupted the oligomerization of HiUvrD, whereas deletion of 63 amino acids from C-terminus of HpUvrD had no effect on its oligomerization. This study presents the characteristic features and comparative analysis of Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori UvrD, and constitutes the basis for understanding the role of UvrD in the biology and virulence of these pathogens. PMID:22500516

  13. Emergence of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae Strains among Elderly Patients but Not among Children▿

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Ohkoshi, Yasuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2008-01-01

    We screened 457 Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated in Japan during 2002 to 2004 and identified 12 fluoroquinolone-resistant strains (2.6%). The resistant strains were divided into three genotypes (eight, three, and one of each type). These were isolated from patients over 58 years of age. Several fluoroquinolone-resistant clones appeared to have invaded the population of elderly patients in a particular area, Sapporo city. PMID:17977993

  14. Comparative Analyses of the Lipooligosaccharides from Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus Show Differences in Sialic Acid and Phosphorylcholine Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Post, Deborah M. B.; Ketterer, Margaret R.; Coffin, Jeremy E.; Reinders, Lorri M.; Munson, Robert S.; Bair, Thomas; Murphy, Timothy F.; Foster, Eric D.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus haemolyticus and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are closely related upper airway commensal bacteria that are difficult to distinguish phenotypically. NTHi causes upper and lower airway tract infections in individuals with compromised airways, while H. haemolyticus rarely causes such infections. The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is an outer membrane component of both species and plays a role in NTHi pathogenesis. In this study, comparative analyses of the LOS structures and corresponding biosynthesis genes were performed. Mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that NTHi LOS contained terminal sialic acid more frequently and to a higher extent than H. haemolyticus LOS did. Genomic analyses of 10 strains demonstrated that H. haemolyticus lacked the sialyltransferase genes lic3A and lic3B (9/10) and siaA (10/10), but all strains contained the sialic acid uptake genes siaP and siaT (10/10). However, isothermal titration calorimetry analyses of SiaP from two H. haemolyticus strains showed a 3.4- to 7.3-fold lower affinity for sialic acid compared to that of NTHi SiaP. Additionally, mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that the LOS from H. haemolyticus contained phosphorylcholine (ChoP) less frequently than the LOS from NTHi strains. These differences observed in the levels of sialic acid and ChoP incorporation in the LOS structures from H. haemolyticus and NTHi may explain some of the differences in their propensities to cause disease. PMID:26729761

  15. The influence of protein binding on the antibacterial activity of faropenem against Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, I; Cars, O

    2004-10-01

    The effects of albumin and human serum on the pharmacodynamics of faropenem were studied. The protein binding of faropenem was 91-95%, corresponding to the increase in MICs for Haemophilus influenzae in broth supplemented with albumin. Time-kill experiments in albumin-containing medium and in inactivated human serum 50% v/v showed that much higher drug concentrations were needed to achieve a bactericidal effect than were needed in broth. Active human serum alone exerted a strain-dependent bactericidal effect. It was concluded that it is the free fraction of faropenem in serum that has antibacterial activity against H. influenzae. PMID:15373892

  16. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease in elderly nursing home residents: two related cases.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, T. C.; Hewitt, M. C.; Jalaludin, B.; Roberts, C.; Capon, A. G.; Jelfs, P.; Gilbert, G. L.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated two fatal cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infection in a community nursing home in western Sydney, Australia. Two elderly women had lived in the same room, and the onset of their illness was 5 days apart. Hib isolates from blood cultures showed identical profiles by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. These findings suggest that Hib infection was transmitted within this nursing home. Serious Hib disease may be underrecognized in this setting. Continued surveillance and serotyping of invasive H. influenzae disease is essential for identifying groups at increasing risk that may benefit from immunization against Hib. PMID:9204300

  17. Population genetics of Haemophilus influenzae serotype a in three Canadian provinces.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Raymond S W; Shuel, Michelle; Wylie, John; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Hoang, Linda; Law, Dennis K S

    2013-05-01

    Haemophilus influenzae serotype a (Hia) is an important pathogen since the introduction of vaccines for control of disease due to serotype b strains. Using a sodC-based polymerase chain reaction, Hia can be divided into 2 phylogenetic divisions, each with their own unique multilocus sequence types. Most Canadian Hia belongs to clonal division I and the ST-23 clonal complex. The recently described hypervirulent clone of ST-4 was found in a single Canadian isolate. Therefore, surveillance of invasive H. influenzae disease should include serotyping to detect Hia and multilocus sequence typing to detect hypervirulent clones. PMID:23647351

  18. Effect of Haemophilus influenzae infection and moxalactam on platelet function in children.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S L; Courtney, J T; Kenal, K A

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study, children with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis received moxalactam or ampicillin or chloramphenicol. Of 41 children, 6 had prolonged bleeding times (greater than 6 min), and 7 of 9 tested had abnormal platelet aggregation at hospital admission. At the end of therapy, no children in the ampicillin-chloramphenicol group, compared with 5 of 22 moxalactam-treated children (23%) (P = 0.08), had prolonged bleeding times (6.5 to 7.5 min). Our data suggest that H. influenzae meningitis and treatment with moxalactam may each have an effect on platelet function in children. PMID:3579263

  19. [A case of acute motor sensory axonal polyneuropathy after Haemophilus influenzae infection].

    PubMed

    Oda, M; Udaka, F; Kubori, T; Oka, N; Kameyama, M

    2000-08-01

    A 47-year-old woman developed consciousness disturbance, and experienced hallucinations while traveling abroad, and then went into critical condition. She was placed in the critical care unit, and had flaccid tetraparesis requiring mechanical ventilation. Haemophilus influenzae was cultured from the sputum. The level of protein of the cerebrospinal fluid was elevated to 114 mg/dl, nerve conduction study showed findings of pure axonal damage, and the sural nerve biopsy revealed severe axonal degeneration. She improved gradually by plasma exchange. The diagnosis of acute motor sensory axonal polyneuropathy (AMSAN) based on autoimmune mechanism was made. We speculate that H. influenzae infection may have elicited AMSAN in this case. PMID:11218707

  20. Adult-onset Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Type f Caused by Acute Lower Leg Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuko; Kakuta, Risako; Araki, Makoto; Sato, Taigo; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Taniuchi, Norihide

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination began in 2013. Thus, similar to other countries, a strain shift is expected in the near future. We experienced a case of H. influenzae type f (Hif) bacteremia in a 66-year-old man. The primary focus of the infection was the soft tissue of the left lower leg, which is an extremely rare origin in adults. Subsequently, we conducted multilocus sequence typing and identified the strain as sequence type 124, which is the most common invasive strain of Hif worldwide. This case may mark the beginning of an Hif strain shift in Japan. PMID:27374690

  1. In Vitro Activities of the Ketolide HMR 3647 against Recent Gram-Positive Clinical Isolates and Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Arthur L.; Fuchs, Peter C.; Brown, Steven D.

    1998-01-01

    The ketolide HMR 3647 (previously RU 66647) was evaluated against 2,563 recent clinical isolates of gram-positive pathogens and 200 Haemophilus influenzae isolates. HMR 3647 was active against macrolide-resistant streptococci, including pneumococci, but was not active against macrolide- or lincosamide-resistant staphylococci. Against H. influenzae, the potency of HMR 3647 was similar to that of azithromycin. PMID:9687424

  2. Cell vacuolation induced by Haemophilus influenzae supernatants in HEp-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Arteaga-Garibay, Ramón I; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae belongs to respiratory tract microbiota. We observed vacuoles formation in previous studies with H. influenzae culture supernatants, so in this work we characterised that cytotoxic effect. We observed an abundant production of acidic cytoplasmic vacuoles due to the presence of a “vacuolating factor” in H. influenzae supernatants which was characterised as thermolabile. Greatest vacuolating activity was observed when utilizing the fraction > 50 kDa. The presence of a large number of vacuoles in HEp-2 cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy and some vacuoles were identified with a double membrane and/or being surrounded by ribosomes. These results suggest similar behaviour to that of vacuolating effects described by autotransporter proteins an undescribed cytotoxic effect induced by H. influenzae . PMID:24402145

  3. Haemophilus haemolyticus Interaction with Host Cells Is Different to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Prevents NTHi Association with Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Janessa L.; Prosser, Amy; Corscadden, Karli J.; de Gier, Camilla; Richmond, Peter C.; Zhang, Guicheng; Thornton, Ruth B.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that resides in the upper respiratory tract and contributes to a significant burden of respiratory related diseases in children and adults. Haemophilus haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal that can be misidentified as NTHi due to high levels of genetic relatedness. There are reports of invasive disease from H. haemolyticus, which further blurs the species boundary with NTHi. To investigate differences in pathogenicity between these species, we optimized an in vitro epithelial cell model to compare the interaction of 10 H. haemolyticus strains with 4 NTHi and 4 H. influenzae-like haemophili. There was inter- and intra-species variability but overall, H. haemolyticus had reduced capacity to attach to and invade nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar epithelial cell lines (D562 and A549) within 3 h when compared with NTHi. H. haemolyticus was cytotoxic to both cell lines at 24 h, whereas NTHi was not. Nasopharyngeal epithelium challenged with some H. haemolyticus strains released high levels of inflammatory mediators IL-6 and IL-8, whereas NTHi did not elicit an inflammatory response despite higher levels of cell association and invasion. Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with H. haemolyticus or NTHi released similar and high levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNFα when compared with unstimulated cells but only NTHi elicited an IFNγ response. Due to the relatedness of H. haemolyticus and NTHi, we hypothesized that H. haemolyticus may compete with NTHi for colonization of the respiratory tract. We observed that in vitro pre-treatment of epithelial cells with H. haemolyticus significantly reduced NTHi attachment, suggesting interference or competition between the two species is possible and warrants further investigation. In conclusion, H. haemolyticus interacts differently with host cells compared to NTHi, with different immunostimulatory and cytotoxic

  4. Characterization of nasopharyngeal isolates of type b Haemophilus influenzae from Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Kandarpa K.; Das, Bimal K.; Bewal, Ramesh K.; Kapil, Arti; Arora, N.K.; Sood, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of mortality and morbidity among young children in developing countries. Increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance especially production of extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) has made treatment and management of H. influenzae infection more difficult. Nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates are excellent surrogate for determination of antibiotic resistance prevalent among invasive H. influenzae isolates. In this study, we characterized nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates obtained from healthy school going children in Delhi. Methods: Nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates were collected from healthy school going children and subjected to serotyping, fimbrial typing and antibiogram profiling. ESBL production was recorded using phenotypic as well as molecular methods. Multi locus sequence typing (MLST) of 13 representative nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates was performed as per guidelines. Results: A significant proportion (26 of 80, 32.5%) of nasopharyngeal isolates of H. influenzae were identified as serotype b. Fimbrial gene (hifA) was detected in 23 (28.75%) isolates. Resistance against commonly prescribed antibiotics (Amp, Tet, Chloro, Septran, Cephalexin) were observed to be high among the nasopharyngeal commensal H. influenzae. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production was observed in a five (6.25%) isolates by both double disk diffusion and molecular typing. MLST identified several novel alleles as well as novel sequence types. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed high resistance against common antibiotics and detection of ESBL in nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates collected from normal healthy school going children in Delhi. Detection of H. influenzae type b capsular gene and the presence of fimbrial gene (hif A) suggest virulence potential of these isolates. Discovery of novel alleles and presence of new sequence types (STs) among nasopharyngeal H

  5. Detection of cryptic genospecies misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in routine clinical samples by assessment of marker genes fucK, hap, and sodC.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2009-08-01

    Clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were assessed for the presence of fucK, hap, and sodC by hybridization with gene-specific probes, and isolates diverging from the expected H. influenzae genotype were characterized by phenotype and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Two of 480 isolates were finally classified as variant strains ("nonhemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus"). PMID:19535530

  6. Impact of conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine introduction in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    von Gottberg, A.; de Gouveia, L.; Madhi, S. A.; du Plessis, M.; Quan, V.; Soma, K.; Huebner, R.; Flannery, B.; Schuchat, A.; Klugman, Kp

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse trends in reported invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in South Africa within the first five years of introduction of conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in the routine child immunization schedule. METHODS: We used national laboratory-based surveillance data to identify cases of invasive H. influenzae disease between July 1999 and June 2004, and submitted isolates for serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. FINDINGS: The absolute number of Hib cases (reported to the national surveillance system) among children below one year of age decreased by 65%, from 55 cases in 1999-2000 to 19 cases in 2003-04. Enhanced surveillance initiated in 2003, identified human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection and incomplete vaccination as contributing factors for Hib transmission. The total number of laboratory-confirmed cases of H. influenzae remained unchanged because non-type b disease was being increasingly reported to the surveillance system concomitant with system enhancements. Children with non-typable disease were more likely to be HIV-positive (32 of 34, 94%) than children with Hib disease (10 of 14, 71%), P = 0.051. Recent Hib isolates were more likely to be multidrug resistant (2% in 1999-2000 versus 19% in 2003-04, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Data from a newly established national laboratory-based surveillance system showed a decrease in Hib disease burden among South African children following conjugate vaccine introduction and identified cases of non-typable disease associated with HIV infection. PMID:17128361

  7. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multimedia Related Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis Diagnosis, Treatment, and Complications Recommend on ... the bacteria. For example, if H. influenzae cause meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain and ...

  8. Immunology of the infant rat experimental model of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Myerowitz, R L; Norden, C W

    1977-01-01

    The age-related acquisition of serum anticapsular and bactericidal antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type b observed in rats was similar to that of humans. The antigenic source for this "natural" immunity was not identified since neither pharyngeal infection with H. influenzae b nor enteric colonization by cross-reacting bacteria was detected. Infant rats surviving H. influenzae b bacteremia failed to respond immunologically to the capsular polysaccharide. However, surviving rats demonstrated no impairment of immune responsiveness to this antigen after subsequent immunization with live bacteria in adulthood. In passive protection experiments, antibodies directed against the type b capsular polysaccharide represented the major protective specificity. However, a small protective effect of antibodies to noncapsular antigens also appeared to have been demonstrated. PMID:301506

  9. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001). PMID:27335148

  10. Photodynamic Action on Native and Denatured Transforming Deoxyribonucleic Acid from Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    León, Manuel Ponce-De; Cabrera-Juárez, Emiliano

    1970-01-01

    The photodynamic inactivation of native or denatured transforming deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Haemophilus influenzae is described. The inactivation at the same pH was higher for denatured than native DNA. At acidic pH, the inactivation both for native and denatured DNA was faster than at alkaline pH. The guanine content of photoinactivated native DNA at neutral pH was less than untreated DNA. The inactivation of biological activity was more extensive than the alteration of guanine. The absorption spectrum of photoinactivated native or denatured DNA was only slightly different than the control DNA at the different experimental conditions. PMID:5309576

  11. Transcription of genes encoding iron and heme acquisition proteins of Haemophilus influenzae during acute otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Whitby, P W; Sim, K E; Morton, D J; Patel, J A; Stull, T L

    1997-01-01

    Unencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae is the second most common etiologic agent of otitis media in children. H. influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth in vitro and is able to utilize hemoglobin and complexes of heme-hemopexin, heme-albumin, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin and ferritransferrin as sources of iron and heme in vitro. Several of the acquisition mechanisms have been characterized and been shown to be heme repressible in vitro. However, little is known about the expression of heme and/or iron acquisition mechanisms during infections in the middle ear. This study was performed to determine if the genes encoding heme and iron acquisition proteins are transcribed during in vivo growth and to compare these findings with those for samples grown in vitro. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze total RNA fractions derived from in vitro- and in vivo-grown H. influenzae. Genes encoding the transferrin-binding proteins TbpA and TbpB, the 100-kDa hemopexin-binding protein HxuA, and the hemoglobin-binding protein HgpA were transcribed during otitis media. Twelve middle ear fluid samples were analyzed by blind RT-PCR to determine the transcriptional status of these genes in H. influenzae during otitis media. Five isolates had transcripts corresponding to tbpA, tbpB, and hxuA. The presence of hgpA transcripts was variable, depending on the presence of hgpA in the genome of the H. influenzae isolate. Samples without H. influenzae gene transcripts contained other etiologic agents commonly causing otitis media. These data demonstrate that H. influenzae iron and/or heme acquisition genes are transcribed during otitis media and suggest that the microenvironment during acute otitis media starves H. influenzae of heme. PMID:9353052

  12. Lower airway colonization and inflammatory response in COPD: a focus on Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Finney, Lydia J; Ritchie, Andrew; Pollard, Elizabeth; Johnston, Sebastian L; Mallia, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is common both in stable patients and during acute exacerbations. The most frequent bacteria detected in COPD patients is Haemophilus influenzae, and it appears this organism is uniquely adapted to exploit immune deficiencies associated with COPD and to establish persistent infection in the lower respiratory tract. The presence of bacteria in the lower respiratory tract in stable COPD is termed colonization; however, there is increasing evidence that this is not an innocuous phenomenon but is associated with airway inflammation, increased symptoms, and increased risk for exacerbations. In this review, we discuss host immunity that offers protection against H. influenzae and how disturbance of these mechanisms, combined with pathogen mechanisms of immune evasion, promote persistence of H. influenzae in the lower airways in COPD. In addition, we examine the role of H. influenzae in COPD exacerbations, as well as interactions between H. influenzae and respiratory virus infections, and review the role of treatments and their effect on COPD outcomes. This review focuses predominantly on data derived from human studies but will refer to animal studies where they contribute to understanding the disease in humans. PMID:25342897

  13. Dynamics of Clarithromycin and Azithromycin Efficacies against Experimental Haemophilus influenzae Pulmonary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alder, J. D.; Ewing, P. J.; Nilius, A. M.; Mitten, M.; Tovcimak, A.; Oleksijew, A.; Jarvis, K.; Paige, L.; Tanaka, S. K. T.

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of clarithromycin and azithromycin efficacy against pulmonary Haemophilus influenzae infection in rats were evaluated. Efficacy was measured by reduction in pulmonary H. influenzae burden on days 3 and 7 postinoculation. Clarithromycin therapy was effective on day 3 or 7 of therapy, while azithromycin was effective on day 7 but not on day 3 of therapy. Both macrolides produced marked efficacy against all six strains of H. influenzae tested, including four strains for which MICs were above the susceptible breakpoint (8 μg/ml) concentration of clarithromycin. The two macrolides demonstrated markedly different pharmacokinetic characteristics, with clarithromycin present in both blood and tissue, while azithromycin was concentrated primarily in tissue. During pulmonary infection in rats, H. influenzae was found in both intracellular locations and an extracellular location in the lung. Blood concentrations of clarithromycin and azithromycin approximated human pharmacokinetics, and the blood concentrations for either macrolide rarely exceeded MICs for H. influenzae. At dosages producing blood concentrations similar to values achieved clinically, clarithromycin produced efficacy on day 3 of therapy, while both clarithromycin and azithromycin were equally effective on day 7. The different dynamics of clarithromycin and azithromycin suggest that length of therapy should be considered as a key parameter in evaluations of drug efficacy. PMID:9736568

  14. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection. PMID:26153407

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae to ampicillin-sulbactam.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, J E; LaRocco, M; Himes, S L; Inderlied, C; Daly, J A; Campos, J M; Mendelman, P M

    1990-01-01

    A total of 1092 clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae (306 type b; 786 non-type-b), from five medical centers were obtained during 1987 and 1988. Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibilities were obtained for all isolates, and broth microdilution susceptibilities were obtained for 502 isolates. Beta-lactamase was produced by 34.3% of type-b and 22.1% of non-type-b isolates, with some geographic variations. Using disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing, all isolates were susceptible to ampicillin-sulbactam, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, and rifampin; two isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol. Whether tested using a fixed ratio of ampicillin to sulbactam of 2:1 or a fixed concentration of sulbactam, the ampicillin-sulbactam combination demonstrated good activity against clinical isolates of H. influenzae. Only 8 of the 1092 isolates did not produce beta-lactamase but demonstrated MICs of greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml for ampicillin. PMID:2076596

  16. Ribotyping, biotyping and capsular typing of Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from patients in Campinas, southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Marcelo; Pace, Fernanda de; Stehling, Eliana Guedes; Villares, Maria Cecília Barisson; Brocchi, Marcelo; Silveira, Wanderley Dias da

    2008-10-01

    Forty-five Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from patients were characterized based on biochemical characteristics. Their capsular types were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); they were compared, using two molecular methods [ribotyping with a specific DNA probe amplified from the 16S rDNA region from H. influenzae and through restriction fragment length polymorphism (RLFP) of an amplified 16S DNA region]. The strains were better discriminated by the ribotyping technique that used the 16S probe and by the combination of both techniques. Biotypes I and IV were the most common, followed by biotypes VI, VIII and III. Biotypes II and VII were not found. Most of the capsular samples were nontypable (89%), with capsular types a and b found in 2 and 9% of the samples, respectively. We concluded that there is a very close genetic identity among pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. PMID:19219284

  17. Connection between Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Use and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kärpänoja, Pauliina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Bergman, Miika; Voipio, Tinna; Paakkari, Pirkko; Huovinen, Pentti; Sarkkinen, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    The association between trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among the major respiratory tract pathogens was investigated by comparing regional consumption of the drug to regional resistance in the following year in 21 central hospital districts in Finland. A total of 23,530 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, 28,320 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 14,138 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates were tested for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole susceptibility during the study period (1998-2004). Among the S. pneumoniae isolates, a statistically significant connection was found between regional consumption and resistance. No statistically significant connection was found between regional trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates. According to our results, it seems that only in pneumococci can the development of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance be influenced by restricting its use. However, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains an important antimicrobial agent because of its reasonable price. Hence, resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole among these pathogens needs continuous monitoring. PMID:18443116

  18. Haemophilus influenzae vaccine candidate outer membrane protein P6 is not conserved in all strains

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Arthur; Kaur, Ravinder; Michel, Lea Vacca; Casey, Janet R

    2011-01-01

    An outer membrane protein (OMP) of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), P6, is a vaccine candidate because it has been characterized as conserved among all H. influenzae strains. Among 151 isolates from children, age 6 to 30 months, evaluating NTHi nasopharyngeal (NP) and oropharyngeal (OP) colonization and tympanocentesis confirmed acute otitis media we identified 14 strains (9.3%) that had variant protein sequences of P6. One atypical omp P6 isolate had sequence mutations in the binding site of a proposed major antigenic epitope of omp P6 identified by monoclonal antibody 7F3. Eight strains (5.3%) had non-homologous variations in amino acids that could result in significant changes to the protein structure of P6, and 5 other strains had amino acid substitutions at four previously described key residue sites. These results show that NTHi omp P6 is not invariant in its structure among respiratory isolates from children. PMID:21285530

  19. Antibiotic sensitivity of Haemophilus influenzae strains including three recent chloramphenicol-resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Zackrisson, G; Brorson, J E

    1980-08-01

    The antibiotic sensitivity of 100 recent isolates of Haemophilus influenzae was determined. Three strains were resistant to chloramphenicol with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 16 microgram/ml. Of these three resistant strains, one produced betalactamase and one was resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. The remaining strains were inhibited by 0.25-2.0 microgram/ml of chloramphenicol. Ampicillin and benzylpenicillin were found to inhibit all but the betalactamase-producing strains at low concentrations. Regarding sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim 96% had minimal inhibitory concentrations of 2.5-0.12 microgram/ml or less, while two strains were resistant. The invitro efficacy of erythromycin against H. influenzae was low. The majority of the strains was inhibited by low concentrations of doxycycline and cefuroxime while cefoxitin exhibited minimal inhibitory concentrations values usually exceeding 1 microgram/ml. The minimal inhibitory concentrations registered are compared to the concentrations of the different antibiotics attainable in certain body fluids. PMID:6968146

  20. [Haemophilus influenzae type b in Italy--after thirty years of vaccination may we lower our guard?].

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Elisa; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib) is responsible for meningitis, systemic infections and acute respiratory illness, especially in children. The use of the conjugate vaccines against Hib reduced the incidence of the disease worldwide. In Italy, after the decrease resulted from vaccination, the disease may reappear due to the reduction in vaccination coverage, the presence of infections in adults and vaccine failures. PMID:26722830

  1. Identification of a group of Haemophilus influenzae penicillin-binding proteins that may have complementary physiological roles

    SciTech Connect

    Malouin, F.; Parr, T.R. Jr.; Bryan, L.E. )

    1990-02-01

    (35S)penicillin bound to different Haemophilus influenzae proteins in assays performed at 20, 37, or 42{degrees}C. Penicillin-binding proteins 3a, 3b, 4, and 4' formed a group characterized by their affinity for moxalactam, cefotaxime, and piperacillin. Penicillin-binding protein 4' showed specific properties that may reflect its complementary role in septation.

  2. Protein D of Haemophilus influenzae is not a universal immunoglobulin D-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, K; Munson, R S

    1993-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b and nontypeable H. influenzae have been reported to bind human immunoglobulin D (IgD). IgD myeloma sera from five patients were tested for the ability of IgD to bind to H. influenzae. Serotype b strains bound human IgD in four of the five sera tested. IgD in the fifth serum bound strongly to type b strain MinnA but poorly to other type b strains. Additionally, IgD binding was not observed when nontypeable strains were tested. The gene for protein D, the putative IgD-binding protein, was cloned from the IgD-binding H. influenzae type b strain MinnA and expressed in Escherichia coli. IgD binding to E. coli expressing protein D was not demonstrable. Recombinant protein D was purified, and antisera were generated in rabbits. Using these rabbit sera, we detected protein D in nontypeable as well as serotype b strains by Western blotting (immunoblotting). In contrast, IgD myeloma protein 4490, which was previously reported to bind to protein D by Ruan and coworkers (M. Ruan, M. Akkoyunlu, A. Grubb, and A. Forsgren, J. Immunol. 145:3379-3384), bound strongly to both type b and nontypeable H. influenzae as well as to E. coli expressing protein D. Thus, IgD binding is a general property of H. influenzae type b strains but not a general property of nontypeable strains, although both type b and nontypeable strains produce protein D. With the exception of IgD myeloma protein 4490 binding, we have no evidence for a role of protein D in IgD binding to H. influenzae. Images PMID:8514409

  3. “BLACK LIGHT” INACTIVATION OF TRANSFORMING DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID FROM HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Juárez, Emiliano

    1964-01-01

    Cabrera-Juárez, Emiliano (Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F., Mexico). “Black light” inactivation of transforming deoxyribonucleic acid from Haemophilus influenzae. J. Bacteriol. 87:771–778. 1964.—The biological activity (intrinsic genetic markers or nitrous acid mutable regions) of transforming deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Haemophilus influenzae has been inactivated by “black light” (BL) by two mechanisms: (i) photodynamic action (oxygen-dependent) and (ii) “BL inactivation” (oxygen-independent). The BL inactivation is greater in denatured than in native DNA, and it is dependent on the pH. It does not depend on the temperature, and the damage produced is stable. The effective wavelength of inactivation is between 330 and 360 mμ. The BL inactivation is not reactivated by photoreactivating enzyme or nitrous acid. The BL and ultraviolet inactivations are additive, suggesting that the changes produced by BL and ultraviolet irradiation on transforming DNA are different. T2 phage was also inactivated by BL. The nature of the photochemical changes produced in DNA by BL is not known. PMID:14139527

  4. The Lung Immune Response to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (Lung Immunity to NTHi)

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul T.; Sharma, Roleen

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is divided into typeable or nontypeable strains based on the presence or absence of a polysaccharide capsule. The typeable strains (such as type b) are an important cause of systemic infection, whilst the nontypeable strains (designated as NTHi) are predominantly respiratory mucosal pathogens. NTHi is present as part of the normal microbiome in the nasopharynx, from where it may spread down to the lower respiratory tract. In this context it is no longer a commensal and becomes an important respiratory pathogen associated with a range of common conditions including bronchitis, bronchiectasis, pneumonia, and particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. NTHi induces a strong inflammatory response in the respiratory tract with activation of immune responses, which often fail to clear the bacteria from the lung. This results in recurrent/persistent infection and chronic inflammation with consequent lung pathology. This review will summarise the current literature about the lung immune response to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, a topic that has important implications for patient management. PMID:26114124

  5. Variable number of tandem repeats in clinical strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A; Scherer, S; van Leeuwen, W; Willemse, D; van Alphen, L; Verbrugh, H

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm capable of identifying short repeat motifs was developed and used to screen the whole genome sequence available for Haemophilus influenzae, since some of these repeats have been shown to affect bacterial virulence. Various di- to hexanucleotide repeats were identified, confirming and extending previous findings on the existence of variable-number-of-tandem-repeat loci (VNTRs). Repeats with units of 7 or 8 nucleotides were not encountered. For all of the 3- to 6-nucleotide repeats in the H. influenzae chromosome, PCR tests capable of detecting allelic polymorphisms were designed. Fourteen of 18 of the potential VNTRs were indeed highly polymorphic when different strains were screened. Two of the potential VNTRs appeared to be short and homogeneous in length; another one may be specific for the H. influenzae Rd strain only. One of the primer sets generated fingerprint-type DNA banding patterns. The various repeat types differed with respect to intrinsic stability as well. It was noted for separate colonies derived from a single clinical specimen or strains passaged for several weeks on chocolate agar plates that the lengths of the VNTRs did not change. When several strains from different patients infected during an outbreak of lung disease were analyzed, increased but limited variation was encountered in all VNTR sites analyzed. One of the 5-nucleotide VNTRs proved to be hypervariable. This variability may reflect the molecular basis of a mechanism used by H. influenzae bacteria to successfully colonize and infect different human individuals. PMID:9393791

  6. Haemophilus influenzae pili are composite structures assembled via the HifB chaperone.

    PubMed Central

    St Geme, J W; Pinkner, J S; Krasan, G P; Heuser, J; Bullitt, E; Smith, A L; Hultgren, S J

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative bacterium that represents a common cause of human disease. Disease due to this organism begins with colonization of the upper respiratory mucosa, a process facilitated by adhesive fibers called pili. In the present study, we investigated the structure and assembly of H. influenzae pili. Examination of pili by electron microscopy using quick-freeze, deep-etch and immunogold techniques revealed the presence of two distinct subassemblies, including a flexible two-stranded helical rod comprised of HifA and a short, thin, distal tip structure containing HifD. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrated that the biogenesis of H. influenzae pili is dependent on a periplasmic chaperone called HifB, which belongs to the PapD family of immunoglobulin-like chaperones. HifB bound directly to HifA and HifD, forming HifB-HifA and HifB-HifD complexes, which were purified from periplasmic extracts by ion-exchange chromatography. Continued investigation of the biogenesis of H. influenzae pili should provide general insights into organelle development and may suggest novel strategies for disease prevention. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8876237

  7. Induction of Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular antibody in neonatal rabbits by gastrointestinal colonization with cross-reacting Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Myerowitz, R L; Handzel, Z T; Scheerson, R; Robbins, J B

    1973-02-01

    In two separate experiments, newborn rabbits were fed a live suspension of either of two Escherichia coli strains which possess a "K" antigen cross-reactive with the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b. Both feedings were harmless and resulted in fecal excretion of the fed E. coli in most animals as well as active immunization of fed animals toward H. influenzae type b. Feeding non-enteropathogenic, cross-reacting E coli to newborns may be a method for inducing active immunity toward H. influenzae type b diseases by accelerating the acquisition of "natural" immunity. PMID:4572607

  8. Molecular Surveillance of True Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: An Evaluation of PCR Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Michael J.; Temple, Beth; Kirkham, Lea-Ann; Wiertsema, Selma P.; Dunne, Eileen M.; Richmond, Peter C.; Marsh, Robyn L.; Leach, Amanda J.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Unambiguous identification of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is not possible by conventional microbiology. Molecular characterisation of phenotypically defined NTHi isolates suggests that up to 40% are Haemophilus haemolyticus (Hh); however, the genetic similarity of NTHi and Hh limits the power of simple molecular techniques such as PCR for species discrimination. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we assess the ability of previously published and novel PCR-based assays to identify true NTHi. Sixty phenotypic NTHi isolates, classified by a dual 16S rRNA gene PCR algorithm as NTHi (n = 22), Hh (n = 27) or equivocal (n = 11), were further characterised by sequencing of the 16S rRNA and recA genes then interrogated by PCR-based assays targeting the omp P2, omp P6, lgtC, hpd, 16S rRNA, fucK and iga genes. The sequencing data and PCR results were used to define NTHi for this study. Two hpd real time PCR assays (hpd#1 and hpd#3) and the conventional iga PCR assay were equally efficient at differentiating study-defined NTHi from Hh, each with a receiver operator characteristic curve area of 0.90 [0.83; 0.98]. The hpd#1 and hpd#3 assays were completely specific against a panel of common respiratory bacteria, unlike the iga PCR, and the hpd#3 assay was able to detect below 10 copies per reaction. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest an evolutionary continuum between NTHi and Hh and therefore no single gene target could completely differentiate NTHi from Hh. The hpd#3 real time PCR assay proved to be the superior method for discrimination of NTHi from closely related Haemophilus species with the added potential for quantification of H. influenzae directly from specimens. We suggest the hpd#3 assay would be suitable for routine NTHi surveillance and to assess the impact of antibiotics and vaccines, on H. influenzae carriage rates, carriage density, and disease. PMID:22470516

  9. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae Serotypes by Standard Slide Agglutination Serotyping and PCR-Based Capsule Typing

    PubMed Central

    LaClaire, Leslye L.; Tondella, Maria Lucia C.; Beall, David S.; Noble, Corie A.; Raghunathan, Pratima L.; Rosenstein, Nancy E.; Popovic, Tanja

    2003-01-01

    To resolve discrepancies in slide agglutination serotyping (SAST) results from state health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we characterized 141 of 751 invasive Haemophilus influenzae isolates that were identified in the United States from January 1998 to December 1999 through an active, laboratory-based, surveillance program coordinated by the CDC. We found discrepancies between the results of SAST performed at state health departments and those of PCR capsule typing performed at the CDC for 56 (40%) of the isolates characterized: 54 isolates that were identified as a particular serotype by SAST were shown to be unencapsulated by PCR, and two isolates that were reported as serotypes b and f were found to be serotypes f and e, respectively, by PCR. The laboratory error most likely to affect the perceived efficacy of the conjugate H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine was the misidentification of isolates as serotype b: of 40 isolates identified as serotype b by SAST, 27 (68%) did not contain the correlating capsule type genes. The frequency of errors fell substantially when standardized reagents and routine quality control of SAST were used during a study involving three laboratories. An overall 94% agreement between SAST and PCR results showed that slide agglutination could be a valid and reliable method for serotyping H. influenzae if the test was performed correctly, in accordance with standardized and recommended procedures. An ongoing prospective analysis of all H. influenzae surveillance isolates associated with invasive disease in children less than 5 years old will provide more accurate national figures for the burden of invasive disease caused by Hib and other H. influenzae serotypes. PMID:12517878

  10. [Relationship between protein binding and antimicrobial activities of antibiotics against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    Fifty isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 42 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were isolated from the blood of children admitted to pediatric wards of hospitals in subprefucture between January 1998 and December 2005. The susceptibilities were measured by a microbroth dilution method using a standard broth and a broth containing 4.5% albumin. Against S. pneumoniae, penicillin G, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, meropenem, vancomycin, cefditoren, cefcapene, cefteram, faropenem and tebipenem were used and against H. influenzae, ampicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, meropenem, clavulanic acid/ amoxicillin, cefditoren, cefcapene, cefteram, faropenem and tebipenem were used. Against S. pneumoniae, tebipenem was the highest antimicrobial activity in oral antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.06 microg/ml) and panipenem showed the highest activity for intravenous antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.12 microg/ml). Against H. influenzae, cefditoren was the highest activity for oral antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.06 microg/ml) and meropenem showed the highest activity for intravenous antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 50.06 microg/ml). The MIC90s measured by albumin containing broth were higher than those measured by standard broth. Protein binding rates of ceftriaxone, cefditoren, and faropenem were greater than 90%, and the MIC90 of these antibiotics measured by albumin addition methods were over 4-fold higher than those measured by standard methods. PMID:17180806

  11. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Serotype f Case Reports in Mazovia Province, Poland.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Anna; Kuch, Alicja; Gawrońska, Agnieszka; Albrecht, Piotr; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kutylowska, Ewa; Feleszko, Wojciech

    2016-02-01

    After successful introduction of anti-Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) serotype b vaccination program in Poland, invasive non-b or nontypeable H. influenzae infections have been reported more frequently alike in other countries all over the world. In this paper, we report 2 cases of H. influenzae serotype f (Hif) meningitis with severe clinical presentations which are rarely seen in previously healthy children.The first case is a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to pediatric ward with signs of meningitis. Laboratory tests confirmed bacteremic meningitis caused by Hif. The girl responded very well to administered treatment and recovered without any further complications. No underlying comorbidities were found. The second patient was a 4-year-old boy who, in course of Hif bacteremic meningitis, developed rapid septicemia and, despite aggressive treatment, died within a few hours of hospitalization. The child's past history was unremarkable.By presenting these cases, we would like to remind clinicians that invasive non-b Hi infections can become fatal not only in the group of the youngest children or children with coexisting comorbidities, as most commonly reported in the worldwide literature. At the same time, we want to emphasize the legitimacy of constant monitoring Hi epidemiology in order to take accurate actions if necessary. PMID:26844500

  12. Localization of high-molecular-weight adhesion proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Bakaletz, L O; Barenkamp, S J

    1994-01-01

    A family of high-molecular-weight (HMW) surface-exposed proteins important in the attachment of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) to human epithelial cells was previously identified (J. W. St. Geme III, S. Falkow, and S. J. Barenkamp, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:2875-2879, 1993). In the present investigation, indirect immunogold labeling and electron microscopy were used to localize these proteins on three clinical isolates of NTHi, mutants deficient in expression of one or both HMW proteins, and embedded sections of human oropharyngeal cells after incubation with NTHi strain 12. The filamentous material comprising the proteins was labeled with monoclonal antibodies directed against two prototype HMW proteins (HMW1 and HMW2) of prototype NTHi strain 12. Gold labeling was observed as a cap or discrete aggregate off one pole or centrally along one long axis of the bacterial cell. Heavily labeled, non-bacterial-cell-associated, disk-like aggregates of the HMW proteins were frequently noted in both bacterial preparations as well as in association with the oropharyngeal cell surface and intracellularly. Mutants demonstrated diminished labeling or an absence thereof, respectively, which correlated well with their previously demonstrated reduced ability or inability to adhere to Chang conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro. The Haemophilus HMW proteins share antigenic determinants with and demonstrate amino acid sequence similarity to the filamentous hemagglutinin protein of Bordetella pertussis, a critical adhesin of that organism. The studies presented here demonstrate that the Haemophilus proteins and B. pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin show impressive morphologic and perhaps additional functional similarity. Images PMID:7927710

  13. Developing a vaccine to prevent otitis media caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nadeem; Ren, Dabin; Kaur, Ravinder; Basha, Saleem; Zagursky, Robert; Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a predominant organism of the upper respiratory nasopharyngeal microbiota. Its disease spectrum includes otitis media, sinusitis, non-bacteremic pneumonia and invasive infections. Protein-based vaccines to prevent NTHi infections are needed to alleviate these infections in children and vulnerable populations such as the elderly and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One NTHi protein is included in a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and has been shown to provide efficacy. Our lab has been interested in understanding the immunogenicity of NTHi vaccine candidates P6, protein D and OMP26 for preventing acute otitis media in young children. We expect that continued investigation and progress in the development of an efficacious protein based vaccine against NTHi infections is achievable in the near future. PMID:26894630

  14. [Haemophilus influenzae b: a review on the determinants of pathogenicity and immune response to the infection].

    PubMed

    Gómez de León, P; Cabrera-Contreras, R; Cravioto, A

    1991-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is still one of the main causes of diverse invasive diseases in children in México. Epidemiologic data indicate that these processes affect primarily the central nervous system and the respiratory tract. Several factors are involved in the expression of infectious disease by this organism, among them the pathogenic determinants of the parasite and those related with resistance in the host. Occurrence of disease is usually the result of the interaction between these determinants. Knowledge of these pathogenic determinants of the parasite and of factors involved in the immune response of the host have allowed an understanding of the infectious process and have directed research in a least three areas: 1) identification of bacterial membrane fractions related with diagnosis of the disease, 2) screening for immunogenic components in the bacterias as vaccine candidates to be used in the prevention of the disease and, 3) the planning of appropriate alternatives for specific antimicrobial therapy. PMID:1948428

  15. Serological grouping of meningococci and encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae strains by latex agglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Leinonen, M; Sivonen, A

    1979-01-01

    The latex agglutination method, utilizing antibody-coated latex particles, was adapted for serogrouping of Neisseria meningitidis and serotyping of encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae strains from agar plates. It was found to give more clear-cut results than conventional slide agglutination. A 100% agreement with the antiserum agar method was found for all strains isolated from blood or cerebrospinal fluid. Many meningococcal strains from nasopharyngeal carriers are autoagglutinable, but some of these gave a positive reaction with the group B latex reagent, although they were negative by the antiserum agar method. The latex agglutination method has several advantages over others: the lack of autoagglutination, easy performance, easy interpretation, and very low consumption of antisera. PMID:118981

  16. Expression and Purification of Haemophilus influenzae Rhomboid Intramembrane Protease GlpG for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Pankaj; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Rhomboid proteases are membrane-embedded proteases that cleave peptide bonds of transmembrane proteins. They play a variety of roles in cell signaling events. The rhomboid protease GlpG from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlpG) is a canonical form of rhomboid protease having six transmembrane segments. In this unit, detailed protocols are presented for optimization of hiGlpG expression using the araBAD promotor system in the pBAD vector. The parameters for optimization include concentration of inducing agent, induction temperature, and time. Optimization of these key factors led to the development of a protocol yielding 1.6 to 2.5 mg/liter protein purified after ion metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further purification can include size exclusion chromatography (SEC). PMID:24692018

  17. Maturation of molybdoenzymes and its influence on the pathogenesis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Dhouib, Rabeb; Pg Othman, Dk S. M.; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Hansbro, Phil M.; Hanson, Jeffrey O.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kappler, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum enzymes of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family occur exclusively in prokaryotes, and a loss of some these enzymes has been linked to a loss of bacterial virulence in several cases. The MobA protein catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of the molybdenum guanine dinucleotide (MGD) cofactor that is exclusive to enzymes of the DMSO reductase family. MobA has been proposed as a potential target for control of virulence since its inhibition would affect the activities of all molybdoenzymes dependent upon MGD. Here, we have studied the phenotype of a mobA mutant of the host-adapted human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. H. influenzae causes and contributes to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the respiratory tract, and several enzymes of the DMSO reductase family are conserved and highly expressed in this bacterium. The mobA mutation caused a significant decrease in the activities of all Mo-enzymes present, and also resulted in a small defect in anaerobic growth. However, we did not detect a defect in in vitro biofilm formation nor in invasion and adherence to human epithelial cells in tissue culture compared to the wild-type. In a murine in vivo model, the mobA mutant showed only a mild attenuation compared to the wild-type. In summary, our data show that MobA is essential for the activities of molybdenum enzymes, but does not appear to affect the fitness of H. influenzae. These results suggest that MobA is unlikely to be a useful target for antimicrobials, at least for the purpose of treating H. influenzae infections. PMID:26594204

  18. Maturation of molybdoenzymes and its influence on the pathogenesis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Dhouib, Rabeb; Pg Othman, Dk S M; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Hansbro, Phil M; Hanson, Jeffrey O; McEwan, Alastair G; Kappler, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum enzymes of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family occur exclusively in prokaryotes, and a loss of some these enzymes has been linked to a loss of bacterial virulence in several cases. The MobA protein catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of the molybdenum guanine dinucleotide (MGD) cofactor that is exclusive to enzymes of the DMSO reductase family. MobA has been proposed as a potential target for control of virulence since its inhibition would affect the activities of all molybdoenzymes dependent upon MGD. Here, we have studied the phenotype of a mobA mutant of the host-adapted human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. H. influenzae causes and contributes to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the respiratory tract, and several enzymes of the DMSO reductase family are conserved and highly expressed in this bacterium. The mobA mutation caused a significant decrease in the activities of all Mo-enzymes present, and also resulted in a small defect in anaerobic growth. However, we did not detect a defect in in vitro biofilm formation nor in invasion and adherence to human epithelial cells in tissue culture compared to the wild-type. In a murine in vivo model, the mobA mutant showed only a mild attenuation compared to the wild-type. In summary, our data show that MobA is essential for the activities of molybdenum enzymes, but does not appear to affect the fitness of H. influenzae. These results suggest that MobA is unlikely to be a useful target for antimicrobials, at least for the purpose of treating H. influenzae infections. PMID:26594204

  19. Expression of the Haemophilus influenzae transferrin receptor is repressible by hemin but not elemental iron alone.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, D J; Musser, J M; Stull, T L

    1993-01-01

    The absolute requirement for elemental iron and the porphyrin nucleus for growth of Haemophilus influenzae led us to investigate the role of iron and hemin in regulation of expression of the H. influenzae transferrin receptor. H. influenzae type b strain H1689 was grown in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with beta-NAD and either 10 or 0.1 microgram of hemin ml-1. Transferrin-binding ability was determined with a dot blot assay using human transferrin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate. Cells grown in media with 0.1 microgram of hemin ml-1 bound transferrin, but organisms grown in media with 10 micrograms ml-1 did not. In hemin-restricted media, transferrin binding occurred despite addition of up to 10 mM ferric nitrate, ferric citrate, or ferric PPi, whereas addition of 10 micrograms of hemoglobin ml-1 repressed expression. The breadth of species distribution of this mode of regulation was determined with strains previously characterized by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. When grown in hemin-restricted media, 24 of 28 type b strains and 52 of 57 serologically nontypeable strains exhibited transferrin binding, although none did so in hemin- and iron-sufficient media. Strain H1689 and serologically nontypeable strain HI1423 grown in heat-inactivated pooled normal human serum, human cerebrospinal fluid, or human breast milk exhibited transferrin binding. Growth in these fluids with 10 micrograms of added hemin ml-1 abolished transferrin binding, whereas addition of 10 mM ferric nitrate did not. These data suggest that the transferrin receptor of H. influenzae is regulated by levels of hemin but not elemental iron alone and that this property is widely distributed among several major cloned families in the species. Images PMID:8406790

  20. Non typable-Haemophilus influenzae biofilm formation and acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NT-Hi) infection is frequently associated with acute otitis media (AOM) treatment failure, recurrence or chronic otitis media. Persistence of otopathogens in a biofilm-structured community was implicated in these situations. Here, we compared biofilm production by H. influenzae strains obtained by culture of middle ear fluid (MEF) from children with AOM treatment failure and by strains isolated from nasopharyngeal (NP) samples from healthy children or those with AOM (first episode or recurrence). We aimed to evaluate an association of clinical signs and in vitro biofilm formation and establish risk factors of carrying a biofilm-producing strain. Methods We used a modification of the microtiter plate assay with crystal violet staining to compare biofilm production by 216 H. influenzae strains: 41 in MEF from children with AOM treatment failure (group MEF), 43 in NP samples from healthy children (NP group 1), 88 in NP samples from children with a first AOM episode (NP group 2, n = 43) or recurrent (NP group 3, n = 45) and 44 in NP samples from children with AOM associated with conjunctivitis (NP group 4). Results At all, 106/216 (49%) H. influenzae strains produced biofilm as did 26/43 (60.5%) in NP samples from healthy children. Biofilm production in MEF samples and NP samples did not significantly differ (40.5% vs 60.5%, 55.8%, 56.8% and 31.1% for NP groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively). On multivariate analysis, only presence of conjunctivitis was significantly associated with low biofilm production (OR = 0.3, CI [0.16-0.60], p = 0.001). The ampicillin resistance of H. influenzae produced by penicillin-binding protein modification was significantly associated with low biofilm production (p = 0.029). Conclusion We found no association of biofilm production and AOM treatment failure or recurrence. Biofilm production was low from H. influenzae strains associated with conjunctivitis-otitis syndrome

  1. Intranasal Immunization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Outer Membrane Vesicles Induces Cross-Protective Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R.; Iwashkiw, Jeremy; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feldman, Mario F.; Krohne, Georg; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative human-restricted bacterium that can act as a commensal and a pathogen of the respiratory tract. Especially nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) is a major threat to public health and is responsible for several infectious diseases in humans, such as pneumonia, sinusitis, and otitis media. Additionally, NTHi strains are highly associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against NTHi commercially available. Thus, this study investigated the utilization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a potential vaccine candidate against NTHi infections. We analyzed the immunogenic and protective properties of OMVs derived from various NTHi strains by means of nasopharyngeal immunization and colonization studies with BALB/c mice. The results presented herein demonstrate that an intranasal immunization with NTHi OMVs results in a robust and complex humoral and mucosal immune response. Immunoprecipitation revealed the most important immunogenic proteins, such as the heme utilization protein, protective surface antigen D15, heme binding protein A, and the outer membrane proteins P1, P2, P5 and P6. The induced immune response conferred not only protection against colonization with a homologous NTHi strain, which served as an OMV donor for the immunization mixtures, but also against a heterologous NTHi strain, whose OMVs were not part of the immunization mixtures. These findings indicate that OMVs derived from NTHi strains have a high potential to act as a vaccine against NTHi infections. PMID:22880074

  2. Characterization of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae collected from respiratory infections and invasive disease cases in Manitoba, Canada.

    PubMed

    Shuel, Michelle; Law, Dennis; Skinner, Stuart; Wylie, John; Karlowsky, James; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2010-03-01

    With the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) vaccine, invasive Hib disease has decreased substantially, but nontypeable H. influenzae (NT Hi) disease appears to be increasing. In order to understand the origin of NT Hi strains and their relationship with serotypeable strains, we analysed 125 NT Hi isolates collected from individual patients with either invasive disease (70 isolates) or respiratory tract infections (55 isolates). Serotype-specific and capsular transport genes were absent by PCR analysis, confirming their nonencapsulated status, which also suggested the NT Hi isolates were not encapsulated strains that shed their capsules. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed the NT Hi isolates did not have the same genetic background as serotypeable strains, including Hib. Despite the genetic heterogeneity found, two major genetic clusters were identified, both containing invasive and respiratory isolates. Fourteen invasive isolates and nine respiratory isolates produced beta-lactamase and were ampicillin resistant. More invasive (26.8%) than respiratory isolates (10.9%) showed decreased susceptibility towards ampicillin by a mechanism unrelated to beta-lactamase production. Besides a change in the capsule status of invasive Hi strains, the burden of invasive Hi disease, which used to be mainly a childhood disease, has now shifted to involve both adults and infants. PMID:20041949

  3. Population genetics and antibiotic susceptibility of invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Manitoba, Canada, from 2000 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Sill, Michelle L; Law, Dennis K S; Zhou, Jianwei; Skinner, Stuart; Wylie, John; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2007-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-two isolates of Haemophilus influenzae causing invasive disease were collected in Manitoba, Canada, from 2000 to 2006 and examined for serotype, biotype, sequence type (ST) by multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility. Nonserotypeable (NST) isolates accounted for over half of the isolates collected (69 isolates, 56.6%). There were 36 serotype a, five serotype b, two serotype c, one serotype d, four serotype e and five serotype f isolates collected. The 69 NST isolates were found to be very diverse, with isolates representing six biotypes and 45 STs. The serotypeable isolates were more clonal, with each of the serotypes showing little diversity in their biotypes and STs. Of the 122 isolates, 17% were resistant to ampicillin due to beta-lactamase production, 10.7% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 1.6% were resistant to clarithromycin, 2.5% were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and none was resistant to ciprofloxacin or moxifloxacin. Antibiotic resistance was more common in the NST strains, with 37.7% showing resistance to at least one antibiotic compared to 15% in the serotypeable strains. The results of this study suggest a shift in the epidemiology of invasive H. influenzae infections in the post-Hib vaccine era, and surveillance should include all serotypeable and NST isolates. PMID:17922774

  4. [Influenza outbreak in weaners with involvement of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Haemophilus parasuis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Unterweger, Christine; Wöchtl, Bettina; Spergser, Joachim; Brunthaler, Rene; Untersperger, Matthias; Lillie-Jaschniski, Kathrin; Dürrwald, Ralf; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel

    2016-08-17

    In a closed farrow-to-finish piglet producing farm 80% of 7-week-old piglets displayed respiratory disease with a 5% mortality rate. In addition to purulent bronchopneumonia in combination with interstitial pneumonia predominantly in the apical and middle lobes, fibrinous serositis was present in the thoracic and abdominal cavities. Further investigations succeeded in confirming the non-pandemic strain of porcine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) subtype H1avN1. The molecular genetic studies on Mycoplasma (M.) hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus were negative, whereas M. hyorhinis and Haemophilus parasuis were isolated from serous membranes. The possible importance of the underrated M. hyorhinis as a cofactor for viral infections should be emphasized and we demonstrated that the cause of apical lobe pneumonia is not restricted to M. hyopneumoniae. Mother pigs had been vaccinated with an influenza vaccine covering the subtype H1avN1. Only 33% of the examined piglets had maternal antibodies in the 7th week of life. The difficulty of prophylaxis of infections by FLUAVsw in weaners due to lack of vaccine authorization for piglets before their 56th day is reflected by this observation. PMID:27273027

  5. Genetics and complementation of Haemophilus influenzae mutants deficient in adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Small, G D; Setlow, J K; Shapanka, R

    1976-01-01

    Eight different mutations in Haemophilus influenzae leading to deficiency in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent nuclease have been investigated in strains in which the mutations of the originally mutagenized strains have been transferred into the wild type. Sensitivity to mitomycin C and deoxycholate and complementation between extracts and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-dependent ATPase activity have been measured. Genetic crosses have provided information on the relative position of the mutations on the genome. There are three complementation groups, corresponding to three genetic groups. The strains most sensitive to mitomycin and deoxycholate, derived from mutants originally selected on the basis of sensitivity to mitomycin C or methyl methanesulfonate, are in one group. Apparently all these sensitive strains lack DNA-dependent ATPase activity, as does a strain intermediate in sensitivity to deoxycholate, which is the sole representative of another group. There are four strains that are relatively resistant to deoxycholate and mitomycin C, and all of these contain the ATPase activity. Three of these are in the same genetic and complementation group, whereas the other incongruously belongs in the same group as the sensitive strains. It is postulated that there are three cistrons in H. influenzae that code for the three known subunits of the ATP-dependent nuclease. PMID:177397

  6. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence of the pilin gene from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, T; Grass, S; Munson, R

    1991-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37 adheres to human buccal epithelial cells and exhibits mannose-resistant hemagglutination of human erythrocytes. An isogenic variant of this strain which was deficient in hemagglutination was isolated. A protein with an apparent molecular weight of 22,000 was present in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel profile of sarcosyl-insoluble proteins from the hemagglutination-proficient strain but was absent from the profile of the isogenic hemagglutination-deficient variant. A monoclonal antibody which reacts with the hemagglutination-proficient isolate but not with the hemagglutination-deficient isolate has been characterized. This monoclonal antibody was employed in an affinity column for purification of the protein as well as to screen a genomic library for recombinant clones expressing the gene. Several clones which contained overlapping genomic fragments were identified by reaction with the monoclonal antibody. The gene for the 22-kDa protein was subcloned and sequenced. The gene for the type b pilin from H. influenzae type b strain MinnA was also cloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence of the strain MinnA gene was identical to that reported previously for two other type b strains. The DNA sequence of the strain M37 gene is 77% identical to that of the type b pilin gene, and the derived amino acid sequence is 68% identical to that of the type b pilin. Images PMID:1673447

  7. In Vitro Activity of ABT-773, a New Ketolide, against Recent Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Brueggemann, Angela B.; Doern, Gary V.; Huynh, Holly K.; Wingert, Elizabeth M.; Rhomberg, Paul R.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro activity of ABT-773 was evaluated against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis isolates. ABT-773 was the most active antimicrobial tested against S. pneumoniae. ABT-773 and azithromycin were equivalent in activity against H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis and more active than either clarithromycin or erythromycin. PMID:10639382

  8. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2015-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:25883794

  9. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption–ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:25883794

  10. Epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae infections in England and Wales in the pre-vaccination era (1990-2).

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, E. C.; Begg, N. T.; Crawshaw, S. C.; Hargreaves, R. M.; Howard, A. J.; Slack, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    This survey defined the pattern of invasive Haemophilus influenzae infections during 1990-2 in six regions in England and Wales during the pre-vaccination era providing a baseline against which any changes in patterns of disease due to the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination programme can be monitored. A total of 946 cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae were recorded during the survey period of which almost 90% were due to type b and most of the remainder were non-typeable. Type b infections occurred predominantly in children less than 5 years of age (88%) with the highest attack rate in male infants in the 6-11 month age group. Diagnostic category varied with both age and serotype; meningitis was the commonest presentation overall but pneumonia and bacteraemia were more common in adults and non-typeable isolates. Mortality was highest in neonates and the elderly (over 65 years of age) who were more likely to have an underlying predisposing condition than older children and adults. Children under 5 years of age had a higher case fatality rate for non-typeable than for type b infections. Ampicillin resistance was 15% and there were no cefotaxime resistant type b isolates. PMID:7641841

  11. Comparison of four different sampling methods for detecting pharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in children.

    PubMed Central

    Rapola, S; Salo, E; Kiiski, P; Leinonen, M; Takala, A K

    1997-01-01

    Samples from 96 children with acute respiratory infection were obtained simultaneously with nasal, nasopharyngeal, and oropharyngeal swabs and by nasopharyngeal aspiration and were cultured on chocolate and blood agar plates. The rates of isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae detected by the four sampling methods were compared. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were optimal for the detection of both S. pneumoniae (isolation rate, 33%) and H. influenzae (isolation rate, 31%). When a nasopharyngeal aspirate is not available, such as for healthy children or children with no obtainable secretions, the nasopharyngeal swab seems optimal for the detection of both S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae among children younger than 13 months of age. Among older children, similarly, the nasopharyngeal swab seems optimal for the detection of S. pneumoniae; however, for H. influenzae, the oropharyngeal swab seems optimal. PMID:9114384

  12. Immunologic and Structural Relationships of the Minor Pilus Subunits among Haemophilus influenzae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Kirk W.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Marrs, Carl F.; Clemans, Daniel; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    1998-01-01

    Two proteins, HifD and HifE, have been identified as structural components of Haemophilus influenzae pili. Both are localized at the pilus tip, and HifE appears to mediate pilus adherence to host cells. In this study we examined the immunologic and structural diversity of these pilus subunits among type b H. influenzae (Hib) and nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHI) strains. Western immunoblot analysis revealed that antibodies directed against the C terminus of HifD and HifE from Hib strain Eagan bound to HifD and HifE proteins, respectively, of all piliated Hib and NTHI strains tested. Whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that antibodies specific for native HifD or HifE of strain Eagan also bound to all piliated Hib strains but did not bind to the piliated NTHI strains. Antibodies against HifE of strain Eagan inhibited the binding of Hib to human erythrocytes but did not inhibit the binding of NTHI strains. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used to determine strain-to-strain structural differences within hifD and hifE genes, either by PCR or by nucleotide sequence analysis. DNA and derived amino acid sequence analyses of HifD and HifE confirmed the uniqueness of the RFLP types. The hifD and hifE genes of all type b strains showed identical restriction patterns. Analysis of hifD and hifE genes from the NTHI strains, however, revealed seven unique RFLP patterns, suggesting that these genes encode proteins with diverse primary structures. These results indicate that HifD and HifE are immunologically and structurally similar among the Hib strains but vary among the NTHI strains. PMID:9746580

  13. DNA aptamers for the detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b by cell SELEX.

    PubMed

    Bitaraf, F S; Rasooli, I; Mousavi Gargari, S L

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) causes acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in children, with a mortality rate of about 3-6 % of the affected patients. ABM can lead to death during a period of hours to several days and, hence, rapid and early detection of the infection is crucial. Aptamers, the short single-stranded DNA or RNA with high affinity to target molecules, are selected by a high-flux screening technique known as in vitro screening and systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment technology (SELEX). In this study, whole-cell SELEX was applied for the selection of target-specific aptamers with high affinity to Hib. ssDNA aptamers prepared by lambda exonuclease were incubated with the target cells (Hib). The aptameric binding rate to Hib was characterized for binding affinity after seven SELEX rounds by flow cytometry. The aptamers with higher binding affinity were cloned. Four of 68 aptamer clones were selected for sequencing. The dissociation constant (Kd) of the high-affinity aptamer clones 45 and 63 were 47.10 and 28.46 pM, respectively. These aptamers did not bind to other bacterial species, including the seven meningitis-causing bacteria. They showed distinct affinity to various H. influenzae strains only. These aptamers showed the highest affinity to Hib and the lowest affinity to H. influenzae type c and to other meningitis-causing bacteria. Clone 63 could detect Hib in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples at 60 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. The results indicate applicability of the aptamers for rapid and early detection of infections brought about by Hib. PMID:26768582

  14. In vitro pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of S-013420 against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tomoyuki; Hori, Toshihiko; Ohshiro, Merime; Maki, Hideki; Yamano, Yoshinori; Shimada, Jingoro; Kuwahara, Shogo

    2010-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters and the antibacterial activity of S-013420, a novel bicyclolide, against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, including macrolide-resistant isolates, were investigated using an in vitro PD model. Various time-concentration curves were artificially constructed by modifying the PK data obtained in phase I studies. The activity against H. influenzae was evaluated using two parameters, that is, the area above the killing curve (AAC) and the viable cell reduction at 24 h. The relationships between the antibacterial activity of S-013420 and the three PK/PD parameters were investigated by fitting the data to the sigmoid maximum effective concentration model. The square of the correlation coefficient (R(2)) values for AAC versus the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24))/MIC, the peak concentration (C(max))/MIC, and the cumulative percentage of a 24-h period that the drug concentration exceeded the MIC under steady-state PK conditions (%T(MIC)) were 0.92, 0.87, and 0.49, respectively. The R(2) values for viable cell reduction at 24 h versus AUC(0-24)/MIC, C(max)/MIC, and %T(MIC) were 0.93, 0.61, and 0.56, respectively. These results demonstrated that AUC(0-24)/MIC is the most significant parameter for evaluation of the antibacterial activity of S-013420. The values of AUC(0-24)/MIC required for maximum and static efficacy were 10.8 and 9.63, respectively, for H. influenzae and 16.3 to 22.3 and 4.66 to 9.01, respectively, for S. pneumoniae. This analysis is considered useful for determining the AUC value at the infection site, which would be required for efficacy in clinical use. PMID:20660692

  15. Activity and local delivery of azithromycin in a mouse model of Haemophilus influenzae lung infection.

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, E; Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Pocidalo, J J; Bergogne-Bérézin, E

    1992-01-01

    We compared the activities of azithromycin and erythromycin against Haemophilus influenzae in a mouse model of nonparenchymatous lower respiratory tract infection. In vitro and in vivo efficacy data for both drugs were analyzed relative to their pharmacokinetics in lungs and in vivo uptake by phagocytes. Aged C57BL/6 mice (mean age, 15.1 +/- 1.9 months) were infected intratracheally with 10(8) CFU of H. influenzae serotype b. Oral drug administration was initiated 4 h after infection by various dosage regimens. In terms of bacterial killing in the lung, azithromycin was much more active than erythromycin (P less than 0.01). Its in vivo activity was also more durable after a single administration relative to the durability of three doses of erythromycin given at 6-h intervals. The MIC of azithromycin was eightfold lower than that of erythromycin, and better penetration and a longer half-life in lung tissue were achieved after a single oral administration. Phagocytes delivered increased amounts of both drugs to the infected lungs, particularly at the site of infection (bronchoalveolar airspaces), and detectable levels of azithromycin were maintained locally for long periods. The fact that the efficacy of azithromycin coincided with the arrival of large numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes within the airspaces suggests that active extracellular concentrations were provided by the release of azithromycin from these cells. This further supports the potential value of once-daily azithromycin regimens for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in humans, provided that inhibitory concentrations against common pathogens such as H. influenzae are maintained for adequate periods of time. PMID:1324644

  16. Oral non-typable Haemophilus influenzae enhances physiological mechanism of airways protection.

    PubMed

    Clancy, R L; Dunkley, M L

    2010-07-01

    Oral immunotherapy with inactivated non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) prevents exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but the mechanism is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of protection. This was a placebo versus active prospective study over 3 months in 64 smokers. The active treatment was three courses of oral NTHi given at monthly intervals, followed by measurement of bacteriological and immunological parameters. The results can be summarized: (i) NTHi-specific T cells increased in the placebo treatment group over time (P<0.05); (ii) the T cell response in the oral NTHi group started earlier than that in the placebo group (P<0.05); and (iii) serum NTHi-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G had significantly greater variation in the placebo group (P<0.0001). The increase in antibody in placebos over time correlated with exposure to live H. influenzae (P<0.05) determined from culture of gargles; (iv) reduction in saliva lysozyme over time (P<0.05) was detected only in the oral NTHi treatment group. These data are consistent with T cell priming of gut lymphoid tissue by aspiration of bronchus content into the gut, with oral immunotherapy augmenting this process leading to enhanced bronchus protection. The evidence for protection was a stable IgG antibody level through the study in the oral NTHi treatment group, contrasting with an increase in antibody correlating with exposure of the airways to H. influenzae in the placebo group. Saliva lysozyme was a useful biomarker of mucosal inflammation, falling after oral NTHi consistent with a reduction in the level of intralumenal inflammation. PMID:20408861

  17. HrrF Is the Fur-Regulated Small RNA in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Estevan A.; Harrison, Alistair; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth D.; Kelly, Benjamin J.; White, Peter; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are Gram-negative commensal bacteria that reside in the nasopharynx. NTHi can also cause multiple upper and lower respiratory tract diseases that include sinusitis, conjunctivitis, bronchitis, and otitis media. In numerous bacterial species the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) acts as a global regulator of iron homeostasis by negatively regulating the expression of iron uptake systems. However in NTHi strain 86-028NP and numerous other bacterial species there are multiple instances where Fur positively affects gene expression. It is known that many instances of positive regulation by Fur occur indirectly through a small RNA intermediate. However, no examples of small RNAs have been described in NTHi. Therefore we used RNA-Seq analysis to analyze the transcriptome of NTHi strain 86-028NPrpsL and an isogenic 86-028NPrpsLΔfur strain to identify Fur-regulated intergenic transcripts. From this analysis we identified HrrF, the first small RNA described in any Haemophilus species. Orthologues of this small RNA exist only among other Pasteurellaceae. Our analysis showed that HrrF is maximally expressed when iron levels are low. Additionally, Fur was shown to bind upstream of the hrrF promoter. RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify targets of HrrF which include genes whose products are involved in molybdate uptake, deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, and amino acid biosynthesis. The stability of HrrF is not dependent on the RNA chaperone Hfq. This study is the first step in an effort to investigate the role small RNAs play in altering gene expression in response to iron limitation in NTHi. PMID:25157846

  18. Laboratory characterization of invasive Haemophilus influenzae isolates from Nunavut, Canada, 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Raymond S. W.; Li, Y. Anita; Mullen, Angie; Baikie, Maureen; Whyte, Kathleen; Shuel, Michelle; Tyrrell, Gregory; Rotondo, Jenny A. L.; Desai, Shalini; Spika, John

    2016-01-01

    Background With invasive Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) disease controlled by vaccination with conjugate Hib vaccines, there is concern that invasive disease due to non-serotype b strains may emerge. Objective This study characterized invasive H. influenzae (Hi) isolates from Nunavut, Canada, in the post-Hib vaccine era. Methods Invasive H. influenzae isolates were identified by conventional methods at local hospitals; and further characterized at the provincial and federal public health laboratories, including detection of serotype antigens and genes, multi-locus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility. Results Of the 89 invasive H. influenzae cases identified from 2000 to 2012, 71 case isolates were available for study. There were 43 serotype a (Hia), 12 Hib, 2 Hic, 1 Hid, 1 Hie, 2 Hif and 10 were non-typeable (NT). All 43 Hia were biotype II, sequence type (ST)-23. Three related STs were found among the Hib isolates: ST-95 (n=9), ST-635 (n=2) and ST-44 (n=1). Both Hif belonged to ST-124 and the 2 Hic were typed as ST-9. The remaining Hid (ST-1288) and Hie (ST-18) belonged to 2 separate clones. Of the 10 NT strains, 3 were typed as ST-23 and the remaining 7 isolates each belonged to a unique ST. Eight Hib and 1 NT-Hi were found to be resistant to ampicillin due to β-lactamase production. No resistance to other antibiotics was detected. Conclusion During the period of 2000–2012, Hia was the predominant serotype causing invasive disease in Nunavut. This presents a public health concern due to an emerging clone of Hia as a cause of invasive H. influenzae disease and the lack of published guidelines for the prophylaxis of contacts. The clonal nature of Hia could be the result of spread within an isolated population, and/or unique characteristics of this strain to cause invasive disease. Further study of Hia in other populations may provide important information on this emerging pathogen. No antibiotic resistance was detected among Hia isolates; a

  19. Effect of Fluoroquinolones and Macrolides on Eradication and Resistance of Haemophilus influenzae in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Tsuji, Brian T; Gent, Janneane F; Kong, Yong; Holden, Patricia N; Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the effect of antibiotics on eradication of carriage and development of resistance in Haemophilus influenzae in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our goals were to assess antibiotic susceptibilities, prevalence of resistance genes, and development of resistance in H. influenzae and to evaluate the effect of macrolide and fluoroquinolone administration on H. influenzae eradication. Data were from a 15-year longitudinal study of COPD. Genome sequence data were used to determine genotype and identify resistance genes. MICs of antibiotics were determined by reference broth microdilution. Generalized linear mixed models were used to evaluate associations between antibiotic use and H. influenzae eradication. We examined 267 H. influenzae isolates from 77 individuals. All newly acquired H. influenzae isolates were susceptible to azithromycin. Five of 27 (19%) strains developed 4-fold increases in azithromycin MICs and reached or exceeded the susceptibility breakpoint (≤4 μg/ml) during exposure. H. influenzae isolates were uniformly susceptible to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin (MIC90s of 0.015, 0.015, and 0.06, respectively); there were no mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions. Fluoroquinolone administration was associated with increased H. influenzae eradication compared to macrolides (odds ratio [OR], 16.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.67 to 104.09). There was no difference in H. influenzae eradication when comparing macrolide administration to no antibiotic (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 0.43 to 8.30). Fluoroquinolones are effective in eradicating H. influenzae in individuals with COPD. Macrolides are ineffective in eradicating H. influenzae, and their use in COPD patients may lead to decreased macrolide susceptibility and resistance. PMID:27139476

  20. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization. PMID:19446978

  1. Conservation and antigenic cross-reactivity of the transferrin-binding proteins of Haemophilus influenzae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Holland, J; Parsons, T R; Hasan, A A; Cook, S M; Stevenson, P; Griffiths, E; Williams, P

    1996-12-01

    Haemophilus influenzae acquires iron from the iron-transporting glycoprotein transferrin via a receptor-mediated process. This involves two outer-membrane transferrin-binding proteins (Tbps) termed Tbp1 and Tbp2 which show considerable preference for the human form of transferrin. Since the Tbps are attracting considerable attention as potential vaccine components, we used transferrin affinity chromatography to examine their conservation amongst 28 H. influenzae type b strains belonging to different outer-membrane-protein subtypes as well as six non-typable strains. Whole cells of all type b and non-typable strains examined bound human transferrin; whilst most strains possessed a Tbp1 of approximately 105 kDa, the molecular mass of Tbp2 varied from 79 to 94 kDa. Antisera raised against affinity-purified native H. influenzae Tbp1/Tbp2 receptor complex cross-reacted on Western blots with the respective Tbps of all the Haemophilus strains examined. When used to probe Neisseria meningitidis Tbps, sera from each of four mice immunized with the Haemophilus Tbp1/2 complex recognized the 68 kDa Tbp2 of N. meningitidis strain B16B6 but not the 78 kDa Tbp2 of N. meningitidis strain 70942. Serum from one mouse also reacted weakly with Tbp1 of strain B16B6. Apart from a weak reaction with the Tbp2 of a serotype 5 strain, this mouse antiserum failed to recognize the Tbps of the porcine pathogen A. pleuropneumoniae. However, a monospecific polyclonal antiserum raised against the denatured Tbp2 of Neisseria meningitidis B16B6 recognized the Tbps of all Haemophilus and Actinobacillus strains examined. Since H. influenzae forms part of the natural flora of the upper respiratory tract, human sera were screened for the presence of antibodies to the Tbps. Sera from healthy adults contained antibodies which recognized both Tbp1 and Tbp2 from H. influenzae but not N. meningitidis. Convalescent sera from meningococcal meningitis patients contained antibodies which, on Western blots

  2. Contribution of a 28-kilodalton membrane protein to the virulence of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Chanyangam, M; Smith, A L; Moseley, S L; Kuehn, M; Jenny, P

    1991-01-01

    A Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib) membrane protein with a molecular mass of 28 kDa bound polyclonal antisera raised against a highly purified Hib fimbrial subunit. We cloned the gene encoding this protein and found that the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis identified an 843-bp open reading frame which predicted a 26.78-kDa protein with an amino-terminal signal sequence and a mature protein with 70% similarity to the 28-kDa lipoprotein of E. coli (F. Yu, S. Inouye, and M. Inouye, J. Biol. Chem. 261:2284, 1986). Colony blot hybridization analysis with an intergenic probe of the cloned gene demonstrated that 29 of 32 H. influenzae strains hybridize with this gene. Insertion of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene into the open reading frame inactivated expression of the 28-kDa protein in E. coli. Isogenic Hib strains were derived by marker exchange mutagenesis to generate mutants which no longer expressed the 28-kDa protein as recognized with Western immunoblot analysis. There was no difference in the rate of nasopharyngeal colonization of infant rats or monkeys by the isogenic mutants which lacked the 28-kDa protein compared with colonization by the wild-type strain. In contrast, the frequency of invasion and density of bacteremia in infant rats caused by the isogenic mutants were reduced relative to those caused by the wild-type Hib strain. We conclude that this 28-kDa outer membrane protein aids transepithelial invasion of type b strains but is not essential. Images PMID:1987077

  3. Molecular Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Tirado-Vélez, José Manuel; Calatayud, Laura; Tubau, Fe; Garmendia, Junkal; Ardanuy, Carmen; Marti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common cause of respiratory infections in adults, who are frequently treated with fluoroquinolones. The aims of this study were to characterize the genotypes of fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates and their mechanisms of resistance. Among 7,267 H. influenzae isolates collected from adult patients from 2000 to 2013, 28 (0.39%) were ciprofloxacin resistant according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria. In addition, a nalidixic acid screening during 2010 to 2013 detected five (0.23%) isolates that were ciprofloxacin susceptible but nalidixic acid resistant. Sequencing of their quinolone resistance-determining regions and genotyping by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing of the 25 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates available and all 5 nalidixic acid-resistant isolates were performed. In the NTHi isolates studied, two mutations producing changes in two GyrA residues (Ser84, Asp88) and/or two ParC residues (Ser84, Glu88) were associated with increased fluoroquinolone MICs. Strains with one or two mutations (n = 15) had ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin MICs of 0.12 to 2 μg/ml, while those with three or more mutations (n = 15) had MICs of 4 to 16 μg/ml. Long persistence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains was observed in three chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. High genetic diversity was observed among fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates. Although fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat respiratory infections, the proportion of resistant NTHi isolates remains low. The nalidixic acid disk test is useful for detecting the first changes in GyrA or in GyrA plus ParC among fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains that are at a potential risk for the development of resistance under selective pressure by fluoroquinolone treatment. PMID:25385097

  4. Loss of plasmids containing cloned inserts coding for novobiocin resistance or novobiocin sensitivity in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, J K; Spikes, D; Ledbetter, M

    1984-01-01

    Plasmids pNov1 and pNov1s , coding for resistance and sensitivity to novobiocin, respectively, were readily lost from wild-type Haemophilus influenzae but retained in a strain lacking an inducible defective prophage. The plasmid loss could be partly or wholly eliminated by a low-copy-number mutation in the plasmid or by the presence of certain antibiotic resistance markers in the host chromosome. Release of both phage HP1c1 , measured by plaque assay, and defective phage, measured by electron microscopy, was increased when the plasmids were present. The frequency of recombination between pNov1 and the chromosome, causing the plasmid to be converted to pNov1s , could under some circumstances be decreased from the normal 60 to 70% to below 10% by the presence of a kanamycin resistance marker in the chromosome. This suggested that a gene product coded for by the plasmid, the expression of which was affected by the kanamycin resistance marker, was responsible for the high recombination frequency. Evidence was obtained from in vitro experiments that the gene product was a gyrase. Images PMID:6327644

  5. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  6. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  7. Ampicillin resistance of invasive Haemophilus influenzae isolates in Germany 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Lâm, Thiên-Trí; Claus, Heike; Elias, Johannes; Frosch, Matthias; Vogel, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    In this retrospective study covering a four-year observation period (2009-2012) the prevalence of aminopenicillin resistance of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) in Germany was analyzed. The main resistance mechanism against aminopenicillins is conferred by β-lactamase production, which can be inhibited by clavulanate or sulbactam. Apart from that, β-lactamase negative ampicillin resistance (BLNAR) has been reported due to mutations in the penicillin-binding protein PBP3. The prevalence of BLNAR varies considerably in different countries. Representative data from Germany have not been reported. We analyzed 704 culture positive cases with bacteraemia or detection of Hi in cerebrospinal fluid; 82 isolates (11.6%) were phenotypically resistant to ampicillin. Among these isolates, 65 (79.3%) showed β-lactamase production, and 17 isolates (20.7%) were phenotypic BLNAR Hi. The proportion of ampicillin resistant isolates remained stable over the observation period. Analysis of the PBP3 sequences of 133 isolates with different susceptibility phenotypes including susceptible, BLNAR, and β-lactamase positive isolates, revealed a high genetic diversity. Previously described PBP3 mutations were associated to elevated MIC values, albeit not exclusively, since few highly susceptible strains were found to be positive for the mutations. Furthermore, since ampicillin susceptible strains with elevated MIC values frequently harboured these mutations, prediction of the resistance phenotype using ftsI sequencing appears to be impossible. PMID:26321008

  8. SAFETY OF A CRM197-CONJUGATED HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B VACCINE IN KOREAN CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyoyoung; Bock, Hans; Guadagno, Alana; Costantini, Marco; Baehner, Frank; Kim, Yeon Ho; Ahn, Seung In; Son, Ki Hyuk; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2015-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a major cause of meningitis and pneumonia with high morbidity and mortality rates in young children. The introduction of effective and well-tolerated conjugate Hib vaccines, has nearly eradicated this disease in many countries. We investigated the safety of the Hib PRP-CRM197 vaccine in a multi-center post-marketing surveillance (PMS) study. Korean children (N = 764) aged 1-33 months were enrolled when receiving a routine primary immunization or a booster vaccine with Hib PRP-CRM197 and solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were recorded using a diary card for 7 and 28 days after each vaccination, respectively. In this study, AEs were reported by 66% of subjects but were generally mild, with 42% of subjects reporting solicited AEs and 46% reporting unsolicited AEs. Among the unsolicited AEs, 98% were determined to be unrelated to the study vaccine. The studied Hib PRP-CRM197 vaccine was well tolerated by the study group and found to have a similar safety profile to that reported in other clinical studies. This vaccine is suitable for routine immunization against Hib disease among Korean children. AEs due to this vaccine will continue to be monitored. PMID:26867395

  9. A biphasic epigenetic switch controls immunoevasion, virulence and niche adaptation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Atack, John M; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Fox, Kate L; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Brockman, Kenneth L; Clark, Tyson A; Boitano, Matthew; Power, Peter M; Jen, Freda E-C; McEwan, Alastair G; Grimmond, Sean M; Smith, Arnold L; Barenkamp, Stephen J; Korlach, Jonas; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contains an N(6)-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (ModA) that is subject to phase-variable expression (random ON/OFF switching). Five modA alleles, modA2, modA4, modA5, modA9 and modA10, account for over two-thirds of clinical otitis media isolates surveyed. Here, we use single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis to identify the DNA-recognition motifs for all five of these modA alleles. Phase variation of these alleles regulates multiple proteins including vaccine candidates, and key virulence phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance (modA2, modA5, modA10), biofilm formation (modA2) and immunoevasion (modA4). Analyses of a modA2 strain in the chinchilla model of otitis media show a clear selection for ON switching of modA2 in the middle ear. Our results indicate that a biphasic epigenetic switch can control bacterial virulence, immunoevasion and niche adaptation in an animal model system. PMID:26215614

  10. A biphasic epigenetic switch controls immunoevasion, virulence and niche adaptation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Atack, John M.; Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Fox, Kate L.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Brockman, Kenneth L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Boitano, Matthew; Power, Peter M.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Smith, Arnold L.; Barenkamp, Stephen J.; Korlach, Jonas; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contains an N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (ModA) that is subject to phase-variable expression (random ON/OFF switching). Five modA alleles, modA2, modA4, modA5, modA9 and modA10, account for over two-thirds of clinical otitis media isolates surveyed. Here, we use single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis to identify the DNA-recognition motifs for all five of these modA alleles. Phase variation of these alleles regulates multiple proteins including vaccine candidates, and key virulence phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance (modA2, modA5, modA10), biofilm formation (modA2) and immunoevasion (modA4). Analyses of a modA2 strain in the chinchilla model of otitis media show a clear selection for ON switching of modA2 in the middle ear. Our results indicate that a biphasic epigenetic switch can control bacterial virulence, immunoevasion and niche adaptation in an animal model system. PMID:26215614

  11. Overlapping and complementary oxidative stress defense mechanisms in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Baker, Beth D; Munson, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative commensal bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) can cause respiratory tract diseases that include otitis media, sinusitis, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchitis. During colonization and infection, NTHI withstands oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by the host, and by other copathogens and flora. These reactive oxygen species include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals, whose killing is amplified by iron via the Fenton reaction. We previously identified genes that encode proteins with putative roles in protection of the NTHI isolate strain 86-028NP against oxidative stress. These include catalase (HktE), peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin (PgdX), and a ferritin-like protein (Dps). Strains were generated with mutations in hktE, pgdX, and dps. The hktE mutant and a pgdX hktE double mutant were more sensitive than the parent to killing by H2O2. Conversely, the pgdX mutant was more resistant to H2O2 due to increased catalase activity. Supporting the role of killing via the Fenton reaction, binding of iron by Dps significantly mitigated the effect of H2O2-mediated killing. NTHI thus utilizes several effectors to resist oxidative stress, and regulation of free iron is critical to this protection. These mechanisms will be important for successful colonization and infection by this opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:25368297

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Causing Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Calatayud, Laura; Martí, Sara; Tubau, Fe; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen which causes a variety of respiratory infections. The objectives of the study were to determine its antimicrobial susceptibility, to characterize the β-lactam resistance, and to establish a genetic characterization of NTHi isolates. Ninety-five NTHi isolates were analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST). Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by microdilution, and the ftsI gene (encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, PBP3) was PCR amplified and sequenced. Thirty (31.6%) isolates were non-susceptible to ampicillin (MIC≥2 mg/L), with 10 of them producing β-lactamase type TEM-1 as a resistance mechanism. After ftsI sequencing, 39 (41.1%) isolates showed amino acid substitutions in PBP3, with Asn526→ Lys being the most common (69.2%). Eighty-four patients were successfully treated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone and levofloxacin. Eight patients died due either to aspiration or complication of their comorbidities. In conclusion, NTHi causing CAP in adults shows high genetic diversity and is associated with a high rate of reduced susceptibility to ampicillin due to alterations in PBP3. The analysis of treatment and outcomes demonstrated that NTHi strains with mutations in the ftsI gene could be successfully treated with ceftriaxone or fluoroquinolones. PMID:24349303

  13. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Causing Invasive Disease in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Grau, Imma; Tubau, Fe; Calatayud, Laura; Pallares, Roman; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) has changed since the introduction of the Hi type b (Hib) vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and molecular epidemiology of Hi invasive disease in adults. Methods Clinical data of the 82 patients with Hi invasive infections were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility, serotyping, and genotyping were studied (2008–2013). Results Men accounted for 63.4% of patients (whose mean age was 64.3 years). The most frequent comorbidities were immunosuppressive therapy (34.1%), malignancy (31.7%), diabetes, and COPD (both 22%). The 30-day mortality rate was 20.7%. The majority of the strains (84.3%) were nontypeable (NTHi) and serotype f was the most prevalent serotype in the capsulated strains. The highest antimicrobial resistance was for cotrimoxazole (27.1%) and ampicillin (14.3%). Twenty-three isolates (32.9%) had amino acid changes in the PBP3 involved in resistance. Capsulated strains were clonal and belonged to clonal complexes 6 (serotype b), 124 (serotype f), and 18 (serotype e), whereas NTHi were genetically diverse. Conclusions Invasive Hi disease occurred mainly in elderly and those with underlying conditions, and it was associated with a high mortality rate. NTHi were the most common cause of invasive disease and showed high genetic diversity. PMID:25379704

  14. Combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines for primary immunisation.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, F; Martin, A; Blondeau, C; Thornton, C; Chaplais, J; Finn, A

    1996-01-01

    A total of 146 infants were immunised at ages 2, 3, and 4 months with a combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (DTP)--Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) tetanus toxoid conjugate (PRP-T) vaccine (Pasteur Merieux) to assess the antibody response and adverse events associated with immunisation. Adverse events, including fever, were recorded by parents in a diary for three days following each injection. Blood was taken before the first immunisation and four weeks after the third immunisation to assess antibody response. Data were compared with those from historical controls who had received DTP and PRP-T vaccines by separate injection. The combined vaccine was well tolerated. Rates of local and general reactions were similar to those reported for infants immunised by separate injection. All infants achieved protective antibody titres (> 0.01 IU/ml) for diphtheria and tetanus; 98% acquired Hib (PRP) antibody > 0.15 microgram/ml and 82.5% > 1.0 microgram/ml. Pertussis antibody titres (pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin, total agglutinins, and agglutinins 2 and 3) showed appreciable rise following immunisation. DTP and PRP-T vaccines provide similar antibody responses and adverse effects whether mixed in the same syringe or administered by separate injection. The vaccines could be combined for use in the United Kingdom primary immunisation schedule. PMID:8984914

  15. Role of the nuclease of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in dispersal of organisms from biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cho, Christine; Chande, Aroon; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ketterer, Margaret; Shao, Jian; Gotoh, Kenji; Foster, Eric; Hunt, Jason; O'Brien, Erin; Apicella, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) forms biofilms in the middle ear during human infection. The biofilm matrix of NTHI contains extracellular DNA. We show that NTHI possesses a potent nuclease, which is a homolog of the thermonuclease of Staphylococcus aureus. Using a biofilm dispersal assay, studies showed a biofilm dispersal pattern in the parent strain, no evidence of dispersal in the nuclease mutant, and a partial return of dispersion in the complemented mutant. Quantitative PCR of mRNA from biofilms from a 24-h continuous flow system demonstrated a significantly increased expression of the nuclease from planktonic organisms compared to those in the biofilm phase of growth (P < 0.042). Microscopic analysis of biofilms grown in vitro showed that in the nuclease mutant the nucleic acid matrix was increased compared to the wild-type and complemented strains. Organisms were typically found in large aggregates, unlike the wild-type and complement biofilms in which the organisms were evenly dispersed throughout the biofilm. At 48 h, the majority of the organisms in the mutant biofilm were dead. The nuclease mutant formed a biofilm in the chinchilla model of otitis media and demonstrated a propensity to also form similar large aggregates of organisms. These studies indicate that NTHI nuclease is involved in biofilm remodeling and organism dispersal. PMID:25547799

  16. Mutations in polI but not mutSLH destabilize Haemophilus influenzae tetranucleotide repeats.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Christopher D; van de Ven, Tamsin; Moxon, E Richard

    2002-03-15

    Haemophilus influenzae (Hi), an obligate upper respiratory tract commensal/pathogen, uses phase variation (PV) to adapt to host environment changes. Switching occurs by slippage of nucleotide repeats (microsatellites) within genes coding for virulence molecules. Most such microsatellites in Hi are tetranucleotide repeats, but an exception is the dinucleotide repeats in the pilin locus. To investigate the effects on PV rates of mutations in genes for mismatch repair (MMR), insertion/deletion mutations of mutS, mutL, mutH, dam, polI, uvrD, mfd and recA were constructed in Hi strain Rd. Only inactivation of polI destabilized tetranucleotide (5'AGTC) repeat tracts of chromosomally located reporter constructs, whereas inactivation of mutS, but not polI, destabilized dinucleotide (5'AT) repeats. Deletions of repeats were predominant in polI mutants, which we propose are due to end-joining occurring without DNA polymerization during polI-deficient Okazaki fragment processing. The high prevalence of tetranucleotides mediating PV is an exceptional feature of the Hi genome. The refractoriness to MMR of hypermutation in Hi tetranucleotides facilitates adaptive switching without the deleterious increase in global mutation rates that accompanies a mutator genotype. PMID:11889052

  17. Antisera Against Certain Conserved Surface-Exposed Peptides of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Are Protective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) cause significant disease, including otitis media in children, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and invasive disease in susceptible populations. No vaccine is currently available to prevent NTHi disease. The interactions of NTHi and the human host are primarily mediated by lipooligosaccharide and a complex array of surface-exposed proteins (SEPs) that act as receptors, sensors and secretion systems. We hypothesized that certain SEPs are present in all NTHi strains and that a subset of these may be antibody accessible and represent protective epitopes. Initially we used 15 genomic sequences available in the GenBank database along with an additional 11 genomic sequences generated by ourselves to identify the core set of putative SEPs present in all strains. Using bioinformatics, 56 core SEPs were identified. Molecular modeling generated putative structures of the SEPs from which potential surface exposed regions were defined. Synthetic peptides corresponding to ten of these highly conserved surface-exposed regions were used to raise antisera in rats. These antisera were used to assess passive protection in the infant rat model of invasive NTHi infection. Five of the antisera were protective, thus demonstrating their in vivo antibody accessibility. These five peptide regions represent potential targets for peptide vaccine candidates to protect against NTHi infection. PMID:26390432

  18. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M.; Kerwin, James; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24 hr biofilms, two were found only in 96 hr biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or were cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation. PMID:24942343

  19. Genome sequencing of disease and carriage isolates of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae identifies discrete population structure.

    PubMed

    De Chiara, Matteo; Hood, Derek; Muzzi, Alessandro; Pickard, Derek J; Perkins, Tim; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Dougan, Gordon; Rappuoli, Rino; Moxon, E Richard; Soriani, Marco; Donati, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    One of the main hurdles for the development of an effective and broadly protective vaccine against nonencapsulated isolates of Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) lies in the genetic diversity of the species, which renders extremely difficult the identification of cross-protective candidate antigens. To assess whether a population structure of NTHi could be defined, we performed genome sequencing of a collection of diverse clinical isolates representative of both carriage and disease and of the diversity of the natural population. Analysis of the distribution of polymorphic sites in the core genome and of the composition of the accessory genome defined distinct evolutionary clades and supported a predominantly clonal evolution of NTHi, with the majority of genetic information transmitted vertically within lineages. A correlation between the population structure and the presence of selected surface-associated proteins and lipooligosaccharide structure, known to contribute to virulence, was found. This high-resolution, genome-based population structure of NTHi provides the foundation to obtain a better understanding, of NTHi adaptation to the host as well as its commensal and virulence behavior, that could facilitate intervention strategies against disease caused by this important human pathogen. PMID:24706866

  20. Shp2 Deficiency Impairs the Inflammatory Response Against Haemophilus influenzae by Regulating Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lifang; Xia, Jingyan; Li, Tiantian; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Wei; Hong, Zhuping; Ke, Yuehai; Qian, Jing; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-15

    Macrophages can polarize and differentiate to regulate initiation, development, and cessation of inflammation during pulmonary infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms driving macrophage phenotypic differentiation are largely unclear. Our study investigated the role of Shp2, a Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase, in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and bacterial clearance. Shp2 levels were increased upon NTHi stimulation. Selective inhibition of Shp2 in mice led to an attenuated inflammatory response by skewing macrophages toward alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Upon pulmonary NTHi infection, Shp2(-/-) mice, in which the gene encoding Shp2 in monocytes/macrophages was deleted, showed an impaired inflammatory response and decreased antibacterial ability, compared with wild-type controls. In vitro data demonstrated that Shp2 regulated activated macrophage (M1) gene expression via activation of p65-nuclear factor-κB signaling, independent of p38 and extracellular regulated kinase-mitogen-activated proteins kinase signaling pathways. Taken together, our study indicates that Shp2 is required to orchestrate macrophage function and regulate host innate immunity against pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27330052

  1. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD+ utilization pathway by dephosphorylating NMN to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases, which are nonspecific 5′-, 3′-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with NMN, 5′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 2′-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, which explains the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, which is consistent with observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5′- and 3′-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme’s direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5′ substrates in an anti conformation and 3′ substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B and C acid phosphatases share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  2. Structural basis for haem piracy from host haemopexin by Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Zambolin, Silvia; Clantin, Bernard; Chami, Mohamed; Hoos, Sylviane; Haouz, Ahmed; Villeret, Vincent; Delepelaire, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an obligate human commensal/pathogen that requires haem for survival and can acquire it from several host haemoproteins, including haemopexin. The haem transport system from haem-haemopexin consists of HxuC, a haem receptor, and the two-partner-secretion system HxuB/HxuA. HxuA, which is exposed at the cell surface, is strictly required for haem acquisition from haemopexin. HxuA forms complexes with haem-haemopexin, leading to haem release and its capture by HxuC. The key question is how HxuA liberates haem from haemopexin. Here, we solve crystal structures of HxuA alone, and HxuA in complex with the N-terminal domain of haemopexin. A rational basis for the release of haem from haem-haemopexin is derived from both in vivo and in vitro studies. HxuA acts as a wedge that destabilizes the two-domains structure of haemopexin with a mobile loop on HxuA that favours haem ejection by redirecting key residues in the haem-binding pocket of haemopexin. PMID:27188378

  3. Safety and Immunological Outcomes Following Human Inoculation With Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Winokur, Patricia L.; Chaloner, Kathryn; Doern, Gary V.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Apicella, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) exclusively infects humans, causing significant numbers of upper respiratory tract infections. The goal of this study was to develop a safe experimental human model of NTHi nasopharyngeal colonization. Methods. A novel streptomycin-resistant strain of NTHi was developed, and 15 subjects were inoculated in an adaptive-design phase I trial to rapidly identify colonizing doses of NTHi. Bayesian analysis was used to estimate the human colonizing dose 50 and 90 (HCD50 and HCD90, respectively). Side effects and immunological responses to whole-cell sialylated NTHi were measured. Results. Nine subjects were colonized and tolerated colonization well. Immunological analyses demonstrated that 7 colonized subjects and 0 noncolonized subjects had a 4-fold rise in serum levels of immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin M, or immunoglobulin G. Preexisting immunity to whole-cell NTHi did not predict success or failure of colonization. Conclusions. The statistical design incorporated a slow escalation to higher dose levels. HCD50 and HCD90 Bayesian estimates were identified as approximately 2000 and 150 000 colony-forming units, respectively; credible interval estimates were broad. This study provides a potential platform for early proof of concept studies for NTHi vaccines, as well as a way to evaluate bacterial factors associated with colonization. PMID:23715660

  4. Haemophilus influenzae increases the susceptibility and inflammatory response of airway epithelial cells to viral infections.

    PubMed

    Gulraiz, Fahad; Bellinghausen, Carla; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Stassen, Frank R

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), a common colonizer of lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), can enhance expression of the cellular receptor intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), which in turn can be used by major group human rhinoviruses (HRVs) for attachment. Here, we evaluated the effect of NTHI-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 on viral replication and inflammatory responses toward different respiratory viruses. Therefore, human bronchial epithelial cells were pretreated with heat-inactivated NTHI (hi-NTHI) and subsequently infected with either HRV16 (major group), HRV1B (minor group), or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Pretreatment with hi-NTHI significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 in BEAS-2B cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells. Concomitantly, release of infectious HRV16 particles was increased in cells pretreated with hi-NTHI. Pretreatment with hi-NTHI also caused a significant increase in HRV16 RNA, whereas replication of HRV1B and RSV were increased to a far lesser extent and only at later time points. Interestingly, release of IL-6 and IL-8 after RSV, but not HRV, infection was synergistically increased in hi-NTHI-pretreated BEAS-2B cells. In summary, exposure to hi-NTHI significantly enhanced sensitivity toward HRV16 but not HRV1B or RSV, probably through ICAM-1 up-regulation. Furthermore, hi-NTHI pretreatment may enhance the inflammatory response to RSV infection, suggesting that preexisting bacterial infections might exaggerate inflammation during secondary viral infection. PMID:25411435

  5. Extensive Cotransformation of Natural Variation into Chromosomes of Naturally Competent Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Lee, Jae Yun; Firme, Marlo; Sinha, Sunita; Redfield, Rosemary J.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally competent bacterial species actively take up environmental DNA and can incorporate it into their chromosomes by homologous recombination. This can bring genetic variation from environmental DNA to recipient chromosomes, often in multiple long “donor” segments. Here, we report the results of genome sequencing 96 colonies of a laboratory Haemophilus influenzae strain, which had been experimentally transformed by DNA from a diverged clinical isolate. Donor segments averaged 6.9 kb (spanning several genes) and were clustered into recombination tracts of ~19.5 kb. Individual colonies had replaced from 0.1 to 3.2% of their chromosomes, and ~1/3 of all donor-specific single-nucleotide variants were present in at least one recombinant. We found that nucleotide divergence did not obviously limit the locations of recombination tracts, although there were small but significant reductions in divergence at recombination breakpoints. Although indels occasionally transformed as parts of longer recombination tracts, they were common at breakpoints, suggesting that indels typically block progression of strand exchange. Some colonies had recombination tracts in which variant positions contained mixtures of both donor and recipient alleles. These tracts were clustered around the origin of replication and were interpreted as the result of heteroduplex segregation in the original transformed cell. Finally, a pilot experiment demonstrated the utility of natural transformation for genetically dissecting natural phenotypic variation. We discuss our results in the context of the potential to merge experimental and population genetic approaches, giving a more holistic understanding of bacterial gene transfer. PMID:24569039

  6. Structural basis for haem piracy from host haemopexin by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Zambolin, Silvia; Clantin, Bernard; Chami, Mohamed; Hoos, Sylviane; Haouz, Ahmed; Villeret, Vincent; Delepelaire, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an obligate human commensal/pathogen that requires haem for survival and can acquire it from several host haemoproteins, including haemopexin. The haem transport system from haem-haemopexin consists of HxuC, a haem receptor, and the two-partner-secretion system HxuB/HxuA. HxuA, which is exposed at the cell surface, is strictly required for haem acquisition from haemopexin. HxuA forms complexes with haem-haemopexin, leading to haem release and its capture by HxuC. The key question is how HxuA liberates haem from haemopexin. Here, we solve crystal structures of HxuA alone, and HxuA in complex with the N-terminal domain of haemopexin. A rational basis for the release of haem from haem-haemopexin is derived from both in vivo and in vitro studies. HxuA acts as a wedge that destabilizes the two-domains structure of haemopexin with a mobile loop on HxuA that favours haem ejection by redirecting key residues in the haem-binding pocket of haemopexin. PMID:27188378

  7. Extensive cotransformation of natural variation into chromosomes of naturally competent Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Lee, Jae Yun; Firme, Marlo; Sinha, Sunita; Redfield, Rosemary J

    2014-04-01

    Naturally competent bacterial species actively take up environmental DNA and can incorporate it into their chromosomes by homologous recombination. This can bring genetic variation from environmental DNA to recipient chromosomes, often in multiple long "donor" segments. Here, we report the results of genome sequencing 96 colonies of a laboratory Haemophilus influenzae strain, which had been experimentally transformed by DNA from a diverged clinical isolate. Donor segments averaged 6.9 kb (spanning several genes) and were clustered into recombination tracts of ~19.5 kb. Individual colonies had replaced from 0.1 to 3.2% of their chromosomes, and ~1/3 of all donor-specific single-nucleotide variants were present in at least one recombinant. We found that nucleotide divergence did not obviously limit the locations of recombination tracts, although there were small but significant reductions in divergence at recombination breakpoints. Although indels occasionally transformed as parts of longer recombination tracts, they were common at breakpoints, suggesting that indels typically block progression of strand exchange. Some colonies had recombination tracts in which variant positions contained mixtures of both donor and recipient alleles. These tracts were clustered around the origin of replication and were interpreted as the result of heteroduplex segregation in the original transformed cell. Finally, a pilot experiment demonstrated the utility of natural transformation for genetically dissecting natural phenotypic variation. We discuss our results in the context of the potential to merge experimental and population genetic approaches, giving a more holistic understanding of bacterial gene transfer. PMID:24569039

  8. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  9. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  10. Haemophilus influenzae responds to glucocorticoids used in asthma therapy by modulation of biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Chris S; Keong, Teh Wooi; An, Shi-qi; Murdoch, Sarah; McCarthy, Yvonne; Garmendia, Junkal; Ward, Joseph; Dow, J Maxwell; Yang, Liang; O’Toole, George A; Ryan, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are used as a main treatment to reduce airway inflammation in people with asthma who suffer from neutrophilic airway inflammation, a condition frequently associated with Haemophilus influenzae colonization. Here we show that glucocorticosteroids have a direct influence on the behavior of H. influenzae that may account for associated difficulties with therapy. Using a mouse model of infection, we show that corticosteroid treatment promotes H. influenzae persistence. Transcriptomic analysis of bacteria either isolated from infected mouse airway or grown in laboratory medium identified a number of genes encoding regulatory factors whose expression responded to the presence of glucocorticosteroids. Importantly, a number of these corticosteroid-responsive genes also showed elevated expression in H. influenzae within sputum from asthma patients undergoing steroid treatment. Addition of corticosteroid to H. influenzae led to alteration in biofilm formation and enhanced resistance to azithromycin, and promoted azithromycin resistance in an animal model of respiratory infection. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that H. influenzae can respond directly to corticosteroid treatment in the airway potentially influencing biofilm formation, persistence and the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. PMID:25995336

  11. Identification and characterization of a nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae putative toxin-antitoxin locus

    PubMed Central

    Daines, Dayle A; Jarisch, Justin; Smith, Arnold L

    2004-01-01

    Background Certain strains of an obligate parasite of the human upper respiratory tract, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), can cause invasive diseases such as septicemia and meningitis, as well as chronic mucosal infections such as otitis media. To do this, the organism must invade and survive within both epithelial and endothelial cells. We have identified a facilitator of NTHi survival inside human cells, virulence-associated protein D (vapDHi, encoded by gene HI0450). Both vapDHi and a flanking gene, HI0451, exhibit the genetic and physical characteristics of a toxin/antitoxin (TA) locus, with VapDHi serving as the toxin moiety and HI0451 as the antitoxin. We propose the name VapXHi for the HI0451 antitoxin protein. Originally identified on plasmids, TA loci have been found on the chromosomes of a number of bacterial pathogens, and have been implicated in the control of translation during stressful conditions. Translation arrest would enhance survival within human cells and facilitate persistent or chronic mucosal infections. Results Isogenic mutants in vapDHi were attenuated for survival inside human respiratory epithelial cells (NCI-H292) and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), the in vitro models of mucosal infection and the blood-brain barrier, respectively. Transcomplementation with a vapDHi allele restored wild-type NTHi survival within both cell lines. A PCR survey of 59 H. influenzae strains isolated from various anatomical sites determined the presence of a vapDHiallele in 100% of strains. Two isoforms of the gene were identified in this population; one that was 91 residues in length, and another that was truncated to 45 amino acids due to an in-frame deletion. The truncated allele failed to transcomplement the NTHi vapDHi survival defect in HBMEC. Subunits of full-length VapDHi homodimerized, but subunits of the truncated protein did not. However, truncated protein subunits did interact with full-length subunits, and this

  12. TEM-1 AND ROB-1 PRESENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE STRAINS, ISTANBUL, TURKEY.

    PubMed

    Kuvat, Nuray; Nazik, Hasan; Berkiten, Rahmiye; Öngen, Betigül

    2015-03-01

    Resistance of 235 Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates from Istanbul Medical Faculty Hospital, Turkey were determined against 19 antibiotics by disc diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of those found resistant to ampicillin, cefuroxim, chloramphenicol and meropenem were measured using E-test. Ampicillin-resistant isolates producing beta-lactamase as demonstrated by a nitrocefin assay were analyzed for the presence of TEM-1 and ROB-1 genes by PCR. Eleven percent of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin (10 µg/ml), of which 73% were beta-lactamase positive and carried TEM-1 gene, but none were positive for ROB-1 gene. All isolates susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate (20/10 µg/ml), azithromycin (15 µg/ml), aztreonam (30 µg/ml), cefotaxime (30 µg/ml), ceftriaxone (30 µg/ml), ciprofloxacin (5 µg/ml), levofloxacin (5 µg/ml), and telithromycin (15 µg/ml) but 24%, 15%, 4%, 4%, 2%, 1%, 1%, 0.5%, 0.5% and 0.5% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (1.25/23.75 µg/ml), tetracycline (30 µg/ml), cefaclor (30 µg/ml), clarithromycin (15 µg/ml), cefuroxime (30 µg/ml), meropenem (10 µg/ml), chloramphenicol (30 µg/ml), ampicillin-sulbactam (10/10 µg/ml), nalidixic acid (30 µg/ml), and fosfomycin (30 µg/ml), respectively. MIC values of three cefuroxime-resistant isolates was 24, 48 and > 256 µg/ml, respectively; of two meropenem-resistant strains > 256 µg/ml; and of two chloramphenicol-susceptible isolates (by disc diffusion method) 6 µg/ml (considered as intermediate susceptible). Multiple- antibiotics resistance was detected in 15% of the strains, with resistance to 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 antibiotics in 8.5%, 4%, 2%, 0.5% and 0.5% of the isolates, respectively. By identifying beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae, empirical therapy with beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations and second generation cephalosporins would be inappropriate for such patients (approximately 3%). Our findings will

  13. Expression of urease by Haemophilus influenzae during human respiratory tract infection and role in survival in an acid environment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a common cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infection in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Prior studies have shown that H. influenzae expresses abundant urease during growth in the middle ear of the chinchilla and in pooled human sputum, suggesting that expression of urease is important for colonization and infection in the hostile environments of the middle ear and in the airways in adults. Virtually nothing else is known about the urease of H. influenzae, which was characterized in the present study. Results Analysis by reverse transcriptase PCR revealed that the ure gene cluster is expressed as a single transcript. Knockout mutants of a urease structural gene (ureC) and of the entire ure operon demonstrated no detectable urease activity indicating that this operon is the only one encoding an active urease. The ure operon is present in all strains tested, including clinical isolates from otitis media and COPD. Urease activity decreased as nitrogen availability increased. To test the hypothesis that urease is expressed during human infection, purified recombinant urease C was used in ELISA with pre acquisition and post infection serum from adults with COPD who experienced infections caused by H. influenzae. A total of 28% of patients developed new antibodies following infection indicating that H. influenzae expresses urease during airway infection. Bacterial viability assays performed at varying pH indicate that urease mediates survival of H. influenzae in an acid environment. Conclusions The H. influenzae genome contains a single urease operon that mediates urease expression and that is present in all clinical isolates tested. Nitrogen availability is a determinant of urease expression. H. influenzae expresses urease during human respiratory tract infection and urease is a target of the human antibody response. Expression of urease enhances viability in an acid

  14. rRNA gene restriction patterns of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains associated with Brazilian purpuric fever.

    PubMed Central

    Irino, K; Grimont, F; Casin, I; Grimont, P A

    1988-01-01

    The rRNA gene restriction patterns of 92 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius, associated with conjunctivitis or Brazilian purpuric fever in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were studied with 16 + 23S rRNA from Escherichia coli as a probe. All strains were classified into 15 patterns. Isolates from Brazilian purpuric fever cases were seen only in patterns 3 (most frequently) and 4 (rarely), whereas isolates from conjunctivitis were found in all 15 patterns. The study demonstrated that rRNA from E. coli can serve as a probe for molecular epidemiology. Images PMID:2459153

  15. Investigations into genome diversity of Haemophilus influenzae using whole genome sequencing of clinical isolates and laboratory transformants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Haemophilus influenzae is an important human commensal pathogen associated with significant levels of disease. High-throughput DNA sequencing was used to investigate differences in genome content within this species. Results Genomic DNA sequence was obtained from 85 strains of H. influenzae and from other related species, selected based on geographical site of isolation, disease association and documented genotypic and phenotypic differences. When compared by Mauve alignment these indicated groupings of H. influenzae that were consistent with previously published analyses; capsule expressing strains fell into two distinct groups and those of serotype b (Hib) were found in two closely positioned lineages. For 18 Hib strains representing both lineages we found many discrete regions (up to 40% of the total genome) displaying sequence variation when compared to a common reference strain. Evidence that this naturally occurring pattern of inter-strain variation in H. influenzae can be mediated by transformation was obtained through sequencing DNA obtained from a pool of 200 independent transformants of a recipient (strain Rd) using donor DNA from a heterologous Hib strain (Eagan). Conclusion Much of the inter-strain variation in genome sequence in H. influenzae is likely the result of inter-strain exchanges of DNA, most plausibly through transformation. PMID:23176117

  16. Residual Activity of Thermally Denatured Transforming Deoxyribonucleic Acid from Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Benjamin J.

    1965-01-01

    Barnhart, Benjamin J. (Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md.). Residual activity of thermally denatured transforming deoxyribonucleic acid from Haemophilus influenzae. J. Bacteriol. 89:1271–1279. 1965.—The level of residual transforming activity of heated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (i.e., 1 to a few per cent of native DNA-transforming activity) was found to be independent of the heating and quenching temperatures and less susceptible than native or renatured DNA to heat inactivation upon prolonged heating above or below the critical melting temperature. Similar dose-response curves were obtained for inactivation by formamide of native and renatured DNA, but the residual-active material was much more resistant. Heating DNA above the Tm in the presence of 1% formaldehyde resulted in a level of residual activity 4 logs lower than that obtained without formaldehyde. Residual-active material was not inactivated by Escherichia coli phosphodiesterase, but it was susceptible to snake venom phosphodiesterase. A new genetic marker was induced in heated-quenched DNA but not in purified residual-active material following nitrous acid treatment. Residual activity was found to be less susceptible to ultraviolet inactivation and to band at a higher density region in CsCl than native DNA. In conclusion, it is suggested that the residual-active material is a structure formed by intrastrand hydrogen bonding of the separated units of heated-quenched DNA. Such a configuration would result in at least a partially double-stranded structure, which is probably the essential characteristic of the residual-active material endowing it with biological activity. PMID:14292997

  17. Transformed Recombinant Enrichment Profiling Rapidly Identifies HMW1 as an Intracellular Invasion Locus in Haemophilus influenza

    PubMed Central

    Moleres, Javier; Sinha, Sunita; Fernández-Calvet, Ariadna; Porsch, Eric A.; St. Geme, Joseph W.; Nislow, Corey; Redfield, Rosemary J.; Garmendia, Junkal

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species actively take up and recombine homologous DNA into their genomes, called natural competence, a trait that offers a means to identify the genetic basis of naturally occurring phenotypic variation. Here, we describe “transformed recombinant enrichment profiling” (TREP), in which natural transformation is used to generate complex pools of recombinants, phenotypic selection is used to enrich for specific recombinants, and deep sequencing is used to survey for the genetic variation responsible. We applied TREP to investigate the genetic architecture of intracellular invasion by the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae, a trait implicated in persistence during chronic infection. TREP identified the HMW1 adhesin as a crucial factor. Natural transformation of the hmw1 operon from a clinical isolate (86-028NP) into a laboratory isolate that lacks it (Rd KW20) resulted in ~1,000-fold increased invasion into airway epithelial cells. When a distinct recipient (Hi375, already possessing hmw1 and its paralog hmw2) was transformed by the same donor, allelic replacement of hmw2AHi375 by hmw1A86-028NP resulted in a ~100-fold increased intracellular invasion rate. The specific role of hmw1A86-028NP was confirmed by mutant and western blot analyses. Bacterial self-aggregation and adherence to airway cells were also increased in recombinants, suggesting that the high invasiveness induced by hmw1A86-028NP might be a consequence of these phenotypes. However, immunofluorescence results found that intracellular hmw1A86-028NP bacteria likely invaded as groups, instead of as individual bacterial cells, indicating an emergent invasion-specific consequence of hmw1A-mediated self-aggregation. PMID:27124727

  18. Transformed Recombinant Enrichment Profiling Rapidly Identifies HMW1 as an Intracellular Invasion Locus in Haemophilus influenza.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Viadas, Cristina; Moleres, Javier; Sinha, Sunita; Fernández-Calvet, Ariadna; Porsch, Eric A; St Geme, Joseph W; Nislow, Corey; Redfield, Rosemary J; Garmendia, Junkal

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial species actively take up and recombine homologous DNA into their genomes, called natural competence, a trait that offers a means to identify the genetic basis of naturally occurring phenotypic variation. Here, we describe "transformed recombinant enrichment profiling" (TREP), in which natural transformation is used to generate complex pools of recombinants, phenotypic selection is used to enrich for specific recombinants, and deep sequencing is used to survey for the genetic variation responsible. We applied TREP to investigate the genetic architecture of intracellular invasion by the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae, a trait implicated in persistence during chronic infection. TREP identified the HMW1 adhesin as a crucial factor. Natural transformation of the hmw1 operon from a clinical isolate (86-028NP) into a laboratory isolate that lacks it (Rd KW20) resulted in ~1,000-fold increased invasion into airway epithelial cells. When a distinct recipient (Hi375, already possessing hmw1 and its paralog hmw2) was transformed by the same donor, allelic replacement of hmw2AHi375 by hmw1A86-028NP resulted in a ~100-fold increased intracellular invasion rate. The specific role of hmw1A86-028NP was confirmed by mutant and western blot analyses. Bacterial self-aggregation and adherence to airway cells were also increased in recombinants, suggesting that the high invasiveness induced by hmw1A86-028NP might be a consequence of these phenotypes. However, immunofluorescence results found that intracellular hmw1A86-028NP bacteria likely invaded as groups, instead of as individual bacterial cells, indicating an emergent invasion-specific consequence of hmw1A-mediated self-aggregation. PMID:27124727

  19. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine. PMID:25659268

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and immunologic properties of detoxified lipooligosaccharide from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae conjugated to proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X X; Tsai, C M; Ueyama, T; Barenkamp, S J; Robbins, J B; Lim, D J

    1996-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important cause of otitis media in children and of pneumonitis in adults with depressed resistance. Lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is a major surface antigen of NTHi and elicits bactericidal and opsonic antibodies. We prepared detoxified LOS (dLOS) protein conjugates from NTHi for use as experimental vaccines. LOS from NTHi 9274 was treated with anhydrous hydrazine and had its toxicity reduced to clinically acceptable levels. dLOS was bound to tetanus toxoid (TT) or high- molecular-weight proteins (HMPs) from NTHi through a linker of adipic acid dihydrazide to form dLOS-TT or dLOS-HMP. The molar ratio of the dLOS to protein carriers ranged from 26:1 to 50:1. The antigenicity of the conjugates was similar to that of the LOS alone as determined by double immunodiffusion. Subcutaneous or intramuscular injection of the conjugates elicited a 28- to 486-fold rise in the level of immunoglobulin G antibodies in mice to the homologous LOS after two or three injections and a 169- to 243-fold rise in the level of immunoglobulin G antibodies in rabbits after two injections. The immunogenicity of the conjugates in mice and rabbits was enhanced by formulation with monophosphoryl lipid A plus trehalose dimycolate. In rabbits, conjugate-induced LOS antibodies induced complement-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous strain 9274 and prototype strain 3189. These results indicate that a detoxified LOS-protein conjugate is a candidate vaccine for otitis media and pneumonitis caused by NTHi. PMID:8926067

  1. Development and technology transfer of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Beurret, Michel; Hamidi, Ahd; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2012-07-13

    This paper describes the development of a Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment/Netherlands Vaccine Institute (RIVM/NVI, Bilthoven, The Netherlands), and the subsequent transfer of its production process to manufacturers in developing countries. In 1998, at the outset of the project, the majority of the world's children were not immunized against Hib because of the high price and limited supply of the conjugate vaccines, due partly to the fact that local manufacturers in developing countries did not master the Hib conjugate production technology. To address this problem, the RIVM/NVI has developed a robust Hib conjugate vaccine production process based on a proven model, and transferred this technology to several partners in India, Indonesia, Korea and China. As a result, emerging manufacturers in developing countries acquired modern technologies previously unavailable to them. This has in turn facilitated their approach to producing other conjugate vaccines. As an additional spin-off from the project, a World Health Organization (WHO) Hib quality control (QC) course was designed and conducted at the RIVM/NVI, resulting in an increased regulatory capacity for conjugate vaccines in developing countries at the National Regulatory Authority (NRA) level. For the local populations, this has translated into an increased and sustainable supply of affordable Hib conjugate-containing combination vaccines. During the course of this project, developing countries have demonstrated their ability to produce large quantities of high-quality modern vaccines after a successful transfer of the technology. PMID:22683521

  2. Haemophilus influenzae serotype B (Hib) seroprevalence in England and Wales in 2009.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, Sn; Ramsay, Me; Flood, Js; Campbell, H; Slack, Mp; Pebody, R; Findlow, J; Newton, E; Wilding, M; Warrington, R; Crawford, H; Min, Sy; Gray, K; Martin, S; Frankland, S; Bokuvha, N; Laher, G; Borrow, R

    2012-01-01

    A national seroprevalence study was performed to determine the prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) antibodies in England and Wales in 2009, when Hib disease incidence was the lowest ever recorded. A total of 2,693 anonymised residual sera from routine diagnostic testing submitted by participating National Health Service hospital laboratories were tested for Hib anti-polyribosyl-ribitol phosphate (PRP) IgG antibodies using a fluorescent bead assay. Median anti-PRP IgG concentrations were highest in toddlers aged 1–4 years (2.65 μg/ml), followed by children aged 5–9 years (1.95 μg/ml). Antibody concentrations were significantly lower after this age, but were still significantly higher among 10–19 year-olds (0.54 μg/ml) compared with adults aged >20 years (0.16 μg/ ml; p<0.0001). Half of the adults (51%) did not have Hib antibody concentrations ≥0.15 μg/ml, the level considered to confer short-term protection. Thus, the current excellent Hib control appears to be the result of high anti-PRP antibody concentrations in children aged up to 10 years, achieved through the various childhood vaccination campaigns offering booster immunisation. The lack of seroprotection in adults emphasises the importance of maintaining control of the disease and, most probably carriage, in children, therefore raising the question as to whether long-term routine boosting of either pre-school children or adolescents may be required. PMID:23171823

  3. Identification and Characterization of msf, a Novel Virulence Factor in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kress-Bennett, Jennifer M; Hiller, N Luisa; Eutsey, Rory A; Powell, Evan; Longwell, Mark J; Hillman, Todd; Blackwell, Tenisha; Byers, Barbara; Mell, Joshua C; Post, J Christopher; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Janto, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen. The emergence of virulent, non-typeable strains (NTHi) emphasizes the importance of developing new interventional targets. We screened the NTHi supragenome for genes encoding surface-exposed proteins suggestive of immune evasion, identifying a large family containing Sel1-like repeats (SLRs). Clustering identified ten SLR-containing gene subfamilies, each with various numbers of SLRs per gene. Individual strains also had varying numbers of SLR-containing genes from one or more of the subfamilies. Statistical genetic analyses of gene possession among 210 NTHi strains typed as either disease or carriage found a significant association between possession of the SlrVA subfamily (which we have termed, macrophage survival factor, msf) and the disease isolates. The PittII strain contains four chromosomally contiguous msf genes. Deleting all four of these genes (msfA1-4) (KO) resulted in a highly significant decrease in phagocytosis and survival in macrophages; which was fully complemented by a single copy of the msfA1 gene. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media and invasive disease, the KO strain displayed a significant decrease in fitness compared to the WT in co-infections; and in single infections, the KO lost its ability to invade the brain. The singly complemented strain showed only a partial ability to compete with the WT suggesting gene dosage is important in vivo. The transcriptional profiles of the KO and WT in planktonic growth were compared using the NTHi supragenome array, which revealed highly significant changes in the expression of operons involved in virulence and anaerobiosis. These findings demonstrate that the msfA1-4 genes are virulence factors for phagocytosis, persistence, and trafficking to non-mucosal sites. PMID:26977929

  4. Otitis media associated polymorphisms in the hemin receptor HemR of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Nathan C.; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonize the human pharynx asymptomatically, and are also an important cause of otitis media (OM). Previous studies have demonstrated that some genes are more prevalent in OM-causing NTHi strains than in commensal strains, suggesting a role in virulence. These studies, however, are unable to investigate the possible associations between gene polymorphisms and disease. This study examined amino acid polymorphisms and sequence diversity in a potential virulence gene, the hemin receptor hemR, from a previously characterized NTHi strain collection containing both commensal and OM organisms to identify possible associations between the polymorphisms and otitis media. The full open reading frame of hemR was sequenced from a total of 146 NTHi isolates, yielding a total of 47 unique HemR amino acid sequences. The predicted structure of HemR showed substantial similarity to a class of monomeric TonB dependent, ligand-gated channels involved in iron acquisition in other gram negative bacteria. Fifteen amino acid polymorphisms were significantly more prevalent at the 90% confidence level among commensal compared to OM isolates. Upon controlling for the confounding effect of population structure, over half of the polymorphism-otitis media relationships lost statistical significance, emphasizing the importance of assessing the effect of population structure in association studies. The seven polymorphisms that retained significance were dispersed throughout the protein in various functional and structural domains, including the signal peptide, N-terminal plug domain, and intra- and extracellular loops. The alternate amino acid of only one of these seven polymorphisms was more common among OM isolates, demonstrating a strong trend toward the consensus sequence among disease causing NTHi. We hypothesize that variability at these positions in HemR may result in a reduced ability to acquire iron, rendering NTHi with such versions of the gene

  5. Prospects for prevention of Haemophilus influenzae type b disease by immunization.

    PubMed

    Granoff, D M; Munson, R S

    1986-03-01

    A vaccine consisting of the polysaccharide (PS) capsule of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) has recently been licensed in the United States. This vaccine is safe and effective in preventing invasive Hib disease in children two years of age and older, but it is ineffective in younger children, the group at greatest risk of disease. The PS vaccine also may be ineffective in preventing disease in certain subgroups of the population that are genetically at increased risk of disease and show impaired antibody responses to immunization. Thus, new strategies need to be considered. Currently, several new Hib PS-protein conjugate vaccines are being evaluated. These vaccines differ in their method of preparation, carrier protein, and PS size. In contrast to the plain Hib PS vaccine, conjugate vaccines are immunogenic in infants and elicit boostable increases in antibody to PS upon reinjection of vaccine. However, some infants less than six months of age do not respond. To confer protection on all infants, it may be necessary to modify further the conjugate vaccines. One approach is to use outer membrane proteins (OMPs) as vaccine components. Five major OMPs have been purified from Hib, and three, P1 (50 kilodalton [kDa]), P2 (37 kDa), and P6 (16 kDa), contain antigens capable of eliciting strain-specific protective antibodies in experimental animals. In summary, PS-protein conjugate vaccines hold enormous promise for the prevention of Hib disease in infants, but further work is needed to define the optimal carrier protein, PS size, and method of coupling. Information is also needed on whether genetic factors influence responses to these vaccines. PMID:3485160

  6. Preclinical evaluation of a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine process intended for technology transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Ahd; Verdijk, Pauline; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in low- and middle-income countries has been limited by cost and availability of Hib conjugate vaccines for a long time. It was previously recognized by the Institute for Translational Vaccinology (Intravacc, originating from the former Vaccinology Unit of the National Institute of Public Health [RIVM] and the Netherlands Vaccine Institute [NVI]) that local production of a Hib conjugate vaccine would increase the affordability and sustainability of the vaccine and thereby help to speed up Hib introduction in these countries. A new affordable and a non-infringing production process for a Hib conjugate vaccine was developed, including relevant quality control tests, and the technology was transferred to a number of vaccine manufacturers in India, Indonesia, and China. As part of the Hib technology transfer project managed by Intravacc, a preclinical toxicity study was conducted in the Netherlands to test the safety and immunogenicity of this new Hib conjugate vaccine. The data generated by this study were used by the technology transfer partners to accelerate the clinical development of the new Hib conjugate vaccine. A repeated dose toxicity and local tolerance study in rats was performed to assess the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a new Hib conjugate vaccine compared to a licensed vaccine. The results showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in rats, no major differences in both safety and immunogenicity in rats were found between the vaccine produced according to the production process developed by Intravacc and the licensed one. Rats may be useful to verify the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines and for preclinical evaluation. In general, nonclinical evaluation of the new Hib conjugate vaccine, including this proof of concept (safety and immunogenicity study in rats), made it possible for technology transfer partners, having implemented the original process with no changes

  7. A chalcone with potent inhibiting activity against biofilm formation by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Baothong, Sudarat; Khetkam, Pichit; Chokchaisiri, Suwadee; Suksamrarn, Apichart

    2014-10-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), an important human respiratory pathogen, frequently causes biofilm infections. Currently, resistance of bacteria within the biofilm to conventional antimicrobials poses a major obstacle to effective medical treatment on a global scale. Novel agents that are effective against NTHi biofilm are therefore urgently required. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic chalcones with various chemical substituents were evaluated in vitro for their antibiofilm activities against strong biofilm-forming strains of NTHi. Of the test chalcones, 3-hydroxychalcone (chalcone 8) exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity, its mean minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 ) being 16 μg/mL (71.35 μM), or approximately sixfold more active than the reference drug, azithromycin (MBIC50 419.68 μM). The inhibitory activity of chalcone 8, which is a chemically modified chalcone, appeared to be superior to those of the natural chalcones tested. Significantly, chalcone 8 inhibited biofilm formation by all studied NTHi strains, indicating that the antibiofilm activities of this compound occur across multiple strong-biofilm forming NTHi isolates of different clinical origins. According to antimicrobial and growth curve assays, chalcone 8 at concentrations that decreased biofilm formation did not affect growth of NTHi, suggesting the biofilm inhibitory effect of chalcone 8 is non-antimicrobial. In terms of structure-activity relationship, the possible substituent on the chalcone backbone required for antibiofilm activity is discussed. These findings indicate that 3-hydroxychalcone (chalcone 8) has powerful antibiofilm activity and suggest the potential application of chalcone 8 as a new therapeutic agent for control of NTHi biofilm-associated infections. PMID:25154700

  8. Identification and Characterization of msf, a Novel Virulence Factor in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Kress-Bennett, Jennifer M.; Hiller, N. Luisa; Eutsey, Rory A.; Powell, Evan; Longwell, Mark J.; Hillman, Todd; Blackwell, Tenisha; Byers, Barbara; Mell, Joshua C.; Post, J. Christopher; Hu, Fen Z.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Janto, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen. The emergence of virulent, non-typeable strains (NTHi) emphasizes the importance of developing new interventional targets. We screened the NTHi supragenome for genes encoding surface-exposed proteins suggestive of immune evasion, identifying a large family containing Sel1-like repeats (SLRs). Clustering identified ten SLR-containing gene subfamilies, each with various numbers of SLRs per gene. Individual strains also had varying numbers of SLR-containing genes from one or more of the subfamilies. Statistical genetic analyses of gene possession among 210 NTHi strains typed as either disease or carriage found a significant association between possession of the SlrVA subfamily (which we have termed, macrophage survival factor, msf) and the disease isolates. The PittII strain contains four chromosomally contiguous msf genes. Deleting all four of these genes (msfA1-4) (KO) resulted in a highly significant decrease in phagocytosis and survival in macrophages; which was fully complemented by a single copy of the msfA1 gene. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media and invasive disease, the KO strain displayed a significant decrease in fitness compared to the WT in co-infections; and in single infections, the KO lost its ability to invade the brain. The singly complemented strain showed only a partial ability to compete with the WT suggesting gene dosage is important in vivo. The transcriptional profiles of the KO and WT in planktonic growth were compared using the NTHi supragenome array, which revealed highly significant changes in the expression of operons involved in virulence and anaerobiosis. These findings demonstrate that the msfA1-4 genes are virulence factors for phagocytosis, persistence, and trafficking to non-mucosal sites. PMID:26977929

  9. Ferric Uptake Regulator and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Estevan A.; Szelestey, Blake R.; Newsom, David E.; White, Peter; Mason, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a commensal microorganism of the human nasopharynx, and yet is also an opportunistic pathogen of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Host microenvironments influence gene expression patterns, likely critical for NTHi persistence. The host sequesters iron as a mechanism to control microbial growth, and yet iron limitation influences gene expression and subsequent production of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. Careful regulation of iron uptake, via the ferric uptake regulator Fur, is essential in multiple bacteria, including NTHi. We hypothesized therefore that Fur contributes to iron homeostasis in NTHi, is critical for bacterial persistence, and likely regulates expression of virulence factors. Toward this end, fur was deleted in the prototypic NTHi clinical isolate, 86-028NP, and we assessed gene expression regulated by Fur. As expected, expression of the majority of genes that encode proteins with predicted roles in iron utilization was repressed by Fur. However, 14 Fur-regulated genes encode proteins with no known function, and yet may contribute to iron utilization or other biological functions. In a mammalian model of human otitis media, we determined that Fur was critical for bacterial persistence, indicating an important role for Fur-mediated iron homeostasis in disease progression. These data provide a profile of genes regulated by Fur in NTHi and likely identify additional regulatory pathways involved in iron utilization. Identification of such pathways will increase our understanding of how this pathogen can persist within host microenvironments, as a common commensal and, importantly, as a pathogen with significant clinical impact. PMID:23381990

  10. Synergistic activation of NF-kappaB by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Jono, Hirofumi; Han, Jiahuai; Lim, David J; Li, Jian-Dong

    2004-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important human pathogen causing otitis media in children and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. Like most other bacterial infections, NTHi infections are also characterized by inflammation, which is mainly mediated by cytokines and chemokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Among a variety of transcription regulators, NF-kappaB has been shown to play a critical role in regulating the expression of large numbers of genes encoding inflammatory mediators. In review of the current studies on NF-kappaB regulation, most of them have focused on investigating how NF-kappaB is activated by a single inducer at a time. However, in bacteria-induced inflammation in vivo, multiple inducers including both exogenous and endogenous mediators are present simultaneously. A key issue that has yet to be addressed is whether the exogenous inducers such as NTHi and the endogenous factors such as TNF-alpha activate NF-kappaB in a synergistic manner. We show that NTHi and TNF-alpha, when present together, synergistically induce NF-kappaB activation via two distinct signaling pathways: NF-kappaB translocation-dependent and -independent pathways. The NF-kappaB translocation-dependent pathway involves NF-kappaB-inducing kinase-IkappaB kinase beta/gamma-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, whereas the NF-kappaB translocation-independent pathway involves mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase kinase 1-dependent activation of MAPK kinase 3/6-p38 MAPK pathway. In addition, the same signaling pathways are also involved in synergistic induction of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-8. These studies should deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the combinatorial regulation of inflammation and lead to development of therapeutic strategies for NTHi-induced infections. PMID:14993593

  11. HPAEC-PAD quantification of Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide in upstream and downstream samples.

    PubMed

    van der Put, Robert M F; de Haan, Alex; van den IJssel, Jan G M; Hamidi, Ahd; Beurret, Michel

    2015-11-27

    Due to the rapidly increasing introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and other conjugate vaccines worldwide during the last decade, reliable and robust analytical methods are needed for the quantitative monitoring of intermediate samples generated during fermentation (upstream processing, USP) and purification (downstream processing, DSP) of polysaccharide vaccine components. This study describes the quantitative characterization of in-process control (IPC) samples generated during the fermentation and purification of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS), polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP), derived from Hib. Reliable quantitative methods are necessary for all stages of production; otherwise accurate process monitoring and validation is not possible. Prior to the availability of high performance anion exchange chromatography methods, this polysaccharide was predominantly quantified either with immunochemical methods, or with the colorimetric orcinol method, which shows interference from fermentation medium components and reagents used during purification. Next to an improved high performance anion exchange chromatography-pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) method, using a modified gradient elution, both the orcinol assay and high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) analyses were evaluated. For DSP samples, it was found that the correlation between the results obtained by HPAEC-PAD specific quantification of the PRP monomeric repeat unit released by alkaline hydrolysis, and those from the orcinol method was high (R(2)=0.8762), and that it was lower between HPAEC-PAD and HPSEC results. Additionally, HPSEC analysis of USP samples yielded surprisingly comparable results to those obtained by HPAEC-PAD. In the early part of the fermentation, medium components interfered with the different types of analysis, but quantitative HPSEC data could still be obtained, although lacking the specificity of the HPAEC-PAD method. Thus, the HPAEC

  12. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Carriage and Novel Bacterial Population Structure among Children in Urban Kathmandu, Nepal▿

    PubMed Central

    Williams, E. J.; Lewis, J.; John, T.; Hoe, J. C.; Yu, L.; Dongol, S.; Kelly, D. F.; Griffiths, D. T.; Shah, A.; Limbu, B.; Pradhan, R.; Mawas, F.; Shrestha, S.; Thorson, S.; Werno, A. M.; Murdoch, D. R.; Adhikari, N.; Pollard, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a major cause of invasive bacterial infection in children that can be prevented by a vaccine, but there is still uncertainty about its relative importance in Asia. This study investigated the age-specific prevalence of Hib carriage and its molecular epidemiology in carriage and disease in Nepal. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from children in Kathmandu, Nepal, from 3 different settings: a hospital outpatient department (OPD), schools, and children's homes. Hib was isolated using Hib antiserum agar plates, and serotyping was performed with latex agglutination. Hib isolates from children with invasive disease were obtained during active microbiological surveillance at Patan Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal. Genotyping of disease and carriage isolates was undertaken using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Swabs were taken from 2,195 children, including 1,311 children at an OPD, 647 children attending schools, and 237 children in homes. Overall, Hib was identified in 5.0% (110/2,195; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.9% to 6.4%). MLST was performed on 108 Hib isolates from children carrying Hib isolates and 15 isolates from children with invasive disease. Thirty-one sequence types (STs) were identified, and 20 of these were novel STs. The most common ST isolates were sequence type 6 (ST6) and the novel ST722. There was marked heterogeneity among the STs from children with disease and children carrying Hib. STs identified from invasive infections were those commonly identified in carriage. This study provides evidence of Hib carriage among children in urban Nepal with genetically diverse strains prior to introduction of universal vaccination. The Hib carriage rate in Nepal was similar to the rates observed in other populations with documented high disease rates prior to vaccination, supporting implementation of Hib vaccine in Nepal in 2009. PMID:21270225

  13. Detoxified lipooligosaccharide from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae conjugated to proteins confers protection against otitis media in chinchillas.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X X; Sun, J; Jin, S; Barenkamp, S J; Lim, D J; Robbins, J B; Battey, J

    1997-01-01

    Detoxified-lipooligosaccharide (dLOS)-protein conjugates from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) elicited a significant rise of anti-LOS antibodies with bactericidal activity in rabbits (X.-X. Gu, C.-M. Tsai, T. Ueyama, S. J. Barenkamp, J. B. Robbins, and D. J. Lim, Infect. Immun. 64:4047-4053, 1996). In this study, we evaluated whether vaccination with the conjugates would protect against NTHi otitis media in chinchillas. Fifty-eight chinchillas received three subcutaneous or intramuscular injections of dLOS-conjugated tetanus toxoid, dLOS-conjugated high-molecular-weight proteins from NTHi, or saline (control) in Freund's adjuvant and then were challenged by intrabullar inoculation with 140 CFU of NTHi. All vaccinated animals responded with elevated serum titers of anti-LOS antibody, and 49% (19 of 39) demonstrated bactericidal activity against the homologous strain. Otitis media with culture-positive NTHi effusions developed in all 19 controls and 56% (22 of 39) of the vaccinated animals during a period of 21 days (P < 0.001). Bacterial counts of the middle ear effusions were lower in the vaccine groups than in the controls (P < 0.01). The incidences of infection in the unchallenged ear or inner ear were 26 or 28% in the vaccine groups and 53 or 58% in the controls (P < 0.05). The signs of infection observed by otoscopy were less severe in the vaccine groups than in the controls. There was no significant difference between the two vaccine groups. These data indicate that active immunization with LOS-based conjugates reduces the incidence of NTHi-induced otitis media. PMID:9353024

  14. Relationship between Azithromycin Susceptibility and Administration Efficacy for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Euba, Begoña; Moleres, Javier; Viadas, Cristina; Barberán, Montserrat; Caballero, Lucía; Grilló, María-Jesús; Bengoechea, José Antonio; de-Torres, Juan Pablo; Liñares, Josefina; Leiva, José

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an opportunistic pathogen that is an important cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). COPD is an inflammatory disease of the airways, and exacerbations are acute inflammatory events superimposed on this background of chronic inflammation. Azithromycin (AZM) is a macrolide antibiotic with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties and a clinically proven potential for AECOPD prevention and management. Relationships between AZM efficacy and resistance by NTHI and between bactericidal and immunomodulatory effects on NTHI respiratory infection have not been addressed. In this study, we employed two pathogenic NTHI strains with different AZM susceptibilities (NTHI 375 [AZM susceptible] and NTHI 353 [AZM resistant]) to evaluate the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of AZM on the NTHI-host interplay. At the cellular level, AZM was bactericidal toward intracellular NTHI inside alveolar and bronchial epithelia and alveolar macrophages, and it enhanced NTHI phagocytosis by the latter cell type. These effects correlated with the strain MIC of AZM and the antibiotic dose. Additionally, the effect of AZM on NTHI infection was assessed in a mouse model of pulmonary infection. AZM showed both preventive and therapeutic efficacies by lowering NTHI 375 bacterial counts in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and by reducing histopathological inflammatory lesions in the upper and lower airways of mice. Conversely, AZM did not reduce bacterial loads in animals infected with NTHI 353, in which case a milder anti-inflammatory effect was also observed. Together, the results of this work link the bactericidal and anti-inflammatory effects of AZM and frame the efficacy of this antibiotic against NTHI respiratory infection. PMID:25712355

  15. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children. PMID:27113355

  16. Preclinical evaluation of a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine process intended for technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Ahd; Verdijk, Pauline; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in low- and middle-income countries has been limited by cost and availability of Hib conjugate vaccines for a long time. It was previously recognized by the Institute for Translational Vaccinology (Intravacc, originating from the former Vaccinology Unit of the National Institute of Public Health [RIVM] and the Netherlands Vaccine Institute [NVI]) that local production of a Hib conjugate vaccine would increase the affordability and sustainability of the vaccine and thereby help to speed up Hib introduction in these countries. A new affordable and a non-infringing production process for a Hib conjugate vaccine was developed, including relevant quality control tests, and the technology was transferred to a number of vaccine manufacturers in India, Indonesia, and China. As part of the Hib technology transfer project managed by Intravacc, a preclinical toxicity study was conducted in the Netherlands to test the safety and immunogenicity of this new Hib conjugate vaccine. The data generated by this study were used by the technology transfer partners to accelerate the clinical development of the new Hib conjugate vaccine. A repeated dose toxicity and local tolerance study in rats was performed to assess the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a new Hib conjugate vaccine compared to a licensed vaccine. The results showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in rats, no major differences in both safety and immunogenicity in rats were found between the vaccine produced according to the production process developed by Intravacc and the licensed one. Rats may be useful to verify the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines and for preclinical evaluation. In general, nonclinical evaluation of the new Hib conjugate vaccine, including this proof of concept (safety and immunogenicity study in rats), made it possible for technology transfer partners, having implemented the original process with no changes

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis of lower extremity caused by Haemophilus influenzae in a healthy adult with a closed lisfranc injury.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R Wesley; Casillas, Mark M; Almaguer, Enrique C

    2014-05-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare bacterial infection with an incidence of approximately 0.4 cases per 100,000 population. Although the majority of cases of necrotizing fasciitis are polymicrobial, a systematic review of the literature found only 7 reports of Haemophilus influenzae as the causal agent, and only 1 incidence of H influenzae causing the infection in a healthy adult. This report documents the unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy adult with a history of smoking as her only risk factor. The patient presented with a seemingly innocuous low-grade Lisfranc injury. Our case illustrates the importance of early diagnosis and aggressive surgical management and medical treatment of necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:24839630

  18. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Carriage among Young Children in Metropolitan Atlanta in the Context of Vaccine Shortage and Booster Dose Deferral ▿

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer Dolan; Jackson, Michael L.; Sharma, Dolly; Mair, Raydel; Bach, Michelle C.; Castillo, Dana; Ejigiri, O. Grace; Satola, Sarah; Cohn, Amanda C.; Jerris, Robert; Jain, Shabnam; Farley, Monica M.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Messonnier, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    Short-term deferral of the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine booster dose during a recent U.S. Hib vaccine shortage did not result in widespread Hib carriage in Atlanta, as the Hib carriage rate was found to be 0.3% (1/342). Hib colonization was significantly more common among males and day care attendees. PMID:22012977

  19. Lack of expression of the global regulator OxyR in Haemophilus influenzae has a profound effect on growth phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Maciver, I; Hansen, E J

    1996-01-01

    A pBR322-based library of chromosomal DNA from the nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae TN106 was screened for the expression of transferrin-binding activity in Escherichia coli. A recombinant clone expressing transferrin-binding activity contained a 3.7-kb fragment of nontypeable H. influenzae DNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this insert revealed the presence of two complete open reading frames encoding proteins of approximately 26 and 34 kDa. Mini-Tn10kan transposon mutagenesis at different sites within the open reading frame encoding the 34-kDa protein resulted in the abolition of transferrin-binding activity in the recombinant E. coli clone. The deduced amino acid sequence of the 34-kDa protein had 70% identity with the OxyR protein of E. coli; this latter macromolecule is a member of the LysR family of transcriptional activators. When a mutated H. influenzae oxyR gene was introduced into the chromosome of the wild-type H. influenzae strain by allelic exchange, the resulting oxyR mutant still exhibited wild-type levels of transferrin-binding activity but was unable to grow on media containing the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in place of heme. This mutant also exhibited reduced growth around disks impregnated with heme sources. Supplementation of the PPIX-based growth media with catalase or sodium pyruvate resulted in normal growth of the H. influenzae oxyR mutant. Provision of the wild-type H. influenzae oxyR gene in trans also permitted the growth of this mutant on a PPIX-based medium. Exogenously supplied catalase restored the growth of this mutant with heme sources to nearly wild-type levels. These results indicate that expression of a wild-type OxyR protein by H. influenzae is essential to allow this organism to protect itself against oxidative stresses in vitro. PMID:8890216

  20. Lack of expression of the global regulator OxyR in Haemophilus influenzae has a profound effect on growth phenotype.

    PubMed

    Maciver, I; Hansen, E J

    1996-11-01

    A pBR322-based library of chromosomal DNA from the nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae TN106 was screened for the expression of transferrin-binding activity in Escherichia coli. A recombinant clone expressing transferrin-binding activity contained a 3.7-kb fragment of nontypeable H. influenzae DNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this insert revealed the presence of two complete open reading frames encoding proteins of approximately 26 and 34 kDa. Mini-Tn10kan transposon mutagenesis at different sites within the open reading frame encoding the 34-kDa protein resulted in the abolition of transferrin-binding activity in the recombinant E. coli clone. The deduced amino acid sequence of the 34-kDa protein had 70% identity with the OxyR protein of E. coli; this latter macromolecule is a member of the LysR family of transcriptional activators. When a mutated H. influenzae oxyR gene was introduced into the chromosome of the wild-type H. influenzae strain by allelic exchange, the resulting oxyR mutant still exhibited wild-type levels of transferrin-binding activity but was unable to grow on media containing the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in place of heme. This mutant also exhibited reduced growth around disks impregnated with heme sources. Supplementation of the PPIX-based growth media with catalase or sodium pyruvate resulted in normal growth of the H. influenzae oxyR mutant. Provision of the wild-type H. influenzae oxyR gene in trans also permitted the growth of this mutant on a PPIX-based medium. Exogenously supplied catalase restored the growth of this mutant with heme sources to nearly wild-type levels. These results indicate that expression of a wild-type OxyR protein by H. influenzae is essential to allow this organism to protect itself against oxidative stresses in vitro. PMID:8890216

  1. Complete Deletion of the Fucose Operon in Haemophilus influenzae Is Associated with a Cluster in Multilocus Sequence Analysis-Based Phylogenetic Group II Related to Haemophilus haemolyticus: Implications for Identification and Typing

    PubMed Central

    de Gier, Camilla; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus are difficult to differentiate from Haemophilus influenzae despite a wide difference in pathogenic potential. A previous investigation characterized a challenging set of 60 clinical strains using multiple PCRs for marker genes and described strains that could not be unequivocally identified as either species. We have analyzed the same set of strains by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MLSA unambiguously allocated all study strains to either of the two species, while identification by 16S rRNA sequence was inconclusive for three strains. Notably, the two methods yielded conflicting identifications for two strains. Most of the “fuzzy species” strains were identified as H. influenzae that had undergone complete deletion of the fucose operon. Such strains, which are untypeable by the H. influenzae multilocus sequence type (MLST) scheme, have sporadically been reported and predominantly belong to a single branch of H. influenzae MLSA phylogenetic group II. We also found evidence of interspecies recombination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus within the 16S rRNA genes. Establishing an accurate method for rapid and inexpensive identification of H. influenzae is important for disease surveillance and treatment. PMID:26378279

  2. Complete Deletion of the Fucose Operon in Haemophilus influenzae Is Associated with a Cluster in Multilocus Sequence Analysis-Based Phylogenetic Group II Related to Haemophilus haemolyticus: Implications for Identification and Typing.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus are difficult to differentiate from Haemophilus influenzae despite a wide difference in pathogenic potential. A previous investigation characterized a challenging set of 60 clinical strains using multiple PCRs for marker genes and described strains that could not be unequivocally identified as either species. We have analyzed the same set of strains by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MLSA unambiguously allocated all study strains to either of the two species, while identification by 16S rRNA sequence was inconclusive for three strains. Notably, the two methods yielded conflicting identifications for two strains. Most of the "fuzzy species" strains were identified as H. influenzae that had undergone complete deletion of the fucose operon. Such strains, which are untypeable by the H. influenzae multilocus sequence type (MLST) scheme, have sporadically been reported and predominantly belong to a single branch of H. influenzae MLSA phylogenetic group II. We also found evidence of interspecies recombination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus within the 16S rRNA genes. Establishing an accurate method for rapid and inexpensive identification of H. influenzae is important for disease surveillance and treatment. PMID:26378279

  3. Quantitative fucK gene polymerase chain reaction on sputum and nasopharyngeal secretions to detect Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Mölling, Paula; Herrmann, Björn

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the fucK gene was developed for specific detection of Haemophilus influenzae. The method was tested on sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) from 78 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). With a reference standard of sputum culture and/or serology against the patient's own nasopharyngeal isolate, H. influenzae etiology was detected in 20 patients. Compared with the reference standard, fucK PCR (using the detection limit 10(5) DNA copies/mL) on sputum and NPA showed a sensitivity of 95.0% (19/20) in both cases, and specificities of 87.9% (51/58) and 89.5% (52/58), respectively. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sputum fucK PCR was found to be significantly superior to sputum P6 PCR for detection of H. influenzae CAP. NPA fucK PCR was positive in 3 of 54 adult controls without respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, quantitative fucK real-time PCR provides a sensitive and specific identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. PMID:23541117

  4. A discrete role for FNR in the transcriptional response to moderate changes in oxygen by Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Donald; Tikhomirova, Alexandra; Bent, Stephen J; Kidd, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    The survival by pathogenic bacteria within the specific conditions of an anatomical niche is critical for their persistence. These conditions include the combination of toxic chemicals, such as reactive oxygen (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), with factors relevant to cell growth, such as oxygen. Haemophilus influenzae senses oxygen levels largely through the redox state of the intracellular fumarate-nitrate global regulator (FNR). H. influenzae certainly encounters oxygen levels that fluctuate, but in reality, these would rarely reach a state that results in FNR being fully reduced or oxidized. We were therefore interested in the response of H. influenzae to ROS and RNS at moderately high or low oxygen levels and the corresponding role of FNR. At these levels of oxygen, even though the growth rate of an H. influenzae fnr mutant was similar to wild type, its ROS and RNS tolerance was significantly different. Additionally, the subtle changes in oxygen did alter the whole cell transcriptional profile and this was different between the wild type and fnr mutant strains. It was the changed whole cell profile that impacted on ROS/RNS defence, but surprisingly, the FNR-regulated, anaerobic nitrite reductase (NrfA) continued to be expressed and had a role in this phenotype. PMID:26499095

  5. Cloning of a DNA fragment encoding a heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding outer membrane protein from Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H; Ren, Z; Pozsgay, J M; Elkins, C; Whitby, P W; Morton, D J; Stull, T L

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is able to use hemoglobin as a sole source of heme, and heme-repressible hemoglobin binding to the cell surface has been demonstrated. Using an affinity purification methodology, a hemoglobin-binding protein of approximately 120 kDa was isolated from H. influenzae type b strain HI689 grown in heme-restricted but not in heme-replete conditions. The isolated protein was subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and the derived amino acid sequence was used to design corresponding oligonucleotides. The oligonucleotides were used to probe a Southern blot of EcoRI-digested HI689 genomic DNA. A hybridizing band of approximately 4.2 kb was successfully cloned into pUC19. Using a 1.9-kb internal BglII fragment of the 4.2-kb clone as a probe, hybridization was seen in both typeable and nontypeable H. influenzae but not in other bacterial species tested. Following partial nucleotide sequencing of the 4.2-kb insert, a putative open reading frame was subcloned into an expression vector. The host Escherichia coli strain in which the cloned fragment was expressed bound biotinylated human hemoglobin, whereas binding of hemoglobin was not detected in E. coli with the vector alone. In conclusion, we hypothesize that the DNA fragment encoding an approximately 120-kDa heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding protein mediates one step in the acquisition of hemoglobin by H. influenzae in vivo. PMID:8757844

  6. Microbiological Characterization of Haemophilus influenzae Isolated from Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections in a Tertiary Care Hospital, South India

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Padmaja Ananth; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Shaw, Dipika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Haemophilus influenzae is responsible for wide range of localized and invasive lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) with the highest burden of disease in low and middle income countries. Aim The aim of the present study was to characterize the H.influenzae isolates from suspected LRTI. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted over a period of one and half years (December 2012 to May 2014) including patients with LRTI. H.influenzae was isolated from lower respiratory specimens following standard procedures. Complete characterization of the isolates was performed by bio typing, capsular serotyping, molecular genotyping and antibiotic susceptibility testing. The predisposing factors and clinical presentation were studied in the infected patients. Results A total of 8995 samples were received during the study period, out of which growth was significantly observed in 2848 (31.7%) samples. Among the various respiratory pathogens, H.influenzae was isolated from 175 (6.14%) patients. Majority (78.9%) of the patients presented with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The isolates most frequently were of Biotype II (35.42%). Only four of the 50 isolates subjected to capsular serotyping were typeable and were of type b, e and f. All the 50 isolates tested were found to be non-typeable by PCR for capsular genotyping. Maximum resistance was found against ampicillin (9.71%). Conclusion H.influenzae was found to be a significant cause of LRTI. Majority of the isolates were found to be non typeable strains. Non typeable H. influenzae isolates should not be neglected as they can colonize the respiratory tract in COPD patients and can lead to biofilm formation and treatment failure. PMID:27437218

  7. Immunogenicity of a Haemophilus influenzae polysaccharide-Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein complex conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, J J; Deck, R R; Liu, M A

    1990-11-01

    Polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines made with different carriers vary in their ability to elicit antipolysaccharide IgG antibody responses in young infants and an adult mouse model, suggesting that the carrier proteins used in the conjugate vaccines differ in their ability to act as carriers, or that additional mechanisms of immunogenicity play a role. A conjugate vaccine of Haemophilus influenzae PRP coupled to the outer membrane protein complex (OMPC) of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is immunogenic in children as young as 2 mo of age and is immunogenic in infant rhesus monkeys, an animal model for infant humans. In the present study, PRP-OMPC was found to induce efficient IgM to IgG switching of anti-PRP serum antibody in adult mice, whereas PRP conjugated to two other protein carriers did not. Thus the PRP-OMPC conjugate was examined in order to determine why PRP coupled to OMPC was so immunogenic, even more immunogenic than conjugates made with other carrier proteins. The OMPC carrier differs from the other protein carriers in that the proteins are present in a liposomal form containing lipids (including LPS) derived from the outer membrane of N. meningitidis. We studied the OMPC to see whether the different components or the nature of the OMPC carrier could contribute to its enhanced immunogenicity. Specifically we evaluated the OMPC for both classic Th cell carrier activity and adjuvanticity, and the LPS component of OMPC for systemic polyclonal B cell activation. Carrier recognition of the OMPC moiety of PRP-OMPC was demonstrated. In addition the PRP-OMPC conjugate vaccine was observed to have adjuvant properties for both T cell-dependent and T cell-independent Ag in the absence of LPS-induced systemic polyclonal B cell activation. These observations suggest that in addition to functioning as a classic protein carrier whereby the proteins in OMPC provide Th cell epitopes, the OMPC also has adjuvant activity that distinguishes it from other protein

  8. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. PMID:26014114

  9. Comparative characterization of the iga gene encoding IgA1 protease in Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, H; Poulsen, K; Kilian, M

    1995-02-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the IgA1 protease gene (iga) from Neisseria meningitidis strain HF13 showed an overall structure equivalent to iga genes from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae, although no region corresponding to the gonococcal alpha-peptide was evident. An additional 18 N. meningitidis and 3 H. influenzae iga genes were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction technique and sequenced corresponding approximately to the N-terminal half of the mature enzyme. Comparative analyses of a total of 29 iga genes showed that pathogenic Neisseria have iga genes with a significantly lower degree of heterogeneity than H. influenzae iga genes. Recombinational events indicated by mosaic-like structures corresponding to those found among N. gonorrhoeae protease genes were detected among N. meningitidis iga genes. One region showed characteristic differences in sequence and length which correlated with each of the different cleavage specificities. Meningococci were extremely conserved in this region with no evidence of recombination between isolates of different cleavage specificities. Sequences further downstream showed no obvious relationship with enzyme cleavage type. This region consisted of conserved areas interspersed with highly variable areas. Amino acid sequence homologies in the variable regions of meningococci reflected the antigenic types defined by using polyclonal neutralizing antibodies. PMID:7783620

  10. Crystal Structure of Homoserine Transacetylase from Haemophilus Influenzae Reveals a New Family of alpha/beta-Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza,I.; Nazi, I.; Korczynska, M.; Wright, G.; Berghuis, A.

    2005-01-01

    Homoserine transacetylase catalyzes one of the required steps in the biosynthesis of methionine in fungi and several bacteria. We have determined the crystal structure of homoserine transacetylase from Haemophilus influenzae to a resolution of 1.65 A. The structure identifies this enzyme to be a member of the alpha/beta-hydrolase structural superfamily. The active site of the enzyme is located near the end of a deep tunnel formed by the juxtaposition of two domains and incorporates a catalytic triad involving Ser143, His337, and Asp304. A structural basis is given for the observed double displacement kinetic mechanism of homoserine transacetylase. Furthermore, the properties of the tunnel provide a rationale for how homoserine transacetylase catalyzes a transferase reaction vs. hydrolysis, despite extensive similarity in active site architecture to hydrolytic enzymes.

  11. The effects of disodium cromoglycate on enhanced adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to A549 cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Chie; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ogita, Junko; Hishiki, Haruka; Kohno, Yoichi

    2009-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) secondary infection often complicates respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. Previous studies have revealed that RSV infections enhance NTHi adherence to airway epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and corticosteroids, which are frequently used for the treatment of wheezing often related to RSV infections, on the adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells. DSCG inhibited enhanced adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells, whereas dexamethasone (Dex) and fluticasone propionate (Fp) did not. DSCG suppressed the expression of ICAM-1, which is one of the NTHi receptors. Furthermore, DSCG exhibited an inhibitory effect on RSV infections. It is suggested that DSCG exerts an anti-RSV effect, and consequently attenuates the expression of NTHi receptors. PMID:19390482

  12. ModA2 Phasevarion Switching in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Increases the Severity of Experimental Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Brockman, Kenneth L; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Atack, John M; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Jennings, Michael P; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2016-09-01

    Several human-adapted bacterial pathogens use a phasevarion (ie, a phase-variable regulon) to rapidly and reversibly regulate the expression of many genes, which include known virulence factors, yet the influence of phasevarion-mediated regulation in pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Here we examine the impact of the nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) ModA2 phasevarion on pathogenesis and disease severity in a chinchilla model of experimental otitis media. Chinchillas were challenged with NTHI variant populations that were either inoculated ON and remained ON, inoculated OFF and shifted ON, or inoculated OFF and remained OFF, within the middle ear. We show that populations that shift from OFF to ON within the middle ear induce significantly greater disease severity than populations that are unable to shift. These observations support the importance of phasevarion switching in NTHI pathogenesis and the necessity to considered phasevarion regulation when developing methods to treat and prevent infection. PMID:27288538

  13. Antibacterial FabH Inhibitors with Mode of Action Validated in Haemophilus influenzae by in Vitro Resistance Mutation Mapping.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David C; Eyermann, Charles J; Gu, Rong-Fang; Hu, Jun; Kazmirski, Steven L; Lahiri, Sushmita D; McKenzie, Andrew R; Shapiro, Adam B; Breault, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential to bacterial growth in Gram-negative pathogens. Several small molecules identified through a combination of high-throughput and fragment screening were cocrystallized with FabH (β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III) from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Structure-based drug design was used to merge several scaffolds to provide a new class of inhibitors. After optimization for Gram-negative enzyme inhibitory potency, several compounds demonstrated antimicrobial activity against an efflux-negative strain of Haemophilus influenzae. Mutants resistant to these compounds had mutations in the FabH gene near the catalytic triad, validating FabH as a target for antimicrobial drug discovery. PMID:27626097

  14. International collaborative study for establishment of the 2nd WHO International Standard for Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Mawas, Fatme; Burkin, Karena; Dougall, Thomas; Saydam, Manolya; Rigsby, Peter; Bolgiano, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    In this report we present the results of a collaborative study for the preparation and calibration of a replacement International Standard (IS) for Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide (polyribosyl ribitol phosphate; 5-d-ribitol-(1 → 1)-β-d-ribose-3-phosphate; PRP). Two candidate preparations were evaluated. Thirteen laboratories from 9 different countries participated in the collaborative study to assess the suitability and determine the PRP content of two candidate standards. On the basis of the results from this study, Candidate 2 (NIBSC code 12/306) has been established as the 2nd WHO IS for PRP by the Expert Committee of Biological Standards of the World Health Organisation with a content of 4.904 ± 0.185mg/ampoule, as determined by the ribose assays carried out by 11 of the participating laboratories. PMID:26298195

  15. Haemophilus influenzae with Non-Beta-Lactamase-Mediated Beta-Lactam Resistance: Easy To Find but Hard To Categorize

    PubMed Central

    Lia, Astrid; Hannisdal, Anja; Tveten, Yngvar; Matuschek, Erika; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Kristiansen, Bjørn-Erik

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major pathogen, and beta-lactams are first-line drugs. Resistance due to altered penicillin-binding protein 3 (rPBP3) is frequent, and susceptibility testing of such strains is challenging. A collection of 154 beta-lactamase-negative isolates with a large proportion of rPBP3 (67.5%) was used to evaluate and compare Etest (Haemophilus test medium [HTM]) and disk diffusion (EUCAST method) for categorization of susceptibility to aminopenicillins and cefuroxime, using MICs generated with broth (HTM) microdilution and clinical breakpoints from CLSI and EUCAST as the gold standards. In addition, the proficiency of nine disks in screening for the rPBP3 genotype (N526K positive) was evaluated. By Etest, both essential and categorical agreement were generally poor (<70%), with high very major errors (VME) (CLSI, 13.0%; EUCAST, 34.3%) and falsely susceptible rates (FSR) (CLSI, 87.0%; EUCAST, 88.3%) for ampicillin. Ampicillin (2 μg) with adjusted (+2 mm) zone breakpoints was superior to Etest for categorization of susceptibility to ampicillin (agreement, 74.0%; VME, 11.0%; FSR, 28.3%). Conversely, Etest was superior to 30 μg cefuroxime for categorization of susceptibility to cefuroxime (agreement, 57.1% versus 60.4%; VME, 2.6% versus 9.7%; FSR, 7.1% versus 26.8%). Benzylpenicillin (1 unit) (EUCAST screening disk) and cefuroxime (5 μg) identified rPBP3 isolates with highest accuracies (95.5% and 92.2%, respectively). In conclusion, disk screening reliably detects rPBP3 H. influenzae, but false ampicillin susceptibility is frequent with routine methods. We suggest adding a comment recommending high-dose aminopenicillin therapy or the use of other agents for severe infections with screening-positive isolates that are susceptible to aminopenicillins by gradient or disk diffusion. PMID:26354813

  16. Common antigenic domains in transferrin-binding protein 2 of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, P; Williams, P; Griffiths, E

    1992-06-01

    There is now considerable evidence to show that in the Neisseria and Haemophilus species, membrane receptors specific for either transferrin or lactoferrin are involved in the acquisition of iron from these glycoproteins. In Neisseria meningitidis, the transferrin receptor appears to consist of two proteins, one of which (TBP 1) has an M(r) of 95,000 and the other of which (TBP 2) has an M(r) ranging from 68,000 to 85,000, depending on the strain; TBP 2 binds transferrin after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electroblotting, but TBP 1 does not do so. The relative contributions of these two proteins to the binding reaction observed with intact cells and to iron uptake are presently unknown. However, they are being considered as potential components of a group B meningococcal vaccine. Analogous higher- and lower-molecular-weight proteins associated with transferrin binding have been found in N. gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. Previous work with polyclonal antibodies raised in mice with whole cells of iron-restricted N. meningitidis showed that the meningococcal TBP 2 exhibits considerable antigenic heterogeneity. Here, we report that antiserum against purified TBP 2 from one strain of N. meningitidis cross-reacts on immunoblotting with the TBP 2 of all meningococcal isolates examined, as well as with the TBP 2 of N. gonorrhoeae. This antiserum also cross-reacted with the TBP 2 of several strains of H. influenzae type b, thus showing the presence of common antigenic domains among these functionally equivalent proteins in different pathogens; no cross-reaction was detected with a purified sample of the human transferrin receptor. PMID:1587606

  17. Haemophilus influenzae with Non-Beta-Lactamase-Mediated Beta-Lactam Resistance: Easy To Find but Hard To Categorize.

    PubMed

    Skaare, Dagfinn; Lia, Astrid; Hannisdal, Anja; Tveten, Yngvar; Matuschek, Erika; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Kristiansen, Bjørn-Erik

    2015-11-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major pathogen, and beta-lactams are first-line drugs. Resistance due to altered penicillin-binding protein 3 (rPBP3) is frequent, and susceptibility testing of such strains is challenging. A collection of 154 beta-lactamase-negative isolates with a large proportion of rPBP3 (67.5%) was used to evaluate and compare Etest (Haemophilus test medium [HTM]) and disk diffusion (EUCAST method) for categorization of susceptibility to aminopenicillins and cefuroxime, using MICs generated with broth (HTM) microdilution and clinical breakpoints from CLSI and EUCAST as the gold standards. In addition, the proficiency of nine disks in screening for the rPBP3 genotype (N526K positive) was evaluated. By Etest, both essential and categorical agreement were generally poor (<70%), with high very major errors (VME) (CLSI, 13.0%; EUCAST, 34.3%) and falsely susceptible rates (FSR) (CLSI, 87.0%; EUCAST, 88.3%) for ampicillin. Ampicillin (2 μg) with adjusted (+2 mm) zone breakpoints was superior to Etest for categorization of susceptibility to ampicillin (agreement, 74.0%; VME, 11.0%; FSR, 28.3%). Conversely, Etest was superior to 30 μg cefuroxime for categorization of susceptibility to cefuroxime (agreement, 57.1% versus 60.4%; VME, 2.6% versus 9.7%; FSR, 7.1% versus 26.8%). Benzylpenicillin (1 unit) (EUCAST screening disk) and cefuroxime (5 μg) identified rPBP3 isolates with highest accuracies (95.5% and 92.2%, respectively). In conclusion, disk screening reliably detects rPBP3 H. influenzae, but false ampicillin susceptibility is frequent with routine methods. We suggest adding a comment recommending high-dose aminopenicillin therapy or the use of other agents for severe infections with screening-positive isolates that are susceptible to aminopenicillins by gradient or disk diffusion. PMID:26354813

  18. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae Clones Associated with Invasive Disease a Decade after Introduction of H. influenzae Serotype b Vaccination in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Giufrè, Maria; Cardines, Rita; Accogli, Marisa; Pardini, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) conjugate vaccines has changed the epidemiology of invasive H. influenzae disease, with a shift in the predominant serotype from Hib to nonencapsulated H. influenzae (ncHi). The objective of this study was to identify the genotypes/clones associated with invasive H. influenzae disease in Italy. Eighty-seven H. influenzae strains isolated in the years 2009 to 2011 within the National Surveillance of Invasive Bacterial Disease program were analyzed. Strains were characterized by serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Genetic polymorphisms in the blaTEM gene promoter region as well as the occurrence of both adhesin genes (hmwA and hia) and the IgA1 protease-encoding gene (igaB) were also investigated. Of 87 strains, 67 were ncHi and 20 were encapsulated. Eleven strains were β-lactamase positive, harboring the blaTEM gene. Most blaTEM genes (10/11) were associated with a Pdel promoter region exhibiting a 135-bp deletion; the remaining strain possessed the Pa/Pb overlapping promoter. MLST analysis showed that encapsulated isolates were clonal, with each serotype sharing a few related sequence types (STs). Forty-six different STs were identified among the 67 ncHi strains. Despite this heterogeneity, a group of closely related STs (ST103, ST139, and ST145) encompassed almost 25% of all ncHi strains and 45.5% of the β-lactamase producers carrying the Pdel promoter. These major ST clones were found to be associated with the hmwA gene but not with the igaB gene. To conclude, although the heterogeneity of the ncHi population was confirmed, diffusion of major successful ST clones was documented. PMID:23761663

  19. Genome-wide fitness profiling reveals adaptations required by Haemophilus in coinfection with influenza A virus in the murine lung

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sandy M.; Bernui, Mariana; Shen, Hao; Akerley, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial coinfection represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in epidemics of influenza A virus (IAV). The bacterium Haemophilus influenzae typically colonizes the human upper respiratory tract without causing disease, and yet in individuals infected with IAV, it can cause debilitating or lethal secondary pneumonia. Studies in murine models have detected immune components involved in susceptibility and pathology, and yet few studies have examined bacterial factors contributing to coinfection. We conducted genome-wide profiling of the H. influenzae genes that promote its fitness in a murine model of coinfection with IAV. Application of direct, high-throughput sequencing of transposon insertion sites revealed fitness phenotypes of a bank of H. influenzae mutants in viral coinfection in comparison with bacterial infection alone. One set of virulence genes was required in nonvirally infected mice but not in coinfection, consistent with a defect in anti-bacterial defenses during coinfection. Nevertheless, a core set of genes required in both in vivo conditions indicated that many bacterial countermeasures against host defenses remain critical for coinfection. The results also revealed a subset of genes required in coinfection but not in bacterial infection alone, including the iron-sulfur cluster regulator gene, iscR, which was required for oxidative stress resistance. Overexpression of the antioxidant protein Dps in the iscR mutant restored oxidative stress resistance and ability to colonize in coinfection. The results identify bacterial stress and metabolic adaptations required in an IAV coinfection model, revealing potential targets for treatment or prevention of secondary bacterial pneumonia after viral infection. PMID:24003154

  20. Purification and characterization of a pilin specific for Brazilian purpuric fever-associated Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (H. aegyptius) strains.

    PubMed Central

    Weyant, R S; Bibb, W F; Stephens, D S; Holloway, B P; Moo-Penn, W F; Birkness, K A; Helsel, L O; Mayer, L W

    1990-01-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) is a recently described fatal pediatric disease caused by systemic infection with Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius. Previous studies have shown that all H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains isolated from BPF cases and case contacts share several unique phenotypic and genotypic characteristics that differentiate them from other H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains isolated from conjunctivitis cases in Brazil. One key characteristic of this BPF clone is reactivity in a BPF-specific monoclonal antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We have purified and partially characterized a pilin, referred to as the 25-kilodalton (kDa) protein. Aggregates of this protein contain a heat-labile epitope which is recognized by a monoclonal antibody used in the BPF-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The protein has a molecular weight of approximately 25,000, is insoluble in most detergents, and fractionates with outer membrane vesicles after LiCl extraction. Biochemical analysis of the 25-kDa protein shows it to have an amino acid composition similar but not identical to that of the H. influenzae type b pilin. The sequence of 20 N-terminal amino acids of the 25-kDa protein shows almost complete homology with the N terminus of the H. influenzae type b pilin and the types 1 and P pilins of Escherichia coli. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of the purified protein shows the presence of filamentous structures similar in morphology to those of H. influenzae pili. Reactivity between the 25-kDa protein and the BPF-specific monoclonal antibody is demonstrated by Western blotting (immunoblotting) and colloidal gold-enhanced immunoelectron microscopy. Hemadsorption analysis shows that expression of this protein is associated with increases in piliated cells and enhanced binding of these cells to human erythrocytes. These studies indicate that expression of the 25-kDa protein is a characteristic unique to the BPF clone and

  1. The role of the synergistic phosphate anion in iron transport by the periplasmic iron-binding protein from Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ali G.; Shouldice, Stephen R.; Tari, Leslie W.; Schryvers, Anthony B.

    2006-01-01

    The acquisition of iron from transferrin by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is dependent on a periplasmic ferric-ion-binding protein, FbpA. FbpA shuttles iron from the outer membrane to an inner membrane transport complex. A bound phosphate anion completes the iron co-ordination shell of FbpA and kinetic studies demonstrate that the anion plays a critical role in iron binding and release in vitro. The present study was initiated to directly address the hypothesis that the synergistic anion is required for transport of iron in intact cells. A series of site-directed mutants in the anion-binding amino acids of the Haemophilus influenzae FbpA (Gln-58, Asn-175 and Asn-193) were prepared to provide proteins defective in binding of the phosphate anion. Crystal structures of various mutants have revealed that alteration of the C-terminal domain ligands (Asn-175 or Asn-193) but not the N-terminal domain ligand (Gln-58) abrogated binding of the phosphate anion. The mutant proteins were introduced into H. influenzae to evaluate their ability to mediate iron transport. All of the single site-directed mutants (Q58L, N175L and N193L) were capable of mediating iron acquisition from transferrin and from limiting concentrations of ferric citrate. The results suggest that the transport of iron by FbpA is not dependent on binding of phosphate in the synergistic anion-binding site. PMID:17147516

  2. Haemophilus influenzae Type f Hijacks Vitronectin Using Protein H To Resist Host Innate Immunity and Adhere to Pulmonary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Jubair, Tamim; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Oosterhuis, Sharon; Singh, Birendra; Su, Yu-Ching; Fleury, Christophe; Blom, Anna M; Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2015-12-15

    The incidence of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease has significantly decreased since the introduction of an efficient vaccine against Hib. However, in contrast to Hib, infections caused by H. influenzae serotype f (Hif) are emerging. We recently did a whole genome sequencing of an invasive Hif isolate, and reported that Hif interacts with factor H by expressing protein H (PH). In this study, upon screening with various human complement regulators, we revealed that PH is also a receptor for vitronectin (Vn), an abundant plasma protein that regulates the terminal pathway of the human complement system in addition to being a component of the extracellular matrix. Bacterial Vn binding was significantly reduced when the lph gene encoding PH was deleted in an invasive Hif isolate. The dissociation constant (KD) of the interaction between recombinant PH and Vn was 2.2 μM, as revealed by Biolayer interferometry. We found that PH has different regions for simultaneous interaction with both Vn and factor H, and that it recognized the C-terminal part of Vn (aa 352-362). Importantly, PH-dependent Vn binding resulted in better survival of the wild-type Hif or PH-expressing Escherichia coli when exposed to human serum. Finally, we observed that PH mediated an increased bacterial adherence to alveolar epithelial cells in the presence of Vn. In conclusion, our study reveals that PH most likely plays an important role in Hif pathogenesis by increasing serum resistance and adhesion to the airways. PMID:26538390

  3. Development and Optimization of a Homemade ELISA Kit for Detection of Antibodies Against Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Fazlolah; Fatemi, Sara; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Nikanpour, Elnaz; Malekan, Mohamad Ali; Khabiri, Ali Reza; Janani, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infection has high morbidity and mortality rate, especially in children under 5 years of age. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique is the most used method to detect antibodies against H. influenzae. Available commercial ELISA kits are expensive and not always readily available, particularly for epidemiological studies. Objectives: This study was performed to develop and optimize a homemade ELISA kit for the detection of Hib anti-polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) antibodies in children. Materials and Methods: To develop and optimize an indirect ELISA method, pure PRP was prepared. The PRP was coupled to bovine serum albumin, using sodium periodate. Then optimal conditions for ELISA, including coating antigen concentration and peroxidase labeled conjugate concentrations, incubation temperature and incubation time, were determined. To confirm the efficacy of optimized kit, 83 serum samples from non-vaccinated children, aged less than 6 years were collected and analyzed, using homemade and commercial ELISA. Results: The optimal conditions were considered to perform ELISA. Comparison between results obtained from optimized ELISA kit and commercial ELISA kit showed a good agreement. Conclusions: Taking into account these data, we elaborated a homemade ELISA kit that is an efficacious and cost-effective substitute for commercial kit, in disease control and diagnosis. PMID:27540453

  4. Complex O-acetylation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae lipopolysaccharide: evidence for a novel site of O-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Håkan H; Li, Jianjun; Richards, James C; Hood, Derek W; Moxon, E Richard; Schweda, Elke K H

    2005-12-12

    The structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae strain 723 has been elucidated using NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) on O-deacylated LPS and core oligosaccharide material (OS), as well as ESI-MSn on permethylated dephosphorylated OS. It was found that the LPS contains the common structural element of H. influenzae, l-alpha-D-Hepp-(1-->2)-[PEtn-->6]-l-alpha-D-Hepp-(1-->3)-[beta-D-Glcp-(1-->4)]-l-alpha-D-Hepp-(1-->5)-[PPEtn-->4]-alpha-Kdo-(2-->6)-Lipid A, in which the beta-D-Glcp residue (GlcI) is substituted by phosphocholine at O-6 and the distal heptose residue (HepIII) by PEtn at O-3, respectively. In a subpopulation of glycoforms O-2 of HepIII was substituted by beta-D-Galp-(1-->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1--> or beta-D-Glcp-(1-->. Considerable heterogeneity of the LPS was due to the extent of substitution by O-acetyl groups (Ac) and ester-linked glycine of the core oligosaccharide. The location for glycine was found to be at Kdo. Prominent acetylation sites were found to be at GlcI, HepIII, and the proximal heptose (HepI) residue of the triheptosyl moiety. Moreover, GlcI was acetylated at O-3 and/or O-4 and HepI was acetylated at O-2 as evidenced by capillary electrophoresis ESI-MSn in combination with NMR analyses. This is the first study to show that an acetyl group can substitute HepI of the inner-core region of H. influenzae LPS. PMID:16199021

  5. Density interactions among Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus in the nasopharynx of young Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yu-Wen; Vidal, Jorge E; Grijalva, Carlos G; Bozio, Catherine; Edwards, Kathryn M; Williams, John V; Griffin, Marie R; Verastegui, Hector; Hartinger, Stella M; Gil, Ana I; Lanata, Claudio F; Klugman, Keith P

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus are commonly carried in the nasopharynx of young children, and have been speculated to interact with each other. Although earlier studies used cultures alone to assess these interactions, the addition of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides further insight into these interactions. We compared results of culture and qPCR for the detection of these 3 bacteria in 446 nasopharynx samples collected from 360 healthy young children in a prospective cohort study in the Peruvian Andes. Patterns of concurrent bacterial colonization were studied using repeated measures logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to assess correlations among bacterial densities. At a bacterial density <10 colony forming units/mL measured by qPCR, culture detected significantly less carriers (P < 0.0001) for all 3 pathogens, than at a bacterial density >10 colony forming units/mL. In addition, there was a positive association between S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae colonization measured by both culture (odds ratio [OR] 3.11-3.17, P < 0.001) and qPCR (OR 1.95-1.97, P < 0.01). The densities of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, measured by qPCR, were positively correlated (correlation coefficient 0.32, P < 0.001). A negative association was found between the presence of S. pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in carriage with both culture (OR 0.45, P = 0.024) and qPCR (OR 0.61, P < 0.05). The impact of density on detection by culture and the observed density-related interactions support use of qPCR in additional studies to examine vaccine effects on diverse bacterial species. PMID:22935873

  6. Density Interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus in the Nasopharynx of Young Peruvian Children

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yu-Wen; Vidal, Jorge E.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Bozio, Catherine; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Williams, John V.; Griffin, Marie R.; Verastegui, Hector; Hartinger, Stella M.; Gil, Ana I.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus are commonly carried in the nasopharynx (NP) of young children, and have been speculated to interact with each other. Although earlier studies used cultures alone to assess these interactions, the addition of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides further insight into these interactions. We compared results of culture and qPCR for the detection of these three bacteria in 446 NP samples collected from 360 healthy young children in a prospective cohort study in the Peruvian Andes. Patterns of concurrent bacterial colonization were studied using repeated measures logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. Spearman correlation coefficients were employed to assess correlations among bacterial densities. At a bacterial density <105 colony forming units (CFU)/ml measured by qPCR, culture detected significantly less carriers (P<0.0001) for all three pathogens, than at a bacterial density >105 CFU/ml. In addition, there was a positive association between S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae colonization measured by both culture (OR 3.11 – 3.17, p < 0.001) and qPCR (OR 1.95 – 1.97, p < 0.01). The densities of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, measured by qPCR, were positively correlated (correlation coefficient 0.32, p < 0.001). A negative association was found between the presence of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus in carriage with both culture (OR 0.45, p = 0.024) and qPCR (OR 0.61, p < 0.05). The impact of density on detection by culture and the observed density-related interactions support use of qPCR in additional studies to examine vaccine effects on diverse bacterial species. PMID:22935873

  7. Decreased protective efficacy of reduced and alkylated human immune serum globulin in experimental infection with Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, J R; Barrus, V A; Siber, G R

    1985-01-01

    Conventionally prepared immune serum globulin frequently produces severe side effects when administered intravenously. A modified preparation in which 4 to 5 interchain disulfide bonds have been reduced and alkylated has been made for intravenous use. However, reduction and alkylation may affect Fc-mediated functions of immunoglobulin G, particularly its ability to fix complement by the classical pathway. To determine whether reduction and alkylation alters the protective activity of immune serum globulin in vivo we compared it with two less harshly prepared globulins (pH 4 treated or ultrafiltered) in an infant rat model of Haemophilus influenzae b infection. Antibody binding to the capsular and noncapsular components of H. influenzae b and in vitro bactericidal activity were similar in the globulin preparations. Infant rats were treated with various doses of globulins adjusted to provide identical concentrations of anticapsular antibodies as measured by the Farr radioactive antigen binding assay. At high doses of anticapsular antibody (greater than 1,500 ng per pup), all preparations protected well. At marginal doses (750 ng per pup), however, rats given reduced and alkylated globulin had a significantly greater incidence of bacteremia (P less than 0.05), meningitis (P less than 0.01), and death (P less than 0.05) and a higher magnitude of bacteremia (P less than 0.02) than rats who received pH4-treated or ultrafiltered globulins. These differences were not due to differences in anticapsular antibody concentrations achieved in the serum. The 50% protective serum concentrations of anticapsular antibody in this model were 200 to 300 ng/ml for reduced and alkylated globulin and 100 to 200 ng/ml for acid-treated globulin. Absorption of the globulins with purified H. influenzae b capsule reduced in vitro bactericidal activity and rat protective activity. However, the magnitude of bacteremia was lower in rats receiving absorbed pH 4-treated globulin than in those

  8. Transferable Antibiotic Resistance Elements in Haemophilus influenzae Share a Common Evolutionary Origin with a Diverse Family of Syntenic Genomic Islands

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Zain, Zaini; Turner, Sarah L.; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M.; Lilley, Andrew K.; Inzana, Thomas J.; Duncan, A. Jane; Harding, Rosalind M.; Hood, Derek W.; Peto, Timothy E.; Crook, Derrick W.

    2004-01-01

    Transferable antibiotic resistance in Haemophilus influenzae was first detected in the early 1970s. After this, resistance spread rapidly worldwide and was shown to be transferred by a large 40- to 60-kb conjugative element. Bioinformatics analysis of the complete sequence of a typical H. influenzae conjugative resistance element, ICEHin1056, revealed the shared evolutionary origin of this element. ICEHin1056 has homology to 20 contiguous sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Systematic comparison of these homologous sequences resulted in identification of a conserved syntenic genomic island consisting of up to 33 core genes in 16 β- and γ-Proteobacteria. These diverse genomic islands shared a common evolutionary origin, insert into tRNA genes, and have diverged widely, with G+C contents ranging from 40 to 70% and amino acid homologies as low as 20 to 25% for shared core genes. These core genes are likely to account for the conjugative transfer of the genomic islands and may even encode autonomous replication. Accessory gene clusters were nestled among the core genes and encode the following diverse major attributes: antibiotic, metal, and antiseptic resistance; degradation of chemicals; type IV secretion systems; two-component signaling systems; Vi antigen capsule synthesis; toxin production; and a wide range of metabolic functions. These related genomic islands include the following well-characterized structures: SPI-7, found in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi; PAP1 or pKLC102, found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and the clc element, found in Pseudomonas sp. strain B13. This is the first report of a diverse family of related syntenic genomic islands with a deep evolutionary origin, and our findings challenge the view that genomic islands consist only of independently evolving modules. PMID:15547285

  9. Effect of the inoculum size on carbapenem susceptibilities of beta-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroo; Horii, Toshinobu; Nagura, Osanori; Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2009-01-01

    A higher inoculum size of beta-lactamase-positive Haemophilus influenzae is reported to increase minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for beta-lactams. However, the effect of inoculum size of beta-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae (BLNAR) on MICs for carbapenems has not been investigated. This study evaluated the effect of inoculum size on MICs for carbapenems and other beta-lactams in nine clinical isolates of BLNAR. The MICs were determined by both the standard method described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (final inoculum size of 5 x 10(5) colony-forming units [CFU]/ml) and a modified method (final inoculum size of 5 x 10(6) CFU/ml) using viable cell counts. The findings showed that the higher inoculum size increased MICs for imipenem, meropenem, panipenem, biapenem, ampicillin, ceftazidime, and ceftriaxone. The inoculum effect (4 log(2) dilution or a greater increase in the MIC) with imipenem, meropenem, panipenem, and biapenem was found in three, five, two, and two isolates, respectively. The magnitude of the inoculum effect for panipenem significantly increased with the levels of MICs, but correlation between them for the others was not statistically significant. The mutations of penicillin-binding protein genes had little relevance to the reduced susceptibility to carbapenems or to the magnitude of the inoculum effect. These results suggest that MIC determination using turbidity can produce interpretive errors in the antimicrobial susceptibility testing of BLNAR for carbapenems because of their inoculum effect. Thus, accurate adjustment of inoculum size, such as viable cell count, is helpful for confirming the true MICs when the isolates are interpreted as "resistant" by turbidity-based MIC determination. PMID:18815831

  10. Applying Central Composite Design and Response Surface Methodology to Optimize Growth and Biomass Production of Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    PubMed Central

    Momen, Seyed Bahman; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Akbari, Neda; Ranjbar, Bijan; Khajeh, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    Background Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, otitis media, pneumonia, cellulitis, bacteremia, and septic arthritis in infants and young children. The Hib capsule contains the major virulence factor, and is composed of polyribosyl ribitol phosphate (PRP) that can induce immune system response. Vaccines consisting of Hib capsular polysaccharide (PRP) conjugated to a carrier protein are effective in the prevention of the infections. However, due to costly processes in PRP production, these vaccines are too expensive. Objectives To enhance biomass, in this research we focused on optimizing Hib growth with respect to physical factors such as pH, temperature, and agitation by using a response surface methodology (RSM). Materials and Methods We employed a central composite design (CCD) and a response surface methodology to determine the optimum cultivation conditions for growth and biomass production of H. influenzae type b. The treatment factors investigated were initial pH, agitation, and temperature, using shaking flasks. After Hib cultivation and determination of dry biomass, analysis of experimental data was performed by the RSM-CCD. Results The model showed that temperature and pH had an interactive effect on Hib biomass production. The dry biomass produced in shaking flasks was about 5470 mg/L, which was under an initial pH of 8.5, at 250 rpm and 35° C. Conclusions We found CCD and RSM very effective in optimizing Hib culture conditions, and Hib biomass production was greatly influenced by pH and incubation temperature. Therefore, optimization of the growth factors to maximize Hib production can lead to 1) an increase in bacterial biomass and PRP productions, 2) lower vaccine prices, 3) vaccination of more susceptible populations, and 4) lower risk of Hib infections.

  11. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  12. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  13. Combined Bacteria Microarray and Quartz Crystal Microbalance Approach for Exploring Glycosignatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Recognition by Host Lectins.

    PubMed

    Kalograiaki, Ioanna; Euba, Begoña; Proverbio, Davide; Campanero-Rhodes, María A; Aastrup, Teodor; Garmendia, Junkal; Solís, Dolores

    2016-06-01

    Recognition of bacterial surface epitopes by host receptors plays an important role in the infectious process and is intimately associated with bacterial virulence. Delineation of bacteria-host interactions commonly relies on the detection of binding events between purified bacteria- and host-target molecules. In this work, we describe a combined microarray and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach for the analysis of carbohydrate-mediated interactions directly on the bacterial surface, thus preserving the native environment of the bacterial targets. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) was selected as a model pathogenic species not displaying a polysaccharide capsule or O-antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide, a trait commonly found in several important respiratory pathogens. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of NTHi microarrays for exploring the presence of carbohydrate structures on the bacterial surface. Furthermore, the microarray approach is shown to be efficient for detecting strain-selective binding of three innate immune lectins, namely, surfactant protein D, human galectin-8, and Siglec-14, to different NTHi clinical isolates. In parallel, QCM bacteria-chips were developed for the analysis of lectin-binding kinetics and affinity. This novel QCM approach involves capture of NTHi on lectin-derivatized chips followed by formaldehyde fixation, rendering the bacteria an integrated part of the sensor chip, and subsequent binding assays with label-free lectins. The binding parameters obtained for selected NTHi-lectin pairs provide further insights into the interactions occurring at the bacterial surface. PMID:27176788

  14. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G.; Morris, Gordon A.; Almutairi, Fahad M.; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 106 g.mol−1) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 106 g.mol−1). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 106 g.mol−1), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution. PMID:26915577

  15. Simulating Immune Interference on the Effect of a Bivalent Glycoconjugate Vaccine against Haemophilus influenzae Serotypes "a" and "b".

    PubMed

    Konini, Angjelina; Kang, Mingsong; Moghadas, Seyed M

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We sought to evaluate the immune responses to a bivalent Haemophilus influenzae glycoconjugate vaccine against serotypes "a" (Hia) and "b" (Hib) in the presence of the preexisting immunity to Hib. Methods. We developed a stochastic simulation model of humoral immune response to investigate the antigenic challenge of a bivalent combined glycoconjugate vaccine and a bivalent unimolecular glycoconjugate vaccine. We compared simulation outcomes in the absence of any preexisting immunity with an already primed immune response having specific memory B cells and/or anti-Hib antibodies. Results. The simulation results show that the preexisting immune responses to Hib or carrier protein (CP) may significantly impede the production of anti-Hia antibodies by a unimolecular vaccine. In contrast, the production of anti-Hia antibodies using a combined vaccine is inhibited only in the presence of CP immune responses. Conclusions. Preexisting immunity to Hib and CP may play a critical role in the development of immune responses against Hia or Hib using bivalent combined and unimolecular vaccine formulations. Our results suggest that a bivalent combined glycoconjugate vaccine with a carrier protein not previously used in Hib conjugate vaccines may be an effective formulation for generating immune responses to protect against both Hib and Hia infections. PMID:27366171

  16. Intellectual, neuropsychological, and achievement outcomes in children six to eight years after recovery from Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H G; Michaels, R H; Mazur, P M; Bauer, R E; Liden, C B

    1984-08-01

    Twenty-four grade school children who had sustained an earlier episode of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis were tested, along with a group of 24 school-aged siblings. Evaluations consisted of tests of IQ, academic achievement, and neuropsychological skills. Parents completed forms rating each child's behavioral adjustment and temperament. Available school-administered standardized achievement tests were also obtained. Information relating to the episode of meningitis was extracted from the medical charts of each child who had had meningitis in order to investigate the relationship of these parameters to developmental outcome. Results showed that, compared with nearest-age siblings, children who had had meningitis scored lower on performance IQ and full-scale IQ. The group that had had meningitis also performed more poorly on several neuropsychological tasks. However, the groups did not differ in verbal IQ, and they performed comparably on all academic measures. Significant behavioral adjustment problems were absent from both groups, and there were no notable differences in temperament. Although findings support the existence of postmeningitis sequelae, the selective nature of the deficiencies observed indicate that prognosis for children in the age range examined may be better than that suggested by earlier studies. PMID:6611537

  17. CYLD negatively regulates nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced IL-8 expression via phosphatase MKP-1-dependent inhibition of ERK.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenzhuo Y; Komatsu, Kensei; Huang, Yuxian; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Wenhong; Lee, Ji-Yun; Miyata, Masanori; Xu, Haidong; Li, Jian-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a Gram-negative bacterium, is the primary cause of otitis media in children and the exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. A hallmark of both diseases is an overactive inflammatory response, including the upregulation of chemokines, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8). An appropriate inflammatory response is essential for eradicating pathogens. However, excessive inflammation can cause host tissue damage. Therefore, expression of IL-8 must be tightly regulated. We previously reported that NTHi induces IL-8 expression in an ERK-dependent manner. We also have shown that the deubiquitinase cylindromatosis (CYLD) suppresses NTHi-induced inflammation. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of how CYLD negatively regulates ERK-mediated IL-8 production is largely unknown. Here, we examine both human lung epithelial A549 cells and lung of Cyld-/- mice to show that CYLD specifically targets the activation of ERK. Interestingly, CYLD enhances NTHi-induced upregulation of another negative regulator, MAP Kinase Phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), which, in turn, leads to reduced ERK activation and subsequent suppression of IL-8. Taken together, the CYLD suppression of ERK-dependent IL-8 via MKP-1 may bring novel insights into the tight regulation of inflammatory responses and also lead to innovative therapeutic strategies for controlling these responses by targeting key negative regulators of inflammation. PMID:25389768

  18. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G; Morris, Gordon A; Almutairi, Fahad M; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution. PMID:26915577

  19. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 serves as a primary cognate receptor for the Type IV pilus of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2016-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) utilizes the Type IV pilus (Tfp) to adhere to respiratory tract epithelial cells thus colonizing its human host; however, the host cell receptor to which this adhesive protein binds is unknown. From a panel of receptors engaged by Tfp expressed by other bacterial species, we showed that the majority subunit of NTHI Tfp, PilA, bound to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and that this interaction was both specific and of high affinity. Further, Tfp-expressing NTHI inoculated on to polarized respiratory tract epithelial cells that expressed ICAM1 were significantly more adherent compared to Tfp-deficient NTHI or NTHI inoculated on to epithelial cells to which ICAM1 gene expression was silenced. Moreover, pre-incubation of epithelial cells with recombinant soluble PilA (rsPilA) blocked adherence of NTHI, an outcome that was abrogated by admixing rsPilA with ICAM1 prior to application on to the target cells. Epithelial cells infected with adenovirus or respiratory syncytial virus showed increased expression of ICAM1; this outcome supported augmented adherence of Tfp-expressing NTHI. Collectively, these data revealed the cognate receptor for NTHI Tfp as ICAM1 and promote continued development of a Tfp-targeted vaccine for NTHI-induced diseases of the airway wherein upper respiratory tract viruses play a key predisposing role. PMID:26857242

  20. Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Disease Predisposes to More Severe Infection with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: Protective Effects of Andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Tan, W S Daniel; Peh, Hong Yong; Liao, Wupeng; Pang, Chu Hui; Chan, Tze Khee; Lau, Suk Hiang; Chow, Vincent T; Wong, W S Fred

    2016-05-27

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with many maladies, one of which is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As the disease progresses, patients are more prone to develop COPD exacerbation episodes by bacterial infection, particularly to nontypeable Haemophilus influenza (NTHi) infection. The present study aimed to develop a CS-exposed mouse model that increases inflammation induced by NTHi challenge and investigate the protective effects of andrographolide, a bioactive molecule with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties isolated from the plant Andrographis paniculata. Female BALB/c mice exposed to 2 weeks of CS followed by a single intratracheal instillation of NTHi developed increased macrophage and neutrophil pulmonary infiltration, augmented cytokine levels, and heightened oxidative damage. Andrographolide effectively reduced lung cellular infiltrates and decreased lung levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, 8-OHdG, matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), and MMP-9. The protective actions of andrographolide on CS-predisposed NTHi inflammation might be attributable to increased nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation and decreased Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) repressor function, resulting in enhanced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Taken together, these findings strongly support a therapeutic potential for andrographolide in preventing lung inflammation caused by NTHi in cigarette smokers. PMID:27104764

  1. Antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis in middle ear effusion during early phase of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, H; Koskela, M; Luotonen, J; Herva, E; Sipilä, P

    1990-01-01

    Serum type (IgG, IgM and IgA-class) and secretory type antibodies specific to Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn), Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Branhamella catarrhalis (Br) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 46 serum and 114 middle ear effusion (MEE) samples from 85 children with acute otitis media (AOM). The samples were obtained within 12 h from the onset of the ear symptoms. Serum (but not secretory) type antibodies to the infecting Pn serotype were found in 24% of the MEE samples of the patients with Pn AOM and, correspondingly, serum and/or secretory type antibodies to Hi and Br were seen in 54% and 63% of the MEE samples of the patients with Hi or Br AOM, respectively. Moreover, antibodies against bacteria other than the causative one could also be found in the MEE. The occurrence of the serum type antibodies against these bacteria in the MEE was closely correlated with their serum levels. The findings of this study indicate that during the very early phase of AOM, the MEE contains both serum type antibodies originating from the serum, and secretory antibodies of middle ear origin. Among them there are antibodies specific to the three most common bacteria causing AOM (Pn, Hi, and Br) regardless of the bacterial etiology of the AOM attack in question. PMID:2106760

  2. Development of a diagnostic real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of invasive Haemophilus influenzae in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Meyler, Kenneth L; Meehan, Mary; Bennett, Desiree; Cunney, Robert; Cafferkey, Mary

    2012-12-01

    Since the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae serotype b vaccine, invasive H. influenzae disease has become dominated by nontypeable (NT) strains. Several widely used molecular diagnostic methods have been shown to lack sensitivity or specificity in the detection of some of these strains. Novel real-time assays targeting the fucK, licA, and ompP2 genes were developed and evaluated. The fucK assay detected all strains of H. influenzae tested (n = 116) and had an analytical sensitivity of 10 genome copies/polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This assay detected both serotype b and NT H. influenzae in 12 previously positive specimens (culture and/or bexA PCR) and also detected H. influenzae in a further 5 of 883 culture-negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. The fucK assay has excellent potential as a diagnostic test for detection of typeable and nontypeable strains of invasive H. influenzae in clinical samples of blood and CSF. PMID:23017260

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from community-acquired respiratory tract infection patients in Shanghai City, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Zhou, Zhaoyan; Hu, Bijie; Yamamoto, Taro; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important causative pathogen of community-acquired respiratory infection in China. In this study we investigated 37 H. influenzae strains isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) in Shanghai city between Dec 2008 and Apr 2009. H. influenzae clinical isolates were identified, and b-lactamase production tests were conducted and minimal inhibitory concentrations(MIC) were measured. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis(PFGE) was introduced as an effective finger printing method. Two isolates (5.4%) were verified as serotype b strains, and 30 strains (81.1%) were nontypeable H. influenzae. Furthermore, 10 (27.0%) were b-lactamase-producing ampicillin-resistance (BLPAR) (TEM-1 type)strains, 11 (29.8%) were low-b-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae (Low-BLNAR) strains,and the rest were b-lactamase-negative ampicillin-susceptible(BLNAS) strains. Minimum inhibitory concentrations(MIC90; lg/ml) were 2 for ampicillin/sulbactam, 0.05 force fotaxime, 16 for cefaclor, 2 for azithromycin, 0.12 for levofloxacin, and 4 for imipenem. Fingerprint typing by PFGE revealed 23 independent patterns for the isolates. Pattern A (defined in this study) was predominant in BLPAR strains, and a variety of other patterns were detected in Low-BLNAR and BLNAS strains. Although the incidence of ampicillin resistant H. influenzae is increasing in CARTI patients in China, current antimicrobial chemotherapy seems to be effective. PMID:22302696

  4. [Antibacterial susceptibility surveillance of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from pediatric patients in Gifu and Aichi prefectures (2009-2010)].

    PubMed

    Takakura, Mariko; Fukuda, Yoshiko; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi; Yamaoka, Kazukiyo; Asano, Yuko; Sawamura, Haruki; Katsuragawa, Kouichi; Hashido, Hikonori; Matsukawa, Yoko; Matsubara, Shigenori; Oota, Hirotoshi; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the susceptibility to antibacterial agents of 197 strains of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from pediatric patients at medical facilities in Gifu and Aichi prefectures between 2009 and 2010. Those strains were also examined for the mutations of ftsI coding for penicillin-binding protein 3, presence of bla TEM-1, serotype and beta-lactamase producing ability. Among the 197 strains, the most prevalent serotype was non-typeable (89.8%), followed by serotype b (8.1%), e (1.5%) and f (0.5%). Based on the susceptibility among the 197 strains to antibacterial agents, beta-lactamase nonproducing ampicillin-susceptible H. influenzae (BLNAS) accounted for 27.4%, beta-lactamase nonproducing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae (BLNAR) for 62.4%, beta-lactamase producing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae (BLPAR) for 6.1% and beta-lactamase producing amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid-resistant H. influenzae (BLPACR) for 4.1%. According to PCR-based genotyping, the strains were classified into 6 categories: gBLNAS, gLow-BLNAR, gBLNAR, gBLPAR, gBLPACR-I and gBLPACR-II. The incidences of each resistant class were 17.3% for gBLNAS, 6.6% for gLow-BLNAR, 66.0% for gBLNAR, 5.6% for gBLPAR and 4.6% for gBLPACR-II. The combined incidence of gLow-BLNAR and gBLNAR was 72.6%, which was higher than that of BLNAR (62.4%). The MIC90s of antibacterial agents against the 197 strains were as follows; 0.0156 microg/mL for tosufloxacin and garenoxacin, 0.0313 microg/mL for levofloxacin and pazufloxacin, 0.0625 microg/mL for norfloxacin, 0.25 microg/mL for tazobactam/piperacillin (TAZ/PIPC) and ceftriaxone, 0.5 microg/mL for TAZ/PIPC (1:8) and cefditoren, 1 microg/mL for piperacillin, cefteram, cefotaxime, meropenem, tebipenem and minocycline, 2 microg/mL for doripenem, 4 microg/mL for cefcapene, imipenem and azithromycin, 8 microg/mL for sulbactam/ampicillin, clavulanic acid/amoxicillin (1:2, CVA/AMPC) and cefdinir, 16 microg/mL for CVA/AMPC (1:14), flomoxef and clarithromycin, 32

  5. Nationwide survey of the development of drug-resistance in the pediatric field: drug sensitivity of Haemophilus influenzae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Sato, Yoshitake; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nonoyama, Masato; Oishi, Tomohiro; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the beta-lactamase-producing ability and resistance to 20 antibacterial agents of 448 clinically isolated strains of Haemophilus influenzae accumulated from October 2000 to July 2001 (phase 1) and of 376 different strains accumulated from January to June 2004 (phase 2), from institutions that participated in a nationwide Drug-Resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease. Between phase 1 and phase 2 the proportion of beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin (ABPC)-susceptible (BLNAS) strains declined from 62.9% to 34.3%; the proportions of beta-lactamase-positive ABPC-resistant (BLPAR) strains were 8.3% and 6.4% in phases 1 and 2, but the proportion of beta-lactamase-negative ABPC-resistant (BLNAR) strains increased from 28.8% in phase 1 to 59.3% in phase 2. Comparison of the MIC(90) values of the antibacterial agents for H. influenzae in phase 1 and phase 2 showed that cefcapene, cefpodoxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, and clarithromycin kept the same level, while cefdinir, faropenem, and rokitamycin showed 2-fold to 8-fold decreases. With the exception of the above antibiotics, all of the other antibacterial agents tested showed 2-fold to 4-fold increases. The MIC(90) values of the beta-lactam drugs for BLNAR were 2-fold to 32-fold higher than the values for BLNAS. The proportion of BLNAR H. influenzae strains rose dramatically over the 3 years between phases 1 and 2. In relation to age, prior administration of antibacterial agents, and attendance at a day nursery as background factors, no significant differences between BLNAS and BLNAR were detected in phase 1. In the phase 2 survey, the proportion of BLNAR strains showed significant differences between children under 3 years and those aged 3 years or more, and there were also significant differences according to whether antibacterial agents, especially beta-lactams, had been administered previously. No significant difference was found in resistant bacteria according to whether or not

  6. Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... influenzae type b (Hib) disease is a serious disease caused by bacteria. It usually affects children under 5 years old. It can also affect adults with certain medical conditions. Your child can get Hib disease by being around other children or adults who ...

  7. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... influenzae type b (Hib) disease is a serious disease caused by bacteria. It usually affects children under 5 years old. It can also affect adults with certain medical conditions. Your child can get Hib disease by being around other children or adults who ...

  8. Prevalence of macrolide-non-susceptible isolates among β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae in a tertiary care hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Seyama, Shoji; Nakamura, Yuka; Kashima, Chihiro; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Ushio, Masanobu; Fujii, Takeshi; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2016-09-01

    β-Lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) Haemophilus influenzae account for a large portion of H. influenzae clinical isolates in Japan. The aim of this study was to clarify the antimicrobial susceptibility of BLNAR H. influenzae clinical isolates as well as the annual changes in susceptibility. BLNAR H. influenzae isolates were collected from a tertiary care hospital from 2007 to 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and resistance mechanisms were analysed. All of the isolates (n=304) had amino acid substitutions in penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) and isolates were classified by these amino acid substitutions: R517H or N526K (class I); S385T and R517H (class II); and S385T and N526K (class III). Classes I, II and III represented 8.2% (n=25), 9.5% (n=29) and 81.6% (n=248) of the isolates, respectively; 2 isolates could not be classified because they had a PBP3 with a substantially mutated FtsI transpeptidase domain. All of the isolates were highly susceptible to fluoroquinolones and carbapenems. The number of clarithromycin (CAM)-non-susceptible [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥16μg/mL] H. influenzae isolates increased significantly between 2010 and 2012. Moreover, CAM-non-susceptible H. influenzae isolates were prevalent among class II and class III BLNAR H. influenzae. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of the CAM-resistant (MIC ≥32μg/mL) H. influenzae isolates showed that they were not specific sequence types, suggesting that CAM resistance may occur in any isolates. These results raise concern regarding the occurrence of multidrug-resistant BLNAR H. influenzae. PMID:27530834

  9. Adoption of Preventive Measures and Attitudes toward the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez, Anna; Rodríguez, Tània; López, Maria José; Continente, Xavier; Nebot, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study describes the perceived impact of H1N1 influenza and the adoption of the recommended measures to address the pandemic in schools. Methods: A cross-sectional self-reported survey was conducted in 433 schools in Barcelona addressed to the school principal or the H1N1 influenza designated person. A descriptive analysis was…

  10. Comprehensive Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced Acute Otitis Media Reveal Bacterial Aerobic Respiration in an Immunosuppressed Environment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Dubois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Moseley, M Arthur; Hardison, Rachael L; Heimlich, Derek R; Stoddard, Alexander; Kerschner, Joseph E; Justice, Sheryl S; Thompson, J Will; Mason, Kevin M

    2016-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the molecular details of the interactions between bacteria and host are critical to ultimately prevent disease. Recent technological advances allow simultaneous analysis of host and bacterial protein and metabolic profiles from a single small tissue sample to provide insight into pathogenesis. We used the chinchilla model of human otitis media to determine, for the first time, the most expansive delineation of global changes in protein and metabolite profiles during an experimentally induced disease. After 48 h of infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, middle ear tissue lysates were analyzed by high-resolution quantitative two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Dynamic changes in 105 chinchilla proteins and 66 metabolites define the early proteomic and metabolomic signature of otitis media. Our studies indicate that establishment of disease coincides with actin morphogenesis, suppression of inflammatory mediators, and bacterial aerobic respiration. We validated the observed increase in the actin-remodeling complex, Arp2/3, and experimentally showed a role for Arp2/3 in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion. Direct inhibition of actin branch morphology altered bacterial invasion into host epithelial cells, and is supportive of our efforts to use the information gathered to modify outcomes of disease. The twenty-eight nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae proteins identified participate in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and include cell wall-associated metabolic proteins. Quantitative characterization of the molecular signatures of infection will redefine our understanding of host response driven developmental changes during pathogenesis. These data represent the first comprehensive study of host protein and metabolite profiles in vivo in response to infection and show the feasibility of extensive characterization of host protein profiles during disease. Identification of

  11. Increased Biofilm Formation by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Isolates from Patients with Invasive Disease or Otitis Media versus Strains Recovered from Cases of Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Domenech, Arnau; Garmendia, Junkal; Langereis, Jeroen D.; Mayer, Pascal; Calatayud, Laura; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation by nontypeable (NT) Haemophilus influenzae remains a controversial topic. Nevertheless, biofilm-like structures have been observed in the middle-ear mucosa of experimental chinchilla models of otitis media (OM). To date, there have been no studies of biofilm formation in large collections of clinical isolates. This study aimed to investigate the initial adhesion to a solid surface and biofilm formation by NT H. influenzae by comparing isolates from healthy carriers, those with noninvasive respiratory disease, and those with invasive respiratory disease. We used 352 isolates from patients with nonbacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (NB-CAP), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), OM, and invasive disease and a group of healthy colonized children. We then determined the speed of initial adhesion to a solid surface by the BioFilm ring test and quantified biofilm formation by crystal violet staining. Isolates from different clinical sources displayed high levels of biofilm formation on a static solid support after growth for 24 h. We observed clear differences in initial attachment and biofilm formation depending on the pathology associated with NT H. influenzae isolation, with significantly increased biofilm formation for NT H. influenzae isolates collected from patients with invasive disease and OM compared with NT H. influenzae isolates from patients with NB-CAP or COPD and healthy colonized subjects. In all cases, biofilm structures were detached by proteinase K treatment, suggesting an important role for proteins in the initial adhesion and static biofilm formation measured by crystal violet staining. PMID:25192997

  12. A new model for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae middle ear infection in the Junbo mutant mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Derek; Moxon, Richard; Purnell, Tom; Richter, Caroline; Williams, Debbie; Azar, Ali; Crompton, Michael; Wells, Sara; Fray, Martin; Brown, Steve D. M.; Cheeseman, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common bacterial infection in children and, as a consequence, is the most common reason for antimicrobial prescription to this age group. There is currently no effective vaccine for the principal pathogen involved, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The most frequently used and widely accepted experimental animal model of middle ear infection is in chinchillas, but mice and gerbils have also been used. We have established a robust model of middle ear infection by NTHi in the Junbo mouse, a mutant mouse line that spontaneously develops chronic middle ear inflammation in specific pathogen-free conditions. The heterozygote Junbo mouse (Jbo/+) bears a mutation in a gene (Evi1, also known as Mecom) that plays a role in host innate immune regulation; pre-existing middle ear inflammation promotes NTHi middle ear infection. A single intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates (up to 90%) of middle ear infection and bacterial titres (104-105 colony-forming units/µl) in bulla fluids. Bacteria are cleared from the majority of middle ears between day 21 and 35 post-inoculation but remain in approximately 20% of middle ears at least up to day 56 post-infection. The expression of Toll-like receptor-dependent response cytokine genes is elevated in the middle ear of the Jbo/+ mouse following NTHi infection. The translational potential of the Junbo model for studying antimicrobial intervention regimens was shown using a 3 day course of azithromycin to clear NTHi infection, and its potential use in vaccine development studies was shown by demonstrating protection in mice immunized with killed homologous, but not heterologous, NTHi bacteria. PMID:26611891

  13. Investigation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae outer membrane protein P6 as a new carrier for lipooligosaccharide conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tinghuai; Chen, Jing; Murphy, Timothy F; Green, Bruce A; Gu, Xin-Xing

    2005-10-25

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) outer membrane protein P6 was used as a new protein carrier for NTHi detoxified lipooligosaccharide (dLOS) conjugates due to its conservation and potential to elicit bactericidal antibodies. P6 was covalently conjugated to dLOS of strain 9274 through adipic acid dihydrazide with different ratios of dLOS to P6, which resulted in two conjugate formulations with weight ratios of dLOS to P6 of 3.7 for dLOS-P6 (I) and 1.6 for dLOS-P6 (II). Binding activity of the conjugates was examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with mouse monoclonal antibodies specific to LOS and P6 and a rabbit anti-P6 serum. The results showed that the conjugates bound not only to the LOS antibody but also to both P6 antibodies, suggesting that the conjugates retained epitopes of both LOS and P6 antigens. Animal studies revealed that dLOS-P6 (II) induced high levels of anti-LOS and anti-P6 IgGs in mice and rabbits. However, dLOS-P6 (I) induced lower levels of anti-LOS IgGs in mice and rabbits and anti-P6 IgGs in rabbits with no anti-P6 IgGs in mice. In addition, all rabbit, but not mouse, antisera elicited by the conjugates showed bactericidal activity against the homologous strain, and two of them elicited by each conjugate plus Ribi adjuvant showed cross-bactericidal activity against three of five major serotype stains. These data indicate that P6 could serve as an effective carrier for dLOS or other carbohydrate conjugates and that the ratio of carbohydrate to P6 might contribute to immune responses in vivo. PMID:16039021

  14. A new model for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae middle ear infection in the Junbo mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Hood, Derek; Moxon, Richard; Purnell, Tom; Richter, Caroline; Williams, Debbie; Azar, Ali; Crompton, Michael; Wells, Sara; Fray, Martin; Brown, Steve D M; Cheeseman, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common bacterial infection in children and, as a consequence, is the most common reason for antimicrobial prescription to this age group. There is currently no effective vaccine for the principal pathogen involved, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The most frequently used and widely accepted experimental animal model of middle ear infection is in chinchillas, but mice and gerbils have also been used. We have established a robust model of middle ear infection by NTHi in the Junbo mouse, a mutant mouse line that spontaneously develops chronic middle ear inflammation in specific pathogen-free conditions. The heterozygote Junbo mouse (Jbo/+) bears a mutation in a gene (Evi1, also known as Mecom) that plays a role in host innate immune regulation; pre-existing middle ear inflammation promotes NTHi middle ear infection. A single intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates (up to 90%) of middle ear infection and bacterial titres (10(4)-10(5) colony-forming units/µl) in bulla fluids. Bacteria are cleared from the majority of middle ears between day 21 and 35 post-inoculation but remain in approximately 20% of middle ears at least up to day 56 post-infection. The expression of Toll-like receptor-dependent response cytokine genes is elevated in the middle ear of the Jbo/+ mouse following NTHi infection. The translational potential of the Junbo model for studying antimicrobial intervention regimens was shown using a 3 day course of azithromycin to clear NTHi infection, and its potential use in vaccine development studies was shown by demonstrating protection in mice immunized with killed homologous, but not heterologous, NTHi bacteria. PMID:26611891

  15. The modA10 phasevarion of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae R2866 regulates multiple virulence-associated traits.

    PubMed

    VanWagoner, Timothy M; Atack, John M; Nelson, Kevin L; Smith, Hannah K; Fox, Kate L; Jennings, Michael P; Stull, Terrence L; Smith, Arnold L

    2016-03-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a human restricted commensal and pathogen that elicits inflammation by adhering to and invading airway epithelia cells: transcytosis across these cells can result in systemic infection. NTHi strain R2866 was isolated from the blood of a normal 30-month old infant with meningitis, and is unusual for NTHi in that it is able to cause systemic infection. Strain R2866 is able to replicate in normal human serum due to expression of lgtC which mimics human blood group p(k). R2866 contains a phase-variable DNA methyltransferase, modA10 which switches ON and OFF randomly and reversibly due to polymerase slippage over a long tetrameric repeat tract located in its open reading frame. Random gain or loss of repeats during replication can results in expressed (ON), or not expressed (OFF) states, the latter due to a frameshift or transcriptional termination at a premature stop codon. We sought to determine if the unusual virulence of R2866 was modified by modA10 phase-variation. A modA10 knockout mutant was found to have increased adherence to, and invasion of, human ear and airway monolayers in culture, and increased invasion and transcytosis of polarized human bronchial epithelial cells. Intriguingly, the rate of bacteremia was lower in the infant rat model of infection than a wild-type R2866 strain, but the fatality rate was greater. Transcriptional analysis comparing the modA10 knockout to the R2866 wild-type parent strain showed increased expression of genes in the modA10 knockout whose products mediate cellular adherence. We conclude that loss of ModA10 function in strain R2866 enhances colonization and invasion by increasing expression of genes that allow for increased adherence, which can contribute to the increased virulence of this strain. PMID:26718097

  16. Structure of YciA from Haemophilus influenzae (HI0827), a Hexameric Broad Specificity Acyl-Coenzyme A Thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Mark A.; Zhuang, Zhihao; Song, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2008-04-02

    The crystal structure of HI0827 from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20, initially annotated 'hypothetical protein' in sequence databases, exhibits an acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 'hot dog' fold with a trimer of dimers oligomeric association, a novel assembly for this enzyme family. In studies described in the preceding paper [Zhuang, Z., Song, F., Zhao, H., Li, L., Cao, J., Eisenstein, E., Herzberg, O., and Dunaway-Mariano, D. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 2789-2796], HI0827 is shown to be an acyl-CoA thioesterase that acts on a wide range of acyl-CoA compounds. Two substrate binding sites are located across the dimer interface. The binding sites are occupied by two CoA molecules, one with full occupancy and the second only partially occupied. The CoA molecules, acquired from HI0827-expressing Escherichia coli cells, remained tightly bound to the enzyme through the protein purification steps. The difference in CoA occupancies indicates a different substrate affinity for each of the binding sites, which in turn implies that the enzyme might be subject to allosteric regulation. Mutagenesis studies have shown that the replacement of the putative catalytic carboxylate Asp44 with an alanine residue abolishes activity. The impact of this mutation is seen in the crystal structure of D44A HI0827. Whereas the overall fold and assembly of the mutant protein are the same as those of the wild-type enzyme, the CoA ligands are absent. The dimer interface is perturbed, and the channel that accommodates the thioester acyl chain is more open and wider than that observed in the wild-type enzyme. A model of intact substrate bound to wild-type HI0827 provides a structural rationale for the broad substrate range.

  17. Dynamics of naturally acquired antibody against Haemophilus influenzae type a capsular polysaccharide in a Canadian Aboriginal population.

    PubMed

    Konini, Angjelina; Nix, Eli; Ulanova, Marina; Moghadas, Seyed M

    2016-06-01

    Severe infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae type a (Hia) have reached alarming rates in some Canadian Aboriginal communities. We sought to estimate the frequency of exposure to this pathogen and timelines for boosting protective antibodies. We developed a model of secondary antigenic challenge (natural exposure), and used data for anti-Hia antibodies in serum samples of healthy and immunocompromised adults in a population of Northwestern Ontario, Canada. We parameterized the model with available estimates from previous studies for the decay rate of antibody and its protective levels against both Hia carriage and invasive disease. Simulations were initialized using antibody concentrations from data. We investigated both the duration of immunity without secondary antigenic challenge and the average time between subsequent exposures to Hia. When there was no new natural exposure, serum antibody concentrations in healthy Aboriginal individuals decreased below the level (1 μg/ml) assumed for protection against invasive Hia disease 3 years after primary exposure. This period was shorter (about 2 years) for Aboriginal individuals suffering from chronic renal failure. We estimated that a new antigenic challenge occurs once in 5 and 2 years for healthy and immunocompromised Aboriginal individuals, respectively. More frequent natural exposure was required to maintain protective antibody levels for non-Aboriginal individuals compared to Aboriginal individuals. The findings suggest that frequent boosting of natural immunity is required to maintain the anti-Hia antibody levels protecting against invasive Hia disease, particularly in individuals with underlying medical conditions. This information has important implications for immunization when an anti-Hia vaccine becomes available. PMID:27419007

  18. Dps promotes survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in biofilm communities in vitro and resistance to clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Bing; Hong, Wenzhou; Kock, Nancy D.; Swords, W. Edward

    2012-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common airway commensal and opportunistic pathogen that persists within surface-attached biofilm communities. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that bacterial stress-responses are activated within biofilms. Transcripts for several factors associated with bacterial resistance to environmental stress were increased in biofilm cultures as compared to planktonic cultures. Among these, a homolog of the DNA-binding protein from starved cells (dps) was chosen for further study. An isogenic NTHi 86-028NP dps mutant was generated and tested for resistance to environmental stress, revealing a significant survival defects in high-iron conditions, which was mediated by oxidative stress and was restored by genetic complementation. As expected, NTHi 86-028NP dps had a general stress-response defect, exhibiting decreased resistance to many types of environmental stress. While no differences were observed in density and structure of NTHi 86-028NP and NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms, bacterial survival was decreased in NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms as compared to the parental strain. The role of dps persistence in vivo was tested in animal infection studies. NTHi 86-028NP dps had decreased resistance to clearance after pulmonary infection of elastase-treated mice as compared to NTHi 86-028NP, whereas minimal differences were observed in clearance from mock-treated mice. Similarly, lower numbers of NTHi 86-028NP dps were recovered from middle-ear effusions and bullar homogenates in the chinchilla model for otitis media (OM). Therefore, we conclude that Dps promotes bacterial survival within NTHi biofilm communities both in vitro and in chronic infections in vivo. PMID:22919649

  19. Evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b carrier status among children 10 years after the introduction of Hib vaccine in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Rosemeire Cobo; Brandileone, Maria Cristina de Cunto; Andrade, Ana Lúcia; Ogassavara, Cinthya Terumi; Fiório, Cleiton Eduardo; Brandão, Angela Pires; Almeida, Samanta Cristine Grassi; Lemos, Ana Paula Silva; Gorla, Maria Cecília; Carvalhanas, Telma Regina; Sato, Helena; Liphaus, Bernadete; Nerger, Maria Lígia; Conde, Monica; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) nasopharyngeal (NP) colonisation among healthy children where Hib vaccination using a 3p+0 dosing schedule has been routinely administered for 10 years with sustained coverage (> 90%). NP swabs were collected from 2,558 children who had received the Hib vaccine, of whom 1,379 were 12-< 24 months (m) old and 1,179 were 48-< 60 m old. Hi strains were identified by molecular methods. Hi carriage prevalence was 45.1% (1,153/2,558) and the prevalence in the 12-< 24 m and 48-< 60 m age groups were 37.5% (517/1,379) and 53.9% (636/1,179), respectively. Hib was identified in 0.6% (16/2,558) of all children in the study, being 0.8% (11/1,379) and 0.4% (5/1,179) among the 12-< 24 m and 48-< 60 m age groups, respectively. The nonencapsulate Hi colonisation was 43% (n = 1,099) and was significantly more frequent at 48-< 60 m of age (51.6%, n = 608) compared with that at 12-< 24 m of age (35.6%, n = 491). The overall resistance rates to ampicillin and chloramphenicol were 16.5% and 3.7%, respectively; the co-resistance was detected in 2.6%. Our findings showed that the Hib carrier rate in healthy children under five years was very low after 10 years of the introduction of the Hib vaccine. PMID:26517654

  20. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Infants and Primary Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    SCHUMACHER, SANDRA K.; MARCHANT, COLIN D.; LOUGHLIN, ANITA M.; BOUCHET, VALÉRIE; STEVENSON, ABBIE; PELTON, STEPHEN I.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) causes otitis media, sinusitis, and likely lower respiratory tract infections in children. Colonization, strain diversity, transmission, and antimicrobial susceptibility have implications for both children and their caregivers. METHODS For 13 months, we conducted a cross-sectional study of NTHi colonization. 273 infants and children aged 2 to 26 months old and their primary caregivers had upper respiratory tract cultures performed. NTHi isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and antibiotic resistance was examined. RESULTS Of the 273 infants, 44 (16.1%) were colonized with NTHi. Prevalence of NTHi varied from 14% in infants less than 6 months of age to 32% in infants 19-26 months of age (p=0.003). NTHi colonized infants were more likely to attend daycare (30% vs. 11%), have a recent respiratory infection (68% vs. 38%), recent antibiotic use (27% vs. 9%), and caregiver reported asthma (11% vs. 1%) compared with other infants (p<0.001). Of the 44 infants colonized with NTHi, we identified 33 different MLSTs. Nine (20.5%) of the 44 infant-primary caregiver dyads were colonized with NTHi and 7/9 shared identical NTHi strains. We also found beta-lactamase negative NTHi with minimum inhibitory concentrations >2 μg/mL for amoxicillin and beta-lactamase positive NTHi with minimum inhibitory concentrations >2 μg/mL for amoxicillin clavulanate. CONCLUSIONS We found substantial diversity by MLST analysis among NTHi isolates from this community. Infant-primary caregiver dyads usually carried the same strain of NTHi, suggesting that infant-primary caregiver transmission is occurring. PMID:22051860

  1. Beta- Lactam Antibiotics Stimulate Biofilm Formation in Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae by Up-Regulating Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siva; Li, Xiaojin; Gunawardana, Manjula; Maguire, Kathleen; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Schaudinn, Christoph; Wang, Charles; Baum, Marc M.; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common acute otitis media pathogen, with an incidence that is increased by previous antibiotic treatment. NTHi is also an emerging causative agent of other chronic infections in humans, some linked to morbidity, and all of which impose substantial treatment costs. In this study we explore the possibility that antibiotic exposure may stimulate biofilm formation by NTHi bacteria. We discovered that sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotic (i.e., amounts that partially inhibit bacterial growth) stimulated the biofilm-forming ability of NTHi strains, an effect that was strain and antibiotic dependent. When exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics NTHi strains produced tightly packed biofilms with decreased numbers of culturable bacteria but increased biomass. The ratio of protein per unit weight of biofilm decreased as a result of antibiotic exposure. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilms had altered ultrastructure, and genes involved in glycogen production and transporter function were up regulated in response to antibiotic exposure. Down-regulated genes were linked to multiple metabolic processes but not those involved in stress response. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilm bacteria were more resistant to a lethal dose (10 µg/mL) of cefuroxime. Our results suggest that beta-lactam antibiotic exposure may act as a signaling molecule that promotes transformation into the biofilm phenotype. Loss of viable bacteria, increase in biofilm biomass and decreased protein production coupled with a concomitant up-regulation of genes involved with glycogen production might result in a biofilm of sessile, metabolically inactive bacteria sustained by stored glycogen. These biofilms may protect surviving bacteria from subsequent antibiotic challenges, and act as a reservoir of viable bacteria once antibiotic exposure has ended. PMID:25007395

  2. Frequency of Spontaneous Resistance to Peptide Deformylase Inhibitor GSK1322322 in Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Min, Sharon; Ingraham, Karen; Huang, Jianzhong; McCloskey, Lynn; Rilling, Sarah; Windau, Anne; Pizzollo, Jason; Butler, Deborah; Aubart, Kelly; Miller, Linda A; Zalacain, Magdalena; Holmes, David J; O'Dwyer, Karen

    2015-08-01

    The continuous emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria is compromising the successful treatment of serious microbial infections. GSK1322322, a novel peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitor, shows good in vitro antibacterial activity and has demonstrated safety and efficacy in human proof-of-concept clinical studies. In vitro studies were performed to determine the frequency of resistance (FoR) to this antimicrobial agent in major pathogens that cause respiratory tract and skin infections. Resistance to GSK1322322 occurred at high frequency through loss-of-function mutations in the formyl-methionyl transferase (FMT) protein in Staphylococcus aureus (4/4 strains) and Streptococcus pyogenes (4/4 strains) and via missense mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae (6/21 strains), but the mutations were associated with severe in vitro and/or in vivo fitness costs. The overall FoR to GSK1322322 was very low in Haemophilus influenzae, with only one PDF mutant being identified in one of four strains. No target-based mutants were identified from S. pyogenes, and only one or no PDF mutants were isolated in three of the four S. aureus strains studied. In S. pneumoniae, PDF mutants were isolated from only six of 21 strains tested; an additional 10 strains did not yield colonies on GSK1322322-containing plates. Most of the PDF mutants characterized from those three organisms (35/37 mutants) carried mutations in residues at or in close proximity to one of three highly conserved motifs that are part of the active site of the PDF protein, with 30 of the 35 mutations occurring at position V71 (using the S. pneumoniae numbering system). PMID:26014938

  3. Enhanced respiratory clearance of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae following mucosal immunization with P6 in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kyd, J M; Dunkley, M L; Cripps, A W

    1995-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common cause of infection of the respiratory tract in children and adults. The search for an effective vaccine against this pathogen has focused on components of the outer membrane, and peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein P6 is among the proposed candidates. This study investigated the immunogenicity of P6 in a rat respiratory model. P6 was purified from two strains of NTHi, one capsule-deficient strain and an H. influenzae type b strain, and assessed for clearance of both homologous and heterologous bacterial strains following mucosal immunization. A protective immune response was determined by enhancement of pulmonary clearance of live bacteria and an increased rate of recruitment of phagocytic cells to the lungs. This was most effective when Peyer's patch immunization was accompanied by an intratracheal (IT) boost. However, the rate of bacterial clearance varied between strains, which suggests some differences in anti-P6 immunological defenses recognizing the expression of the highly conserved P6 lipoprotein on the bacterial surface in some strains. P6-specific antibodies in both serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were cross-reactive and did not differ significantly in strain specificity, demonstrating that difference in clearance was unlikely due to differences in P6-specific antibody levels. Serum homologous and heterologous P6-antibody was bactericidal against NTHi even when enhanced clearance had not been observed. Peyer's patch immunization induced P6-specific CD4+ T-helper cell proliferation in lymphocytes isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes. An IT boost increased the level of P6-specific antibodies in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and P6-specific mesenteric node lymphocyte proliferation. Cells from rats immunized with P6 demonstrated proliferation following stimulation with P6 from nonhomologous strains; however, there was some variation in proliferative responses to P6 from different

  4. Rapidly Increasing Prevalence of β-Lactamase-Nonproducing, Ampicillin-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae Type b in Patients with Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Keiko; Chiba, Naoko; Kobayashi, Reiko; Murayama, Somay Y.; Iwata, Satoshi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2004-01-01

    A total of 395 Haemophilus influenzae strains from 226 Japanese institutions participating in the Nationwide Surveillance Study Group for Bacterial Meningitis were received from 1999 to 2002. All strains were analyzed by PCR to identify the resistance genes, and their susceptibilities to β-lactam agents were determined. Of these strains, 29.1% were β-lactamase nonproducing and ampicillin (AMP) susceptible (BLNAS) and lacked all resistance genes; 15.4% were β-lactamase producing and AMP resistant and had the blaTEM-1 gene; 30.6% were β-lactamase nonproducing and AMP resistant (low-BLNAR) and had a Lys-526 or His-517 amino acid substitution in ftsI encoding PBP 3; 13.9% were β-lactamase nonproducing and AMP resistant (BLNAR) and had an additional substitution of Thr-385 in ftsI; 9.1% were amoxicillin-clavulanic acid resistant (BLPACR I) and had the blaTEM-1 gene and a Lys-526 or His-517 amino acid substitution in ftsI; and 1.8% showed resistance similar to that of the BLPACR I group (BLPACR II) but had blaTEM-1 gene and ftsI substitutions, as was the case for the BLNAR strains. All but three strains were serotype b. The prevalence of BLNAR strains has increased rapidly: 0% in 1999, 5.8% in 2000, 14.1% in 2001, and 21.3% in 2002. The MICs at which 90% of BLNAR isolates were inhibited were as follows: AMP, 16 μg/ml; cefotaxime, 1 μg/ml; ceftriaxone, 0.25 μg/ml; and meropenem, 0.5 μg/ml. All of these values were higher than those for the BLNAS counterpart strains. The relatively wide distributions of the β-lactam MICs for BLNAR strains presumably reflect variations in ftsI gene mutations. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis suggested the rapid spread of specific H. influenzae type b strains throughout Japan. Expedited vaccination, rapid identification, and judicious antibiotic use could slow their spread. PMID:15105098

  5. Activities of Faropenem, an Oral β-Lactam, against Recent U.S. Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Ian A.; Karlowsky, James A.; Draghi, Deborah C.; Jones, Mark E.; Thornsberry, Clyde; Murfitt, Kate; Sahm, Daniel F.

    2002-01-01

    The in vitro activities of faropenem and other antimicrobial agents were determined against 4,725 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, 2,614 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 1,193 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates collected from 273 U.S. laboratories during 1999. Faropenem MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were 0.008, 0.25, and 1 μg/ml for penicillin-susceptible, -intermediate, and -resistant S. pneumoniae strains, respectively; 0.5 and 1 μg/ml for β-lactamase-positive and -negative H. influenzae strains, respectively; and 0.12 and 0.5 μg/ml for β-lactamase-negative and -positive M. catarrhalis strains, respectively. Faropenem holds promise as an oral therapy for community-acquired respiratory tract infections. PMID:11796376

  6. Activities of faropenem, an oral beta-lactam, against recent U.S. isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Ian A; Karlowsky, James A; Draghi, Deborah C; Jones, Mark E; Thornsberry, Clyde; Murfitt, Kate; Sahm, Daniel F

    2002-02-01

    The in vitro activities of faropenem and other antimicrobial agents were determined against 4,725 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, 2,614 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 1,193 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates collected from 273 U.S. laboratories during 1999. Faropenem MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were 0.008, 0.25, and 1 microg/ml for penicillin-susceptible, -intermediate, and -resistant S. pneumoniae strains, respectively; 0.5 and 1 microg/ml for beta-lactamase-positive and -negative H. influenzae strains, respectively; and 0.12 and 0.5 microg/ml for beta-lactamase-negative and -positive M. catarrhalis strains, respectively. Faropenem holds promise as an oral therapy for community-acquired respiratory tract infections. PMID:11796376

  7. Binding of human factor H to outer membrane protein P5 of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contributes to complement resistance

    PubMed Central

    Langereis, Jeroen D.; de Jonge, Marien I.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen of the human upper respiratory tract and is often found to cause inflammatory diseases that include sinusitis, otitis media and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To persist in the inflammatory milieu during infection, non-typeable H. influenzae must resist the antimicrobial activity of the human complement system. Here, we used Tn-seq to identify genes important for resistance to complement-mediated killing. This screen identified outer membrane protein P5 in evasion of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Outer membrane protein P5 was shown to bind human complement regulatory protein factor H directly, thereby, preventing complement factor C3 deposition on the surface of the bacterium. Furthermore, we show that amino acid variation within surface-exposed regions within outer membrane P5 affected the level of factor H binding between individual strains. PMID:25091181

  8. Recombinant C-terminal 311 amino acids of HapS adhesin as a vaccine candidate for nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: A study on immunoreactivity in Balb/C mouse.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaee Bafroee, Akram Sadat; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Mousavi, Seyed Fazlollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Khorsand, Hashem; Nejati, Mehdi; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Hap, an auto-transporter protein, is an antigenically conserved adhesion protein which is present on both typeable and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. This protein has central role in bacterial attachment to respiratory tract epithelial cells. A 1000bp C-terminal fragment of Hap passenger domain (HapS) from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector, pET-24a. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with purified rC-HapS. Serum IgG responses to purified rC-HapS, serum IgG subclasses were determined by ELISA and functional activity of antibodies was examined by Serum Bactericidal Assay. The output of rC-HapS was approximately 62% of the total bacterial proteins. Serum IgG responses were significantly increased in immunized group with rC-HapS mixed with Freund's adjuvant in comparison with control groups. Analysis of the serum IgG subclasses showed that the IgG1 subclass was predominant after subcutaneous immunization in BALB/c mice (IgG2a/IgG1 < 1). The sera from rC-HapS immunized animals were strongly bactericidal against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. These results suggest that rC-HapS may be a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. PMID:27377430

  9. Mutations in Haemophilus influenzae mismatch repair genes increase mutation rates of dinucleotide repeat tracts but not dinucleotide repeat-driven pilin phase variation rates.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Christopher D; Sweetman, Wendy A; Moxon, E Richard

    2004-05-01

    High-frequency, reversible switches in expression of surface antigens, referred to as phase variation (PV), are characteristic of Haemophilus influenzae. PV enables this bacterial species, an obligate commensal and pathogen of the human upper respiratory tract, to adapt to changes in the host environment. Phase-variable hemagglutinating pili are expressed by many H. influenzae isolates. PV involves alterations in the number of 5' TA repeats located between the -10 and -35 promoter elements of the overlapping, divergently orientated promoters of hifA and hifBCDE, whose products mediate biosynthesis and assembly of pili. Dinucleotide repeat tracts are destabilized by mismatch repair (MMR) mutations in Escherichia coli. The influence of mutations in MMR genes of H. influenzae strain Rd on dinucleotide repeat-mediated PV rates was investigated by using reporter constructs containing 20 5' AT repeats. Mutations in mutS, mutL, and mutH elevated rates approximately 30-fold, while rates in dam and uvrD mutants were increased 14- and 3-fold, respectively. PV rates of constructs containing 10 to 12 5' AT repeats were significantly elevated in mutS mutants of H. influenzae strains Rd and Eagan. An intact hif locus was found in 14 and 12% of representative nontypeable H. influenzae isolates associated with either otitis media or carriage, respectively. Nine or more tandem 5' TA repeats were present in the promoter region. Surprisingly, inactivation of mutS in two serotype b H. influenzae strains did not alter pilin PV rates. Thus, although functionally analogous to the E. coli MMR pathway and active on dinucleotide repeat tracts, defects in H. influenzae MMR do not affect 5' TA-mediated pilin PV. PMID:15126452

  10. An Application of Outer Membrane Protein P6-Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in Middle Ear Fluids and Nasopharyngeal Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Hotomi, Muneki; Togawa, Akihisa; Kono, Masamitsu; Sugita, Gen; Sugita, Rinya; Fujimaki, Yutaka; Kamide, Yosuke; Uchizono, Akihiro; Kanesada, Keiko; Sawada, Shoichi; Okitsu, Naohiro; Masuda, Hisayo; Tanaka, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yumi; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific to outer membrane protein P6 (P6-ELISA) was applied for detecting Haemophilus influenzae in middle ear fluids (MEFs) from acute otitis media (AOM) patients and in nasopharyngeal secretions (NPSs) from acute rhinosinusitis patients. P6-ELISA had a sensitivity of 83.3% for MEFs and 71.5% for NPSs and a specificity of 85.6% for MEFs and 92.5% for NPSs, respectively. Real-time PCR exhibited significant differences in the number of ompP1 gene copies among samples determined by P6-ELISA to be positive and negative for H. influenzae. However, because the P6-ELISA test has the reactivity in Haemophilus species include two commensals H. haemolyticus and H. parainfluenzae, it is thus a weak method in order to detect only NTHi correctly. Consequently, diagnosis using the P6-ELISA should be based on an overall evaluation, including the results of other related examinations and clinical symptoms to prevent misleading conclusions in clinical setting. PMID:24015192