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Sample records for adrenocortical tumor cells

  1. Chloroquine alleviates etoposide-induced centrosome amplification by inhibiting CDK2 in adrenocortical tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T-Y; Syu, J-S; Lin, T-C; Cheng, H-l; Lu, F-l; Wang, C-Y

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor drug etoposide (ETO) is widely used in treating several cancers, including adrenocortical tumor (ACT). However, when used at sublethal doses, tumor cells still survive and are more susceptible to the recurring tumor due to centrosome amplification. Here, we checked the effect of sublethal dose of ETO in ACT cells. Sublethal dose of ETO treatment did not induce cell death but arrested the ACT cells in G2/M phase. This resulted in centrosome amplification and aberrant mitotic spindle formation leading to genomic instability and cellular senescence. Under such conditions, Chk2, cyclin A/CDK2 and ERK1/2 were aberrantly activated. Pharmacological inactivation of Chk2, CDK2 or ERK1/2 or depletion of CDK2 or Chk2 inhibited the centrosome amplification in ETO-treated ACT cells. In addition, autophagy was activated by ETO and was required for ACT cell survival. Chloroquine, the autophagy inhibitor, reduced ACT cell growth and inhibited ETO-induced centrosome amplification. Chloroquine alleviated CDK2 and ERK, but not Chk2, activation and thus inhibited centrosome amplification in either ETO- or hydroxyurea-treated ACT cells. In addition, chloroquine also inhibited centrosome amplification in osteosarcoma U2OS cell lines when treated with ETO or hydroxyurea. In summary, we have demonstrated that chloroquine inhibited ACT cell growth and alleviated DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification by inhibiting CDK2 and ERK activity, thus preventing genomic instability and recurrence of ACT. PMID:26690546

  2. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Faucz, Fabio R; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the cyclic (c)AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing syndrome (CS). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, downregulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs. PMID:27625633

  3. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Faucz, Fabio R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the cyclic (c)AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing syndrome (CS). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, downregulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs.

  4. Different expression of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors: Relationship with cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovani, G.; Lania, A.G.; Bondioni, S.; Peverelli, E.; Pedroni, C.; Ferrero, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Vicentini, L.; Arnaldi, G.; Bosari, S.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Spada, A.

    2008-01-01

    The four regulatory subunits (R1A, R1B, R2A, R2B) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in several cancer cell lines and exert distinct roles in growth control. Mutations of the R1A gene have been found in patients with Carney complex and in a minority of sporadic primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PKA regulatory subunits in non-PPNAD adrenocortical tumors causing ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and to test the impact of differential expression of these subunits on cell growth. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a defective expression of R2B in all cortisol-secreting adenomas (n = 16) compared with the normal counterpart, while both R1A and R2A were expressed at high levels in the same tissues. Conversely, carcinomas (n = 5) showed high levels of all subunits. Sequencing of R1A and R2B genes revealed a wild type sequence in all tissues. The effect of R1/R2 ratio on proliferation was assessed in mouse adrenocortical Y-1 cells. The R2-selective cAMP analogue 8-Cl-cAMP dose-dependently inhibited Y-1 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, while the R1-selective cAMP analogue 8-HA-cAMP stimulated cell proliferation. Finally, R2B gene silencing induced up-regulation of R1A protein, associated with an increase in cell proliferation. In conclusion, we propose that a high R1/R2 ratio favors the proliferation of well differentiated and hormone producing adrenocortical cells, while unbalanced expression of these subunits is not required for malignant transformation.

  5. Pathogenesis of benign adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel

    2010-12-01

    Most adrenocortical tumors (ACT) are benign unilateral adrenocortical adenomas, often discovered incidentally. Exceptionally, ACT are bilateral. However bilateral ACT have been very helpful to progress in the pathophysiology of ACT. Although most ACT are of sporadic origin, they may also be part of syndromic and/or hereditary disorders. The identification of the genetics of familial diseases associated with benign ACT has been helpful to define somatic alterations in sporadic ACT: for example, identification of PRKAR1A mutations in Carney complex or alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Coli. Components of the cAMP signaling pathway-for example, adrenocorticotropic-hormone receptors and other membrane receptors, Gs protein, phosphodiesterases and protein kinase A-can be altered to various degrees in benign cortisol-secreting ACT. These progress have been important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of benign ACT, but already have profound implications for clinical management, for example in unraveling the genetic origin of disease in some patients with ACT. They also have therapeutic consequences, and should help to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:21115158

  6. Protein kinase A alterations in adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Espiard, S; Ragazzon, B; Bertherat, J

    2014-11-01

    Stimulation of the cAMP pathway by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is essential for adrenal cortex maintenance, glucocorticoid and adrenal androgens synthesis, and secretion. Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cAMP pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway. Molecular alterations of PKA subunits have been observed in adrenocortical tumors. PKA molecular defects can be germline in hereditary disorders or somatic in sporadic tumors. Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) can be observed in patients with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome (CS) due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. Germline gene duplication of the catalytic subunits Cα (PRKACA) has been observed in patients with PPNAD. Furthermore, exome sequencing revealed recently activating somatic mutations of PRKACA in about 40% of cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies help in the progress to understand the mechanisms of adrenocortical tumors development due to PKA regulatory subunits alterations. All these alterations are observed in benign oversecreting tumors and are mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. On the long term, unraveling these alterations will open new strategies of pharmacological treatment targeting the cAMP pathway in adrenal tumors and cortisol-secretion disorders. PMID:25105543

  7. ENDOCRINE TUMOURS: The genomics of adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Faillot, Simon; Assie, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The last decade witnessed the emergence of genomics, a set of high-throughput molecular measurements in biological samples. These pan-genomic and agnostic approaches have revolutionized the molecular biology and genetics of malignant and benign tumors. These techniques have been applied successfully to adrenocortical tumors. Exome sequencing identified new major drivers in all tumor types, including KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CACNA1D mutations in aldosterone-producing adenomas (APA), PRKACA mutations in cortisol-producing adenomas (CPA), ARMC5 mutations in primary bilateral macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PBMAH) and ZNRF3 mutations in adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC). Moreover, the various genomic approaches - including exome sequencing, transcriptome, miRNome, genome and methylome - converge into a single molecular classification of adrenocortical tumors. Especially for ACC, two main molecular groups have emerged, showing major differences in outcomes. These ACC groups differ by their gene expression profiles, but also by recurrent mutations and specific DNA hypermethylation patterns in the subgroup of poor outcome. The clinical impact of these findings is just starting. The main altered signaling pathways now become therapeutic targets. The molecular groups of diseases individualize robust subtypes within diseases such as APA, CPA, PBMAH and ACC. A revised nosology of adrenocortical tumors should impact the clinical research. Obvious consequences also include genetic counseling for the new genetic diseases such as ARMC5 mutations in PBMAH, and a better prognostication of ACC based on targeted measurements of a few discriminant molecular alterations. Identifying the main molecular groups of adrenocortical tumors by extensively gathering the molecular variations is a significant step forward towards precision medicine. PMID:26739091

  8. Adrenocortical tumors and insulin resistance: What is the first step?

    PubMed

    Altieri, Barbara; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Casa, Silvia Della; Ronchi, Cristina L; Balercia, Giancarlo; Orio, Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2016-06-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the onset of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) are still largely unknown. Recently, more attention has been paid to the role of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system on general tumor development and progression. Increased levels of insulin, IGF-1 and IGF-2 are associated with tumor cell growth and increased risk of cancer promotion and progression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia may play a role in adrenal tumor growth through the activation of insulin and IGF-1 receptors. Interestingly, apparently non-functioning ACTs are often associated with a high prevalence of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. However, it is unclear if ACT develops from a primary insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia or if insulin resistance is only secondary to the slight cortisol hypersecretion by ACT. The aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence regarding the relationship between hyperinsulinemia and adrenocortical tumors. PMID:26637955

  9. Inhibition of the Tcf/beta-catenin complex increases apoptosis and impairs adrenocortical tumor cell proliferation and adrenal steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Letícia F.; Bueno, Ana Carolina; Gomes, Débora C.; Abduch, Rafael; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, there is no effective therapy for patients with advanced/metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC). The activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is frequent in ACC and this pathway is a promising therapeutic target. Aim To investigate the effects of the inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin in ACC cells. Methods Adrenal (NCI-H295 and Y1) and non-adrenal (HeLa) cell lines were treated with PNU-74654 (5–200 μM) for 24–96 h to assess cell viability (MTS-based assay), apoptosis (Annexin V), expression/localization of beta-catenin (qPCR, immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and western blot), expression of beta-catenin target genes (qPCR and western blot), and adrenal steroidogenesis (radioimmunoassay, qPCR and western blot). Results In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 significantly decreased cell proliferation 96 h after treatment, increased early and late apoptosis, decreased nuclear beta-catenin accumulation, impaired CTNNB1/beta-catenin expression and increased beta-catenin target genes 48 h after treatment. No effects were observed on HeLa cells. In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione secretion 24 and 48 h after treatment. Additionally, in NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased SF1 and CYP21A2 mRNA expression as well as the protein levels of STAR and aldosterone synthase 48 h after treatment. In Y1 cells, PNU-74654 impaired corticosterone secretion 24 h after treatment but did not decrease cell viability. Conclusions Blocking the Tcf/beta-catenin complex inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in adrenocortical tumor cells triggering increased apoptosis, decreased cell viability and impairment of adrenal steroidogenesis. These promising findings pave the way for further experiments inhibiting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in pre-clinical models of ACC. The inhibition of this pathway may become a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with ACC. PMID:26515592

  10. POD-1/TCF21 Reduces SHP Expression, Affecting LRH-1 Regulation and Cell Cycle Balance in Adrenocortical and Hepatocarcinoma Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    França, Monica Malheiros; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno; Lerario, Antonio Marcondes; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Lotfi, Claudimara Ferini Pacicco

    2015-01-01

    POD-1/TCF21 may play a crucial role in adrenal and gonadal homeostasis and represses Sf-1/SF-1 expression in adrenocortical tumor cells. SF-1 and LRH-1 are members of the Fzt-F1 subfamily of nuclear receptors. LRH-1 is involved in several biological processes, and both LRH-1 and its repressor SHP are involved in many types of cancer. In order to assess whether POD-1 can regulate LRH-1 via the same mechanism that regulates SF-1, we analyzed the endogenous mRNA levels of POD-1, SHP, and LRH-1 in hepatocarcinoma and adrenocortical tumor cells using qRT-PCR. Hereafter, these tumor cells were transiently transfected with pCMVMycPod-1, and the effect of POD-1 overexpression on E-box elements in the LRH-1 and SHP promoter region were analyzed by ChIP assay. Also, Cyclin E1 protein expression was analyzed to detect cell cycle progression. We found that POD-1 overexpression significantly decreased SHP/SHP mRNA and protein levels through POD-1 binding to the E-box sequence in the SHP promoter. Decreased SHP expression affected LRH-1 regulation and increased Cyclin E1. These findings show that POD-1/TCF21 regulates SF-1 and LRH-1 by distinct mechanisms, contributing to the understanding of POD-1 involvement and its mechanisms of action in adrenal and liver tumorigenesis, which could lead to the discovery of relevant biomarkers. PMID:26421305

  11. Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Rainey, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human adrenal cortex secretes mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens. These steroids are produced from unique cell types located within the three distinct zones of the adrenal cortex. Disruption of adrenal steroid production results in a variety of diseases that can lead to hypertension, metabolic syndrome, infertility and androgen excess. The adrenal cortex is also a common site for the development of adenomas, and rarely the site for the development of carcinomas. The adenomas can lead to diseases associated with adrenal steroid excess, while the carcinomas are particularly aggressive and have a poor prognosis. In vitro cell culture models provide an important tool to examine molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling both the normal and pathologic function of the adrenal cortex. Herein we discuss the human adrenocortical cell lines and their use as model systems for adrenal studies. PMID:21924324

  12. [Diagnostic benefits of adrenocortical scintigraphy in hepatic adrenal rest tumor].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kosuke; Horii, Rika; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Arai, Kuniaki; Yamashita, Taro; Kagaya, Takashi; Sakai, Yoshio; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2014-10-01

    An 81-year-old female was referred to our hospital for the examination of an S7 liver tumor. The tumor was suspected to be a hepatic adrenal rest tumor (HART) based on ultrasonography, dynamic CT, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI, and CT during abdominal angiography. After various hormonal tests, the tumor was confirmed as hormonally non-functional. The diagnosis of HART was confirmed based on (131)I-adosterol accumulation in the tumor by adrenocortical scintigraphy. The resected tumor was histologically compatible with HART, and it may have been able to produce cortisol based on the immunohistochemical findings of various adrenocortical hormone metabolic enzymes. Adrenocortical scintigraphy may thus be useful in diagnosing HART. PMID:25283230

  13. Improved clonal and nonclonal growth of human, rat and bovine adrenocortical cells in culture.

    PubMed

    McAllister, J M; Hornsby, P J

    1987-10-01

    This report describes the development of a culture system for long-term growth and cloning of human fetal adrenocortical cells. Optimal conditions for stimulating clonal growth were determined by testing the efficacy of horse serum (HS), fetal bovine serum (FBS), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibronectin, and a combination of growth factors, UltroSer G, in stimulating growth from low density. Optimal conditions for clonal growth were achieved using fibronectin-coated dishes and DME/F12 medium with 10% FBS, 10% HS, 2% UltroSer G, and 100 ng/ml FGF or 100 pM EGF. Conditions for growth at clonal density were found to be optimal for growth of early passage, nonclonal cultures at higher densities. The improved growth conditions used for cloning were shown to allow continued long-term growth of nonclonal human adrenocortical cells without fibroblast overgrowth. All cells in cultures grown in HS, FBS, and UltroSer G had morphologic characteristics of adrenocortical cells, whereas cells grown in FBS only rapidly became overgrown with fibroblasts. Clonal and nonclonal early passage human adrenocortical cells had similar mitogenic responses to FGF and EGF. Whereas FGF, EGF, and UltroSer G showed similar stimulation of DNA synthesis and clonal growth in human adrenocortical cells and human adrenal gland fibroblasts, the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate stimulated growth only in adrenocortical cells and was strongly inhibitory to growth in fibroblasts. In both cell types, forskolin inhibited DNA synthesis. Human adrenocortical cell cultures were functional and synthesized cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. The improved growth conditions for clonal growth of human adrenocortical cells also provided optimal conditions for long-term growth of cultured rat adrenocortical cells and increased the cloning efficiency of cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. PMID:3667487

  14. Metabolic reprogramming: a new relevant pathway in adult adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Faria, André M.; Fragoso, Maria C. B. V.; Lovisolo, Silvana M.; Lerário, Antonio M.; Almeida, Madson Q.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) are complex neoplasias that may present unexpected clinical behavior, being imperative to identify new biological markers that can predict patient prognosis and provide new therapeutic options. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of metabolism-related key proteins in adrenocortical carcinoma. The immunohistochemical expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, CD147, CD44, GLUT1 and CAIX was evaluated in a series of 154 adult patients with adrenocortical neoplasia and associated with patients' clinicopathological parameters. A significant increase in was found for membranous expression of MCT4, GLUT1 and CAIX in carcinomas, when compared to adenomas. Importantly MCT1, GLUT1 and CAIX expressions were significantly associated with poor prognostic variables, including high nuclear grade, high mitotic index, advanced tumor staging, presence of metastasis, as well as shorter overall and disease free survival. In opposition, MCT2 membranous expression was associated with favorable prognostic parameters. Importantly, cytoplasmic expression of CD147 was identified as an independent predictor of longer overall survival and cytoplasmic expression of CAIX as an independent predictor of longer disease-free survival. We provide evidence for a metabolic reprogramming in adrenocortical malignant tumors towards the hyperglycolytic and acid-resistant phenotype, which was associated with poor prognosis. PMID:26587828

  15. Familial predisposition to adrenocortical tumors: clinical and biological features and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Raul C; Pinto, Emilia M; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2010-06-01

    The incidence of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) is increased in several familial cancer syndromes resulting from abnormalities in genes that encode transcription factors implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence, apoptosis, and genomic instability. These include P53, MEN1, APC, and PRKAR1A. Adenomas are the most common ACTs, but adrenocortical carcinomas occur rarely as well. The clinical manifestations of ACTs, which result from increased secretion of adrenocortical hormones, are similar in the familial and sporadic forms of the disease. However, their management may differ because of unique aspects of the constitutional syndromes. The analysis of gene expression profiles of ACTs in these constitutional syndromes have contributed to our understanding of adrenal tumorigenesis and revealed new molecular diagnostic and prognostic markers and candidate genes for targeted therapies. This chapter summarizes the clinical and biological features, pathogenesis, and management strategies for ACTs that develop in patients with familial cancer syndrome. PMID:20833338

  16. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  17. DNA Methylation Profiling Identifies Global Methylation Differences and Markers of Adrenocortical Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rechache, Nesrin S.; Wang, Yonghong; Stevenson, Holly S.; Killian, J. Keith; Edelman, Daniel C.; Merino, Maria; Zhang, Lisa; Nilubol, Naris; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Meltzer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Context: It is not known whether there are any DNA methylation alterations in adrenocortical tumors. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the methylation profile of normal adrenal cortex and benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors. Methods: Genome-wide methylation status of CpG regions were determined in normal (n = 19), benign (n = 48), primary malignant (n = 8), and metastatic malignant (n = 12) adrenocortical tissue samples. An integrated analysis of genome-wide methylation and mRNA expression in benign vs. malignant adrenocortical tissue samples was also performed. Results: Methylation profiling revealed the following: 1) that methylation patterns were distinctly different and could distinguish normal, benign, primary malignant, and metastatic tissue samples; 2) that malignant samples have global hypomethylation; and 3) that the methylation of CpG regions are different in benign adrenocortical tumors by functional status. Normal compared with benign samples had the least amount of methylation differences, whereas normal compared with primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma samples had the greatest variability in methylation (adjusted P ≤ 0.01). Of 215 down-regulated genes (≥2-fold, adjusted P ≤ 0.05) in malignant primary adrenocortical tumor samples, 52 of these genes were also hypermethylated. Conclusions: Malignant adrenocortical tumors are globally hypomethylated as compared with normal and benign tumors. Methylation profile differences may accurately distinguish between primary benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors. Several differentially methylated sites are associated with genes known to be dysregulated in malignant adrenocortical tumors. PMID:22472567

  18. Adrenocortical carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Adrenocortical carcinoma is a cancer of the adrenal glands . Causes Adrenocortical carcinoma is most common in children ... tumor. Symptoms Symptoms of increased cortisol or other adrenal gland hormones: Fatty, rounded hump high on the back ...

  19. The Role of gsp Mutations on the Development of Adrenocortical Tumors and Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson; Wanichi, Ingrid Quevedo; Cavalcante, Isadora Pontes; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula

    2016-01-01

    Somatic GNAS point mutations, commonly known as gsp mutations, are involved in the pathogenesis of McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS) and have also been described in autonomous hormone-producing tumors, such as somatotropinoma, corticotrophoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors, and primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PMAH) (1–3). The involvement of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors was first described by Lyons et al. Since then, several studies have detected the presence of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors, but none of them could explain its presence along or the mechanism that leads to tumor formation and hormone hypersecretion. As a result, the molecular pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic adrenocortical tumors remains unclear (3). PMAH has also been reported with gsp somatic mutations in a few cases. Fragoso et al. identified two distinct gsp somatic mutations affecting arginine residues on codon 201 of GNAS in a few patients with PMAH who lacked any features or manifestations of MAS. Followed by this discovery, other studies have continued looking for gsp mutations based on strong prior evidence demonstrating that increased cAMP signaling is sufficient for cell proliferation and cortisol production (2, 4). With consideration for the previously reported findings, we conjecture that although somatic activating mutations in GNAS are a rare molecular event, these mutations could probably be sufficient to induce the development of macronodule hyperplasia and variable cortisol secretion. In this manuscript, we revised the presence of gsp mutations associated with adrenal cortical tumors and hyperplasia. PMID:27512387

  20. Serum and growth factor requirements for proliferation of human adrenocortical cells in culture: comparison with bovine adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, P J; Sturek, M; Harris, S E; Simonian, M H

    1983-11-01

    Although bovine adrenocortical cells proliferate readily in cell culture, proliferation of fetal or adult human adrenocortical cells has been observed to be limited and preparation of pure proliferating cultures of human adrenocortical cells has not been reported. The growth requirements of fetal human definitive zone adrenocortical cells in culture were compared to the established requirements of bovine adrenocortical cells. The medium used was 1:1 Ham's F12 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with transferrin and insulin. Earlier experiments showed that human cells had a greater proliferative response to horse serum than to fetal bovine serum, whereas the opposite was true for bovine cells. When plated on fibronectin-coated dishes and exposed to varying concentrations of horse serum in the presence of 100 ng/ml fibroblast growth factor (FGF), increasing cell growth was observed up to a serum concentration of 50%. When 50% fetal bovine serum was used instead of horse serum proliferation was less. In contrast, bovine adrenocortical cells showed a maximal proliferative response to either fetal bovine serum or horse serum at 10%. Human adrenocortical cells thus have a very high requirement for serum; 50% is the highest level that may be practically used, but the shape of the dose-response curve suggests that this concentration is still suboptimal. Growth was less in the absence of FGF. Epidermal growth factor can partially substitute for FGF. No response to 100 nM placental lactogen was observed. Less growth was observed when dishes were not coated with fibronectin. The factors present in horse serum that are evidently needed in high amounts by human cells are unknown. Despite this lack of knowledge, use of 50% horse serum enabled long-term growth of human adrenocortical cells that are pure by the criterion of retraction in response to ACTH. Nonadrenocortical cells do not show a retraction response. Such long-term cultures may be useful in studies of

  1. mTOR pathway is activated by PKA in adrenocortical cells and participates in vivo to apoptosis resistance in primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD).

    PubMed

    de Joussineau, Cyrille; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Tissier, Frédérique; Dumontet, Typhanie; Drelon, Coralie; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Tauveron, Igor; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Stratakis, Constantine A; Bertherat, Jérôme; Val, Pierre; Martinez, Antoine

    2014-10-15

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is associated with inactivating mutations of the PRKAR1A tumor suppressor gene that encodes the regulatory subunit R1α of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). In human and mouse adrenocortical cells, these mutations lead to increased PKA activity, which results in increased resistance to apoptosis that contributes to the tumorigenic process. We used in vitro and in vivo models to investigate the possibility of a crosstalk between PKA and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways in adrenocortical cells and its possible involvement in apoptosis resistance. Impact of PKA signaling on activation of the mTOR pathway and apoptosis was measured in a mouse model of PPNAD (AdKO mice), in human and mouse adrenocortical cell lines in response to pharmacological inhibitors and in PPNAD tissues by immunohistochemistry. AdKO mice showed increased mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway activity. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin restored sensitivity of adrenocortical cells to apoptosis in AdKO but not in wild-type mice. In both cell lines and mouse adrenals, rapid phosphorylation of mTORC1 targets including BAD proapoptotic protein was observed in response to PKA activation. Accordingly, BAD hyperphosphorylation, which inhibits its proapoptotic activity, was increased in both AdKO mouse adrenals and human PPNAD tissues. In conclusion, mTORC1 pathway is activated by PKA signaling in human and mouse adrenocortical cells, leading to increased cell survival, which is correlated with BAD hyperphosphorylation. These alterations could be causative of tumor formation. PMID:24865460

  2. Adrenocortical Cells with Stem/Progenitor Cell Properties: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Alex; Hammer, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    The existence and location of undifferentiated cells with the capability of maintaining the homeostasis of the adrenal cortex have long been sought. These cells are thought to remain mostly quiescent with a potential to commit to self-renewal processes or terminal differentiation to homeostatically repopulate the organ. In addition, in response to physiologic stress, the undifferentiated cells undergo rapid proliferation to accommodate organismic need. Sufficient adrenocortical proliferative capacity lasting the lifespan of the host has been demonstrated through cell transplantation and enucleation experiments. Labeling experiments with tritium, BrdU, or trypan blue, as well as transgenic assays support the clonogenic identity and location of these undefined cells within the gland periphery. We define undifferentiated adrenocortical cells as cells devoid of steroidogenic gene expression, and differentiated cells as cells with steroidogenic capacity. In this review, we discuss historic developmental studies together with recent molecular examinations that aim to characterize such populations of cells. PMID:17240045

  3. Effects of Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Silencing in a Human Adrenocortical Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, T C; Jorge, A A; Montenegro, L R; Almeida, M Q; Ferraz-de-Souza, B; Nishi, M Y; Mendonca, B B; Latronico, A C

    2016-07-01

    Type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, including adrenocortical tumors. The aim of the work was to investigate the effects of IGF-1R downregulation in a human adrenocortical cell line by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The human adrenocortical tumor cell line NCI H295R was transfected with 2 specific IGF1R siRNAs (# 1 and # 2) and compared with untreated cells and a negative control siRNA. IGF1R expression was determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRTPCR) and Western blot. The effects of IGF-1R downregulation on cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed. IGF-1R levels were significantly decreased in cells treated with IGF-1R siRNA # 1 or # 2. Relative expression of IGF1R mRNA decreased approximately 50% and Western blot analysis revealed a 30% of reduction in IGF-1R protein. Downregulation of this gene resulted in 40% reduction in cell growth in vitro and 45% increase in apoptosis using siRNA # 2. These findings demonstrate that decreasing IGF-1R mRNA and protein expression in NCI H295R cells can partially inhibit adrenal tumor cell growth in vitro. Targeting IGF1R is a promising therapy for pediatric malignant adrenocortical tumor and can still be an option for adult adrenocortical cancer based on personalized genomic tumor profiling. PMID:27246621

  4. PRKACA: the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Berthon, Annabel S; Szarek, Eva; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is the main effector of cAMP signaling in all tissues. Inactivating mutations of the PRKAR1A gene, coding for the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, are responsible for Carney complex and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A inactivation and PKA dysregulation have been implicated in various types of adrenocortical pathologies associated with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (AICS) from PPNAD to adrenocortical adenomas and cancer, and other forms of bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias (BAH). More recently, mutations of PRKACA, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit C alpha (Cα), were also identified in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PRKACA copy number gain was found in the germline of several patients with cortisol-producing BAH, whereas the somatic Leu206Arg (c.617A>C) recurrent PRKACA mutation was found in as many as half of all adrenocortical adenomas associated with AICS. In vitro analysis demonstrated that this mutation led to constitutive Cα activity, unregulated by its main partners, the PKA regulatory subunits. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the involvement of PRKACA in adrenocortical tumorigenesis, and our understanding of PKA's role in adrenocortical lesions. We also discuss potential therapeutic advances that can be made through targeting of PRKACA and the PKA pathway. PMID:26042218

  5. IGF2 and IGF1R in pediatric adrenocortical tumors: roles in metastasis and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Peixoto Lira, Régia Caroline; Fedatto, Paola Fernanda; Marco Antonio, David Santos; Leal, Letícia Ferro; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo; de Castro, Margaret; Tucci, Silvio; Neder, Luciano; Ramalho, Leandra; Seidinger, Ana Luiza; Cardinalli, Izilda; Mastellaro, Maria José; Yunes, José Andres; Brandalise, Silvia Regina; Tone, Luiz Gonzaga; Rauber Antonini, Sonir Roberto; Scrideli, Carlos Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Deregulation of the IGF system observed in human tumors indicates a role in malignant cell transformation and in tumor cell proliferation. Although overexpression of the IGF2 and IGF1R genes was described in adrenocortical tumors (ACTs), few studies reported their profiles in pediatric ACTs. In this study, the IGF2 and IGF1R expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR according to the patient's clinical/pathological features in 60 pediatric ACT samples, and IGF1R protein was investigated in 45 samples by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Whole transcriptome and functional assays were conducted after IGF1R inhibition with OSI-906 in NCI-H295A cell line. Significant IGF2 overexpression was found in tumor samples when compared with non-neoplastic samples (P<0.001), significantly higher levels of IGF1R in patients with relapse/metastasis (P=0.031) and moderate/strong IGF1R immunostaining in 62.2% of ACTs, but no other relationship with patient survival and clinical/pathological features was observed. OSI-906 treatment downregulated genes associated with MAPK activity, induced limited reduction of cell viability and increased the apoptosis rate. After 24h, the treatment also decreased the expression of genes related to the steroid biosynthetic process, the protein levels of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), and androgen secretion in cell medium, supporting the role of IGF1R in steroidogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Our data showed that the IGF1R overexpression could be indicative of aggressive ACTs in children. However, in vitro treatments with high concentrations of OSI-906 (>1μM) showed limited reduction of cell viability, suggesting that OSI-906 alone could not be a suitable therapy to abolish carcinoma cell growth. PMID:27185872

  6. [Comparative clinical analysis of histological systems of adrenocortical tumors diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Bokhyan, V Yu; Stilidi, I S; Pavlovskaya, A I

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) and cortical adenoma presents certain difficulties since there is no specific histological criterion allowing to distinguish tumors of the adrenal cortex with malignant clinical course. Currently there are offered several systems, and the most widely spread have the index Weiss (IW) and the modified index Weiss (MIW). The accuracy of one or another of the proposed systems remains a matter of debate. There was analyzed own experience on the use of IW and MIW in the diagnosis of 91 cases of the ACC and 13 cases of cortex adenomas of the size at least 5 cm. For the diagnosis of large adenomas sensitivity IW was 77%, MIW--100%. For the diagnosis of metastatic and non-metastatic ACC--100% and 97%, 100% and 86%, respectively (p > 0.05). In multivariate analysis of life expectancy of patients the definition of IW and MIW had a prognostic significance. MIW was less subjective, more simple and convenient to be used and it showed a great informative value at the reclassification of certain "adenomas" into ACC. However to use it on their own, without IW, was impractical as MIW had wider gray area and did not reach the threshold value in some cases of ACC. For the diagnosis of tumors of the adrenal cortex IW remains a standard; when a value was equal of 2 or in cases of doubt it was necessary to calculate MIW as well. PMID:26995980

  7. Partial KCNQ1OT1 hypomethylation: A disguised familial Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome as a sporadic adrenocortical tumor.

    PubMed

    H'mida Ben-Brahim, Dorra; Hammami, Sabeur; Haddaji Mastouri, Marwa; Trabelsi, Saoussen; Chourabi, Maroua; Sassi, Sihem; Mougou, Soumaya; Gribaa, Moez; Zakhama, Abdelfattah; Guédiche, Mohamed Neji; Saad, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome has a wide spectrum of complications such as embryonal tumors, namely adrenocortical tumor. Tumor predisposition is one of the most challenging manifestations of this syndrome. A 45-day old female with a family history of adrenocortical tumor presented with adrenocortical tumor. The case raised suspicion of a hereditary Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, therefore molecular analysis was undertaken. The results revealed partial KCNQ1OT1 hypomethylation in the infant's blood DNA which was associated with a complete loss of methylation in the infant's adrenocortical tumor tissue. It is unique for familial Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome caused by KCNQ1OT1 partial hypomethylation to manifest solely through adrenocortical tumor. Incomplete penetrance and specific tissue mosaicism could provide explanations to this novel hereditary Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome presentation. PMID:26937341

  8. A Case of Cushing's Syndrome with Multiple Adrenocortical Adenomas Composed of Compact Cells and Clear Cells.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Masahiro; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ota, Mitsutane; Numasawa, Mitsuyuki; Sasahara, Yuriko; Takeuchi, Takato; Nakano, Yujiro; Oohara, Norihiko; Murakami, Masanori; Bouchi, Ryotaro; Minami, Isao; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Hashimoto, Koshi; Izumiyama, Hajime; Kawamura, Naoko; Kihara, Kazunori; Negi, Mariko; Akashi, Takumi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Sasano, Hironobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for Cushingoid features and diagnosed as adrenal Cushing's syndrome due to a right adrenocortical mass (60 × 55 mm). The mass was composed of three different tumors; the first one was homogeneously lipid-poor neoplasm measuring 20 × 13 mm located at the most dorsal region, the second one was heterogeneous and lipid-rich tumor containing multiple foci of calcification measuring 50 × 32 mm located at the central region, and the last one was heterogeneous harboring dilated and tortuous vessels and lipid-poor one measuring 35 × 18 mm at the most ventral region of the adrenal gland. A right adrenalectomy was subsequently performed by open surgery. Macroscopic and microscopic analyses revealed that all three tumors were adrenocortical adenomas; the first one represents a pigmented adrenocortical adenoma, the second one adrenocortical adenoma associated with degeneration, and the third one adrenocortical adenoma harboring extensive degeneration. Immunohistochemical analysis of the steroidogenic enzymes also revealed that all of the tumors had the capacity of synthesizing cortisol. This is a very rare case of Cushing's syndrome caused by multiple adrenocortical adenomas including a pigmented adenoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of steroidogenic enzymes contributed to understanding of steroidogenesis in each of these three different adrenocortical adenomas in this case. PMID:26961704

  9. Adrenocortical Tumors and Hyperplasias in Childhood - Etiology, Genetics, Clinical Presentation and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Jennifer A.; Grimberg, Adda

    2007-01-01

    Adrenocortical tumors are rare in children and are associated with a poor prognosis when malignant. The fund of knowledge regarding etiology, presentation and clinical outcomes remains limited. Evaluation of genetic disorders associated with the development of adrenocortical disorders has allowed researchers to identify a number of mutations that may be involved in tumorigenesis, including alterations in the GNAS1, PRKAR1A, TP53 and IGF2 genes. Clinical presentation in children is associated most commonly with young age, female gender and symptoms of virilization. Most children have localized disease at presentation which may be associated with a better prognosis when compared to adults. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment and mitotane, the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent, has a poor response rate and is highly toxic. Broader participation in multi-center research, such as the International Pediatric Adrenocortical Tumor Registry, is needed to collect sufficient data to better guide our clinical management. PMID:17021581

  10. High-density lipoprotein is a potential growth factor for adrenocortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murao, Koji . E-mail: mkoji@kms.ac.jp; Imachi, Hitomi; Cao, Wenming; Yu, Xiao; Li, Junhua; Yoshida, Kazuya; Ahmed, Rania A.M.; Matsumoto, Kensuke; Nishiuchi, Takamasa; Ishida, Toshihiko; Wong, Norman C.W.

    2006-05-26

    The entry of cholesterol contained within high-density lipoprotein (HDL) into adrenocortical cells is mediated by a human homologue of SR-BI, CD36, and LIMPII Analogous-1 (CLA-1) and thus augmenting their growth. To address the role of CLA-1, we created a mutant mCLA that lacked the C-terminal tail. HDL CE selective uptake by cells carrying the mCLA-1 receptor was fully active and equivalent to those transfected with full-length CLA-1 (fCLA-1). Expression of mCLA inhibited the proliferation of an adrenocortical cell line and the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]thymidine into the cells. This effect was sensitive to wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Our transcriptional studies revealed that the inhibitory action of mCLA required the transcriptional factor AP-1 and the effect of HDL on AP-1 activation was also abrogated by wortmannin. These findings raise the possibility that the inhibitors of the effects of HDL may be of therapeutic value for adrenocortical tumor.

  11. Adrenocortical tumor with precocious puberty in a 2-month-old girl.

    PubMed

    Marret, Jean-Baptiste; Raffoul, Lara; Ribault, Virginie; Ravasse, Philippe; Rod, Julien

    2015-10-01

    Adrenocortical tumor is a rare childhood tumor with a median age at onset of 3.2 years. Virilization is the most common sign. Laparotomy is the reference treatment and has a favorable course. The diagnosis of adrenal tumor can be difficult. The main parameters of malignant tumors are size and metastasis. Analysis of TP53 mutation can facilitate final diagnosis. We report a case of virilizing adrenal tumor that developed in a 2-month-old girl, and which was treated with laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:26508188

  12. DAX1 Overexpression in Pediatric Adrenocortical Tumors: A Synergic Role with SF1 in Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, G R V; Soares, I C; Faria, A M; Domingues, V B; Wakamatsu, A; Lerario, A M; Alves, V A F; Zerbini, M C N; Mendonca, B B; Fragoso, M C B V; Latronico, A C; Almeida, M Q

    2015-08-01

    DAX1 transcription factor is a key determinant of adrenogonadal development, acting as a repressor of SF1 targets in steroidogenesis. It was recently demonstrated that DAX1 regulates pluripotency and differentiation in murine embryonic stem cells. In this study, we investigated DAX1 expression in adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) and correlated it with SF1 expression and clinical parameters. DAX1 and SF1 protein expression were assessed in 104 ACTs from 34 children (25 clinically benign and 9 malignant) and 70 adults (40 adenomas and 30 carcinomas). DAX1 gene expression was studied in 49 ACTs by quantitative real-time PCR. A strong DAX1 protein expression was demonstrated in 74% (25 out of 34) and 24% (17 out of 70) of pediatric and adult ACTs, respectively (χ(2)=10.1, p=0.002). In the pediatric group, ACTs with a strong DAX1 expression were diagnosed at earlier ages than ACTs with weak expression [median 1.2 (range, 0.5-4.5) vs. 2.2 (0.9-9.4), p=0.038]. DAX1 expression was not associated with functional status in ACTs. Interestingly, a positive correlation was observed between DAX1 and SF1 protein expression in both pediatric and adult ACTs (r=0.55 for each group separately; p<0.0001). In addition, DAX1 gene expression was significantly correlated with SF1 gene expression (p<0.0001, r=0.54). In conclusion, DAX1 strong protein expression was more frequent in pediatric than in adult ACTs. Additionally, DAX1 and SF1 expression positively correlated in ACTs, suggesting that these transcription factors might cooperate in adrenocortical tumorigenesis. PMID:25985323

  13. Global gene expression response to telomerase in bovine adrenocortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Betts, Dean H. . E-mail: bettsd@uoguelph.ca

    2005-09-30

    The infinite proliferative capability of most immortalized cells is dependent upon the presence of the enzyme telomerase and its ability to maintain telomere length and structure. However, telomerase may be involved in a greater system than telomere length regulation, as recent evidence has shown it capable of increasing wound healing in vivo, and improving cellular proliferation rate and survival from apoptosis in vitro. Here, we describe the global gene expression response to ectopic telomerase expression in an in vitro bovine adrenocortical cell model. Telomerase-immortalized cells showed an increased ability for proliferation and survival in minimal essential medium above cells transgenic for GFP. cDNA microarray analyses revealed an altered cell state indicative of increased adrenocortical cell proliferation regulated by the IGF2 pathway and alterations in members of the TGF-B family. As well, we identified alterations in genes associated with development and wound healing that support a model that high telomerase expression induces a highly adaptable, progenitor-like state.

  14. microRNA-7 as a tumor suppressor and novel therapeutic for adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Anthony J.; Weiss, Jocelyn; Mugridge, Nancy; Kim, Edward; Feeney, Alex L.; Ip, Julian C.; Reid, Glen; Clarke, Stephen; Soon, Patsy S.H.; Robinson, Bruce G.; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; MacDiarmid, Jennifer A.; Sidhu, Stan B.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) has a poor prognosis with significant unmet clinical need due to late diagnosis, high rates of recurrence/metastasis and poor response to conventional treatment. Replacing tumor suppressor microRNAs (miRNAs) offer a novel therapy, however systemic delivery remains challenging. A number of miRNAs have been described to be under-expressed in ACC however it is not known if they form a part of ACC pathogenesis. Here we report that microRNA-7–5p (miR-7) reduces cell proliferation in vitro and induces G1 cell cycle arrest. Systemic miR-7 administration in a targeted, clinically safe delivery vesicle (EGFREDVTM nanocells) reduces ACC xenograft growth originating from both ACC cell lines and primary ACC cells. Mechanistically, miR-7 targets Raf-1 proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (RAF1) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR). Additionally, miR-7 therapy in vivo leads to inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). In patient ACC samples, CDK1 is overexpressed and miR-7 expression inversely related. In summary, miR-7 inhibits multiple oncogenic pathways and reduces ACC growth when systemically delivered using EDVTM nanoparticles. This data is the first study in ACC investigating the possibility of miRNAs replacement as a novel therapy. PMID:26452132

  15. Genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy as a cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome associated with recurrent virilizing adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Bertoin, F; Letouzé, E; Grignani, P; Patey, M; Rossignol, S; Libé, R; Pasqual, C; Lardière-Deguelte, S; Hoeffel-Fornes, C; Gaillard, D; Previderè, C; Delemer, B; Lalli, E

    2015-06-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by fetal macrosomia, macroglossia, and abdominal wall defects. BWS patients are at risk to develop Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma, and adrenal tumors. A young woman with BWS features, but with inconclusive genetic evidence for the disease, came to clinical observation for signs of virilization at the age of 16 years. An adrenocortical tumor was diagnosed and surgically resected. The tumor underwent 2 local relapses that were also surgically treated. The patient was also operated to remove a breast fibroadenoma. SNP arrays were used to analyze chromosome abnormalities in normal and tumor samples from the patient and her parents. The patient presented genome-wide mosaic paternal uniparental disomy (patUPD) both in the adrenocortical and the breast tumors, with different degrees of loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The more recent relapses of the adrenocortical tumor showed a loss of part of chromosome 17p that was absent in the first tumor. Analysis of a skin biopsy sample also showed mosaic patUPD with partial LOH, while no LOH was detected in leukocyte DNA. This case shows that virilizing adrenocortical tumors may be a clinical feature of patients with BWS. The SNP array technology is useful to diagnose genome-wide patUPD mosaicism in BWS patients with an inconclusive molecular diagnosis and underlines the tumorigenic potential of the absence of the maternal genome combined with an excess of the paternal genome. PMID:25365508

  16. Regulation of the adrenocortical stem cell niche: implications for disease

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Elisabeth M.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are endowed with the potential for self-renewal and multipotency. Pluripotent embryonic stem cells have an early role in the formation of the three germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm), whereas adult tissue stem cells and progenitor cells are critical mediators of organ homeostasis. The adrenal cortex is an exceptionally dynamic endocrine organ that is homeostatically maintained by paracrine and endocrine signals throughout postnatal life. In the past decade, much has been learned about the stem and progenitor cells of the adrenal cortex and the multiple roles that these cell populations have in normal development and homeostasis of the adrenal gland and in adrenal diseases. In this Review, we discuss the evidence for the presence of adrenocortical stem cells, as well as the various signalling molecules and transcriptional networks that are critical for the embryological establishment and postnatal maintenance of this vital population of cells. The implications of these pathways and cells in the pathophysiology of disease are also addressed. PMID:25287283

  17. Mechanism of adrenocortical toxicity induced by quinocetone and its bidesoxy-quinocetone metabolite in porcine adrenocortical cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Wan, Dan; Ihsan, Awais; Liu, Qianying; Cheng, Guyue; Li, Juan; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-10-01

    Quinocetone (QCT) is a new feeding antibacterial agent in the QdNOs family. The mechanism of its adrenal toxicity is far from clear. This study was conducted to estimate the adrenal cell damage induced by QCT and its bidesoxy-quinocetone (B-QCT) metabolite and to further investigate their mechanisms. Following doses of QCT increasing from 5 to 50 μM, cell apoptosis and necrosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and redox imbalance were observed in porcine adrenocortical cells. The mRNA levels of the six components of intermediary enzymes and the adrenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) displayed a dysregulation induced by QCT, indicating that QCT might influence aldosterone secretion not only through the upstream of the production but also through the downstream of the adrenal RAAS pathway. In contrast, B-QCT had few toxic effects on the cell apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and redox imbalance. Moreover, LCMS-IT-TOF analysis showed that no desoxy metabolites of QCT were found in either cell lysate or supernatant samples. In conclusion, we reported on the cytotoxicity in porcine adrenocortical cells exposed to QCT via oxidative stress, which raised awareness that its toxic effects resulted from N→O groups, and its toxic mechanism might involve the interference of the steroid hormone biosynthesis pathway. PMID:26296292

  18. The reticulin algorithm for adrenocortical tumor diagnosis: a multicentric validation study on 245 unpublished cases.

    PubMed

    Duregon, Eleonora; Fassina, Ambrogio; Volante, Marco; Nesi, Gabriella; Santi, Raffaella; Gatti, Gaia; Cappellesso, Rocco; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Ventura, Laura; Gambacorta, Marcello; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Loli, Paola; Mannelli, Massimo; Mantero, Franco; Berruti, Alfredo; Terzolo, Massimo; Papotti, Mauro

    2013-09-01

    The pathologic diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) still needs to be improved, because the renowned Weiss Score (WS) system has a poor reproducibility of some parameters and is difficult to apply in borderline cases and in ACC variants. The "reticulin algorithm" (RA) defines malignancy through an altered reticulin framework associated with 1 of the 3 following parameter: necrosis, high mitotic rate, and vascular invasion. This study aimed at validating the interobserver reproducibility of reticulin stain evaluation in an unpublished series of 245 adrenocortical tumors (61 adenomas and 184 carcinomas) from 5 Italian centers, classified according to the WS. Eight pathologists reviewed all reticulin-stained slides. After training, a second round of evaluation on discordant cases was performed 10 weeks later. The RA reclassified 67 cases (27%) as adenomas, including 44 with no reticulin alterations and 23 with an altered reticulin framework but lacking the subsequent parameters of the triad. The other 178 cases (73%) were carcinomas according to the above-mentioned criteria. A complete (8/8 pathologists) interobserver agreement was reached in 75% of cases (κ=0.702), irrespective of case derivation, pathologists' experience, and histologic variants, and was further improved when only those cases with high WS and clinically malignant behavior were considered. After the training, the overall agreement increased to 86%. We conclude that reticulin staining is a reliable technique and an easy-to-interpret system in adrenocortical tumors; moreover, it has a high interobserver reproducibility, which supports the notion of using such a method in the proposed 2-step RA approach for ACC diagnosis. PMID:23774167

  19. Origin and Molecular Pathology of Adrenocortical Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Bielinska, M.; Parviainen, H.; Kiiveri, S.; Heikinheimo, M.; Wilson, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Neoplastic adrenocortical lesions are common in humans and several species of domestic animals. Although there are unanswered questions about the origin and evolution of adrenocortical neoplasms, analysis of human tumor specimens and animal models indicates that adrenocortical tumorigenesis involves both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Chromosomal changes accumulate during tumor progression, and aberrant telomere function is one of the key mechanisms underlying chromosome instability during this process. Epigenetic changes serve to expand the size of the uncommitted adrenal progenitor population, modulate their phenotypic plasticity (i.e., responsiveness to extracellular signals), and increase the likelihood of subsequent genetic alterations. Analyses of heritable and spontaneous types of human adrenocortical tumors have documented alterations in either cell surface receptors or their downstream effectors that impact neoplastic transformation. Many of the mutations associated with benign human adrenocortical tumors result in dysregulated cyclic AMP signaling, whereas key factors/signaling pathways associated with adrenocortical carcinomas include dysregulated expression of the IGF2 gene cluster, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. A better understanding of the factors and signaling pathways involved in adrenal tumorigenesis is necessary to develop targeted pharmacologic and genetic therapies. PMID:19261630

  20. Comparison of the Effects of PRKAR1A and PRKAR2B Depletion on Signaling Pathways, Cell Growth, and Cell Cycle Control of Adrenocortical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Basso, F.; Rocchetti, F.; Rodriguez, S.; Nesterova, M.; Cormier, F.; Stratakis, C.; Ragazzon, B.; Bertherat, J.; Rizk-Rabin, M.

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP/protein kinase A signaling cascade is one of the main pathways involved in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. The PKA R1A and R2B proteins are the most abundant regulatory subunits in endocrine tissues. Inactivating mutations of PRKAR1A are associated with Carney complex and a subset of sporadic tumors and the abundance of R2B protein is low in a subset of secreting adrenocortical adenomas. We previously showed that PRKAR1A and PRKAR2B inactivation have anti-apoptotic effects on the adrenocortical carcinoma cell line H295R. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of PRKAR1A and PRKAR2B depletion on cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. We found that PRKAR2B depletion is compensated by an upregulation in the abundance of R1A protein, whereas PRKAR1A depletion has no effect on the production of R2B. The depletion of either PRKAR1A or PRKAR2B promotes the expression of Bcl-xL and resistance to apoptosis; and is associated with a high percentage of cells in S and G2 phase, activates PKA and MEK/ERK pathways, and impairs the expression of IkB leading to activate the NF-κB pathway. Nonetheless, we observed differences in the regulation of cyclins. The depletion of PRKAR1A leads to the accumulation of cyclin D1 and p27kip, whereas the depletion of PRKAR2B promotes the accumulation of cyclin A, B, cdk1, cdc2, and p21Cip. In conclusion, although the depletion of PRKAR1A and PRKAR2B in adrenocortical cells has similar effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis; loss of these PKA subunits differentially affects cyclin expression. PMID:25268545

  1. Comparison of the effects of PRKAR1A and PRKAR2B depletion on signaling pathways, cell growth, and cell cycle control of adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Basso, F; Rocchetti, F; Rodriguez, S; Nesterova, M; Cormier, F; Stratakis, C A; Ragazzon, B; Bertherat, J; Rizk-Rabin, M

    2014-11-01

    The cyclic AMP/protein kinase A signaling cascade is one of the main pathways involved in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. The PKA R1A and R2B proteins are the most abundant regulatory subunits in endocrine tissues. Inactivating mutations of PRKAR1A are associated with Carney complex and a subset of sporadic tumors and the abundance of R2B protein is low in a subset of secreting adrenocortical adenomas. We previously showed that PRKAR1A and PRKAR2B inactivation have anti-apoptotic effects on the adrenocortical carcinoma cell line H295R. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of PRKAR1A and PRKAR2B depletion on cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. We found that PRKAR2B depletion is compensated by an upregulation of R1A protein, whereas PRKAR1A depletion has no effect on the production of R2B. The depletion of either PRKAR1A or PRKAR2B promotes the expression of Bcl-xL and resistance to apoptosis; and is associated with a high percentage of cells in S and G2 phase, activates PKA and MEK/ERK pathways, and impairs the expression of IkB leading to activate the NF-κB pathway. However, we observed differences in the regulation of cyclins. The depletion of PRKAR1A leads to the accumulation of cyclin D1 and p27kip, whereas the depletion of PRKAR2B promotes the accumulation of cyclin A, B, cdk1, cdc2, and p21Cip. In conclusion, although the depletion of PRKAR1A and PRKAR2B in adrenocortical cells has similar effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis; loss of these PKA subunits differentially affects cyclin expression. PMID:25268545

  2. Knockdown of SF-1 and RNF31 Affects Components of Steroidogenesis, TGFβ, and Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlund, Anna; Jonsson, Philip; Vedin, Lise-Lotte; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Treuter, Eckardt

    2012-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Steroidogenic Factor-1 (SF-1, NR5A1) is a critical regulator of development and homeostasis of the adrenal cortex and gonads. We recently showed that a complex containing E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF31 and the known SF-1 corepressor DAX-1 (NR0B1) interacts with SF-1 on target promoters and represses transcription of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and aromatase (CYP19) genes. To further evaluate the role of SF-1 in the adrenal cortex and the involvement of RNF31 in SF-1-dependent pathways, we performed genome-wide gene-expression analysis of adrenocortical NCI-H295R cells where SF-1 or RNF31 had been knocked down using RNA interference. We find RNF31 to be deeply connected to cholesterol metabolism and steroid hormone synthesis, strengthening its role as an SF-1 coregulator. We also find intriguing evidence of negative crosstalk between SF-1 and both transforming growth factor (TGF) β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. This crosstalk could be of importance for adrenogonadal development, maintenance of adrenocortical progenitor cells and the development of adrenocortical carcinoma. Finally, the SF-1 gene profile can be used to distinguish malignant from benign adrenocortical tumors, a finding that implicates SF-1 in the development of malignant adrenocortical carcinoma. PMID:22427816

  3. Pediatric Adrenocortical Tumors: What They Can Tell Us on Adrenal Development and Comparison with Adult Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lalli, Enzo; Figueiredo, Bonald C.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical tumors (ACT) in children are very rare and are most frequently diagnosed in the context of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a multiple cancer syndrome linked to germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 with loss of heterozygosity in the tumors. A peak of children ACT incidence is present in the states of southern Brazil, where they are linked to the high prevalence in the population of a specific TP53 mutation (R337H). Children ACT have specific features distinguishing them from adult tumors in their pathogenetic mechanisms, genomic profiles, and prognosis. Epidemiological and molecular evidence suggests that in most cases they are derived from the fetal adrenal. PMID:25741319

  4. Genotype analysis of the human endostatin variant p.D104N in benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Mariani, Beatriz Marinho; Trarbach, Ericka Barbosa; Ribeiro, Tamaya Castro; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endostatin is a potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. It is derived from the proteolytic cleavage of collagen XVIII, which is encoded by the COL18A1 gene. A polymorphic COL18A1 allele encoding the functional polymorphism p.D104N impairs the activity of endostatin, resulting in a decreased ability to inhibit angiogenesis. This polymorphism has been previously analyzed in many types of cancer and has been considered a phenotype modulator in some benign and malignant tumors. However, these data are controversial, and different results have been reported for the same tumor types, such as prostate and breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to genotype the p.D104N variant in a cohort of pediatric and adult patients with adrenocortical tumors and to determine its possible association with the biological behavior of adrenocortical tumors. METHODS: DNA samples were obtained from 38 pediatric and 56 adult patients (0.6–75 yrs) with adrenocortical tumors. The DNA samples were obtained from peripheral blood, frozen tissue or paraffin-embedded tumor blocks when blood samples or fresh frozen tissue samples were unavailable. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to genotype the patients and 150 controls. The potential associations of the p.D104N polymorphism with clinical and histopathological features and oncologic outcome (age of onset, tumor size, malignant tumor behavior, and clinical syndrome) were analyzed. RESULTS: Both the patient group and the control group were in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. The frequencies of the p.D104N polymorphism in the patient group were 81.9% (DD), 15.9% (DN) and 2.2% (NN). In the controls, these frequencies were 80.6%, 17.3% and 2.0%, respectively. We did not observe any association of this variant with clinical or histopathological features or oncologic outcome in our cohort of pediatric and adult patients with adrenocortical tumors. PMID:22358232

  5. Need for Comprehensive Hormonal Workup in the Management of Adrenocortical Tumors in Children

    PubMed Central

    Gönç, E. Nazlı; Özön, Zeynep Alev; Çakır, Meltem Didem; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2014-01-01

    Ob­jec­ti­ve: Clinical findings do not reflect the excess hormonal status in adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) in children. Identification of abnormal hormone secretion may help provide the tumor marker and delineate those patients with a risk of adrenal suppression following tumor removal. To analyze the impact of complete hormonal assessment regardless of the clinical presentation in hormone-secreting ACTs in childhood. Methods: Association of hormonal workup at diagnosis with the clinical findings and frequency of adrenal suppression postoperatively were analyzed in 18 children with ACT. Results: Seventeen of the 18 patients had functional ACT. Clinical findings suggested isolated virilization and isolated Cushing’s syndrome in 38.8% and 17.6% of patients, respectively. Hormonal workup revealed a frequency of 83.3% for hyperandrogenism. The majority of the tumors (50%) had mixed type hormonal secretion. Hypercortisolism existed in 28.5% of children with isolated virilization and hyperandrogenism was found in 2/3 of children with isolated Cushing’s syndrome. Various androgens other than dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were also determined to be high in hyperandrogenism. Increased testosterone was a highly prevalent tumor marker. Nine patients (3 with no signs of hypercortisolism) had adrenal suppression following tumor removal which lasted 1-24 months. Conclusion: Complete hormonal workup showed the predominance of mixed hormone-secreting type of tumor in the patients who lacked the appropriate clinical findings and also showed that patients lacking signs of Cushing’s syndrome could have postoperative adrenal suppression. Clinical findings may not reflect the abnormal hormone secretion in all cases and tumor markers as well as risk of postoperative adrenal suppression can best be determined by complete hormonal evaluation at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24932598

  6. Animal models of adrenocortical tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beuschlein, Felix; Galac, Sara; Wilson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on human adrenocortical neoplasia has been dominated by gene expression profiling of tumor specimens and by analysis of genetic disorders associated with a predisposition to these tumors. Although these studies have identified key genes and associated signaling pathways that are dysregulated in adrenocortical neoplasms, the molecular events accounting for the frequent occurrence of benign tumors and low rate of malignant transformation remain unknown. Moreover, the prognosis for patients with adrenocortical carcinoma remains poor, so new medical treatments are needed. Naturally occurring and genetically engineered animal models afford a means to investigate adrenocortical tumorigenesis and to develop novel therapeutics. This comparative review highlights adrenocortical tumor models useful for either mechanistic studies or preclinical testing. Three model species – mouse, ferret, and dog – are reviewed, and their relevance to adrenocortical tumors in humans is discussed. PMID:22100615

  7. ATR-101 disrupts mitochondrial functions in adrenocortical carcinoma cells and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yunhui; Kerppola, Raili Emilia; Kerppola, Tom Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) generally has poor prognosis. Existing treatments provide limited benefit for most patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors. We investigated the mechanisms for the cytotoxicity, xenograft suppression, and adrenalytic activity of ATR-101 (PD132301-02), a prospective agent for ACC treatment. Oral administration of ATR-101 inhibited the establishment and impeded the growth of ACC-derived H295R cell xenografts in mice. ATR-101 induced H295R cell apoptosis in culture and in xenografts. ATR-101 caused mitochondrial hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen release, and ATP depletion within hours after exposure, followed by cytochrome c release, caspase-3/7 activation, and membrane permeabilization. The increase in mitochondrial membrane potential occurred concurrently with the decrease in cellular ATP levels. When combined with ATR-101, lipophilic free radical scavengers suppressed the reactive oxygen release, and glycolytic precursors prevented the ATP depletion, abrogating ATR-101 cytotoxicity. ATR-101 directly inhibited F1F0-ATPase activity and suppressed ATP synthesis in mitochondrial fractions. ATR-101 administration to guinea pigs caused oxidized lipofuscin accumulation in thezona fasciculatalayer of the adrenal cortex, implicating reactive oxygen release in the adrenalytic effect of ATR-101. These results support the development of ATR-101 and other adrenalytic compounds for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26843528

  8. Adrenocortical Stem and Progenitor Cells: Unifying Model of Two Proposed Origins

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michelle A.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    The origins of our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which signaling pathways and downstream transcription factors coordinate the specification of adrenocortical cells within the adrenal gland have arisen from studies on the role of Sf1 in steroidogenesis and adrenal development initiated 20 years ago in the laboratory of Dr. Keith Parker. Adrenocortical stem/progenitor cells have been predicted to be undifferentiated and quiescent cells that remain at the periphery of the cortex until needed to replenish the organ, at which time they undergo proliferation and terminal differentiation. Identification of these stem/progenitor cells has only recently been explored. Recent efforts have examined signaling molecules, including Wnt, Shh, and Dax1, which may coordinate intricate lineage and signaling relationships between the adrenal capsule (stem cell niche) and underlying cortex (progenitor cell pool) to maintain organ homeostasis in the adrenal gland. PMID:21094677

  9. Effects of ToxCast Phase I Chemicals on Steroidogenesis in H295R Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma cells (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid hormones are essential for proper development and reproduction. Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental toxicants results in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells were used to evalu...

  10. Fetal adrenal capsular cells serve as progenitor cells for steroidogenic and stromal adrenocortical cell lineages in M. musculus

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michelle A.; Acharya, Asha; Finco, Isabella; Swonger, Jessica M.; Elston, Marlee J.; Tallquist, Michelle D.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage relationships of fetal adrenal cells and adrenal capsular cells to the differentiated adrenal cortex are not fully understood. Existing data support a role for each cell type as a progenitor for cells of the adult cortex. This report reveals that subsets of capsular cells are descendants of fetal adrenocortical cells that once expressed Nr5a1. These fetal adrenocortical cell descendants within the adrenal capsule express Gli1, a known marker of progenitors of steroidogenic adrenal cells. The capsule is also populated by cells that express Tcf21, a known inhibitor of Nr5a1 gene expression. We demonstrate that Tcf21-expressing cells give rise to Nr5a1-expressing cells but only before capsular formation. After the capsule has formed, capsular Tcf21-expressing cells give rise only to non-steroidogenic stromal adrenocortical cells, which also express collagen 1a1, desmin and platelet-derived growth factor (alpha polypeptide) but not Nr5a1. These observations integrate prior observations that define two separate origins of adult adrenocortical steroidogenic cells (fetal adrenal cortex and/or the adrenal capsule). Thus, these observations predict a unique temporal and/or spatial role of adult cortical cells that arise directly from either fetal cortical cells or from fetal cortex-derived capsular cells. Last, the data uncover the mechanism by which two populations of fetal cells (fetal cortex derived Gli1-expressing cells and mesenchymal Tcf21-expressing mesenchymal cells) participate in the establishment of the homeostatic capsular progenitor cell niche of the adult cortex. PMID:24131628

  11. Adrenocortical Stem and Progenitor Cells—Implications for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Derek P.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    The continuous centripetal repopulation of the adrenal cortex is consistent with a population of cells endowed with the stem/progenitor cell properties of self-renewal and pluripotency. The adrenocortical capsule and underlying undifferentiated cortical cells are emerging as critical components of the stem/progenitor cell niche. Recent genetic analysis has identified various signaling pathways including Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt as crucial mediators of adrenocortical lineage and organ homeostasis. Shh expression is restricted to the peripheral cortical cells that express a paucity of steroidogenic genes but give rise to the underlying differentiated cells of the cortex. Wnt/β-catenin signaling maintains the undifferentiated state and adrenal fate of adrenocortical stem/progenitor cells, in part through induction of its target genes Dax1 and inhibin-α, respectively. The pathogenesis of ACC, a rare yet highly aggressive cancer with an extremely poor prognosis, is slowly emerging from studies of the stem/progenitor cells of the adrenal cortex coupled with the genetics of familial syndromes in which ACC occurs. The frequent observation of constitutive activation of Wnt signaling due to loss-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor gene APC or gain-of-function mutation in β-catenin in both adenomas and carcinomas, suggests perhaps that the Wnt pathway serves an early or initiating insult in the oncogenic process. Loss of p53 might be predicted to cooperate with additional genetic insults such as IGF2 as both are the most common genetic abnormalities in malignant versus benign adrenocortical neoplasms. It is unclear whether other factors such as Pod1 and Pref1, which are implicated in stem/progenitor cell biology in the adrenal and/or other organs, are also implicated in the etiology of adrenocortical carcinoma. The rarity and heterogeneous presentation of ACC makes it difficult to identify the cellular origin and the molecular progression to cancer. A more

  12. Toying with fate: Redirecting the differentiation of adrenocortical progenitor cells into gonadal-like tissue

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Theresa; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Ziegler, Ricarda; Cochran, Rebecca S.; Schrade, Anja; Schillebeeckx, Maximiliaan; Mitra, Robi D.; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate decisions are integral to zonation and remodeling of the adrenal cortex. Animal models exhibiting ectopic differentiation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal cortex can shed light on the molecular mechanisms regulating steroidogenic cell fate. In one such model, prepubertal gonadectomy (GDX) of mice triggers the formation of adrenocortical neoplasms that resemble luteinized ovarian stroma. Transcriptomic analysis and genome-wide DNA methylation mapping have identified genetic and epi-genetic markers of GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasia. Members of the GATA transcription factor family have emerged as key regulators of cell fate in this model. Expression of Gata4 is pivotal for the accumulation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal glands of gonadectomized mice, whereas expression of Gata6 limits the spontaneous and GDX-induced differentiation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal cortex. Additionally, Gata6 is essential for proper development of the adrenal X-zone, a layer analogous to the fetal zone of the human adrenal cortex. The relevance of these observations to developmental signaling pathways in the adrenal cortex, to other animal models of altered adrenocortical cell fate, and to human diseases is discussed. PMID:25498963

  13. Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated Potassium Channels Negatively Regulate Aldosterone Secretion in Human Adrenocortical Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Liang, Qingnan; Shi, Yingtang; Mei, Yan-Ai; Barrett, Paula Q; Hu, Changlong

    2016-09-01

    Aldosterone, which plays a key role in maintaining water and electrolyte balance, is produced by zona glomerulosa cells of the adrenal cortex. Autonomous overproduction of aldosterone from zona glomerulosa cells causes primary hyperaldosteronism. Recent clinical studies have highlighted the pathological role of the KCNJ5 potassium channel in primary hyperaldosteronism. Our objective was to determine whether small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (SK) channels may also regulate aldosterone secretion in human adrenocortical cells. We found that apamin, the prototypic inhibitor of SK channels, decreased membrane voltage, raised intracellular Ca(2+) and dose dependently increased aldosterone secretion from human adrenocortical H295R cells. By contrast, 1-Ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone, an agonist of SK channels, antagonized apamin's action and decreased aldosterone secretion. Commensurate with an increase in aldosterone production, apamin increased mRNA expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and aldosterone synthase that control the early and late rate-limiting steps in aldosterone biosynthesis, respectively. In addition, apamin increased angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone secretion, whereas 1-Ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone suppressed both angiotensin II- and high K(+)-stimulated production of aldosterone in H295R cells. These findings were supported by apamin-modulation of basal and angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone secretion from acutely prepared slices of human adrenals. We conclude that SK channel activity negatively regulates aldosterone secretion in human adrenocortical cells. Genetic association studies are necessary to determine whether mutations in SK channel subtype 2 genes may also drive aldosterone excess in primary hyperaldosteronism. PMID:27432863

  14. Ultrastructural Localization of Endogenous Exchange Factor for ARF6 in Adrenocortical Cells In Situ of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chomphoo, Surang; Mothong, Wilaiwan; Sawatpanich, Tarinee; Kanla, Pipatphong; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisatake; Hipkaeo, Wiphawi

    2016-01-01

    EFA6 (exchange factor for ARF6) activates Arf6 (ADP ribosylation factor 6) by exchanging ADP to ATP, and the resulting activated form of Arf6 is involved in the membrane dynamics and actin re-organization of cells. The present study was attempted to localize EFA6 type D (EFA6D) in mouse adrenocortical cells in situ whose steroid hormone secretion is generally considered not to depend on the vesicle-involved regulatory mechanism. In immunoblotting, an immunoreactive band with the same size as brain EFA6D was detected in homogenates of adrenal cortical tissues almost free of adrenal capsules and medulla. In immuno-light microscopy, EFA6D-immunoreactivity was positive in adrenocortical cells and it was often distinct along the plasmalemma, especially along portions of the cell columns facing the interstitium. In immuno-electron microscopy, the gold-labeling was more dense in the peripheral intracellular domains than the central domain of the immunopositive cells. The labeling was deposited on the plasma membranes in a discontinuous pattern and in cytoplasmic domains rich in filaments. It was also associated with some, but not all, of pleiomorphic vesicles and coated pits/vesicles. No labeling was seen in association with lipid droplets or smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The present finding is in support of the importance of EFA6D for activation of Arf6 in adrenocortical cells. PMID:27462133

  15. Ultrastructural Localization of Endogenous Exchange Factor for ARF6 in Adrenocortical Cells In Situ of Mice.

    PubMed

    Chomphoo, Surang; Mothong, Wilaiwan; Sawatpanich, Tarinee; Kanla, Pipatphong; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisatake; Hipkaeo, Wiphawi

    2016-06-28

    EFA6 (exchange factor for ARF6) activates Arf6 (ADP ribosylation factor 6) by exchanging ADP to ATP, and the resulting activated form of Arf6 is involved in the membrane dynamics and actin re-organization of cells. The present study was attempted to localize EFA6 type D (EFA6D) in mouse adrenocortical cells in situ whose steroid hormone secretion is generally considered not to depend on the vesicle-involved regulatory mechanism. In immunoblotting, an immunoreactive band with the same size as brain EFA6D was detected in homogenates of adrenal cortical tissues almost free of adrenal capsules and medulla. In immuno-light microscopy, EFA6D-immunoreactivity was positive in adrenocortical cells and it was often distinct along the plasmalemma, especially along portions of the cell columns facing the interstitium. In immuno-electron microscopy, the gold-labeling was more dense in the peripheral intracellular domains than the central domain of the immunopositive cells. The labeling was deposited on the plasma membranes in a discontinuous pattern and in cytoplasmic domains rich in filaments. It was also associated with some, but not all, of pleiomorphic vesicles and coated pits/vesicles. No labeling was seen in association with lipid droplets or smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The present finding is in support of the importance of EFA6D for activation of Arf6 in adrenocortical cells. PMID:27462133

  16. Adrenocortical endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    in vivo ACTH challenge test to prove adrenocortical competency, and the H295R cell line to examine molecular mechanisms of steroidogenic pathway toxicity, are discussed. Finally, because of the central role of the adrenal in the physiologically adaptive stress response, the distinguishing features of stress, compared with adrenocortical toxicity, are discussed with reference to the evidence required to claim that adrenal hypertrophy results from stress rather than adrenocortical enzyme inhibition which is a serious adverse toxicological finding. This article is part of a special issue entitled 'Endocrine disruptors and steroids'. PMID:25460300

  17. Nesfatin-1 inhibits proliferation and enhances apoptosis of human adrenocortical H295R cells.

    PubMed

    Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Tan, Bee K; Rucinski, Marcin; Kawan, Mohamed; Hu, Jiamiao; Kaur, Jaspreet; Patel, Vanlata H; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Komarowska, Hanna; Lehnert, Hendrik; Randeva, Harpal S

    2015-07-01

    NUCB2/nesfatin and its proteolytically cleaved product nesfatin-1 are recently discovered anorexigenic hypothalamic neuroproteins involved in energy homeostasis. It is expressed both centrally and in peripheral tissues, and appears to have potent metabolic actions. NUCB2/nesfatin neurons are activated in response to stress. Central nesfatin-1 administration elevates circulating ACTH and corticosterone levels. Bilateral adrenalectomy increased NUCB2/nesfatin mRNA levels in rat paraventricular nuclei. To date, studies have not assessed the effects of nesfatin-1 stimulation on human adrenocortical cells. Therefore, we investigated the expression and effects of nesfatin-1 in a human adrenocortical cell model (H295R). Our findings demonstrate that NUCB2 and nesfatin-1 are expressed in human adrenal gland and human adrenocortical cells (H295R). Stimulation with nesfatin-1 inhibits the growth of H295R cells and promotes apoptosis, potentially via the involvement of Bax, BCL-XL and BCL-2 genes as well as ERK1/2, p38 and JNK1/2 signalling cascades. This has implications for understanding the role of NUCB2/nesfatin in adrenal zonal development. NUCB2/nesfatin may also be a therapeutic target for adrenal cancer. However, further studies using in vivo models are needed to clarify these concepts. PMID:25869615

  18. Metastatic congenital adrenocortical carcinoma: a case report with tumor remission at 3 1/2 years.

    PubMed

    Godil, M A; Atlas, M P; Parker, R I; Priebe, C J; Zerah, M M; Kane, P; Tsung, J; Wilson, T A

    2000-11-01

    We describe a case of metastasizing congenital adrenocortical carcinoma and a follow-up of 3 1/2 yr. Treatment with surgery and mitotane was associated with multiple complications. The patient was in remission at 3 1/2 yr. Because of the rarity of this condition, we discuss step-by-step problems encountered during management. PMID:11095414

  19. Autonomic and adrenocortical reactivity and buccal cell telomere length in kindergarten children

    PubMed Central

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Epel, Elissa; Adler, Nancy; Bush, Nicole R.; Obradović, Jelena; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Stamperdahl, Juliet Lise; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between autonomic nervous system and adrenocortical reactivity to laboratory stressors and buccal cell telomere length (BTL) in children. Methods The study sample comprised 78 five- and six-year-old children from a longitudinal cohort study of kindergarten social hierarchies, biological responses to adversity, and child health. Buccal cell samples and reactivity measures were collected in the spring of the kindergarten year. BTL was measured by realtime PCR, as the telomere-to-single copy gene (T/S) ratio. Parents provided demographic information; parents and teachers reported children’s internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Components of children’s autonomic (heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), pre-ejection period (PEP)) and adrenocortical (salivary cortisol) responses were monitored during standardized laboratory challenges. We examined relations between reactivity, internalizing and externalizing behavior, and BTL, adjusted for age, race, and gender. Results Heart rate and cortisol reactivity were inversely related to BTL, PEP was positively related to BTL, and RSA was unrelated. Internalizing behaviors were also inversely related to BTL (standardized β=−0.33, p=0.004). Split at the median of reactivity parameters, children with high sympathetic activation (decreasing PEP) and high parasympathetic withdrawal (decreasing RSA) did not differ with regard to BTL. However, children with both this profile and high cortisol reactivity (N=12) had significantly shorter BTL (0.80 vs. 1.00, χ2=7.6, p=0.006), compared with other children. Conclusions Autonomic and adrenocortical reactivity in combination were associated with shorter buccal cell telomere length in children. These data suggest that psychophysiological processes may influence, and that BTL may be a useful marker of, early biological aging. PMID:21873585

  20. Rosiglitazone induces autophagy in H295R and cell cycle deregulation in SW13 adrenocortical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cerquetti, Lidia; Sampaoli, Camilla; Amendola, Donatella; Bucci, Barbara; Masuelli, Laura; Marchese, Rodolfo; Misiti, Silvia; De Venanzi, Agostino; Poggi, Maurizio; Toscano, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Antonio

    2011-06-10

    Thiazolidinediones, specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) ligands, used in type-2 diabetes therapy, show favourable effects in several cancer cells. In this study we demonstrate that the growth of H295R and SW13 adrenocortical cancer cells is inhibited by rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinediones member, even though the mechanisms underlying this effect appeared to be cell-specific. Treatment with GW9662, a selective PPAR-{gamma}-inhibitor, showed that rosiglitazone acts through both PPAR-{gamma}-dependent and -independent mechanisms in H295R, while in SW13 cells the effect seems to be independent of PPAR-{gamma}. H295R cells treated with rosiglitazone undergo an autophagic process, leading to morphological changes detectable by electron microscopy and an increased expression of specific proteins such as AMPK{alpha} and beclin-1. The autophagy seems to be independent of PPAR-{gamma} activation and could be related to an increase in oxidative stress mediated by reactive oxygen species production with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, triggered by rosiglitazone. In SW13 cells, flow cytometry analysis showed an arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with a decrease of cyclin E and cdk2 activity, following the administration of rosiglitazone. Our data show the potential role of rosiglitazone in the therapeutic approach to adrenocortical carcinoma and indicate the molecular mechanisms at the base of its antiproliferative effects, which appear to be manifold and cell-specific in adrenocortical cancer lines.

  1. Hormonal regulation of focal adhesions in bovine adrenocortical cells: induction of paxillin dephosphorylation by adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Vilgrain, I; Chinn, A; Gaillard, I; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1998-01-01

    A study of bovine adrenocortical cell shape on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge showed that the cells round up and develop arborized processes. This effect was found to be (1) specific for ACTH because angiotensin II and basic fibroblast growth factor have no effect; (2) mediated by a cAMP-dependent pathway because forskolin reproduces the effect of the hormone; (3) inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, but unchanged by okadaic acid, a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor; and (4) correlated with a complete loss of focal adhesions. Biochemical studies of the focal-adhesion-associated proteins showed that pp125fak, vinculin (110 kDa) and paxillin (70 kDa) were detected in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction from adrenocortical cells. During cell adhesion on fibronectin as substratum, two major phosphotyrosine-containing proteins of molecular masses 125 and 68 kDa were immunodetected in the same fraction. A dramatic decrease in the extent of tyrosine phosphorylation of these proteins was observed within 60 min after treatment with ACTH. No change in pp125fak tyrosine phosphorylation nor in Src activity was detected. In contrast, paxillin was found to be tyrosine-dephosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in ACTH-treated cells. Sodium orthovanadate completely prevented the effect of ACTH. These observations suggest a possible role for phosphotyrosine phosphatases in hormone-dependent cellular regulatory processes. PMID:9601084

  2. Properties and requirements for production of a macrophage product which suppresses steroid production by adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mathison, J C; La Forest, A C; Ulevitch, R J

    1984-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-treated murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM) release a factor or factors into the supernatant that suppress adrenocorticotropic hormone-induced steroidogenesis in explanted rabbit adrenocortical cells (J. C. Mathison et al., J. Immunol. 130:2757-2762, 1983). To determine the requirements for suppression, PEM supernatants (30 microliters) were added to explanted rabbit adrenocortical cells in a final volume of 120 microliters with 10 mU of adrenocorticotropic hormone per ml, and after 18 h at 37 degrees C, steroid concentrations were measured by a fluorometric assay. Supernatant from proteose peptone-elicited C3HeB/FeJ PEM (5 X 10(6) PEM per 3.5-cm well, 10 micrograms of Salmonella minnesota Re595 LPS per ml, 18 h) suppressed steroid production ca. 50%, and kinetic studies demonstrated that the appearance of suppressive activity in the supernatant was gradual over 4 to 18 h. Release of suppressive activity was not associated with decreased viability of the PEM (assessed by fluorescein diacetate staining and measurement of lactic dehydrogenase in the supernatant). Suppression was not observed when the PEM supernatant was diluted 10-fold before addition to the adrenocortical cells, whereas supernatant concentrated 20-fold (prepared with a 10,000-molecular-weight-cutoff filter) produced 75 to 80% suppression. The suppressive activity was stable at pH 4, pH 11, or 70 degrees C for 30 min but was inactivated at 100 degrees C (10 min). Suppressive activity was also induced in C3HeB/FeJ PEM by O111:B4 lipopolysaccharide or heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes. In contrast, PEM from C3H/HeJ mice did not produce detectable suppressive activity in response to Re595 lipopolysaccharide or heat-killed L. monocytogenes. Thus, these results provide additional support for the inducible, selective release of a macrophage product that could affect the host response to lipopolysaccharide by regulation of the adrenocortical response to adrenocorticotropic

  3. [Importance of proliferative potential (as the ratio of a proliferative cells number and duration of mitosis) in diagnoses of malignant degree and prognosis of adrenocortical cancer].

    PubMed

    Raĭkhlin, N T; Bukaeva, I A; Filimoniuk, A V; Smirnova, E A; Probatova, N A; Pavlovskaia, A I; Shabanov, M A; Ponomareva, M V

    2011-01-01

    The aim of research has been the estimation of a proliferative potential as simultaneous detection of a proliferative cells number (Ki-67 index) and duration of mitosis (nucleolar argyrophilic protein expression--B23/nucleophosmin and C23/nucleolin) at patients with adrenocortical cancer. In according to lifetime of patients after operation 2 groups had been sorted out. The first one included patients surviving 56.12 months, the second one--9.25 months. We've found out that different aspects of tumor diagnosis as well distinction of benignant or malignant tumor growth, a malignant degree of tumors, a prognostic criteria of illness, survival of patients etc. must be characterized by total research both a proliferative cells fraction (Ki-67 index) and a rate of mitosis (expressions of B23/nucleophosmin and C23/nucleolin). PMID:22288173

  4. Recurrence and mortality prognostic factors in childhood adrenocortical tumors: Analysis from the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer experience.

    PubMed

    Bulzico, Daniel; de Faria, Paulo Antônio Silvestre; de Paula, Marcela Pessoa; Bordallo, Maria Alice Neves; Pessoa, Cencita H C N; Corbo, Rossana; Ferman, Sima; Vaisman, Mario; Neto, Leonardo Vieira

    2016-05-01

    Prognostic markers that can help identifying precocious risk of unfavorable outcomes in patients with childhood adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) are still unclear. This observational and retrospective study aimed to identify clinical and pathology prognostic factors of recurrence and death in a tertiary cancer center population. Clinical, pathology, demographic, staging, and therapy data from patients with childhood ACT (median age: 3.6 years) treated at the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer between 1997 and 2015 were assessed. Univariate and bivariate analyses were used to study the association of clinical and pathology characteristics with recurrence and mortality. Recurrence and disease-related mortality were the main outcomes. Twenty-seven patients were included. Complete tumor resection was performed in 21 cases. The median tumor size was 8.2 cm. Mitotane was the most common adjuvant/palliative therapy (n = 13). Recurrence occurred in 6 patients, after a median time of 7.2 months, and was more common among those with larger tumors (P =.008), higher Weiss score (P =.001), and microscopic tumoral necrosis (P =.002). Ten patients died from the disease. Older age (P =.04), larger tumor size (P =.002), metastatic disease (P =.003), previous recurrence (P =.003), incomplete resection (P =.002), intraoperative tumor spillage (P =.005), higher Weiss score (P =.03), microscopic necrosis (P =.005), and capsular invasion (P =.02) were all associated with increased death risk. Even though complete tumor resection was performed in most cases, a considerable number of cases of childhood ACT resulted in recurrence and death. Early identification of unfavorable outcomes is essential to determine ideal therapy and appropriate surveillance. PMID:27246903

  5. High-throughput screening of chemical effects on steroidogenesis using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2,060 chemical samples...

  6. Effect of corticosteroid binding proteins on the steroidogenic activity of bovine adrenocortical cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Basset, M; Rostaing-Metz, B; Chambaz, E M

    1982-07-01

    The possible role of steroid binding proteins in the hormonal secretion process of a steroidogenic tissue was examined using bovine adrenocortical cell suspensions, either under basal conditions or in the presence of half-maximally active concentration (1 x 10(-9) M) of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Three types of plasma cortisol binding proteins were used, namely bovine serum albumine (BSA), purified transcortin (CBG) and purified anticortisol immunoglobulins (IgG). When added to the incubation medium, CBG (at 1 x 10(-10) to 2 x 10(-9) M cortisol binding sites) and anticortisol IgG (at 4.8 x 10(-10) to 3 x 10(-9) M cortisol binding sites) did not influence either the basal nor the ACTH-stimulated net cortisol production of the cell preparations. Whereas crystallized and delipidated BSA showed also no effect, crude commercial BSA preparation (Cohn fraction V) exhibited an ACTH-like cofactor effect which resulted in a marked increase in the net cortisol production by stimulated cells. These observations might be explained by the presence in crude BSA of lipoprotein-cholesterol complexes, possibly acting as an extracellular source of cholesterol available for corticosteroidogenesis. It may be concluded that specific high affinity cortisol binding systems present outside adrenocortical steroidogenic cells do not influence their secretory activity under short term in vitro condition. In addition, it can be stressed that use of ill defined protein preparations (e.g. crude BSA) may lead to artifactual observations in the study of the differentiated functions of isolated steroidogenic cells. PMID:6287106

  7. Effects of neuromedin-U on immature rat adrenocortical cells: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Macchi, Carlo; Trejter, Marcin; Rucinski, Marcin; Nowak, Magdalena; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2008-03-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) is a brain-gut peptide, that in the peripheral organs and tissues acts via a G protein-coupled receptor, called NMUR1. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed the expression of NMUR1 mRNA in either cortex and medulla or dispersed zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata-reticularis cells of the immature rat adrenals. Accordingly, immunocytochemistry demonstrated the presence of NMUR1-like immunoreactivity in the cortex and medulla of immature adrenals. NMU8 administration to immature rats was found to raise aldosterone, but not corticosterone, plasma concentration, without altering adrenal growth. Conversely, the exposure to NMU8 markedly enhanced the proliferative activity of immature rat inner adrenocortical cells in primary in vitro culture, without significantly affecting their corticosterone secretion. Collectively, our findings suggest that adrenals of immature rats may be a target for circulating NMU. However, the physiological significance and relevance of the adrenal effects of NMU remain to be ascertained. PMID:18288377

  8. Adrenocortical hemorrhagic necrosis: the role of catecholamines and retrograde medullary-cell embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; McComb, D.J.; Kovacs, K.; Huettner, I.

    1981-10-01

    We investigated the pathogenesis of adrenal necrosis using animal models of the disease (induced by administration of acrylonitrile, cysteamine, or pyrazole) and human cases. Results of electron-microscopic and histochemical time-response studies with rat models revealed an early, retrograde embolization of medullary cells and cell fragments in the cortical capillaries that showed prominent endothelial injury. The experimental adrenal lesions were prevented by surgical removal of the medulla one month before administration of adrenocorticolytic chemicals, or by the administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride. Histochemical staining for medullary (argyrophil) granules in human cases of adrenal necrosis demonstrated tissue fragments that stained positively for silver in vascular cortical spaces in nine of ten autopsy specimens and in all four surgical cases we reviewed. Thus, catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla and from the retrograde medullary emboli in the cortex may have a role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical necrosis.

  9. Advanced diagnostic approaches and current medical management of insulinomas and adrenocortical disease in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Chen, Sue

    2010-09-01

    Endocrine neoplasia is the most common tumor type in domestic ferrets, especially in middle-aged to older ferrets. Islet cell tumors and adrenocortical tumors constitute the major types of endocrine neoplasms. Insulinoma is a tumor that produces and releases excessive amounts of insulin. Evaluation of fasted blood glucose levels provides a quick diagnostic assessment for the detection of insulinomas. Use of glucocorticoids, diazoxide, and diet modification are some of the medical treatment options for insulinomas. Adrenocortical neoplasia in ferrets usually overproduces one or more sex hormones. Sex hormones which can result in progressive alopecia, vulvar swelling in females, and prostagomegaly in males. Abdominal ultrasonography and sex hormone assays can be used to diagnose adrenocortical neoplasms. Drugs such as leuprolide acetate, deslorelin acetate, and the hormone melatonin can be used to treat adrenocortical neoplasms in ferrets when surgery is not an option. PMID:20682429

  10. Rearrangements at the 11p15 locus and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II gene in sporadic adrenocortical tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gicquel, C.; Schneid, H.; Le Bouc, Y.; Bertagna, X.; Francillard-Leblond, M.; Luton, J.P.; Girard, F.

    1994-06-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of sporadic adrenocortical tumors in adults. Because loss of heterozygosity at the 11p15 locus has been described in childhood tumors, particularly in adrenocortical tumors associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and because insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a crucial regulator of fetal adrenal growth, the authors looked for structural analysis at the 11p15 locus and IGF-II gene expression in 23 sporadic adrenocortical adult tumors: 6 carcinomas (5 with Cushing`s syndrome and 1 nonsecreting) and 17 benign adenomas (13 with Cushing`s syndrome, 1 pure androgen secreting, and 3 nonsecreting). Twenty-one patients were informative at the 11p15 locus, and six (four carcinomas and two adenomas) of them (28.5%) exhibited 11p15 structural abnormalities in tumor DNA (five, a uniparental disomy and one, a mosaicism). In a single case that could be further studied, a paternal isodisomy was observed. Very high IGF-II mRNA contents were detected in seven tumors (30%; 5 of the 6 carcinomas and 2 of the 17 adenomas). They were particularly found in tumors with uniparental disomy at the 11p15 locus. Overall, a strong correlation existed between IGF-II mRNA contents and DNA demethylation at the IGF-II locus. These data show that genetic alterations involving the 11p15 locus were highly frequent in malignant tumors, but found only in rare adenomas. These results in combination with evidence for overexpression of IGF-II from the 11p15.5 locus suggest that abnormalities in structure and/or expression of the IGF-II gene play a role as a late event of a multistep process of tumorigenesis. 58 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. The effect of pioglitazone on aldosterone and cortisol production in HAC15 human adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Ding; Choudhary, Vivek; Seremwe, Mutsa; Tsai, Ying-Ying; Olala, Lawrence; Chen, Xunsheng; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    Pioglitazone belongs to the class of drugs called thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which are widely used as insulin sensitizers in the treatment of diabetes. A major side effect of TZDs is fluid retention. The steroid hormone aldosterone also promotes sodium and fluid retention; however, the effect of pioglitazone on aldosterone production is controversial. We analyzed the effect of pioglitazone alone and in combination with angiotensin II (AngII) on the late rate-limiting step of adrenocortical steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical carcinoma HAC15 cells. Treatment with pioglitazone for 24hr significantly increased the expression of CYP11B2 and enhanced AngII-induced CYP11B2 expression. Despite the observed changes in mRNA levels, pioglitazone significantly inhibited AngII-induced aldosterone production and CYP11B2 protein levels. On the other hand, pioglitazone stimulated the expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) marker DDIT3, with this effect occurring at early times and inhibitable by the PPARγ antagonist GW9962. The levels of DDIT3 (CHOP) and phospho-eIF2α (Ser51), a UPR-induced event that inhibits protein translation, were also increased. Thus, pioglitazone promotes CYP11B2 expression but nevertheless inhibits aldosterone production in AngII-treated HAC15 cells, likely by blocking global protein translation initiation through DDIT3 and phospho-eIF2α. In contrast, pioglitazone promoted AngII-induced CYP11B1 expression and cortisol production. Since cortisol enhances lipolysis, this result suggests the possibility that PPARs, activated by products of fatty acid oxidation, stimulate cortisol secretion to promote utilization of fatty acids during fasting. In turn, the ability of pioglitazone to stimulate cortisol production could potentially underlie the effects of this drug on fluid retention. PMID:25038520

  12. The effect of pioglitazone on aldosterone and cortisol production in HAC15 human adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Ding; Choudhary, Vivek; Seremwe, Mutsa; Tsai, Ying-Ying; Olala, Lawrence; Chen, Xunsheng; Bollag, Wendy B

    2014-08-25

    Pioglitazone belongs to the class of drugs called thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which are widely used as insulin sensitizers in the treatment of diabetes. A major side effect of TZDs is fluid retention. The steroid hormone aldosterone also promotes sodium and fluid retention; however, the effect of pioglitazone on aldosterone production is controversial. We analyzed the effect of pioglitazone alone and in combination with angiotensin II (AngII) on the late rate-limiting step of adrenocortical steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical carcinoma HAC15 cells. Treatment with pioglitazone for 24 h significantly increased the expression of CYP11B2 and enhanced AngII-induced CYP11B2 expression. Despite the observed changes in mRNA levels, pioglitazone significantly inhibited AngII-induced aldosterone production and CYP11B2 protein levels. On the other hand, pioglitazone stimulated the expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) marker DDIT3, with this effect occurring at early times and inhibitable by the PPARγ antagonist GW9962. The levels of DDIT3 (CHOP) and phospho-eIF2α (Ser51), a UPR-induced event that inhibits protein translation, were also increased. Thus, pioglitazone promotes CYP11B2 expression but nevertheless inhibits aldosterone production in AngII-treated HAC15 cells, likely by blocking global protein translation initiation through DDIT3 and phospho-eIF2α. In contrast, pioglitazone promoted AngII-induced CYP11B1 expression and cortisol production. Since cortisol enhances lipolysis, this result suggests the possibility that PPARs, activated by products of fatty acid oxidation, stimulate cortisol secretion to promote utilization of fatty acids during fasting. In turn, the ability of pioglitazone to stimulate cortisol production could potentially underlie the effects of this drug on fluid retention. PMID:25038520

  13. Extracellular activation of Wnt signaling through epigenetic dysregulation of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (Wif-1) is associated with pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumor.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Yozo; Yasumoto, Hiroaki; Nagami, Taichi; Hiraki, Miho; Arichi, Naoko; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Araki, Asuka; Maruyama, Riruke; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Shiina, Hiroaki

    2014-04-30

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is considered to be an essential regulator of adrenocortical oncogenesis. Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (Wif-1), an extracellular regulator of Wnt signaling, is frequently down-regulated by hypermethylation of the promoter CpG. We investigated epigenetic regulation of Wif-1 and its association with adrenocortical (AC) tumor pathogenesis in light of Wnt activation. The AC tumors showed a high prevalence of Wif-1 promoter methylation and low prevalence of Wif-1 mRNA transcription as compared to the normal adrenal (NA) samples. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between Wif-1 promoter methylation and mRNA transcription in the tumors. Either intracellular β-catenin accumulation or β-catenin mRNA transcription was significantly elevated in the AC tumors, which also showed an inverse correlation with Wif-1 mRNA transcription. Cyclin D1, a target gene of Wnt signaling, was also up-regulated in the AC tumors as compared with the NA samples. In addition, down-regulation of Wif-1 was correlated with increased cyclin D1 at both mRNA and protein levels. However, despite the proposed activation of Wnt signaling in AC tumors, only 2 of 20 with intracellular β-catenin accumulation showed β-catenin mutations. Thus, genetic alterations of β-catenin and epigenetics-related Wif-1 promoter hypermethylation may be important mechanisms underlying AC tumor formation though aberrant canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation. PMID:24755523

  14. Expression of the spexin gene in the rat adrenal gland and evidences suggesting that spexin inhibits adrenocortical cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Porzionato, Andrea; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2010-04-01

    Spexin (SPX, also called NPQ) is a recently identified, highly conserved peptide which is processed and secreted. We analysed the SPX gene and its protein product in the rat adrenal gland to ascertain whether SPX is involved in the regulation of corticosteroid secretion of and growth of adrenocortical cells. In adult rat adrenal glands the highest levels of SPX mRNA were present in the glomerulosa (ZG) and fasciculate/reticularis (ZF/R) zones. High SPX gene expression levels were found in freshly isolated adult rat ZG and ZF/R cells. In cultured adrenocortical cells the levels of SPX mRNA were lower than in freshly isolated cells. SPX mRNA expression levels were found to be 2-3 times higher during days 90-540 of postnatal development than found during days 2-45. Prolonged ACTH administration lowered and dexamethasone increased adrenal SPX mRNA levels in vivo. Adrenal enucleation produced a significant linear increase in SPX mRNA levels, with the highest value occurring at day 8 after surgery, with control values taken on day 30 after enucleation. Immunohistochemistry revealed SPX-like immunoreactivity in the entire cortex of the adult male rat and in enucleation-induced regenerating cortex. A concentration of 10-6M SPX peptide stimulated basal aldosterone secretion by freshly isolated ZG. In prolonged exposure of adrenocortical cell primary cultures to SPX (10-6M) resulted in a small increase in corticosterone secretion and a notable decrease in BrdU incorporation. The results suggest the direct involvement of SPX in the regulation of adrenocortical cell proliferation; however, the mechanism of action remains unknown. PMID:20045034

  15. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  16. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Casaburi, Ivan; Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  17. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Islet cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors ... In the healthy pancreas, cells called islet cells produce hormones that regulate a several bodily functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of ...

  18. Differential regulation of glucocorticoid synthesis in murine intestinal epithelial versus adrenocortical cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Matthias; Atanasov, Atanas; Cima, Igor; Corazza, Nadia; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones with important functions in development, immune regulation, and glucose metabolism. The adrenal glands are the predominant source of glucocorticoids; however, there is increasing evidence for extraadrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in thymus, brain, skin, and vascular endothelium. We recently identified intestinal epithelial cells as an important source of glucocorticoids, which regulate the activation of local intestinal immune cells. The molecular regulation of intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis is currently unexplored. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of the steroidogenic enzymes P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme and 11beta-hydroxylase, and the production of corticosterone in the murine intestinal epithelial cell line mICcl2 and compared it with that in the adrenocortical cell line Y1. Surprisingly, we observed a reciprocal stimulation pattern in these two cell lines. Elevation of intracellular cAMP induced the expression of steroidogenic enzymes in Y1 cells, whereas it inhibited steroidogenesis in mICcl2 cells. In contrast, phorbol ester induced steroidogenic enzymes in intestinal epithelial cells, which was synergistically enhanced upon transfection of cells with the nuclear receptors steroidogenic factor-1 (NR5A1) and liver receptor homolog-1 (NR5A2). Finally, we observed that basal and liver receptor homolog-1/phorbol ester-induced expression of steroidogenic enzymes in mICcl2 cells was inhibited by the antagonistic nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner. We conclude that the molecular basis of glucocorticoid synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells is distinct from that in adrenal cells, most likely representing an adaptation to the local environment and different requirements. PMID:17170096

  19. H295R Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells as a Screening Platform for Steroidogenesis (NC SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proper biosynthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones is essential for development and reproduction. Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental toxicants results in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. H295R human adrenocortical carc...

  20. Role of ALADIN in Human Adrenocortical Cells for Oxidative Stress Response and Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jühlen, Ramona; Idkowiak, Jan; Taylor, Angela E.; Kind, Barbara; Arlt, Wiebke; Huebner, Angela; Koehler, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Triple A syndrome is caused by mutations in AAAS encoding the protein ALADIN. We investigated the role of ALADIN in the human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R1 by either over-expression or down-regulation of ALADIN. Our findings indicate that AAAS knock-down induces a down-regulation of genes coding for type II microsomal cytochrome P450 hydroxylases CYP17A1 and CYP21A2 and their electron donor enzyme cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, thereby decreasing biosynthesis of precursor metabolites required for glucocorticoid and androgen production. Furthermore we demonstrate that ALADIN deficiency leads to increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and alteration in redox homeostasis after paraquat treatment. Finally, we show significantly impaired nuclear import of DNA ligase 1, aprataxin and ferritin heavy chain 1 in ALADIN knock-down cells. We conclude that down-regulating ALADIN results in decreased oxidative stress response leading to alteration in steroidogenesis, highlighting our knock-down cell model as an important in-vitro tool for studying the adrenal phenotype in triple A syndrome. PMID:25867024

  1. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors. PMID:19717419

  2. Hepatocyte Growth Factor/cMET Pathway Activation Enhances Cancer Hallmarks in Adrenocortical Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Phan, Liem M; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Wu, Weixin; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Sircar, Kanishka; Wood, Christopher G; Hai, Tao; Jimenez, Camilo; Cote, Gilbert J; Ozsari, Levent; Hofmann, Marie-Claude; Zheng, Siyuan; Verhaak, Roeland; Pagliaro, Lance; Cortez, Maria Angelica; Lee, Mong-Hong; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2015-10-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy with poor prognosis and limited response to chemotherapy. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor cMET augment cancer growth and resistance to chemotherapy, but their role in adrenocortical carcinoma has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the association between HGF/cMET expression and cancer hallmarks of adrenocortical carcinoma. Transcriptomic and immunohistochemical analyses indicated that increased HGF/cMET expression in human adrenocortical carcinoma samples was positively associated with cancer-related biologic processes, including proliferation and angiogenesis, and negatively correlated with apoptosis. Accordingly, treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma cells with exogenous HGF resulted in increased cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo while short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of cMET suppressed cell proliferation and tumor growth. Moreover, exposure of cells to mitotane, cisplatin, or radiation rapidly induced pro-cMET expression and was associated with an enrichment of genes (e.g., CYP450 family) related to therapy resistance, further implicating cMET in the anticancer drug response. Together, these data suggest an important role for HGF/cMET signaling in adrenocortical carcinoma growth and resistance to commonly used treatments. Targeting cMET, alone or in combination with other drugs, could provide a breakthrough in the management of this aggressive cancer. PMID:26282167

  3. Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Alex C.; Sabolch, Aaron; Raymond, Victoria M.; Kandathil, Asha; Caoili, Elaine M.; Jolly, Shruti; Miller, Barbra S.; Giordano, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare endocrine malignancy, often with an unfavorable prognosis. Here we summarize the knowledge about diagnosis, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and therapy of ACC. Over recent years, multidisciplinary clinics have formed and the first international treatment trials have been conducted. This review focuses on evidence gained from recent basic science and clinical research and provides perspectives from the experience of a large multidisciplinary clinic dedicated to the care of patients with ACC. PMID:24423978

  4. Molecular pathways of human adrenocortical carcinoma - translating cell signalling knowledge into diagnostic and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Szyszka, Paulina; Grossman, Ashley B; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Sworczak, Krzysztof; Dworakowska, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is associated with a low cure rate and a high recurrence rate. The prognosis is poor, and at diagnosis 30-40% of cases are already metastatic. The current therapeutic options (surgical resection, followed by adjuvant mitotane treatment +/- chemotherapy) are limited, and the results remain unsatisfactory. Key molecular events that contribute to formation of adrenocortical cancer are IGF2 overexpression, TP53-inactivating mutations, and constitutive activation of the Wnt/b-catenin signalling pathway via activating mutations of the b-catenin gene. The underlying genetic causes of inherited tumour syndromes have provided insights into molecular pathogenesis. The increased occurrence of adrenocortical tumours in Li-Fraumeni and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes, and Carney complex, has highlighted the roles of specific susceptibility genes: TP53, IGF2, and PRKAR1A, respectively. Further studies have confirmed that these genes are also involved in sporadic tumour cases. Crucially, transcriptome-wide studies have determined the differences between malignant and benign adrenocortical tumours, providing potential diagnostic tools. In conclusion, enhancing our understanding of the molecular events of adrenocortical tumourigenesis, especially with regard to the signalling pathways that may be disrupted, will greatly contribute to improving a range of available diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment approaches. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 427-440). PMID:27387247

  5. Adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Recent developments in the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) include diagnostic and prognostic risk stratification algorithms, increasing evidence of the impact of historical therapies on overall survival, and emerging targets from integrated epigenomic and genomic analyses. Advances include proper clinical and molecular characterization of all patients with ACC, standardization of proliferative index analyses, referral of these patients to large cancer referral centers at the time of first surgery, and development of new trials in patients with well-characterized ACC. Networking and progress in the molecular characterization of ACC constitute the basis for significant future therapeutic breakthroughs. PMID:26038209

  6. Combined steroidogenic characters of fetal adrenal and Leydig cells in childhood adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sakaguchi, Kimiyoshi; Ono, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Rie; Kato, Fumiko; Kagami, Masayo; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2016-05-01

    Although childhood adrenocortical carcinomas (c-ACCs) with a TP53 mutation are known to produce androgens, detailed steroidogenic characters have not been clarified. Here, we examined steroid metabolite profiles and expression patterns of steroidogenic genes in a c-ACC removed from the left adrenal position of a 2-year-old Brazilian boy with precocious puberty, using an atrophic left adrenal gland removed at the time of tumorectomy as a control. The c-ACC produced not only abundant dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate but also a large amount of testosterone via the Δ5 pathway with Δ5-androstenediol rather than Δ4-androstenedione as the primary intermediate metabolite. Furthermore, the c-ACC was associated with elevated expressions of CYP11A1, CYP17A1, POR, HSD17B3, and SULT2A1, a low but similar expression of CYB5A, and reduced expressions of AKR1C3 (HSD17B5) and HSD3B2. Notably, a Leydig cell marker INSL3 was expressed at a low but detectable level in the c-ACC. Furthermore, molecular studies revealed a maternally inherited heterozygous germline TP53 mutation, and several post-zygotic genetic aberrations in the c-ACC including loss of paternally derived chromosome 17 with a wildtype TP53 and loss of maternally inherited chromosome 11 and resultant marked hyperexpression of paternally expressed growth promoting gene IGF2 and drastic hypoexpression of maternally expressed growth suppressing gene CDKN1C. These results imply the presence of combined steroidogenic properties of fetal adrenal and Leydig cells in this patient's c-ACC with a germline TP53 mutation and several postzygotic carcinogenic events. PMID:26940356

  7. Production of platelet-activating factor is a component of the angiotensin II-protein kinase C activation pathway in bovine adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Pelosin, J M; Keramidas, M; Chambaz, E M

    1991-08-15

    Lyso-platelet-activating factor (lyso-PAF): acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67) enzyme activity was characterized for the first time in bovine adrenocortical tissue. It was found to be associated with the microsomal membrane fraction, in which it exhibited a specific activity of 0.4 nmol/min per mg of protein and catalytic properties similar to those described in other cell types. The adrenocortical acetyltransferase activity was increased by 2-3-fold on incubation of the preparation with purified protein kinase C (PKC) under phosphorylating condition. This activation was optimal after 5 min of incubation and paralleled an increase in PKC-catalysed 32P incorporation into microsomal proteins. Both acetyltransferase activation and protein phosphorylation were dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids, and were blocked in the presence of the potent PKC inhibitor H-7. In the intact adrenocortical cell, angiotensin II and a potent phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) were able to rapidly induce an increase in the biosynthesis of PAF, which was mostly released into the extracellular medium. These data suggest that bovine adrenocortical lyso-PAF acetyltransferase may be regulated by a PKC-dependent activation pathway, whereas no evidence for an additional adrenocorticotropin/cyclic AMP-dependent stimulation process was obtained in this cell type. Bovine adrenocortical cell membrane preparations were shown to possess high-affinity PAF-binding sites (Kd approximately 0.5 nM). Altogether, these observations suggest that PAF production and release may play a role in the autocrine or paracrine control of adrenocortical cell activation. PMID:1883337

  8. A Rare Case of Functioning Adrenocortical Oncocytoma Presenting as Cushing Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicola; Cianci, Pasquale; Altamura, Amedeo; Lizzi, Vincenzo; Vovola, Fernanda; Fersini, Alberto; Ambrosi, Antonio; Neri, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Functioning adrenocortical oncocytoma is very rare neoplasm. It is usually nonfunctional and benign and incidentally detected. Generally, these tumors originate in the kidneys, thyroid, parathyroid, and salivary or pituitary glands; they have also been reported in other sites including choroid plexus, respiratory tract, and larynx. Histologically, they are characterized by cells with eosinophilic granular cytoplasm and numerous packed mitochondria. We reported a case of a 44-year-old female who presented with Cushing syndrome for hypersecretion of cortisol due to adrenocortical oncocytoma. Magnetic resonance of abdomen revealed a right adrenal mass. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and the tumor was pathologically confirmed as benign adrenocortical oncocytoma. After surgical treatment, Cushing's syndrome resolved. PMID:26989553

  9. A Rare Case of Functioning Adrenocortical Oncocytoma Presenting as Cushing Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Nicola; Cianci, Pasquale; Altamura, Amedeo; Lizzi, Vincenzo; Vovola, Fernanda; Fersini, Alberto; Ambrosi, Antonio; Neri, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Functioning adrenocortical oncocytoma is very rare neoplasm. It is usually nonfunctional and benign and incidentally detected. Generally, these tumors originate in the kidneys, thyroid, parathyroid, and salivary or pituitary glands; they have also been reported in other sites including choroid plexus, respiratory tract, and larynx. Histologically, they are characterized by cells with eosinophilic granular cytoplasm and numerous packed mitochondria. We reported a case of a 44-year-old female who presented with Cushing syndrome for hypersecretion of cortisol due to adrenocortical oncocytoma. Magnetic resonance of abdomen revealed a right adrenal mass. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and the tumor was pathologically confirmed as benign adrenocortical oncocytoma. After surgical treatment, Cushing's syndrome resolved. PMID:26989553

  10. PROFILING GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN H295R ADRENOCORTICAL CARCINOMA CELLS AND RAT TESTES TO IDENTIFY PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY FOR CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Profiling Gene Expression in Human H295R Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells and Rat Testes to Identify Pathways of Toxicity for Conazole Fungicides
    Ren1, H., Schmid1, J., Retief2, J., Turpaz2, Y.,Zhang3, X.,Jones3, P., Newsted3, J.,Giesy3, J., Wolf1, D.,Wood1, C., Bao1, W., Dix1, ...

  11. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone stimulates phosphotyrosine phosphatase SHP2 in bovine adrenocortical cells: phosphorylation and activation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rocchi, S; Gaillard, I; van Obberghen, E; Chambaz, E M; Vilgrain, I

    2000-01-01

    During activation of adrenocortical cells by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), tyrosine dephosphorylation of paxillin is stimulated and this correlates with protrusion of filopodial structures and a decreased number of focal adhesions. These effects are inhibited by Na(3)VO(4), a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor [Vilgrain, Chinn, Gaillard, Chambaz and Feige (1998) Biochem. J. 332, 533-540]. However, the tyrosine phosphatases involved in these processes remain to be identified. In this study, we provide evidence that the Src homology domain (SH)2-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase (SHP)2, but not SHP1, is expressed in adrenocortical cells and is phosphorylated upon ACTH challenge. ACTH (10(-8) M) treatment of (32)P-labelled adrenocortical cells resulted in an increase in phosphorylated SHP2. By probing SHP2-containing immunoprecipitates with an antibody to phosphoserine we found that SHP2 was phosphorylated on serine in ACTH-treated cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, using an in vitro kinase assay, we showed that SHP2 was a target for cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Serine was identified as the only target amino acid phosphorylated in SHP2. Phosphorylation of SHP2 by PKA resulted in a dramatic stimulation of phosphatase activity measured either with insulin receptor substrate-1 or with the synthetic peptide [(32)P]poly(Glu/Tyr) as substrate. In an in-gel assay of SHP2-containing immunoprecipitates, phosphorylated in vitro by PKA or isolated from adrenocortical cells treated with 10 nM ACTH, a pronounced activation of SHP2 activity was shown. These observations clearly support the idea that a PKA-mediated signal transduction pathway contributes to SHP2 regulation in adrenocortical cells and point to SHP2 as a possible mediator of the effects of ACTH. PMID:11085942

  12. Regulation of corticotropin receptor number and messenger RNA in cultured human adrenocortical cells by corticotropin and angiotensin II.

    PubMed Central

    Lebrethon, M C; Naville, D; Begeot, M; Saez, J M

    1994-01-01

    The regulation of ACTH receptor binding sites and mRNA by ACTH and angiotensin II (A-II) was studied using cultured human adrenal fasciculata reticularis cells (HAC). These cells expressed two major ACTH receptor transcripts of 1.8 and 3.4 kb and three minor ones of 4, 7, and 11 kb. ACTH increased the levels of all these transcripts in a time- and dose-dependent manner. At a maximal concentration of 10(-8) M, ACTH enhanced 21- and 4-fold the level of ACTH receptor mRNA and the number of receptors per cell, respectively. Pretreatment of HAC with A-II produced a dose-dependent enhancement of ACTH receptor mRNA that was associated with an increase of both ACTH receptor number and responsiveness to this hormone. The effects of A-II were completely blocked by an AT1 receptor subtype antagonist but not by an AT2 antagonist. The effects of ACTH together with A-II on ACTH receptor mRNA were greater than those induced by each hormone alone. These results show that ACTH receptor number and mRNA are positively regulated by the two main hormones (ACTH and A-II) which, in vivo, regulate adrenocortical functions. In addition, they also show that HAC are a target for A-II. Thus, regulation of ACTH receptors may be one mechanism by which ACTH and A-II regulate adrenocortical functions under both normal and pathological conditions. Images PMID:8163681

  13. Mitotane Inhibits Sterol-O-Acyl Transferase 1 Triggering Lipid-Mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptosis in Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Sbiera, Silviu; Leich, Ellen; Liebisch, Gerhard; Sbiera, Iuliu; Schirbel, Andreas; Wiemer, Laura; Matysik, Silke; Eckhardt, Carolin; Gardill, Felix; Gehl, Annemarie; Kendl, Sabine; Weigand, Isabel; Bala, Margarita; Ronchi, Cristina L; Deutschbein, Timo; Schmitz, Gerd; Rosenwald, Andreas; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin; Kroiss, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy that harbors a dismal prognosis in advanced stages. Mitotane is approved as an orphan drug for treatment of ACC and counteracts tumor growth and steroid hormone production. Despite serious adverse effects, mitotane has been clinically used for decades. Elucidation of its unknown molecular mechanism of action seems essential to develop better ACC therapies. Here, we set out to identify the molecular target of mitotane and altered downstream mechanisms by combining expression genomics and mass spectrometry technology in the NCI-H295 ACC model cell line. Pathway analyses of expression genomics data demonstrated activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and profound alteration of lipid-related genes caused by mitotane treatment. ER stress marker CHOP was strongly induced and the two upstream ER stress signalling events XBP1-mRNA splicing and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 A (eIF2α) phosphorylation were activated by mitotane in NCI-H295 cells but to a much lesser extent in four nonsteroidogenic cell lines. Lipid mass spectrometry revealed mitotane-induced increase of free cholesterol, oxysterols, and fatty acids specifically in NCI-H295 cells as cause of ER stress. We demonstrate that mitotane is an inhibitor of sterol-O-acyl-transferase 1 (SOAT1) leading to accumulation of these toxic lipids. In ACC tissue samples we show variable SOAT1 expression correlating with the response to mitotane treatment. In conclusion, mitotane confers adrenal-specific cytotoxicity and down-regulates steroidogenesis by inhibition of SOAT1 leading to lipid-induced ER stress. Targeting of cancer-specific lipid metabolism opens new avenues for treatment of ACC and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26305886

  14. Novel markers of gonadectomy-induced adrenocortical neoplasia in the mouse and ferret

    PubMed Central

    Schillebeeckx, Maximiliaan; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Gretzinger, Elisabeth; Yang, Wei; Thol, Franziska; Hiller, Theresa; Löbs, Ann-Kathrin; Röhrig, Theresa; Schrade, Anja; Cochran, Rebecca; Jay, Patrick Y.; Heikinheimo, Markku; Mitra, Robi D.; Wilson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadectomy (GDX) induces sex steroid-producing adrenocortical tumors in certain mouse strains and in the domestic ferret. Transcriptome analysis and DNA methylation mapping were used to identify novel genetic and epigenetic markers of GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasia in female DBA/2J mice. Markers were validated using a combination of laser capture microdissection, quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Microarray expression profiling of whole adrenal mRNA from ovariectomized vs. intact mice demonstrated selective upregulation of gonadal-like genes including Spinlw1 and Insl3 in GDX-induced adrenocortical tumors of the mouse. A complementary candidate gene approach identified Foxl2 as another gonadal-like marker expressed in GDX-induced neoplasms of the mouse and ferret. That both “male-specific” (Spinlw1) and “female-specific” (Foxl2) markers were identified is noteworthy and implies that the neoplasms exhibit mixed characteristics of male and female gonadal somatic cells. Genome-wide methylation analysis showed that two genes with hypomethylated promoters, Igfbp6 and Foxs1, are upregulated in GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasms. These new genetic and epigenetic markers may prove useful for studies of steroidogenic cell development and for diagnostic testing. PMID:25289806

  15. Canine mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Macy, D W

    1985-07-01

    Despite the fact that the mast cell tumor is a common neoplasm of the dog, we still have only a meager understanding of its etiology and biologic behavior. Many of the published recommendations for treatment are based on opinion rather than facts derived from careful studies and should be viewed with some skepticism. Because of the infrequent occurrence of this tumor in man, only a limited amount of help can be expected from human oncologists; therefore, burden of responsibility for progress in predicting behavior and developing treatment effective for canine mast cell tumors must fall on the shoulders of the veterinary profession. PMID:3929444

  16. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  17. 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis identifies new potential therapeutic targets for adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Armignacco, Roberta; Ercolino, Tonino; Canu, Letizia; Baroni, Gianna; Nesi, Gabriella; Galli, Andrea; Mannelli, Massimo; Luconi, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare aggressive tumor with poor prognosis when metastatic at diagnosis. The tumor biology is still mostly unclear, justifying the limited specificity and efficacy of the anti-cancer drugs currently available. This study reports the first proteomic analysis of ACC by using two-dimensional-differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to evaluate a differential protein expression profile between adrenocortical carcinoma and normal adrenal. Mass spectrometry, associated with 2D-DIGE analysis of carcinomas and normal adrenals, identified 22 proteins in 27 differentially expressed 2D spots, mostly overexpressed in ACC. Gene ontology analysis revealed that most of the proteins concurs towards a metabolic shift, called the Warburg effect, in adrenocortical cancer. The differential expression was validated by Western blot for Aldehyde-dehydrogenase-6-A1,Transferrin, Fascin-1,Lamin A/C,Adenylate-cyclase-associated-protein-1 and Ferredoxin-reductase. Moreover, immunohistochemistry performed on paraffin-embedded ACC and normal adrenal specimens confirmed marked positive staining for all 6 proteins diffusely expressed by neoplastic cells, compared with normal adrenal cortex. In conclusion, our preliminary findings reveal a different proteomic profile in adrenocortical carcinoma compared with normal adrenal cortex characterized by overexpression of mainly metabolic enzymes, thus suggesting the Warburg effect also occurs in ACC. These proteins may represent promising novel ACC biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets if validated in larger cohorts of patients. PMID:25691058

  18. Cortisol Stimulates Secretion of Dehydroepiandrosterone in Human Adrenocortical Cells Through Inhibition of 3βHSD2

    PubMed Central

    Topor, Lisa Swartz; Asai, Masato; Dunn, James; Majzoub, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Initiating factors leading to production of adrenal androgens are poorly defined. Cortisol is present in high concentrations within the adrenal gland, and its production rises with growth during childhood. Objective: Our aim was to characterize the effect of cortisol and other glucocorticoids on androgen secretion from a human adrenocortical cell line and from nonadrenal cells transfected with CYP17A1 or HSD3B2. Design/Setting: This study was performed in cultured cells, at an academic medical center. Methods: The effects of cortisol upon steroid production in human adrenal NCI-H295R cells were measured by immunoassay, tandem mass spectrometry, and thin-layer chromatography. The effects of cortisol upon the activities of 17, 20 lyase and 3βHSD2 were measured in NCI-H295R cells and in transfected COS-7 cells. Results: Cortisol markedly and rapidly stimulated dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a dose-dependent manner at cortisol concentrations ≥50 μm. Cortisone and 11-deoxycortisol were also potent stimulators of DHEA secretion, whereas prednisolone and dexamethasone were not. Treatment with cortisol did not affect expression of CYP17A1 or HSD3B2 mRNAs. Stimulation of DHEA secretion by cortisol was associated with competitive inhibition of 3βHSD2 activity. Conclusions: Cortisol inhibits 3βHSD2 activity in adrenal cells and in COS-7 cells transfected with HSD3B2. Thus, it is possible that intraadrenal cortisol may participate in the regulation of adrenal DHEA secretion through inhibition of 3βHSD2. We hypothesize that a rise in intraadrenal cortisol during childhood growth may lead to inhibition of 3βHSD2 activity and contribute to the initiation of adrenarche. PMID:20943790

  19. Steroid hormone related effects of marine persistent organic pollutants in human H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    van den Dungen, Myrthe W; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Kampman, Ellen; Steegenga, Wilma T; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-06-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) 126 and 153, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), tributyltin (TBT), and methylmercury (MeHg) can be accumulated in seafood and then form a main source for human exposure. Some POPs have been associated with changes in steroid hormone levels in both humans and animals. This study describes the in vitro effects of these POPs and mixtures thereof in H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Relative responses for 13 steroid hormones and 7 genes involved in the steroidogenic pathway, and CYP1A1, were analyzed. PFOS induced the most pronounced effects on steroid hormone levels by significantly affecting 9 out of 13 hormone levels measured, with the largest increases found for 17β-estradiol, corticosterone, and cortisol. Furthermore, TCDD, both PCBs, and TBT significantly altered steroidogenesis. Increased steroid hormone levels were accompanied by related increased gene expression levels. The differently expressed genes were MC2R, CYP11B1, CYP11B2, and CYP19A1 and changes in gene expression levels were more sensitive than changes in hormone levels. The POP mixtures tested showed mostly additive effects, especially for DHEA and 17β-estradiol levels. This study shows that some seafood POPs are capable of altering steroidogenesis in H295R cells at concentrations that mixtures might reach in human blood, suggesting that adverse health effects cannot be excluded. PMID:25765474

  20. Species-specific sensitivity to selenium-induced impairment of cortisol secretion in adrenocortical cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.L. Hontela, A.

    2011-06-01

    Species differences in physiological and biochemical attributes exist even among closely related species and may underlie species-specific sensitivity to toxicants. Rainbow trout (RT) are more sensitive than brook trout (BT) to the teratogenic effects of selenium (Se), but it is not known whether all tissues exhibit this pattern of vulnerability. In this study, primary cultures of RT and BT adrenocortical cells were exposed to selenite (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}) and selenomethionine (Se-Met) to compare cell viability and ACTH-stimulated cortisol secretion in the two fish species. Cortisol, the primary stress hormone in fish, facilitates maintenance of homeostasis when fish are exposed to stressors, including toxicants. Cell viability was not affected by Se, but selenite impaired cortisol secretion, while Se-Met did not (RT and BT EC{sub 50} > 2000 mg/L). RT cells were more sensitive (EC{sub 50} = 8.7 mg/L) to selenite than BT cells (EC{sub 50} = 90.4 mg/L). To identify the targets where Se disrupts cortisol synthesis, selenite-impaired RT and BT cells were stimulated with ACTH, dbcAMP, OH-cholesterol, and pregnenolone. Selenite acted at different steps in the cortisol biosynthesis pathway in RT and BT cells, confirming a species-specific toxicity mechanism. To test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates Se-induced toxicity, selenite-impaired RT cells were exposed to NAC, BSO and antioxidants (DETCA, ATA, Vit A, and Vit E). Inhibition of SOD by DETCA enhanced selenite-induced cortisol impairment, indicating that oxidative stress plays a role in Se toxicity; however, modifying GSH content of the cells did not have an effect. The results of this study, with two closely related salmonids, provided additional evidence for species-specific differences in sensitivity to Se which should be considered when setting thresholds and water quality guidelines. - Research Highlights: > We investigated species-specific sensitivity to Se in trout adrenocortical cells. > Selenite

  1. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2014-02-01

    Human germ cell tumors are of interest because of their epidemiology, clinical behavior and pathobiology. Histologically, they are subdivided into various elements, with similarities to embryogenesis. Recent insights resulted in a division of five types of human germ cell tumors. In the context of male germ cells, three are relevant; Type I: teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants; Type II: seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults; and Type III: spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly. Recent studies led to significant increases in understanding of the parameters involved in the earliest pathogenetic steps of human germ cells tumors, in particularly the seminomas and nonseminomas (Type II). In case of a disturbed gonadal physiology, either due to the germ cell itself, or the micro-environment, embryonic germ cells during a specific window of sensitization can be blocked in their maturation, resulting in carcinoma in situ or gonadoblastoma, the precursors of seminomas and nonseminomas. The level of testicularization of the gonad determines the histological composition of the precursor. These insights will allow better definition of individuals at risk to develop a germ cell malignancy, with putative preventive measurements, and allow better selection of scientific approaches to elucidate the pathogenesis. PMID:24683949

  2. Enucleation-induced rat adrenal gland regeneration: expression profile of selected genes involved in control of adrenocortical cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tyczewska, Marianna; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Trejter, Marcin; Hochol-Molenda, Anna; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2014-01-01

    Enucleation-induced adrenal regeneration is a highly controlled process; however, only some elements involved in this process have been recognized. Therefore, we performed studies on regenerating rat adrenals. Microarray RNA analysis and QPCR revealed that enucleation resulted in a rapid elevation of expression of genes involved in response to wounding, defense response, and in immunological processes. Factors encoded by these genes obscure possible priming effects of various cytokines on initiation of regeneration. In regenerating adrenals we identified over 100 up- or downregulated genes involved in adrenocortical cell proliferation. The changes were most significant at days 2-3 after enucleation and their number decreased during regeneration. For example, expression analysis revealed a notable upregulation of the growth arrest gene, Gadd45, only 24 hours after surgery while expression of cyclin B1 and Cdk1 genes was notably elevated between days 1-8 of regeneration. These changes were accompanied by changes in expression levels of numerous growth factors and immediate-early transcription factors genes. Despite notable differences in mechanisms of adrenal and liver regeneration, in regenerating adrenals we identified genes, the expression of which is well recognized in regenerating liver. Thus, it seems legitimate to suggest that, in the rat, the general model of liver and adrenal regeneration demonstrate some degree of similarity. PMID:25431590

  3. Enucleation-Induced Rat Adrenal Gland Regeneration: Expression Profile of Selected Genes Involved in Control of Adrenocortical Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tyczewska, Marianna; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Trejter, Marcin; Hochol-Molenda, Anna; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Malendowicz, Ludwik K.

    2014-01-01

    Enucleation-induced adrenal regeneration is a highly controlled process; however, only some elements involved in this process have been recognized. Therefore, we performed studies on regenerating rat adrenals. Microarray RNA analysis and QPCR revealed that enucleation resulted in a rapid elevation of expression of genes involved in response to wounding, defense response, and in immunological processes. Factors encoded by these genes obscure possible priming effects of various cytokines on initiation of regeneration. In regenerating adrenals we identified over 100 up- or downregulated genes involved in adrenocortical cell proliferation. The changes were most significant at days 2-3 after enucleation and their number decreased during regeneration. For example, expression analysis revealed a notable upregulation of the growth arrest gene, Gadd45, only 24 hours after surgery while expression of cyclin B1 and Cdk1 genes was notably elevated between days 1–8 of regeneration. These changes were accompanied by changes in expression levels of numerous growth factors and immediate-early transcription factors genes. Despite notable differences in mechanisms of adrenal and liver regeneration, in regenerating adrenals we identified genes, the expression of which is well recognized in regenerating liver. Thus, it seems legitimate to suggest that, in the rat, the general model of liver and adrenal regeneration demonstrate some degree of similarity. PMID:25431590

  4. Altered glycosylation in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reading, C.L. ); Hakomori, S. ); Marcus, D.M. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceeding on the following: Glycoconjugates of normal and tumor cells; Glycosyltransferases in normal and neoplastic cells; Mammalian lectins of normal tissues and tumor cells; and Immune recognition of carbohydrates and clinical applications.

  5. Stages of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Childhood Treatment for more information.) Having certain genetic conditions increases the risk of adrenocortical carcinoma. Anything ... can be a sign of disease. CT scan (CAT scan) : A procedure that makes a series of ...

  6. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs. PMID:26902424

  7. Galanin stimulates cortisol secretion from human adrenocortical cells through the activation of galanin receptor subtype 1 coupled to the adenylate cyclase-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Belloni, Anna S; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Rucinski, Marcin; Guidolin, Diego; Nussdorfer, Gastone G

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies showed that galanin receptors are expressed in the rat adrenal, and galanin modulates glucocorticoid secretion in this species. Hence, we investigated the expression of the various galanin receptor subtypes (GAL-R1, GAL-R2 and GAL-R3) in the human adrenocortical cells, and the possible involvement of galanin in the control of cortisol secretion. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detected the expression of GAL-R1 (but not GAL-R2 and GAL-R3) in the inner zones of the human adrenal cortex. The galanin concentration dependently enhanced basal, but not ACTH-stimulated secretion of cortisol from dispersed inner adrenocortical cells (maximal effective concentration, 10(-8) M). The cortisol response to 10(-8) M galanin was abrogated by GAL-R1 immunoneutralization, and unaffected by GAL-R2 or GAL-R3 immunoneutralization. Galanin (10(-8) M) and ACTH (10(-9) M) enhanced cyclic-AMP production from dispersed cells, and the response was suppressed by the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536 (10(-4) M). Galanin did not affect inositol triphosphate release, which, in contrast, was raised by angiotensin-II (10(-8) M). SQ-22536 and the protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor H-89 (10(-5) M) abolished the cortisol response to 10(-8) M galanin, while the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and the PKC inhibitor calphostin-C were ineffective. Preincubation with pertussis toxin (Ptx) (0.5 microg/ml) partially inhibited the cortisol response to galanin. We conclude that galanin stimulates cortisol secretion from human inner adrenocortical cells, acting through GAL-R1 coupled to the adenylate cyclase/PKA-dependent signaling cascade via a Ptx-sensitive Galpha protein. PMID:17982695

  8. High-Throughput Screening of Chemical Effects on Steroidogenesis Using H295R Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toole, Colleen M.; Filer, Dayne L.; Lewis, Kenneth C.; Martin, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2060 chemical samples on steroidogenesis via high-performance liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry quantification of 10 steroid hormones, including progestagens, glucocorticoids, androgens, and estrogens. The study employed a 3 stage screening strategy. The first stage established the maximum tolerated concentration (MTC; ≥ 70% viability) per sample. The second stage quantified changes in hormone levels at the MTC whereas the third stage performed concentration-response (CR) on a subset of samples. At all stages, cells were prestimulated with 10 µM forskolin for 48 h to induce steroidogenesis followed by chemical treatment for 48 h. Of the 2060 chemical samples evaluated, 524 samples were selected for 6-point CR screening, based in part on significantly altering at least 4 hormones at the MTC. CR screening identified 232 chemical samples with concentration-dependent effects on 17β-estradiol and/or testosterone, with 411 chemical samples showing an effect on at least one hormone across the steroidogenesis pathway. Clustering of the concentration-dependent chemical-mediated steroid hormone effects grouped chemical samples into 5 distinct profiles generally representing putative mechanisms of action, including CYP17A1 and HSD3B inhibition. A distinct pattern was observed between imidazole and triazole fungicides suggesting potentially distinct mechanisms of action. From a chemical testing and prioritization perspective, this assay platform provides a robust model for high-throughput screening of chemicals for effects on steroidogenesis. PMID:26781511

  9. High-Throughput Screening of Chemical Effects on Steroidogenesis Using H295R Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Karmaus, Agnes L; Toole, Colleen M; Filer, Dayne L; Lewis, Kenneth C; Martin, Matthew T

    2016-04-01

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2060 chemical samples on steroidogenesis via high-performance liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry quantification of 10 steroid hormones, including progestagens, glucocorticoids, androgens, and estrogens. The study employed a 3 stage screening strategy. The first stage established the maximum tolerated concentration (MTC; ≥ 70% viability) per sample. The second stage quantified changes in hormone levels at the MTC whereas the third stage performed concentration-response (CR) on a subset of samples. At all stages, cells were prestimulated with 10 µM forskolin for 48 h to induce steroidogenesis followed by chemical treatment for 48 h. Of the 2060 chemical samples evaluated, 524 samples were selected for 6-point CR screening, based in part on significantly altering at least 4 hormones at the MTC. CR screening identified 232 chemical samples with concentration-dependent effects on 17β-estradiol and/or testosterone, with 411 chemical samples showing an effect on at least one hormone across the steroidogenesis pathway. Clustering of the concentration-dependent chemical-mediated steroid hormone effects grouped chemical samples into 5 distinct profiles generally representing putative mechanisms of action, including CYP17A1 and HSD3B inhibition. A distinct pattern was observed between imidazole and triazole fungicides suggesting potentially distinct mechanisms of action. From a chemical testing and prioritization perspective, this assay platform provides a robust model for high-throughput screening of chemicals for effects on steroidogenesis. PMID:26781511

  10. Tumor cell intravasation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Serena P H; Cabrera, Ramon M; Segall, Jeffrey E

    2016-07-01

    The process of entering the bloodstream, intravasation, is a necessary step in the development of distant metastases. The focus of this review is on the pathways and molecules that have been identified as being important based on current in vitro and in vivo assays for intravasation. Properties of the vasculature which are important for intravasation include microvessel density and also diameter of the vasculature, with increased intravasation correlating with increased vessel diameter in some tumors. TGFB signaling can enhance intravasation at least in part through induction of EMT, and we discuss other TGFB target genes that are important for intravasation. In addition to TGFB signaling, a number of studies have demonstrated that activation of EGF receptor family members stimulates intravasation, with downstream signaling through PI3K, N-WASP, RhoA, and WASP to induce invadopodia. With respect to proteases, there is strong evidence for contributions by uPA/uPAR, while the roles of MMPs in intravasation may be more tumor specific. Other cells including macrophages, fibroblasts, neutrophils, and platelets can also play a role in enhancing tumor cell intravasation. The technology is now available to interrogate the expression patterns of circulating tumor cells, which will provide an important reality check for the model systems being used. With a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying intravasation, the goal is to provide new opportunities for improving prognosis as well as potentially developing new treatments. PMID:27076614

  11. Low DICER1 expression is associated with poor clinical outcome in adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Gabriela Resende Vieira; Ribeiro, Tamaya C.; Faria, Andre M.; Mariani, Beatriz M.P.; Lerario, Antonio M.; Zerbini, Maria Claudia N.; Soares, Iberê C.; Wakamatsu, Alda; Alves, Venancio A.F.; Mendonca, Berenice B.; Fragoso, Maria Candida B.V.; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Almeida, Madson Q.

    2015-01-01

    Low DICER1 expression was associated with poor outcome in several cancers. Recently, hot-spot DICER1 mutations were found in ovarian tumors, and TARBP2 truncating mutations in tumor cell lines with microsatellite instability. In this study, we assessed DICER1 e TRBP protein expression in 154 adult adrenocortical tumors (75 adenomas and 79 carcinomas). Expression of DICER1 and TARBP2 gene was assessed in a subgroup of 61 tumors. Additionally, we investigated mutations in metal biding sites located at the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 and in the exon 5 of TARBP2 in 61 tumors. A strong DICER1 expression was demonstrated in 32% of adenomas and in 51% of carcinomas (p = 0.028). Similarly, DICER1 gene overexpression was more frequent in carcinomas (60%) than in adenomas (23%, p = 0.006). But, among adrenocortical carcinomas, a weak DICER1 expression was significantly more frequent in metastatic than in non-metastatic adrenocortical carcinomas (66% vs. 31%; p = 0.002). Additionally, a weak DICER1 expression was significantly correlated with a reduced overall (p = 0.004) and disease-free (p = 0.005) survival. In the multivariate analysis, a weak DICER1 expression (p = 0.048) remained as independent predictor of recurrence. Regarding TARBP2 gene, its protein and gene expression did not correlate with histopathological and clinical parameters. No variant was identified in hot spot areas of DICER1 and TARBP2. In conclusion, a weak DICER1 protein expression was associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival and was a predictor of recurrence in adrenocortical carcinomas. PMID:26087193

  12. Untreated Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with 17-α Hydroxylase/17,20-Lyase Deficiency Presenting as Massive Adrenocortical Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Jin; Song, Je Eun; Hwang, Sena; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Hye-Sun; Han, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency is usually characterized by hypertension and primary amenorrhea, sexual infantilism in women, and pseudohermaphroditism in men. hypertension, and sexual infantilism in women and pseudohermaphroditism in men. In rare cases, a huge adrenal gland tumor can present as a clinical manifestation in untreated CAH. Adrenal cortical adenoma is an even more rare phenotype in CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency. A 36-year-old female presented with hypertension and abdominal pain caused by a huge adrenal mass. Due to mass size and symptoms, left adrenalectomy was performed. After adrenalectomy, blood pressure remained high. Based on hormonal and genetic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed as CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency. The possibility of a tumorous change in the adrenal gland due to untreated CAH should be considered. It is important that untreated CAH not be misdiagnosed as primary adrenal tumor as these conditions require different treatments. Adequate suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in CAH is also important to treat and to prevent the tumorous changes in the adrenal gland. Herein, we report a case of untreated CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency presenting with large adrenal cortical adenoma and discuss the progression of adrenal gland hyperplasia due to inappropriate suppression of ACTH secretion. PMID:26248854

  13. [Mediastinal germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Bremmer, F; Ströbel, P

    2016-09-01

    The mediastinum is among the most frequent anatomic region in which germ cell tumors (GCT) arise, second only to the gonads. Mediastinal GCT (mGCT) account for 16 % of all mediastinal neoplasms. Although the morphology and (according to all available data) the molecular genetics of mediastinal and gonadal GCT are identical, a number of unique aspects exist. There is a highly relevant bi-modal age distribution. In pre-pubertal children of both sexes, mGCT consist exclusively of teratomas and yolk sac tumors. The prognosis is generally favorable with modern treatment. In post-pubertal adults, virtually all patients with malignant mGCT are males; the prognosis is more guarded and depends (among other factors) on the histological GCT components and is similar to GCT in other organs. So-called somatic type malignancies (i. e. clonally related, non-germ cell neoplasias arising in a GCT) are much more frequent in mGCT than in other organs, and the association between mediastinal yolk sac tumors and hematological malignancies, such as myelodysplasias and leukemias, is unique to mediastinal tumors. The prognosis of GCT with somatic type malignancies is generally dismal. PMID:27491549

  14. The effect of mitotane on viability, steroidogenesis and gene expression in NCI‑H295R adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Tomasz P; Wrzesiński, Tomasz; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2013-03-01

    Mitotane, also known as o,p'‑DDD or (RS)‑1‑chl-oro‑2‑[2,2‑dichloro‑1‑(4‑chlorophenyl)‑ethyl]‑benzene, is an adrenal cortex-specific cytotoxic drug used in the therapy of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). The drug also inhibits steroidogenesis, however, the mechanisms of its anticancer and antisteroidogenic effects remain unknown. At present, data on the impact of mitotane on cell viability and the regulation of genes encoding proteins associated with steroids synthesis in the adrenal cortex, including cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), are limited and contradictory. In the present study, the effect of 24‑h mitotane treatment on viability of the ACC cell line, NCI‑H295R, was analyzed, identifying a decrease in cell viability and an increase in caspase‑3 and ‑7 activities. Mitotane treatment also led to decreased cortisol and DHEAS concentration in the culture media. Concomitantly, mitotane resulted in decreased mRNA levels of two cytochromes P450 (CYP11A1 and CYP17A1), mRNAs encoding proteins involved in the synthesis of cortisol and DHEAS. Mitotane did not affect mRNA levels of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (encoding p21) and MYC (encoding cMyc). cMyc and p21 are key transcription factors associated with cell cycle regulation. However, mitotane inhibited expression of transforming growth factor β1 gene, encoding a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation and steroidogenesis. PRKAR1A, a protein kinase A regulatory subunit, is involved in the activation of steroidogenesis. PRKAR1A mRNA levels were reduced following 24‑h treatment with mitotane. Results indicate that mitotane markedly inhibited expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis, secretion of cortisol and DHEAS. Reduced expression of TGFB1 cannot account fully for the effect of mitotane on CYP11A1 and CYP17A1. We hypothesized that reduced viability of NCI‑H295R cells in the presence of mitotane may be a result of apoptosis triggered by increased

  15. Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Sweety Sagarmal; Joy, Tabita; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Landge, Jayant Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) is a rare, odontogenic neoplasm which is considered to be a solid variant of calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) with locally aggressive behavior. It accounts for only 2–14% of all COCs. To the best of our knowledge, only 88 cases of DGCT have been reported in the literature from 1968 to 2014. Herewith, we report a case of DGCT in a 68-year-old male patient with clinical presentation as a soft tissue growth over alveolar ridge and histopathologically characterized by ameloblastomatous epithelium, abundance of eosinophilic material and ghost cells. PMID:27194885

  16. Curcumin inhibits bTREK-1 K+ channels and stimulates cortisol secretion from adrenocortical cells

    PubMed Central

    Enyeart, Judith A.; Liu, Haiyan; Enyeart, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Bovine adrenal zona fasciculata (AZF) cells express bTREK-1 K+ channels that set the resting membrane potential. Inhibition of these channels by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is coupled to membrane depolarization and cortisol secretion. Curcumin, a phytochemical with medicinal properties extracted from the spice turmeric, was found to modulate both bTREK-1 K+ currents and cortisol secretion from AZF cells. In whole-cell patch clamp experiments, curcumin inhibited bTREK-1 with an IC50 of 0.93μM by a mechanism that was voltage-independent. bTREK-1 inhibition by curcumin occurred through interaction with an external binding site and was independent of ATP hydrolysis. Curcumin produced a concentration-dependent increase in cortisol secretion that persisted for up to 24 h. At a maximally effective concentration of 50 μM, curcumin increased secretion as much as10-fold. These results demonstrate that curcumin potently inhibits bTREK-1 K+ channels and stimulates cortisol secretion from bovine AZF cells. The inhibition of bTREK-1 by curcumin may be linked to cortisol secretion through membrane depolarization. Since TREK-1 is widely expressed in a variety of cells, it is likely that some of the biological actions of curcumin, including its therapeutic effects, may be mediated through inhibition of these K+ channels. PMID:18406348

  17. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. ATR-101, a Selective and Potent Inhibitor of Acyl-CoA Acyltransferase 1, Induces Apoptosis in H295R Adrenocortical Cells and in the Adrenal Cortex of Dogs.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Christopher R; Mann, Jacqueline E; Rainey, William E; Crudo, Valentina; Hunt, Stephen W; Hammer, Gary D

    2016-05-01

    ATR-101 is a novel, oral drug candidate currently in development for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer. ATR-101 is a selective and potent inhibitor of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol O-acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1), an enzyme located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane that catalyzes esterification of intracellular free cholesterol (FC). We aimed to identify mechanisms by which ATR-101 induces adrenocortical cell death. In H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells, ATR-101 decreases the formation of cholesteryl esters and increases FC levels, demonstrating potent inhibition of ACAT1 activity. Caspase-3/7 levels and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end labeled-positive cells are increased by ATR-101 treatment, indicating activation of apoptosis. Exogenous cholesterol markedly potentiates the activity of ATR-101, suggesting that excess FC that cannot be adequately esterified increases caspase-3/7 activation and subsequent cell death. Inhibition of calcium release from the ER or the subsequent uptake of calcium by mitochondria reverses apoptosis induced by ATR-101. ATR-101 also activates multiple components of the unfolded protein response, an indicator of ER stress. Targeted knockdown of ACAT1 in an adrenocortical cell line mimicked the effects of ATR-101, suggesting that ACAT1 mediates the cytotoxic effects of ATR-101. Finally, in vivo treatment of dogs with ATR-101 decreased adrenocortical steroid production and induced cellular apoptosis that was restricted to the adrenal cortex. Together, these studies demonstrate that inhibition of ACAT1 by ATR-101 increases FC, resulting in dysregulation of ER calcium stores that result in ER stress, the unfolded protein response, and ultimately apoptosis. PMID:26986192

  19. Efonidipine, a Ca(2+)-channel blocker, enhances the production of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in NCI-H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Keiichi; Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Steroid biosynthesis is initiated with transportation of cholesterol along with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) into the mitchondria and is achieved with several steroidogenic enzymes. It has been reported that Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs), such as azelnidipine, efonidipine and nifedipine, suppress the biosynthesis of aldosterone and cortisol, but the overall effects of CCBs on steroid biosynthesis remain to be clarified. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of CCBs on the expression of steroidogenic enzymes and the production of adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) that has anti-atherosclerotic actions. NCI-H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells and HepG2 human hepatoma cells were cultured for 24 hours with or without a CCB (amlodipine, efonidipine, nifedipine, azelnidipine R(-)-efonidipine, verapamil or diltiazem). HepG2 hepatoma cells were used to confirm the effects of CCBs on the expression of StAR. In fact, efonidipine and nifedipine increased the expression of StAR in HepG2 cells. Efonidipine and nifedipine, but not other examined CCBs, also increased the N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP)-induced StAR mRNA, which reflects the action of adrenocorticotropic hormone, and efonidipine and R(-)-efonidipine enhanced the dbcAMP-induced DHEA-S production in NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Therefore, efonidipine and nifedipine might increase the expression of StAR and, in turn, efonidipine enhanced the dbcAMP-induced DHEA-S production, independent of Ca(2+) channel blockade. These results indicate that such effects are not associated with Ca(2+) influx. Moreover, only efonidipine enhanced the angiotensin II-induced expression of StAR mRNA (P < 0.01 vs. angiotensin II alone). In conclusion, efonidipine might exert an additional action beyond anti-hypertensive actions. PMID:21757861

  20. Activation of the SCPx promoter in mouse adrenocortical Y1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Dayami; Niesen, Melissa; Bedi, Mohini; Hale, David; McLean, Mark P. . E-mail: mmclean@health.usf.edu

    2007-06-01

    Sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) is a peroxisomal protein with both lipid transfer and thiolase activity. Treatment of mouse adrenal Y1 cells with cAMP for 24 h caused a significant induction of SCPx mRNA levels. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that treatment with cAMP and SF-1 was able to activate the SCPx promoter. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of three putative steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) binding motifs (designated SFB1, SFB2, and SFB3) and one CRE. Only SFB1 and SFB3 were able to bind recombinant SF-1 protein in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The CRE was able to form a DNA/protein complex in the presence of Y1 nuclear extracts. Mutational analysis studies demonstrated that SFB3 is required for full activation of the SCPx promoter by cAMP treatment. Regulation of the SCPx gene by SF-1 and cAMP is similar to the regulatory mechanisms observed for other steroidogenic genes.

  1. Role of EPAC in cAMP-Mediated Actions in Adrenocortical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Aurélia E.; Aesoy, Reidun; Bakke, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone regulates adrenal steroidogenesis mainly via the intracellular signaling molecule cAMP. The effects of cAMP are principally relayed by activating protein kinase A (PKA) and the more recently discovered exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP 1 and 2 (EPAC1 and EPAC2). While the intracellular roles of PKA have been extensively studied in steroidogenic tissues, those of EPACs are only emerging. EPAC1 and EPAC2 are encoded by the genes RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4, respectively. Whereas EPAC1 is ubiquitously expressed, the expression of EPAC2 is more restricted, and typically found in endocrine tissues. Alternative promoter usage of RAPGEF4 gives rise to three different isoforms of EPAC2 that vary in their N-termini (EPAC2A, EPAC2B, and EPAC2C) and that exhibit distinct expression patterns. EPAC2A is expressed in the brain and pancreas, EPAC2B in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal gland and testis, and EPAC2C has until now only been found in the liver. In this review, we discuss current knowledge on EPAC expression and function with focus on the known roles of EPAC in adrenal gland physiology. PMID:27379015

  2. Role of EPAC in cAMP-Mediated Actions in Adrenocortical Cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Aurélia E; Aesoy, Reidun; Bakke, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone regulates adrenal steroidogenesis mainly via the intracellular signaling molecule cAMP. The effects of cAMP are principally relayed by activating protein kinase A (PKA) and the more recently discovered exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP 1 and 2 (EPAC1 and EPAC2). While the intracellular roles of PKA have been extensively studied in steroidogenic tissues, those of EPACs are only emerging. EPAC1 and EPAC2 are encoded by the genes RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4, respectively. Whereas EPAC1 is ubiquitously expressed, the expression of EPAC2 is more restricted, and typically found in endocrine tissues. Alternative promoter usage of RAPGEF4 gives rise to three different isoforms of EPAC2 that vary in their N-termini (EPAC2A, EPAC2B, and EPAC2C) and that exhibit distinct expression patterns. EPAC2A is expressed in the brain and pancreas, EPAC2B in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal gland and testis, and EPAC2C has until now only been found in the liver. In this review, we discuss current knowledge on EPAC expression and function with focus on the known roles of EPAC in adrenal gland physiology. PMID:27379015

  3. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  4. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T; Hecht, Vivian C; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O; Manalis, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  5. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  6. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  7. Tumor angiogenesis--characteristics of tumor endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Maishi, Nako; Torii, Chisaho; Hida, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Tumor blood vessels provide nutrition and oxygen to the tumor, resulting in tumor progression. They also act as gatekeepers, inducing tumor metastasis. Thus, targeting tumor blood vessels is an important strategy in cancer therapy. Tumor endothelial cells (TECs), which line the inner layer of blood vessels of the tumor stromal tissue, are the main targets of anti-angiogenic therapy. Because new tumor blood vessels generally sprout from pre-existing vasculature, they have been considered to be the same as normal blood vessels. However, tumor blood vessels demonstrate a markedly abnormal phenotype that includes several important morphological changes. The degree of angiogenesis is determined by the balance between the angiogenic stimulators and inhibitors released by the tumor and host cells. Recent studies have revealed that TECs also exhibit altered characteristics which depend on the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review recent studies on TEC abnormalities and heterogeneity with respect to tumor progression and consider their therapeutic implications. PMID:26879652

  8. [Ovarian germ cell tumors in girls].

    PubMed

    Nechushkina, I V; Karseladze, A I

    2015-01-01

    Morphological structure of tumor influences on the clinical course of the disease in children with germ cell tumors. Patients with ovarian dysgerminoma at the time of diagnosis are significantly older than patients with immature teratoma and yolk sac tumor. Immature teratoma and mixed germ cell tumors are significantly larger compared to other germ cell tumors. Yolk sac tumor and embryonal carcinoma are the most common cause of emergency surgical interventions and are accompanied by rupture of tumor capsule. PMID:26087605

  9. Estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) a promising target for the therapy of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC)

    PubMed Central

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Malivindi, Rocco; Rago, Vittoria; Fiorillo, Marco; Domanico, Francesco; Campana, Carmela; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the adrenocortical cancer (ACC) involves integration of molecular signals and the interplay of different downstream pathways (i.e. IGFII/IGF1R, β-catenin, Wnt, ESR1). This tumor is characterized by limited therapeutic options and unsuccessful treatments. A useful strategy to develop an effective therapy for ACC is to identify a common downstream target of these multiple pathways. A good candidate could be the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) because of its ability to regulate energy metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and signalings related to cancer progression. In this study we tested the effect of ERRα inverse agonist, XCT790, on the proliferation of H295R adrenocortical cancer cell line. Results from in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that XCT790 reduced H295R cell growth. The inhibitory effect was associated with impaired cell cycle progression which was not followed by any apoptotic event. Instead, incomplete autophagy and cell death by a necrotic processes, as a consequence of the cell energy failure, induced by pharmacological reduction of ERRα was evidenced. Our results indicate that therapeutic strategies targeting key factors such as ERRα that control the activity and signaling of bioenergetics processes in high-energy demanding tumors could represent an innovative/alternative therapy for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26312764

  10. Estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) a promising target for the therapy of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC).

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Avena, Paola; De Luca, Arianna; Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Malivindi, Rocco; Rago, Vittoria; Fiorillo, Marco; Domanico, Francesco; Campana, Carmela; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-09-22

    The pathogenesis of the adrenocortical cancer (ACC) involves integration of molecular signals and the interplay of different downstream pathways (i.e. IGFII/IGF1R, β-catenin, Wnt, ESR1). This tumor is characterized by limited therapeutic options and unsuccessful treatments. A useful strategy to develop an effective therapy for ACC is to identify a common downstream target of these multiple pathways. A good candidate could be the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) because of its ability to regulate energy metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and signalings related to cancer progression. In this study we tested the effect of ERRα inverse agonist, XCT790, on the proliferation of H295R adrenocortical cancer cell line. Results from in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that XCT790 reduced H295R cell growth. The inhibitory effect was associated with impaired cell cycle progression which was not followed by any apoptotic event. Instead, incomplete autophagy and cell death by a necrotic processes, as a consequence of the cell energy failure, induced by pharmacological reduction of ERRα was evidenced. Our results indicate that therapeutic strategies targeting key factors such as ERRα that control the activity and signaling of bioenergetics processes in high-energy demanding tumors could represent an innovative/alternative therapy for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26312764

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adrenocortical Carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Childhood Treatment for more information.) Having certain genetic conditions increases the risk of adrenocortical carcinoma. Anything ... can be a sign of disease. CT scan (CAT scan) : A procedure that makes a series of ...

  12. Methylation Status of Vitamin D Receptor Gene Promoter in Benign and Malignant Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, Catia; Rebellato, Andrea; Urbanet, Riccardo; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Cappellesso, Rocco; Sasano, Hironobu; Fassina, Ambrogio

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed a decreased expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA/protein in a small group of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) tissues, suggesting the loss of a protective role of VDR against malignant cell growth in this cancer type. Downregulation of VDR gene expression may result from epigenetics events, that is, methylation of cytosine nucleotide of CpG islands in VDR gene promoter. We analyzed methylation of CpG sites in the VDR gene promoter in normal adrenals and adrenocortical tumor samples. Methylation of CpG-rich 5′ regions was assessed by bisulfite sequencing PCR using bisulfite-treated DNA from archival microdissected paraffin-embedded adrenocortical tissues. Three normal adrenals and 23 various adrenocortical tumor samples (15 adenomas and 8 carcinomas) were studied. Methylation in the promoter region of VDR gene was found in 3/8 ACCs, while no VDR gene methylation was observed in normal adrenals and adrenocortical adenomas. VDR mRNA and protein levels were lower in ACCs than in benign tumors, and VDR immunostaining was weak or negative in ACCs, including all 3 methylated tissue samples. The association between VDR gene promoter methylation and reduced VDR gene expression is not a rare event in ACC, suggesting that VDR epigenetic inactivation may have a role in adrenocortical carcinogenesis. PMID:26843863

  13. Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy for Large Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahaibi, Khalifa; Rizvi, Syed G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is a rare disease that is difficult to treat. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy (LA) is performed, even for large adrenocortical carcinomas. However, the oncological effectiveness of LA remains unclear. This review presents the current knowledge of the feasibility and oncological effectiveness of laparoscopic surgery for ACC, with an analysis of data for outcomes and other parameters. Database: A systematic review of the literature was performed by searching the PubMed and Medline databases for all relevant articles in English, published between January 1992 and August 2014 on LA for adrenocortical carcinoma. Discussion: The search resulted in retrieval of 29 studies, of which 10 addressed the outcome of LA versus open adrenalectomy (OA) and included 844 patients eligible for this review. Among these, 206 patients had undergone LA approaches, and 638 patients had undergone OA. Among the 10 studies that compared the outcomes obtained with LA and OA for ACC, 5 noted no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in the oncological outcomes of recurrence and disease-free survival, whereas the remaining 5 reported inferior outcomes in the LA group. Using a paired t test for statistical analysis, except for tumor size, we found no significant difference in local recurrence, peritoneal carcinomatosis, positive resection margin, and time to recurrence between the LA and OA groups. The overall mean tumor size in patients undergoing LA and OA was 7.1 and 11.2 cm, respectively (P = .0003), and the mean overall recurrence was 61.5 and 57.9%, respectively. The outcome of LA is believed to depend to a large extent on the size and stage of the lesion (I and II being favorable) and the surgical expertise in the center where the patient undergoes the operation. However, the present review shows no difference in the outcome between the 2 approaches across all stages. A poor outcome is likely to result from inadequate surgery

  14. QRFP induces aldosterone production via PKC and T-type calcium channel-mediated pathways in human adrenocortical cells: evidence for a novel role of GPR103.

    PubMed

    Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Karteris, Emmanouil; Chen, Jing; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Ahmed, Naima; Kagerer, Sonja; Jöhren, Olaf; Lehnert, Hendrik; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Randeva, Harpal S

    2013-11-01

    Hormonal regulation of adrenal function occurs primarily through activation of GPCRs. GPCRs are central to many of the body's endocrine and neurotransmitter pathways. Recently, it was shown that activation of GPR103 by its ligand QRFP induced feeding, locomotor activity, and metabolic rate, and QRFP is bioactive in adipose tissue of obese individuals. Given that the adrenal gland is a pivotal organ for energy balance and homeostasis, we hypothesized that GPR103 and QRFP are involved in steroidogenic responses. Using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, we mapped both GPR103 and QRFP in human fetal and adult adrenal gland as well as rat adrenals. Both were primarily localized in the adrenal cortex but not in the medulla. Activation of GPR103 in human adrenocortical H295R cells led to a decrease in forskolin-increased cAMP and an increase of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. In addition, treatment of H295R cells with QRFP induced aldosterone and cortisol secretion as measured by ELISA. These increases were accompanied by increased expression and activity of StAR, CYB11B1, and CYP11B2 as assessed by qRT-PCR and luciferase reporter assay, respectively. Using specific inhibitors, we also demonstrated that aldosterone induction involves MAPK, PKC, and/or T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent pathways. These novel data demonstrate that QRFP induces adrenal steroidogenesis in vitro by regulating key steroidogenic enzymes involving MAPK/PKC and Ca(2+) signaling pathways. PMID:23964068

  15. Adrenocortical involution in rats during oestrus synchronisation with medroxyprogesterone.

    PubMed

    Fell, B F; Campbell, R M; Dinsdale, D

    1977-05-01

    Daily treatment of female rats with medroxyprogesterone acetate in aqueous suspension resulted in adrenocortical atrophy. The doses given were those used for oestrus synchronisation. Intramuscular injections of 2-0 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate were used to investigate the atrophic process. Adrenocortical involution was associated with extensive single cell deletion (apoptosis). It is suggested that theses changes were due to suppression of pituitary ACTH secretion. The cytological changes support the concept that single cell death plays an important role in organ remodelling. Biochemical determinations of DNA, RNA, protein and dry matter, and histological examination, did not reveal significant changes in the liver. PMID:560035

  16. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Rapidly Increases Cortisol Biosynthesis and the Expression of Genes Involved in Cholesterol Uptake and Transport in H295R Adrenocortical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lucki, Natasha C.; Li, Donghui; Sewer, Marion B.

    2011-01-01

    In the acute phase of adrenocortical steroidogenesis, adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) activates a cAMP/PKA-signaling pathway that promotes the transport of free cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane. We have previously shown that ACTH rapidly stimulates the metabolism of sphingolipids and the secretion of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in H295R cells. In this study, we examined the effect of S1P on genes involved in the acute phase of steroidogenesis. We show that S1P increases the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). S1P-induced StAR mRNA expression requires Gαi signaling, phospholipase C (PLC), Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CamKII), and ERK1/2 activation. S1P also increases intracellular Ca2+, the phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) at Ser563, and cortisol secretion. Collectively, these findings identify multiple roles for S1P in the regulation of glucocorticoid biosynthesis. PMID:21864647

  17. Interaction of MSC with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Catharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hass, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor development and tumor progression is not only determined by the corresponding tumor cells but also by the tumor microenvironment. This includes an orchestrated network of interacting cell types (e.g. immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC)) via the extracellular matrix and soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and various metabolites. Cell populations of the tumor microenvironment can interact directly and indirectly with cancer cells by mutually altering properties and functions of the involved partners. Particularly, mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) play an important role during carcinogenesis exhibiting different types of intercellular communication. Accordingly, this work focusses on diverse mechanisms of interaction between MSC and cancer cells. Moreover, some functional changes and consequences for both cell types are summarized which can eventually result in the establishment of a carcinoma stem cell niche (CSCN) or the generation of new tumor cell populations by MSC-tumor cell fusion. PMID:27608835

  18. 5th International ACC Symposium: Classification of Adrenocortical Cancers from Pathology to Integrated Genomics: Real Advances or Lost in Translation?

    PubMed

    de Krijger, Ronald E; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2016-02-01

    For the clinician, despite its rarity, adrenocortical cancer is a heterogeneous tumor both in term of steroid excess and tumor evolution. For patient management, it is crucial to have an accurate vision of this heterogeneity, in order to use a correct tumor classification. Pathology is the best way to classify operated adrenocortical tumors: to recognize their adrenocortical nature and to differentiate benign from malignant tumors. Among malignant tumors pathology also aims at prognosis assessment. Although progress has being made for prognosis assessment, there is still a need for improvement. Recent studies have established the value of Ki67 for adrenocortical cancer (ACC) prognostication, aiming also at standardization to reduce variability. The use of genomics to study adrenocortical tumors gives a very new insight in their pathogenesis and molecular classification. Genomics studies of ACC give now a clear description of the mRNA (transcriptome) and miRNA expression profile, as well as chromosomal and methylation alterations. Exome sequencing also established firmly the list of the main ACC driver genes. Interestingly, genomics study of ACC also revealed subtypes of malignant tumors with different pattern of molecular alterations, associated with different outcome. This leads to a new vision of adrenocortical tumors classification based on molecular analysis. Interestingly, these molecular classifications meet also the results of pathological analysis. This opens new perspectives on the development and use of various molecular tools to classify, along with pathological analysis, ACC, and guides patient management at the area of precision medicine. PMID:26676358

  19. Pubertal outcome in a female with virilizing adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Breidbart, Emily; Cameo, Tamara; Garvin, James H.; Hibshoosh, Hanina

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical tumors are neoplasms that rarely occur in pediatric patients. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is even more uncommon, and is an aggressive malignancy with 5-year survival of 55% in a registry series. There is a lack of information on long-term endocrine outcome in survivors. We describe a 10-year follow-up in a patient who presented at 3 years 5 months with a 1-year history of axillary odor and 6 months’ history of pubic hair development with an increased clitoral size. Androgen levels were increased and a pelvic sonogram revealed a suprarenal mass of the left kidney. The tumor was successfully removed. At 6 years 11 months, androgen levels increased again. Workup for tumor recurrence was negative and the findings likely represented early adrenarche. The patient had menarche at an appropriate time and attained a height appropriate for her family. PMID:26812773

  20. Pubertal outcome in a female with virilizing adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Breidbart, Emily; Cameo, Tamara; Garvin, James H; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Oberfield, Sharon E

    2016-04-01

    Adrenocortical tumors are neoplasms that rarely occur in pediatric patients. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is even more uncommon, and is an aggressive malignancy with 5-year survival of 55% in a registry series. There is a lack of information on long-term endocrine outcome in survivors. We describe a 10-year follow-up in a patient who presented at 3 years 5 months with a 1-year history of axillary odor and 6 months' history of pubic hair development with an increased clitoral size. Androgen levels were increased and a pelvic sonogram revealed a suprarenal mass of the left kidney. The tumor was successfully removed. At 6 years 11 months, androgen levels increased again. Workup for tumor recurrence was negative and the findings likely represented early adrenarche. The patient had menarche at an appropriate time and attained a height appropriate for her family. PMID:26812773

  1. Palifosfamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-11

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  2. Expression of prepro-ghrelin and related receptor genes in the rat adrenal gland and evidences that ghrelin exerts a potent stimulating effect on corticosterone secretion by cultured rat adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Tyczewska, Marianna; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2009-08-01

    The orexigenic peptide ghrelin (GHREL) and obestatin (OBS) originate from the same peptide precursor, preproghrelin (ppGHREL). Apart from orexigenic effect, GHREL also regulates neuroendocrine function. We investigated GHREL and OBS effects on corticosterone secretion by freshly isolated and cultured rat adrenocortical cells. Classic RT-PCR revealed the presence of ppGHREL, GHS-R1a, GPR39v1 and GPR39v2 and GOAT4 (ghrelin O-acyl transferase) mRNAs in rat adrenals and cultured for 4 days rat adrenocortical cells. Expression of ppGHREL, GHS-R1a, and GOAT genes was notably higher in the cortex than in medulla. High expression level of GOAT gene was found in the zona glomerulosa, while expression level of both GPR39v1 and GPR39v2 genes was similar in adrenal cortical zones and in medulla. In freshly isolated cells neither GHREL nor OBS had an effect on corticosteroid output. Prolonged exposure of cultured cells to GHREL resulted in a potent, comparable to ACTH, stimulating effect of GHREL on corticosterone secretion. Prolonged exposure to OBS was ineffective. Neither GHREL nor OBS had any effect on proliferation of studied cells, while ACTH notably lowered it. GHREL down regulated GHS-R1a gene expression while both ACTH and GHREL stimulated expression level of GPR39v1 gene. Expression of CYP11A1 gene was notably stimulated and that of StAR gene remained unaffected by ACTH or GHREL. Thus, our study is the first to demonstrate direct stimulating effect of GHREL on corticosterone output by cultured rat adrenocortical cells. This stimulating action differs from that evoked by ACTH and is not dependent on the presence of functional ACTH receptor. PMID:19416745

  3. General Information about Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. General Information about Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  6. Oxaliplatin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent Solid Tumors That Have Not Responded to Previous Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Hepatoblastoma; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer

  7. Cerebellin and des-cerebellin exert ACTH-like effects on corticosterone secretion and the intracellular signaling pathway gene expression in cultured rat adrenocortical cells--DNA microarray and QPCR studies.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2009-04-01

    Precerebellins (Cbln) belong to the C1q/TNF superfamily of secreted proteins which have diverse functions. They are abundantly expressed in the cerebellum, however, three of them are also expressed in the rat adrenal gland. All members of the Cbln family form homomeric and heteromeric complexes with each other in vitro and it was suggested that such complexes play a crucial role in normal development of the cerebellum. The aim of our study was to investigate whether Cbln1-derived peptides, cerebellin (CER) and des-Ser1-cerebellin (desCER) are involved in regulating biological functions of rat adrenocortical cells. In the primary culture of rat adrenocortical cells, 24 h exposure to CER or desCER notably stimulated corticosterone output and inhibited proliferative activity and similar effects were evoked by ACTH. To study gene transcript regulation by CER, desCER and ACTH, we applied Oligo GEArray DNA Microarray: Rat Signal Transduction Pathway Finder. In relation to the control culture, 13 of the 113 transcripts present on the array were differentially expressed. These transcripts were either up- or down-regulated by ACTH and/or CER or desCER treatment. Validation of DNA Microarray data by QPCR revealed that only 5 of 13 genes studied were differentially expressed. Of those genes, Fos and Icam1 were up-regulated and Egr1 was down-regulated by ACTH, CER and desCER. The remaining two genes, Fasn (insulin signaling pathway) and Hspb1 (HSP27) (stress signaling pathway), were regulated only by CER and desCER, but not by ACTH. Thus, both CER and desCER have effects similar to and different from corticotrophin on the intracellular signaling pathway gene expression in cultured rat adrenocortical cells. PMID:19288031

  8. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  9. Helsinki score-a novel model for prediction of metastases in adrenocortical carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pennanen, Mirkka; Heiskanen, Ilkka; Sane, Timo; Remes, Satu; Mustonen, Harri; Haglund, Caj; Arola, Johanna

    2015-03-01

    Histopathologic diagnosis of adrenocortical tumors is based on adverse features that indicate malignant potential. Proliferation index has served as a supplemental tool in assessing the malignant potential of adrenocortical tumors. None of the current histologic classification systems can sufficiently accurately predict tumors' metastatic potential. We studied 177 consecutive adult patients with primary adrenocortical tumors operated on at Helsinki University Central Hospital between 1990 and 2003, all patients with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. We determined for each tumor the Weiss score and the Weiss revisited score by Aubert. Proliferation index was measured by computer-assisted image analysis. Each of the 9 Weiss criteria and the proliferation index were then used to establish a scoring system to predict the metastatic potential of adrenocortical tumors. Use of stepwise regression analysis led us to propose a calculation: 3 × mitotic rate (>5/50 high-power fields) + 5 × presence of necrosis + proliferation index in the most proliferative area of the tumor. Using a cutoff value of 8.5, the new scoring system was able to diagnose metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma with 100% sensitivity (confidence interval [CI], 76.8%-100%) and 99.4% specificity (CI, 96.6%-100%). The corresponding sensitivity of the Weiss system was 100% (CI, 76.8%-100%), and specificity, 90.2% (CI, 84.6%-94.3%), with sensitivity of the Weiss revisited system at 100% (CI, 76.8%-100%) and specificity at 96.9% (CI, 93.0%-99.0%). The new Helsinki score thus was accurate in predicting the metastatic potential of adrenocortical tumors. PMID:25582500

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hCG and LDH may be at any level. Poor prognosis A nonseminoma extragonadal germ cell tumor is in the poor prognosis group if: the tumor is in the ... extragonadal germ cell tumor does not have a poor prognosis group. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There ...

  11. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S.; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics. PMID:26446994

  12. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma) is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM) of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue), metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS. PMID:21914164

  13. Granular Cell Tumor: An Uncommon Benign Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Tirthankar; Das, Anupam; Shome, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Das, Dipti; Saha, Abanti

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor. PMID:26120181

  14. Combined transcriptome studies identify AFF3 as a mediator of the oncogenic effects of β-catenin in adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, L; Omeiri, H; Drougat, L; Hantel, C; Giraud, M; Val, P; Rodriguez, S; Perlemoine, K; Blugeon, C; Beuschlein, F; de Reyniès, A; Rizk-Rabin, M; Bertherat, J; Ragazzon, B

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is a very aggressive tumor, and genomics studies demonstrate that the most frequent alterations of driver genes in these cancers activate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, the adrenal-specific targets of oncogenic β-catenin-mediating tumorigenesis have not being established. A combined transcriptomic analysis from two series of human tumors and the human ACC cell line H295R harboring a spontaneous β-catenin activating mutation was done to identify the Wnt/β-catenin targets. Seven genes were consistently identified in the three studies. Among these genes, we found that AFF3 mediates the oncogenic effects of β-catenin in ACC. The Wnt response element site located at nucleotide position −1408 of the AFF3 transcriptional start sites (TSS) mediates the regulation by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. AFF3 silencing decreases cell proliferation and increases apoptosis in the ACC cell line H295R. AFF3 is located in nuclear speckles, which play an important role in RNA splicing. AFF3 overexpression in adrenocortical cells interferes with the organization and/or biogenesis of these nuclear speckles and alters the distribution of CDK9 and cyclin T1 such that they accumulate at the sites of AFF3/speckles. We demonstrate that AFF3 is a new target of Wnt/β-catenin pathway involved in ACC, acting on transcription and RNA splicing. PMID:26214578

  15. Adrenocortical Oncocytic Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of the Histopathologic Diagnostic Criteria.

    PubMed

    Arik, Deniz; Canaz, Funda; Dündar, Emine

    2016-01-01

    Oncocytic tumors are rare in the adrenal gland. The histopathological diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma is difficult due to the lack of precise diagnostic criteria for malignancy. A 44-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with left flank pain. Radiologically an adrenal mass was detected. After the excision and histopathologic evaluation of the mass, a diagnosis of adrenocortical oncocytic carcinoma was made. At least one of the features of more than 5 mitoses in 50 high power fields, atypical mitotic figures or venous invasion is required for the diagnosis of malignancy in adrenocortical tumors. It has been suggested that tumors that have more than one of the minor criteria of large size ( > 10 cm or > 200 gr), necrosis, capsular or sinusoidal invasion, should be evaluated as having uncertain malignant potential. PMID:27562395

  16. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2009-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:19189072

  17. Cell Fusion Connects Oncogenesis with Tumor Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Merchak, Kevin; Lee, Woojin; Grande, Joseph P.; Cascalho, Marilia; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion likely drives tumor evolution by undermining chromosomal and DNA stability and/or by generating phenotypic diversity; however, whether a cell fusion event can initiate malignancy and direct tumor evolution is unknown. We report that a fusion event involving normal, nontransformed, cytogenetically stable epithelial cells can initiate chromosomal instability, DNA damage, cell transformation, and malignancy. Clonal analysis of fused cells reveals that the karyotypic and phenotypic potential of tumors formed by cell fusion is established immediately or within a few cell divisions after the fusion event, without further ongoing genetic and phenotypic plasticity, and that subsequent evolution of such tumors reflects selection from the initial diverse population rather than ongoing plasticity of the progeny. Thus, one cell fusion event can both initiate malignancy and fuel evolution of the tumor that ensues. PMID:26066710

  18. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  19. Paracrine control of steroidogenesis by serotonin in adrenocortical neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, H; Duparc, C; Prévost, G; Zennaro, M C; Bertherat, J; Louiset, E

    2015-06-15

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) is able to activate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis via multiple actions at different levels. In the human adrenal gland, 5-HT, released by subcapsular mast cells, stimulates corticosteroid production through a paracrine mode of communication which involves 5-HT receptor type 4 (5-HT4) primarily located in zona glomerulosa. As a result, 5-HT is much more efficient to stimulate aldosterone secretion than cortisol release in vitro and administration of 5-HT4 receptor agonists to healthy individuals is followed by an increase in plasma aldosterone levels without any change in plasma cortisol concentrations. Interestingly, adrenocortical hyperplasias and tumors responsible for corticosteroid hypersecretion exhibit various cellular and molecular defects which tend to reinforce the intraadrenal serotonergic tone. These pathophysiological mechanisms, which are summarized in the present review, include an increase in adrenal 5-HT production and overexpression of 5-HT receptors in adrenal neoplastic tissues. Altogether, these data support the concept of adrenal serotonergic paracrinopathy and suggest that 5-HT and its receptors may constitute valuable targets for pharmacological treatments of primary adrenal diseases. PMID:25433205

  20. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  1. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sree, V. Gowri; Udayakumar, K.; Sundararajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this. PMID:22295214

  2. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  3. Cholesterol and steroid synthesizing smooth endoplasmic reticulum of adrenocortical cells contains high levels of translocation apparatus proteins.

    PubMed

    Black, V H; Sanjay, A; van Leyen, K; Möeller, I; Lauring, B; Kreibich, G

    2002-11-01

    Steroid-secreting cells possess abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum whose membranes contain many enzymes involved in sterol and steroid synthesis. In this study we demonstrate that adrenal smooth microsomal subfractions enriched in these membranes also possess high levels of proteins belonging to the translocation apparatus, proteins previously assumed to be confined to morphologically identifiable rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). We further demonstrate that these smooth microsomal subfractions are capable of effecting the functions of these protein complexes: co-translational translocation, signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation of newly synthesized polypeptides. We hypothesize that these elements participate in regulating the levels of ER-targeted membrane proteins involved in cholesterol and steroid metabolism in a sterol-dependent and hormonally-regulated manner. PMID:12530645

  4. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  5. CD44 enhances tumor aggressiveness by promoting tumor cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Yvette W J; Huijbers, Elisabeth J M; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Soetekouw, Patricia M M B; Pauwels, Patrick; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Griffioen, Arjan W

    2015-08-14

    Aggressive tumor cells can obtain the ability to transdifferentiate into cells with endothelial features and thus form vasculogenic networks. This phenomenon, called vasculogenic mimicry (VM), is associated with increased tumor malignancy and poor clinical outcome. To identify novel key molecules implicated in the process of vasculogenic mimicry, microarray analysis was performed to compare gene expression profiles of aggressive (VM+) and non-aggressive (VM-) cells derived from Ewing sarcoma and breast carcinoma. We identified the CD44/c-Met signaling cascade as heavily relevant for vasculogenic mimicry. CD44 was at the center of this cascade, and highly overexpressed in aggressive tumors. Both CD44 standard isoform and its splice variant CD44v6 were linked to increased aggressiveness in VM. Since VM is most abundant in Ewing sarcoma tumors functional analyses were performed in EW7 cells. Overexpression of CD44 allowed enhanced adhesion to its extracellular matrix ligand hyaluronic acid. CD44 expression also facilitated the formation of vasculogenic structures in vitro, as CD44 knockdown experiments repressed migration and vascular network formation. From these results and the observation that CD44 expression is associated with vasculogenic structures and blood lakes in human Ewing sarcoma tissues, we conclude that CD44 increases aggressiveness in tumors through the process of vasculogenic mimicry. PMID:26189059

  6. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  7. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging them. Additional protocols for labeling macrophages, blood vessel imaging, and image analysis are also included. PMID:23456602

  8. 5th International ACC Symposium: The New Genetics of Benign Adrenocortical Neoplasia: Hyperplasias, Adenomas, and Their Implications for Progression into Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Lawrence S; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-02-01

    Genetic tools for the analysis of human tumors have developed rapidly over the past 20 years. Adrenocortical neoplasms have been subject to multiple analyses using these new genetic tools. Analysis of adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) has been complicated by the fact that these tumors tend to exhibit multiple somatic abnormalities, so that identifying driver mutations is complex task. In contrast, benign adrenocortical neoplasms have proven to be a fertile ground for the identification of the genetic causes of adrenocortical adenomas, as well as a variety of adrenocortical hyperplasia. Analysis of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas has revealed alterations leading to enhanced signaling through the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) pathway. In contrast, macronodular cortisol-producing neoplasias have been shown to result from mutations in the ARMC5 gene, whose function is not yet quite so clear. In contrast, adrenal tumors resulting in excess production of the blood pressure hormone aldosterone almost always result from abnormalities of calcium handling, both in single adenomas and in bilateral hyperplasias. In both cases, there is elevation of a signaling pathway responsible both for hormone secretion and for gland growth and maintenance, thus confirming the linkage of these two output of cellular physiology. The connection between the benign hyperplasia observed in these states and adrenocortical carcinogenesis is not nearly as clear, although genetic studies are beginning to elucidate the relationship between benign and malignant tumors of this gland. PMID:26684645

  9. Pathway Implications of Aberrant Global Methylation in Adrenocortical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Christophe R.; Demeure, Michael J.; Whitsett, Timothy G.; Gooden, Gerald C.; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Jung, Sungwon; Waibhav, Tembe; Kim, Seungchan; Salhia, Bodour

    2016-01-01

    Context Adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC) are a rare tumor type with a poor five-year survival rate and limited treatment options. Objective Understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this disease has been aided by genomic analyses highlighting alterations in TP53, WNT, and IGF signaling pathways. Further elucidation is needed to reveal therapeutically actionable targets in ACC. Design In this study, global DNA methylation levels were assessed by the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip Array on 18 ACC tumors and 6 normal adrenal tissues. A new, non-linear correlation approach, the discretization method, assessed the relationship between DNA methylation/gene expression across ACC tumors. Results This correlation analysis revealed epigenetic regulation of genes known to modulate TP53, WNT, and IGF signaling, as well as silencing of the tumor suppressor MARCKS, previously unreported in ACC. Conclusions DNA methylation may regulate genes known to play a role in ACC pathogenesis as well as known tumor suppressors. PMID:26963385

  10. Evaluation of 9-cis retinoic acid and mitotane as antitumoral agents in an adrenocortical xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Zoltán; Baghy, Kornélia; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Micsik, Tamás; Nyírő, Gábor; Rácz, Gergely; Butz, Henriett; Perge, Pál; Kovalszky, Ilona; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila; Igaz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The available drug treatment options for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) are limited. In our previous studies, the in vitro activity of 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cisRA) on adrenocortical NCI-H295R cells was shown along with its antitumoral effects in a small pilot xenograft study. Our aim was to dissect the antitumoral effects of 9-cisRA on ACC in a large-scale xenograft study involving mitotane, 9-cisRA and their combination. 43 male SCID mice inoculated with NCI-H295R cells were treated in four groups (i. control, ii. 9-cisRA, iii. mitotane, iv. 9-cisRA + mitotane) for 28 days. Tumor size follow-up, histological and immunohistochemical (Ki-67) analysis, tissue gene expression microarray, quantitative real-time-PCR for the validation of microarray results and to detect circulating microRNAs were performed. Protein expression was studied by proteomics and Western-blot validation. Only mitotane alone and the combination of 9-cisRA and mitotane resulted in significant tumor size reduction. The Ki-67 index was significantly reduced in both 9-cisRA and 9-cisRA+mitotane groups. Only modest changes at the mRNA level were found: the 9-cisRA-induced overexpression of apolipoprotein A4 and down-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4A was validated. The expression of circulating hsa-miR-483-5p was significantly reduced in the combined treatment group. The SET protein was validated as being significantly down-regulated in the combined mitotane+9-cisRA group. 9-cisRA might be a helpful additive agent in the treatment of ACC in combination with mitotane. Circulating hsa-miR-483-5p could be utilized for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ACC patients, and the treatment-induced reduction in protein SET expression might raise its relevance in ACC biology. PMID:26885453

  11. Targeting tumor cell motility to prevent metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Trenis D.; Ashby, William J.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries

    2011-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with solid tumors invariably results from the disruption of normal biological function caused by disseminating tumor cells. Tumor cell migration is under intense investigation as the underlying cause of cancer metastasis. The need for tumor cell motility in the progression of metastasis has been established experimentally and is supported empirically by basic and clinical research implicating a large collection of migration-related genes. However, there are few clinical interventions designed to specifically target the motility of tumor cells and adjuvant therapy to specifically prevent cancer cell dissemination is severely limited. In an attempt to define motility targets suitable for treating metastasis, we have parsed the molecular determinants of tumor cell motility into five underlying principles including cell autonomous ability, soluble communication, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and integrating these determinants of migration on molecular scaffolds. The current challenge is to implement meaningful and sustainable inhibition of metastasis by developing clinically viable disruption of molecular targets that control these fundamental capabilities. PMID:21664937

  12. Safety of targeting tumor endothelial cell antigens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Szymanski, Julia; Ma, Hong; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Plata-Munoz, Juan J; Silva, Francisco; Patel, Amit N; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying discrimination between "self" and "non-self", a central immunological principle, require careful consideration in immune oncology therapeutics where eliciting anti-cancer immunity must be weighed against the risk of autoimmunity due to the self origin of tumors. Whole cell vaccines are one promising immunotherapeutic avenue whereby a myriad of tumor antigens are introduced in an immunogenic context with the aim of eliciting tumor rejection. Despite the possibility collateral damage to healthy tissues, cancer immunotherapy can be designed such that off target autoimmunity remains limited in scope and severity or completely non-existent. Here we provide an immunological basis for reconciling the safety of cancer vaccines, focusing on tumor endothelial cell vaccines, by discussing the following topics: (a) Antigenic differences between neoplastic and healthy tissues that can be leveraged in cancer vaccine design; (b) The layers of tolerance that control T cell responses directed against antigens expressed in healthy tissues and tumors; and, (c) The hierarchy of antigenic epitope selection and display in response to whole cell vaccines, and how antigen processing and presentation can afford a degree of selectivity against tumors. We conclude with an example of early clinical data utilizing ValloVax™, an immunogenic placental endothelial cell vaccine that is being advanced to target the tumor endothelium of diverse cancers, and we report on the safety and efficacy of ValloVax™ for inducing immunity against tumor endothelial antigens. PMID:27071457

  13. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  14. DNA Tumor Viruses and Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Darekar, Suhas

    2016-01-01

    Viruses play an important role in cancerogenesis. It is estimated that approximately 20% of all cancers are linked to infectious agents. The viral genes modulate the physiological machinery of infected cells that lead to cell transformation and development of cancer. One of the important adoptive responses by the cancer cells is their metabolic change to cope up with continuous requirement of cell survival and proliferation. In this review we will focus on how DNA viruses alter the glucose metabolism of transformed cells. Tumor DNA viruses enhance “aerobic” glycolysis upon virus-induced cell transformation, supporting rapid cell proliferation and showing the Warburg effect. Moreover, viral proteins enhance glucose uptake and controls tumor microenvironment, promoting metastasizing of the tumor cells. PMID:27034740

  15. Adrenocortical neoplasia: evolving concepts in tumorigenesis with an emphasis on adrenal cortical carcinoma variants.

    PubMed

    de Krijger, Ronald R; Papathomas, Thomas G

    2012-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare, heterogeneous malignancy with a poor prognosis. According to WHO classification 2004, ACC variants include oncocytic ACCs, myxoid ACCs and ACCs with sarcomatous areas. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of these rare subtypes of adrenocortical malignancy and emphasize their clinicopathological features with the aim of elucidating aspects of diagnostic categorization, differential diagnostics and biological behavior. The issue of current terminology, applied to biphasic tumors with pleomorphic, sarcomatous or sarcomatoid elements arising in adrenal cortex, is also discussed. We additionally present emerging evidence concerning the adrenal cortical tumorigenesis and the putative adenoma-carcinoma sequence as well. PMID:22086150

  16. Targeting regulatory T cells in tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T (Treg ) cells play a crucial role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. However, they also represent a major barrier to effective antitumor immunity and immunotherapy. Consequently, there has been considerable interest in developing approaches that can selectively or preferentially target Treg cells in tumors, while not impacting their capacity to maintain peripheral immune homeostasis. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the recruitment, expansion, and suppressive activity of tumor-associated Treg cells, and discuss the approaches used and the challenges encountered in the immunotherapeutic targeting of Treg cells. In addition, we summarize the primary clinical targets and some emerging data on exciting new potential Treg cell-restricted targets. We propose that discovering and understanding mechanisms that are preferentially used by Treg cells within the tumor microenvironment will lead to strategies that selectively target Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor immunity while maintaining peripheral immune tolerance. PMID:26787424

  17. Ceramide Kinase Promotes Tumor Cell Survival and Mammary Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Ania W.; Pant, Dhruv K.; Pan, Tien-chi; Chodosh, Lewis A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent breast cancer is typically an incurable disease and, as such, is disproportionately responsible for deaths from this disease. Recurrent breast cancers arise from the pool of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) that survive adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy, and patients with detectable DTCs following therapy are at substantially increased risk for recurrence. Consequently, the identification of pathways that contribute to the survival of breast cancer cells following therapy could aid in the development of more effective therapies that decrease the burden of residual disease and thereby reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence. We now report that Ceramide Kinase (Cerk) is required for mammary tumor recurrence following HER2/neu pathway inhibition and is spontaneously up-regulated during tumor recurrence in multiple genetically engineered mouse models for breast cancer. We find that Cerk is rapidly up-regulated in tumor cells following HER2/neu down-regulation or treatment with Adriamycin and that Cerk is required for tumor cell survival following HER2/neu down-regulation. Consistent with our observations in mouse models, analysis of gene expression profiles from over 2,200 patients revealed that elevated CERK expression is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in women with breast cancer. Additionally, although CERK expression is associated with aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, including those that are ER–, HER2+, basal-like, or high grade, its association with poor clinical outcome is independent of these clinicopathological variables. Together, our findings identify a functional role for Cerk in breast cancer recurrence and suggest the clinical utility of agents targeted against this pro-survival pathway. PMID:25164007

  18. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-07-10

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-02-23

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created "sialic acid low" tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing "sialic acid low" tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  20. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A. M.; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I.; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created “sialic acid low” tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing “sialic acid low” tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  1. [Benign and malignant granular cell tumors. An immunohistochemical classification of tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1987-06-15

    Eight benign and three malignant granular cell tumors were characterized by means of antibodies and antisera against keratin, desmin, epithelial membrane antigen, factor VIII-related protein, lysozyme, myelin basic protein, myoglobin, neurone-specific enolase, S 100 protein, myelin-associated protein (Leu 7), glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and neurofilament. All benign granular cell tumours showed positive staining of the tumor cells to antibodies against vimentin, S 100 protein, and neurone-specific enolase; myelin-associated protein (Leu 7), in contrast, was only detectable in a few tumor sections. Histogenetically the granular cells may be classified as Schwann's cells which lost their expression of laminin. The three malignant granular cell tumors showed a staining pattern significantly different from that of the benign tumours. Thus, only neurone-specific enolase was detectable in all the tumors, whereas S 100 protein and vimentin could not be demonstrated but in one and two, resp., out of three tumors. PMID:3303714

  2. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  3. Recognition of tumor cells by Dectin-1 orchestrates innate immune cells for anti-tumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Shiho; Ikushima, Hiroaki; Ueki, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Hangai, Sho; Nishio, Junko; Negishi, Hideo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of tumor cells requires communication to and signaling by cells of the immune system. Natural killer (NK) cells are essential tumor-killing effector cells of the innate immune system; however, little is known about whether or how other immune cells recognize tumor cells to assist NK cells. Here, we show that the innate immune receptor Dectin-1 expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages is critical to NK-mediated killing of tumor cells that express N-glycan structures at high levels. Receptor recognition of these tumor cells causes the activation of the IRF5 transcription factor and downstream gene induction for the full-blown tumoricidal activity of NK cells. Consistent with this, we show exacerbated in vivo tumor growth in mice genetically deficient in either Dectin-1 or IRF5. The critical contribution of Dectin-1 in the recognition of and signaling by tumor cells may offer new insight into the anti-tumor immune system with therapeutic implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04177.001 PMID:25149452

  4. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Amoêdo, Nívea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg's original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers. PMID:22693511

  5. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas☆

    PubMed Central

    Temesgen, Wudneh M.; Wachtel, Mitchell; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatic giant cell tumors are rare, with an incidence of less than 1% of all pancreatic tumors. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor (OGCT) of the pancreas is one of the three types of PGCT, which are now classified as undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient is a 57 year old woman who presented with a 3 week history of epigastric pain and a palpable abdominal mass. Imaging studies revealed an 18 cm × 15 cm soft tissue mass with cystic components which involved the pancreas, stomach and spleen. Exploratory laparotomy with distal pancreatectomy, partial gastrectomy and splenectomy was performed. Histology revealed undifferentiated pancreatic carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells with production of osteoid and glandular elements. DISCUSSION OGCT of the pancreas resembles benign-appearing giant cell tumors of bone, and contain osteoclastic-like multinucleated cells and mononuclear cells. OGCTs display a less aggressive course with slow metastasis and lymph node spread compared to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Due to the rarity of the cancer, there is a lack of prospective studies on treatment options. Surgical en-bloc resection is currently considered first line treatment. The role of adjuvant therapy with radiotherapy or chemotherapy has not been established. CONCLUSION Pancreatic giant cell tumors are rare pancreatic neoplasms with unique clinical and pathological characteristics. Osteoclastic giant cell tumors are the most favorable sub-type. Surgical en bloc resection is the first line treatment. Long-term follow-up of patients with these tumors is essential to compile a body of literature to help guide treatment. PMID:24631915

  6. Reversing drug resistance of soft tumor-repopulating cells by tumor cell-derived chemotherapeutic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Li, Yong; Xu, Pingwei; Sun, Yanling; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianzhen; Luo, Shunqun; Jin, Yang; Luo, Xiuli; Li, Chengyin; Gong, Hongwei; Long, Zhixiong; Lu, Jinzhi; Hu, Zhuowei; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Ning; Yang, Xiangliang; Huang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Developing novel approaches to reverse the drug resistance of tumor-repopulating cells (TRCs) or stem cell-like cancer cells is an urgent clinical need to improve outcomes of cancer patients. Here we show an innovative approach that reverses drug resistance of TRCs using tumor cell-derived microparticles (T-MPs) containing anti-tumor drugs. TRCs, by virtue of being more deformable than differentiated cancer cells, preferentially take up T-MPs that release anti-tumor drugs after entering cells, which in turn lead to death of TRCs. The underlying mechanisms include interfering with drug efflux and promoting nuclear entry of the drugs. Our findings demonstrate the importance of tumor cell softness in uptake of T-MPs and effectiveness of a novel approach in reversing drug resistance of TRCs with promising clinical applications. PMID:27167569

  7. An overview of therapeutic approaches to brain tumor stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Primary and secondary malignant central nervous system (CNS) tumors are devastating invasive tumors able to give rise to many kinds of differentiated tumor cells. Glioblastoma multiform (GBM), is the most malignant brain tumor, in which its growth and persistence depend on cancer stem cells with enhanced DNA damage repair program that also induces recurrence and resists current chemo- and radiotherapies. Unlike non-tumor stem cells, tumor stem cells lack the normal mechanisms that regulate proliferation and differentiation, resulting in uncontrolled production and incomplete differentiation of tumor cells. In current paper recent developments and new researches in the field of brain tumor stem cells have been reviewed. PMID:23483074

  8. One cell, multiple roles: contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to tumor development in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue reparative and immunosuppressive abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has drawn more attention to tumor microenvironment and its role in providing the soil for the tumor cell growth. MSCs are recruited to tumor which is referred as the never healing wound and altered by the inflammation environment, thereby helping to construct the tumor microenvironment. The environment orchestrated by MSCs and other factors can be associated with angiogenesis, immunosuppression, inhibition of apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), survival of cancer stem cells, which all contribute to tumor growth and progression. In this review, we will discuss how MSCs are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and what effects they have on tumor progression. PMID:23336752

  9. Treatment Options by Stage (Adrenocortical Carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Childhood Treatment for more information.) Having certain genetic conditions increases the risk of adrenocortical carcinoma. Anything ... can be a sign of disease. CT scan (CAT scan) : A procedure that makes a series of ...

  10. Extramitochondrial OPA1 and adrenocortical function.

    PubMed

    Fülöp, László; Rajki, Anikó; Katona, Dávid; Szanda, Gergö; Spät, András

    2013-12-01

    We have previously described that silencing of the mitochondrial protein OPA1 enhances mitochondrial Ca(2+) signaling and aldosterone production in H295R adrenocortical cells. Since extramitochondrial OPA1 (emOPA1) was reported to facilitate cAMP-induced lipolysis, we hypothesized that emOPA1, via the enhanced hydrolysis of cholesterol esters, augments aldosterone production in H295R cells. A few OPA1 immunopositive spots were detected in ∼40% of the cells. In cell fractionation studies OPA1/COX IV (mitochondrial marker) ratio in the post-mitochondrial fractions was an order of magnitude higher than that in the mitochondrial fraction. The ratio of long to short OPA1 isoforms was lower in post-mitochondrial than in mitochondrial fractions. Knockdown of OPA1 failed to reduce db-cAMP-induced phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), Ca(2+) signaling and aldosterone secretion. In conclusion, OPA1 could be detected in the post-mitochondrial fractions, nevertheless, OPA1 did not interfere with the cAMP - PKA - HSL mediated activation of aldosterone secretion. PMID:23906536

  11. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  12. Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cells Promoting Tumor Invasion and Metastasis: Existing Theories

    PubMed Central

    Man, Yan-gao; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Mason, Jeffrey; Avital, Itzhak; Bilchik, Anton; Bruecher, Bjoern; Protic, Mladjan; Nissan, Aviram; Izadjoo, Mina; Zhang, Xichen; Jewett, Anahid

    2013-01-01

    It is a commonly held belief that infiltration of immune cells into tumor tissues and direct physical contact between tumor cells and infiltrated immune cells is associated with physical destructions of the tumor cells, reduction of the tumor burden, and improved clinical prognosis. An increasing number of studies, however, have suggested that aberrant infiltration of immune cells into tumor or normal tissues may promote tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Neither the primary reason for these contradictory observations, nor the mechanism for the reported diverse impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells has been elucidated, making it difficult to judge the clinical implications of infiltration of immune cells within tumor tissues. This mini-review presents several existing hypotheses and models that favor the promoting impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumor invasion and metastasis, and also analyzes their strength and weakness. PMID:23386907

  13. Apoptin: specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L; Luxon, B A; Gäken, J

    2005-08-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.(1) These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at G2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.(2) In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin's function to kill tumor cells.(3) In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin's ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported "black and white" tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  14. Apoptin: Specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M.; Guelen, L.; Luxon, B. A.; Gäken, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.1 These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at g2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.2 In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin’s function to kill tumor cells.3 In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin’s ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported “black and white” tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  15. Molecular biology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Exposito, R; Merino, M; Aguayo, C

    2016-06-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common solid tumors in young adult men. They constitute a unique pathology because of their embryonic and germ origin and their special behavior. Genetic predisposition, environmental factors involved in their development and genetic aberrations have been under study in many works throughout the last years trying to explain the susceptibility and the transformation mechanism of TGCTs. Despite the high rate of cure in this type of tumors because its particular sensitivity to cisplatin, there are tumors resistant to chemotherapy for which it is needed to find new therapies. In the present work, it has been carried out a literature review on the most important molecular aspects involved in the onset and development of such tumors, as well as a review of the major developments regarding prognostic factors, new prognostic biomarkers and the possibility of new targeted therapies. PMID:26482724

  16. Enhanced delivery of liposomes to lung tumor through targeting interleukin-4 receptor on both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, Lianhua; Na, Moon-Hee; Jung, Hyun-Kyung; Vadevoo, Sri Murugan Poongkavithai; Kim, Cheong-Wun; Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Tae-In; Park, Jae-Yong; Hwang, Ilseon; Park, Keon Uk; Liang, Frank; Lu, Maggie; Park, Jiho; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2015-07-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that pathological lesions express tissue-specific molecular targets or biomarkers within the tissue. Interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) is overexpressed in many types of cancer cells, including lung cancer. Here we investigated the properties of IL-4R-binding peptide-1 (IL4RPep-1), a CRKRLDRNC peptide, and its ability to target the delivery of liposomes to lung tumor. IL4RPep-1 preferentially bound to H226 lung tumor cells which express higher levers of IL-4R compared to H460 lung tumor cells which express less IL-4R. Mutational analysis revealed that C1, R2, and R4 residues of IL4RPep-1 were the key binding determinants. IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes containing doxorubicin were more efficiently internalized in H226 cells and effectively delivered doxorubicin into the cells compared to unlabeled liposomes. In vivo fluorescence imaging of nude mice subcutaneously xenotransplanted with H226 tumor cells indicated that IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes accumulate more efficiently in the tumor and inhibit tumor growth more effectively compared to unlabeled liposomes. Interestingly, expression of IL-4R was high in vascular endothelial cells of tumor, while little was detected in vascular endothelial cells of control organs including the liver. IL-4R expression in cultured human vascular endothelial cells was also up-regulated when activated by a pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, the up-regulation of IL-4R expression was observed in primary human lung cancer tissues. These results indicate that IL-4R-targeting nanocarriers may be a useful strategy to enhance drug delivery through the recognition of IL-4R in both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells. PMID:25979323

  17. Cathepsin S from both tumor and tumor-associated cells promote cancer growth and neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Small, Donna M; Burden, Roberta E; Jaworski, Jakub; Hegarty, Shauna M; Spence, Shaun; Burrows, James F; McFarlane, Cheryl; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; McCarthy, Helen O; Johnston, James A; Walker, Brian; Scott, Christopher J

    2013-11-01

    Recent murine studies have demonstrated that tumor-associated macrophages in the tumor microenvironment are a key source of the pro-tumorigenic cysteine protease, cathepsin S. We now show in a syngeneic colorectal carcinoma murine model that both tumor and tumor-associated cells contribute cathepsin S to promote neovascularization and tumor growth. Cathepsin S depleted and control colorectal MC38 tumor cell lines were propagated in both wild type C57Bl/6 and cathepsin S null mice to provide stratified depletion of the protease from either the tumor, tumor-associated host cells, or both. Parallel analysis of these conditions showed that deletion of cathepsin S inhibited tumor growth and development, and revealed a clear contribution of both tumor and tumor-associated cell derived cathepsin S. The most significant impact on tumor development was obtained when the protease was depleted from both sources. Further characterization revealed that the loss of cathepsin S led to impaired tumor vascularization, which was complemented by a reduction in proliferation and increased apoptosis, consistent with reduced tumor growth. Analysis of cell types showed that in addition to the tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and endothelial cells can produce cathepsin S within the microenvironment. Taken together, these findings clearly highlight a manner by which tumor-associated cells can positively contribute to developing tumors and highlight cathepsin S as a therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:23629809

  18. Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Childhood Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma

  19. Computing tumor trees from single cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander; Navin, Nicholas E

    2016-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed to reconstruct evolutionary lineages from tumors using single-cell genomic data. The resulting tumor trees have important applications in cancer research and clinical oncology.Please see related Research articles: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-0929-9 and http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-0936-x . PMID:27230879

  20. cAMP/PKA signaling defects in tumors: genetics and tissue-specific pluripotential cell-derived lesions in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Stratakis, Constantine A

    2013-05-22

    In the last few years, bench and clinical studies led to significant new insight into how cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, the molecular pathway that had been identified in the early 2000s as the one involved in most benign cortisol-producing adrenal hyperplasias, affects adrenocortical growth and development, as well as tumor formation. A major discovery was the identification of tissue-specific pluripotential cells (TSPCs) as the culprit behind tumor formation not only in the adrenal, but also in bone. Discoveries in animal studies complemented a number of clinical observations in patients. Gene identification continued in parallel with mouse and other studies on the cAMP signaling and other pathways. PMID:23485729

  1. Amplification of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Gene Is a Rare Event in Adrenocortical Adenocarcinomas: Searching for Potential Mechanisms of Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tamaya Castro; Jorge, Alexander Augusto; Almeida, Madson Q.; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula; Nishi, Mirian Yumi; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares

    2014-01-01

    Context. IGF1R overexpression appears to be a prognostic biomarker of metastatic pediatric adrenocortical tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that are implicated in its upregulation remain unknown. Aim. To investigate the potential mechanisms involved in IGF1R overexpression. Patients and Methods. We studied 64 adrenocortical tumors. IGF1R copy number variation was determined in all patients using MLPA and confirmed using real time PCR. In a subgroup of 32 patients, automatic sequencing was used to identify IGF1R allelic variants and the expression of microRNAs involved in IGF1R regulation by real time PCR. Results. IGF1R amplification was detected in an adrenocortical carcinoma that was diagnosed in a 46-year-old woman with Cushing's syndrome and virilization. IGF1R overexpression was demonstrated in this case. In addition, gene amplification of other loci was identified in this adrenocortical malignant tumor, but no IGF1R copy number variation was evidenced in the remaining cases. Automatic sequencing revealed three known polymorphisms but they did not correlate with its expression. Expression of miR-100, miR-145, miR-375, and miR-126 did not correlate with IGF1R expression. Conclusion. We demonstrated amplification and overexpression of IGF1R gene in only one adrenocortical carcinoma, suggesting that these combined events are uncommon. In addition, IGF1R polymorphisms and abnormal microRNA expression did not correlate with IGF1R upregulation in adrenocortical tumors. PMID:25110710

  2. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26689709

  3. High-Dose Thiotepa Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-06

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Cancer; Retinoblastoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  5. Granular cell tumor of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Patel, R M; DeSota-LaPaix, F; Sika, J V; Mallaiah, L R; Purow, E

    1981-12-01

    Two cases of granular cell tumor of the esophagus are reported and the main features of the previously reported cases are summarized. Dysphagia and substernal discomfort or pain are the most common symptoms seen and are likely to occur with lesions greater than 1 cm. in diameter. The diagnosis should be considered in adult females with an intramural mass of the esophagus. The cell of origin is still disputed. The treatment of choice, when the patient is symptomatic or the lesion greater than 1 cm. in size, is local resection. The tumor, when incidentally discovered in an asymptomatic patient, may safely be followed endoscopically. PMID:6277183

  6. Tumor cohesion and glioblastoma cell dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Foty, Ramsey A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma typically present when tumors are at an advanced stage. Surgical resection, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy are currently the standard of care for glioblastoma. However, due to the infiltrative and dispersive nature of the tumor, recurrence rate remains high and typically results in very poor prognosis. Efforts to treat the primary tumor are, therefore, palliative rather than curative. From a practical perspective, controlling growth and dispersal of the recurrence may have a greater impact on disease-free survival, In order for cells to disperse, they must first detach from the mass. Preventing detachment may keep tumors that recur more localized and perhaps more amenable to therapy. Here we introduce a new perspective in which a quantifiable mechanical property, namely tissue surface tension, can provide novel information on tumor behavior. The overall theme of the discussion will attempt to integrate how adhesion molecules can alter a tumor’s mechanical properties and how, in turn, these properties can be modified to prevent tumor cell detachment and dispersal. PMID:23902244

  7. Chemotherapy of WAP-T mouse mammary carcinomas aggravates tumor phenotype and enhances tumor cell dissemination.

    PubMed

    Jannasch, Katharina; Wegwitz, Florian; Lenfert, Eva; Maenz, Claudia; Deppert, Wolfgang; Alves, Frauke

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the effects of the standard chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide/adriamycin/5-fluorouracil (CAF) on tumor growth, dissemination and recurrence after orthotopic implantation of murine G-2 cells were analyzed in the syngeneic immunocompetent whey acidic protein-T mouse model (Wegwitz et al., PLoS One 2010; 5:e12103; Schulze-Garg et al., Oncogene 2000; 19:1028-37). Single-dose CAF treatment reduced tumor size significantly, but was not able to eradicate all tumor cells, as recurrent tumor growth was observed 4 weeks after CAF treatment. Nine days after CAF treatment, residual tumors showed features of regressive alterations and were composed of mesenchymal-like tumor cells, infiltrating immune cells and some tumor-associated fibroblasts with an intense deposition of collagen. Recurrent tumors were characterized by coagulative necrosis and less tumor cell differentiation compared with untreated tumors, suggesting a more aggressive tumor phenotype. In support, tumor cell dissemination was strongly enhanced in mice that had developed recurrent tumors in comparison with untreated controls, although only few disseminated tumor cells could be detected in various organs 9 days after CAF application. In vitro experiments revealed that CAF treatment of G-2 cells eliminates the vast majority of epithelial tumor cells, whereas tumor cells with a mesenchymal phenotype survive. These results together with the in vivo findings suggest that tumor cells that underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition and/or exhibit stem-cell-like properties are difficult to eliminate using one round of CAF chemotherapy. The model system described here provides a valuable tool for the characterization of the effects of chemotherapeutic regimens on recurrent tumor growth and on tumor cell dissemination, thereby enabling the development and preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies to target mammary carcinomas. PMID:25449528

  8. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the testes, release a male sex hormone called testosterone . These cells are also found in a woman's ... the levels of female and male hormones, including testosterone . An ultrasound or another imaging test will likely ...

  9. YPEL4 modulates HAC15 adrenal cell proliferation and is associated with tumor diameter.

    PubMed

    Oki, Kenji; Plonczynski, Maria W; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2016-10-15

    Yippee-like (YPEL) proteins are thought to be related to cell proliferation because of their structure and location in the cell. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of YPEL4 on aldosterone production and cell proliferation in the human adrenocortical cell line (HAC15) and aldosterone producing adenoma (APA). Basal aldosterone levels in HAC15 cells over-expressing YPEL4 was higher than those of control HAC15 cells. The positive effects of YPEL4 on cell proliferation were detected by XTT assay and crystal violet staining. YPEL4 levels in 39 human APA were 2.4-fold higher compared to those in 12 non-functional adrenocortical adenomas, and there was a positive relationship between YPEL4 levels and APA diameter (r = 0.316, P < 0.05). In summary, we have demonstrated that YPEL4 stimulates human adrenal cortical cell proliferation, increasing aldosterone production as a consequence. These results in human adrenocortical cells are consistent with the clinical observations with APA in humans. PMID:27333825

  10. CDC20 maintains tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Mack, Stephen C.; Yang, Kailin; Kim, Leo; Hubert, Christopher G.; Flavahan, William A.; Chu, Chengwei; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent and lethal primary intrinsic brain tumor. Glioblastoma displays hierarchical arrangement with a population of self-renewing and tumorigenic glioma tumor initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells. While non-neoplastic neural stem cells are generally quiescent, glioblastoma TICs are often proliferative with mitotic control offering a potential point of fragility. Here, we interrogate the role of cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), an essential activator of anaphase-promoting complex (APC) E3 ubiquitination ligase, in the maintenance of TICs. By chromatin analysis and immunoblotting, CDC20 was preferentially expressed in TICs relative to matched non-TICs. Targeting CDC20 expression by RNA interference attenuated TIC proliferation, self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth. CDC20 disruption mediated its effects through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression. CDC20 maintains TICs through degradation of p21CIP1/WAF1, a critical negative regulator of TICs. Inhibiting CDC20 stabilized p21CIP1/WAF1, resulting in repression of several genes critical to tumor growth and survival, including CDC25C, c-Myc and Survivin. Transcriptional control of CDC20 is mediated by FOXM1, a central transcription factor in TICs. These results suggest CDC20 is a critical regulator of TIC proliferation and survival, linking two key TIC nodes – FOXM1 and p21CIP1/WAF1 — elucidating a potential point for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25938542

  11. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Resistant Malignant Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-12

    Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  12. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene expression, steroid-hormone secretion and proliferative activity of adrenocortical cells in the presence of proteasome inhibitors: in vivo studies on the regenerating rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Tortorella, Cinzia; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Nowak, Magdalena; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that proteasome inhibitors promote the accumulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in cultured rat adrenocortical cells. Unexpectedly, this response was associated with a moderate lowering in the corticosterone secretion and proliferation rate of cultured cells. Hence, we studied the effects of proteasome inhibitors MG115 and MG132 on the secretion and proliferative activity of the regenerating adrenal cortex in rats 5 days after surgery. Animals were given two subcutaneous injections of 0.15 or 1.5 nmol/100 g of inhibitors 24 and 12 h before decapitation. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that StAR expression, both mRNA and protein, was markedly lower in regenerating adrenals than in the intact gland of sham-operated rats. Neither MG115 nor MG132 affected StAR expression in regenerating gland. Inhibitors induced a slight decrease in the plasma concentrations of aldosterone and corticosterone, but did not significantly alter metaphase index of the regenerating adrenal cortex. Our findings provide the first evidence that down-regulation of StAR occurs during the early stages of adrenal regeneration. Moreover, this suggests that the steroidogenic pathway is more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than that regulating proliferative activity of regenerating adrenal cortex in the rat. PMID:18425351

  13. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology. PMID:23980681

  14. Steroidogenic enzyme profile in an androgen-secreting adrenocortical oncocytoma associated with hirsustism

    PubMed Central

    Tetsi Nomigni, Milène; Ouzounian, Sophie; Benoit, Alice; Vadrot, Jacqueline; Tissier, Frédérique; Renouf, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Hervé; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Louiset, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutism induced by hyperandrogenism can be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, 21-hydroxylase (OH) deficiency or androgen-secreting tumors, including ovarian and adrenal tumors. Adrenal androgen-secreting tumors are frequently malignant. Adrenal oncocytomas represent rare causes of hyperandrogenism. The aim of the study was to investigate steroidogenic enzyme expression and steroid secretion in an androgen-secreting adrenal oncocytoma in a young woman presenting with hirsutism. Hyperandrogenism was diagnosed on the basis of elevated plasma Δ4-androstenedione and testosterone levels. Pelvic ultrasound was normal, CT scanning revealed a right adrenal mass. Androgens were assessed in adrenal and ovarian vein samples and proved a right adrenal origin. Adrenalectomy normalized androgen levels and the adrenal tumor was diagnosed as an oncocytoma. Real time-PCR, immunohistochemistry and cell culture studies were performed on tumor explants to investigate the steroid secretion profile. Among enzymes required for cortisol synthesis, 17α-OH and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3β-HSD2) were highly expressed whereas 21-OH and 11β-OH were weakly produced at the mRNA and/or protein levels. Enzymes involved in testosterone production, 17β-HSD5 and 17β-HSD3, were also detected. ACTH receptor was present in the tissue. Cortisol, Δ4-androstenedione and testosterone secretions by cultured cells were increased by ACTH. These results provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of abnormal expression profile of steroidogenic enzymes in an adrenocortical oncocytoma. Our results also indicate that Δ4-androstenedione hypersecretion resulted from high 17α-OH and 3β-HSD2 expression in combination with low expression of 21-OH and 11β-OH. Testosterone production was ascribed to occurrence of 17β-HSD5 and 17β-HSD3. Finally, our results indicate that androgen secretion was stimulated by ACTH. PMID:26034121

  15. Transcapillary Trafficking of Clustered Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Brian; Au, Sam; Chen, Yeng-Long; Sarioglu, Fatih; Javaid, Sarah; Haber, Daniel; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC-clusters) are known to be more metastatic than equal numbers of singlet circulating tumor cells. Yet the mechanisms responsible for CTC-cluster dissemination and tumor seeding are still largely unknown. Without direct experimental evidence, it was assumed that because of their size, CTC-clusters would occlude and rupture capillaries. In this work, we have challenged this assumption by investigating the transit of CTC-clusters through microfluidic capillary constrictions under physiological pressures. Remarkably, cancer cell aggregates containing 2-20 cells were observed to successfully traverse constrictions 5-10 microns with over 90% efficiency. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into chain-like geometries to pass through constrictions in single file. This observation was verified by computational simulation of clusters modeled with physiological cell-cell interaction energies. Hydrodynamic analysis suggested that CTC-clusters were able to pass narrow constrictions by acting as individual cells in series, not as cohesive units. Upon exiting constrictions, clusters remained viable, proliferative and rapidly returned to `typical' cluster morphologies.

  16. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  17. Exposure to the three structurally different PCB congeners (PCB 118, 153, and 126) results in decreased protein expression and altered steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line H295R.

    PubMed

    Tremoen, Nina Hårdnes; Fowler, Paul A; Ropstad, Erik; Verhaegen, Steven; Krogenæs, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), synthetic, persistent organic pollutants (POP), are detected ubiquitously, in water, soil, air, and sediments, as well as in animals and humans. PCB are associated with range of adverse health effects, such as interference with the immune system and nervous system, reproductive abnormalities, fetotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and endocrine disruption. Our objective was to determine the effects of three structurally different PCB congeners, PCB118, PCB 126, and PCB 153, each at two concentrations, on the steroidogenic capacity and proteome of human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line cultures (H295R) . After 48 h of exposure, cell viability was monitored and estradiol, testosterone, cortisol and progesterone secretion measured to quantify steroidogenic capacity of the cells. Two-dimensional (2D) gel-based proteomics was used to screen for proteome alterations in H295R cells in response to the PCB. Exposure to PCB 118 increased estradiol and cortisol secretion, while exposure to PCB 153 elevated estradiol secretion. PCB 126 was the most potent congener, increasing estradiol, cortisol, and progesterone secretion in exposed H295R cells. Seventy-three of the 711 spots analyzed showed a significant difference in normalized spot volumes between controls (vehicle only) and at least one exposure group. Fourteen of these protein spots were identified by liquid chromatography with mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). Exposure to three PCB congeners with different chemical structure perturbed steroidogenesis and protein expression in the H295R in vitro model. This study represents an initial analysis of the effects on proteins and hormones in the H295R cell model, and additional studies are required in order to obtain a more complete understanding of the pathways disturbed by PCB congeners in H295R cells. Overall, alterations in protein regulation and steroid hormone synthesis suggest that exposure to PCB disturbs several cellular processes, including

  18. Molecular Culprits Generating Brain Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    Despite current advances in multimodality therapies, such as surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the outcome for patients with high-grade glioma remains fatal. Understanding how glioma cells resist various therapies may provide opportunities for developing new therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that the main obstacle for successfully treating high-grade glioma is the existence of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), which share a number of cellular properties with adult stem cells, such as self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capabilities. Owing to their resistance to standard therapy coupled with their infiltrative nature, BTSCs are a primary cause of tumor recurrence post-therapy. Therefore, BTSCs are thought to be the main glioma cells representing a novel therapeutic target and should be eliminated to obtain successful treatment outcomes. PMID:24904883

  19. The role of microRNA deregulation in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Özata, Deniz M; Caramuta, Stefano; Velázquez-Fernández, David; Akçakaya, Pinar; Xie, Hong; Höög, Anders; Zedenius, Jan; Bäckdahl, Martin; Larsson, Catharina; Lui, Weng-Onn

    2011-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive tumor showing frequent metastatic spread and poor survival. Although recent genome-wide studies of ACC have contributed to our understanding of the disease, major challenges remain for both diagnostic and prognostic assessments. The aim of this study was to identify specific microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with malignancy and survival of ACC patients. miRNA expression profiles were determined in a series of ACC, adenoma, and normal cortices using microarray. A subset of miRNAs showed distinct expression patterns in the ACC compared with adrenal cortices and adenomas. Among others, miR-483-3p, miR-483-5p, miR-210, and miR-21 were found overexpressed, while miR-195, miR-497, and miR-1974 were underexpressed in ACC. Inhibition of miR-483-3p or miR-483-5p and overexpression of miR-195 or miR-497 reduced cell proliferation in human NCI-H295R ACC cells. In addition, downregulation of miR-483-3p, but not miR-483-5p, and increased expression of miR-195 or miR-497 led to significant induction of cell death. Protein expression of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), a potential target of miR-483-3p, was significantly decreased in ACC, and inversely correlated with miR-483-3p expression. In addition, high expression of miR-503, miR-1202, and miR-1275 were found significantly associated with shorter overall survival among patients with ACC (P values: 0.006, 0.005, and 0.042 respectively). In summary, we identified additional miRNAs associated with ACC, elucidated the functional role of four miRNAs in the pathogenesis of ACC cells, demonstrated the potential involvement of the pro-apoptotic factor PUMA (a miR-483-3p target) in adrenocortical tumors, and found novel miRNAs associated with survival in ACC. PMID:21859927

  20. The biology of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pantel, K; Speicher, M R

    2016-03-10

    Metastasis is a biologically complex process consisting of numerous stochastic events which may tremendously differ across various cancer types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that are shed from primary tumors and metastatic deposits into the blood stream. CTCs bear a tremendous potential to improve our understanding of steps involved in the metastatic cascade, starting from intravasation of tumor cells into the circulation until the formation of clinically detectable metastasis. These efforts were propelled by novel high-resolution approaches to dissect the genomes and transcriptomes of CTCs. Furthermore, capturing of viable CTCs has paved the way for innovative culturing technologies to study fundamental characteristics of CTCs such as invasiveness, their kinetics and responses to selection barriers, such as given therapies. Hence the study of CTCs is not only instrumental as a basic research tool, but also allows the serial monitoring of tumor genotypes and may therefore provide predictive and prognostic biomarkers for clinicians. Here, we review how CTCs have contributed to significant insights into the metastatic process and how they may be utilized in clinical practice. PMID:26050619

  1. Non-MHC-dependent redirected T cells against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Lundby, Marianne; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells with restricted tumor specificity provides a promising approach to immunotherapy of cancers. However, the isolation of autologous cytotoxic T cells that recognize tumor-associated antigens is time consuming and fails in many instances. Alternatively, gene modification with tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can be used to redirect the specificity of large numbers of immune cells toward the malignant cells. Chimeric antigen receptors are composed of the single-chain variable fragment (scFv) of a tumor-recognizing antibody cloned in frame with human T-cell signaling domains (e.g., CD3zeta, CD28, OX40, 4-1BB), thus combining the specificity of antibodies with the effector functions of cytotoxic T cells. Upon antigen binding, the intracellular signaling domains of the CAR initiate cellular activation mechanisms including cytokine secretion and cytolysis of the antigen-positive target cell.In this chapter, we provide detailed protocols for large-scale ex vivo expansion of T cells and manufacturing of medium-scale batches of CAR-expressing T cells for translational research by mRNA electroporation. An anti-CD19 chimeric receptor for the targeting of leukemias and lymphomas was used as a model system. We are currently scaling up the protocols to adapt them to cGMP production of a large number of redirected T cells for clinical applications. PMID:20387166

  2. Carney complex presenting with a unilateral adrenocortical nodule: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carney complex is an autosomal dominant syndrome with multiple neoplasms in different sites, including myxomas, endocrine tumors and lentigines lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Carney complex presenting with a unilateral adrenal adenoma associated with a pituitary incidentaloma. Case presentation A 27-year-old Iranian woman was referred to our endocrinology clinic with amenorrhea and hirsutism, further confirming a diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing’s syndrome. The cause was believed to be a right adrenocortical adenoma based on a computed tomography scan. Our patient underwent a right laparoscopic adrenalectomy and pathological examination revealed pigmented micronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging also documented a microadenoma that was considered to be an incidentaloma based on normal pituitary function tests. Recurrence of hypercortisolism led to a left laparoscopic adrenalectomy, providing further evidence for the diagnosis of primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease. Carney complex was established in light of her history of cardiac myxomas. Conclusion We present what we believe to be the first case of Carney complex presenting with a unilateral adrenocortical adenoma in association with a pituitary incidentaloma. Although primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is rare as a component of Carney complex, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. Rarely, adrenal and pituitary imaging can be misleading. PMID:24499519

  3. Chloroquine enhances the efficacy of cisplatin by suppressing autophagy in human adrenocortical carcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xia, Leilei; Wang, Xianjin; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhu, Zhaowei; Zhong, Shan; Wang, Chuandong; Shen, Zhoujun

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated that chloroquine (CQ) enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy. However, little is known about whether CQ could enhance the efficacy of cisplatin (DDP) in the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). In this study, we explore the efficacy and mechanism by which CQ affects DDP sensitivity in human ACC in vitro and in vivo. Methods The autophagic gene Beclin-1 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry, and the protein levels were analyzed using immunoblotting assays of ACC tissues and normal adrenal cortex tissues. The ACC SW13 cells were treated with DDP and/or CQ. The cell viability assay was performed using the MTT method. Qualitative autophagy detection was performed by monodansylcadaverine staining of autophagic vacuoles. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining was used to count cell apoptosis by flow cytometry. The autophagy-related protein (Beclin-1, LC3, and p62) and apoptosis relative protein (Bax and Bcl-2) levels were evaluated with Western blot analysis. Furthermore, a murine model of nude BALB/c mice bearing SW13 cell xenografts was established to evaluate the efficacy of concomitant therapy. Results The expression of the autophagic gene Beclin-1 was significantly downregulated in ACC tissues compared to normal adrenal cortex tissues. The Beclin-1 protein level in ACC tissues was lower than that in normal adrenal cortex tissues (P<0.05). In vitro concomitant therapy (DDP and CQ) was more effective in restraining SW13 cell proliferation. DDP could promote cell apoptosis and induce autophagy in SW13 cells. Concomitant therapy further promoted cell apoptosis by inhibiting autophagy. In vivo, we found that concomitant therapy was more potent than DDP monotherapy in inhibiting the growth of xenografted tumors and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Conclusion The antitumor ability of DDP was related to autophagy activity, and the concomitant therapy (DDP and CQ) could be an

  4. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  5. Select forms of tumor cell apoptosis induce dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Sandra; Santori, Fabio R; Ng, Bruce; Liebes, Leonard; Formenti, Silvia C; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2005-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a crucial role in initiating immune responses to tumors. DC can efficiently present antigens from apoptotic tumor cells, but apoptotic cells are thought to lack the inflammatory signals required to induce DC maturation. Here, we show that apoptosis of 67NR mouse carcinoma cells via the Fas (CD95) pathway or induced by the anticancer drug bortezomib (PS-341) but not by ultraviolet irradiation is associated with the production of maturation signals for DC. These data have important implications for the effects of chemotherapy on antitumor immunity in solid and hematologic malignancies. PMID:15569694

  6. Primary brain tumors, neural stem cell, and brain tumor cancer cells: where is the link?

    PubMed Central

    Germano, Isabelle; Swiss, Victoria; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of brain tumor-derived cells (BTSC) with the properties of stem cells has led to the formulation of the hypothesis that neural stem cells could be the cell of origin of primary brain tumors (PBT). In this review we present the most common molecular changes in PBT, define the criteria of identification of BTSC and discuss the similarities between the characteristics of these cells and those of the endogenous population of neural stem cells (NPCs) residing in germinal areas of the adult brain. Finally, we propose possible mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression and suggest a model of tumor initiation that includes intrinsic changes of resident NSC and potential changes in the microenvironment defining the niche where the NSC reside. PMID:20045420

  7. [Cancer stemness and circulating tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tomoko; Mimori, Koshi

    2015-05-01

    The principle concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) giving rise to the carcinogenesis, relapse or metastasis of malignancy is broadly recognized. On the other hand, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) also plays important roles in relapse or metastasis of malignancy, and there has been much focused on the association between CSCs and CTCs in cancer cases. The technical innovations for detection of CTCs enabled us to unveil the nature of CTCs. We now realize that CTCs isolated by cell surface antibodies, such as DCLK1, LGR5 indicated CSC properties, and CTCs with epitherial-mesenchymal transition(EMT) phenotype showed characteristics of CSCs. PMID:25985635

  8. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multifunctional nucleic acid, termed AptamiR, composed of an aptamer domain and an antimiR domain. This composition mediates cell specific delivery of antimiR molecules for silencing of endogenous micro RNA. The introduced multifunctional molecule preserves cell targeting, anti-proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting and treatment. PMID:24494617

  9. General Information about Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors Go to ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Laser capture microdissection–reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (LCM-RRBS) maps changes in DNA methylation associated with gonadectomy-induced adrenocortical neoplasia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schillebeeckx, Maximiliaan; Schrade, Anja; Löbs, Ann-Kathrin; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Wilson, David B.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is a mechanism for long-term transcriptional regulation and is required for normal cellular differentiation. Failure to properly establish or maintain DNA methylation patterns leads to cell dysfunction and diseases such as cancer. Identifying DNA methylation signatures in complex tissues can be challenging owing to inaccurate cell enrichment methods and low DNA yields. We have developed a technique called laser capture microdissection-reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (LCM-RRBS) for the multiplexed interrogation of the DNA methylation status of cytosine–guanine dinucleotide islands and promoters. LCM-RRBS accurately and reproducibly profiles genome-wide methylation of DNA extracted from microdissected fresh frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. To demonstrate the utility of LCM-RRBS, we characterized changes in DNA methylation associated with gonadectomy-induced adrenocortical neoplasia in the mouse. Compared with adjacent normal tissue, the adrenocortical tumors showed reproducible gains and losses of DNA methylation at genes involved in cell differentiation and organ development. LCM-RRBS is a rapid, cost-effective, and sensitive technique for analyzing DNA methylation in heterogeneous tissues and will facilitate the investigation of DNA methylation in cancer and organ development. PMID:23589626

  11. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-α and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-α. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  12. Circulating Tumor Cells Measurements in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the seventh in women. During the past 20 years, the incidence of HCC has tripled while the 5-year survival rate has remained below 12%. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) reflects the aggressiveness nature of a tumor. Many attempts have been made to develop assays that reliably detect and enumerate the CTC during the development of the HCC. In this case, the challenges are (1) there are few markers specific to the HCC (tumor cells versus nontumor cells) and (2) they can be used to quantify the number of CTC in the bloodstream. Another technical challenge consists of finding few CTC mixed with million leukocytes and billion erythrocytes. CTC detection and identification can be used to estimate prognosis and may serve as an early marker to assess antitumor activity of treatment. CTC can also be used to predict progression-free survival and overall survival. CTC are an interesting source of biological information in order to understand dissemination, drug resistance, and treatment-induced cell death. Our aim is to review and analyze the different new methods existing to detect, enumerate, and characterize the CTC in the peripheral circulation of patients with HCC. PMID:22690340

  13. Pediatric germ cell tumors presenting beyond childhood?

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, J W; Stoop, J A; Rijlaarsdam, M A; Biermann, K; Smit, V T H B M; Hersmus, R; Looijenga, L H J

    2015-01-01

    Four cases are reported meeting the criteria of a pediatric (i.e., Type I) testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT), apart from the age of presentation, which is beyond childhood. The tumors encompass the full spectrum of histologies of pediatric TGCT: teratoma, yolk sac tumor, and various combinations of the two, and lack intratubular germ cell neoplasia/carcinoma in situ in the adjacent parenchyma. The neoplasms are (near)diploid, and lack gain of 12p, typical for seminomas and non-seminomas of the testis of adolescents and adults (i.e., Type II). It is proposed that these neoplasms are therefore late appearing pediatric (Type I) TGCT. The present report broadens the concept of earlier reported benign teratomas of the post-pubertal testis to the full spectrum of pediatric TGCT. The possible wide age range of pediatric TGCT, demonstrated in this study, lends credence to the concept that TGCT should according to their pathogenesis be classified into the previously proposed types. This classification is clinically relevant, because Type I mature teratomas are benign tumors, which are candidates for testis conserving surgery, as opposed to Type II mature teratomas, which have to be treated as Type II (malignant) non-seminomas. PMID:25427839

  14. Diagnostic immunohistochemistry of canine round cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Sandusky, G E; Carlton, W W; Wightman, K A

    1987-11-01

    Sixty-five canine skin neoplasms studied using immunocytochemistry, included 22 histiocytomas, 18 amelanotic melanomas, 14 cutaneous lymphosarcomas, six mast cell tumors, and five transmissible venereal tumors. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were stained using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) immunoperoxidase technique for reactivity with S-100 protein, kappa and lambda immunoglobulin light chains, alpha-1-antitrypsin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, leukocyte common antigen (LCA), neuron-specific enolase, keratin, cytokeratin, muramidase, and vimentin. Detection of S-100, kappa and lambda light chains, neuron-specific enolase, and vimentin were most useful for screening these neoplasms. None of the markers examined was consistent in staining histiocytomas. While reactivity of S-100 (ten cases) and neuron-specific enolase (ten cases) was detected in some amelanotic melanomas, lambda light chain immunoglobulin (eight cases) was relatively consistent in cutaneous lymphomas. Mast cell neoplasms reacted with avidin and, therefore, were positive, even on negative control sections. Vimentin reacted strongly on all amelanotic melanomas and transmissible venereal tumors examined. These antibodies are helpful adjuncts in the differential diagnosis of canine skin tumors. PMID:3137715

  15. Tumor cell response to bevacizumab single agent therapy in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis represents a highly multi-factorial and multi-cellular complex (patho-) physiologic event involving endothelial cells, tumor cells in malignant conditions, as well as bone marrow derived cells and stromal cells. One main driver is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA), which is known to interact with endothelial cells as a survival and mitogenic signal. The role of VEGFA on tumor cells and /or tumor stromal cell interaction is less clear. Condition specific (e.g. hypoxia) or tumor specific expression of VEGFA, VEGF receptors and co-receptors on tumor cells has been reported, in addition to the expression on the endothelium. This suggests a potential paracrine/autocrine loop that could affect changes specific to tumor cells. Methods We used the monoclonal antibody against VEGFA, bevacizumab, in various in vitro experiments using cell lines derived from different tumor entities (non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer (BC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC)) in order to determine if potential VEGFA signaling could be blocked in tumor cells. The experiments were done under hypoxia, a major inducer of VEGFA and angiogenesis, in an attempt to mimic the physiological tumor condition. Known VEGFA induced endothelial biological responses such as proliferation, migration, survival and gene expression changes were evaluated. Results Our study was able to demonstrate expression of VEGF receptors on tumor cells as well as hypoxia regulated angiogenic gene expression. In addition, there was a cell line specific effect in tumor cells by VEGFA blockade with bevacizumab in terms of proliferation; however overall, there was a limited measurable consequence of bevacizumab therapy detected by migration and survival. Conclusion The present study showed in a variety of in vitro experiments with several tumor cell lines from different tumor origins, that by blocking VEGFA with bevacizumab, there was a limited autocrine or cell

  16. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue. PMID:27294158

  17. Juxtaglomerular cell tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, HONGYUAN; WANG, ZUFEI; JI, JIANSONG

    2016-01-01

    The current study reports the case of a 29-year-old female with a long-standing history of hypertension and headaches who presented to the Outpatient Clinic of The Central Hospital of Lishui (Lishui, Zhejiang, China). Abdominal ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography were performed, which showed a left renal neoplasm, prompting a diagnosis of renal angiomyolipoma or renal cell carcinoma. After a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was performed, a number of different diagnoses were suggested by several pathologists from eight hospitals. Considering the patient's gender, age, medical history, histopathological features and immunohistochemistry, a final diagnosis of a juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JGCT) was established. The present study therefore indicates that the possibility of a JGCT should be considered when young adults present with renal parenchymatous tumors and high blood pressure. In addition, pathologists must take clinical information into account to form a precise diagnosis. PMID:26893753

  18. Single-cell analyses of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-Xi; Bai, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of tumor cells mediating metastasis, which results in most of the cancer related deaths. The number of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients is rare, and many platforms have been launched for detection and enrichment of CTCs. Enumeration of CTCs has already been used as a prognosis marker predicting the survival rate of cancer patients. Yet CTCs should be more potential. Studies on CTCs at single cell level may help revealing the underlying mechanism of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Though far from developed, this area of study holds much promise in providing new clinical application and deep understanding towards metastasis and cancer development. PMID:26487963

  19. Paediatric Nonfunctioning Adrenocortical Carcinoma with Extension up to Right-Side Heart: Cardiac Surgery Approach

    PubMed Central

    Quarti, Andrea; Surace, Chiara; Pozzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy. Due to late diagnosis and no adequate effective adjuvant treatment, prognosis remains poor. Only approximately 30% of these malignancies are confined to the adrenal gland when they are diagnosed, as these tumors tend to be found years after their genesis. Cardiac involvement of adrenal carcinoma is very rare. We report a rare case of a 7-year-old female with right adrenal cortical carcinoma, involving the right-side heart. PMID:27493811

  20. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  1. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site.

    PubMed

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric; Trautmann, Alain; Bercovici, Nadège

    2015-09-29

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  2. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  3. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  4. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  5. Tumor-associated macrophages promote tumor cell proliferation in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixiong; Fan, Linni; Wang, Yingmei; Li, Peifeng; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Weichen; Zhang, Yuehua; Huang, Gaosheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and proliferative activity of tumor cells and the relationship between two macrophage biomarkers CD68 and CD163 in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to reconfirm the diagnosis of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and detect the numbers of TAMs and the ki-67 label index of the tumor cells in all 31 cases. In addition, 12 cases of inflammatory cases were collected as controls, for which the immunostaining of CD68 and CD163 were done as well. Then staining results were analyzed with Pearson correlation and t test. Results: The number of TAMs was positively correlated with tumor proliferative activity (P = 0.024) in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. The expression of CD68 and CD163 was closely related (P = 0.009), and the positive rate of CD68 was generally higher than CD163, however there is no statistical significance. Conclusion: The increase in numbers of TAMs in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma is related to higher proliferative index, indicating the TAMs play an important role in tumor proliferation. Meanwhile both CD68 and CD163 might be the markers for TAMs but CD163 would be the better one. PMID:25337185

  6. Mast cells: potential positive and negative roles in tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Marichal, Thomas; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that reside in virtually all vascularized tissues. Upon activation by diverse mechanisms, mast cells can secrete a broad array of biologically active products that either are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of the cells (e.g., histamine, heparin, various proteases) or are produced de novo upon cell stimulation (e.g., prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors). Mast cells are best known for their effector functions during anaphylaxis and acute IgE-associated allergic reactions, but they also have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that maintain health or contribute to disease. There has been particular interest in the possible roles of mast cells in tumor biology. In vitro studies have shown that mast cells have the potential to influence many aspects of tumor biology, including tumor development, tumor-induced angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling, and the shaping of adaptive immune responses to tumors. Yet, the actual contributions of mast cells to tumor biology in vivo remain controversial. Here, we review some basic features of mast cell biology with a special emphasis on those relevant to their potential roles in tumors. We discuss how using in vivo tumor models in combination with models in which mast cell function can be modulated has implicated mast cells in the regulation of host responses to tumors. Finally, we summarize data from studies of human tumors that suggest either beneficial or detrimental roles for mast cells in tumors. PMID:24777963

  7. Tumor-associated stromal cells as key contributors to the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Mutkus, Lysette; Stumpf, Kristina; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Marini, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a heterogeneous population of cells consisting of the tumor bulk plus supporting cells. It is becoming increasingly evident that these supporting cells are recruited by cancer cells from nearby endogenous host stroma and promote events such as tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, as well as mediate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. In addition, recruited stromal cells range in type and include vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, and bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. During normal wound healing and inflammatory processes, local stromal cells change their phenotype to become that of reactive stroma. Under certain conditions, however, tumor cells can co-opt these reactive stromal cells and further transition them into tumor-associated stromal cells (TASCs). These TASCs express higher levels of proteins, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibroblast activating protein, and matrix metalloproteinases, compared with their normal, non-reactive counterparts. TASCs are also known to secrete many pro-tumorigenic factors, including IL-6, IL-8, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, which recruit additional tumor and pro-tumorigenic cells to the developing microenvironment. Here, we review the current literature pertaining to the origins of recruited host stroma, contributions toward tumor progression, tumor-associated stromal cells, and mechanisms of crosstalk between endogenous host stroma and tumor cells. PMID:27515302

  8. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-03-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes.

  9. Effusion cytomorphology of small round cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Katsuhide; Tsuta, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a group of tumors composed of small, round, and uniform cells with high nuclear/cytoplasmic (N/C) ratios. The appearance of SRCT neoplastic cells in the effusion fluid is very rare. We reported the cytomorphological findings of SRCTs in effusion cytology, and performed statistical and mathematical analyses for a purpose to distinguish SRCTs. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the cytologic findings of effusion samples from 40 SRCT cases and measured the lengths of the nuclei, cytoplasms, and the cell cluster areas. The SRCT cases included 14 Ewing sarcoma (EWS)/primitive neuroectodermal tumor cases, 5 synovial sarcoma cases, 6 rhabdomyosarcoma cases, 9 small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cases, and 6 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) cases. Results: Morphologically, there were no significant differences in the nuclear and cytoplasmic lengths in cases of EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. The cytoplasmic lengths in cases of SCLC and DLBL were smaller than those of EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. The nuclear density of the cluster in SCLC was higher than that in other SRCTs, and cases of DLBL showed a lack of anisokaryosis and anisocytosis. Conclusion: We believe that it might be possible to diagnose DLBL and SCLC from cytologic analysis of effusion samples but it is very difficult to use this method to distinguish EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. Statistical and mathematical analyses indicated that nuclear density and dispersion of nuclear and cytoplasmic sizes are useful adjuncts to conventional cytologic diagnostic criteria, which are acquired from experience. PMID:27279684

  10. Rare inactivating PDE11A variants associated with testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Anand; Stewart, Douglas R; Faucz, Fabio R; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Bass, Sara; Vogt, Aurelie; Zhang, Xijun; Boland, Joseph; Yeager, Meredith; Loud, Jennifer T; Nathanson, Katherine L; McGlynn, Katherine A; Stratakis, Constantine A; Greene, Mark H; Mirabello, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    Germline inactivating mutations of isoform 4 of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 11A (coded by the PDE11A gene) have been associated with familial adrenocortical tumors and familial testicular cancer. Testicular tissue is unique in expressing all four isoforms of PDE11A. In a prior candidate gene study of 94 familial testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) subjects, we identified a significant association between the presence of functionally abnormal variants in PDE11A and familial TGCT risk. To validate this novel observation, we sequenced the PDE11A coding region in 259 additional TGCT patients (both familial and sporadic) and 363 controls. We identified 55 PDE11A variants: 20 missense, four splice-site, two nonsense, seven synonymous, and 22 intronic. Ten missense variants were novel; nine occurred in transcript variant 4 and one in transcript variant 3. Five rare mutations (p.F258Y, p.G291R, p.V820M, p.R545X, and p.K568R) were present only in cases and were significantly more common in cases vs controls (P=0.0037). The latter two novel variants were functionally characterized and shown to be functionally inactivating, resulting in reduced PDE activity and increased cAMP levels. In further analysis of this cohort, we focused on white participants only to minimize confounding due to population stratification. This study builds upon our prior reports implicating PDE11A variants in familial TGCT, provides the first independent validation of those findings, extends that work to sporadic testicular cancer, demonstrates that these variants are uncommonly but reproducibly associated with TGCT, and refines our understanding regarding which specific inactivating PDE11A variants are most likely to be associated with TGCT risk. PMID:26459559