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Sample records for adult bacteremic pneumococcal

  1. Empyema and bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in children under five years of age*, **

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Maria Regina Alves; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria Costa; Ferrero, Fernando; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Ruvinsky, Raul; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto; Brandileone, Maria Cristina de Cunto; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo; Maggi, Ruben; Feris-Iglesias, Jesus; Benguigui, Yehuda; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    We compared bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) and pneumococcal empyema (PE), in terms of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings, in under-fives. A cross-sectional nested cohort study, involving under-fives (102 with PE and 128 with BPP), was conducted at 12 centers in Argentina, Brazil, and the Dominican Republic. Among those with PE, mean age was higher; disease duration was longer; and tachypnea, dyspnea, and high leukocyte counts were more common. Among those with BPP, fever and lethargy were more common. It seems that children with PE can be distinguished from those with BPP on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Because both conditions are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, prompt diagnosis is crucial. PMID:24626272

  2. Empyema and bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in children under five years of age.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Maria Regina Alves; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria Costa; Ferrero, Fernando; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Ruvinsky, Raul; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto; Brandileone, Maria Cristina de Cunto; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo; Maggi, Ruben; Feris-Iglesias, Jesus; Benguigui, Yehuda; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    We compared bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) and pneumococcal empyema (PE), in terms of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings, in under-fives. A cross-sectional nested cohort study, involving under-fives (102 with PE and 128 with BPP), was conducted at 12 centers in Argentina, Brazil, and the Dominican Republic. Among those with PE, mean age was higher; disease duration was longer; and tachypnea, dyspnea, and high leukocyte counts were more common. Among those with BPP, fever and lethargy were more common. It seems that children with PE can be distinguished from those with BPP on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Because both conditions are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, prompt diagnosis is crucial. PMID:24626272

  3. Impact of pneumococcal vaccination in children on serotype distribution in adult community-acquired pneumonia using the serotype-specific multiplex urinary antigen detection assay.

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W; Ewig, Santiago; Rohde, Gernot; Schuette, Hartwig; Rupp, Jan; Welte, Tobias; Suttorp, Norbert; Forstner, Christina

    2016-04-29

    The aim of the study was to compare the distribution of the vaccine-serotypes covered by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7 and PCV13) in adult patients with pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia in Germany between the periods 2002-2006 and 2007-2011 using a novel serotype-specific multiplex urinary antigen detection assay (SSUA). Vaccination of children started with PCV7 in 2007, which was replaced by PCV13 in 2010. Following confirmation of the accuracy of SSUA in long-term stored urine samples from 112 patients with confirmed pneumonia and known pneumococcal serotype, urine samples of 391 CAPNETZ patients with documented pneumococcal pneumonia (i.e. positive BinaxNOW(®) Streptococcus pneumoniae urine antigen test) but unknown serotype were tested for the 13 vaccine-serotypes using SSUA. The proportion of PCV7-serotypes significantly decreased in adult patients with pneumonia from 30.6% (2002-6) to 13.3% (2007-11, p<0.001); in bacteremic pneumonia, PCV7-serotypes completely disappeared (3/14 versus 0/19, p=0.058). Conversely, pneumococcal serotypes included by PCV13 remained stable during study period with a coverage of 61.5% (2002-06) and 59.7% (2007-11) in non-bacteremic pneumonia and 79% (for both periods) in bacteremic pneumonia, mainly due to an increase in pneumococcal serotypes 1, 3 and 7F during the second period. Thus, implementation of PCV7 in children in Germany in 2007 was associated with a significant decrease in vaccine-serotypes covered by PCV7 in adult patients with non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia and with an elimination of PCV7 vaccine-serotypes in bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia. PCV13 coverage remained high up to 2011, mainly due to an increase in serotypes 1, 3 and 7F. German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00005274. PMID:27016653

  4. [Pneumococcal vaccination for children and adults].

    PubMed

    Albrich, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococci are the leading bacterial causes of respiratory tract infections, bacteremia and meningitis. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) are effective and safe in young children. Their introduction led to significant reductions of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), pneumonia, otitis media and antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal infections. Beyond these effects in the vaccinated age groups, there is a reduction in nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage and therefore in transmission. This in turn led to marked reductions in IPD and pneumonia in non-vaccinated age groups, particularly elderly adults as evidence of herd protection. Recently it was shown that the 13-valent PCV13 is effective and safe in adults leading to the age-independent recommendation of PCV13 in all persons with risk factors. PMID:27268445

  5. [Pneumococcal vaccines. New conjugate vaccines for adults].

    PubMed

    Campins Martí, Magda

    2015-11-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and are one of the 10 leading causes of death worldwide. Children under 2 years have a higher incidence rate, followed by adults over 64 years. The main risk group are individuals with immunodeficiency, and those with anatomical or functional asplenia, but can also affect immunocompetent persons with certain chronic diseases. Significant progress has been made in the last 10 years in the prevention of these infections. Until a few years ago, only the 23-valent non-conjugate pneumococcal vaccine was available. Its results were controversial in terms of efficacy and effectiveness, and with serious limitations on the type of immune response induced. The current possibility of using the 13-valent conjugate vaccine in adults has led to greater expectations in improving the prevention of pneumococcal disease in these age groups. PMID:26474708

  6. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use in adults.

    PubMed

    Isturiz, Raul E; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate; Scott, Daniel A; Jodar, Luis; Webber, Chris; Sings, Heather L; Paradiso, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of illness and death in adults. A polysaccharide vaccine has been available for over 30 years, but despite significant use, the public health impact of this vaccine has been limited. The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) has been licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration and other international regulatory authorities with the assumption that induction of a T cell-dependent immune response and noninferior immunogenicity to vaccine antigens when compared with the polysaccharide vaccine would be important to satisfy a significant unmet medical need. PCV13 efficacy against vaccine-type pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia was confirmed in a large randomized controlled trial in older adults and its use is now increasingly recommended globally. PMID:26651847

  7. Overwhelming pneumococcal infection in a hyposplenic adult.

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, J. P.; Sibbald, W. J.; Austin, T. W.

    1983-01-01

    In a woman with an atrophic, apparently nonfunctioning spleen pneumococcal septicemia led to death within 72 hours of admission. As in five previously described adults, the patient's presentation and subsequent clinical course were identical to those of the syndrome of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection, except that there was no history of splenectomy. Patients without spleens may be given penicillin prophylaxis for an indefinite period, vaccinated against pneumococci or both. PMID:6616391

  8. Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children 1 and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor Routine Recommendations for Pneumococcal Conjugate ... X X X X X 1 For PCV13 vaccination of healthy children, see “Recommen- dations for Pneumococcal ...

  9. Role of pneumococcal vaccination in prevention of pneumococcal disease among adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Eng, Philip; Lim, Lean Huat; Loo, Chian Min; Low, James Alvin; Tan, Carol; Tan, Eng Kiat; Wong, Sin Yew; Setia, Sajita

    2014-01-01

    The burden of disease associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in adults can be considerable but is largely preventable through routine vaccination. Although substantial progress has been made with the recent licensure of the new vaccines for prevention of pneumonia in adults, vaccine uptake rates need to be improved significantly to tackle adult pneumococcal disease effectively. Increased education regarding pneumococcal disease and improved vaccine availability may contribute to a reduction in pneumococcal disease through increased vaccination rates. The increase in the elderly population in Singapore as well as globally makes intervention in reducing pneumococcal disease an important priority. Globally, all adult vaccines remain underused and family physicians give little priority to pneumococcal vaccination for adults in daily practice. Family physicians are specialists in preventive care and can be leaders in ensuring that adult patients get the full benefit of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases. They can play a key role in the immunization delivery of new and routine vaccines by educating the public on the risks and benefits associated with vaccines. Local recommendations by advisory groups on vaccination in adults will also help to tackle vaccine preventable diseases in adults. PMID:24729726

  10. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype.

    PubMed

    Heckenberg, S G B; Brouwer, M C; van der Ende, A; Hensen, E F; van de Beek, D

    2012-09-01

    We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in two prospective nationwide cohort studies performed from April 1998 through to October 2002 and March 2006 through to January 2009. Hearing loss was evaluated on admission and discharge for all patients. Severe hearing loss was assessed by pure tone average on audiology and corrected for age, or by the combination of hearing loss on discharge and a score on the Glasgow Outcome Scale below 5, which could not be explained by other neurological sequelae. A total of 531 episodes of pneumococcal meningitis with non-lethal outcome were included. Predisposing conditions for pneumococcal meningitis were present in the majority of patients (64%), most commonly otitis (36%). Hearing loss was present at discharge in 116 patients (22%) and was classified as mild in 53% and severe in 47%. Hearing loss was related to otitis (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-4.02; p < 0.001) and inversely related to serotype 23 F infection (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.13-0.98; p = 0.025), but not with parameters of disease severity or indicators of cerebrospinal fluid inflammation severity. Meningitis due to pneumococcal serotype 3 was associated with the highest rate of hearing loss. Hearing loss frequently complicates pneumococcal meningitis. Risk factors for hearing loss were infection with pneumococcal serotype 23 F and otitis, but not disease severity. Otitis and resulting perilympathic inflammation contribute to meningitis-associated hearing loss. PMID:21958295

  11. Incidence of Pneumococcal Pneumonia among Adults in Rural Thailand, 2006–2011: Implications for Pneumococcal Vaccine Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Piralam, Barameht; Tomczyk, Sara M.; Rhodes, Julia C.; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Gregory, Christopher J.; Olsen, Sonja J.; Praphasiri, Prabda; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Naorat, Sathapana; Chantra, Somrak; Areerat, Peera; Hurst, Cameron P.; Moore, Matthew R.; Muangchana, Charung; Baggett, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults is a key driver for the cost-effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine used among children. We sought to obtain more accurate incidence estimates among adults by including results of pneumococcal urine antigen testing (UAT) from population-based pneumonia surveillance in two Thai provinces. Active surveillance from 2006 to 2011 identified acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI)–related hospital admissions. Adult cases of pneumococcal pneumonia were defined as hospitalized ALRI patients aged ≥ 18 years with isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood or with positive UAT. Among 39,525 adult ALRI patients, we identified 481 pneumococcal pneumonia cases (105 by blood culture, 376 by UAT only). Estimated incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations was 30.5 cases per 100,000 persons per year (2.2 and 28.3 cases per 100,000 persons per year by blood culture and UAT, respectively). Incidence varied between 22.7 in 2007 and 43.5 in 2010, and increased with age to over 150 per 100,000 persons per year among persons aged ≥ 70 years. Viral coinfections including influenza A/B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and adenovirus occurred in 11% (44/409) of pneumococcal pneumonia cases tested. Use of UAT to identify cases of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults in rural Thailand substantially increases estimates of pneumococcal pneumonia burden, thereby informing cost-effectiveness analyses and vaccine policy decisions. PMID:26503277

  12. Incidence of Pneumococcal Pneumonia Among Adults in Rural Thailand, 2006-2011: Implications for Pneumococcal Vaccine Considerations.

    PubMed

    Piralam, Barameht; Tomczyk, Sara M; Rhodes, Julia C; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Gregory, Christopher J; Olsen, Sonja J; Praphasiri, Prabda; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Naorat, Sathapana; Chantra, Somrak; Areerat, Peera; Hurst, Cameron P; Moore, Matthew R; Muangchana, Charung; Baggett, Henry C

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults is a key driver for the cost-effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine used among children. We sought to obtain more accurate incidence estimates among adults by including results of pneumococcal urine antigen testing (UAT) from population-based pneumonia surveillance in two Thai provinces. Active surveillance from 2006 to 2011 identified acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI)-related hospital admissions. Adult cases of pneumococcal pneumonia were defined as hospitalized ALRI patients aged ≥ 18 years with isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood or with positive UAT. Among 39,525 adult ALRI patients, we identified 481 pneumococcal pneumonia cases (105 by blood culture, 376 by UAT only). Estimated incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations was 30.5 cases per 100,000 persons per year (2.2 and 28.3 cases per 100,000 persons per year by blood culture and UAT, respectively). Incidence varied between 22.7 in 2007 and 43.5 in 2010, and increased with age to over 150 per 100,000 persons per year among persons aged ≥ 70 years. Viral coinfections including influenza A/B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and adenovirus occurred in 11% (44/409) of pneumococcal pneumonia cases tested. Use of UAT to identify cases of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults in rural Thailand substantially increases estimates of pneumococcal pneumonia burden, thereby informing cost-effectiveness analyses and vaccine policy decisions. PMID:26503277

  13. HIV Infection and the Epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD) in South African Adults and Older Children Prior to the Introduction of a Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV)

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Susan; Cohen, Cheryl; Quan, Vanessa; de Gouveia, Linda; Feldman, Charles; Karstaedt, Alan; Klugman, Keith P.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Rabie, Helene; Sriruttan, Charlotte; von Gottberg, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Streptococcus pneumoniae is the commonest cause of bacteremic pneumonia among HIV-infected persons. As more countries with high HIV prevalence are implementing infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programs, we aimed to describe the baseline clinical characteristics of adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the pre-PCV era in South Africa in order to interpret potential indirect effects following vaccine use. Methods National, active, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD was conducted in South Africa from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2008. At 25 enhanced surveillance (ES) hospital sites, clinical data, including HIV serostatus, were collected from IPD patients ≥ 5 years of age. We compared the clinical characteristics of individuals with IPD in those HIV-infected and -uninfected using multivariable analysis. PCV was introduced into the routine South African Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in 2009. Results In South Africa, from 2003–2008, 17 604 cases of IPD occurred amongst persons ≥ 5 years of age, with an average incidence of 7 cases per 100 000 person-years. Against a national HIV-prevalence of 18%, 89% (4190/4734) of IPD patients from ES sites were HIV-infected. IPD incidence in HIV-infected individuals is 43 times higher than in HIV-uninfected persons (52 per 100 000 vs. 1.2 per 100 000), with a peak in the HIV-infected elderly population of 237 per 100 000 persons. Most HIV-infected individuals presented with bacteremia (74%, 3 091/4 190). HIV-uninfected individuals were older; and had more chronic conditions (excluding HIV) than HIV-infected persons (39% (210/544) vs. 19% (790/4190), p<0.001). During the pre-PCV immunization era in South Africa, 71% of serotypes amongst HIV-infected persons were covered by PCV13 vs. 73% amongst HIV-uninfected persons, p = 0.4, OR 0.9 (CI 0.7–1.1). Conclusion Seventy to eighty-five percent of adult IPD in the pre-PCV era were vaccine serotypes and 93% of cases had recognized risk

  14. [PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINE IN ADULTS REDUCES THE RISK OF INFECTIONS CAUSED BY STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE].

    PubMed

    Belocerkovskaja, Ju G; Romanovskih, A G; Styrt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of severe disease worldwide, particularly in the risk population. Two pneumococcal vaccines are currently available for specific prevention of pneumococcal infections among adults in Russia: a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) and a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). The article describes modern views on the effectiveness and safety of two pneumococcal vaccines in adults with underlying medical conditions and adults aged ≥ 65 years and provides current recommendations for routine use of PPSV23 and PCV13 among persons included in the risk group. PMID:27172726

  15. In-Hospital Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccination Is Associated With Detection of Pneumococcal Vaccine Serotypes in Adults Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, Carlos G; Wunderink, Richard G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Balk, Robert; Fakhran, Sherene; Courtney, D Mark; Anderson, Evan J; Qi, Chao; Trabue, Christopher; Pavia, Andrew T; Moore, Matthew R; Jain, Seema; Edwards, Kathryn M; Self, Wesley H

    2015-12-01

    During an etiology study of adults hospitalized for pneumonia, in which urine specimens were examined for serotype-specific pneumococcal antigen detection, we observed that some patients received 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine before urine collection. Some urine samples became positive for specific vaccine pneumococcal serotypes shortly after vaccination, suggesting false-positive test results. PMID:26512357

  16. In-Hospital Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccination Is Associated With Detection of Pneumococcal Vaccine Serotypes in Adults Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J.; Balk, Robert; Fakhran, Sherene; Courtney, D. Mark; Anderson, Evan J.; Qi, Chao; Trabue, Christopher; Pavia, Andrew T.; Moore, Matthew R.; Jain, Seema; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Self, Wesley H.

    2015-01-01

    During an etiology study of adults hospitalized for pneumonia, in which urine specimens were examined for serotype-specific pneumococcal antigen detection, we observed that some patients received 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine before urine collection. Some urine samples became positive for specific vaccine pneumococcal serotypes shortly after vaccination, suggesting false-positive test results. PMID:26512357

  17. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in adults: Let's see what happens.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Peter R

    2016-07-01

    The recent recommendation for the use of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in adults 65 y of age and older, provides a new tool for preventing disease in this at-risk population. The conjugate vaccine induces a T-cell dependent response, which distinguishes it from the polysaccharide vaccine and could provide the longer-term protection necessary to have a significant impact in this population. PMID:26901618

  18. Incidence of Hospitalized Pneumococcal Pneumonia among Adults in Guatemala, 2008-2012

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Carmen Lucía; Verani, Jennifer R.; Lopez, María Renee; Paredes, Antonio; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Roldan, Aleida; Arvelo, Wences; Lindblade, Kim A.; McCracken, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia worldwide. However, the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults in low- and middle-income countries is not well described. Methods Data from 2008–2012 was analyzed from two surveillance sites in Guatemala to describe the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults. A case of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia was defined as a positive pneumococcal urinary antigen test or blood culture in persons aged ≥ 18 years hospitalized with an acute respiratory infection (ARI). Results Among 1595 adults admitted with ARI, 1363 (82%) had either urine testing (n = 1286) or blood culture (n = 338) performed. Of these, 188 (14%) had pneumococcal pneumonia, including 173 detected by urine only, 8 by blood culture only, and 7 by both methods. Incidence rates increased with age, with the lowest rate among 18–24 year-olds (2.75/100,000) and the highest among ≥65 year-olds (31.3/100,000). The adjusted incidence of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia was 18.6/100,000 overall, with in-hospital mortality of 5%. Conclusions An important burden of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia in adults was described, particularly for the elderly. However, even adjusted rates likely underestimate the true burden of pneumococcal pneumonia in the community. These data provide a baseline against which to measure the indirect effects of the 2013 introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children in Guatemala. PMID:26488871

  19. Risk of hospitalization due to pneumococcal disease in adults in Spain. The CORIENNE study.

    PubMed

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Pascual-Garcia, Raquel; Walter, Stefan; Álvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Gil-De-Miguel, Ángel

    2016-07-01

    Pneumococcal disease causes a high burden of disease in adults, leading to high rates of hospitalization, especially in the elderly. All hospital discharges for pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal pneumonia among adults over 18 y of age reported in first diagnostic position in 2011 (January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011) were obtained. A total of 10,861 hospital discharges due to pneumococcal disease were reported in adults in Spain in 2011 with an annual incidence of hospitalization of 0.285 (CI 95%: 0.280-0.291) per 1,000 population over 18 y old. Case-fatality rate was 8%. Estimated cost of these hospitalisations in 2011 was more than 57 million €. Pneumococcal pneumonia accounted for the 92% of the hospital discharges All the chronic condition studied: asplenia, chronic respiratory disease, chronic heart disease, chronic renal disease, Diabetes Mellitus and immunosuppression, increased the risk of hospitalization in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, especially in those aged 18-64 y old. Case-fatality rate among adult patients hospitalized with at least one underlying condition was significantly higher than among patients without comorbidities. Our results identified asplenia, chronic respiratory disease, chronic heart disease, chronic renal disease, chronic liver disease, Diabetes Mellitus and immunosuppression as risk groups for hospitalization. Older adults, immunocompromised patients and immunocompetent patients with underlying conditions could benefit from vaccination. PMID:26901683

  20. Nasopharyngeal versus oropharyngeal sampling for detection of pneumococcal carriage in adults.

    PubMed

    Watt, James P; O'Brien, Katherine L; Katz, Scott; Bronsdon, Melinda A; Elliott, John; Dallas, Jean; Perilla, Mindy J; Reid, Raymond; Murrow, Laurel; Facklam, Richard; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2004-11-01

    Several studies have shown that nasopharyngeal sampling is more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling for the detection of pneumococcal carriage in children. The data for adults are limited and conflicting. This study was part of a larger study of pneumococcal carriage on the Navajo and White Mountain Apache Reservation following a clinical trial of a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Persons aged 18 years and older living in households with children enrolled in the vaccine trial were eligible. We collected both nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens by passing a flexible calcium alginate wire swab either nasally to the posterior nasopharynx or orally to the posterior oropharynx. Swabs were placed in skim milk-tryptone-glucose-glycerin medium and frozen at -70 degrees C. Pneumococcal isolation was performed by standard techniques. Analyses were based on specimens collected from 1,994 adults living in 1,054 households. Nasopharyngeal specimens (11.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8 and 12.6%) were significantly more likely to grow pneumococci than were oropharyngeal specimens (5.8%; 95% CI, 4.8 to 6.9%) (P < 0.0001). Few persons had pneumococcal growth from both specimens (1.7%). Therefore, both tests together were more likely to identify pneumococcal carriage (15.2%; 95% CI, 13.7 to 16.9%) than either test alone. Although we found that nasopharyngeal sampling was more sensitive than oropharyngeal sampling, nasopharyngeal sampling alone would have underestimated the prevalence of pneumococcal carriage in this adult population. Sampling both sites may give more accurate results than sampling either site alone in studies of pneumococcal carriage in adults. PMID:15528682

  1. Risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease among Navajo adults.

    PubMed

    Watt, James P; O'Brien, Katherine L; Benin, Andrea L; McCoy, Sandra I; Donaldson, Connie M; Reid, Raymond; Schuchat, Anne; Zell, Elizabeth R; Hochman, Michael; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2007-11-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is 3-5 times more common among Navajo adults than in the general US population. The authors conducted a case-control study to identify risk factors for IPD among Navajo adults. Navajos aged > or =18 years with IPD were identified through prospective, population-based active laboratory surveillance (December 1999-February 2002). Controls matched to cases on age, gender, and neighborhood were selected. Risk factors were identified through structured interviews and medical record reviews. The authors conducted a matched analysis based on 118 cases and 353 controls. Risk factors included in the final multivariable analysis were chronic renal failure (odds ratio (OR) = 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9, 7.7), congestive heart failure (OR = 5.6, 95% CI: 2.2, 14.5), self-reported alcohol use or alcoholism (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.5, 5.4), body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) <5th (OR = 3.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 10.6) or >95th (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.0, 8.0) percentile, and unemployment (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 5.5). The population attributable fractions were 10% for chronic renal failure, 18% for congestive heart failure, 30% for self-reported alcohol use or alcoholism, 6% for body mass index, and 20% for unemployment. Several modifiable risk factors for IPD in Navajos were identified. The high prevalence of renal failure, alcoholism, and unemployment among Navajo adults compared with the general US population may explain some of their increased risk of IPD. PMID:17693393

  2. Evaluation of urine pneumococcal antigen test performance among adults in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee M; Bigogo, Godfrey; Jagero, Geofrey; da Gloria Carvalho, Maria; Pimenta, Fabiana; Junghae, Muthoni; Breiman, Robert F; Whitney, Cynthia G; Feikin, Daniel R; Conklin, Laura M

    2016-08-01

    When used in an area of rural western Kenya, the BinaxNOW® urine antigen test had a sensitivity of 67% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 43-85%) among 21 adults ≥15 years old with acute respiratory illnesses and pneumococcal bacteremia and a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 96-99%) among 660 adults ≥15 years old without fever or cough. The specificity of the test was not significantly affected by pneumococcal colonization, regardless of patients' HIV status, age, or sex. Use of the pneumococcal urine antigen test in clinical assessments of adults in Africa with acute respiratory illness is a viable option regardless of whether a patient is colonized by pneumococci, even among HIV-infected adults, although the moderate sensitivity of the urine antigen test indicates that the test is probably best used clinically as part of a panel with other tests that can detect pneumococci. PMID:27220607

  3. Genomic pneumococcal load and CSF cytokines are not related to outcome in Malawian adults with meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma C.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Scarborough, Matthew; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine M.B.; Mukaka, Mavuto; Corless, Caroline; Lalloo, David G.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Bacterial meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa is predominantly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is often associated with HIV co-infection and mortality rates are double those seen in better resourced settings. Methods To investigate the cause of this excessive mortality we quantified the pneumococcal DNA load and six common pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Malawian adults with culture proven pneumococcal meningitis and correlated the results to clinical parameters and outcome. There are currently no published data relating bacterial load to outcome in adults with pneumococcal meningitis. Results The mean age of patients was 32 years, 82% were HIV infected and 49% had died by day 40. CSF bacterial loads were high (median 6.5 × 105 copies/ml CSF) and there was no significant variation in bacterial load between survivors and non-survivors. All pro-inflammatory CSF cytokines were elevated in the CSF, with no clinically important differences between survivors and non-survivors. HIV status did not affect the CSF bacterial load or cytokine response. Conclusion Mortality from pneumococcal meningitis in adults in sub-Saharan Africa is not related to pneumococcal bacterial load. More research is needed to understand the very high mortality from meningitis in this region. PMID:24975177

  4. Pneumococcal pneumonia prevention among adults: is the herd effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in children as good a way as the active immunization of the elderly?

    PubMed

    Prato, Rosa; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    The indirect protection of adults as a result of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of infants has been discussed from different epidemiological points of view. In some countries, including Italy, even after pediatric vaccination, vaccine serotypes are still responsible for most pneumonia and invasive diseases in the elderly. Although the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA) produced encouraging results, it has not showed the efficacy of the 13-valent conjugate vaccine in preventing pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia regardless of the number of episodes and serotype. Addressing these points by monitoring the direct impact of adult vaccination in real life distinguished from the effects of herd immunity will assist public health decision-making on the most effective adult pneumococcal vaccination strategies. PMID:26652736

  5. Direct Ex-Vivo Evaluation of Pneumococcal Specific T-Cells in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Aamir; Chapel, Helen; Ogg, Graham

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an encapsulated bacterium that causes significant global morbidity and mortality. The nasopharynxes of children are believed to be the natural reservoir of pneumococcus and by adulthood nasopharyngeal carriage is infrequent; such infrequency may be due to demonstrable pneumococcal specific T and B-cell responses. HLA Class 2 tetrameric complexes have been used to characterise antigen specific T-cell responses in a variety of models of infection. We therefore sought to determine the frequency and phenotype of pneumococcal specific T-cells, using a novel HLA-DRB1*1501 tetramer complex incorporating a recently defined T-cell epitope derived from the conserved pneumococcal serine/threonine kinase (StkP). We were able to detect direct ex-vivo StkP446–60-tetramer binding in HLA-DRB1*1501 adults. These StkP446–60-tetramer binding T-cells had increased CD38 expression and were enriched in CCR7- CD45RA+ expression indicating recent and on-going activation and differentiation. Furthermore, these StkP446–60-tetramer binding T-cells demonstrated rapid effector function by secreting interferon-gamma on stimulation with recombinant StkP. This is the first study to directly enumerate and characterise pneumococcal specific T-cells using HLA class 2 tetrameric complexes. We found that ex-vivo pneumococcal-specific T cells were detectable in healthy adults and that they were enriched with cell surface markers associated with recent antigen exposure and later stages of antigen-driven differentiation. It is likely that these activated pneumococcal specific T-cells reflect recent immunostimulatory pneumococcal exposure in the nasopharynx and it is possible that they may be preventing subsequent colonisation and disease. PMID:22039412

  6. Innovative Strategies Designed to Improve Adult Pneumococcal Immunizations in Safety Net Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Park, Nina J; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Hoang, Khathy; Tran, Helen; Campa, David; Scheib, Geoffrey; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a principal cause of serious illness, including bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia, worldwide. Pneumococcal immunization is proven to reduce morbidity and mortality in high-risk adult and elderly populations. Current pneumococcal vaccination practices are suboptimal in part because of recommendation complexity, the high cost of provider-driven immunization interventions, and outreach methods that are not patient-centric. These barriers are amplified within the safety net. This paper identifies efforts by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services to increase pneumococcal immunization rates for adult indigent patient populations. A 4-part approach will be used to increase vaccination rates: (1) protocol driven care, (2) staff education, (3) electronic identification of eligible patients, and (4) automated patient outreach and scheduling. The proposed analytics plan and potential for scalability are described. (Population Health Management 2016;19:240-247). PMID:26824148

  7. Effectiveness of the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine against invasive pneumococcal disease in Navajo adults.

    PubMed

    Benin, Andrea L; O'Brien, Katherine L; Watt, James P; Reid, Raymond; Zell, Elizabeth R; Katz, Scott; Donaldson, Connie; Parkinson, Alan; Schuchat, Anne; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2003-07-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease occurs 2-3-fold more often among Navajo adults than among adults in the general United States population. The objective of this observational study was to determine the effectiveness of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) among Navajo adults. Active surveillance identified cases of invasive pneumococcal disease during 1996-1997. Three control patients per case patient were matched according to underlying medical conditions, sex, age, and location of medical care. Effectiveness was calculated by regression analysis of case-control sets and by indirect cohort methodology. Diabetes and alcoholism occurred in 41% and 43% of 108 case patients, respectively; 62% of case patients and 64% of control patients were immunized. Overall vaccine effectiveness was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], -29% to 58%); 15% (95% CI, -116% to 67%) for patients with diabetes and -5% (95% CI, -141% to 54%) for patients with alcoholism. Overall vaccine effectiveness, as determined by use of the indirect cohort methodology, was 35% (95% CI, -33% to 69%). PPV23 was not significantly effective among Navajo adults and may be inadequate to prevent serious pneumococcal disease in this population. PMID:12825175

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination from age 60 in São Paulo State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Joao Tonolio; Gagliardi, Anna; Pinho, Amanda; Durand, Laure; Fonseca, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination of adults aged 60 years and older against Streptococcus pneumonia is not recommended in Brazil. The 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23) is only available for institutionalized persons or with underlying diseases despite the substantial medical and economic burden related to pneumococcal infections in adults over than 59 years. The study aimed at evaluating the cost effectiveness of implementing a large PPV program in this population. This analysis was performed using a static decision tree model. Demographic and epidemiological data were obtained from Brazilian official sources and international literature. Economic data were obtained from a study performed in 2007 in a public and a private hospital located in Sao Paulo. Vaccination was assumed to protect for 5 years with 60% effectiveness against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) and 21% effectiveness against non bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NBPP). Deterministic and sensitivity analyses were performed. The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination saved 5,218 life year gained (LYG). The vaccination program was found to be cost effective in the social security and public health care perspectives with a mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of R$10,887 and R$8,281 per LYG respectively. Results were sensitive to the vaccine effectiveness against NBPP, the incidence and case-fatality rate of NBPP. From a societal perspective, PPV23 program for adults 60 and older was found to be cost-saving. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination is clinically and economically favored over the present vaccination strategy, in which persons aged over 59 years in Sao Paulo have not been vaccinated. PMID:21941088

  9. Clinical Implications of Pneumococcal Serotypes: Invasive Disease Potential, Clinical Presentations, and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Moon H.; Moseley, M. Allen

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can asymptomatically colonize the nasopharynx and cause a diverse range of illnesses. This clinical spectrum from colonization to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) appears to depend on the pneumococcal capsular serotype rather than the genetic background. According to a literature review, serotypes 1, 4, 5, 7F, 8, 12F, 14, 18C, and 19A are more likely to cause IPD. Although serotypes 1 and 19A are the predominant causes of invasive pneumococcal pneumonia, serotype 14 remains one of the most common etiologic agents of non-bacteremic pneumonia in adults, even after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction. Serotypes 1, 3, and 19A pneumococci are likely to cause empyema and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Serotype 1 pneumococcal meningitis is prevalent in the African meningitis belt, with a high fatality rate. In contrast to the capsule type, genotype is more closely associated with antibiotic resistance. CC320/271 strains expressing serotype 19A are multidrug-resistant (MDR) and prevalent worldwide in the era of PCV7. Several clones of MDR serotype 6C pneumococci emerged, and a MDR 6D clone (ST282) has been identified in Korea. Since the pneumococcal epidemiology of capsule types varies geographically and temporally, a nationwide serosurveillance system is vital to establishing appropriate vaccination strategies for each country. PMID:23341706

  10. Persisting high prevalence of pneumococcal carriage among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Malawi: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heinsbroek, Ellen; Tafatatha, Terence; Phiri, Amos; Ngwira, Bagrey; Crampin, Amelia C.; Read, Jonathan M.; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HIV-infected adults have high rates of pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults prior to infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) rollout. Design: Observational cohort study. Methods: We recruited HIV-infected adults newly attending a rural HIV clinic in northern Malawi between 2008 and 2010. Nasopharyngeal samples were taken at baseline and after 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. We compared pneumococcal carriage by ART status using generalized estimated equation models adjusted for CD4+ cell count, sex, seasonality, and other potential confounders. Results: In total, 336 individuals were included, of which 223 individuals started ART during follow-up. Individuals receiving ART had higher pneumococcal carriage than individuals not receiving ART (25.9 vs. 19.8%, P = 0.03) particularly for serotypes not included in PCV13 (16.1 vs. 9.6% P = 0.003). Following adjustment, increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes was still observed for individuals on ART, but results for all serotypes were nonsignificant [all serotypes: adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.22 (0.95–1.56); non-PCV13 serotypes: aRR 1.72, 95% CI 1.13–2.62]. Conclusion: Pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults in Malawi remained high despite use of ART, consistent with failure of mucosal immune reconstitution in the upper respiratory tract. There was evidence of increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes. HIV-infected adults on ART could remain an important reservoir for pneumococcal diversity post infant pneumococcal vaccine introduction. Control of pneumococcal disease in African HIV remains a priority. PMID:26218599

  11. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sadlier, C.; O’Dea, S.; Bennett, K.; Dunne, J.; Conlon, N.; Bergin, C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46–2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40–2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22–2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15–2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27580688

  12. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sadlier, C; O'Dea, S; Bennett, K; Dunne, J; Conlon, N; Bergin, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40-2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22-2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15-2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27580688

  13. Why the recent ACIP recommendations regarding conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in adults may be irrelevant.

    PubMed

    Musher, Daniel M; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria B

    2016-02-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the US Centers for Disease Control (ACIP) has recently recommended the 13-valent protein-conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) for routine use in adults age 18-65 who have immunocompromising conditions as well as in all adults over the age of 65. By comparison to 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23), antibody responses to PCV13 are similar or modestly better one month after vaccination. The implication that PCV13 will provide more persistent immunity has been disproven; 12 months later, recipients of PPSV23 or PCV13 have identical anti-pneumococcal activity. The theoretical concept that a protein-based vaccine will be followed by a booster effect when pure polysaccharide antigens are administered is based on remarkably little evidence. The strongest objection to the current recommendations is that, since PCVs stimulate mucosal antibodies, the widespread use of these PCVs has led to a near-disappearance of vaccine serotypes from the population. This phenomenon has been amply documented for PCV7, and PCV13 is well on its way to doing the same. Thus, as US physicians are convincing their adult patients to receive 2 "pneumonia shots" instead of one, the use of PCV13 in the USA is rapidly becoming irrelevant. PMID:26606172

  14. Minimum incidence of adult invasive pneumococcal disease in Blantyre, Malawi an urban african setting: a hospital based prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Mtunthama, Neema; Gordon, Stephen B; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in Africa. Evaluating population level indirect impact on adult disease of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programmes in infants requires baseline population incidence rates but these are often lacking in areas with limited disease surveillance. We used hospital based blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid surveillance to calculate minimal incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the adult (≥15 years old) population of Blantyre, a rapidly growing urban centre in southern Malawi, in the period preceding vaccine introduction. Invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in Blantyre district was high, mean 58.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 53.7, 62.7) per 100,000 person years and peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 108.8 (95%CI: 89.0, 131.7) mirroring the population age prevalence of HIV infection. For pneumococcal bacteraemia in urban Blantyre, mean incidence was 60.6 (95% CI: 55.2, 66.5) per 100,000 person years, peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 114.8 (95%CI: 90.3, 143.9). We suspected that our surveillance may under-ascertain the true burden of disease, so we used location data from bacteraemic subjects and projected population estimates to calculate local sub-district incidence, then examined the impact of community level socio-demographic covariates as possible predictors of local sub-district incidence of pneumococcal and non-pneumococcal pathogenic bacteraemia. Geographic heterogeneity in incidence was marked with localised hotspots but ward level covariates apart from prison were not associated with pneumococcal bacteraemia incidence. Modelling suggests that the current sentinel surveillance system under-ascertains the true burden of disease. We outline a number of challenges to surveillance for pneumococcal disease in our low-resource setting. Subsequent surveillance in the vaccine era will have to account for geographic heterogeneity when evaluating population level indirect

  15. Minimum Incidence of Adult Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Blantyre, Malawi an Urban African Setting: A Hospital Based Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Mtunthama, Neema; Gordon, Stephen B; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in Africa. Evaluating population level indirect impact on adult disease of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programmes in infants requires baseline population incidence rates but these are often lacking in areas with limited disease surveillance. We used hospital based blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid surveillance to calculate minimal incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the adult (≥15 years old) population of Blantyre, a rapidly growing urban centre in southern Malawi, in the period preceding vaccine introduction. Invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in Blantyre district was high, mean 58.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 53.7, 62.7) per 100,000 person years and peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 108.8 (95%CI: 89.0, 131.7) mirroring the population age prevalence of HIV infection. For pneumococcal bacteraemia in urban Blantyre, mean incidence was 60.6 (95% CI: 55.2, 66.5) per 100,000 person years, peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 114.8 (95%CI: 90.3, 143.9). We suspected that our surveillance may under-ascertain the true burden of disease, so we used location data from bacteraemic subjects and projected population estimates to calculate local sub-district incidence, then examined the impact of community level socio-demographic covariates as possible predictors of local sub-district incidence of pneumococcal and non-pneumococcal pathogenic bacteraemia. Geographic heterogeneity in incidence was marked with localised hotspots but ward level covariates apart from prison were not associated with pneumococcal bacteraemia incidence. Modelling suggests that the current sentinel surveillance system under-ascertains the true burden of disease. We outline a number of challenges to surveillance for pneumococcal disease in our low-resource setting. Subsequent surveillance in the vaccine era will have to account for geographic heterogeneity when evaluating population level indirect

  16. A comparative public health and budget impact analysis of pneumococcal vaccines: The French case

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiling; Gervais, Frédéric; Gauthier, Aline; Baptiste, Charles; Martinon, Prescilla; Bresse, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In 2002, a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was introduced to French infants and toddlers. A change has been witnessed in the incidence of pneumococcal diseases in adults: the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) of serotypes covered by PCV decreased, and serotypes not covered by PCV increased. This study aimed to quantify the public health and budget impact of pneumococcal vaccination strategies in at-risk adults in France over 5 years. A previously published population-based Markov model was adapted to the French situation. At-risk adults received either PPV23 (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine; for the immunocompetent) or PCV13 (for the immunosuppressed). The strategy was compared to PCV13 alone. Uncertainty was addressed using extreme scenario analyses. Between 2014 and 2018, vaccination with PPV23/PCV13 led to a higher reduction in terms of IPD and non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia cases avoided in most scenarios analyzed when compared to PCV13 alone. For budget impact, none of the scenarios was in favor of PCV13. Under conservative coverage assumptions, the total incremental budget impact ranged from € 39.8 million to € 69.3 million if PCV13 were to replace PPV23 in the immunocompetent. With the epidemiological changes of pneumococcal diseases and the broader serotype coverage of PPV23, the current program remains an optimal strategy from public health perspective. Given the additional budget required for the use of PCV13 alone and its uncertain public health benefits, vaccination with PPV23 remains the preferred strategy. PMID:26267239

  17. A comparative public health and budget impact analysis of pneumococcal vaccines: The French case.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiling; Gervais, Frédéric; Gauthier, Aline; Baptiste, Charles; Martinon, Prescilla; Bresse, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In 2002, a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was introduced to French infants and toddlers. A change has been witnessed in the incidence of pneumococcal diseases in adults: the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) of serotypes covered by PCV decreased, and serotypes not covered by PCV increased. This study aimed to quantify the public health and budget impact of pneumococcal vaccination strategies in at-risk adults in France over 5 years. A previously published population-based Markov model was adapted to the French situation. At-risk adults received either PPV23 (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine; for the immunocompetent) or PCV13 (for the immunosuppressed). The strategy was compared to PCV13 alone. Uncertainty was addressed using extreme scenario analyses. Between 2014 and 2018, vaccination with PPV23/PCV13 led to a higher reduction in terms of IPD and non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia cases avoided in most scenarios analyzed when compared to PCV13 alone. For budget impact, none of the scenarios was in favor of PCV13. Under conservative coverage assumptions, the total incremental budget impact ranged from € 39.8 million to € 69.3 million if PCV13 were to replace PPV23 in the immunocompetent. With the epidemiological changes of pneumococcal diseases and the broader serotype coverage of PPV23, the current program remains an optimal strategy from public health perspective. Given the additional budget required for the use of PCV13 alone and its uncertain public health benefits, vaccination with PPV23 remains the preferred strategy. PMID:26267239

  18. Cost-effectiveness of adult pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Rozenbaum, Mark H; Huijts, Susanne M; van Werkhoven, Cornelis H; Postma, Douwe F; Atwood, Mark; van Deursen, Anna M M; van der Ende, Arie; Grobbee, Diederick E; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Sato, Reiko; Verheij, Theo J M; Vissink, Conrad E; Bonten, Marc J M; de Wit, G Ardine

    2015-11-01

    The Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA) demonstrated the efficacy of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in preventing vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia and vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease in elderly subjects. We examined the cost-effectiveness of PCV13 vaccination in the Netherlands. Using a Markov-type model, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) of PCV13 vaccination in different age- and risk-groups for pneumococcal disease were evaluated using a societal perspective. Estimates of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs, vaccine efficacy and epidemiological data were based on the CAPiTA study and other prospective studies. The base-case was PCV13 vaccination of adults aged 65-74 years compared to no vaccination, assuming no net indirect effects in base-case due to paediatric 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use. Analyses for age- and risk-group specific vaccination strategies and for different levels of hypothetical herd effects from a paediatric PCV programme were also conducted. The ICER for base-case was €8650 per QALY (95% CI 5750-17,100). Vaccination of high-risk individuals aged 65-74 years was cost-saving and extension to medium-risk individuals aged 65-74 years yielded an ICER of €2900. Further extension to include medium- and high-risk individuals aged ≥18 years yielded an ICER of €3100.PCV13 vaccination is highly cost-effective in the Netherlands. The transferability of our results to other countries depends upon vaccination strategies already implemented in those countries. PMID:26160871

  19. A Cross-Sectional Observational Study of Pneumococcal Carriage in Children, Their Parents, and Older Adults Following the Introduction of the 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hamaluba, Mainga; Kandasamy, Rama; Ndimah, Susan; Morton, Richard; Caccamo, Marisa; Robinson, Hannah; Kelly, Sarah; Field, Aimee; Norman, Lily; Plested, Emma; Thompson, Ben A.V.; Zafar, Azhar; Kerridge, Simon A.; Lazarus, Rajeka; John, Tessa; Holmes, Jane; Fenlon, Shannon N.; Gould, Katherine A.; Waight, Pauline; Hinds, Jason; Crook, Derrick; Snape, Matthew D.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Using nasopharyngeal carriage as a marker of vaccine impact, pneumococcal colonization and its relation to invasive disease were examined in children, their parents, and older adults in the United Kingdom following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and prior to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). A cross-sectional observational study was conducted, collecting nasopharyngeal swabs from children aged 25 to 55 months who had previously received 3 doses of PCV7, their parents, and adults aged ≥65 years. Pneumococcal serotyping was conducted according to World Health Organization guidelines with nontypeable isolates further analyzed by molecular serotyping. A national invasive disease surveillance program was conducted throughout the corresponding period. Pneumococcus was isolated from 47% of children, 9% of parents, and 2.2% of older adults. For these groups, the percentage of serotypes covered by PCV7 were 1.5%, 0.0%, and 15.4%, with a further 20.1%, 44.4%, and 7.7% coverage added by those in PCV13. In each group, the percentage of disease due to serotypes covered by PCV7 were 1.0%, 7.4% and 5.1% with a further 65.3%, 42.1%, and 61.4% attributed to those in PCV13. The prevalence of carriage is the highest in children, with direct vaccine impact exemplified by low carriage and disease prevalence of PCV7 serotypes in vaccinated children, whereas the indirect effects of herd protection are implied by similar observations in unvaccinated parents and older adults. PMID:25569650

  20. A cross-sectional observational study of pneumococcal carriage in children, their parents, and older adults following the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hamaluba, Mainga; Kandasamy, Rama; Ndimah, Susan; Morton, Richard; Caccamo, Marisa; Robinson, Hannah; Kelly, Sarah; Field, Aimee; Norman, Lily; Plested, Emma; Thompson, Ben A V; Zafar, Azhar; Kerridge, Simon A; Lazarus, Rajeka; John, Tessa; Holmes, Jane; Fenlon, Shannon N; Gould, Katherine A; Waight, Pauline; Hinds, Jason; Crook, Derrick; Snape, Matthew D; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Using nasopharyngeal carriage as a marker of vaccine impact, pneumococcal colonization and its relation to invasive disease were examined in children, their parents, and older adults in the United Kingdom following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and prior to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13).A cross-sectional observational study was conducted, collecting nasopharyngeal swabs from children aged 25 to 55 months who had previously received 3 doses of PCV7, their parents, and adults aged ≥65 years. Pneumococcal serotyping was conducted according to World Health Organization guidelines with nontypeable isolates further analyzed by molecular serotyping. A national invasive disease surveillance program was conducted throughout the corresponding period.Pneumococcus was isolated from 47% of children, 9% of parents, and 2.2% of older adults. For these groups, the percentage of serotypes covered by PCV7 were 1.5%, 0.0%, and 15.4%, with a further 20.1%, 44.4%, and 7.7% coverage added by those in PCV13. In each group, the percentage of disease due to serotypes covered by PCV7 were 1.0%, 7.4% and 5.1% with a further 65.3%, 42.1%, and 61.4% attributed to those in PCV13.The prevalence of carriage is the highest in children, with direct vaccine impact exemplified by low carriage and disease prevalence of PCV7 serotypes in vaccinated children, whereas the indirect effects of herd protection are implied by similar observations in unvaccinated parents and older adults. PMID:25569650

  1. Temporal Variations among Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Serotypes in Children and Adults in Germany (1992–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Imöhl, Matthias; Reinert, Ralf René; van der Linden, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Nationwide surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease has been conducted in Germany since 1992. From 1992 to 2008, a total of 12,137 isolates from invasive pneumococcal disease were collected. Data on serotypes were available for 9,394 invasive isolates. The leading serotypes were serotypes 14 (16.5%), 3 (8.0%), 7F (7.6%), 1 (7.3%), and 23F (6.0%). Variations in serotype distribution over the years are particularly extensive, especially concerning serotype 14 (min 7.4%, max 33.5%) with the highest percentages among the isolates serotyped from around 1997 to 2006. Serotypes 1 and 7F increased over the last decade. No increase was observed concerning serotype 19A. Higher pneumococcal conjugate vaccine coverages were observed among children (7v, 57.3%; 10v, 72.8%; 13v, 83.5%) than among adults (7v, 39.9%; 10v, 55.5%; 13v, 73.5%). The temporal variations in serotype distribution have to be kept in mind when interpreting vaccine coverages reported in epidemiological studies. PMID:20671944

  2. Cost-effectiveness of vaccinating adults with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiling; Gauthier, Aline; Annemans, Lieven; van der Linden, Mark; Nicolas-Spony, Laurence; Bresse, Xavier

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of routine infant vaccination against pneumococcal disease has resulted in a decreased overall invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in adults but also a change in invasive pneumococcal disease serotypes. This study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) in Germany in this context. A population-based Markov model was developed. A cohort of adults currently eligible for vaccination was followed until death. Adult vaccination with PPV23 was associated with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €17,065/quality-adjusted life years gained from the third-party payer's perspective. Univariate sensitivity analyses showed that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was below €50,000/quality-adjusted life years gained in most test scenarios. The model suggests that adult PPV23 vaccination is cost effective in Germany, due to its broad serotype coverage. This is despite epidemiological changes in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes caused by wider use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines during childhood. PMID:23025422

  3. Reference ranges and cutoff levels of pneumococcal antibody global serum assays (IgG and IgG2) and specific antibodies in healthy children and adults.

    PubMed

    Rose, M A; Buess, J; Ventur, Y; Zielen, S; Herrmann, E; Schulze, J; Schubert, R

    2013-08-01

    Pneumococcal antibodies represent the acquisition of natural immunity. Determination of pneumococcal antibodies is an important screening tool for immunodeficiencies. Our study generated reference ranges and cutoff levels for pneumococcal antibody global serum assays correlated to a specific pneumococcal antibody ELISA. Specific pneumococcal antibody levels were measured from 457 children undergoing elective surgery and 46 healthy adult volunteers (88 with previous pneumococcal immunization from both groups), 22 severe immunodeficient subjects with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T, negative controls), and age-matched 36 healthy allergic asthmatics. We determined a representative panel of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibodies (serotype 4, 5, 6B, 7F, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F) by ELISA and global pneumococcal IgG and IgG2 antibodies by EIA. In vaccine-naïve healthy subjects, initial pneumococcal IgG geometric mean concentrations of 13.1 μg/ml were low in the first year of life and increased over the time, reaching adult levels (70.5 μg/ml) at age 8-12 years. In parallel, IgG2 antibodies increased from 20.7 % (0.5-1 year old) to adult proportions (>30 %) in preschoolers. Correlation between the pneumococcal IgG screening assay and specific pneumococcal antibody levels was acceptable (Pearson's coefficient r = 0.4455; p = 0.001). Cutoff levels showed high sensitivity, whereas specificity was high to moderate calculated from correlations with the specific ELISA. We provide reference ranges and cutoff levels for the interpretation of specific antibody determinations in the clinical setting. The global pneumococcal IgG/IgG2 assay is a suitable screening tool and correlates with the ELISA serotype-specific pneumococcal antibodies. However, results below our cutoff values should be re-evaluated by serotype-specific ELISA testing. PMID:23529214

  4. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to protect infants and toddlers, and some older children and adults with certain health conditions, from pneumococcal disease.Pneumococcal disease is caused by infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. These bacteria can spread from person ...

  5. Pneumococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumococcal disease. Quick Facts About Pneumococcal Disease and Vaccination According to WHO, pneumococcal pneumonia and meningitis are ... of antibiotic treatment. (9, 10, 11) Conjugate pneumococcal vaccination is safe and effective for preventing severe childhood ...

  6. Relating Pneumococcal Carriage Among Children to Disease Rates Among Adults Before and After the Introduction of Conjugate Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Daniel M; Grant, Lindsay R; Weatherholtz, Robert C; Warren, Joshua L; O'Brien, Katherine L; Hammitt, Laura L

    2016-06-01

    The use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in children has a strong indirect effect on disease rates in adults. When children are vaccinated with PCVs, other serotypes that are not targeted by the vaccine can increase in frequency (serotype replacement) and reduce the direct and indirect benefits of the vaccine. To understand and predict the likely impacts of serotype replacement, it is important to know how patterns in the transmission of serotypes among children relate to disease rates in adults. We used data on pneumococcal carriage and disease from Navajo Nation children and adults collected before and after the routine use of PCVs (1998-2012). Using regression models within a Bayesian framework, we found that serotype-specific carriage and invasiveness (disease incidence divided by carriage prevalence) had similar patterns in children and adults. Moreover, carriage in children, invasiveness in children, and a serotype-specific random intercept (which captured additional variation associated with the serotypes) could predict the incidence serotype-specific pneumococcal disease in adults 18-39 years of age and those 40 years of age or older in the era of routine use of PCVs. These models could help us predict the effects of future pneumococcal vaccine use in children on disease rates in adults, and the modeling approach developed here could be used to test these findings in other settings. PMID:27188949

  7. Predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among older adults with pneumonia: findings from the Community Acquired Pneumonia Impact Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) almost triples for older adults aged 65 years or older. In Canada, CAP is a leading cause of hospital admissions and mortality. Although CAP is very prevalent, complications due to CAP may be reduced with the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV). The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among community-dwelling older adults with clinically diagnosed CAP. Methods A telephone survey was used to collect detailed information from adults aged 60 years and older with clinically diagnosed CAP. This was a community wide study with participants being recruited from all radiology clinics in one Ontario community. Results The most important predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among older adults included: getting an influenza vaccine within the past year (OR 14.5, 95% CI 4.27 to 49.0); at least weekly contact with a friend (OR 3.97, 95% CI 1.71 to 9.24); having one or more co-morbidities/chronic conditions (OR 3.64, 95% CI 1.60 to 8.28); being 70 years of age or older (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.21 to 5.40); having health problems that limited physical activities (OR 5.37, 95% CI 1.49 to 19.3); having little or no bodily pain (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.25 to 6.73); and reporting having spiritual values or religious faith (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.03 to 11.67). Conclusions A wide range of factors, including demographic, co-morbidity, quality of life, social support and lifestyle were found to be associated with pneumococcal vaccination status among older adults with clinically diagnosed CAP. The findings from this study could inform future pneumococcal immunization strategies by identifying individuals who are least likely to receive the PPV. PMID:20591180

  8. Serotype Changes and Drug Resistance in Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases in Adults after Vaccinations in Children, Japan, 2010-2013.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Kimiko; Chiba, Naoko; Hanada, Shigeo; Morozumi, Miyuki; Wajima, Takeaki; Shouji, Michi; Iwata, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    After 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) for children was introduced in Japan in November 2010, we examined changes in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes and in genetic antimicrobial drug resistance of isolates from adults with invasive pneumococcal diseases. During April 2010-March 2013, a total of 715 isolates were collected from adults with invasive pneumococcal diseases. Seven-valent PCV serotypes in adults decreased from 43.3% to 23.8%, most noticeably for serotype 6B. Concomitantly, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) serotypes decreased from 82.2% to 72.2%; non-PPSV23 serotypes increased from 13.8% to 25.1%. Parallel with serotype changes, genotypic penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae decreased from 32.4% to 21.1%, and 6 non-PPSV23 serotypes emerged (6D, 15A, 15C, 16F, 23A, and 35B). Respective vaccine coverage rates for 13-valent PCV and PPSV23 differed by disease: 73.9% and 84.3% for patients with pneumonia, 56.4% and 69.2% for patients with bacteremia and sepsis, and 45.7% and 69.3% for patients with meningitis. PMID:26485679

  9. Serotype Changes and Drug Resistance in Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases in Adults after Vaccinations in Children, Japan, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Naoko; Hanada, Shigeo; Morozumi, Miyuki; Wajima, Takeaki; Shouji, Michi; Iwata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    After 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) for children was introduced in Japan in November 2010, we examined changes in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes and in genetic antimicrobial drug resistance of isolates from adults with invasive pneumococcal diseases. During April 2010–March 2013, a total of 715 isolates were collected from adults with invasive pneumococcal diseases. Seven-valent PCV serotypes in adults decreased from 43.3% to 23.8%, most noticeably for serotype 6B. Concomitantly, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) serotypes decreased from 82.2% to 72.2%; non-PPSV23 serotypes increased from 13.8% to 25.1%. Parallel with serotype changes, genotypic penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae decreased from 32.4% to 21.1%, and 6 non-PPSV23 serotypes emerged (6D, 15A, 15C, 16F, 23A, and 35B). Respective vaccine coverage rates for 13-valent PCV and PPSV23 differed by disease: 73.9% and 84.3% for patients with pneumonia, 56.4% and 69.2% for patients with bacteremia and sepsis, and 45.7% and 69.3% for patients with meningitis. PMID:26485679

  10. Safety and tolerability of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in healthy Chinese adults, children and infants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fengcai; Hu, Yuemei; Liang, Qi; Young, Mariano; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Zhangjing; Liang, John Z.; Gruber, William C.; Scott, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pneumococcal disease is a global problem, including in China. The objective of this study was to provide safety data for single-dose 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in Chinese subjects, needed to begin a phase III safety and immunogenicity study in Chinese infants. Methods: Healthy Chinese adults (18−55 years), children (3−5 years), and infants (42–98 days) received a single dose of PCV13 in this open-label safety study. Local reactions and systemic events were collected for 7 days via an electronic diary; adverse events were recorded for 1 month after vaccination. Results: All 72 (24 per group) screened subjects (58.3% males; mean ± standard deviation [SD] age: 43.3 ± 9.1 years [adults], 4.5 ± 0.7 years [children], and 79.6 ± 15.2 days [infants]) were enrolled, received vaccine, and completed the study. The most frequently reported local reactions per group were pain at the injection site (n = 23 adults [95.8%]), tenderness (n = 18 children [75%]), and swelling (n = 6 infants [25%]), none of which were severe. The mean duration of each local reaction was ⩽2.0 days in infants and ⩽2.4 days in children but in adults was 3.3 days for pain at the injection site and 9 days each for redness and swelling. Systemic events in adults were muscle pain (n = 5), fatigue (n = 3), and headache and joint pain (n = 1 each). One child and seven infants had disturbed sleep (increased or decreased). One adult and one child had mild fever (37.7–38.5°C, as per China Food and Drug Administration guidelines). No subject used antipyretic medication. One adverse event (bronchopneumonia in an infant) was reported, which was serious, severe, and unrelated to vaccination. There were no deaths. Conclusions: A single dose of PCV13 was safe and well tolerated in healthy Chinese adults, children, and infants. This study provided the safety data to enable a phase III safety and immunogenicity registration trial in Chinese infants to proceed. PMID

  11. Host Factors and Biomarkers Associated with Poor Outcomes in Adults with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Shigeo; Iwata, Satoshi; Kishi, Kazuma; Morozumi, Miyuki; Chiba, Naoko; Wajima, Takeaki; Takata, Misako; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) causes considerable morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify host factors and biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in adult patients with IPD in Japan, which has a rapidly-aging population. Methods In a large-scale surveillance study of 506 Japanese adults with IPD, we investigated the role of host factors, disease severity, biomarkers based on clinical laboratory data, treatment regimens, and bacterial factors on 28-day mortality. Results Overall mortality was 24.1%, and the mortality rate increased from 10.0% in patients aged ˂50 years to 33.1% in patients aged ≥80 years. Disease severity also increased 28-day mortality, from 12.5% among patients with bacteraemia without sepsis to 35.0% in patients with severe sepsis and 56.9% with septic shock. The death rate within 48 hours after admission was high at 54.9%. Risk factors for mortality identified by multivariate analysis were as follows: white blood cell (WBC) count <4000 cells/μL (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7–12.8, p < .001); age ≥80 years (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.0–21.6, p = .002); serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.5–8.1, p < .001); underlying liver disease (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6–7.8, p = .002); mechanical ventilation (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7–5.6, p < .001); and lactate dehydrogenase ≥300 IU/L (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4–4.0, p = .001). Pneumococcal serotype and drug resistance were not associated with poor outcomes. Conclusions Host factors, disease severity, and biomarkers, especially WBC counts and serum creatinine, were more important determinants of mortality than bacterial factors. PMID:26815915

  12. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and older People at high risk for pneumococcus infection Alternative Names Pneumococcal meningitis Images Pneumococci organism Pneumococcal pneumonia References Swartz MN. Meningitis: bacterial, ...

  13. Factors predicting mortality in invasive pneumococcal disease in adults in Alberta.

    PubMed

    Marrie, Thomas James; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Garg, Sipi; Vanderkooi, Otto G

    2011-05-01

    To define the factors associated with 30-day mortality among adult patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), we conducted a retrospective review of all cases of IPD in Alberta from 2000 to 2004. We hypothesized that multiple factors would be predictive of such mortality. We also examined the factors predictive of early (within 5 days of admission) mortality. We identified 1154 patients who met our inclusion criteria, 163 (14.1%) of whom died within 30 days. Over half (62.6%) of the deaths occurred within 5 days of admission. Ten factors were independently associated with increased 30-day mortality: 3 comorbidity factors-cancer within 5 years of diagnosis of IPD, diabetes, and cirrhosis; 4 complications-requirement for supplemental oxygen, mechanical ventilation, alteration of mental status, and cardiac arrest; 2 microorganism-related factors-infection with high- or infection with intermediate-mortality serotypes; and 1 treatment-related factor-treatment with a single antibiotic. Age 18-40 years and treatment with 2 antibiotics concurrently were associated with lower 30-day mortality. Comorbid illnesses were not contributory to early mortality (within 5 days of admission); instead, complications (alteration of mental status, requirement for supplemental oxygen, mechanical ventilation, and cardiac arrest) as well as infection with high-mortality serotypes and treatment with a single antibiotic were important. Age 18-40 years, infection with serotypes in the polysaccharide vaccine, and treatment with 2 or more than 2 antibiotics were associated with decreased early mortality. Early mortality accounted for 62.6% of the deaths. In conclusion, we found that mortality in IPD is multifactorial, the factors differ for 5- and 30-day mortality, and mortality is associated with host (age and complications), microorganism (pneumococcal serotypes), and therapeutic factors. Our data indicate that treatment with 2 or more antibiotics effective against Streptococcus

  14. [Prophylaxis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Outbreaks with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine. Prospects Analysis for Russian Military Community].

    PubMed

    Guchev, I A; Klochkov, O I; Sinopalnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia and other diseases caused by pneumococci still remain the main factors of high morbidity and mortality rates throughout the world. Pneumococci as the leading pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute otitis media and sinusitis also cause a number of other serious systemic disorders including invasive infections with high mortality in spite of the antimicrobial resistance status and adequate antimicrobials choice. Pneumococcal infections are responsible for 5-35% or more of community-acquired pneumonias. The burden of pneumonia (up to 100-200 per thousand) is recorded among military recruits in training centers. Since the specific environment of the soldiers could be carrected, their health protection requires medical surveillance. For these reasons, polysaccharide and more immunogenic conjugated pneumococcal vaccines were developed. There is now an urgent need to understand whether such vaccines are effective in military conscripts. Controversy about the effectiveness and value of the polysaccharide (PPV-23) vaccine as a CAP morbidity restriction measure still persists. There were implemented plenty of metaanalyses of pneumococcal vaccines in adults. Some of them showed that the vaccine was effective against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in 'low risk' healthy adults and elders. There have been a number of poor quality observational studies in Russia where 'all pneumonia cases' were considered as an endpoint. It remains controversial whether these observational studies provide adequate evidence to justify the use of the polysaccharide vaccine in the groups of healthy young men for whom it is being advocated. In our analysis we found weak evidence supporting pneumococcal vaccination with PPV-23 for this group. Nevertheless, favorable tendency was found to immunize. It is the reason for a trail to find pharmacoepidemiological support for vaccination by novel conjugated vaccines with better immunogenicity. PMID:27337866

  15. Pneumococcal serotype distribution in adults with invasive disease and in carrier children in Italy: Should we expect herd protection of adults through infants' vaccination?

    PubMed

    Azzari, Chiara; Cortimiglia, Martina; Nieddu, Francesco; Moriondo, Maria; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Mattei, Romano; Zuliani, Massimo; Adriani, Beatrice; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Consales, Guglielmo; Aquilini, Donatella; Bini, Giancarlo; Di Natale, Massimo Edoardo; Canessa, Clementina; Ricci, Silvia; de Vitis, Elisa; Mangone, Giusi; Bechini, Angela; Bonanni, Paolo; Pasinato, Angela; Resti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) produced a significant herd protection in unvaccinated adult population mostly because of pneumococcus carriage decrease in vaccinated children. It is not known if the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine can give similar effect on adults. Aims of the work were to evaluate whether the 6 additional serotypes are present in nasopharynx of children and serotype distribution in invasive pneumococcal infections (IPD) in adults. Realtime-PCR was used to evaluate pneumococcal serotypes in adults with confirmed IPD and in nasopharyngeal swabs (NP) from 629 children not vaccinated or vaccinated with PCV7 and resident in the same geographical areas. Two hundred twenty-one patients (116 males, median 67.9 years) with IPD were studied (pneumonia n = 103, meningitis n = 61 sepsis n = 50, other n = 7). Two hundred twelve were serotyped. The most frequent serotypes were 3, (31/212; 14.6%), 19A, (19/212; 9.0%), 12 (17/212; 8.0%), 7F, (14/212; 6.6%). In NP of children, the frequency of those serotypes causing over 50% of IPD in adults was very low, ranging from 0.48% for serotype 7F to 7.9% for serotype 19A. On the other side serotype 5, very frequent in NP (18.7%) caused <1% IPD. In conclusion serotypes causing IPD in adults are very rarely found in children NP. We suggest that herd protection obtainable with the additional 6 serotypes included in PCV13 may be more limited than that demonstrated with PCV7 in the past. In order to reduce the burden of disease in adults, adults should be offered a specific vaccination program with highly immunogenic PCV. PMID:26647277

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13-valent in older adults in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nowadays, there are two vaccination strategies in Colombia to prevent pneumococcal diseases in people over 50 years. Our aim is to estimate cost-effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13-valent (PCV13) versus pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23-valent (PPSV23) to prevent pneumococcal diseases and their related mortality in people over 50 years old in Colombia. Methods A Markov model was developed with national data, including pneumococcal serotypes distribution in Colombia between 2005 and 2010. Vaccination of a cohort was simulated and a five year time horizon was assumed. Analysis was done from a perspective of a third party payer. Direct costs were provided by a national insurance company; sensitive univariate and probabilistic analysis were done for epidemiological and clinical effectiveness parameters and costs. Results PCV13 avoids 3 560 deaths by pneumococcal infections versus PPSV23 and 4 255 deaths versus no vaccine. PCV13 prevents 79 633 cases by all-cause pneumonia versus PPSV23 and 81 468 cases versus no vaccine. Total costs (healthcare and vaccines costs) with PCV13 would be U.S. $ 97,587,113 cheaper than PPSV23 and it would save U.S. $ 145,196,578 versus no vaccine. Conclusion PCV13 would be a cost-saving strategy in the context of a mass vaccination program in Colombia to people over 50 years old because it would reduce burden of disease and specific mortality by pneumococcal diseases, besides, it saves money versus PPSV23. PMID:24679135

  17. Neonatal Exposure to Pneumococcal Phosphorylcholine Modulates the Development of House Dust Mite Allergy during Adult Life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Preeyam S.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, ∼20% of the global population suffers from an allergic disorder. Allergies and asthma occur at higher rates in developed and industrialized countries. It is clear that many human atopic diseases are initiated neonatally and herald more severe IgE-mediated disorders, including allergic asthma, which is driven by the priming of Th2 effector T cells. The hygiene hypothesis attempts to link the increased excessively sanitary conditions early in life to a default Th2 response and increasing allergic phenomena. Despite the substantial involvement of IgE Abs in such conditions, little attention has been paid to the effects of early microbial exposure on the B cell repertoire prior to the initiation of these diseases. In this study, we use Ab-binding assays to demonstrate that Streptococcus pneumoniae and house dust mite (HDM) bear similar phosphorylcholine (PC) epitopes. Neonatal C57BL/6 mice immunized with a PC-bearing pneumococcal vaccine expressed increased frequencies of PC-specific B cells in the lungs following sensitizing exposure to HDM as adults. Anti-PC IgM Abs in the lung decreased the interaction of HDM with pulmonary APCs and were affiliated with lowered allergy-associated cell infiltration into the lung, IgE production, development of airway hyperresponsiveness, and Th2 T cell priming. Thus, exposure of neonatal mice to PC-bearing pneumococci significantly reduced the development of HDM-induced allergic disease during adult life. Our findings demonstrate that B cells generated against conserved epitopes expressed by bacteria, encountered early in life, are also protective against the development of allergic disease during adult life. PMID:25957171

  18. Neonatal exposure to pneumococcal phosphorylcholine modulates the development of house dust mite allergy during adult life.

    PubMed

    Patel, Preeyam S; Kearney, John F

    2015-06-15

    Currently, ∼20% of the global population suffers from an allergic disorder. Allergies and asthma occur at higher rates in developed and industrialized countries. It is clear that many human atopic diseases are initiated neonatally and herald more severe IgE-mediated disorders, including allergic asthma, which is driven by the priming of Th2 effector T cells. The hygiene hypothesis attempts to link the increased excessively sanitary conditions early in life to a default Th2 response and increasing allergic phenomena. Despite the substantial involvement of IgE Abs in such conditions, little attention has been paid to the effects of early microbial exposure on the B cell repertoire prior to the initiation of these diseases. In this study, we use Ab-binding assays to demonstrate that Streptococcus pneumoniae and house dust mite (HDM) bear similar phosphorylcholine (PC) epitopes. Neonatal C57BL/6 mice immunized with a PC-bearing pneumococcal vaccine expressed increased frequencies of PC-specific B cells in the lungs following sensitizing exposure to HDM as adults. Anti-PC IgM Abs in the lung decreased the interaction of HDM with pulmonary APCs and were affiliated with lowered allergy-associated cell infiltration into the lung, IgE production, development of airway hyperresponsiveness, and Th2 T cell priming. Thus, exposure of neonatal mice to PC-bearing pneumococci significantly reduced the development of HDM-induced allergic disease during adult life. Our findings demonstrate that B cells generated against conserved epitopes expressed by bacteria, encountered early in life, are also protective against the development of allergic disease during adult life. PMID:25957171

  19. Pneumococcal Vaccination Strategies. An Update and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Berical, Andrew C; Harris, Drew; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Possick, Jennifer D

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important global pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical disease in children and adults. Pneumococcal pneumonia is by far the common presentation of noninvasive and invasive pneumococcal disease and affects the young, the elderly, and the immunocompromised disproportionately. Patients with chronic pulmonary diseases are also at higher risk for pneumococcal infections. Substantial progress over the century has been made in the understanding of pneumococcal immunobiology and the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease through vaccination. Currently, two pneumococcal vaccines are available for individuals at risk of pneumococcal disease: the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 13-valent pneumococcal protein-conjugate vaccine (PCV13). The goal of pneumococcal vaccination is to stimulate effective antipneumococcal antibody and mucosal immunity response and immunological memory. Vaccination of infants and young children with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has led to significant decrease in nasal carriage rates and pneumococcal disease in all age groups. Recent pneumococcal vaccine indication and schedule recommendations on the basis of age and risk factors are outlined in this Focused Review. As new pneumococcal vaccine recommendations are being followed, continued efforts are needed to address the vaccine efficacy in the waning immunity of the ever-aging population, the implementation of vaccines using two different vaccines under very specific schedules and their real world clinical and cost effectiveness, and the development of next generation pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:27088424

  20. A review of economic evaluations of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in adults and the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Dirmesropian, S; Wood, JG; MacIntyre, CR; Newall, AT

    2015-01-01

    The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV13) is already recommended for some adult groups and is being considered for wider use in many countries. In order to identify the strengths and limitations of the existing economic evaluation studies of PCV13 in adults and the elderly a literature review was conducted. The majority of the studies identified (9 out of 10) found that PCV13 was cost-effective in adults and/or the elderly. However, these results were based on assumptions that could not always be informed by robust evidence. Key uncertainties included the efficacy of PCV13 against non-invasive pneumonia and the herd immunity effect of childhood vaccination programs. Emerging trial evidence on PCV13 in adults from the Netherlands offers the ability to parameterize future economic evaluations with empirical efficacy data. However, it is important that these estimates are used thoughtfully when they are transferred to other settings. PMID:25933180

  1. Is 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) Combined With 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV23) Superior to PPSV23 Alone for Reducing Incidence or Severity of Pneumonia in Older Adults? A Clin-IQ

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Starla; Thompson, Lou Ann; McEachern, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia infection is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the public health concerns, pneumonia also accounts for a significant cost to the health care system. Currently there are two leading vaccines targeted against S. pneumoniae: 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). Until recently the recommendation for adult pneumonia vaccination has been a single dose of PPSV23 for all adults 65 years and older. However, concerns were raised regarding the vaccine’s efficacy due to the persistent burden of pneumococcal disease in the elderly population. This paper focuses on two trials which evaluate the safety and efficacy of PCV13 in the adult population. The first study reveals improved immune response with the addition of PCV13 to PPSV23, while the second shows PCV13 was effective in the prevention of vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia. The two studies observed adequate safety profiles for PCV13 in series with PPSV23 and with PCV13 compared to placebo. PMID:27376105

  2. Randomized, Controlled Trial of a 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Administered Concomitantly with an Influenza Vaccine in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gurtman, Alejandra; Rubino, John; Smith, William; van Cleeff, Martin; Jayawardene, Deepthi; Giardina, Peter C.; Emini, Emilio A.; Gruber, William C.; Scott, Daniel A.; Schmöle-Thoma, Beate

    2012-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) coadministered with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in pneumococcal vaccine-naive adults. Participants ages 50 to 59 years (n = 1,116) received TIV with PCV13 (group 1) or placebo (group 2) (1:1 randomization); 1 month later, group 1 received placebo and group 2 received PCV13. A hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay for TIV and a standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for pneumococcal serotype-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) were performed and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titers (assessed post hoc) were measured at baseline and 1 and 2 months postvaccination. The rises in HAI assay geometric mean titer (GMT) and percentage of participants in groups 1 and 2 with ≥4-fold increases in HAI responses (A/H1N1, 84.0% and 81.2%, respectively; A/H3N2, 71.1% and 69.5%, respectively; and B, 60.6% and 60.3%, respectively) were similar. In group 1, all serotypes met the predefined IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) ratio noninferiority criterion relative to group 2, but GMCs were lower in group 1 than group 2. When comparing group 1 with group 2, 5 serotypes did not meet the OPA GMT ratio noninferiority criterion, and OPA GMTs were significantly lower for 10 serotypes. PCV13 injection site reactions were similar and mostly mild in both groups. Systemic events were more frequent in group 1 (86.2%) than group 2 (76.7%; P < 0.001); no vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. Coadministration of PCV13 and TIV was well tolerated but associated with lower PCV13 antibody responses and is of unknown clinical significance. Given the positive immunologic attributes of PCV13, concomitant administration with TIV should be dictated by clinical circumstances. PMID:22739693

  3. A cohort study of bacteremic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Guillamet, Cristina Vazquez; Vazquez, Rodrigo; Noe, Jonas; Micek, Scott T.; Kollef, Marin H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacteremic pneumonia is usually associated with greater mortality. However, risk factors associated with hospital mortality in bacteremic pneumonia are inadequately described. The study was a retrospective cohort study, conducted in Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2008–2015). For purposes of this investigation, antibiotic susceptibility was determined according to ceftriaxone susceptibility, as ceftriaxone represents the antimicrobial agent most frequently recommended for hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia as opposed to nosocomial pneumonia. Two multivariable analyses were planned: the first model included resistance to ceftriaxone as a variable, whereas the second model included the various antibiotic-resistant species (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae). In all, 1031 consecutive patients with bacteremic pneumonia (mortality 37.1%) were included. The most common pathogens associated with infection were S aureus (34.1%; methicillin resistance 54.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (28.0%), P aeruginosa (10.6%), anaerobic bacteria (7.3%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (5.6%). Compared with ceftriaxone-susceptible pathogens (46.8%), ceftriaxone-resistant pathogens (53.2%) were significantly more likely to receive inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment (IIAT) (27.9% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001) and to die during hospitalization (41.5% vs 32.0%; P = 0.001). The first logistic regression analysis identified IIAT with the greatest odds ratio (OR) for mortality (OR 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–3.2, P < 0.001). Other independent predictors of mortality included age, mechanical ventilation, immune suppression, prior hospitalization, prior antibiotic administration, septic shock, comorbid conditions, and severity of illness. In the second multivariable analysis that included the antibiotic-resistant species, IIAT was still associated with excess mortality, and P aeruginosa infection was

  4. A public health and budget impact analysis of vaccinating at-risk adults and the elderly against pneumococcal diseases in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiling; Gauthier, Aline; Annemans, Lieven; van der Linden, Mark; Nicolas-Spony, Laurence; Bresse, Xavier

    2012-10-01

    To assess the comparative public health and budget impact over 5 years of several pneumococcal vaccination strategies (23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine [PPV23] and/or 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV13]) in Germany, within the context of changing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence over time. A multi-cohort, population-based Markov model was developed. Uncertainty around vaccine effectiveness, costs and IPD incidence change was handled through scenario analyses. Between 2012 and 2016, the introduction of PCV13 in adults, compared with the use of PPV23, would be associated with a net estimated budget increase of €59.7 million (+6.7%) to €151.6 million (+13.7%). Impact on IPD incidence ranged from -113 cases (-0.8%) to +298 cases (+2.8%). Introducing PCV13 in adults is expected to significantly affect healthcare budgets. Adult vaccination with PPV23 remains the optimal vaccination strategy from public health and budget perspectives. PMID:23025421

  5. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal conjugate vaccine induces antibody-independent memory responses in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Offersen, Rasmus; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Paludan, Søren R; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole S

    2012-08-01

    HIV-patients have excess of pneumococcal infection. We immunized 40 HIV-patients twice with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar, Pfizer) +/- a TLR9 agonist (CPG 7909). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with pneumococcal polysaccharides and cytokine concentrations measured. The CPG 7909 adjuvant group had significantly higher relative cytokine responses than the placebo group for IL-1β, IL-2R, IL-6, IFN-γ and MIP-β, which, did not correlate with IgG antibody responses. These findings suggests that CPG 7909 as adjuvant to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine induces cellular memory to pneumococcal polysaccharides in HIV-patients, independently of the humoral response. PMID:22854665

  6. Serotype changes in adult invasive pneumococcal infections in Portugal did not reduce the high fraction of potentially vaccine preventable infections.

    PubMed

    Horácio, Andreia N; Diamantino-Miranda, Jorge; Aguiar, Sandra I; Ramirez, Mário; Melo-Cristino, José

    2012-01-01

    We determined the serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of 1100 isolates responsible for adult invasive pneumococcal infections (IPD) in Portugal between 2006 and 2008. Serotypes 3 (13%), 1 (12%), 7F (11%), 19A (10%) and 14 (7%) were the most frequent causes of IPD and the two later serotypes accounted for the majority of erythromycin and penicillin nonsusceptible isolates. Serotype 1 was associated with younger adults whereas serotype 3 was associated with older adults. Despite the availability of the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) in Portugal since 1996, the proportion of PPV23 preventable IPD remained stable and above 80%. Comparing with previous data from Portugal, we showed a continued decline of the serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in adult IPD and a rise of serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine, increasing its potential coverage of adult IPD to 70% in 2008. Penicillin non-susceptibility remained stable (17%) whereas erythromycin resistance (18%) has continued to rise in the post-PCV7 years. PMID:22100892

  7. Immunogenicity and Safety of the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine versus the 23-Valent Polysaccharide Vaccine in Unvaccinated HIV-Infected Adults: A Pilot, Prospective Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Francesca; Belmonti, Simone; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Morandi, Matteo; Rossetti, Barbara; Tordini, Giacinta; Cauda, Roberto; De Luca, Andrea; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Montagnani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Definition of the optimal pneumococcal vaccine strategy in HIV-infected adults is still under evaluation. We aimed to compare immunogenicity and safety of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) versus the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) in HIV-infected adults. Methods We performed a pilot, prospective controlled study enrolling HIV-infected pneumococcal vaccine-naïve outpatients, aged 18–65 years with CD4 counts ≥200 cells/μL. Eligible subjects were recruited into two parallel groups: group 1 (n = 50) received two doses of PCV13 eight weeks apart, and group 2 (n = 50) received one dose of PPSV23, as part of their standard of care. Anti-pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide immunoglobulin G concentrations were quantified by ELISA at baseline, 8, 24 and 48 weeks. Clinical and viro-immunological follow-up was performed at the same time points. Unvaccinated, age-matched HIV-negative adults (n = 100) were also enrolled as baseline controls. Results Pre-vaccination specific IgG titers for each pneumococcal antigen did not differ between study groups but they were constantly lower than those from the HIV-negative controls. After immunization, significant increases in IgG titers were observed in both study groups at each time point compared to baseline, but response to serotype 3 was blunted in group 1. Antibody titers for each antigen did not differ between study groups at week 48. Overall, the proportion of subjects achieving seroprotection and seroconversion to all serotypes was comparable between groups. A marked decrease in IgG levels over time was observed with both vaccines. No relevant adverse reactions were reported in either group. Conclusions In this population with favorable immune profile, no relevant differences were observed in immunogenicity between PCV13 and PPSV23. Both vaccines were safe and well tolerated. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02123433 PMID:27258647

  8. Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV)Treatment of pneumococcal infections with penicillin and other drugs used to be more effective. But ... the disease, through vaccination, even more important. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) protects against 23 types of pneumococcal ...

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine formulations with and without aluminum phosphate and comparison of the formulation of choice with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Christine; de Villiers, Pierre JT; Moodley, Keymanthri; Jayawardene, Deepthi; Jansen, Kathrin U; Scott, Daniel A; Emini, Emilio A; Gruber, William C; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate

    2014-01-01

    This randomized open-label trial was designed to provide preliminary immunogenicity and safety data to support development of the pediatric 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) for adults. The aims were to: identify an age-appropriate PCV13 formulation, i.e., with (n = 309) or without (n = 304) aluminum phosphate (AlPO4); compare the selected PCV13 formulation (n = 309) with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23; n = 301); and, together with an extension study, assess sequential use of pneumococcal vaccines at 1-year intervals in adults aged ≥65 years (n = 105) not pre-vaccinated with PPSV23. Immune responses were measured by ELISA and opsonophagocytic activity assays 1 month postvaccination. Immunoglobulin G responses elicited by PCV13 with AlPO4 and PCV13 without AlPO4 were similar for the majority, and noninferior for all PCV13 serotypes. PCV13 with AlPO4 was generally more reactogenic, with reactions mainly mild or moderate. Thus, PCV13 with AlPO4 (hereafter PCV13) became the selected formulation. Immune responses to PCV13 were noninferior for all but one serotype and for most PCV13 serotypes superior to PPSV23. Vaccine sequence assessments showed that for PCV13/PPSV23, the initial PCV13 dose generally enhanced responses to a subsequent PPSV23 dose, compared with PPSV23 alone. For PCV13/PCV13, a second dose did not enhance the first dose response when given after 1 year. For PCV13/PPSV23/PCV13, priming with PCV13 (vaccination 1) did not protect against lower responses induced by PPSV23 to subsequent PCV13 (vaccination 3). In conclusion, the pediatric PCV13 formulation with AlPO4 is well tolerated and immunogenic in adults, is generally more immunogenic than PPSV23, and subsequent vaccination with PPSV23 is possible if required. PMID:24576885

  10. A retrospective cohort study of panipenem/betamipron for adult pneumococcal bacteremia at three teaching hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Shichi, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Maeno, Tetsuhiro; Nakamura, Hidenori

    2013-08-01

    Panipenem/betamipron (PAPM/BP) may be highly effective for life-threatening Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. However, the efficacy of PAPM/BP for S. pneumoniae infections has not been compared with that of other antimicrobial agents. We retrospectively compared PAPM/BP with other carbapenems for treatment of life-threatening infections in newly hospitalized adults with pneumococcal bacteremia. Clinical information for cases of pneumococcal bacteremia was collected from three teaching hospitals in Japan from January 2003 to December 2010. In total, 17 patients who received PAPM/BP therapy and 34 treated with other carbapenems (27 with meropenem, 4 with imipenem/cilastatin, and 3 with biapenem) were identified. The mean age (71 vs. 70 years old), sex distribution (women, 29 vs. 21 %), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) (1.5 vs. 1.6), and rates of septic shock (29 vs. 38 %), and meningitis (5.9 vs. 8.8 %) did not differ significantly between the two groups. The inpatient mortality rates were lower in the PAPM/BP group (12 vs. 44 %, p = 0.03). Multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, CCI, and severe sepsis/septic shock showed that use of other carbapenems was associated with higher in-hospital mortality, with an odds ratio of 6.922 (95 % CI, 1.171-40.92) compared to PAPM/BP therapy. Initial PAPM/BP therapy might have a therapeutic advantage over other carbapenems in treatment of severe Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. PMID:23203218

  11. Impact of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Used in Children on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children and Adults in the United States: Analysis of Multisite, Population-based Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Matthew R.; Link-Gelles, Ruth; Schaffner, William; Lynfield, Ruth; Lexau, Catherine; Bennett, Nancy M.; Petit, Susan; Zansky, Shelley M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Reingold, Arthur; Miller, Lisa; Scherzinger, Karen; Thomas, Ann; Farley, Monica M.; Zell, Elizabeth R.; Taylor, Thomas H.; Pondo, Tracy; Rodgers, Loren; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard; Jorgensen, James H.; Whitney, Cynthia G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background In 2000, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the U.S. and resulted in dramatic reductions in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and modest increases in non-PCV7-type IPD. In 2010, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced PCV7 in the U.S. immunization schedule. We evaluated the effect of PCV13 use in children on IPD in children and adults in the U.S. Methods We used laboratory- and population-based data on incidence of IPD from CDC’s Emerging Infections Program / Active Bacterial Core surveillance in a time-series model to estimate the impact of vaccination. Cases of IPD during July 2004–June 2013 were classified as being caused by the PCV13 serotypes against which PCV7 has no effect (PCV13/nonPCV7). Findings Compared with incidence expected among children <5 years old if PCV7 alone had been continued, incidence of IPD overall and IPD caused by PCV13/nonPCV7 serotypes declined by 64% (95% interval estimate [IE] 59–68 %) and 93% (95%IE 91–94), respectively, by July 2012–June 2013. Among adults, incidence of IPD overall and PCV13/nonPCV7-type IPD also declined by 12–32% and 58–72%, respectively, depending on age. In all age groups, reductions were driven principally by changes in incidence of serotypes 19A and 7F. We estimate that over 30,000 cases of IPD and 3,000 deaths were averted in the first 3 years following PCV13 introduction. Interpretation PCV13 has reduced IPD among all ages when used routinely in children in the U.S. Serotypes 19A and 7F, which emerged after PCV7 introduction, have been effectively controlled. PMID:25656600

  12. Inflammatory Markers and Immune Response to Pneumococcal Vaccination in HIV-Positive and -Negative Adults

    PubMed Central

    Leggat, David J.; Ohtola, Jennifer A.; Saul-McBeth, Jessica L.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Westerink, M. A. Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background Members of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-superfamily have speculated roles in the response against T-independent type II antigens (TI-II) including pneumococcal polysaccharides (PPS). Dysregulation in their expression is associated with an enhanced risk for pneumococcal disease in neonates but their expression in other high-risk populations including HIV-positive individuals remains to be elucidated. Objective To investigate signals that contribute towards PPS-response and identify potential anomalies that may account for diminished serological response in HIV-positive individuals post Pneumovax (PPV23) immunization. Methods Markers of inflammation, C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6, sCD27 and sCD30, were assessed in HIV-positive and -negative individuals as potential predictors of PPV23 response. Serum levels of B cell activating factor (BAFF), transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cytophilin ligand interactor (TACI), B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) and B cell expression of BAFF-R, TACI, BCMA, CD40 and CD21 were assessed in total (unselected) and PPS23F (antigen)-specific B cells of PPV23 immunized HIV-positive and -negative individuals. Results CRP, sCD27, sCD30 and BAFF were significantly elevated in the serum of HIV-positive individuals but did not adversely affect PPV23 response. Assessment of PPS-specific B cells revealed enhanced TACI and reduced BAFF-R expression compared to unselected B cells in HIV-positive and -negative individuals. Surface TACI was similar but soluble TACI was significantly lower in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative individuals. Conclusion Current studies highlight a potential role for TACI in PPV23 response based on its enhanced expression on PPS-specific B cells. Although surface levels of TACI were similar, diminished soluble TACI (sTACI) in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative individuals could potentially decrease BAFF responsiveness and Ig response. A better understanding of the role of TNF receptors

  13. Pneumococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood, imaging, or lab tests. Treatment is with antibiotics. Vaccines can prevent pneumococcal infections. There are two vaccines. One is for infants and young children. The other is for people ...

  14. Pneumococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a very serious infection that causes pneumonia, meningitis, and bloodstream infection (sepsis). About one million US ... will die from it. Fewer will get pneumococcal meningitis or sepsis, but the mortality rate in this ...

  15. Open-Label Trial of Immunogenicity and Safety of a 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Adults ≥50 Years of Age in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Christine; Ruiz Palacios, Guillermo M.; Vazquez-Narvaez, Jorge; Enkerlin-Pauwells, Hermann Leo; Sundaraiyer, Vani; Pathirana, Sudam; Kalinina, Elena; Gruber, William C.; Scott, Daniel A.; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate

    2014-01-01

    This open-label multicenter clinical trial conducted in Mexico assessed the immunogenicity and safety of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in adults ≥50 years of age not previously vaccinated with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). The PCV13 elicited a robust immune response in this study population, as reflected by the magnitude of fold rises in functional antibody levels measured by serotype-specific opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) assays before and 1 month after vaccination. Although the prevaccination OPA geometric mean titers (GMTs) for the majority of the serotypes were significantly lower in the 50- to 64-year age group than those in the ≥65-year age group, the postvaccination immune responses were generally similar. The overall immune responses were higher for the majority of the serotypes in the Mexican study population than those in similar adult study populations who received the PCV13 in Europe and the United States. PCV13 was well tolerated, and there were no vaccine-related serious adverse events. In conclusion, PCV13 is safe and immunogenic when administered to adults ≥50 years of age in Mexico and has the potential to protect against vaccine-type pneumococcal disease. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01432262.) PMID:25499011

  16. Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... children and younger adults) from pneumococcal disease . Pneumococcal disease is caused by bacteria that can spread from person to person through close contact. It can cause ear infections, and it can also lead to more serious infections of ... can get pneumococcal disease, but children under 2 years of age, people ...

  17. Community-Acquired Moraxella catarrhalis Bacteremic Pneumonia: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel Angel; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; García-Clemente, Marta; Fole-Vázquez, David; Casan, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella (formerly Branhamella) catarrhalis was discovered at the end of the nineteenth century, and for many decades it was considered to be a harmless commensal of the upper respiratory tract. It is a Gram-negative, aerobic diplococcus considered to be the third most common pathogen isolated in childhood sinusitis and otitis media and in adult chronic lower respiratory disease, as well as an etiological agent of pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients or those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Moraxella catarrhalis pneumonia is rarely associated with bacteremia. Here, we present two cases of community-acquired Moraxella catarrhalis bacteremic pneumonia. PMID:26989548

  18. Clinical and Microbiological Factors Associated with High Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Density in Patients with Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Alpkvist, Helena; Athlin, Simon; Nauclér, Pontus; Herrmann, Björn; Abdeldaim, Guma; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Hedlund, Jonas; Strålin, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to study if certain clinical and/or microbiological factors are associated with a high nasopharyngeal (NP) density of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pneumococcal pneumonia. In addition, we aimed to study if a high NP pneumococcal density could be useful to detect severe pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Adult patients hospitalized for radiologically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia were included in a prospective study. NP aspirates were collected at admission and were subjected to quantitative PCR for pneumococcal DNA (Spn9802 DNA). Patients were considered to have pneumococcal etiology if S. pneumoniae was detected in blood culture and/or culture of respiratory secretions and/or urinary antigen test. Results Of 166 included patients, 68 patients had pneumococcal DNA detected in NP aspirate. Pneumococcal etiology was noted in 57 patients (84%) with positive and 8 patients (8.2%) with negative test for pneumococcal DNA (p<0.0001). The median NP pneumococcal density of DNA positive patients with pneumococcal etiology was 6.83 log10 DNA copies/mL (range 1.79–9.50). In a multivariate analysis of patients with pneumococcal etiology, a high pneumococcal density was independently associated with severe pneumonia (Pneumonia Severity Index risk class IV-V), symptom duration ≥2 days prior to admission, and a medium/high serum immunoglobulin titer against the patient’s own pneumococcal serotype. NP pneumococcal density was not associated with sex, age, smoking, co-morbidity, viral co-infection, pneumococcal serotype, or bacteremia. Severe pneumococcal pneumonia was noted in 28 study patients. When we studied the performance of PCR with different DNA cut-off levels for detection of severe pneumococcal pneumonia, we found sensitivities of 54–82% and positive predictive values of 37–56%, indicating suboptimal performance. Conclusions Pneumonia severity, symptom duration ≥2 days, and a medium/high serum immunoglobulin titer against the patient

  19. Identification of potential new protein vaccine candidates through pan-surfomic analysis of pneumococcal clinical isolates from adults.

    PubMed

    Olaya-Abril, Alfonso; Jiménez-Munguía, Irene; Gómez-Gascón, Lidia; Obando, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2013-01-01

    Purified polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines are widely used for preventing infections in adults and in children against the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, a pathogen responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates, especially in developing countries. However, these polysaccharide-based vaccines have some important limitations, such as being serotype-dependent, being subjected to losing efficacy because of serotype replacement and high manufacturing complexity and cost. It is expected that protein-based vaccines will overcome these issues by conferring a broad coverage independent of serotype and lowering production costs. In this study, we have applied the "shaving" proteomic approach, consisting of the LC/MS/MS analysis of peptides generated by protease treatment of live cells, to a collection of 16 pneumococcal clinical isolates from adults, representing the most prevalent strains circulating in Spain during the last years. The set of unique proteins identified in all the isolates, called "pan-surfome", consisted of 254 proteins, which included most of the protective protein antigens reported so far. In search of new candidates with vaccine potential, we identified 32 that were present in at least 50% of the clinical isolates analyzed. We selected four of them (Spr0012, Spr0328, Spr0561 and SP670_2141), whose protection capacity has not yet been tested, for assaying immunogenicity in human sera. All of them induced the production of IgM antibodies in infected patients, thus indicating that they could enter the pipeline for vaccine studies. The pan-surfomic approach shows its utility in the discovery of new proteins that can elicit protection against infectious microorganisms. PMID:23894641

  20. Identification of Potential New Protein Vaccine Candidates through Pan-Surfomic Analysis of Pneumococcal Clinical Isolates from Adults

    PubMed Central

    Olaya-Abril, Alfonso; Jiménez-Munguía, Irene; Gómez-Gascón, Lidia; Obando, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J.

    2013-01-01

    Purified polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines are widely used for preventing infections in adults and in children against the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, a pathogen responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates, especially in developing countries. However, these polysaccharide-based vaccines have some important limitations, such as being serotype-dependent, being subjected to losing efficacy because of serotype replacement and high manufacturing complexity and cost. It is expected that protein-based vaccines will overcome these issues by conferring a broad coverage independent of serotype and lowering production costs. In this study, we have applied the “shaving” proteomic approach, consisting of the LC/MS/MS analysis of peptides generated by protease treatment of live cells, to a collection of 16 pneumococcal clinical isolates from adults, representing the most prevalent strains circulating in Spain during the last years. The set of unique proteins identified in all the isolates, called “pan-surfome”, consisted of 254 proteins, which included most of the protective protein antigens reported so far. In search of new candidates with vaccine potential, we identified 32 that were present in at least 50% of the clinical isolates analyzed. We selected four of them (Spr0012, Spr0328, Spr0561 and SP670_2141), whose protection capacity has not yet been tested, for assaying immunogenicity in human sera. All of them induced the production of IgM antibodies in infected patients, thus indicating that they could enter the pipeline for vaccine studies. The pan-surfomic approach shows its utility in the discovery of new proteins that can elicit protection against infectious microorganisms. PMID:23894641

  1. [Pneumococcal vaccine: protection of adults and reduction of antibiotic resistence by vaccination of children with a conjugated vaccine].

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W

    2011-06-01

    Pneumococcal infections (pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis, meningitis) are common and usually involve toddlers, immunocompromised and the elderly. Main reservoir of pneumococci is the nasopharyngeal zone of healthy carriers, especially of toddlers. Currently, two types of pneumococcal vaccines are in clinical use, which induce production of antibodies against capsular polysaccharides. The older vaccine consists of pure capsular polysaccharides. It induces a limited immunity, because polysaccharides are poor antigens that stimulate mainly B-cells. In children under two years of age this vaccine is not used, because it does not induce a sufficient immunologic response, presumably because of the immaturity of their immune system. In 2000, a vaccination program with a novel pneumococcal vaccine was launched in the USA. This vaccine contains capsular polysaccharides, that are conjugated with a highly immunogenic protein. It induces both a T cell and B cell response that results in specific humoral and mucosal immunity. U.S. data demonstrate, that serotypes covered by the conjugated vaccine can be reduced in the whole population by vaccination of children being the main reservoir of pneumococci. This so called ,,herd protection" results in a decrease in invasive pneumococcal diseases in vaccinees and non-vaccinees as well as in a reduction of antibiotic resistance rates by reducing resistant pneumococcal cones. PMID:21812250

  2. Fatal bacteremic melioidosis in patients with prolonged neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Teng, Jade L L; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-03-01

    Melioidosis, an infection with an expanding geographic range, is extremely rare in neutropenic patients. We report bacteremic melioidosis (ST-70 and ST-660) in 2 patients with prolonged neutropenia, who succumbed despite appropriate antibiotics. Clinicians should be aware of this emerging infection in neutropenic patients residing in or returning from endemic areas. PMID:26712267

  3. A Virtual Clinic Improves Pneumococcal Vaccination for Asplenic Veterans at High Risk for Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Robin L.; Banks, Richard; Wilson, Brigid; Montpetite, Michelle M.; Carter, Rebecca; Phillips, Susan; Perez, Federico

    2015-01-01

    We developed a “virtual clinic” to improve pneumococcal vaccination among asplenic adults. Using an electronic medical record, we identified patients, assessed their vaccination status, entered orders, and notified patients and providers. Within 180 days, 38 of 76 patients (50%) received a pneumococcal vaccination. A virtual clinic may optimize vaccinations among high-risk patients. PMID:26668815

  4. Efficacy of PPV23 in Preventing Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Adults at Increased Risk – A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner-Rohe, Julia; Witt, Annika; Hemmerling, Jana; von Eiff, Christof; Leverkus, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (pCAP) is the most frequent form of pneumonia. The elderly and adults with underlying diseases are at an increased risk of developing pCAP. The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) was licensed over 30 years ago and is recommended as the standard intervention in many countries across the globe, although its efficacy continues to be debated. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to investigate the effect of PPV23 for preventing pCAP in adults ≥60 years of age. Methods An existing Cochrane Review was updated to Oct 2014 using a systematic literature search to select appropriate RCTs. DerSimonian and Laird random-effects meta-analyses were performed and odd ratios (OR) with 95%-confidence intervals (CI) and p-values were calculated for the descriptive analyses. Reasons for heterogeneity were explored by subgroup analyses. Results Meta-analysis of PPV23 efficacy included four studies. Three of them did not demonstrate efficacy for PPV23. The body of evidence indicated statistically significant heterogeneity (I2 = 78%, p = 0.004) that could be explained by subgroup analysis by “study setting”. Further effect modifiers for pCAP were “continent of trial” (p<0.01), and “method of pneumococcal diagnostics” (p = 0.001). Subgroup analyses revealed that the only study showing efficacy for PPV23 was an outlier. Overall, the validity of the meta-analytic PPV23 efficacy assessment was confirmed by the meta-analysis of all-cause CAP including six studies. Discussion Inconsistencies in PPV23 treatment effects to prevent pCAP could solely be explained by one outlier study that was performed in nursing homes in Japan. The effect modifier “method of pneumococcal diagnostics” should be interpreted carefully, since methodological weaknesses are not restricted to one special method only, which would justify the exclusion of certain studies. Overall, we conclude from our

  5. The majority of adult pneumococcal invasive infections in Portugal are still potentially vaccine preventable in spite of significant declines of serotypes 1 and 5.

    PubMed

    Horácio, Andreia N; Diamantino-Miranda, Jorge; Aguiar, Sandra I; Ramirez, Mário; Melo-Cristino, José

    2013-01-01

    In Portugal, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been administered to children outside of the national immunization plan since 2001. We determined the serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of 1265 isolates responsible for adult invasive pneumococcal infections (IPD) between 2009 and 2011 and compared the results with previously published data from 1999 to 2008. Serotypes 3 (12.6%), 7F (10.0%), 19A (9.1%), 14 (8.4%), 1 (6.9%) and 8 (6.2%) were the most frequent and together accounted for 53.2% of adult IPD. Serotypes 1 and 5 declined significantly while serotype 34, not included in any vaccine, increased. Taken together, the serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13) peaked among adult IPD isolates in 2008 (70.2%) and declined since then reaching 53.5% in 2011. The decline in the serotypes included in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine since 2007 was also significant but much more modest with 79.2% of the isolates causing IPD in 2011 expressing these serotypes. Since the changes in serotypes causing IPD in adults coincided with the 10-valent and PCV13 introduction in children, it is unlikely that vaccination triggered these changes although it may have accelerated them. The proportion of IPD caused by serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine remained stable (19.0%). Both penicillin non-susceptibility and erythromycin resistance increased in the study period, with serotypes 14 and 19A accounting for the majority of resistant isolates. PMID:24066064

  6. Comparative reactogenicity and immunogenicity of 23 valent pneumococcal vaccine administered by intramuscular or subcutaneous injection in elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian F; Pond, Dimity; Hartel, Gunter

    2007-06-15

    23 Valent pneumococcal vaccine is provided to the elderly through public health programs in many countries. However there is no clear recommendation regarding its route of administration (subcutaneous or intramuscular). In a randomised, observer blind study of 254 elderly subjects, the immunogenicity of a 23 valent pneumococcal vaccine was not influenced by its route of administration. A low rate of systemic adverse reactions was observed with the vaccine (subcutaneous and intramuscular both 6.3%). Local adverse reaction rates were; intramuscular 7.1% and subcutaneous 18.9% and these were predicted by: * Pre-vaccination antibody titres>1 microg/ml, odds ratio 22.4 (8.06-74.84) compared with pre-vaccination antibody titre<1 microg/ml. * Female gender, odds ratio 5.0 (1.85-14.83) compared with male gender. * Subcutaneous injection route, odds ratio 3.20 (1.13-9.13) compared with intramuscular injection route. * Female gender subcutaneous injection route, odds ratio 2.99 (1.10-8.70) compared with female gender intramuscular injection route. These data support the intramuscular injection of 23 valent pneumococcal vaccine, especially in elderly females. PMID:17512098

  7. Pneumococcal vaccine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal vaccine is an immunization against Streptococcus pneumoniae , a bacterium that frequently causes meningitis and pneumonia in the elderly, and people with chronic illnesses. Pneumococcal pneumonia accounts for 10 ...

  8. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in adults aged 60 years and over in the Region of Madrid, Spain, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez Rodriguez, M A; Ordobas Gavin, M A; Garcia-Comas, L; Sanz Moreno, J C; Cordoba Deorador, E; Lasheras Carbajo, M D; Taveira Jimenez, J A; Martin Martinez, F; Iniesta Fornies, D; Arce Arnaez, A

    2014-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a notifiable disease in the Region of Madrid. The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is recommended for children and adults aged two years or over with a high risk of disease, and for all adults aged 60 and over. We describe the evolution of IPD incidence from 2008 to 2011 in people aged 60 years and over and PPV23 vaccine effectiveness (VE). VE is estimated using both the screening method and indirect cohort method. The incidence of IPD varied from 20.0 in 2008 to 15.2 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2011 (RR: 0.8; 95% CI: 0.6–0.9). Adjusted VE estimated with the screening method was 68.2% (95% CI: 56.2–76.9). VE with the Broome method was 44.5% (95% CI: 23.8–59.6) for all PPV23 serotypes, and 64.4% (95% CI: 45.2–76.8) for PPV23 serotypes not included in conjugate vaccines. VE was lower in patients aged 80 years and older (25.5%; 95% CI:-23.2 to 55.0) and those with highrisk medical conditions (31.7%; 95% CI: -2.2 to -54.4). Adjusted VE was 44.5% (95% CI: 19.4-61.8) within 5 years of vaccination and 32.5% (95% CI: -5.6 to 56.9) after 5 years. These results are compatible with current recommendations for PPV23. PMID:25323079

  9. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. PMID:25107494

  10. Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Are Associated With Severe Sepsis at Admission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Chien; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Hung-Ping; Huang, Yun-Jhong; Wang, Jann-Tay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical features and treatment outcomes among patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR Enterobacteriaceae and to identify whether MDR pathogens were independently associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. The clinical data of adult patients visiting and being treated at Chia-Yi Christian Hospital due to bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae from January 2006 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 585 patients were enrolled. Among them, 220 (37.6%) were caused by the MDR Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 206 patients (35.2%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. Patients in the MDR group tend to be male and have a past history of gout, recurrent UTI, prior hospitalization, hydronephrosis, renal stone, ureteral stone, indwelling urinary catheter, newly development of renal dysfunction, severe sepsis or septic shock, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, receipt of ineffective empirical therapy, longer hospital stay, and higher in-hospital mortality (2.7% vs 1.9%, P = 0.569). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, it is revealed that independent predictors associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation were liver cirrhosis (OR 2.868; 95% CI 1.439–5.716; P = 0.003), indwelling urinary catheter (OR 1.936; 95% CI 1.238–3.027; P = 0.004), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (OR 1.447; 95% CI 1.002–2.090; P = 0.049). Multidrug resistance was associated with the development of severe sepsis or septic shock upon presentation among patients with bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, empirical antibiotics therapy for patients with UTI presented with severe sepsis and/or septic shock should be more broad-spectrum to effectively cover MDR Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27196480

  11. Clinical effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccine. Meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, B. G.; Oxman, A. D.; Shannon, H. S.; Lloyd, S.; Altmayer, C. A.; Thomas, K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccine. DATA SOURCES: Computerized searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCISEARCH databases were performed, reference lists of retrieved articles were reviewed, and first authors of published studies were contacted. STUDY SELECTION: Studies of use of pneumococcal vaccines in adults were included if the study design was a randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trial and at least one of the following clinical outcomes was reported: vaccine-type systemic pneumococcal infection, systemic pneumococcal infection, vaccine-type pneumococcal pneumonia, pneumococcal pneumonia, non-vaccine-type pneumococcal pneumonia. SYNTHESIS: Study quality was assessed and descriptive information concerning the study populations, interventions, and outcome measurements was extracted for 13 trials involving more than 65,000 patients. Estimates of vaccine efficacy, based on a meta-analysis of randomized and quasi-randomized trials, were determined for clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine can be expected to reduce the risk of systemic infection due to pneumococcal types included in the vaccine by 83% and systemic infection due to all pneumococci by 73%. We found no evidence that the vaccine was less efficacious for the elderly, institutionalized people, or those with chronic disease. PMID:10540698

  12. Comparison of computed tomography findings between bacteremic and non-bacteremic acute pyelonephritis due to Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seon Jung; Je, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Seung Hwa; Choi, Won Seok; Hong, Doran; Kim, Sung-Bum

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify computed tomography (CT) findings that are associated with the presence of bacteremia in patients with acute pyelonephritis (APN) due to Escherichia coli (E. coli). METHODS: The clinical data and contrast-enhanced CT findings of 128 patients who were diagnosed with APN due to E. coli and showed renal abnormality on contrast-enhanced CT between January 2003 and November 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of bacteremia: The bacteremia group and the non-bacteremia group. The abnormality on contrast-enhanced CT were categorized into 5 renal and 4 extrarenal CT findings and compared between the two groups using the χ2 test and multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Among the 128 patients, 34 patients (26.6%) were classified into the bacteremia group and 94 patients (73.4%) into the non-bacteremia group. There was no statistically significant difference in gender between the two groups (P = 0.09), but the age of the patients in the bacteremia group was higher than that of the patients in the non-bacteremia group (P < 0.01). Compared to the non-bacteremia group, 1 renal CT finding such as urothelial thickening and 3 extrarenal CT findings such as diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis and pulmonary congestion were more frequently observed in the bacteremia group with statistical significance. The logistic regression analysis revealed that CT findings, including urothelial thickening, diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis and pulmonary congestion were suggested as the predictive CT findings of bacteremic APN. CONCLUSION: On CT, urothelial thickening, diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis, and pulmonary congestion are more frequently observed in patients with bacteremic APN due to E. coli. PMID:27158427

  13. Long-term immune responses and comparative effectiveness of one or two doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in HIV-positive adults in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aristine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Tsai, Mao-Song; Su, Yi-Ching; Liu, Wen-Chun; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection impairs maintenance of immunological memory, yet few studies of HIV-positive adults receiving 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) have followed them beyond the first year. We determined and compared the durability of serological responses and the clinical outcomes of HIV-positive adults annually for five years following vaccination with one or two doses of PCV7. Methods In this non-randomized clinical trial, 221 pneumococcal vaccine-naïve HIV-positive adults receiving one (n=109) or two doses four weeks apart (n=112) of PCV7 between 2008 and 2010 were longitudinally followed for evaluation of significant serological response and for episodes of pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease. Results At the time of vaccination, the two groups were well matched for age, risk factors, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) coverage, CD4 count and plasma HIV RNA load (PVL). At the end of five years, the CD4 counts for the one- and two-dose groups had increased from 407 and 406 to 550 and 592 cells/µL, respectively, and 82.4 and 81.6% of the participants had fully suppressed PVL. Significant immune responses to ≥2 serotypes persisted for 67.9 vs 78.6%, 64.2 vs 71.4%, 66.1 vs 71.4%, 57.8 vs 69.6% in the second, third, fourth and fifth years after one and two doses of PCV7 in the intention-to-treat analysis, respectively. In multivariate analysis, immunization with two doses of PCV7 (odds ratio (OR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10 to 2.65, p=0.016), concurrent cART (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.16 to 4.00, p=0.015) and CD4 proliferation (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.27, p=0.031) were predictive of persistent serological responses in the fifth year. Only one patient in the one-dose group had documented pneumococcal pneumonia (non-bacteraemic) and none had invasive pneumococcal disease in the 6.5 years of follow-up. Conclusions One or two doses of PCV7 achieve durable seroprotective responses in HIV-treated participants; however, two

  14. Pneumococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stages Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12-18yrs. Young Adult 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ...

  15. Pneumococcal vaccination in older adults in the era of childhood vaccination: Public health insights from a Norwegian statistical prediction study.

    PubMed

    Steens, Anneke; Vestrheim, Didrik F; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2015-06-01

    Two different vaccines, a 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and a 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13), are available for prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the population aged 65 years and older (65+). The IPD epidemiology in the 65+ is undergoing change due to indirect effects of childhood immunisation. Vaccine recommendations for the 65+ must take into account these trends in epidemiology. We therefore explored the preventive potential of vaccination strategies to prevent IPD in the 65+, including PPV23, PCV13 or PCV13 + PPV23 in 2014-2019. Quasi-Poisson regression models were fitted to 2004-2014 population-wide surveillance data and used to predict incidences for vaccine-type and non-vaccine type IPD. We determined the number of people needed to be vaccinated to prevent one case per season (NNV) for each strategy and estimated the public health impact on the IPD case counts from increasing the vaccine uptake to 28-45%. Our results indicate that PCV13-IPD will decrease by 71% from 58 (95% prediction interval 55-61) cases in 2014/15 to 17 (6-52) in 2018/19 and PPV23-IPD by 32% from 168 (162-175) to 115 (49-313) cases. The NNV will increase over time for all strategies because of a decreasing vaccine-type IPD incidence. In 2018/19, the PCV13-NNV will be 5.3 times higher than the PPV23-NNV. Increasing the vaccine uptake will lead to a larger public health impact for all scenarios. Combining PCV13 and PPV23 is most effective, but the additional effect of PCV13 will decrease and is only marginal in 2018/19. Our study demonstrates the importance of increasing PPV23 uptake and of developing vaccines that confer broader immunity. PMID:25979279

  16. Density and duration of experimental human pneumococcal carriage

    PubMed Central

    Gritzfeld, J F; Cremers, A J H; Ferwerda, G; Ferreira, D M; Kadioglu, A; Hermans, P W M; Gordon, S B

    2014-01-01

    The density and duration of pneumococcal carriage are considered to affect the likelihood of transmission and invasive disease. Because of its importance in both spreading and causing disease, carriage has been suggested as an endpoint in future vaccine studies. Culture is the current gold standard for detection, but may not be sensitive enough to detect changes at low density. Healthy adult volunteers received an intranasal inoculation of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B. Pneumococcal density in nasal washes collected at six time-points post-inoculation was determined by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Natural pneumococcal carriers detected at initial screening were followed in parallel. In 331 nasal washes from 79 volunteers, the sensitivity and specificity of pneumococcal detection by qPCR, as compared with culture, were 92.3% and 75.9%. The estimation of pneumococcal density by culture and qPCR was highly correlated (rs = 0.73, p <0.0001), although qPCR had a lower detection limit. Pneumococcal density fluctuated within a carriage episode, and occasionally fell below the detection limit of both methods. The duration of carriage episodes was underestimated when only one method was used. Similar fluctuations in density were observed in natural carriers. Pneumococcal carriage is a dynamic event. Culture and qPCR are complementary for surveying the density and duration of pneumococcal carriage episodes. PMID:24995531

  17. Fulminant pneumococcal infection

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Ryo; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Kajino, Kazunori; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fulminant pneumococcal infection is a fatal pneumococcal infection that tends to occur in immunocompromised hosts, such as patients who are asplenic or on immunosuppressant therapy. We experienced a case of a 73-year-old Japanese man with a medical history of coronary stent implantation and catheter ablation for atrial flutter who presented with dyspnoea at rest. The patient was diagnosed with streptococcal pneumonia based on a urine antigen test and CT. Despite the use of effective antibiotics and systemic therapies, his clinical course was rapidly progressive and he died 18 h after admission. This case of fulminant pneumococcal infection is reported along with the autopsy findings. PMID:25150240

  18. Alcoholic leukopenic pneumococcal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Shaheen, Khaldoon; Alraies, M Chadi

    2013-04-01

    Alcohol abuse has been associated with an increased mortality and morbidity due to increased aspiration, delirium tremens, and seizures. The association of pneumococcal lung infections and leukopenia in the setting of alcohol abuse are rarely reported; however, when present, severe lung infections can happen with severe lung injury and poor response to conventional therapy and ultimately, death. We are reporting a case of 55-year-old-man presented with shortness of breath, cough and altered mental status and eventually found with severe pneumococcal lung infection in the setting of leukopenia and long-term alcohol abuse representing alcoholic leukopenic pneumococcal sepsis syndrome. PMID:23930244

  19. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anselm Chi-Wai; Siao-Ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-08-31

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets. PMID:22184532

  20. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anselm Chi-wai; Siao-ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets. PMID:22184532

  1. Bacteremic skin and soft tissue infection caused by Prevotella loescheii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaerobes are a major component of gut flora. They play an important role in the pathogenesis of infections resulting from breaches in mucus membranes. Because of the difficulties in cultivating and identifying it, their role continues to be undermined. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Prevotella loescheii bacteremic skin and soft tissue infection and review the literature. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian man was admitted for an elective bariatric surgery. A lengthy intensive care unit stay and buttocks decubitus ulcers complicated his post-operative course. After being transferred to a long-term care facility, the decubitus ulcer became secondarily infected with multiple bacteria including P. loescheii; an anaerobe that grew in blood and wound cultures. The patient was treated successfully with aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics and subsequent wound care. Conclusion P. loescheii colonizes the gut and plays an important role in periodontal infections. In rare occasions and under suitable circumstances, it can infect skin and soft tissues as well as joints. Given the difficulties in isolating anaerobes in the microbiology lab, considering this bacterium alongside other anaerobes in infections of devitalized tissue is indicated even if cultures were reported negative. PMID:24661318

  2. Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes and Mortality in Adults and Adolescents in South Africa: Analysis of National Surveillance Data, 2003 - 2008

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; Naidoo, Nireshni; Meiring, Susan; de Gouveia, Linda; von Mollendorf, Claire; Walaza, Sibongile; Naicker, Preneshni; Madhi, Shabir A.; Feldman, Charles; Klugman, Keith P.; Dawood, Halima; von Gottberg, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background An association between pneumococcal serotypes and mortality has been suggested. We aimed to investigate this among individuals aged ≥15 years with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in South Africa. Methods IPD cases were identified through national laboratory-based surveillance at 25 sites, pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) introduction, from 2003–2008. We assessed the association between the 20 commonest serotypes and in-hospital mortality using logistic regression with serotype 4 (the third commonest serotype with intermediate case-fatality ratio (CFR)) as referent. Results Among 3953 IPD cases, CFR was 55% (641/1166) for meningitis and 23% (576/2484) for bacteremia (p<0.001). Serotype 19F had the highest CFR (48%, 100/207), followed by serotype 23F (39%, 99/252) and serotype 1 (38%, 246/651). On multivariable analysis, factors independently associated with mortality included serotype 1 (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.1–3.5) and 19F (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.4–6.1) vs. serotype 4; increasing age (25–44 years, OR 1.8, 95%CI 1.0–3.0; 45–64 years, OR 3.6, 95%CI 2.0–6.4; ≥65 years, OR 5.2, 95%CI 1.9–14.1; vs. 15–24 years); meningitis (OR 4.1, 95%CI 3.0–5.6) vs. bacteremic pneumonia; and HIV infection (OR1.7, 95%CI 1.0–2.8). On stratified multivariate analysis, serotype 19F was associated with increased mortality amongst bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia cases, while no serotype was associated with increased mortality in meningitis cases. Conclusion Mortality was increased in HIV-infected individuals, which may be reduced by increased antiretroviral therapy availability. Serotypes associated with increased mortality are included in the 10-and-13-valent PCV and may become less common in adults due to indirect effects following routine infant immunization. PMID:26460800

  3. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... or HIV infection); or cochlear implants. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Children younger than 2 years old, ...

  4. MedlinePlus: Pneumococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections are Ear infections Sinus infections Pneumonia Sepsis Meningitis How the diagnosis is made depends upon where ... Article: The Earliest Success of Penicillin. Article: Pneumococcal meningitis outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal Infections -- see ...

  5. The Impact of Order Set Use on Pneumococcal Vaccination at the Time of Admission and at the Time of Discharge for Adult Patients in an Acute Inpatient Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathew, Rekha

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pneumococcal vaccination (PV) is important as Streptococcus pneumoniae accounts for one third of all hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia. In 2009, 1.1 million people in the U.S. were hospitalized with pneumonia and more than 50,000 people died from the disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that…

  6. PcpA Promotes Higher Levels of Infection and Modulates Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Melissa M; Novak, Lea; Widener, Rebecca; Grubbs, James Aaron; King, Janice; Hale, Joanetha Y; Ochs, Martina M; Myers, Lisa E; Briles, David E; Deshane, Jessy

    2016-03-01

    We used two different infection models to investigate the kinetics of the PcpA-dependent pneumococcal disease in mice. In a bacteremic pneumonia model, we observed a PcpA-dependent increase in bacterial burden in the lungs, blood, liver, bronchoalveolar lavage, and spleens of mice at 24 h postinfection. This PcpA-dependent effect on bacterial burden appeared earlier (within 12 h) in the focal pneumonia model, which lacks bacteremia or sepsis. Histological changes show that the ability of pneumococci to make PcpA was associated with unresolved inflammation in both models of infection. Using our bacteremic pneumonia model we further investigated the effects of PcpA on recruitment of innate immune regulatory cells. The presence of PcpA was associated with increased IL-6 levels, suppressed production of TRAIL, and reduced infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells. The ability of pneumococci to make PcpA negatively modulated both the infiltration and apoptosis of macrophages and the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor-like cells. The latter have been shown to facilitate the clearance and control of bacterial pneumonia. Taken together, the ability to make PcpA was strongly associated with increased bacterial burden, inflammation, and negative regulation of innate immune cell recruitment to the lung tissue during bacteremic pneumonia. PMID:26829988

  7. Retrospective epidemiological study for the characterization of community- acquired pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia in adults in a well-defined area of Badalona (Barcelona, Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has large impact on direct healthcare costs, especially those derived from hospitalization. This study determines impact, clinical characteristics, outcome and economic consequences of CAP in the adult (≥18 years) population attended in 6 primary-care centers and 2 hospitals in Badalona (Spain) over a two-year period. Methods Medical records were identified by codes from the International Classification of Diseases in databases (January 1st 2008-December 31st 2009). Results A total of 581 patients with CAP (55.6% males, mean age 57.5 years) were identified. Prevalence: 0.64% (95% CI: 0.5%-0.7%); annual incidence: 3.0 cases/1,000 inhabitants (95% CI: 0.2-0.5). Up to 241 (41.5%) required hospitalization. Hospital admission was associated (p<0.002) with liver disease (OR=5.9), stroke (OR=3.6), dementia (OR=3.5), COPD (OR=2.9), diabetes mellitus (OR=1.9) and age (OR=1.1 per year). Length of stay (4.4±0.3 days) was associated with PSI score (β=0.195), in turn associated with age (r=0.827) and Charlson index (r=0.497). Microbiological tests were performed in all inpatients but only in 35% outpatients. Among patients with microbiological tests, results were positive in 51.7%, and among them, S pneumoniae was identified in 57.5% cases. Time to recovery was 29.9±17.2 days. Up to 7.5% inpatients presented complications, 0.8% required ICU admission and 19.1% readmission. Inhospital mortality rate was 2.5%. Adjusted mean total cost was €2,332.4/inpatient and €698.6/outpatient (p<0.001). Patients with pneumococcal CAP (n=107) showed higher comorbidity and hospitalization (76.6%), higher PSI score, larger time to recovery and higher overall costs among inpatients. Conclusions Strategies preventing CAP, thus reducing hospital admissions could likely produce substantial costs savings in addition to the reduction of CAP burden. PMID:23114195

  8. Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Are Associated With Severe Sepsis at Admission: Implication for Empirical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chien; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Hung-Ping; Huang, Yun-Jhong; Wang, Jann-Tay

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical features and treatment outcomes among patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR Enterobacteriaceae and to identify whether MDR pathogens were independently associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation.The clinical data of adult patients visiting and being treated at Chia-Yi Christian Hospital due to bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae from January 2006 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.A total of 585 patients were enrolled. Among them, 220 (37.6%) were caused by the MDR Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 206 patients (35.2%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. Patients in the MDR group tend to be male and have a past history of gout, recurrent UTI, prior hospitalization, hydronephrosis, renal stone, ureteral stone, indwelling urinary catheter, newly development of renal dysfunction, severe sepsis or septic shock, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, receipt of ineffective empirical therapy, longer hospital stay, and higher in-hospital mortality (2.7% vs 1.9%, P = 0.569). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, it is revealed that independent predictors associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation were liver cirrhosis (OR 2.868; 95% CI 1.439-5.716; P = 0.003), indwelling urinary catheter (OR 1.936; 95% CI 1.238-3.027; P = 0.004), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (OR 1.447; 95% CI 1.002-2.090; P = 0.049).Multidrug resistance was associated with the development of severe sepsis or septic shock upon presentation among patients with bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, empirical antibiotics therapy for patients with UTI presented with severe sepsis and/or septic shock should be more broad-spectrum to effectively cover MDR Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27196480

  9. Low vaccination coverage for seasonal influenza and pneumococcal disease among adults at-risk and health care workers in Ireland, 2013: The key role of GPs in recommending vaccination.

    PubMed

    Giese, Coralie; Mereckiene, Jolita; Danis, Kostas; O'Donnell, Joan; O'Flanagan, Darina; Cotter, Suzanne

    2016-07-12

    The World Health Organization (WHO), and European Agencies recommend influenza vaccination for individuals at-risk due to age (≥65 years), underlying diseases, pregnancy and for health care workers (HCWs) in Europe. Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for those at-risk of pneumococcal disease. In Ireland, vaccination uptake among at-risk adults is not routinely available. In 2013, we conducted a national survey among Irish residents ≥18 years of age, to estimate size and vaccination coverage of at-risk groups, and identify predictive factors for influenza vaccination. We used computer assisted telephone interviews to collect self-reported information on health, vaccination status, attitudes towards vaccination. We calculated prevalence and prevalence ratios (PR) using binomial regression. Overall, 1770 individuals participated. For influenza, among those aged 18-64 years, 22% (325/1485) [95%CI: 17%-20%] were at-risk; 28% [95%CI: 23%-33%] were vaccinated. Among those aged ≥65 years, 60% [95%CI: 54%-66%] were vaccinated. Influenza vaccine uptake among HCWs was 28% [95%CI: 21%-35%]. For pneumococcal disease, among those aged 18-64 years, 18% [95%CI: 16%-20%] were at-risk; 16% [95%CI: 12%-21%] reported ever-vaccination; among those aged ≥65 years, 36% [95%CI: 30%-42%] reported ever-vaccination. Main reasons for not receiving influenza vaccine were perceptions of not being at-risk, or not thinking of it; and among HCWs thinking that vaccination was not necessary or they were not at-risk. At-risk individuals were more likely to be vaccinated if their doctor had recommended it (PR 3.2; [95%CI: 2.4%-4.4%]) or they had access to free medical care or free vaccination services (PR 2.0; [95%CI: 1.5%-2.8%]). Vaccination coverage for both influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in at-risk individuals aged 18-64 years was very low. Influenza vaccination coverage among individuals ≥65 years was moderate. Influenza vaccination status was associated with GP vaccination

  10. Metabolites in Blood for Prediction of Bacteremic Sepsis in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Kauppi, Anna M.; Edin, Alicia; Ziegler, Ingrid; Mölling, Paula; Sjöstedt, Anders; Gylfe, Åsa; Strålin, Kristoffer; Johansson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A metabolomics approach for prediction of bacteremic sepsis in patients in the emergency room (ER) was investigated. In a prospective study, whole blood samples from 65 patients with bacteremic sepsis and 49 ER controls were compared. The blood samples were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Multivariate and logistic regression modeling using metabolites identified by chromatography or using conventional laboratory parameters and clinical scores of infection were employed. A predictive model of bacteremic sepsis with 107 metabolites was developed and validated. The number of metabolites was reduced stepwise until identifying a set of 6 predictive metabolites. A 6-metabolite predictive logistic regression model showed a sensitivity of 0.91(95% CI 0.69–0.99) and a specificity 0.84 (95% CI 0.58–0.94) with an AUC of 0.93 (95% CI 0.89–1.01). Myristic acid was the single most predictive metabolite, with a sensitivity of 1.00 (95% CI 0.85–1.00) and specificity of 0.95 (95% CI 0.74–0.99), and performed better than various combinations of conventional laboratory and clinical parameters. We found that a metabolomics approach for analysis of acute blood samples was useful for identification of patients with bacteremic sepsis. Metabolomics should be further evaluated as a new tool for infection diagnostics. PMID:26800189

  11. What are the latest recommendations for pneumococcal vaccines?

    PubMed

    Fabel, Patricia H; Horton, Emily C; Shealy, Kayce

    2016-04-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recently updated its guidelines on pneumococcal pneumonia vaccines for older adults. The new guidelines recommend that patients age 65 years and older receive the PCV13 vaccine in a series along with the PPSV23 vaccine. This article summarizes these changes along with a review of when to vaccinate other key adult populations. PMID:27023652

  12. A Review of Pneumococcal Vaccines: Current Polysaccharide Vaccine Recommendations and Future Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Calvin C.; Rogers, P. David

    2016-01-01

    This review describes development of currently available pneumococcal vaccines, provides summary tables of current pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in children and adults, and describes new potential vaccine antigens in the pipeline. Streptococcus pneumoniae, the bacteria responsible for pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis and bacteremia, remains a cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults. Introductions of unconjugated and conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have each reduced the rate of pneumococcal infections caused by the organism S. pneumoniae. The first vaccine developed, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23), protected adults and children older than 2 years of age against invasive disease caused by the 23 capsular serotypes contained in the vaccine. Because PPSV23 did not elicit a protective immune response in children younger than 2 years of age, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) containing seven of the most common serotypes from PPSV23 in pediatric invasive disease was developed for use in children younger than 2 years of age. The last vaccine to be developed, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), contains the seven serotypes in PCV7, five additional serotypes from PPSV23, and a new serotype not contained in PPSV23 or PCV7. Serotype replacement with virulent strains that are not contained in the polysaccharide vaccines has been observed after vaccine implementation and stresses the need for continued research into novel vaccine antigens. We describe eight potential protein antigens that are in the pipeline for new pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:26997927

  13. A Review of Pneumococcal Vaccines: Current Polysaccharide Vaccine Recommendations and Future Protein Antigens.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Calvin C; Rogers, P David; Shelton, Chasity M

    2016-01-01

    This review describes development of currently available pneumococcal vaccines, provides summary tables of current pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in children and adults, and describes new potential vaccine antigens in the pipeline. Streptococcus pneumoniae, the bacteria responsible for pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis and bacteremia, remains a cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults. Introductions of unconjugated and conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have each reduced the rate of pneumococcal infections caused by the organism S. pneumoniae. The first vaccine developed, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23), protected adults and children older than 2 years of age against invasive disease caused by the 23 capsular serotypes contained in the vaccine. Because PPSV23 did not elicit a protective immune response in children younger than 2 years of age, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) containing seven of the most common serotypes from PPSV23 in pediatric invasive disease was developed for use in children younger than 2 years of age. The last vaccine to be developed, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), contains the seven serotypes in PCV7, five additional serotypes from PPSV23, and a new serotype not contained in PPSV23 or PCV7. Serotype replacement with virulent strains that are not contained in the polysaccharide vaccines has been observed after vaccine implementation and stresses the need for continued research into novel vaccine antigens. We describe eight potential protein antigens that are in the pipeline for new pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:26997927

  14. The Saudi Thoracic Society pneumococcal vaccination guidelines-2016

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, N. S.; Al-Barrak, A. M.; Al-Moamary, M. S.; Zeitouni, M. O.; Idrees, M. M.; Al-Ghobain, M. O.; Al-Shimemeri, A. A.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Saudi Arabia is a host to millions of pilgrims who travel annually from all over the world for Umrah and the Hajj pilgrimages and are at risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia or invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). There is also the risk of transmission of S. pneumoniae including antibiotic resistant strains between pilgrims and their potential global spread upon their return. The country also has unique challenges posed by susceptible population to IPD due to people with hemoglobinopathies, younger age groups with chronic conditions, and growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Since the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease is constantly changing, with an increase in nonvaccine pneumococcal serotypes, vaccination policies on the effectiveness and usefulness of vaccines require regular revision. As part of the Saudi Thoracic Society (STS) commitment to promote the best practices in the field of respiratory diseases, we conducted a review of S. pneumoniae infections and the best evidence base available in the literature. The aim of the present study is to develop the STS pneumococcal vaccination guidelines for healthcare workers in Saudi Arabia. We recommend vaccination against pneumococcal infections for all children <5 years old, adults ≥50 years old, and people ≥6 years old with certain risk factors. These recommendations are based on the presence of a large number of comorbidities in Saudi Arabia population <50 years of age, many of whom have risk factors for contracting pneumococcal infections. A section for pneumococcal vaccination before the Umrah and Hajj pilgrimages is included as well. PMID:27168856

  15. The Saudi Thoracic Society pneumococcal vaccination guidelines-2016.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, N S; Al-Barrak, A M; Al-Moamary, M S; Zeitouni, M O; Idrees, M M; Al-Ghobain, M O; Al-Shimemeri, A A; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Saudi Arabia is a host to millions of pilgrims who travel annually from all over the world for Umrah and the Hajj pilgrimages and are at risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia or invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). There is also the risk of transmission of S. pneumoniae including antibiotic resistant strains between pilgrims and their potential global spread upon their return. The country also has unique challenges posed by susceptible population to IPD due to people with hemoglobinopathies, younger age groups with chronic conditions, and growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Since the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease is constantly changing, with an increase in nonvaccine pneumococcal serotypes, vaccination policies on the effectiveness and usefulness of vaccines require regular revision. As part of the Saudi Thoracic Society (STS) commitment to promote the best practices in the field of respiratory diseases, we conducted a review of S. pneumoniae infections and the best evidence base available in the literature. The aim of the present study is to develop the STS pneumococcal vaccination guidelines for healthcare workers in Saudi Arabia. We recommend vaccination against pneumococcal infections for all children <5 years old, adults ≥50 years old, and people ≥6 years old with certain risk factors. These recommendations are based on the presence of a large number of comorbidities in Saudi Arabia population <50 years of age, many of whom have risk factors for contracting pneumococcal infections. A section for pneumococcal vaccination before the Umrah and Hajj pilgrimages is included as well. PMID:27168856

  16. Pneumococcal Disease in the Era of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Inci; Shea, Kimberly M; Pelton, Stephen I

    2015-12-01

    Universal immunization of infants and toddlers with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines over the last 15 years has dramatically altered the landscape of pneumococcal disease. Decreases in invasive pneumococcal disease, all-cause pneumonia, empyema, mastoiditis, acute otitis media, and complicated otitis media have been reported from multiple countries in which universal immunization has been implemented. Children with comorbid conditions have higher rates of pneumococcal disease and increased case fatality rates compared with otherwise healthy children, and protection for the most vulnerable pediatric patients will require new strategies to address the underlying host susceptibility and the expanded spectrum of serotypes observed. PMID:26610421

  17. Invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with haematological malignancies before routine use of conjugate vaccines in Finland.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Vesa; Aittoniemi, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Klemets, Peter; Ollgren, Jukka; Silvennoinen, Raija; Nuorti, J Pekka; Sinisalo, Marjatta

    2016-05-01

    The baseline national invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence rate, serotype distribution and serotype coverage of pneumococcal vaccines were evaluated in patients with Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, myeloma and leukaemia within 1 year after haematological diagnosis during 1995-2002, before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Pneumococcal serotype distribution among these patients was different from serotypes causing IPD in the general population. The serotype coverages of PCV13 and PPSV23 were 57% and 64%, respectively, lower than in the general population. This reflects a higher predisposition to IPD in vaccinated patients with haematological malignancies and possibly less benefit of herd immunity gained with the wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in the general population. This data will be useful as a baseline for determining the future role of adult PCV vaccination in these patient groups. PMID:26635103

  18. Case Report of Low Virulence Francisella tularensis Presented as Severe Bacteremic Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ting-Yi; Shie, Shian-Sen; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tularemia is a zoonotic infection seen primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. It is caused by the bacteria Francisella tularensis. Although the ulceroglandular form of the disease is the more common manifestation of infection, F tularensis is known to cause pneumonia. F tularensis has two predominant subspecies, namely subsp. tularensis (type A) and subsp. holarctica (type B). Type B tularemia is considered to be much less virulent than type A and barely caused lethal disease and pneumonia. We reported a case with a 68-year-old man immune-compromised patient diagnosed with bacteremic pneumonia engendered by type B tularemia with initial presentation of high fever, pneumonia with pleural effusion; the diagnosis was performed using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The patient's fever, pneumonia, and pleural effusion were resolved with appropriate antibiotics for tularemia. This case involving severe bacteremic pneumonia in an immune-compromised patient is rare. This case suggests that low virulence F tularensis should be included in the differential diagnoses of bacteremic pneumonia for endemic tularemia. PMID:27175638

  19. Pneumococcal Vaccines: Understanding Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is a common and serious health problem that is best prevented by the pneumococcal vaccine. The first vaccine approved by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration in 1977 contained 14 polysaccharide antigens. An improved vaccine introduced in 1983 included 23 polysaccharide antigens. Both vaccines were effective for immunocompetent adults; however, young children and immunocompromised adults remained susceptible. A pediatric vaccine was developed consisting of the capsular antigens of seven pneumococcal serotypes commonly found in children. The antigens in this preparation are covalently conjugated to diphtheria protein to make them more antigenic. The conjugate vaccine was expanded to include 13 serotypes by 2010. Although more immunogenic, the conjugate vaccine has fewer serotypes than the older 23-valent vaccine. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that children at risk for pneumococcal pneumonia as defined by the presence of chronic disease should receive the 13-valent conjugated vaccine. Adults at risk for pneumococcal pneumonia, which includes those over 65 years of age and those who have a chronic disease, should receive the 23-polysaccharide vaccine. Immunosuppressed patients of any age should receive both vaccines. Adults should be revaccinated once at age 65 years or older with the 23-polysaccharide vaccine provided that at least 5 years have elapsed since the previous vaccination. PMID:25032872

  20. Heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine elicits similar antibody response as standard 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine in adult patients with RA treated with immunomodulating drugs.

    PubMed

    Kapetanovic, Meliha Crnkic; Roseman, Carmen; Jönsson, Göran; Truedsson, Lennart

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of the study were to compare antibody response in immunosuppressed patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after vaccination with heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) to that of RA patients and healthy controls vaccinated with 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and to study the impact of disease and/or treatment characteristics and type of vaccine on antibody response following pneumococcal vaccination in patients with RA. In total, 253 RA patients treated with methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNF blockers as monotherapy or anti-TNF + MTX were vaccinated with a single dose (0.5 ml) of PCV7. In addition, 149 RA patients receiving corresponding treatments and 47 healthy controls were vaccinated with a single dose (0.5 ml) of PPV23. Serotype-specific IgG to 23F and 6B were measured at vaccination and 4-6 weeks after vaccination using ELISA. Antibody response ratio (ARR), i.e. ratio between post-/prevaccination antibody levels, was compared between corresponding treatment groups. Differences in ARR were analysed using analysis of variance. Positive antibody response (posAR) was defined as equal to or greater than twofold increase in prevaccination antibody levels. Possible predictors of posAR were analysed using logistic regression model. Corresponding RA treatment groups showed similar ARR and posAR for both serotypes regardless of vaccine type. Higher age at vaccination and concomitant MTX were identified as predictors of impaired posAR for both serotypes tested, whereas type of vaccine did not influence posAR significantly. PCV7 elicits similar antibody response as PPV23 in patients with RA receiving immunosuppressive treatment. In RA patients, higher age and MTX treatment but not type of vaccine predicted impaired posAR. PMID:21956234

  1. Facts about Rubella for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  2. Facts about Mumps for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  3. Pneumococcal Vaccination: Who Needs It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... News and Media Resources News Newsletters Events Pneumococcal Vaccination: Who Needs It? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... doses will depend on the child's age when vaccination begins. Ask your healthcare provider for details. Children ...

  4. Three-O-methylglucose transport in soleus muscle of bacteremic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, M.V.; Sayeed, M.M.

    1987-07-01

    Basal and insulin-stimulated soleus muscle 3-O-(/sup 14/C)merhylglucose ((/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG) transport was studied in vitro and in vivo during bacteremia in rats. Fasted rats were injected with Escherichia coli to produce bacteremia (B), and controls (C) received saline. In vitro studies using soleus muscles were carried out 8 of 12 hr after bacterial injection, and transport was measured using the rate coefficient (lambda = min/sup /minus/1/). Although insulin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport was decreased in 12-h bacteremic rat muscles the basal (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport was rate coefficient was elevated. For in vivo studies, (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG with or without insulin was injected into rats 10-40 min prior to removing soleus muscles at 12 h postbacterial or postsaline injection. Transport was measured as the ratio of (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG/sub intracell//(/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG/sub extracell/. Basal ratios were not different and muscles from both control and bacteremic rats responded comparably to insulin with increased (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport during the initial 30 min. At 35-40 min postinsulin injection there was a further stimulation of (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport in control but not in 12-h bacteremic rat muscles. The changes in (/sup 14/C)-3-O-MG transport observed in vitro and in vivo after 12 h of bacteremia may be due to circulating mediators and/or changes in membrane function.

  5. A cohort study of bacteremic pneumonia: The importance of antibiotic resistance and appropriate initial therapy?

    PubMed

    Guillamet, Cristina Vazquez; Vazquez, Rodrigo; Noe, Jonas; Micek, Scott T; Kollef, Marin H

    2016-08-01

    Bacteremic pneumonia is usually associated with greater mortality. However, risk factors associated with hospital mortality in bacteremic pneumonia are inadequately described.The study was a retrospective cohort study, conducted in Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2008-2015). For purposes of this investigation, antibiotic susceptibility was determined according to ceftriaxone susceptibility, as ceftriaxone represents the antimicrobial agent most frequently recommended for hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia as opposed to nosocomial pneumonia. Two multivariable analyses were planned: the first model included resistance to ceftriaxone as a variable, whereas the second model included the various antibiotic-resistant species (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae).In all, 1031 consecutive patients with bacteremic pneumonia (mortality 37.1%) were included. The most common pathogens associated with infection were S aureus (34.1%; methicillin resistance 54.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (28.0%), P aeruginosa (10.6%), anaerobic bacteria (7.3%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (5.6%). Compared with ceftriaxone-susceptible pathogens (46.8%), ceftriaxone-resistant pathogens (53.2%) were significantly more likely to receive inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment (IIAT) (27.9% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001) and to die during hospitalization (41.5% vs 32.0%; P = 0.001). The first logistic regression analysis identified IIAT with the greatest odds ratio (OR) for mortality (OR 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-3.2, P < 0.001). Other independent predictors of mortality included age, mechanical ventilation, immune suppression, prior hospitalization, prior antibiotic administration, septic shock, comorbid conditions, and severity of illness. In the second multivariable analysis that included the antibiotic-resistant species, IIAT was still associated with excess mortality, and P aeruginosa infection was identified as an

  6. Should Pneumococcal Vaccines Eliminate Nasopharyngeal Colonization?

    PubMed Central

    Swiatlo, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Streptococcus pneumoniae remains an important human pathogen. For more than 100 years, there have been vaccine efforts to prevent pneumococcal infection. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have significantly reduced invasive disease. However, these vaccines have changed pneumococcal ecology within the human nasopharynx. We suggest that elimination of the pneumococcus from the human nasopharynx can have consequences that should be considered as the next generation of pneumococcal vaccines is developed. PMID:27222469

  7. Should Pneumococcal Vaccines Eliminate Nasopharyngeal Colonization?

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Larry S; Swiatlo, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae remains an important human pathogen. For more than 100 years, there have been vaccine efforts to prevent pneumococcal infection. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have significantly reduced invasive disease. However, these vaccines have changed pneumococcal ecology within the human nasopharynx. We suggest that elimination of the pneumococcus from the human nasopharynx can have consequences that should be considered as the next generation of pneumococcal vaccines is developed. PMID:27222469

  8. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Australia, 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Bareja, Chritina; Toms, Cindy; Lodo, Kerryn; de Kluyver, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was conducted in all Australian states and territories in 2009 and 2010 with comprehensive comparative data available since 2002. There were 1,556 cases of IPD notified to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System in Australia in 2009, a notification rate of 7.2 cases per 100,000 population. In 2010 there were 1,640 cases, a notification rate of 7.4 cases per 100,000. The overall rate of IPD in Indigenous Australians was almost 6 times the rate in non-Indigenous Australians in both 2009 and 2010. In 2009 and 2010, notification rates of IPD caused by serotypes included in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) continued to decrease across all age groups. Rates of IPD caused by non-7vPCV serotypes continued to show an increasing trend in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous children aged less than 5 years. In Indigenous adults (≥50 years), rates of IPD caused by both 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23vPPV) serotypes and non-23vPPV serotypes continued to show an overall increase, particularly in 2010. There were 110 deaths attributed to IPD in 2009 and 137 in 2010, although it should be noted that deaths may be under-reported. The number of invasive pneumococcal isolates with reduced penicillin susceptibility remained low and reduced susceptibility to third generation cephalosporins was rare. PMID:26234260

  9. Fatal Levofloxacin Failure in Treatment of a Bacteremic Patient Infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae with a Preexisting parC Mutation▿

    PubMed Central

    de Cueto, M.; Rodríguez, J. M.; Soriano, M. J.; López-Cerero, L.; Venero, J.; Pascual, A.

    2008-01-01

    The fatal outcome of levofloxacin treatment in a patient with bacteremic pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae with a preexisting parC mutation is reported. Failure was due to the emergence of a gyrA mutation after 4 days of therapy. Problems encountered in detecting first-step mutation isolates are discussed. PMID:18287316

  10. Bacteremic Disseminated Tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Crump, John A.; Ramadhani, Habib O.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Mwako, Mtumwa S.; Yang, Lan-Yan; Chow, Shein-Chung; Njau, Boniface N.; Mushi, Godfrey S.; Maro, Venance P.; Reller, L. Barth; Bartlett, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Disseminated tuberculosis is a major health problem in countries where generalized human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection epidemics coincide with high tuberculosis incidence rates; data are limited on patient outcomes beyond the inpatient period. Methods. We enrolled consecutive eligible febrile inpatients in Moshi, Tanzania, from 10 March 2006 through 28 August 2010; those with Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia were followed up monthly for 12 months. Survival, predictors of bacteremic disseminated tuberculosis, and predictors of death were assessed. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) and tuberculosis treatment were provided. Results. A total of 508 participants were enrolled; 29 (5.7%) had M. tuberculosis isolated by blood culture. The median age of all study participants was 37.4 years (range, 13.6–104.8 years). Cough lasting >1 month (odds ratio [OR], 13.5; P < .001), fever lasting >1 month (OR, 7.8; P = .001), weight loss of >10% (OR, 10.0; P = .001), lymphadenopathy (OR 6.8; P = .002), HIV infection (OR, undefined; P < .001), and lower CD4 cell count and total lymphocyte count were associated with bacteremic disseminated tuberculosis. Fifty percent of participants with M. tuberculosis bacteremia died within 36 days of enrollment. Lower CD4 cell count (OR, 0.88; P = .049) and lower total lymphocyte count (OR, 0.76; P = .050) were associated with death. Magnitude of mycobacteremia tended to be higher among those with lower CD4 cell counts, but did not predict death. Conclusions. In the era of free ART and access to tuberculosis treatment, almost one half of patients with M. tuberculosis bacteremia may die within a month of hospitalization. Simple clinical assessments can help to identify those with the condition. Advanced immunosuppression predicts death. Efforts should focus on early diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection, tuberculosis, and disseminated disease. PMID:22511551

  11. Pneumococcal vaccination: what have we learnt so far and what can we expect in the future?

    PubMed

    Torres, A; Bonanni, P; Hryniewicz, W; Moutschen, M; Reinert, R R; Welte, T

    2015-01-01

    Individuals <2 years and ≥ 50 years of age, as well as those with other specific risk factors, are especially vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Conjugate vaccines have been developed against encapsulated bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae to provide improved immune responses. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has significantly reduced the burden of vaccine-type pneumococcal diseases in children, including invasive disease and pneumonia and acute otitis media. There have also been significant declines in antimicrobial resistance in 7-valent vaccine serotypes and carriage of S. pneumoniae in the post-PCV7 era. Two to three years after the introduction of PCV13, there is emerging, global evidence of a reduced burden of pneumococcal diseases in children, including declines in IPD (UK and Germany) and nasopharyngeal carriage of PCV13 serotypes (Portugal and France). The functional immunogenicity of PCV13 in individuals ≥ 50 years of age has been demonstrated in clinical trials in comparison with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and for children and adults 6 to 49 years of age. Between 2011 and 2013, PCV13 received market authorisation by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for these additional age groups and is now available in Europe for the prevention of pneumococcal disease in all age groups. PMID:25149825

  12. Performance of a Pneumolysin Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    del Mar García-Suárez, María; Cima-Cabal, María Dolores; Villaverde, Roberto; Espinosa, Emma; Falguera, Miquel; de Los Toyos, Juan R.; Vázquez, Fernando; Méndez, Francisco J.

    2007-01-01

    A pneumolysin-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PLY-ELISA) for the detection of pneumolysin in urine was developed and evaluated in comparison with the commercially available Binax Now Streptococcus pneumoniae test (Binax, Portland, ME) for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infections. Assay sensitivity was evaluated using urine from 108 patients with culture-confirmed pneumococcal infections. In adults, the sensitivity and specificity of the PLY-ELISA were 56.6% and 92.2%, respectively. In children with nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage, PLY-ELISA and Binax Now S. pneumoniae test sensitivities were 62.5% and 87.5%, respectively, while specificities were 94.4% and 27.8%, respectively. In children with nonnasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage, PLY-ELISA and Binax Now S. pneumoniae test sensitivities were 68.7% and 93.7%, respectively, and test specificities were 94.1% and 41.2%, respectively. The persistence of pneumolysin in urine of pneumococcal pneumonia patients decreased significantly after 4 to 6 days of treatment. Our data suggest that combining the high specificity of the PLY-ELISA with the high sensitivity of the Binax Now S. pneumoniae test would enable pneumococcal infections to be accurately diagnosed in children. PMID:17728474

  13. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  14. Evolving pneumococcal serotypes and sequence types in relation to high antibiotic stress and conditional pneumococcal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lin-Hui; Kuo, An-Jing; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Li, Hsin-Chieh; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Feng, Ye; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan, beginning in 2013, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was provided free of charge to children 2–5 years of age. In 2014, this was extended to children 1–5 years old. During 2012–2014, 953 cases of culture-confirmed pneumococcal disease (CCPD), including 104 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), were prospectively identified and analyzed at a 3,700-bed hospital in Taiwan. From 2012 to 2014, the incidence per 10,000 admissions decreased from 26.7 to 20.4 for CCPD (P < 0.001) and from 3.2 to 1.9 for IPD (P < 0.05). Significant reduction of PCV13 serotypes was firstly noted in children in 2013 and extended to both paediatric and adult populations in 2014. Simultaneously, the incidence per 10,000 admissions of non-PCV13 serotypes increased from 6.1 in 2012 to 9.3 in 2014 (P < 0.005). The most prevalent non-PCV13 serotypes were 15A, 15B, and 23A, each containing a predominant clone, ST6315A, ST8315B, and ST33823A. From 2012 to 2014, isolates with penicillin minimum inhibitory concentrations >2 mg/L decreased from 27.8% to 8.1% (P < 0.001) among all isolates. PCV13 immunization in young children demonstrated an early protective effect in all ages. However, in the elderly, the effect was compromised by an emergence of non-PCV13 serotypes. PMID:26522920

  15. Risk Factors for Death from Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, Europe, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana Gomes; Hruba, Frantiska; Lopalco, Pier Luigi; Pastore-Celentano, Lucia; Gauci, Andrew J. Amato

    2015-01-01

    We studied the possible association between patient age and sex, clinical presentation, Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype, antimicrobial resistance, and death in invasive pneumococcal disease cases reported by 17 European countries during 2010. The study sample comprised 2,921 patients, of whom 56.8% were men and 38.2% were >65 years of age. Meningitis occurred in 18.5% of cases. Death was reported in 264 (9.0%) cases. Older age, meningitis, and nonsusceptibility to penicillin were significantly associated with death. Non–pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) serotypes among children <5 years of age and 7-valent PCV serotypes among persons 5–64 years of age were associated with increased risk for death; among adults >65 years of age, risk did not differ by serotype. These findings highlight differences in case-fatality rates between serotypes and age; thus, continued epidemiologic surveillance across all ages is crucial to monitor the long-term effects of PCVs. PMID:25693604

  16. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Australia, 2011 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Toms, Cindy; de Kluyver, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, there were 1,883 cases (8.3 per 100,000 population) of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) notified to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) in 2011 and 1,823 cases (8.0 per 100,000) in 2012. The overall rate of IPD in Indigenous Australians was 9 times the rate of IPD in non-Indigenous Australians in 2011 and 7 times in 2012. Following the July 2011 introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (13vPCV) to the National Immunisation Program, rates of IPD in children aged less than 5 years decreased from 19.5 per 100,000 in 2011 to 12.6 per 100,000 in 2012. In Indigenous adults aged 50 years or over the rates of IPD caused by serotypes included in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23vPPV) continued to increase in both 2011 (47.2 per 100,000) and 2012 (51.2 per 100,000). The rates of IPD in non-Indigenous adults aged 65 years or over caused by serotypes included in the 23vPPV also increased in 2011 (10.1 per 100,000) and 2012 (11.2 per 100,000). There were 134 deaths attributable to IPD in 2011 and 126 in 2012, although it should be noted that deaths may be under-reported. The number of invasive pneumococcal isolates with reduced penicillin susceptibility remained low and reduced susceptibility to ceftriaxone/cefotaxime continued to be rare. PMID:27522138

  17. Dual function of pneumolysin in the early pathogenesis of murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Rubins, J B; Charboneau, D; Paton, J C; Mitchell, T J; Andrew, P W; Janoff, E N

    1995-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common etiologic agents of community-acquired pneumonia, particularly bacteremic pneumonia. Pneumolysin, a multifunctional cytotoxin, is a putative virulence factor for S. pneumoniae; however, a direct role for pneumolysin in the early pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia has not been confirmed in vivo. We compared the growth of a pneumolysin-deficient (PLY[-]) type 2 S. pneumoniae strain with its isogenic wild-type strain (PLY[+]) after direct endotracheal instillation of bacteria into murine lungs. Compared with PLY(-) bacteria, infection with PLY(+) bacteria produced greater injury to the alveolar-capillary barrier, as assayed by albumin concentrations in alveolar lavage, and substantially greater numbers of PLY(+) bacteria were recovered in alveolar lavages and lung homogenates at 3 and 6 h after infection. The presence of pneumolysin also contributed to the development of bacteremia, which was detected at 3 h after intratracheal instillation of PLY(+) bacteria. The direct effects of pneumolysin on lung injury and on the ability of pneumococci to evade local lung defenses was confirmed by addition of purified recombinant pneumolysin to inocula of PLY(-) pneumococci, which promoted growth of PLY(-) bacteria in the lung to levels comparable to those seen with the PLY(+) strain. We further demonstrated the contributions of both the cytolytic and the complement-activating properties of pneumolysin on enhanced bacterial growth in murine lungs using genetically modified pneumolysin congeners and genetically complement-deficient mice. Thus, pneumolysin facilitates intraalveolar replication of pneumococci, penetration of bacteria from alveoli into the interstitium of the lung, and dissemination of pneumococci into the bloodstream during experimental pneumonia. Moreover, both the cytotoxic and the complement-activating activities of pneumolysin may contribute independently to the acute pulmonary injury and the high rates of

  18. Pneumococcal Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPV23) English 肺炎球菌多糖疫苗 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) PDF ... Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPV23) English Русский (Russian) PDF Immunization Action ...

  19. Molecular features of heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bacteremic patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA) bacteremia is an emerging infection. Our objective was to determine the molecular features of hVISA strains isolated from bacteremic patients and to compare them to methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) blood isolates. Results We assessed phenotypic and genomic changes of hVISA (n = 24), MRSA (n = 16) and MSSA (n = 17) isolates by PCR to determine staphylococcal chromosomal cassette (SCCmec) types, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the accessory gene regulator (agr) loci. Biofilm formation was quantified. Genetic relatedness was assessed by PFGE. PFGE analysis of isolates was diverse suggesting multiple sources of infection. 50% of hVISA isolates carried SCCmec type I, 21% type II; 25% type V; in 4% the SCCmec type could not be identified. Among MRSA isolates, 44% were SCCmec type I, 12.5% type II, 25% type V, 12.5% were non-typable, and 6% were SCCmec type IVd. Only one hVISA isolate and two MSSA isolates carried the PVL. Biofilm formation and agr patterns were diverse. Conclusion hVISA isolates were diverse in all parameters tested. A considerable number of hVISA and MRSA strains carried the SCCmec type V cassette, which was not related to community acquisition. PMID:19732456

  20. A Retrospective Study of the Clinical Burden of Hospitalized All-Cause and Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Canada

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Shelly A.; Qizilbash, Nawab; Ye, Jian; Gray, Sharon; Zanotti, Giovanni; Munson, Samantha; Dartois, Nathalie; Laferriere, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Routine vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae is recommended in Canada for infants, the elderly, and individuals with chronic comorbidity. National incidence and burden of all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia in Canada (excluding Quebec) were assessed. Methods. Incidence, length of stay, and case-fatality rates of hospitalized all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia were determined for 2004–2010 using ICD-10 discharge data from the Canadian Institutes for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database. Population-at-risk data were obtained from the Statistics Canada census. Temporal changes in pneumococcal and all-cause pneumonia rates in adults ≥65 years were analyzed by logistic regression. Results. Hospitalization for all-cause pneumonia was highest in children <5 years and in adults >70 years and declined significantly from 1766/100,000 to 1537/100,000 per year in individuals aged ≥65 years (P < 0.001). Overall hospitalization for pneumococcal pneumonia also declined from 6.40/100,000 to 5.08/100,000 per year. Case-fatality rates were stable (11.6% to 12.3%). Elderly individuals had longer length of stay and higher case-fatality rates than younger groups. Conclusions. All-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalization rates declined between 2004 and 2010 in Canada (excluding Quebec). Direct and indirect effects from pediatric pneumococcal immunization may partly explain some of this decline. Nevertheless, the burden of disease from pneumonia remains high. PMID:27445530

  1. Call to action on pneumococcal disease: review of vaccination evidence and outcomes of webcast programs.

    PubMed

    Grogg, Stanley E; Schultz, Jan

    2015-06-01

    In 2015, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices issued updated recommendations for the use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) to immunize adults aged 19 to 64 years with risk factors and all adults aged 65 years or older. Despite these recommendations, rates of vaccination among adults remain low. Federal and state initiatives have been launched to encourage health care providers to incorporate vaccination screening and recommendations in practice. Several resources are available to improve vaccination rates, including implementing electronic medical records; engaging non-physician staff in assessing vaccination history and administering immunizations; adopting standing order protocols; and implementing strong recommendations to patients regarding needed immunizations. However, even in the face of compelling evidence-based research, implementing changes in practice is challenging. The American Osteopathic Association implemented a 2-part Web program called the Call to Action on Pneumococcal Disease. Although some changes in attitudes and intent to change were demonstrated by this initiative, there were no statistically significant increases in self-reported actual adoption of standing order protocols or increases in adult pneumococcal immunization. Nonetheless, some lessons were learned, and these results support the need for ongoing efforts in this area of medicine. PMID:26000904

  2. Polyamine transporter in Streptococcus pneumoniae is essential for evading early innate immune responses in pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Aswathy N.; Thornton, Justin A.; Stokes, John; Sunesara, Imran; Swiatlo, Edwin; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common bacterial etiology of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults worldwide. Genomic plasticity, antibiotic resistance and extreme capsular antigenic variation complicates the design of effective therapeutic strategies. Polyamines are ubiquitous small cationic molecules necessary for full expression of pneumococcal virulence. Polyamine transport system is an attractive therapeutic target as it is highly conserved across pneumococcal serotypes. In this study, we compared an isogenic deletion strain of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 in polyamine transport operon (ΔpotABCD) with the wild type in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Our results show that the wild type persists in mouse lung 24 h post infection while the mutant strain is cleared by host defense mechanisms. We show that intact potABCD is required for survival in the host by providing resistance to neutrophil killing. Comparative proteomics analysis of murine lungs infected with wild type and ΔpotABCD pneumococci identified expression of proteins that could confer protection to wild type strain and help establish infection. We identified ERM complex, PGLYRP1, PTPRC/CD45 and POSTN as new players in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Additionally, we found that deficiency of polyamine transport leads to up regulation of the polyamine synthesis genes speE and cad in vitro. PMID:27247105

  3. Polyamine transporter in Streptococcus pneumoniae is essential for evading early innate immune responses in pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rai, Aswathy N; Thornton, Justin A; Stokes, John; Sunesara, Imran; Swiatlo, Edwin; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common bacterial etiology of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults worldwide. Genomic plasticity, antibiotic resistance and extreme capsular antigenic variation complicates the design of effective therapeutic strategies. Polyamines are ubiquitous small cationic molecules necessary for full expression of pneumococcal virulence. Polyamine transport system is an attractive therapeutic target as it is highly conserved across pneumococcal serotypes. In this study, we compared an isogenic deletion strain of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 in polyamine transport operon (ΔpotABCD) with the wild type in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Our results show that the wild type persists in mouse lung 24 h post infection while the mutant strain is cleared by host defense mechanisms. We show that intact potABCD is required for survival in the host by providing resistance to neutrophil killing. Comparative proteomics analysis of murine lungs infected with wild type and ΔpotABCD pneumococci identified expression of proteins that could confer protection to wild type strain and help establish infection. We identified ERM complex, PGLYRP1, PTPRC/CD45 and POSTN as new players in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Additionally, we found that deficiency of polyamine transport leads to up regulation of the polyamine synthesis genes speE and cad in vitro. PMID:27247105

  4. Pneumococcal Sepsis Complicated by Splenic Abscesses and Purpura Fulminans in a 15-Month-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Pangonis, Scott; Patamasucon, Pisespong; Fitzpatrick, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an invasive organism that causes a wide range of common diseases, including sinusitis, acute otitis media, and pneumonia. Splenic abscesses and purpura fulminans (PF) are rare complications of pneumococcal disease. Splenic abscesses caused by S pneumoniae have only been reported in the adult literature. PF has been described in the pediatric population as a rare complication in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) with and without underlying immunological disorders such as asplenia. Here, we report a patient with IPD complicated by splenic abscesses and PF. Our patient initially presented with bacteremia, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She subsequently developed PF and splenic abscesses. She survived her illness after receiving a total of 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This case highlights 2 rare complications of IPD and demonstrates the need to keep pneumococcal disease in the differential diagnosis even in children whose vaccination status is up to date. PMID:27006958

  5. Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of infants on pneumonia and influenza hospitalization and mortality in all age groups in the United States.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Lone; Taylor, Robert J; Young-Xu, Yinong; Haber, Michael; May, Larissa; Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduced in the United States in 2000 has been shown to reduce invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both vaccinated children and adults through induction of herd immunity. We assessed the impact of infant immunization on pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations and mortality in all age groups using Health Care Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (SID) for 1996 to 2006 from 10 states; SID contain 100% samples of ICD9-coded hospitalization data for the selected states. Compared to a 1996-1997 through 1998-1999 baseline, by the 2005-2006 season, both IPD and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations and deaths had decreased substantially in all age groups, including a 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38 to 54%) reduction in nonbacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (ICD9 code 481 with no codes indicating IPD) in infants <2 years old and a 54% reduction (CI, 53 to 56%) in adults ≥65 years of age. A model developed to calculate the total burden of pneumococcal pneumonia prevented by infant PCV7 vaccination in the United States from 2000 to 2006 estimated a reduction of 788,838 (CI, 695,406 to 875,476) hospitalizations for pneumococcal pneumonia. Ninety percent of the reduction in model-attributed pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations occurred through herd immunity among adults 18 years old and older; similar proportions were found in pneumococcal disease mortality prevented by the vaccine. In the first seasons after PCV introduction, when there were substantial state differences in coverage among <5-year-olds, states with greater coverage had significantly fewer influenza-associated pneumonia hospitalizations among children, suggesting that PCV7 use also reduces influenza-attributable pneumonia hospitalizations. PMID:21264063

  6. Use of Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analyses To Identify Nonhemolytic Streptococci Isolated from Bacteremic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Tomonori; Fujiwara, Taku; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate molecular and phenotypic methods for the identification of nonhemolytic streptococci. A collection of 148 strains consisting of 115 clinical isolates from cases of infective endocarditis, septicemia, and meningitis and 33 reference strains, including type strains of all relevant Streptococcus species, were examined. Identification was performed by phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of four housekeeping genes, ddl, gdh, rpoB, and sodA; by PCR analysis of the glucosyltransferase (gtf) gene; and by conventional phenotypic characterization and identification using two commercial kits, Rapid ID 32 STREP and STREPTOGRAM and the associated databases. A phylogenetic tree based on concatenated sequences of the four housekeeping genes allowed unequivocal differentiation of recognized species and was used as the reference. Analysis of single gene sequences revealed deviation clustering in eight strains (5.4%) due to homologous recombination with other species. This was particularly evident in S. sanguinis and in members of the anginosus group of streptococci. The rate of correct identification of the strains by both commercial identification kits was below 50% but varied significantly between species. The most significant problems were observed with S. mitis and S. oralis and 11 Streptococcus species described since 1991. Our data indicate that identification based on multilocus sequence analysis is optimal. As a more practical alternative we recommend identification based on sodA sequences with reference to a comprehensive set of sequences that is available for downloading from our server. An analysis of the species distribution of 107 nonhemolytic streptococci from bacteremic patients showed a predominance of S. oralis and S. anginosus with various underlying infections. PMID:16333101

  7. Pneumococcal Disease: Risk Factors and Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis Risk Factors and Transmission Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... the brain and spinal cord) Who smoke cigarettes Transmission Pneumococcal bacteria spread from person-to-person by ...

  8. Pneumococcal Vaccine in Diabetes: Relevance in India.

    PubMed

    Shashank, R Joshi; Samika, S Joshi; Siddharth, N Shah

    2015-04-01

    Currently we have more than 65 million Diabetes patients in India with estimated 80 million prediabetics. Diabetes is a immunologically vulnerable population to develop all types of microbial infections. Pneumoccocal infections do have a substantial morbidity and mortality burden in the community. India has a large geriatric pool now which has substantially increased pneumococcal disease burden. Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for pneumococcal infection and predisposes individuals to nasopharyngeal colonization with the pneumococcus which is associated with invasive infection. In diabetics who are elderly, with chronic kidney or pulmonary disease and long standing duration of the disease with poor glycemic control are the highest risk group susceptible to invasive pneumococcal disease. With now availibilty of Pneumoccal vaccine in India, now it may be an preventive option which can be offered. Most global organisations recommend pneumococcal vaccination to diabetics. PMID:26562963

  9. Clearance of Pneumococcal Colonization in Infants Is Delayed through Altered Macrophage Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Steven J.; Tamashiro, Edwin; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Infections are a common cause of infant mortality worldwide, especially due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Colonization is the prerequisite to invasive pneumococcal disease, and is particularly frequent and prolonged in children, though the mechanisms underlying this susceptibility are unknown. We find that infant mice exhibit prolonged pneumococcal carriage, and are delayed in recruiting macrophages, the effector cells of clearance, into the nasopharyngeal lumen. This lack of macrophage recruitment is paralleled by a failure to upregulate chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (Ccl2 or Mcp-1), a macrophage chemoattractant that is required in adult mice to promote clearance. Baseline expression of Ccl2 and the related chemokine Ccl7 is higher in the infant compared to the adult upper respiratory tract, and this effect requires the infant microbiota. These results demonstrate that signals governing macrophage recruitment are altered at baseline in infant mice, which prevents the development of appropriate innate cell infiltration in response to pneumococcal colonization, delaying clearance of pneumococcal carriage. PMID:26107875

  10. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... statements/ppv.html CDC review information for Pneumococcal Polysaccharide VIS: Page last reviewed: April 24, 2015 Page ...

  11. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) - What you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/pcv13.html CDC review information for Pneumococcal Conjugate VIS: ... the disease, through vaccination, even more important. 2. PCV13 vaccine Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (called PCV13) protects against ...

  12. Invasive pneumococcal disease leads to activation and hyperreactivity of platelets.

    PubMed

    Tunjungputri, Rahajeng N; de Jonge, Marien I; de Greeff, Astrid; van Selm, Saskia; Buys, Herma; Harders-Westerveen, Jose F; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Phillip G; Smith, Hilde E; van der Ven, Andre J; de Mast, Quirijn

    2016-08-01

    Using a novel porcine model of intravenous Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, we showed that invasive pneumococcal infections induce marked platelet activation and hyperreactivity. This may contribute to the vascular complications seen in pneumococcal infection. PMID:27322088

  13. Survey of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents Regarding Pneumococcal Vaccination in Pregnancy: Education, Knowledge, and Barriers to Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Emily E.; Hoppe, Kara K.; Schulkin, Jay; Eckert, Linda O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for adults over 65 years of age and younger adults with certain medical conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state insufficient evidence to recommend routine pneumococcal vaccination during pregnancy, but the vaccine is indicated for pregnant women with certain medical conditions. We designed this project to gauge obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) resident knowledge of maternal pneumococcal vaccination. Methods. We administered a 22-question survey to OB/GYN residents about maternal pneumococcal vaccination. We performed descriptive analysis for each question. Results. 238 OB/GYN residents responded. Overall, 69.3% of residents reported receiving vaccination education and 86.0% reported having ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. Most residents knew that asplenia (78.2%), pulmonary disease (77.3%), and HIV/AIDS (69.4%) are indications for vaccination but less knew that cardiovascular disease (45.0%), diabetes (35.8%), asthma (42.8%), nephrotic syndrome (19.7%), and renal failure (33.6%) are also indications for vaccination. Conclusion. OB/GYN residents are taught about vaccines and have ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. However, knowledge of indications for pneumococcal vaccination in pregnancy is lacking. Likely, the opportunity to vaccinate at-risk pregnant patients is being missed. PMID:26949324

  14. Survey of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents Regarding Pneumococcal Vaccination in Pregnancy: Education, Knowledge, and Barriers to Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fay, Emily E; Hoppe, Kara K; Schulkin, Jay; Eckert, Linda O

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for adults over 65 years of age and younger adults with certain medical conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state insufficient evidence to recommend routine pneumococcal vaccination during pregnancy, but the vaccine is indicated for pregnant women with certain medical conditions. We designed this project to gauge obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) resident knowledge of maternal pneumococcal vaccination. Methods. We administered a 22-question survey to OB/GYN residents about maternal pneumococcal vaccination. We performed descriptive analysis for each question. Results. 238 OB/GYN residents responded. Overall, 69.3% of residents reported receiving vaccination education and 86.0% reported having ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. Most residents knew that asplenia (78.2%), pulmonary disease (77.3%), and HIV/AIDS (69.4%) are indications for vaccination but less knew that cardiovascular disease (45.0%), diabetes (35.8%), asthma (42.8%), nephrotic syndrome (19.7%), and renal failure (33.6%) are also indications for vaccination. Conclusion. OB/GYN residents are taught about vaccines and have ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. However, knowledge of indications for pneumococcal vaccination in pregnancy is lacking. Likely, the opportunity to vaccinate at-risk pregnant patients is being missed. PMID:26949324

  15. Directed vaccination against pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Hill, Andrew; Beitelshees, Marie; Shao, Shuai; Lovell, Jonathan F; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R; Hakansson, Anders P; Pfeifer, Blaine A; Jones, Charles H

    2016-06-21

    Immunization strategies against commensal bacterial pathogens have long focused on eradicating asymptomatic carriage as well as disease, resulting in changes in the colonizing microflora with unknown future consequences. Additionally, current vaccines are not easily adaptable to sequence diversity and immune evasion. Here, we present a "smart" vaccine that leverages our current understanding of disease transition from bacterial carriage to infection with the pneumococcus serving as a model organism. Using conserved surface proteins highly expressed during virulent transition, the vaccine mounts an immune response specifically against disease-causing bacterial populations without affecting carriage. Aided by a delivery technology capable of multivalent surface display, which can be adapted easily to a changing clinical picture, results include complete protection against the development of pneumonia and sepsis during animal challenge experiments with multiple, highly variable, and clinically relevant pneumococcal isolates. The approach thus offers a unique and dynamic treatment option readily adaptable to other commensal pathogens. PMID:27274071

  16. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  17. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  18. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  19. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  20. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  1. Pneumococcal Acquisition Among Infants Exposed to HIV in Rural Malawi: A Longitudinal Household Study

    PubMed Central

    Heinsbroek, Ellen; Tafatatha, Terence; Chisambo, Christina; Phiri, Amos; Mwiba, Oddie; Ngwira, Bagrey; Crampin, Amelia C.; Read, Jonathan M.; French, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) carriage is higher in adults who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than in adults who are not. We hypothesized that infants exposed to HIV become carriers of nasopharyngeal pneumococcus earlier and more frequently than infants who are not exposed to HIV. We compared infant pneumococcal acquisition by maternal HIV status and household exposure in Karonga District, Malawi, in 2009–2011, before the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected every 4–6 weeks in the first year of life from infants with known HIV-exposure status, their mothers, and other household members. We studied infant pneumococcal acquisition by maternal HIV status, serotype-specific household exposure, and other risk factors, including seasonality. We recruited 54 infants who were exposed to HIV and 131 infants who were not. There was no significant difference in pneumococcal acquisition by maternal HIV status (adjusted rate ratio (aRR) = 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87, 1.15). Carriage by the mother was associated with greater acquisition of the same serotype (aRR = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.47, 6.50), but the adjusted population attributable fraction was negligible (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.0, 4.3). Serotype-specific exposure to children under 5 years of age was associated with higher acquisition (aRR = 4.30, 95% CI: 2.80, 6.60; adjusted population attributable fraction = 8.8%, 95% CI: 4.0, 13.4). We found no evidence to suggest that maternal HIV infection would affect the impact of pneumococcal vaccination on colonization in this population. PMID:26628514

  2. Adult Vaccinations | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 ... high-risk medical conditions had received a pneumococcal vaccination. Only about 1 out of 4 (24 percent) ...

  3. Pneumococcal Vaccination in High-Risk Individuals: Are We Doing It Right?

    PubMed

    Papadatou, Ioanna; Spoulou, Vana

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal use of the 23-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for the protection of high-risk individuals, such as children and adults with immunocompromising conditions and the elderly. The effectiveness and immunogenicity of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) are limited in such high-risk populations compared to the healthy, with meta-analyses failing to provide robust evidence on vaccine efficacy against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) or pneumonia. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a PPV23-induced state of immune tolerance or hyporesponsiveness to subsequent vaccination, where the response to revaccination does not reach the levels achieved with primary vaccination. The clinical significance of hyporesponsiveness is not yet clarified, but attenuated humoral and cellular response could lead to reduced levels of protection and increased susceptibility to pneumococcal disease. As disease epidemiology among high-risk groups shows that we are still in need of maximum serotype coverage, the optimal use of PPV23 in the context of combined conjugate/polysaccharide vaccine schedules is an important priority. In this minireview, we discuss PPV23-induced hyporesponsiveness and its implications in designing highly effective vaccination schedules for the optimal protection for high-risk individuals. PMID:27009210

  4. [Anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage for hospitalized risk patients: Assessment and suggestions for improvements].

    PubMed

    Richard, C; Le Garlantezec, P; Lamand, V; Rasamijao, V; Rapp, C

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can cause invasive infections. Incidence and severity are linked to patients' risk factors. Due to the resistance to leading antibiotics, the anti-pneumococcal vaccination has become a major public health issue. The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage in a population of adults with risk factors. This was a prospective study that included patients with at least one recommendation for pneumococcal vaccination as indicated by the Weekly Epidemiological Bulletin (BEH), to which three further US recommendations were added (diabetes, obesity and age>65years). One hundred and thirty-four patients with an average age of 70 years were included. The physician could only confirm 68 % of the patients' vaccination status. Vaccination coverage as recommended by the BEH board was 30 % (n=54). All HIV patients were vaccinated (n=2) and the vaccination coverage was 75 % (n=8) for patients treated for autoimmune diseases and only 10 % (n=20) for patients treated with chemotherapy. Patients with no vaccination didn't know the existence of the vaccine or didn't know that vaccination was recommended to them. This study has highlighted a deficit in pneumococcal vaccination coverage and a high level of ignorance of the existence of recommended vaccination. In addition to awareness campaign for patients and caregiver training, the expansion of the vaccine e-book utilization could improve the vaccination status. PMID:26619926

  5. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-07-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  6. Rationale and prospects for novel pneumococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Kristin; Malley, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae remains one of the most frequent bacterial causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. National immunization programs implementing pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have successfully reduced rates of vaccine-type invasive disease and colonization both via direct effects in immunized children and, in some settings, indirect effects in unimmunized individuals. Limitations of the current PCV approach include the emergence of non-vaccine serotypes contributing to carriage and invasive disease in high-PCV coverage settings and the high cost of goods of PCVs which limits their accessibility in developing countries where the burden of disease remains highest. Furthermore, the distribution of serotypes causing disease varies geographically and includes more serotypes than are currently covered in a single PCV formulation. Researchers have long been exploring the potential of genetically conserved non-capsular pneumococcal antigens as vaccine candidates that might overcome such limitations. To better evaluate the rationale of such approaches, an understanding of the mechanisms of immunity to the various phases of pneumococcal infection is of paramount importance. Herein we will review the evolving understanding of both vaccine-induced and naturally acquired immunity to pneumococcal colonization and infection and discuss how this informs current approaches using serotype-independent pneumococcal vaccine candidates. We will then review the alternative vaccine candidates that have been or are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:26535755

  7. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  8. [Pneumococcal vaccination for persons 65 years of age and older].

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, W J H M

    2002-05-01

    In the Netherlands, in contrast to other countries, pneumococcal vaccination for older people and people at risk is not routine, except for patients under special circumstances, such as after a splenectomy. Although pneumococcal vaccination is an effective way to prevent invasive pneumococcal disease in young healthy persons, there is no conclusive evidence that it is effective in older people and people at risk without a good immune response. Pneumococcal disease can be an important complication of an ordinary flu. Because there is a high level of vaccination against influenza in the Netherlands, the risk of pneumococcal disease is low compared to other countries in the world. Adding a pneumococcal vaccine to the influenza vaccination could decrease the degree of protection against influenza. The experimental introduction of pneumococcal vaccination does not seem to lead to an increase in the number of patients that refuse vaccination against influenza. PMID:12038219

  9. Risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-I; Song, J-H; Kim, S H; Chung, D R; Peck, K R; So, T M; Hsueh, P-R

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical features of community-onset levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia and to identify risk factors for levofloxacin resistance. Using the database of a surveillance study of community-acquired pneumococcal infections in Asian countries, we conducted a nested case-control study to identify risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Of 981 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, 46 (4.7 %) had levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, of whom 39 evaluable cases were included in the analysis. All cases were from Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Among patients with levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae, 490 controls were selected based on patient country. Of the 39 cases of levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia, 23 (59.0 %) were classified as healthcare-associated, while 164 (33.5 %) of the 490 controls of levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (P = 0.001) were classified as healthcare-associated. Multivariate analysis showed that previous treatment with fluoroquinolones, cerebrovascular disease, and healthcare-associated infection were significantly associated with levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia (all P < 0.05). Levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococci pose an important new public health threat in our region, and more information on the emergence and spread of these resistant strains will be necessary to prevent spread throughout the population. PMID:24062235

  10. Impact of the Hajj on pneumococcal transmission.

    PubMed

    Memish, Z A; Assiri, A; Almasri, M; Alhakeem, R F; Turkestani, A; Al Rabeeah, A A; Akkad, N; Yezli, S; Klugman, K P; O'Brien, K L; van der Linden, M; Gessner, B D

    2015-01-01

    Over two million Muslim pilgrims assemble annually in Mecca and Medina, Saudi Arabia, to complete the Hajj. The large number of people in a crowded environment increases the potential for pneumococcal carriage amplification. We evaluated pneumococcal carriage prevalence with four cross-sectional studies conducted at beginning-Hajj (Mecca) and end-Hajj (Mina) during 2011 and 2012. A questionnaire was administered and a nasopharyngeal swab was collected. The swab was tested for pneumococcus, serotype and antibiotic resistance. A total of 3203 subjects (1590 at beginning-Hajj and 1613 at end-Hajj) originating from 18 countries in Africa or Asia were enrolled. The overall pneumococcal carriage prevalence was 6.0%. There was an increase in carriage between beginning-Hajj and end-Hajj cohorts for: overall carriage (4.4% versus 7.5%, prevalence ratio (PR) 1.7, 95% CI 1.3-2.3), and carriage of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine serotypes (2.3% versus 4.1%, PR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.7), 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) serotypes (1.1% versus 3.6%, PR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.6), 10-valent PCV serotypes (0.6% versus 1.6%, PR 2.6, 95% CI 1.2-5.3), antibiotic non-susceptible isolates (2.5% versus 6.1%, PR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.6) and multiple non-susceptible isolates (0.6% versus 2.2%, PR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-7.9). Fifty-two different serotypes were identified, most commonly serotypes 3 (17%), 19F (5%) and 34 (5%). These results suggest that the Hajj may increase pneumococcal carriage-particularly conjugate vaccine serotypes and antibiotic non-susceptible strains, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. The Hajj may therefore provide a mechanism for the global distribution of pneumococci. PMID:25636939

  11. Impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Universal Routine Vaccination on Pneumococcal Disease in Italian Children

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Domenico; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Cozza, Vanessa; Prato, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, the effectiveness of pneumococcal universal vaccination in preventing vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the PCV7/PCV13 shifting period was estimated to be 84.3% (95% CI: 84.0–84.6%) in children <5 years. This study aims at corroborating the estimation of both the effectiveness (VE) of PCVs and its impact in reducing pneumococcal diseases. A 1 : 3 matched-case-control study was conducted among children <5 years old hospitalized for IPD or pneumococcal pneumonia (PP) between 2006 and 2012 in the Puglia region. Moreover, hospitalizations for pneumococcal outcomes in the pre- and postvaccination period and the hospitalization risk ratios (HRRs) with 95% CIs were computed in Italy and in the first eight regions that introduced PCVs in 2006. The overall effectiveness of PCVs was 75% (95% CI: 61%–84%); it was 69% (95% CI: 30%–88%) against IPD and 77% (95% CI: 61%–87%) against PP. PCVs showed a significant impact on IPD and acute otitis media either at a national level or in those regions with a longer vaccination history, with a nearly 40% reduction of hospitalizations for both outcomes. Our findings provide further evidence of the effectiveness of PCVs against pneumococcal diseases and its impact on nasopharyngeal carriage in children <5 years, indicating the importance of maintaining high immunization coverage. PMID:26351644

  12. Maternal Immunization with Pneumococcal Surface Protein A Protects against Pneumococcal Infections among Derived Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Hollingshead, Susan K.; Briles, David E.; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-specific antibody plays an important role in protection against pneumococcal carriage and infections. However, neonates and infants exhibit impaired innate and adaptive immune responses, which result in their high susceptibility to pneumococci. To protect neonates and infants against pneumococcal infection it is important to elicit specific protective immune responses at very young ages. In this study, we investigated the protective immunity against pneumococcal carriage, pneumonia, and sepsis induced by maternal immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). Mother mice were intranasally immunized with recombinant PspA (rPspA) and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) prior to being mated. Anti-PspA specific IgG, predominantly IgG1, was present at a high level in the serum and milk of immunized mothers and in the sera of their pups. The pneumococcal densities in washed nasal tissues and in lung homogenate were significantly reduced in pups delivered from and/or breast-fed by PspA-immunized mothers. Survival after fatal systemic infections with various types of pneumococci was significantly extended in the pups, which had received anti-PspA antibody via the placenta or through their milk. The current findings strongly suggest that maternal immunization with PspA is an attractive strategy against pneumococcal infections during early childhood. (191 words) PMID:22073127

  13. Maternal immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A protects against pneumococcal infections among derived offspring.

    PubMed

    Kono, Masamitsu; Hotomi, Muneki; Hollingshead, Susan K; Briles, David E; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-specific antibody plays an important role in protection against pneumococcal carriage and infections. However, neonates and infants exhibit impaired innate and adaptive immune responses, which result in their high susceptibility to pneumococci. To protect neonates and infants against pneumococcal infection it is important to elicit specific protective immune responses at very young ages. In this study, we investigated the protective immunity against pneumococcal carriage, pneumonia, and sepsis induced by maternal immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). Mother mice were intranasally immunized with recombinant PspA (rPspA) and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) prior to being mated. Anti-PspA specific IgG, predominantly IgG1, was present at a high level in the serum and milk of immunized mothers and in the sera of their pups. The pneumococcal densities in washed nasal tissues and in lung homogenate were significantly reduced in pups delivered from and/or breast-fed by PspA-immunized mothers. Survival after fatal systemic infections with various types of pneumococci was significantly extended in the pups, which had received anti-PspA antibody via the placenta or through their milk. The current findings strongly suggest that maternal immunization with PspA is an attractive strategy against pneumococcal infections during early childhood. PMID:22073127

  14. [Pneumococcal vaccines: different types and their use in practice].

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, M

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for a large number of invasive infections and upper respiratory tract infections in infants, elderly and patients with high complication risk. Currently, two types of vaccine are available on the Belgian market. In the context of pharmaceutical care, it is important for pharmacists to know their specific characteristics and differences. In this article we try to explain these and to motivate their use in different patient populations. The 23-valent vaccine is different from the 13-valent vaccine, not only in number of serotypes, but also in its presentation as respectively polysaccharide- and conjugated vaccine which affects the immunogenicity. Moreover, their indication and use are also different. Finally we take a closer look at the specific use in infants and children at risk at one hand, and vaccination of eldery and adults with increased risk for severe pneumococcal infection on the other hand. PMID:23638606

  15. Prevention of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    The interest in mass gathering and its implications has been increasing due to globalization and international travel. The potential occurrence of infectious disease outbreaks during mass gathering is most feared. In this context, respiratory tract infections are of great concern due to crowding in a limited space which facilitates and magnifies the potential of disease spread among attendees. Pneumococcal disease is best described among pilgrims to Makkah and vaccination is one of the methods for the prevention of this disease. Pneumonia was described in a mass gathering with a prevalence of 4.8/100,000 pilgrims and contributes to 15-39% of hospitalizations. Various studies showed that 7-37% of pilgrims are 65 y of age or older. The uptake of pneumococcal vaccine among pilgrims is low at 5%. There is no available data to make strong recommendations for S. pneumoniae vaccination of all pilgrims, it is important that a high risk population receive the indicated vaccination. We reviewed the available literature on the burden of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering and evaluate the available literature on pneumococcal vaccinations for attendees of mass gathering. PMID:26176306

  16. Effects of PCV7 and PCV13 on invasive pneumococcal disease and carriage in Stockholm, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Ilias; Lindstrand, Ann; Darenberg, Jessica; Browall, Sarah; Nannapaneni, Priyanka; Sjöström, Karin; Morfeldt, Eva; Naucler, Pontus; Blennow, Margareta; Örtqvist, Åke

    2016-01-01

    The effects of pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCVs) need to be investigated. In Stockholm County, Sweden, PCV7 was introduced in the childhood immunisation programme in 2007 and changed to PCV13 in 2010. Over 90% of all invasive isolates during 2005–2014 (n=2336) and carriage isolates, 260 before and 647 after vaccine introduction, were characterised by serotyping, molecular typing and antibiotic susceptibility, and serotype diversity was calculated. Clinical information was collected for children and adults with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The IPD incidence decreased post-PCV7, but not post-PCV13, in vaccinated children. Beneficial herd effects were seen in older children and adults, but not in the elderly. The herd protection was more pronounced post-PCV7 than post-PCV13. PCV7 serotypes decreased. IPD caused by PCV13 serotypes 3 and 19A increased post-PCV7. Post-PCV13, serotypes 6A and 19A, but not serotype 3, decreased. The serotype distribution changed in carriage and IPD to nonvaccine types, also in nonvaccinated populations. Expansion of non-PCV13 serotypes was largest following PCV13 introduction. Serotype diversity increased and nonvaccine clones emerged, such as CC433 (serotype 22F) in IPD and CC62 (serotype 11A) in carriage. In young children, meningitis, septicaemia and severe rhinosinusitis, but not bacteraemic pneumonia, decreased. Pneumococcal vaccination leads to expansion of new or minor serotypes/clones, also in nonvaccinated populations. PMID:26797033

  17. Effects of PCV7 and PCV13 on invasive pneumococcal disease and carriage in Stockholm, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Ilias; Lindstrand, Ann; Darenberg, Jessica; Browall, Sarah; Nannapaneni, Priyanka; Sjöström, Karin; Morfeldt, Eva; Naucler, Pontus; Blennow, Margareta; Örtqvist, Åke; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2016-04-01

    The effects of pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCVs) need to be investigated. In Stockholm County, Sweden, PCV7 was introduced in the childhood immunisation programme in 2007 and changed to PCV13 in 2010.Over 90% of all invasive isolates during 2005-2014 (n=2336) and carriage isolates, 260 before and 647 after vaccine introduction, were characterised by serotyping, molecular typing and antibiotic susceptibility, and serotype diversity was calculated. Clinical information was collected for children and adults with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD).The IPD incidence decreased post-PCV7, but not post-PCV13, in vaccinated children. Beneficial herd effects were seen in older children and adults, but not in the elderly. The herd protection was more pronounced post-PCV7 than post-PCV13. PCV7 serotypes decreased. IPD caused by PCV13 serotypes 3 and 19A increased post-PCV7. Post-PCV13, serotypes 6A and 19A, but not serotype 3, decreased. The serotype distribution changed in carriage and IPD to nonvaccine types, also in nonvaccinated populations. Expansion of non-PCV13 serotypes was largest following PCV13 introduction. Serotype diversity increased and nonvaccine clones emerged, such as CC433 (serotype 22F) in IPD and CC62 (serotype 11A) in carriage. In young children, meningitis, septicaemia and severe rhinosinusitis, but not bacteraemic pneumonia, decreased.Pneumococcal vaccination leads to expansion of new or minor serotypes/clones, also in nonvaccinated populations. PMID:26797033

  18. Epidemiology of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in adults in Finland.

    PubMed Central

    Sankilampi, U.; Herva, E.; Haikala, R.; Liimatainen, O.; Renkonen, O. V.; Leinonen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal infections in adults in Finland from 1983 to 1992 identified 862 episodes of pneumococcal bacteraemia and 97 episodes of meningitis. The overall incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections was 9.1 per 100,000 for all adults per year, but 27.1, 35.8, and 44.5 per 100,000 in those aged 65 years or over, 75 years or over, and 85 years or over, respectively. Most (99.7%) of the pneumococcal strains were sensitive to penicillin. Ninety-five percent of the strains belonged to serogroups/types present in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Group/type distribution was different in patients aged 16-64 years compared to those 65 years or over (P < 0.001), in bacteraemia compared to meningitis (P < 0.001), and in the years 1983-7 compared to 1988-92 (P < 0.05). PMID:9042030

  19. Pneumococcal Colonization Rates in Patients Admitted to a United Kingdom Hospital with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection: a Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Catherine M. K.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Banyard, Antonia; Hancock, Carole A.; Wright, Angela D.; Macfarlane, Laura; Ferreira, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests are ineffective for identifying the etiological pathogen in hospitalized adults with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). The association of pneumococcal colonization with disease has been suggested as a means to increase the diagnostic precision. We compared the pneumococcal colonization rates and the densities of nasal pneumococcal colonization by (i) classical culture and (ii) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting lytA in patients with LRTIs admitted to a hospital in the United Kingdom and control patients. A total of 826 patients were screened for inclusion in this prospective case-control study. Of these, 38 patients were recruited, 19 with confirmed LRTIs and 19 controls with other diagnoses. Nasal wash (NW) samples were collected at the time of recruitment. Pneumococcal colonization was detected in 1 patient with LRTI and 3 controls (P = 0.6) by classical culture. By qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was detected in 10 LRTI patients and 8 controls (P = 0.5). Antibiotic usage prior to sampling was significantly higher in the LRTI group than in the control group (19 versus 3; P < 0.001). With a clinically relevant cutoff of >8,000 copies/ml on qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was found in 3 LRTI patients and 4 controls (P > 0.05). We conclude that neither the prevalence nor the density of nasal pneumococcal colonization (by culture and qPCR) can be used as a method of microbiological diagnosis in hospitalized adults with LRTI in the United Kingdom. A community-based study recruiting patients prior to antibiotic therapy may be a useful future step. PMID:26791364

  20. Potential Role for Telavancin in Bacteremic Infections Due to Gram-Positive Pathogens: Focus on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Corey, G. Ralph; Rubinstein, Ethan; Stryjewski, Martin E.; Bassetti, Matteo; Barriere, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is one of the most common serious bacterial infections and the most frequent invasive infection due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Treatment is challenging, particularly for MRSA, because of limited treatment options. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic that is active against a range of clinically relevant gram-positive pathogens including MRSA. In experimental animal models of sepsis telavancin was shown to be more effective than vancomycin. In clinically evaluable patients enrolled in a pilot study of uncomplicated SAB, cure rates were 88% for telavancin and 89% for standard therapy. Among patients with infection due to only gram-positive pathogens enrolled in the 2 phase 3 studies of telavancin for treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia, cure rates for those with bacteremic S. aureus pneumonia were 41% (9/22, telavancin) and 40% (10/25, vancomycin) with identical mortality rates. These data support further evaluation of telavancin in larger, prospective studies of SAB. PMID:25472944

  1. Risk factors for pneumococcal nasopharyngeal colonization before and after pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in persons with HIV: brief report.

    PubMed

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Søgaard, Ole S; Harboe, Zitta B; Schønheyder, Henrik C

    2012-04-01

    HIV-infected individuals have excess rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. We investigated risk factors for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization at baseline and after 9 months in 96 HIV patients immunized twice with 7- valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine ±1mg CPG 7909. In total, 22 patients (23%) were colonized, 11 at baseline only, four at both baseline and 9 months, and seven at 9 months only. Compared to non-colonized patients, more colonized patients were smokers, had lower CD4+ nadir and had an AIDS-diagnosis. Immunization, antiretroviral treatment and the CPG adjuvant had no impact on colonization. These results suggest preventive strategies in addition to pneumococcal immunization. PMID:22384845

  2. US Pneumonia Hospitalizations, a Decade of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Use

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Marie R.; Zhu, Yuwei; Moore, Matthew R.; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into the US childhood immunization schedule in 2000 has substantially reduced vaccine-serotype invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both young children and unvaccinated older children and adults. All-cause pneumonia hospitalizations also markedly declined in young children by 2004. Because of concern about increases in disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes, we assessed whether the pneumonia reduction in young children was sustained through 2009 and whether pneumonia hospitalizations in older age groups also declined. Methods Annual all-cause pneumonia hospitalization rates were estimated using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Pneumonia hospitalizations were defined by pneumonia listed first or listed in another position if sepsis, meningitis or empyema was the first listed diagnosis. Average annual rates in pre-PCV7 (1997–1999) and late PCV7 years (2007–2009) were used to estimate annual declines in pneumonia hospitalizations. Results Annual pneumonia hospitalization rates declined by 551.1 (95% confidence interval 445.1–657.1) per 100,000 children aged <2 years, translating to 47,172 fewer hospitalizations annually compared to expected based on pre-PCV7 rates. The decline of 1300.8 (984.0–1617.6) pneumonia hospitalizations per 100,000 adults aged ≥85 years translated to 73,243 fewer hospitalizations annually. Pneumonia hospitalizations declined by 8.4 (0.6–16.2), 85.3 (7.0–163.6), and 359.8 (199.6–520.0) per 100,000 adults aged 18–39, 65–74 and 75–84 years, respectively. Overall, we estimated an age-adjusted annual reduction of 54.8 (41.1–68.5) per 100,000 or 168,182 fewer pneumonia hospitalizations annually. Conclusions Declines in childhood pneumonia were sustained during the decade since PCV7 introduction. Substantial reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations in adults were also observed. PMID:23841730

  3. Pneumococcal Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Farsi (فارسی) Russian (Русский) Spanish (español) Tagalog (Tagalog) Thai (ภาษาไทย) Vietnamese ( ... Action Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Russian (Русский) Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine English Русский (Russian) PDF ...

  4. Cannabidiol reduces host immune response and prevents cognitive impairments in Wistar rats submitted to pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Ceretta, Renan A; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Moreira, Ana Paula; Simões, Lutiana R; Comim, Clarissa M; Quevedo, João; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José A; Teixeira, Antônio Lucio

    2012-12-15

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute infection affecting the pia matter, arachnoid and subarachnoid space. The intense inflammatory response is associated with a significant mortality rate and neurologic sequelae, such as, seizures, sensory-motor deficits and impairment of learning and memory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute and extended administration of cannabidiol on pro-inflammatory cytokines and behavioral parameters in adult Wistar rats submitted to pneumococcal meningitis. Male Wistar rats underwent a cisterna magna tap and received either 10μl of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of S. pneumoniae suspension. Rats subjected to meningitis were treated by intraperitoneal injection with cannabidiol (2.5, 5, or 10mg/kg once or daily for 9 days after meningitis induction) or a placebo. Six hours after meningitis induction, the rats that received one dose were killed and the hippocampus and frontal cortex were obtained to assess cytokines/chemokine and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. On the 10th day, the rats were submitted to the inhibitory avoidance task. After the task, the animals were killed and samples from the hippocampus and frontal cortex were obtained. The extended administration of cannabidiol at different doses reduced the TNF-α level in frontal cortex. Prolonged treatment with canabidiol, 10mg/kg, prevented memory impairment in rats with pneumococcal meningitis. Although descriptive, our results demonstrate that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in pneumococcal meningitis and prevents cognitive sequel. PMID:23085269

  5. Protease Inhibitors Do Not Affect Antibody Responses to Pneumococcal Vaccination.

    PubMed

    De La Rosa, Indhira; Munjal, Iona M; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Yu, Xiaoying; Pirofski, Liise-Anne; Mendoza, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    HIV(+) subjects on optimal antiretroviral therapy have persistently impaired antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccination. We explored the possibility that this effect may be due to HIV protease inhibitors (PIs). We found that in humans and mice, PIs do not affect antibody production in response to pneumococcal vaccination. PMID:27074938

  6. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  7. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  8. Estimating the burden of hospitalization for pneumococcal pneumonia in a general population aged 50 years or older and implications for vaccination strategies

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Emanuele; Costantino, Claudio; Boccalini, Sara; Tramuto, Fabio; Maida, Carmelo M; Vitale, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human infectious diseases worldwide. Despite this documented evidence, data on pneumococcal disease rates among general populations are scant because of the frequent lack of cultural identification. In this study we propose a model for estimating the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia on hospitalizations. The study was performed by analyzing administrative and clinical data of patients aged 50 years or older, resident in Sicily, and hospitalized, from 2005 to 2012. Demographic information, admission/discharge dates, discharge status, and up to 6 discharge diagnoses coded according to ICD-9 CM were collected for each hospitalized patient. During the 8-year study period, a total of 72 372 hospitalizations with at least one ICD-9 CM diagnosis code suggestive of all-cause pneumonia were recorded. Of these, 1943 (2.7%) hospitalizations had specific ICD-9 CM diagnosis codes for pneumococcal pneumonia. According to the proposed model, 16 541 (22.9%) pneumonia out of all-cause pneumonia was estimated to be attributable to S. pneumoniae. Pneumococcal pneumonia and model-estimated pneumococcal pneumonia had mean hospitalization rates of 13.4 and 113.3/100 000, respectively, with a decreasing temporal trend. The risk of hospitalization for pneumococcal pneumonia was strongly correlated with age (P < 0.001). Our model provides data usable to construct suitable decisional models for the decision-makers and could allow to the responsibles of healthcare facilities to assess the budget impact if they hypothesize to offer vaccination for pneumococcal disease to certain cohorts of subjects aged 50 years or older. In our area, the high estimated hospitalization rates among adults aged ≥65 years suggest the need to implement effective preventive strategies (e.g., vaccination) tailored for these groups. PMID:24577505

  9. Theory and strategy for Pneumococcal vaccines in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Funatsu, Yohei; Kimizuka, Yoshifumi; Yagi, Kazuma; Asami, Takahiro; Asakura, Takanori; Suzuki, Shoji; Kamo, Testuro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the fourth-leading cause of death globally, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most important causative pathogen. Because the incidence of pneumococcal diseases is likely to increase with the aging society, we should determine an optimal strategy for pneumococcal vaccination. While consensus indicates that 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine prevents invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD), its effects on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain controversial. Recently, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was released. The latest clinical study (CAPiTA study) showed that PCV13 reduced vaccine-type CAP and IPD. Based on these results, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended initial vaccination with PCV13 for the elderly. Scientific evidence regarding immunosenescence is needed to determine a more ideal vaccination strategy for the elderly with impaired innate and adaptive immunity. Continuing research on the cost effectiveness of new vaccine strategies considering constantly changing epidemiology is also warranted. PMID:26406267

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase is the key enzyme for pneumococcal pyruvate metabolism and pneumococcal survival in blood.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A Y; Andrew, Peter W; Neves, Ana Rute; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression. PMID:25245810

  11. Lactate Dehydrogenase Is the Key Enzyme for Pneumococcal Pyruvate Metabolism and Pneumococcal Survival in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A. Y.; Andrew, Peter W.; Neves, Ana Rute

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression. PMID:25245810

  12. Pneumococcal Infection among Children before Introduction of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Claudia; Suy, Kuong; Soeng, Sona; Ly, Sokeng; Miliya, Thyl; Goldblatt, David; Day, Nicholas P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination of children with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was initiated in Cambodia in 2015. To determine baseline data, we collected samples from children in 2013 and 2014. PCV13 serotypes accounted for 62.7% of colonizing organisms in outpatients and 88.4% of invasive pneumococci overall; multidrug resistance was common. Thus, effectiveness of vaccination should be high. PMID:26488597

  13. Pneumococcal Infection among Children before Introduction of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul; Turner, Claudia; Suy, Kuong; Soeng, Sona; Ly, Sokeng; Miliya, Thyl; Goldblatt, David; Day, Nicholas P J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccination of children with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was initiated in Cambodia in 2015. To determine baseline data, we collected samples from children in 2013 and 2014. PCV13 serotypes accounted for 62.7% of colonizing organisms in outpatients and 88.4% of invasive pneumococci overall; multidrug resistance was common. Thus, effectiveness of vaccination should be high. PMID:26488597

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility rates of invasive pneumococci before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Germany.

    PubMed

    Imöhl, Matthias; Reinert, Ralf René; van der Linden, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Continuous nationwide surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was conducted in Germany. A total of 22,208 isolates from invasive pneumococcal disease were collected between July 1, 1992 and June 30, 2013. The present study was conducted to analyze changes in antimicrobial susceptibility and pneumococcal vaccine coverage after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Germany. Most of the isolates originated from adults ≥16 years (82.5%), while 17.5% were obtained from children <16 years. Penicillin resistance was observed in 7.2% of meningitis cases both among children and adults during the entire study period. In the post-PCV13 period, the resistance rate was 11.3% in children and 10.0% in adults, which is higher than in the pre-PCV7 and post-PCV7 periods. In the non-meningitis group, an overall penicillin nonsusceptibility rate (intermediate resistance and resistance) of 0.5% was detected both among children and adults. Nonsusceptibility rates among children were 6.3% (pre-PCV7), 7.6% (post-PCV7) and 9.0% (post-PCV13). The corresponding nonsusceptibility rates among adults were 4.4%, 6.0% and 7.9%, respectively. Concerning cefotaxime, in meningitis cases 0.8% of all isolates were intermediate and 0.5% resistant among children, while among adults, 0.9% were intermediate and 0.2% resistant. In non meningitis cases, cefotaxime nonsusceptibility rates were 0.5% in children and 0.3% in adults. Macrolide nonsusceptibility rates were lower in the post-PCV13 period (children 8.2%; adults 8.8%) than in the post-PCV7 period (children 17.3%; adults 13.0%) and the pre-PCV7 period (children 24.8%; adults 13.3%). In the pre-PCV7 period, macrolide resistance was mainly caused by M-phenotype clones carrying the mefA gene. In the post-PCV7/13 period, ermB (MLSb-phenotype) was the dominant resistance marker. Overall nonsusceptibility rates were 5.5% for clindamycin (intermediate 0.3%, resistant 5.2%), 0.7% for levofloxacin (intermediate 0

  15. Many radiologic facies of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, H.G.

    1981-12-01

    In 1978, 89 patients were treated for (S. pneumoniae) pneumonia at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Only 40 cases met rather strict diagnostic criteria. Of these, 12 demonstrated the classical consolidative (air space) pattern usually ascribed to this disease. A bronchopneumonic (patch) pattern was demonstrated in an equal number of patients; interstitial (irregular linear) infiltrates were manifest in nine cases and a mixed interstitial and patchy presentation shown in seven cases. Absence of the consolidative pattern does not exclude pneumococcal pneumonia. Bacteriologic investigation is required to determine the proper diagnosis and course of therapy.

  16. Increased Mortality with Accessory Gene Regulator (agr) Dysfunction in Staphylococcus aureus among Bacteremic Patients ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Marin L.; Furuno, Jon P.; Sakoulas, George; Johnson, J. Kristie; Harris, Anthony D.; Shardell, Michelle D.; McGregor, Jessina C.; Thom, Kerri A.; Perencevich, Eli N.

    2011-01-01

    Accessory gene regulator (agr) dysfunction in Staphylococcus aureus has been associated with a longer duration of bacteremia. We aimed to assess the independent association between agr dysfunction in S. aureus bacteremia and 30-day in-hospital mortality. This retrospective cohort study included all adult inpatients with S. aureus bacteremia admitted between 1 January 2003 and 30 June 2007. Severity of illness prior to culture collection was measured using the modified acute physiology score (APS). agr dysfunction in S. aureus was identified semiquantitatively by using a δ-hemolysin production assay. Cox proportional hazard models were used to measure the association between agr dysfunction and 30-day in-hospital mortality, statistically adjusting for patient and pathogen characteristics. Among 814 patient admissions complicated by S. aureus bacteremia, 181 (22%) patients were infected with S. aureus isolates with agr dysfunction. Overall, 18% of patients with agr dysfunction in S. aureus died, compared to 12% of those with functional agr in S. aureus (P = 0.03). There was a trend toward higher mortality among patients with S. aureus with agr dysfunction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87 to 2.06). Among patients with the highest APS (scores of >28), agr dysfunction in S. aureus was significantly associated with mortality (adjusted HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.03 to 3.21). This is the first study to demonstrate an independent association between agr dysfunction and mortality among severely ill patients. The δ-hemolysin assay examining agr function may be a simple and inexpensive approach to predicting patient outcomes and potentially optimizing antibiotic therapy. PMID:21173172

  17. Surveillance of pneumococcal diseases in Central and Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan, Mehmet; Dagan, Ron; Sayiner, Abdullah; Chernyshova, Liudmyla; Dinleyici, Ener Çağrı; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Kulcsár, Andrea; Mad'arová, Lucia; Pazdiora, Petr; Sidorenko, Sergey; Streinu-Cercel, Anca; Tambić-Andrašević, Arjana; Yeraliyeva, Lyazzat

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pneumococcal infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The burden of disease associated with S. pneumoniae is largely preventable through routine vaccination. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (e.g. PCV7, PCV13) provide protection from invasive pneumococcal disease as well as non-invasive infection (pneumonia, acute otitis media), and decrease vaccine-type nasopharyngeal colonisation, thus reducing transmission to unvaccinated individuals. PCVs have also been shown to reduce the incidence of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal disease. Surveillance for pneumococcal disease is important to understand local epidemiology, serotype distribution and antibiotic resistance rates. Surveillance systems also help to inform policy development, including vaccine recommendations, and monitor the impact of pneumococcal vaccination. National pneumococcal surveillance systems exist in a number of countries in Central and Eastern Europe (such as Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia), and some have introduced PCVs (Czech Republic, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Russia, Slovakia and Turkey). Those countries without established programs (such as Kazakhstan, Russia and Ukraine) may be able to learn from the experiences of those with national surveillance systems. The serotype distributions and impact of PCV13 on pediatric pneumococcal diseases are relatively similar in different parts of the world, suggesting that approaches to vaccination used elsewhere are also likely to be effective in Central and Eastern Europe. This article briefly reviews the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease, presents the latest surveillance data from Central and Eastern Europe, and discusses any similarities and differences in these data as well the potential implications for vaccination policies in the region. PMID:27096714

  18. Pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome and steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Groves, Andrew P; Reich, Patrick; Sigdel, Binayak; Davis, T Keefe

    2016-08-01

    Pneumococcal-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (pHUS) is a rare but severe complication of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. We report the case of a 12-year-old female with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome treated with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (H.P. Acthar(®) Gel), who developed pneumococcal pneumonia and subsequent pHUS. While nephrotic syndrome is a well-known risk factor for invasive pneumococcal disease, this is the first reported case of pHUS in an adolescent patient with nephrotic syndrome, and reveals novel challenges in the diagnosis, treatment and potential prevention of this complication. PMID:27478599

  19. Brain Abscesses Complicating Acute Pneumococcal Meningitis During Etanercept Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kasirye, Yusuf; Epperla, Narendranath; Manne, Janaki Ram; Bapani, Sowjanya; Garcia-Montilla, Romel J

    2012-01-01

    Brain abscess formation as a sequelae of community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all meningitis complications. Although metastatic seeding from a distal peripheral septic focus has been observed, this phenomenon most commonly occurs in the context of ear, nose and throat infections, post-cranial neurosurgical procedures, traumatic open cranial injury, or immunosuppression. We present the case of a man, 61 years old, on etanercept therapy for ankylosing spondylitis who developed multiple brain abscesses as a complication of pneumococcal meningitis. We believe that the predisposition to this extremely rare complication of a particularly aggressive pneumococcal meningitis was most likely due to the underlying immunosuppression resulting from etanercept therapy. As far as we know, this case is the first report linking multiple brain abscess formation in a patient with community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis with etanercept therapy. PMID:22634540

  20. Effectiveness of vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in preventing hospitalization with laboratory confirmed influenza during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 seasons

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Angela; Castilla, Jesús; Godoy, Pere; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Saez, Marc; Soldevila, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Martín, Vicente; Quintana, José María; González-Candelas, Fernando; Galán, Juan Carlos; Tamames, Sonia; Castro, Ady; Baricot, Maretva; Garín, Olatz; Pumarola, Tomas; Working Group (Spain), CIBERESP Cases and Controls in Pandemic Influenza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Since influenza predisposes to bacterial pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, studies have suggested that pneumococcal vaccination might reduce its occurrence during pandemics. We assessed the effectiveness of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination alone and in combination with influenza vaccination in preventing influenza hospitalization during the 2009–2010 pandemic wave and 2010–2011 influenza epidemic. Methods: We conducted a multicenter case-control study in 36 Spanish hospitals. We selected patients aged ≥ 18 y hospitalized with confirmed influenza and two hospitalized controls per case, matched according to age, date of hospitalization and province of residence. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. Subjects were considered vaccinated if they had received the pneumococcal or seasonal influenza vaccine > 14 d (or > 7 d for pandemic influenza vaccine) before the onset of symptoms (cases) or the onset of symptoms in matched cases (controls). Results: 1187 cases and 2328 controls were included. The adjusted estimate of effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing influenza hospitalization was 41% (95% CI 8–62) in all patients and 43% (95% CI 2–78) in patients aged ≥ 65 y. The adjusted effectiveness of dual PPV23 and influenza vaccination was 81% (95% CI 65–90) in all patients and 76% (95% CI 46–90) in patients aged ≥ 65 y. The adjusted effectiveness of influenza vaccination alone was 58% (95% CI 38–72). Conclusions: In elderly people and adults with chronic illness, pneumococcal vaccination may reduce hospitalizations during the influenza season. In people vaccinated with both the influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, the benefit in hospitalizations avoided was greater than in those vaccinated only against influenza. PMID:23563516

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as pneumococcal septicaemia and septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, J; Williams, B D; Smith, A P; Hall, M; Jessop, J D

    1990-01-01

    A 50 year old woman presented with pneumococcal septicaemia, septic arthritis, and a lobar pneumonia and was subsequently diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus. The blood film and splenic 99mTc sulphur colloid uptake were normal, although selective functional hyposplenism was shown by the impaired clearance of immunoglobulin coated erythrocytes. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with fulminating pneumococcal sepsis in the presence of selective defects in spleen function is previously unreported. PMID:2322028

  2. Effective management in clusters of pneumococcal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Basarab, Marina; Ihekweazu, Chikwe; George, Robert; Pebody, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Outbreaks of serious pneumococcal disease can occur with high attack rates in certain settings. We systematically reviewed studies of interventions implemented in pneumococcal clusters and those reporting the effect of antibiotics on carriage reduction to assess the effectiveness of interventions. Evidence was graded according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network system. Of 28 identified cluster reports, one showed that administration of antibiotics to close contacts reduced risk of pneumococcal disease. In three of four clusters where rifampicin chemoprophylaxis was used and in four of five clusters where penicillin was used no further cases were seen after intervention. In clusters where pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine was used, subsequent cases occurred, all within around 2 weeks of vaccination, which suggests delayed benefit with this approach (evidence grade D). Use of infection control measures alone was reported in eight clusters, with no further cases being reported in seven (grade D). From 21 selected carriage studies, large carriage reductions were observed consistently with use of penicillin and azithromycin, with median values being 90% and 73%, respectively (grade C). The findings were presented to a working group for pneumococcal cluster guidelines and used to develop key recommendations on the management of clusters that supported prompt use of amoxicillin or azithromycin chemoprophylaxis, pneumococcal vaccination for close contacts, and implementation of infection control measures. PMID:21272792

  3. Influenza-induced inflammation drives pneumococcal otitis media.

    PubMed

    Short, Kirsty R; Reading, Patrick C; Brown, Lorena E; Pedersen, John; Gilbertson, Brad; Job, Emma R; Edenborough, Kathryn M; Habets, Marrit N; Zomer, Aldert; Hermans, Peter W M; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A; Wijburg, Odilia L

    2013-03-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) predisposes individuals to secondary infections with the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). Infections may manifest as pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, or otitis media (OM). It remains controversial as to whether secondary pneumococcal disease is due to the induction of an aberrant immune response or IAV-induced immunosuppression. Moreover, as the majority of studies have been performed in the context of pneumococcal pneumonia, it remains unclear how far these findings can be extrapolated to other pneumococcal disease phenotypes such as OM. Here, we used an infant mouse model, human middle ear epithelial cells, and a series of reverse-engineered influenza viruses to investigate how IAV promotes bacterial OM. Our data suggest that the influenza virus HA facilitates disease by inducing a proinflammatory response in the middle ear cavity in a replication-dependent manner. Importantly, our findings suggest that it is the inflammatory response to IAV infection that mediates pneumococcal replication. This study thus provides the first evidence that inflammation drives pneumococcal replication in the middle ear cavity, which may have important implications for the treatment of pneumococcal OM. PMID:23319557

  4. Climate induces seasonality in pneumococcal transmission

    PubMed Central

    Numminen, Elina; Chewapreecha, Claire; Turner, Claudia; Goldblatt, David; Nosten, Francois; Bentley, Stephen D.; Turner, Paul; Corander, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen and a leading cause of infant mortality in developing countries. Considerable global variation in the pneumococcal carriage prevalence has been observed and the ecological factors contributing to it are not yet fully understood. We use data from a cohort of infants in Asia to study the effects of climatic conditions on both acquisition and clearance rates of the bacterium, finding significantly higher transmissibility during the cooler and drier months. Conversely, the length of a colonization period is unaffected by the season. Independent carriage data from studies conducted on the African and North American continents suggest similar effects of the climate on the prevalence of this bacterium, which further validates the obtained results. Further studies could be important to replicate the findings and explain the mechanistic role of cooler and dry air in the physiological response to nasopharyngeal acquisition of the pneumococcus. PMID:26067932

  5. Climate induces seasonality in pneumococcal transmission.

    PubMed

    Numminen, Elina; Chewapreecha, Claire; Turner, Claudia; Goldblatt, David; Nosten, Francois; Bentley, Stephen D; Turner, Paul; Corander, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen and a leading cause of infant mortality in developing countries. Considerable global variation in the pneumococcal carriage prevalence has been observed and the ecological factors contributing to it are not yet fully understood. We use data from a cohort of infants in Asia to study the effects of climatic conditions on both acquisition and clearance rates of the bacterium, finding significantly higher transmissibility during the cooler and drier months. Conversely, the length of a colonization period is unaffected by the season. Independent carriage data from studies conducted on the African and North American continents suggest similar effects of the climate on the prevalence of this bacterium, which further validates the obtained results. Further studies could be important to replicate the findings and explain the mechanistic role of cooler and dry air in the physiological response to nasopharyngeal acquisition of the pneumococcus. PMID:26067932

  6. Improving Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates in Ambulatory Specialty Practices

    PubMed Central

    Pennant, Keyana N.; Costa, John J.; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Sax, Paul E.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Lara E.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Desai, Sonali P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are recommended for elderly and high-risk patients; however, rates of adherence are low. We sought to implement influenza and pneumococcal vaccine initiatives in 4 different ambulatory specialty practices, using 3 unique approaches. Methods. Four specialties with high-risk patient populations were selected for intervention: allergy (asthma), infectious disease (ID) (human immunodeficiency virus), pulmonary (chronic lung disease), and rheumatology (immunocompromised). Allergy and ID focused on influenza vaccination, and pulmonary and rheumatology focused on pneumococcal vaccination. We used 3 strategies for quality improvement: physician reminders, patient letters, and a nurse-driven model. Physicians were provided their performance data on a monthly basis and presented trended data on a quarterly basis at staff meetings. Results. All 4 specialties developed processes for improving vaccination rates with all showing some increase. Higher rates were achieved with pneumococcal vaccine than influenza. Pneumococcal vaccine rates showed steady improvement from year to year while influenza vaccine rates remained relatively constant. Allergy's influenza rate was 59% in 2011 and 64% in the 2014 flu season. Infectious disease influenza rates moved from 74% in the 2011 flu season to 86% for the 2014 season. Pneumococcal vaccine in pulmonary patients' rate was 52% at the start of intervention in February 2009 and 79% as of January 2015. Rheumatology rates rose from 50% in February 2009 to 87% in January 2015. Conclusions. Integrated routine workflow and performance data sharing can effectively engage specialists and staff in vaccine adherence improvement. Influenza vaccination may require other approaches to achieve the rates seen with pneumococcal vaccine. PMID:26430697

  7. Assignment of Weight-Based Antibody Units for Seven Additional Serotypes to a Human Pneumococcal Standard Reference Serum, 007sp

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C. Y.; Burbidge, P.; McElhiney, S.; McLaughlin, L.; Tucker, R.; Rauh, M.; Sidhu, M.; Giardina, P. C.

    2015-01-01

    The pneumococcal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reference standard serum, lot 89SF, has been in use since 1990 and was replaced in 2013 with a new reference standard, 007sp, that is projected to be available for the next 25 years. 007sp was generated under an FDA-approved clinical protocol; 278 adult volunteers were immunized with the 23-valent unconjugated polysaccharide vaccine Pneumovax II, and a unit of blood was obtained twice from each immunized subject within 120 days following immunization. Pooled serum was prepared from the plasma of 262 subjects, filled at 6 ml per vial, and lyophilized. Five independent laboratories participated in bridging the serotype-specific IgG assignments for 89SF to the new reference standard, 007sp, to establish equivalent reference values for 13 pneumococcal capsular serotypes (1,3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, and 23F) by using the WHO reference ELISA. In a second study involving three laboratories, a similar protocol was used to assign weight-based IgG concentrations in micrograms per ml to 007sp of seven serotypes (8, 10A, 11A, 12F, 15B, 22F, and 33F) also present in the 23-valent pneumococcal unconjugated polysaccharide vaccine. In addition, the IgG assignments for a 12-member WHO quality control (QC) serum panel were also extended to cover these seven serotypes. Agreement was excellent, with a concordance correlation coefficient (rc) of >0.996 when each laboratory was compared to the assigned values for the 12 WHO QC serum samples. There are four remaining pneumococcal serotypes (2, 9N, 17F, and 20) found in Pneumovax II for which IgG assignments exist for 89SF and remain to be bridged. PMID:26354860

  8. Pneumococcal Capsules and Their Types: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Geno, K Aaron; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Song, Joon Young; Skovsted, Ian C; Klugman, Keith P; Jones, Christopher; Konradsen, Helle B; Nahm, Moon H

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Its virulence is largely due to its polysaccharide capsule, which shields it from the host immune system, and because of this, the capsule has been extensively studied. Studies of the capsule led to the identification of DNA as the genetic material, identification of many different capsular serotypes, and identification of the serotype-specific nature of protection by adaptive immunity. Recent studies have led to the determination of capsular polysaccharide structures for many serotypes using advanced analytical technologies, complete elucidation of genetic basis for the capsular types, and the development of highly effective pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Conjugate vaccine use has altered the serotype distribution by either serotype replacement or switching, and this has increased the need to serotype pneumococci. Due to great advances in molecular technologies and our understanding of the pneumococcal genome, molecular approaches have become powerful tools to predict pneumococcal serotypes. In addition, more-precise and -efficient serotyping methods that directly detect polysaccharide structures are emerging. These improvements in our capabilities will greatly enhance future investigations of pneumococcal epidemiology and diseases and the biology of colonization and innate immunity to pneumococcal capsules. PMID:26085553

  9. Pneumococcal Capsules and Their Types: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Geno, K. Aaron; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.; Song, Joon Young; Skovsted, Ian C.; Klugman, Keith P.; Jones, Christopher; Konradsen, Helle B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Its virulence is largely due to its polysaccharide capsule, which shields it from the host immune system, and because of this, the capsule has been extensively studied. Studies of the capsule led to the identification of DNA as the genetic material, identification of many different capsular serotypes, and identification of the serotype-specific nature of protection by adaptive immunity. Recent studies have led to the determination of capsular polysaccharide structures for many serotypes using advanced analytical technologies, complete elucidation of genetic basis for the capsular types, and the development of highly effective pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Conjugate vaccine use has altered the serotype distribution by either serotype replacement or switching, and this has increased the need to serotype pneumococci. Due to great advances in molecular technologies and our understanding of the pneumococcal genome, molecular approaches have become powerful tools to predict pneumococcal serotypes. In addition, more-precise and -efficient serotyping methods that directly detect polysaccharide structures are emerging. These improvements in our capabilities will greatly enhance future investigations of pneumococcal epidemiology and diseases and the biology of colonization and innate immunity to pneumococcal capsules. PMID:26085553

  10. Delivering pneumococcal vaccine to a high risk population: the Navajo experience.

    PubMed

    Benin, Andrea L; Watt, James P; O'Brien, Katherine L; Reid, Raymond; Zell, Elizabeth R; Katz, Scott; Donaldson, Connie; Schuchat, Anne; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2005-01-01

    High rates of preventable diseases such as pneumococcal disease occur among the Navajo despite their universal health insurance through the Indian Health Service. The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of Navajo adults vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and to examine key features of vaccination programs of the Navajo Indian Health Service. For this cross-sectional study, medical charts of Navajo patients with vaccine indications were randomly selected and reviewed to determine who had been vaccinated as of January 1, 1999. Among 480 Navajo>or=65 years old, 73% were vaccinated (95% confidence interval [CI]: 69%-77%). Among 111 Navajo 18-64 years old with vaccine indications, 54% were vaccinated (95% CI: 45% -63%). Vaccination programs utilized extensive public health nursing, home visits, standing orders, and "express lane" clinics. In spite of excellent delivery systems and universal healthcare, the proportion of Navajo persons vaccinated was still below the goals for Healthy People 2010 of having 90% of persons>or=65 years old vaccinated and 60% of high-risk persons 18-64 years old vaccinated. PMID:17038821

  11. Indirect effect of conjugate pneumococcal vaccination in a 2+1 dose schedule.

    PubMed

    Vestrheim, Didrik F; Høiby, E Arne; Bergsaker, Marianne R; Rønning, Karin; Aaberge, Ingeborg S; Caugant, Dominique A

    2010-03-01

    In 2006, the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the Norwegian Childhood Vaccination Programme in a 2+1 dose schedule; immunisations are administered at 3, 5 and 12 months. Changes in invasive pneumococcal disease in all ages from the baseline years 2004-2005 to 2008 were assessed, focusing on the indirect effect in the unvaccinated population. Following the introduction of PCV7, incidence rates of IPD caused by vaccine serotypes declined across all age groups, the decline being statistically significant for the age groups <5 years, 5-19 years, 40-64 years and > or = 65 years. In the unvaccinated population aged > or = 5 years the incidence rate of IPD caused by PCV7 serotypes declined by 48% from 12.34 cases/100,000 population to 6.44 cases/100,000 population, accounting for 74% of prevented cases of IPD in 2008. Among the adults aged > or = 65 years the incidence rate of IPD caused by serotypes not included in PCV7 increased. No vaccine failure was identified, indicating a very high effectiveness of the 2+1 dose schedule vaccination programme. PMID:20056192

  12. Seasonality of Pneumococcal Nasopharyngeal Carriage in Rural Gambia Determined within the Context of a Cluster Randomized Pneumococcal Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bojang, Abdoulie; Jafali, James; Egere, Uzochukwu E.; Hill, Phillip C.; Antonio, Martin; Jeffries, David; Greenwood, Brian M.; Roca, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted an ancillary study among individuals who had participated in a PCV-7 trial in rural Gambia, to determine the influence of season on the prevalence of pneumococcal carriage. Methods 636 individuals above 30 months of age were followed from 4 to 20 months after vaccination with PCV-7 or meningococcal-conjugate-vaccine. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected periodically between November 2006 and June 2008. Overall, 4,495 NPS were collected. Results Prevalence of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage in the study subjects (median age 11 years) was 55.0%; this prevalence decreased linearly with increasing age (p = 0.001). Prevalence of carriage was significantly higher during the dry than the rainy season for any pneumococcal carriage [57.6% versus 47.8% (p<0.001)], pneumococcal vaccine serotype carriage [10.3% versus 6.5% (p< 0.001)] and non-vaccine serotype carriage [49.7% versus 42.7% (p<0.001)]. Differences remained significant in the adjusted analysis. Conclusions In areas of Africa with marked variation in rainfall, seasonality of pneumococcal carriage needs to be considered when interpreting carriage data. PMID:26132206

  13. High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Nyein, Phyo Pyae; Aung, Ne Myo; Kyi, Tint Tint; Htet, Zaw Win; Anstey, Nicholas M; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Background.  African children with severe falciparum malaria commonly have concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia, but co-infection has been thought to be relatively rare in adult malaria. Methods.  Adults with a diagnosis of falciparum malaria hospitalized at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Myanmar had blood cultures collected at admission. The frequency of concomitant bacteremia and the clinical characteristics of the patients, with and without bacteremia, were explored. Results.  Of 67 adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria, 9 (13% [95% confidence interval, 5.3%-21.6%]) were also bacteremic on admission, 7 (78%) with Gram-negative enteric organisms (Escherichia coli [n = 3], typhoidal Salmonella species [n = 3], nontyphoidal Salmonella [n = 1]). Bacteremic adults had more severe disease (median Respiratory Coma Acidosis Malaria [RCAM] score 3; interquartile range [IQR], 1-4) than those without bacteremia (median RCAM score 1; IQR, 1-2) and had a higher frequency of acute kidney injury (50% vs 16%, P = .03). Although 35 (52%) were at high risk of death (RCAM score ≥2), all 67 patients in the study survived, 51 (76%) of whom received empirical antibiotics on admission. Conclusions.  Bacteremia was relatively frequent in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in Myanmar. Like children in high transmission settings, bacteremic adults in this low transmission setting were sicker than nonbacteremic adults, and were often difficult to identify at presentation. Empirical antibiotics may also be appropriate in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in low transmission settings, until bacterial infection is excluded. PMID:26989752

  14. High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Nyein, Phyo Pyae; Aung, Ne Myo; Kyi, Tint Tint; Htet, Zaw Win; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Background. African children with severe falciparum malaria commonly have concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia, but co-infection has been thought to be relatively rare in adult malaria. Methods. Adults with a diagnosis of falciparum malaria hospitalized at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Myanmar had blood cultures collected at admission. The frequency of concomitant bacteremia and the clinical characteristics of the patients, with and without bacteremia, were explored. Results. Of 67 adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria, 9 (13% [95% confidence interval, 5.3%–21.6%]) were also bacteremic on admission, 7 (78%) with Gram-negative enteric organisms (Escherichia coli [n = 3], typhoidal Salmonella species [n = 3], nontyphoidal Salmonella [n = 1]). Bacteremic adults had more severe disease (median Respiratory Coma Acidosis Malaria [RCAM] score 3; interquartile range [IQR], 1–4) than those without bacteremia (median RCAM score 1; IQR, 1–2) and had a higher frequency of acute kidney injury (50% vs 16%, P = .03). Although 35 (52%) were at high risk of death (RCAM score ≥2), all 67 patients in the study survived, 51 (76%) of whom received empirical antibiotics on admission. Conclusions. Bacteremia was relatively frequent in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in Myanmar. Like children in high transmission settings, bacteremic adults in this low transmission setting were sicker than nonbacteremic adults, and were often difficult to identify at presentation. Empirical antibiotics may also be appropriate in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in low transmission settings, until bacterial infection is excluded. PMID:26989752

  15. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C; Veuillez, Veronique; Poyart, Claire; Abachin, Eric; Quesne, Gilles; Dupont, Bertrand; Berche, Patrick; Viard, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, despite chemoprophylaxis and capsular vaccination. Conclusions Efficacy of anti-pneumococcal chemoprophylaxis and vaccination in HIV-infected patients are discussed in the light of this particular case. PMID:14613586

  16. Pneumococcal meningitis in an adolescent with fever and foot ache.

    PubMed

    Dias, Catarina; Pedrosa, Cláudia; Romariz, Jorge; Santos, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease predominantly affects younger children, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Pneumococcal meningitis is a particularly important form of presentation, considering its high rate of morbimortality. We present the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old adolescent male who was hospitalized due to suspicion of osteoarticular infection in his left foot. A few hours later, he developed meningeal signs, exhibiting slight pleocytosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Imaging studies were inconclusive regarding the nature of the foot disorder. We considered the hypothesis of osteomyelitis of the navicular bone as the most likely, for which he completed six weeks of antibiotic therapy. There was a favorable clinical evolution, along with complete absence of osteoarticular or neurological sequelae. The relevance of this clinical case resides in the unusual presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in this age group, as well as in the rare form of orthopedic involvement. PMID:23956909

  17. The importance of splenic blood flow in clearing pneumococcal organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J; Ogden, M E; Williams, S; Coln, D

    1982-01-01

    Overwhelming infection from encapsulated bacteria occurs after splenectomy. Decreases in IgM, tufsin, and serum opsonin are known to occur in animals and humans after splenectomy. A substantial immunologic advantage exists if some splenic tissue remains, but this may not offer sufficient protection from encapsulated bacteria if splenic arterial blood flow is reduced. This experiment was designed to examine the rate of pneumococcal clearance by the spleen and to determine the relationship between splenic blood flow and splenic tissue mass in bacterial clearance from the blood. Pneumococcal clearance, splenic blood flow, and residual splenic weight were measured in 171 rabbits with normal spleens, ligated splenic arteries, splenic autotransplants, hemisplenectomies, and splenectomies. Interruption of the splenic artery results in delayed pneumococcal clearance that is due to reduced blood flow and not to a decrease in splenic tissue mass. Splenic artery ligation to preserve an injured spleen cannot be assumed to give protection from sepsis. PMID:7055394

  18. Pneumococcal Meningitis in an Adolescent with Fever and Foot Ache

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Catarina; Pedrosa, Cláudia; Romariz, Jorge; Santos, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease predominantly affects younger children, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Pneumococcal meningitis is a particularly important form of presentation, considering its high rate of morbimortality. We present the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old adolescent male who was hospitalized due to suspicion of osteoarticular infection in his left foot. A few hours later, he developed meningeal signs, exhibiting slight pleocytosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Imaging studies were inconclusive regarding the nature of the foot disorder. We considered the hypothesis of osteomyelitis of the navicular bone as the most likely, for which he completed six weeks of antibiotic therapy. There was a favorable clinical evolution, along with complete absence of osteoarticular or neurological sequelae. The relevance of this clinical case resides in the unusual presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in this age group, as well as in the rare form of orthopedic involvement. PMID:23956909

  19. Pediatric Pneumococcal Serotypes in 4 European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kissling, Esther; Fenoll, Asuncion; George, Robert; Lepoutre, Agnes; Lernout, Tinne; Tarragó, David; Varon, Emmanuelle; Verhaegen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    After heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was marketed in France, Spain, Belgium, and England and Wales (United Kingdom), invasive disease from non-PCV7 serotypes (NVT) increased. Adjusted serotype-specific incidences among children <15 years of age were compared between 1999–2002 (prevaccine) and 2005–2006 (postmarketing). Vaccine coverage increased to ≈32%–48% in France, Spain, and Belgium but remained <1% in England and Wales. Serotype 1 incidence rose in all age groups and countries (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.3–4.2; p<0.004), independently of PCV7 use, but incidence of serotypes 7F and 19A increased most in France, Spain, and Belgium (IRR 1.9–16.9 in children <5 years; p<0.001), where PCV7 coverage was greater. Vaccine-induced replacement of PCV7 serotypes possibly contributed to NVT increases, as did secular trends. New vaccines targeting these serotypes are available, but serotype dynamics needs further exploration that accounts for underreporting and prevaccine trends. PMID:20735928

  20. Non-invasive pneumococcal pneumonia in Portugal--serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Horácio, Andreia N; Lopes, Joana P; Ramirez, Mário; Melo-Cristino, José

    2014-01-01

    There is limited information on the serotypes causing non-invasive pneumococcal pneumonia (NIPP). Our aim was to characterize pneumococci causing NIPP in adults to determine recent changes in serotype prevalence, the potential coverage of pneumococcal vaccines and changes in antimicrobial resistance. Serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a sample of 1300 isolates recovered from adult patients (≥18 yrs) between 1999 and 2011 (13 years) were determined. Serotype 3 was the most frequent cause of NIPP accounting for 18% of the isolates. The other most common serotypes were 11A (7%), 19F (7%), 19A (5%), 14 (4%), 22F (4%), 23F (4%) and 9N (4%). Between 1999 and 2011, there were significant changes in the proportion of isolates expressing vaccine serotypes, with a steady decline of the serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine from 31% (1999-2003) to 11% (2011) (P<0.001). Taking together the most recent study years (2009-2011), the potential coverage of the 13-valent conjugate vaccine was 44% and of the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine was 66%. While erythromycin resistance increased from 8% in 1999-2003 to 18% in 2011 (P<0.001), no significant trend was identified for penicillin non-susceptibility, which had an average value of 18.5%. The serotype distribution found in this study for NIPP was very different from the one previously described for IPD, with only two serotypes in common to the ones responsible for half of each presentation in 2009-2011 - serotypes 3 and 19A. In spite of these differences, the overall prevalence of resistant isolates was similar in NIPP and in IPD. PMID:25075961

  1. Clonal Expansion of the Macrolide Resistant ST386 within Pneumococcal Serotype 6C in France

    PubMed Central

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002–2003) to the PCV13 era (2010–2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter. PMID:24603763

  2. Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical-pathological correlations (MeninGene-Path).

    PubMed

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and vascular damage. Of the 27 patients with known time from the admission to death, 14 patients died within 7 days of admission and 13 after 7 days of admission. Eleven of 25 (44 %) patients had been treated with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy. Observed pathological processes were inflammation of medium-large arteries in 30 brains (97 %), cerebral haemorrhage in 24 (77 %), cerebritis in 24 (77 %), thrombosis in 21 (68 %), infarction in 19 (61 %) and ventriculitis in 19 (of 28 cases, 68 %). Inflammation of medium-large arteries led to obstruction of the vascular lumen in 14 (of 31 cases, 45 %). Vascular inflammation was associated with infarction and thrombosis of brain parenchymal vessels. Hippocampal dentate gyrus apoptosis between patients treated with and without dexamethasone was similar (p = 0.66); however, dexamethasone treated patients had higher total pathology score than non-dexamethasone treated patients (p = 0.003). Our study shows that vascular damage is key in the process of brain damage in pneumococcal meningitis. Data and material of this study will be made open-access for translational research in pneumococcal meningitis (MeninGene-Path). PMID:27001057

  3. Sialic Acid Transport Contributes to Pneumococcal Colonization ▿

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Carolyn; Burnaugh, Amanda M.; Woodiga, Shireen A.; King, Samantha J.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia and meningitis. Airway colonization is a necessary precursor to disease, but little is known about how the bacteria establish and maintain colonization. Carbohydrates are required as a carbon source for pneumococcal growth and, therefore, for colonization. Free carbohydrates are not readily available in the naso-oropharynx; however, N- and O-linked glycans are common in the airway. Sialic acid is the most common terminal modification on N- and O-linked glycans and is likely encountered frequently by S. pneumoniae in the airway. Here we demonstrate that sialic acid supports pneumococcal growth when provided as a sole carbon source. Growth on sialic acid requires import into the bacterium. Three genetic regions have been proposed to encode pneumococcal sialic acid transporters: one sodium solute symporter and two ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Data demonstrate that one of these, satABC, is required for transport of sialic acid. A satABC mutant displayed significantly reduced growth on both sialic acid and the human glycoprotein alpha-1. The importance of satABC for growth on human glycoprotein suggests that sialic acid transport may be important in vivo. Indeed, the satABC mutant was significantly reduced in colonization of the murine upper respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that S. pneumoniae is able to use sialic acid as a sole carbon source and that utilization of sialic acid is likely important during pneumococcal colonization. PMID:21189320

  4. Cognitive impairment in adults with good recovery after bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    van de Beek, Diederik; Schmand, Ben; de Gans, Jan; Weisfelt, Martijn; Vaessen, Heleen; Dankert, Jacob; Vermeulen, Marinus

    2002-10-01

    Adults without neurologic sequelae after bacterial meningitis are supposed to live without restrictions. Neuropsychological outcome was assessed in 51 adults from a prospective cohort with good recovery, defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale score 5, after pneumococcal or meningococcal meningitis. Patients who recovered well after pneumococcal meningitis showed cognitive slowness (P=.001). A cognitive disorder was found in 27% of these patients. Patients who previously had meningococcal meningitis were not significantly different from control subjects. Scores on general health and quality of life questionnaires revealed lower scores for patients with meningitis, which were related to cognitive slowing (R, -0.46 to -0.38). In conclusion, adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis were at significant risk of neuropsychological abnormalities, even if they were clinically well recovered. PMID:12232850

  5. Effect of previous vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Schaballie, H; Wuyts, G; Dillaerts, D; Frans, G; Moens, L; Proesmans, M; Vermeulen, F; De Boeck, K; Meyts, I; Bossuyt, X

    2016-08-01

    During the past 10 years, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) has become part of the standard childhood vaccination programme. This may impact upon the diagnosis of polysaccharide antibody deficiency by measurement of anti-polysaccharide immunoglobulin (Ig)G after immunization with unconjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV). Indeed, contrary to PPV, PCV induces a T-dependent, more pronounced memory response. The antibody response to PPV was studied retrospectively in patients referred for suspected humoral immunodeficiency. The study population was divided into four subgroups based on age (2-5 years versus ≥ 10 years) and time tested (1998-2005 versus 2010-12). Only 2-5-year-old children tested in 2010-12 had been vaccinated with PCV prior to PPV. The PCV primed group showed higher antibody responses for PCV-PPV shared serotypes 4 and 18C than the unprimed groups. To a lesser extent, this was also found for non-PCV serotype 9N, but not for non-PCV serotypes 19A and 8. Furthermore, PCV-priming elicited a higher IgG2 response. In conclusion, previous PCV vaccination affects antibody response to PPV for shared serotypes, but can also influence antibody response to some non-PCV serotypes (9N). With increasing number of serotypes included in PCV, the diagnostic assessment for polysaccharide antibody deficiency requires careful selection of serotypes that are not influenced by prior PCV (e.g. serotype 8). Further research is needed to identify more serotypes that are not influenced. PMID:26939935

  6. Impact of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on the incidence of pneumococcal meningitis in children.

    PubMed

    Chapoutot, A G; Dessein, R; Guilluy, O; Lagrée, M; Wallet, F; Varon, E; Martinot, A; Dubos, F

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) on the incidence of pneumococcal meningitis (PM) in children is unknown. To determine this impact, a descriptive multicentre retrospective cohort study was conducted from 2008 to 2013 in northern France. All laboratory-confirmed PM in children aged <18 years in all hospitals of the area with paediatric units were included. Two independent databases were used for exhaustive identification of cases: medical plus laboratory records at each hospital and discharge codes. The corrected incidence of PM was determined by a capture-recapture analysis using these two databases. Sixty-two cases were found over the 6-year period. A decrease of the PM corrected incidence was observed in the global population (P = 0·07), significant only for children aged <2 years, from 11·9/100 000 in 2008 in 1·9/100 000 in 2013 [6·4 fold-decrease, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·4-41, P = 0·01] between years 2008 and 2013. When comparing the pre- and post-PCV13 periods, this decrease was still statistically significant for children aged <2 years [7·32/100 000 (95% CI 4·39-10·25) to 2·78/100 000 (95% CI 0·96-4·60), P = 0·01]. Only three (5%) cases of PM caused by vaccine serotypes could have been prevented. After the introduction of the PCV13 vaccine, a decrease in the incidence of PM cases in children in northern France was observed. PMID:26234410

  7. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kloek, Anne T; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10(-7)). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10(-6); G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05-5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10(-5); G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54-0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10(-7)). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  8. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Anne T.; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10−7). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10−6; G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05–5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10−5; G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54–0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10−7). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  9. Unravelling the structure of the pneumococcal autolytic lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Monterroso, Begoña; López-Zumel, Consuelo; García, José L.; Sáiz, José L.; García, Pedro; Campillo, Nuria E.; Menéndez, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    The LytC lysozyme of Streptococcus pneumoniae forms part of the autolytic system of this important pathogen. This enzyme is composed of a C-terminal CM (catalytic module), belonging to the GH25 family of glycosyl hydrolases, and an N-terminal CBM (choline-binding module), made of eleven homologous repeats, that specifically recognizes the choline residues that are present in pneumococcal teichoic and lipoteichoic acids. This arrangement inverts the general assembly pattern of the major pneumococcal autolysin, LytA, and the lytic enzymes encoded by pneumococcal bacteriophages that place the CBM (made of six repeats) at the C-terminus. In the present paper, a three-dimensional model of LytC built by homology modelling of each module and consistent with spectroscopic and hydrodynamic studies is shown. In addition, the putative catalytic-pair residues are identified. Despite the inversion in the modular arrangement, LytC and the bacteriophage-encoded Cpl-1 lysozyme most probably adopt a similar global fold. However, the distinct choline-binding ability and their substrate-binding surfaces may reflect a divergent evolution directed by the different roles played by them in the host (LytC) or in the bacteriophage (Cpl-1). The tight binding of LytC to the pneumococcal envelope, mediated by the acquisition of additional choline-binding repeats, could facilitate the regulation of the potentially suicidal activity of this autolysin. In contrast, a looser attachment of Cpl-1 to the cell wall and the establishment of more favourable interactions between its highly negatively charged catalytic surface and the positively charged chains of pneumococcal murein could enhance the lytic activity of the parasite-encoded enzyme and therefore liberation of the phage progeny. PMID:15943581

  10. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Uptake in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Immunosuppressive Therapy in the UK: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using Data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin L.; Pye, Stephen R.; Brown, Benjamin; Dixon, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) recommend using influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations to mitigate infection risk. The level of adherence to these guidelines is not well known in the UK. The aims of this study were to describe the uptake of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations in patients with RA in the UK, to compare the characteristics of those vaccinated to those not vaccinated and to compare vaccination rates across regions of the UK. Methods A retrospective cohort study of adults diagnosed with incident RA and treated with non-biologic immunosuppressive therapy, using data from a large primary care database. For the influenza vaccination, patients were considered unvaccinated on 1st September each year and upon vaccination their status changed to vaccinated. For pneumococcal vaccination, patients were considered vaccinated after their first vaccination until the end of follow-up. Patients were stratified by age 65 at the start of follow-up, given differences in vaccination guidelines for the general population. Results Overall (N = 15,724), 80% patients received at least one influenza vaccination, and 50% patients received a pneumococcal vaccination, during follow-up (mean 5.3 years). Of those aged below 65 years (N = 9,969), 73% patients had received at least one influenza vaccination, and 43% patients received at least one pneumococcal vaccination. Of those aged over 65 years (N = 5,755), 91% patients received at least one influenza vaccination, and 61% patients had received at least one pneumococcal vaccination. Those vaccinated were older, had more comorbidity and visited the GP more often. Regional differences in vaccination rates were seen with the highest rates in Northern Ireland, and the lowest rates in London. Conclusions One in five patients received no influenza vaccinations and one in two patients received no pneumonia vaccine over five years of follow-up. There remains significant scope to improve

  11. Inhibition of Hippocampal Regeneration by Adjuvant Dexamethasone in Experimental Infant Rat Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bally, Lia; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) causes neurological sequelae in up to half of surviving patients. Neuronal damage associated with poor outcome is largely mediated by the inflammatory host response. Dexamethasone (DXM) is used as an adjuvant therapy in adult PM, but its efficacy in the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis in children is controversially discussed. While DXM has previously been shown to enhance hippocampal apoptosis in experimental PM, its impact on hippocampal cell proliferation is not known. This study investigated the impact of DXM on hippocampal proliferation in infant rat PM. Eleven-day-old nursing Wistar rats (n = 90) were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae to induce experimental meningitis. Treatment with DXM or vehicle was started 18 h after infection, concomitantly with antibiotics (ceftriaxone 100 mg/kg of body weight twice a day [b.i.d.]). Clinical parameters were monitored, and the amount of cells with proliferating activity was assessed using in vivo incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and an in vitro neurosphere culture system at 3 and 4 d postinfection. DXM significantly worsened weight loss and survival. Density of BrdU-positive cells, as an index of cells with proliferating activity, was significantly lower in DXM-treated animals compared to vehicle controls (P < 0.0001). In parallel, DXM reduced neurosphere formation as an index for stem/progenitor cell density compared to vehicle treatment (P = 0.01). Our findings provide clear evidence that DXM exerts an antiproliferative effect on the hippocampus in infant rat PM. We conclude that an impairment of regenerative hippocampal capacity should be taken into account when considering adjuvant DXM in the therapeutic regimen for PM in children. PMID:26824948

  12. Pneumococcal Hydrogen Peroxide–Induced Stress Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Loose, Maria; Hudel, Martina; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Garcia, Ernesto; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Lucas, Rudolf; Chakraborty, Trinad; Pillich, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections can induce aberrant responses in cellular stress pathways, leading to translational attenuation, metabolic restriction, and activation of oxidative stress, with detrimental effects on cell survival. Here we show that infection of human airway epithelial cells with Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, and regulation of their respective target genes. We identify pneumococcal H2O2 as the causative agent for these responses, as both catalase-treated and pyruvate oxidase-deficient bacteria lacked these activities. Pneumococcal H2O2 induced nuclear NF-κB translocation and transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of translational arrest and ER stress by salubrinal or of MAPK signaling pathways attenuate cytokine transcription. These results provide strong evidence for the notion that inhibition of translation is an important host pathway in monitoring harmful pathogen-associated activities, thereby enabling differentiation between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. PMID:25183769

  13. Verbascoside Alleviates Pneumococcal Pneumonia by Reducing Pneumolysin Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoran; Li, Hongen; Wang, Jianfeng; Guo, Yan; Liu, Bowen; Deng, Xuming; Niu, Xiaodi

    2016-03-01

    Pneumolysin (PLY), an essential virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), can penetrate the physical defenses of the host and possesses inflammatory properties. The vital role PLY plays in pneumococcus pathogenesis makes this virulence factor one of the most promising targets for the treatment of pneumococcal infection. Verbascoside (VBS) is an agent that does not exhibit bacteriostatic activity but has been shown to inhibit PLY-mediated cytotoxicity. The results from molecular dynamics simulations and mutational analysis indicated that VBS binds to the cleft between domains 3 and 4 of PLY, thereby blocking PLY's oligomerization and counteracting its hemolytic activity. Moreover, VBS can effectively alleviate PLY-mediated human alveolar epithelial (A549) cell injury, and treatment with VBS provides significant protection against lung damage and reduces mortality in a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model. Our results demonstrate that VBS is a strong candidate as a novel therapeutic in the treatment of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. PMID:26700563

  14. Microarray Analysis of Pneumococcal Gene Expression during Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela, Carlos J.; Radin, Jana N.; Sublett, Jack E.; Gao, Geli; Kaushal, Deepak; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease. This is the first study to examine the expression of S. pneumoniae genes in vivo by using whole-genome microarrays available from The Institute for Genomic Research. Total RNA was collected from pneumococci isolated from infected blood, infected cerebrospinal fluid, and bacteria attached to a pharyngeal epithelial cell line in vitro. Microarray analysis of pneumococcal genes expressed in these models identified body site-specific patterns of expression for virulence factors, transporters, transcription factors, translation-associated proteins, metabolism, and genes with unknown function. Contributions to virulence predicted for several unknown genes with enhanced expression in vivo were confirmed by insertion duplication mutagenesis and challenge of mice with the mutants. Finally, we cross-referenced our results with previous studies that used signature-tagged mutagenesis and differential fluorescence induction to identify genes that are potentially required by a broad range of pneumococcal strains for invasive disease. PMID:15385455

  15. Impact of Preceding Flu-Like Illness on the Serotype Distribution of Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joon Young; Nahm, Moon H.; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2014-01-01

    Background Even though the pathogenicity and invasiveness of pneumococcus largely depend on capsular types, the impact of serotypes on post-viral pneumococcal pneumonia is unknown. Methods and Findings This study was performed to evaluate the impact of capsular serotypes on the development of pneumococcal pneumonia after preceding respiratory viral infections. Patients with a diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia were identified. Pneumonia patients were divided into two groups (post-viral pneumococcal pneumonia versus primary pneumococcal pneumonia), and then their pneumococcal serotypes were compared. Nine hundred and nineteen patients with pneumococcal pneumonia were identified during the study period, including 327 (35.6%) cases with post-viral pneumococcal pneumonia and 592 (64.4%) cases with primary pneumococcal pneumonia. Overall, serotypes 3 and 19A were the most prevalent, followed by serotypes 19F, 6A, and 11A/11E. Although relatively uncommon (33 cases, 3.6%), infrequently colonizing invasive serotypes (4, 5, 7F/7A, 8, 9V/9A, 12F, and 18C) were significantly associated with preceding respiratory viral infections (69.7%, P<0.01). Multivariate analysis revealed several statistically significant risk factors for post-viral pneumococcal pneumonia: immunodeficiency (OR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10–2.53), chronic lung diseases (OR 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09–1.93) and ICI serotypes (OR 4.66; 95% CI, 2.07–10.47). Conclusions Infrequently colonizing invasive serotypes would be more likely to cause pneumococcal pneumonia after preceding respiratory viral illness, particularly in patients with immunodeficiency or chronic lung diseases. PMID:24691515

  16. Evolving role of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Azzari, Chiara; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Schmitt, Heinz-Josef; Dagan, Ron

    2014-08-01

    Since the introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), PCVs with extended coverage have become available, and there is emerging global evidence that these vaccines, in particular PCV13, have further reduced rates of invasive pneumococcal disease compared with PCV7. The present article aims to address emerging topics related to PCV13 use in routine clinical practice; specifically: (1) the potential role of high-valent PCVs in reducing pneumococcal disease burden; (2) the impact of PCVs on nasopharyngeal carriage and how this may contribute to reductions in otitis media and pneumonia, as well as the prevalence of resistant pneumococcal strains; (3) new PCV13 indications and (4) importance of schedule adherence for PCV in the prevention of cases of vaccine serotype-specific invasive pneumococcal disease. The beneficial effects of PCVs in protecting individuals from a wide spectrum of pneumococcal diseases can be increased by improving the vaccine coverage and adhering to the recommended vaccination schedules. There is increasing evidence that PCV13 has reduced much of the post-PCV7 burden of pneumococcal diseases in the pediatric community, including reducing pneumococcal colonization and the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease and mucosal diseases. This has also led to a reduction in antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal diseases. The role of PCV13 in clinical practice is evolving, with PCV13 now available for children and adolescents between the ages of 6 weeks and 17 years, thus ensuring that children in all age groups can be protected against vaccine-serotype pneumococcal diseases. Continued surveillance is warranted to monitor the impact of PCV13 on disease burden. PMID:24618937

  17. Secular trends (1990-2013) in serotypes and associated non-susceptibility of S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease in the pre-/post-era of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Spanish regions without universal paediatric pneumococcal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, Asunción; Granizo, Juan-José; Giménez, María-José; Yuste, José; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2015-10-13

    This study analyzed temporal trends of non-susceptibility/serotypes in invasive pneumococci from Spanish regions where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) were not included in paediatric immunization programmes. All invasive pneumococcal isolates voluntarily sent to the Spanish Reference Laboratory for Pneumococci (January 1990-December 2013) from hospitals located in target study regions were analyzed by age group. The PCV estimated coverage in children <24 months was correlated with 13-valent PCV (PCV13) serotypes trends. A total of 28,124 invasive isolates were analyzed: 3138 (11.2%) from children <24 months, 2161 (7.7%) from children 24-59 months, 781 (2.8%) from children 5-14 years, and 22,044 (78.4%) from adults. The estimated coverage increased from 17.6% (2002) to around 40% (2010-2013). The percentage of PCV13 serotypes among all isolates over time followed a cubic significant trend (R(2)=0.884), with an increasing trend up to 2001 followed by a decrease (more prominent from 2010 onwards). The estimated PCVs coverage was significantly correlated with the decrease in the percentage of PCV13 isolates in children <24 months (r(2)=0.824) and in adults (r(2)=0.786), mainly due to decreases in serotypes 1 and 7F in adults, and in serogroup 6 and serotypes 7F and 19A in children <24 months. None of the non-PCV13 serotypes stood out with substantial increases in the last period. This study showed that the different serotypes (and its associated non-susceptibility trends) were not equally affected by low PCVs disposition. Lack of impact in certain serotypes as serotype 1 (in children 24-59 months), 6C (in all age groups), and 19A (in adults) suggests the need for increasing vaccine coverage in the target vaccine population to increase direct and indirect protection. PMID:26341563

  18. Increase in Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Infections in Children with Sickle Cell Disease since Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Licensure

    PubMed Central

    McCavit, Timothy L.; Quinn, Charles T.; Techasaensiri, Chonnamet; Rogers, Zora R.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) has decreased with prophylactic penicillin, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and pneumococcal protein-conjugate vaccine (PCV7) usage. We report 10 IPD cases since PCV7 licensure, including a recent surge of non-vaccine serotypes. IPD continues to be a serious risk in SCD. PMID:21193205

  19. Impact of bacterial coinfection on clinical outcomes in pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, S; Ishida, T; Tachibana, H; Ito, Y; Ito, A; Hashimoto, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of bacterial coinfection on patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. We retrospectively analyzed the incidence, clinical features, microbial distributions, and outcomes of patients with bacterial coinfection in a cohort of 433 hospitalized patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. Eighty-five patients (19.6 %) were diagnosed with bacterial coinfection; the most frequent pathogens were Haemophilus influenzae (25 patients, 33.3 %), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (15 patients, 20.0 %), and Moraxella catarrhalis (13 patients, 17.3 %). The CURB-65 score and pneumonia severity index (PSI) were significantly higher in patients with bacterial coinfection (both P < 0.001). In addition, the proportion of patients with bacterial coinfection who met the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA)/American Thoracic Society (ATS) severe pneumonia criteria was significantly higher (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified three risk factors for bacterial coinfection in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia: alcoholism (odds ratio [OR], 5.12; 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI), 1.60-16.4; P = 0.006), hospitalization for 2 days or more within 90 days preceding admission (OR, 2.02; 95 % CI, 1.03-3.98; P = 0.041), and residence in a nursing home or extended care facility (OR, 3.22; 95 % CI, 1.48-6.97; P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis for 30-day mortality showed that bacterial coinfection was a significant adverse prognostic factor (OR, 2.50; 95 % CI, 1.13-5.53; P = 0.023), independent of IDSA/ATS severe pneumonia, PSI, or healthcare-associated pneumonia. In conclusion, bacterial coinfection may have an adverse impact on severity and outcomes of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:26059041

  20. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine on diabetic elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Lu, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yu-Kang; Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Hung, Shou-Hung; Yang, Ming-Ching; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is recommended for prevention of pneumonia. However, the effectiveness of PPV23 remains unclear in the older diabetic patients who usually have compromised immune function. We used data extracted from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from 2000 to 2009 to conduct a population-based retrospective cohort study, comparing the incidence of pneumococcal diseases among PPV23-vaccinated and propensity-score matched PPV23-unvaccinated groups in diabetic elderly. The primary outcome was invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs), and the secondary outcomes were medical utilization. PPV23-vaccinated group had reduced risks of IPD (adjusted OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.78–0.94), respiratory failure (0.84, 0.77–0.93), and shorter length of hospitalization (−1.27 ± 0.19 days, P value: 0.0012). In flu-vaccinated group, subjects who received PPV23 had reduced risks of IPD, hospitalization, and respiratory failure; had shorter lengths of hospitalization; and less medical costs, than those without receiving PPV23. In not flu-vaccinated group, PPV23 vaccination was associated with reduced risks of IPD and respiratory failure. Receiving both vaccines could bring better protection in IPD, hospitalization, visits of emergency department, and respiratory failure. PPV23 vaccination was effective in prevention of pneumococcal diseases and reduction of medical utilization in diabetic elderly aged 75 and more. Receiving both vaccines resulted in better outcomes than PPV vaccination alone. PMID:27368047

  1. Dense genomic sampling identifies highways of pneumococcal recombination.

    PubMed

    Chewapreecha, Claire; Harris, Simon R; Croucher, Nicholas J; Turner, Claudia; Marttinen, Pekka; Cheng, Lu; Pessia, Alberto; Aanensen, David M; Mather, Alison E; Page, Andrew J; Salter, Susannah J; Harris, David; Nosten, Francois; Goldblatt, David; Corander, Jukka; Parkhill, Julian; Turner, Paul; Bentley, Stephen D

    2014-03-01

    Evasion of clinical interventions by Streptococcus pneumoniae occurs through selection of non-susceptible genomic variants. We report whole-genome sequencing of 3,085 pneumococcal carriage isolates from a 2.4-km(2) refugee camp. This sequencing provides unprecedented resolution of the process of recombination and its impact on population evolution. Genomic recombination hotspots show remarkable consistency between lineages, indicating common selective pressures acting at certain loci, particularly those associated with antibiotic resistance. Temporal changes in antibiotic consumption are reflected in changes in recombination trends, demonstrating rapid spread of resistance when selective pressure is high. The highest frequencies of receipt and donation of recombined DNA fragments were observed in non-encapsulated lineages, implying that this largely overlooked pneumococcal group, which is beyond the reach of current vaccines, may have a major role in genetic exchange and the adaptation of the species as a whole. These findings advance understanding of pneumococcal population dynamics and provide information for the design of future intervention strategies. PMID:24509479

  2. Investigational new drugs for the treatment of resistant pneumococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Hoffman-Roberts, Holly L; C Babcock, Emily; Mitropoulos, Isaac F

    2005-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is not only increasing with penicillin but also with other antimicrobial classes including the macrolides, tetracyclines and sulfonamides. This trend with antibiotic resistance has highlighted the need for the further development of new anti-infectives for the treatment of pneumococcal infections, particularly against multi-drug resistant pneumococci. Several new drugs with anti-pneumococcal activity are at various stages of development and will be discussed in this review. Two new cephalosporins with activity against S. pneumoniae include ceftobiprole and RWJ-54428. Faropenem is in a new class of beta-lactam antibiotics called the penems. Structurally, the penems are a hybrid between the penicillins and cephalosporins. Sitafloxacin and garenoxacin are two new quinolones that are likely to have a role in treating pneumococcal infections. Oritavancin and dalbavancin are glycopeptides with activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. as well as multi-drug resistant pneumococci. Tigecycline is the first drug in a new class of anti-infectives called the glycycyclines that has activity against penicillin-resistant pneumococci. PMID:16050791

  3. A pneumococcal pilus influences virulence and host inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barocchi, M A; Ries, J; Zogaj, X; Hemsley, C; Albiger, B; Kanth, A; Dahlberg, S; Fernebro, J; Moschioni, M; Masignani, V; Hultenby, K; Taddei, A R; Beiter, K; Wartha, F; von Euler, A; Covacci, A; Holden, D W; Normark, S; Rappuoli, R; Henriques-Normark, B

    2006-02-21

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The initial event in invasive pneumococcal disease is the attachment of encapsulated pneumococci to epithelial cells in the upper respiratory tract. This work provides evidence that initial bacterial adhesion and subsequent ability to cause invasive disease is enhanced by pili, long organelles able to extend beyond the polysaccharide capsule, previously unknown to exist in pneumococci. These adhesive pili-like appendages are encoded by the pneumococcal rlrA islet, present in some, but not all, clinical isolates. Introduction of the rlrA islet into an encapsulated rlrA-negative isolate allowed pilus expression, enhanced adherence to lung epithelial cells, and provided a competitive advantage upon mixed intranasal challenge of mice. Furthermore, a pilus-expressing rlrA islet-positive clinical isolate was more virulent than a nonpiliated deletion mutant, and it out-competed the mutant in murine models of colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia. Additionally, piliated pneumococci evoked a higher TNF response during systemic infection, compared with nonpiliated derivatives, suggesting that pneumococcal pili not only contribute to adherence and virulence but also stimulate the host inflammatory response. PMID:16481624

  4. Dense genomic sampling identifies highways of pneumococcal recombination

    PubMed Central

    Chewapreecha, Claire; Harris, Simon R; Croucher, Nicholas J; Turner, Claudia; Marttinen, Pekka; Cheng, Lu; Pessia, Alberto; Aanensen, David M; Mather, Alison E; Page, Andrew J; Salter, Susannah J.; Harris, David; Nosten, Francois; Goldblatt, David; Corander, Jukka; Parkhill, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of clinical interventions by Streptococcus pneumoniae occurs through selection of non-susceptible genomic variants. Here we use genome sequencing of 3,085 pneumococcal carriage isolates from a 2.4 km2 refugee camp to enable unprecedented resolution of the process of recombination, and highlight its impact on population evolution. Genomic recombination hotspots show remarkable consistency between lineages, indicating common selective pressures acting at certain loci, particularly those associated with antibiotic resistance. Temporal changes in antibiotic consumption are reflected in changes in recombination trends demonstrating rapid spread of resistance when selective pressure is high. The highest frequencies of receipt and donation of recombined DNA fragments were observed in non-encapsulated lineages, implying that this largely overlooked pneumococcal group, which is beyond the reach of current vaccines, may play a major role in genetic exchange and adaptation of the species as a whole. These findings advance our understanding of pneumococcal population dynamics and provide important information for the design of future intervention strategies. PMID:24509479

  5. A pneumococcal pilus influences virulence and host inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Barocchi, M. A.; Ries, J.; Zogaj, X.; Hemsley, C.; Albiger, B.; Kanth, A.; Dahlberg, S.; Fernebro, J.; Moschioni, M.; Masignani, V.; Hultenby, K.; Taddei, A. R.; Beiter, K.; Wartha, F.; von Euler, A.; Covacci, A.; Holden, D. W.; Normark, S.; Rappuoli, R.; Henriques-Normark, B.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The initial event in invasive pneumococcal disease is the attachment of encapsulated pneumococci to epithelial cells in the upper respiratory tract. This work provides evidence that initial bacterial adhesion and subsequent ability to cause invasive disease is enhanced by pili, long organelles able to extend beyond the polysaccharide capsule, previously unknown to exist in pneumococci. These adhesive pili-like appendages are encoded by the pneumococcal rlrA islet, present in some, but not all, clinical isolates. Introduction of the rlrA islet into an encapsulated rlrA-negative isolate allowed pilus expression, enhanced adherence to lung epithelial cells, and provided a competitive advantage upon mixed intranasal challenge of mice. Furthermore, a pilus-expressing rlrA islet-positive clinical isolate was more virulent than a nonpiliated deletion mutant, and it out-competed the mutant in murine models of colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia. Additionally, piliated pneumococci evoked a higher TNF response during systemic infection, compared with nonpiliated derivatives, suggesting that pneumococcal pili not only contribute to adherence and virulence but also stimulate the host inflammatory response. PMID:16481624

  6. The economic burden of childhood invasive pneumococcal diseases and pneumonia in Taiwan: Implications for a pneumococcal vaccination program

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yi-Chien; Lee, Pei-Lun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Shiou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pneumonia are the major causes of morbidity and deaths in children in the world. The management of IPD and pneumonia is an important economic burden on healthcare systems and families. The aim of this study was to assess the economic burden of IPD and pneumonia among younger children in Taiwan. We used a cost-illness approach to identify the cost categories for analysis in this study according to various perspectives. We obtained data of admission, outpatient, and emergency department visit data from the National Health Insurance Research (NHIR) database for children <5 y of age between January 2008 and December 2008. A prospective survey was administered to the families of patients to obtain detailed personal costs. All costs are presented in US dollars and were estimated by extrapolating 2008 cost data to 2013 price levels. We estimated the number of pneumococcal disease cases that were averted if the PCV-13 vaccine had been available in 2008. The total annual social and hospital costs for IPD were US $4.3 million and US $926,000, respectively. The total annual social and hospital costs for pneumonia were US $150 million and US $17 million, respectively. On average, families spent US $653 or US $218 when their child was diagnosed with IPD or pneumonia, respectively. This cost is approximately 27%–81% of the monthly salary of an unskilled worker. In conclusion, a safe and effective pediatric pneumococcal vaccine is needed to reduce the economic burden caused by pneumococcal infection. PMID:25874476

  7. 75 FR 48707 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... these materials is included in a December 17, 1999 Federal Register notice (64 FR 70914). Proposed... Vaccine: What You Need to Know 1. Pneumococcal Disease Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria... risk for serious disease than older children. Pneumococcal bacteria are spread from person to...

  8. Pneumococcal meningitis: development of a new animal model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin P.C.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Clark, Graeme M.; O’Leary, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Hypothesis The rat is a suitable animal to establish a model for the study of pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation Background There has been an increase in the number of cases of cochlear implant-related meningitis. The most common organism identified was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis in healthy subjects without other risk factors remains to be determined. Previous animal studies do not focus on the pathogenesis and risk of pneumococcal meningitis post implantation and are based on relatively small animal numbers, making it difficult to assess the cause and effect relationship. There is, therefore, a need to develop a new animal model allowing direct examination of the pathogenesis of meningitis in the presence of a cochlear implant. Methods Eighteen non-implanted rats were infected with 1× 106 and 1 × 108 colony forming units (CFU) of a clinical isolate of S. pneumoniae via three different inoculation routes (middle ear, inner ear and intraperitoneal) to examine for evidence of meningitis over 24 hours. Six implanted rats were infected with the highest amount of bacteria possible for each route of inoculation (4 × 1010 CFU intraperitoneal, 3 × 108CFU middle ear, 1 × 106 CFU inner ear) to examine for evidence of meningitis with the presence of an implant. Histological pattern of cochlear infections for each of the three different inoculating routes were examined. Results Pneumococcal meningitis was evident in all 6 implanted animals for each of the three different routes of inoculation. Once in the inner ear, bacteria were found to enter the central nervous system either via the cochlear aqueduct or canaliculi perforantes of osseous spiral lamina, reaching the perineural and perivascular space then the internal acoustic meatus. The rate, extent and pattern of infection within the cochleae depended on the route of inoculation. Finally, there was no evidence of pneumococcal

  9. Reduced incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease after introduction of the 13-valent conjugate vaccine in Navarre, Spain, 2001-2013.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Marcela; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Gil-Setas, Alberto; Torroba, Luis; Beristain, Xabier; Aguinaga, Aitziber; García-Irure, José Javier; Navascués, Ana; García-Cenoz, Manuel; Castilla, Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) were licensed for use in children and became available for private purchase in Spain in 2001 (PCV7), 2009 (PCV10) and 2010 (PCV13). This study evaluates changes in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and the pattern of serotypes isolated in Navarre, Spain, between the period of use of PCV7 (2004-2009) and that of PCV13 (2010-2013). The percentage of children <2 years who received at least one dose of PCV in these periods ranged from 25 to 61% and 61 to 78%, respectively. Between the periods 2004-2009 and 2010-2013 IPD incidence declined by 37%, from 14.9 to 9.4 cases/100,000 inhabitants (p<0.001). In children <5 years it fell by 69% (p<0.001), in persons aged 5-64 years, by 34% (p<0.001), and in those ≥ 65, by 23% (p=0.024). The incidence of cases due to PCV13 serotypes declined by 81% (p<0.001) in children <5 years and by 52% (p<0.001) in the whole population. No significant changes were seen in the distribution of clinical presentations or in disease severity. The incidence of IPD has declined and the pattern of serotypes causing IPD has changed notably in children and moderately in adults following the replacement of PCV7 by PCV13. PMID:24674661

  10. Changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease following increased coverage with the heptavalent conjugate vaccine in Navarre, Spain.

    PubMed

    Guevara, M; Barricarte, A; Gil-Setas, A; García-Irure, J J; Beristain, X; Torroba, L; Petit, A; Polo Vigas, M E; Aguinaga, A; Castilla, J

    2009-11-01

    The present study evaluated changes in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and the pattern of serotypes isolated in Navarre, Spain, after the introduction and increased coverage of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). All cases with isolation of pneumococcus from normally sterile bodily fluids were included. The incidence of IPD in children and adults was compared for the periods 2001-2002 and 2006-2007. By the end of 2002, only 11% of children aged <5 years had received any dose of PCV7, whereas, beginning in 2007, the proportion exceeded 50%. Among the cases of IPD aged <5 years, the percentage of those vaccinated increased from 7% during 2001-2002 to 53% during 2006-2007 (p <0.001). The incidence of IPD from PCV7-serotypes decreased by 85% in children <5 years (p <0.001), by 45% in the population aged 5-64 years (p 0.10) and by 68% in those >or=65 years (p 0.004). By contrast, the incidence of IPD from non-PCV7 serotypes increased by 40% overall (p 0.006). The incidence of IPD from all serotypes did not change significantly in children <5 years (from 83 to 72 per 100 000) or in the total population (from 15.8 to 16.3 per 100 000). The percentage of cases as a result of serotypes 7 and 19A increased significantly in both children and adults. No significant changes were seen in the clinical forms of IPD. The pattern of serotypes causing IPD has changed, in both children and adults, following the increased coverage of PCV7, although the incidence has been reduced only slightly. PMID:19673968