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Sample records for adult epileptic patients

  1. Psychosocial Functioning of Adult Epileptic and MS Patients and Adult Normal Controls on the WPSI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Siang-Yang

    1986-01-01

    Psychosocial functioning of adult epileptic outpatients as assessed by the Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) was compared to that of adult multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatients and normal subjects. When only valid WPSI profiles were considered, the only significant finding was that the epilepsy group and the MS group had more…

  2. Factors influencing the population pharmacokinetic parameters of phenytoin in adult epileptic patients in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Valodia, P; Seymour, M A; Miller, R; McFadyen, M L; Folb, P I

    1999-02-01

    The influence of various covariates (including weight, race, smoking, gender, age, mild-to-moderate alcohol intake, and body surface area) on the population pharmacokinetic parameters of phenytoin in adult epileptic patients in South Africa was investigated. The parameters were the maximum metabolic rate (Vm) and the Michaelis-Menten (MM) constant (Km) of phenytoin. The study population comprised 332 black and colored epileptic patients (note: "black" refers to indigenous people of South Africa, who speak one of the Bantu languages as their native language; "colored" refers to people considered to be of mixed race, classified as such by the apartheid former government of South Africa). The influence of covariates on Vm and Km estimates was determined using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM). Parameter models describing the factors that could potentially influence Vm and Km were tested using the Michaelis-Menten parallel MM and first-order elimination models, to which 853 steady state dose-to-serum concentration pairs were fitted. The results indicated that body weight, smoking, race, and age (65 years or older), in descending order of importance, significantly influenced Vm (p < 0.05). Although a significant difference (p = 0.03) in Km was found between black and colored patients, incorporating the influence of race in Km in the final regression model did not improve the fit of the model to the data, which indicated that the variability in Km was accounted for by Vm. The scaling factors for smoking, colored patients and age (65 years or older) in Vm were 1.16, 1.10, and 0.88, respectively. These factors should be taken into account when adjusting phenytoin dose. PMID:10051055

  3. Effect of antiepileptic drug therapy on thyroid hormones among adult epileptic patients: An analytical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Adhimoolam, Mangaiarkkarasi; Arulmozhi, Ranjitha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the effect of conventional and newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on thyroid hormone levels in adult epileptic patients. Methods: A hospital-based, analytical cross-sectional study was conducted among the adult epileptic patients receiving conventional AEDs (Group 2) or newer AEDs (Group 3) for more than 6 months. Serum thyroid hormone levels including free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were analyzed and the hormonal status was compared with healthy control subjects (Group 1). Findings: Sodium valproate and phenytoin were commonly used conventional AEDs; levetiracetam and topiramate were common among the newer drugs. There was a statistically significant decrease in serum fT4 and increase in serum TSH levels (P < 0.0001) in patients on long-term therapy with conventional antiepileptic agents than in the control group. No significant change in thyroid hormone levels (fT3, fT4, and TSH; P = 0.68, 0.37, and 0.90, respectively) was observed with newer antiepileptics-treated patients when compared to control group. One-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was performed using SPSS version 17.0 software package. Conclusion: The present study showed that conventional AEDs have significant alteration in the thyroid hormone levels than the newer antiepileptics in adult epileptic patients. PMID:27512707

  4. [A national framework for educational programs in epileptic patients, children and adults].

    PubMed

    Prévos-Morgant, M; Petit, J; Grisoni, F; André-Obadia, N; Auvin, S; Derambure, P

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease with a wide range of presentations occurring at any age. It affects the patient's quality of life, implying a need for numerous healthcare services. Therapeutic education programs (TEPs) are designed to match patient age, disease course, and individual learning abilities. In France, these programs are proposed by the national health authorities (Superior Health Authority), and authorized by the Regional Health Agencies. Two years ago, a Therapeutic Education Programs Commission (TEPC), supported by the French League against Epilepsy (FLAE), was created. The goal was to bring together representative healthcare professionals in a working group in order to standardize practices. This led to the creation of a national reference of healthcare skills specific for children and adults with epilepsy. Five tables, for five "life periods", outline the framework of this professional reference tool. Program personalization, an essential part of TEPs, is necessary to develop a creative atmosphere. This slow process is specific to the various stages of life and can be influenced by the occurrence of various handicaps. Family and caregivers make key contributions to the process. The national framework for therapeutic education in epilepsy serves as a central crossroad where professions can find essential information to create or adapt their own TEPs. In the near future, regional experiences will be documented and collected for regular updates. This professional therapeutic education network will help promote therapeutic education programs and facilitate standard practices. Finally, several TEP files and tools will be shared on the FLAE website available for professional access. Today, the group's goal is to achieve national deployment of this "referential" framework. PMID:24947486

  5. A clinical trial of single dose rectal and oral administration of diazepam for the prevention of serial seizures in adult epileptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, N M; Dhillon, S; Griffiths, A; Oxley, J; Richens, A

    1984-01-01

    The clinical anticonvulsant efficacy of single dose rectal and oral administration of diazepam 20 mg was examined in two double-blind placebo-controlled trials in adult epileptic patients. All subjects suffered from drug resistant epilepsy and frequently experienced serial seizures. Diazepam was administered rectally as a new experimental suppository formulation immediately after a seizure and was highly effective in preventing recurrent fits within a 24 h observation period (p less than 0.001). Pharmacokinetic studies revealed a wide range of serum diazepam concentrations 60 min after administration of the suppository (mean serum diazepam level 190 +/- 73 (SD ng/ml). In a similar study oral administration of diazepam 20 mg significantly reduced the incidence of serial seizures compared with a placebo (p less than 0.01) and the mean 60 min serum diazepam level was 273 +/- 190 (SD) ng/ml. PMID:6368753

  6. MMPI-2 profiles: fibromyalgia patients compared to epileptic and non-epileptic seizure patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy L; Storzbach, Daniel; Binder, Laurence M; Barkhuizen, André; Kent Anger, W; Salinsky, Martin C; Tun, Saw-Myo; Rohlman, Diane S

    2010-02-01

    We compared MMPI-2 profiles of Gulf War veterans with fibromyalgia (FM) to epileptic seizure (ES) patients, psychogenic non-epileptic seizure (PNES) patients, and Gulf War veteran healthy controls. Both PNES and FM are medically unexplained conditions. In previous MMPI-2 research PNES patients were shown to have significantly higher Hs and Hy clinical scales than ES patients. In the present research the FM group had significantly higher Hs and Hy scale scores than both the ES group and the healthy control group. There was no significant difference between the FM and PNES Hs scale scores; however, the FM Hy scale score was significantly lower than the PNES Hy scale score. Present findings indicate a high level of psychological distress in the FM group. PMID:19859855

  7. [Clinical approach to the first epileptic crisis in adults].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo Alfonso; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel Ernesto

    2014-04-16

    Seizures are one of the main reasons for visits to emergency and neurology. Represent a traumatic event with potential medical and social consequences. A first epileptic seizure, can be the initial manifestation of malignancy, systemic disorder or infection, but can also be the first manifestation of epilepsy. The misdiagnosis of symptomatic seizures and unprovoked seizure, significantly affects prognosis and patient outcomes. The aim of this review is to examine the general concepts that enable successful diagnostic and therapeutic approach to the patient presenting with a first epileptic seizure. PMID:24723179

  8. Disposition of sodium valproate in epileptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Gatti, G; Frigo, G M; Crema, A; Calzetti, S; Visintini, D

    1978-01-01

    1 Serum levels of valproic acid have been determined at fixed intervals after the administration of single oral and intravenous doses (800 mg) to six epileptic patients receiving chronic treatment with other antiepileptic drugs. 2 Serum levels declined monoexponentially shortly after the intravenous administration. Biological half-lives averaged 9.0 +/- 1.4 h (s.d.). Volumes of distribution were 0.175 +/- 0.025 l/kg. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between volumes of distribution and serum half-lives (P less than 0.005). 3 After oral doses serum levels rose rapidly to peak values within 0.5--2 h. Biological availability was 96 +/- 9%. 4 Comparison with a previous study performed according to the same protocol in healthy volunteers showed significantly increased volumes of distribution and rates of elimination in the patients. Total serum clearance was 85% higher in the patients as compared to the healthy subjects (P less than 0.001). Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:350251

  9. Expression of Glypican-4 in the brains of epileptic patients and epileptic animals and its effects on epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Yanke; Zheng, Fangshuo; Yang, Yong; Xu, Xin; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Binglin; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Glypican-4 (Gpc4) has been found to play an important role in enhancing miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). But, the relationship between Gpc4 and epilepsy is still a mystery. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns of Gpc4 in patients with epilepsy and in a pilocarpine-induced rat model of epilepsy. We also determined if altered Gpc4 expression resulted in increased susceptibility to seizures. Western blotting and immunofluorescent methods were utilized. Gpc4 was significantly increased in patients and epileptic rats induced by pilocarpine injection. According to behavioral studies, downregulation of Gpc4 by Gpc4 siRNA decreased spontaneous seizure frequency, while upregulation of Gpc4 by recombinant Gpc4 overexpression led to a converse result. These findings support the hypothesis that increased expression of Gpc4 in the brain is associated with epileptic seizures. PMID:27425250

  10. Complementary treatment of psychotic and epileptic patients in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Razali, Salleh Mohd; Yassin, Azhar Mohd

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this article is to describe and compare the use of traditional/complementary medicine (T/CM) among psychotic (schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder) and epileptic Malay patients in peninsular Malaysia. There were 60 patients in each group. T/CM consultation was uniformly spread across all levels of education and social status. We could not find a single over-riding factor that influenced the decision to seek T/CM treatment because the decision to seek such treatment was complex and the majority of decisions were made by others. Fifty-three patients (44.2%), consisting of 37 (61.7%) psychotic and 16 (26.7%) epileptic patients had consulted Malay traditional healers (bomoh) and/or homeopathic practitioners in addition to modern treatment; of these, only three had consulted bomoh and homeopathic practitioners at the same time. The use of T/CM was significantly higher in psychotic than in epileptic Malay patients. PMID:18799643

  11. Quality of life in epileptic patients compared with healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Ali; Salarilak, Shaker; Lotfabadi, Pegah; Kiani, Fereshte; Rajabi, Abdolhalim; Mansori, Kamyar; Moosavi Jahromi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder that has a great impact on people’s lives. Patients with epilepsy are at increased risk for poor Quality of Life (QoL). The objective of this study was to evaluate the QoL of epileptic patients in comparison to healthy persons. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 52 epileptic patients from Golbu region in Neyshabur (a city in northeast of Iran). Using Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scale, the data were collected between April and Jun 2012. Every patient were compared with two healthy persons. Epileptic and healthy persons were similar for age, sex and local residence. Pearson’s correlation coefficient and t-independent test applied for data analysis through SPSS v. 16 software. Results: Of 52 epileptic patients, 24 were female (46.2%) and 28 were male (53.8%). The mean±SD age of epileptic patients was 40.92±20.33yr (Rang: 15-86yr). The total mean score of SF- 36 in patient group was 55.88 and in healthy group 68.52and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Among the different subscales of SF-36 in epileptic patients, the highest and the lowest mean scores were found for social functioning and general health subscales, respectively. The mean scores in patient group in comparison to healthy group were lower in all subscales of SF-36 and these differences were statistically significant in all domains (except role limitations due to physical problems domain and role limitations due to emotional problems domain). Conclusion: The study showed that epilepsy disease has an important role in QoL of patients, thus some interventional programs are necessary to improve their QOL. PMID:27493932

  12. Neocortical slices from adult chronic epileptic rats exhibit discharges of higher voltages and broader spread.

    PubMed

    Serafini, R; Dettloff, S; Loeb, J A

    2016-05-13

    Much of the current understanding of epilepsy mechanisms has been built on data recorded with one or a few electrodes from temporal lobe slices of normal young animals stimulated with convulsants. Mechanisms of adult, extratemporal, neocortical chronic epilepsy have not been characterized as much. A more advanced understanding of epilepsy mechanisms can be obtained by recording epileptiform discharges simultaneously from multiple points of an epileptic focus so as to define their sites of initiation and pathways of spreading. Brain slice recordings can characterize epileptic mechanisms in a simpler, more controlled preparation than in vivo. Yet, the intrinsic hyper-excitability of a chronic epileptic focus may not be entirely preserved in slices following the severing of connections in slice preparation. This study utilizes recordings of multiple electrode arrays to characterize which features of epileptic hyper-excitability present in in vivo chronic adult neocortical epileptic foci are preserved in brain slices. After tetanus toxin somatosensory cortex injections, adult rats manifest chronic spontaneous epileptic discharges both in the injection site (primary focus) and in the contralateral side (secondary focus). We prepared neocortical slices from these epileptic animals. When perfused with 4-Aminopyridine in a magnesium free medium, epileptic rat slices exhibit higher voltage discharges and broader spreading than control rat slices. Rates of discharges are similar in slices of epileptic and normal rats, however. Ictal and interictal discharges are distributed over most cortical layers, though with significant differences between primary and secondary foci. A chronic neocortical epileptic focus in slices does not show increased spontaneous pacemakers initiating epileptic discharges but shows discharges with higher voltages and broader spread, consistent with an enhanced synchrony of cellular and synaptic generators over wider surfaces. PMID:26892299

  13. Studying Network Mechanisms Using Intracranial Stimulation in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    David, Olivier; Bastin, Julien; Chabardès, Stéphan; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering from focal drug-resistant epilepsy who are explored using intracranial electrodes allow to obtain data of exceptional value for studying brain dynamics in correlation with pathophysiological and cognitive processes. Direct electrical stimulation (DES) of cortical regions and axonal tracts in those patients elicits a number of very specific perceptual or behavioral responses, but also abnormal responses due to specific configurations of epileptic networks. Here, we review how anatomo-functional brain connectivity and epilepsy network mechanisms can be assessed from DES responses measured in patients. After a brief summary of mechanisms of action of brain electrical stimulation, we recall the conceptual framework for interpreting DES results in the context of brain connectivity and review how DES can be used for the characterization of functional networks, the identification of the seizure onset zone, the study of brain plasticity mechanisms, and the anticipation of epileptic seizures. This pool of exceptional data may be underexploited by fundamental research on brain connectivity and leaves much to be learned. PMID:21060722

  14. Location of Irritative Zone in Epileptic Brains of Schizencephalic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Oh-Young; Jung, Suck-Won; Jeong, Heejeong; Son, Seongnam; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Kang, Heeyoung; Park, Ki-Jong; Choi, Nack-Cheon; Lim, ByeongHoon

    2016-07-01

    Although many schizencephaly patients suffer from epilepsy, the relationship between schizencephalic lesions and epileptic foci remains unclear. Previous studies have shown that schizencephalic lesions may be associated with, rather than contain, epileptogenic zones. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the current source distribution (CSD) of epileptiform discharges in schizencephalic patients and to correlate this activity with existing structural lesions. A consecutive series of 30 schizencephalic patients who were diagnosed using brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were selected retrospectively and prospectively. Of the original 30 subjects selected, 13 had epilepsy, and 6 of these patients exhibited schizencephaly, epilepsy, and interictal spikes on electroencephalograms (EEG) and were enrolled in the present study investigating the current source analysis of interictal spikes. The CSDs of the initial rising phases and the peak points of the interictal spikes were obtained using standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Five patients exhibited a single focus of interictal spikes, while 1 patient showed 2 foci. Relative to the structural brain lesions, 5 patients displayed extrinsically localized CSDs, while 1 patient showed a partially intrinsically localized CSD. The present findings demonstrate that the CSDs of interictal spikes in schizencephalic patients are in general anatomically distinct from the cerebral schizencephalic lesions and that these lesions may display an extrinsic epileptogenicity. PMID:25253435

  15. The dilemma of treatments for epileptic patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Gao, Xia; Xu, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity. It may occur due to existence of other mental or physical diseases or from the medications for those illnesses. It is one of the leading sources of disability. Among these physical diseases, epilepsy is widely recognized as one of the main causes of depression. Patients with epilepsy are at high risk of developing depressive symptoms, and the suicide rates in patients with epilepsy have been reported to be much higher than in the general population. However, due to fears of lowering seizure threshold and adverse drug interactions between antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs, physician are reluctant to place patients with epilepsy on antidepressant medication. As a result, the question has been raised that what the best managements should be used to treat epileptic patients with depression. In this review, the currently used medications for antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs were summarized by their working targets in order to establish appropriate pharmacological management of depression and epilepsy. Despite the complex relationship between epilepsy and depression, coadministration of antidepressants and AEDs can still be done safely and effectively under the conditions of good clinical management. The ideal antidepressants for people with epilepsy should be efficacious but with few adverse effects, which will not antagonize GABAergic mechanisms or interfere with plasma anticonvulsant concentrations. PMID:25271800

  16. Treatment with phenobarbital and monitoring of epileptic patients in rural Mali.

    PubMed Central

    Nimaga, K.; Desplats, D.; Doumbo, O.; Farnarier, G.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of phenobarbital treatment for epileptic patients in rural Mali. METHODS: Epileptic patients were treated at home with phenobarbital at daily dosages ranging from 50 mg for children to 200 mg for adults and their condition was monitored. Advice was given to patients, their families, and the village authorities in order to achieve compliance. An uninterrupted supply of generic phenobarbital was provided and a rural physician made two follow-up visits to each village to ensure that the drug was taken in the correct doses. The physician gave information to the population, distributed the phenobarbital in sufficient quantities to cover the periods between visits, and monitored the patients' responses to treatment. During the first year the physician visited the patients every two months. The frequency of visits was subsequently reduced to once every four months. FINDINGS: In the six months preceding treatment the average rate of seizures among patients exceeded four per month. After a year of treatment, 80.2% of the patients experienced no seizures for at least five months. A total of 15.7% of patients experienced a reduction in seizures. In many cases no further seizures occurred and there were improvements in physical health, mental health and social status. There were very few side-effects and no cases of poisoning were reported. The cost of treatment per patient per year was 7 US dollars for generic phenobarbital and 8.4 US dollars for logistics. CONCLUSION: Low doses of phenobarbital were very effective against epilepsy. However, there is an urgent need for programmes involving increased numbers of physicians in rural areas and, at the national level, for the inclusion of epilepsy treatment in the activities of health care facilities. Internationally, an epilepsy control programme providing free treatment should be developed. PMID:12163916

  17. Immunological findings in epileptic and febrile convulsion patients before and under treatment.

    PubMed

    Tartara, A; Verri, A P; Nespoli, L; Moglia, A; Botta, M G

    1981-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin levels of 86 epileptic patients have been evaluated in order to investigate the relationship between epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs and humoral immunity. The results confirm a high incidence of immunological disorders in the epileptic and febrile convulsion patients. These abnormalities were not related to clinical type of epilepsy nor to the therapy; the common feature seems the early onset of seizures and antiepileptic treatment. PMID:6791931

  18. Factors influencing serum concentration of zonisamide in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Tanaka, N; Kimura, Y; Miyake, K; Kitaura, T; Fukuchi, H; Harada, Y

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between daily dose and serum concentration of zonisamide (ZNS) and the effects of patient age on the serum level/dose (L/D) ratio for ZNS were studied in epileptic patients (mean age +/- S.D. = 10.6 +/- 6.2 years) who chronically received ZNS. The influence of phenytoin (PHT), phenobarbital (PB), carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproic acid (VPA) on the serum protein binding of ZNS in vitro and the correlation between total and unbound serum levels of ZNS in patients were also examined. Significant correlations were obtained between daily dose per body weight or per body surface area and serum level of ZNS. The correlation coefficient of the latter was higher than that of the former. There was no effect of age on the L/D ratio on the basis of body surface area, whereas that on the basis of body weight increased significantly with age. No significant increase in the free fraction of ZNS was observed in the presence of PHT, PB and CBZ except VPA in vitro. There were significant correlations between total and unbound serum levels of ZNS in the two patient groups coadministered with and without VPA. Although the free fraction of ZNS in the former was significantly higher than that of the latter, the increase was small. These results suggest that dosage regimens on the basis of body surface area would be more accurate than those on a body weight basis and that there is little effect of other antiepileptics on the serum protein binding of ZNS. PMID:1576673

  19. Oxidative Stress Measurement and Prediction of Epileptic Seizure in Children and Adults With Severe Motor and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Masahito; Satomura, Shigeko; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro; Kyotani, Shojiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The medical care of severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) depends on the empirical medical care. Epileptic seizure specific to SMID is difficult to suppress using anti-epileptic drugs, and its tendency to persist for long periods poses an issue. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between epileptic seizure in cases with SMID and oxidative stress in the living body by examining endogenous antioxidants, the degree of oxidation (reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs)), and the biological antioxidant potential (BAP) as indicators. Methods Target patients were 43 SMID epilepsy patients. Blood was sampled before breakfast and medication. As for the specimen, d-ROMs and BAP were measured using the free radical analyzer. Results The present study did not reveal any correlation between endogenous antioxidants (albumin) and the frequency of epileptic seizures. On the other hand, d-ROMs were correlated with the frequency of epileptic seizure. In particular, strong correlations between the frequency of epileptic seizures and the d-ROMs/BAP ratio as well as the BAP/d-ROMs ratio were noted. Conclusions These results indicate that the use of d-ROMs and BAP as biomarkers can provide a tool for predicting the prognosis of epileptic seizures in patients with SMID. PMID:27222671

  20. Management of a high risk epileptic patient under conscious sedation: A multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Chellathurai, Burnice Nalina Kumari; Thiagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Jayakumaran, SelvaKumar; Devadoss, Pradeep; Elavazhagan

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy, characterized by the risk of recurrent seizures, is a chronic disease that afflicts about 5% of the world's population. The main dental problems associated with epileptic patients include gingival hyperplasia, minor oral injuries, tooth trauma, and prosthodontic problems, which require the dental treatment. Stress and fear are the most common triggering factors for the epilepsy in dental chair. Therefore, a more appropriate method of treating such epileptic patients may be warranted. Conscious sedation is a technique of providing good anesthesia and analgesia to patients, the main advantage of which is the patient's rapid return to presentation levels. Midazolam used as a sedative agent has anticonvulsant properties. This case report highlights a case requiring multiple dental procedures carried out in a high risk epileptic patient under conscious sedation. PMID:27041847

  1. IPS Interest in the EEG of Patients after a Single Epileptic Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Mounach, Jamal; Satte, Amal; Ouhabi, Hamid; El Hessni, Aboubaker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of pathological cerebral activity responses to intermittent rhythmic photic stimulation (IPS) after a single epileptic seizure. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven EEGs were performed at the Neurophysiology Department of Mohamed V Teaching Military Hospital in Rabat. Clinical and EEG data was collected. Results. 9.5% of our patients had photoparoxysmal discharges (PPD). Incidence was higher in males than in females, but p value was not significant (p = 0.34), and it was higher in children compared to adults with significant p value (p = 0.08). The most epileptogenic frequencies were within the range 15–20 Hz. 63 patients had an EEG after 72 hours; among them 11 were photosensitive (p = 0.001). The frequency of the PPR was significantly higher in patients with generalized abnormalities than in focal abnormalities (p = 0.001). EEG confirmed a genetic generalized epilepsy in 8 cases among 13 photosensitive patients. Conclusion. PPR is age related. The frequencies within the range 15–20 Hz should inevitably be included in EEG protocols. The presence of PPR after a first seizure is probably more in favor of generalized seizure rather than the other type of seizure. PPR seems independent from the delay Seizure-EEG. Our study did not show an association between sex and photosensitivity.

  2. Perceived parental rearing behaviour and psychopathology in epileptic patients: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Maj, M; Del Vecchio, M; Tata, M R; Guizzaro, A; Bravaccio, F; Kemali, D

    1987-01-01

    Memories of parental rearing behaviour were assessed by the EMBU in 61 epileptics and 151 healthy controls. The occurrence of the first crisis during the childhood was an inclusion criterion for patients. Epileptics, as compared with controls, rated their fathers and mothers as less stimulating, their fathers as less performance oriented and affectionate, and their mothers as more tolerant. Moreover, the score on the subscale 'favouring subject' for both fathers and mothers was higher in epileptics. As patients with and without interictal psychopathological features were compared, the scores on the subscales 'overprotective' and 'favouring subject' for mothers and 'abusive' and 'depriving' for fathers were higher in the former subgroup, whereas that on the subscale 'performance oriented' for fathers was higher in the latter. No significant difference was observed among patients suffering from the various subtypes of epilepsy. These results are consistent with the idea that parents of epileptics tend to encourage passivity in their children, have low expectations as regards their ability to operate effectively, and treat them in a more indulgent way because of their disability. Furthermore, they are in line with the reported association between maternal overprotectiveness and problem behaviour in epileptics. PMID:3130645

  3. The differences in epileptic characteristics in patients with porencephaly and schizencephaly.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Miki; Maeda, Tomoki; Izumi, Tatsuro

    2012-08-01

    The epileptic characteristics and their differences in patients with porencephaly and schizencephaly were, respectively, evaluated. Eleven patients with porencephaly and eight patients with schizencephaly were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Five of the six patients with extensive porencephaly and all five patients with open-lip schizencephaly had been suffering from various types of epileptic seizures. Three patients with extensive porencephaly and all five patients with open-lip schizencephaly had presented with early onset seizures before 9 months of age. Two patients with extensive porencephaly and three patients with open-lip schizencephaly had presented with West syndrome. These two groups of patients with epileptic seizures showed generalized epilepsy or generalized epilepsy with unilateral dominancy at the onset, and then developed localization-related epilepsy or unilateral seizures with increasing age. The epileptic paroxysms showed multifocal independent spikes, which were not always localized in the defect or cleft sites at the last examination. Polytherapy or synergistic combinations were eventually introduced for these intractable seizures in both groups for patients without any evidence of efficacy. In the porencephaly patients, four of five patients achieved good seizure control with appropriate monotherapy or two-drug therapy including valproate. All five patients with schizencephaly had been treated by polytherapy, and three of them had persistent intractable seizures in spite of trying rational monotherapy or two-drug therapy. The epileptic intractability associated with open-lip schizencephaly might be related to the epileptogenesis of these extensive and widespread defective lesions, which were commonly associated with cortical dysplasia. A trial of rational monotherapy or two-drug therapy may be effective, rather than larger-number polytherapy in many cases, more in porencephaly than schizencephaly. PMID:22024697

  4. Nocturnal interictal epileptic discharges in adult Lennox-Gastaut syndrome: the effect of sleep stage and time of night.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Emilia; Mahdi, Rima; Roche, Frederic; Maeder, Malin; Foletti, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is characterized by interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) occurring during sleep. The aim of this study was to determine whether sleep influences not only the frequency of seizures and IEDs, but also the time-dependent evolution that may support the hypothesis of homeostatic influences on epileptic threshold. Video polysomnography data from our database were reviewed to identify adult LGS patients with at least seven hours of nocturnal recording. Thirteen patients were identified and a second polysomnography was available for nine. The number, duration and index of IEDs, relative to total sleep, sleep stages, and time during the night, were calculated. The majority of IEDs occurred during non-rapid eye movement sleep, mainly in stage 2 and slow-wave sleep. Adjusting for time spent in each sleep stage, we found 45 IEDs/hour in stage 1, 123/hour in stage 2, 106/hour in slow-wave sleep, and 26/hour in rapid eye movement sleep. The temporal distribution of IEDs showed a significant rise in the first three hours of sleep, followed by a progressive decrease at the end of the night (F=85.6; p<0.0001). Interictal epileptiform discharges occurrence in adult LGS is facilitated by non-rapid eye movement sleep with an evident effect of stage 2 and slow-wave sleep. The significant IED occurrence in the first part of the night and the subsequent decline suggests a link between epileptic threshold and homeostatic sleep mechanisms. The latter should be considered regarding choice of therapy. PMID:26842220

  5. Frequency of Toxoplasma and Toxocara Sp. Antibodies in Epileptic Patients, in South Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    ALLAHDIN, Sudabeh; KHADEMVATAN, Shahram; RAFIEI, Abdollah; MOMEN, Aliakbar; RAFIEI, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate seizures. Infectious agents are mentioned in its etiology. With identifying and appropriate treatment of these infectious agents, preventing their secondary outcomes, including seizure is possible. This study was conducted to determine frequency of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies (IgG, IgM) and anti-Toxocara antibody (IgG) in epileptic patients. Materials & Methods Study sample consisted of 141 epileptic patients and 144 healthy people. After obtaining informed consents and completing demographic questionnaire, serum samples were taken from participants. The diagnostic test of Toxoplasma IgG & IgM and Toxocara antibodies was performed under the same conditions using ELISA method in a qualified private laboratory. Samples from patients and control groups with positive ELISA test in terms of anti-Toxocara antibody were also used for confirmatory Western blot test. Result According to ELISA results, 28 (19.85%) epileptic patients and 2(1.38%) of healthy people had anti-Toxocara antibodies (P<001), while 39 (30.46%) of the control group people and 14.18% of patients had anti-Toxoplsma antibodies (P=0.001). Conclusion Frequency of anti-Toxoplasma gondii is lower in epileptic than healthy individuals and this result is contrary to investigations that have reported higher levels of this antibody in such patient groups. ELISA results for Toxocara showed that the frequency of anti-Toxocara antibody in epileptic patients might empower the probability that this parasite may cause central nervous system damage. Western blotting has high specificity and is a proper confirmative method for diagnosis of toxocariasis. PMID:26664439

  6. Aura and post-ictal headache in epileptic patients treated with flunarizine.

    PubMed

    Binnie, C D; Overweg, J

    1986-01-01

    Flunarizine is effective for the prophylaxis of both migraine attacks and epileptic seizures. Of 77 patients treated with flunarizine for intractable epilepsy, 28 had an aura preceding their seizures. In 22 this disappeared on flunarizine administration. Of 14 subject to post-ictal headache, 13 reported relief of this symptom on flunarizine. PMID:3609881

  7. Verbal Memory Compensation: Application to Left and Right Temporal Lobe Epileptic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresson, Christel; Lespinet-Najib, Veronique; Rougier, Alain; Claverie, Bernard; N'Kaoua, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the compensatory impact of cognitive aids on left and right temporal lobe epileptic patients suffering from verbal memory disorders, who were candidates for surgery. Cognitive aids are defined in the levels-of-processing framework and deal with the depth of encoding, the elaboration of information, and the use of retrieval…

  8. Burn injury in epileptic patients: an experience in a tertiary institute.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M S; Ahmad, I; Khan, A H; Fahud Khurram, M; Haq, A

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, types and severity of burn injuries, including sites involved, morbidities, operative procedures, and their outcomes, to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries in epileptic patients. This retrospective study was conducted at our centre between February 2008 and January 2012. The study included 54 patients who sustained burn injuries due to epileptic seizures, accounting for 1.3% of all burn admissions. All patients, irrespective of the severity of their injuries, were admitted to our centre, assessed, treated and educated regarding specific preventive measures. All study data were evaluated from patient medical records. Causes of burn injury were as follows: scald burns (30), contact with hot surfaces (12), electrical burns in the bathroom (6), and flame burns (6). Second degree burns were the most common (18 out of 54 patients) and third degree burns were the least common. Upper limb and trunk were the most common sites involved (36 out of 54 patients). Thirty patients required surgical intervention whereas the remainder was conservatively managed. Most of the injuries occurred in the age group between 30-37 years. Injuries occurred predominantly in females [42 females, 12 males; F:M=3.5:1]. The study revealed that patients with epilepsy should be categorized as a high risk group considering the sudden and unpredictable attack of epileptic seizures leading to loss of consciousness and accidental burn injuries. Early surgical intervention and targeting of all epileptic patients for education and instituting the specific preventive measures gives good outcomes. PMID:26170789

  9. PRRT2 Mutations Are Related to Febrile Seizures in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng-Wen; Qu, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Mao, Chen-Xue; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Deng, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Yin, Ji-Ye; Long, Hong-Yu; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported that the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) gene was identified to be related to paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), infantile convulsions with PKD, PKD with migraine and benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE). The present study explores whether the PRRT2 mutation is a potential cause of febrile seizures, including febrile seizures plus (FS+), generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and Dravet syndrome (DS); thus, it may provide a new drug target for personalized medicine for febrile seizure patients. We screened PRRT2 exons in a cohort of 136 epileptic patients with febrile seizures, including FS+, GEFS+ and DS. PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 25 out of 136 (18.4%) febrile seizures in epileptic patients. Five loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified: c.649delC (p.R217Efs*12), c.649_650insC (p.R217Pfs*8), c.412C>G (p.Pro138Ala), c.439G>C (p.Asp147His) and c.623C>A (p.Ser208Tyr). PRRT2 variants were probably involved in the etiology of febrile seizures in epileptic patients. PMID:25522171

  10. PRRT2 mutations are related to febrile seizures in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    He, Zheng-Wen; Qu, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Mao, Chen-Xue; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Deng, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Yin, Ji-Ye; Long, Hong-Yu; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported that the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) gene was identified to be related to paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), infantile convulsions with PKD, PKD with migraine and benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE). The present study explores whether the PRRT2 mutation is a potential cause of febrile seizures, including febrile seizures plus (FS+), generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and Dravet syndrome (DS); thus, it may provide a new drug target for personalized medicine for febrile seizure patients. We screened PRRT2 exons in a cohort of 136 epileptic patients with febrile seizures, including FS+, GEFS+ and DS. PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 25 out of 136 (18.4%) febrile seizures in epileptic patients. Five loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified: c.649delC (p.R217Efs*12), c.649_650insC (p.R217Pfs*8), c.412C>G (p.Pro138Ala), c.439G>C (p.Asp147His) and c.623C>A (p.Ser208Tyr). PRRT2 variants were probably involved in the etiology of febrile seizures in epileptic patients. PMID:25522171

  11. Late-onset epileptic spasms in a female patient with a CASK mutation.

    PubMed

    Nakajiri, Tomoshi; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Oka, Makio; Miya, Fuyuki; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Yoshinaga, Harumi

    2015-10-01

    We report a female patient with late-onset epileptic spasms (ESs) of a rare form, distinct from those seen in typical West syndrome, in association with a heterozygous frameshift CASK mutation (c.1896dupC (p.C633fs(∗)2)). She has a phenotype of microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH), and has had intractable ESs in clusters since 3 years 8 months of age with multifocal, particularly bifrontal, epileptic discharges in electroencephalogram. The available literature on patients with both ESs and CASK mutations has been reviewed, revealing that four of the five female children, including the present girl, had late-onset ESs, in contrast to the four males, who tended toward early-onset ESs. PMID:25765806

  12. [Auto-cholinergic synapse dysfunction in patients with generalized epileptic seizures. A preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Qu, Z P

    1991-06-01

    The mechanism of epileptic seizures so far remains unclear. Immunological disturbances may be one of the possible mechanisms. The assumption that primary epilepsy is an autoimmune disease lacks an experimental basis. In order to search any relationship between generalized epileptic seizures and autoimmune we examined and measured the serum anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (A AchR Ab) and anti-synaptic premembrane antibody (A PrM Ab) in 12 patients with typical absences, 20 patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC) and 6 patients with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome. 2 (16.7%) out of 12 patients with absences showed positive both A AchR Ab and A PrM Ab, positive A AchR Ab in 1 patient. Among 20 patients with GTC both A AchR Ab and A PrM Ab were positive in 7 patients (35%), A PrM Ab was positive in 1 patient. Totally in 8 patients A PrM Ab was positive. However, the difference between the two Antibodies was not significant (1.1:1). The two kinds of antibody were positive in 5 (83%) out of 6 patients and A PrM Ab was positive, but A AchR Ab was doubtful in another one patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Therefore, all the patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome showed positive antibody. Our data suggested that different types of generalized epileptic-seizures showed different severity of autoimmune dysfunction. The meaning of this kind of immune dysfunction needs further investigation. PMID:1889327

  13. Classifying Normal and Abnormal Status Based on Video Recordings of Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhen, Xiantong; Liu, Xianzeng

    2014-01-01

    Based on video recordings of the movement of the patients with epilepsy, this paper proposed a human action recognition scheme to detect distinct motion patterns and to distinguish the normal status from the abnormal status of epileptic patients. The scheme first extracts local features and holistic features, which are complementary to each other. Afterwards, a support vector machine is applied to classification. Based on the experimental results, this scheme obtains a satisfactory classification result and provides a fundamental analysis towards the human-robot interaction with socially assistive robots in caring the patients with epilepsy (or other patients with brain disorders) in order to protect them from injury. PMID:24977196

  14. Comparison of MMPI-2 profiles of Gulf War veterans with epileptic and nonepileptic seizure patients.

    PubMed

    Binder, L M; Storzbach, D; Campbell, K A; Rohlman, D S; Anger, W K; Salinsky, M C; Campbell, B R; Mueller, R

    2000-03-01

    As part of a larger study of illnesses related to service in the Gulf War, MMPI-2 profiles of epileptic seizure (ES) patients; nonepileptic seizure (NES) patients; Gulf War veterans with unexplained cognitive, psychological, musculoskeletal, fatigue, or dermatologic symptoms; and asymptomatic Gulf War veterans (Controls) were analyzed. There were 70 people in each group. Seizure diagnosis was based upon intensive EEG monitoring. Gulf War cases were mildly abnormal on MMPI-2 Scales Hs and D and significantly higher than controls on 8 of 10 MMPI-2 clinical scales, but they were significantly lower than NES patients on several scales including Hs and Hy. PMID:10668007

  15. Population pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine in Singapore epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Eli; Lee, How Sung; Hue, Swee Shan

    2001-01-01

    Aims To document the population pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine in patients with epilepsy living in Singapore, the majority of whom are of Chinese origin and others of minority races. Methods Steady-state plasma carbamazepine concentration data were gathered during routine care from various hospitals in Singapore for patients with epilepsy. Age, body weight, gender, race, formulation and concurrent medication (for other illnesses) were the fixed effects (covariates) tested simultaneously for their influence on the population mean of carbamazepine clearance, using the nonlinear mixed-effects model, in the NONMEM program. Results No age, gender, race, or formulation–related effect was found. Body weight (W), age (A) and concurrent medication with phenobarbitone (PB) emerged as the determinants of carbamazepine clearance (CL). The final regression model for carbamazepine clearance found best to describe the data was CL = 40.7 × A0.494 × W−1.17 × 1.44PB where CL is in l day−1 kg−1, A is in years, W is in kg and PB = 0 for a patient on carbamazepine only and PB = 1 for a patient on concomitant PB. The corresponding interindividual variability (CV%) in CL, described by using an exponential model, was 21.4%, and the residual error, described by using an exponential error model, was 18.2%. Predictive performance of this population covariate model was evaluated by Bayesian forecasting in a similar, but independent cohort of patients. There was no statistically significant bias between predicted and measured plasma carbamazepine concentrations. The population mean value of carbamazepine clearance obtained was similar to that previously reported for patients with a very different ethnic (Caucasians and Blacks) or geographical background (South Africa, Europe and USA). Conclusions The derived covariate regression model reasonably predicted concentrations in the separate validation Singapore patient data set. The correlation between carbamazepine clearance and

  16. Acquired equivalence associative learning in GTC epileptic patients: experimental and computational study

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Radwa; Abo Elfetoh, Noha; Moftah, Marie Z.; Khedr, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous cognitive behavioral studies based on Acquired Equivalence Associative learning Task (AEALT) showed a strong relation between hippocampus and basal ganglia in associative learning. However, experimental behavioral studies of patients with Generalized Tonic Clonic (GTC) epilepsy remained sparse. The aim of the present study is to integrate a classical behavioral cognitive analysis with a computational model approach to investigate cognitive associative learning impairments in patients with GTC epilepsy. We measured the accuracy of associative learning response performance in five GTC epileptic patients and five control subjects by using AEALT, all subjects were matched in age and gender. We ran the task using E-Prime, a neuropsychological software program, and SPSS for data statistical analysis. We tested whether GTC epileptic patients would have different learning performance than normal subjects, based on the degree and the location of impairment either in basal ganglia and/or hippocampus. With the number of patients that was available, our behavioral analysis showed no remarkable differences in learning performance of GTC patients as compared to their control subjects, both in the transfer and acquisition phases. In parallel, our simulation results confirmed strong connection and interaction between hippocampus and basal ganglia in our GTC and their control subjects. Nevertheless, the differences in neural firing rate of the connectionist model and weight update of basal ganglia were not significantly different between GTC and control subjects. Therefore, the behavioral analysis and the simulation data provided the same result, thus indicating that the computational model is likely to predict cognitive outcomes. PMID:26578883

  17. Patient Eye Examinations - Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examinations, Adults Patient Eye Examinations, Children Refractive Errors Scientists in the Laboratory Visual Acuity Testing Patient Eye Examinations, Adults × Warning message Automatic fallback to the cURL connection method kicked in to handle the request. Result code ...

  18. [Diagnosis and certification of the ability of epileptic patients to drive motor vehicles: cases consulted by the author].

    PubMed

    Sińczuk-Walczak, Halina; Wagrowska-Koski, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    Epilepsy is a frequent diagnostic problem. It is also difficult to certify whether an epileptic patient is able to drive a motor vehicle. With the advent of efficient anti-epileptic treatment, a general practice of refusing epileptic patients driving license should be seriously reconsidered. However, the matter should be given careful consideration not to jeopardize public safety and patients' rights. The aim of the study was to highlight the problems encountered in rediagnosing and certifying people with diagnosed epilepsy or pseudoepileptic seizures. The authors discuss the diagnosis and certification procedures in persons with epileptic seizures after severe craniocerebral trauma. They also analyze a case of diagnosed epilepsy suggesting the syncope in a patient with cardiac defect; a case of psychogenous pseudoepileptic seizures and the course of the disease in a patient with febrile convulsions in childhood. The problems result from the fact that reliable medical histories are not available and thus the retroassessment of the clinical picture of epileptic seizures is not possible. Missing results of timely laboratory tests (EEG, ECG) and diagnostic errors concerning earlier episodes, especially epilepsy diagnosed inconsiderately, are additional obstacles. PMID:12577810

  19. A patient with epileptic psychosis who had rare acute episodic symptoms☆

    PubMed Central

    Horinouchi, Toru; Oyanagi, Yuka; Umemoto, Yuka; Hosokawa, Yoshiyuki; Honma, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a 38-year-old woman with temporal lobe epilepsy and epileptic psychoses. The psychoses consisted of three rare symptoms that were “a distortion in the sense of time,” “what should be there disappears,” and “the next scene is supposed to be in a particular way.” There have been few reports that included these symptoms; therefore, we report the course of this patient in detail. PMID:25667891

  20. Biclustering EEG data from epileptic patients treated with vagus nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busygin, Stanislav; Boyko, Nikita; Pardalos, Panos M.; Bewernitz, Michael; Ghacibeh, Georges

    2007-11-01

    We present a pilot study of an application of consistent biclustering to analyze scalp EEG data obtained from epileptic patients undergoing treatment with a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS). The ultimate goal of this study is to develop a physiologic marker for optimal VNS parameters (e.g. output current, signal frequency, etc.) using measures of scalp EEG signals. A time series of STLmax values was computed for each scalp EEG channel recorded from two epileptic patients and used as a feature of the two datasets. The averaged samples from stimulation periods were then separated from averaged samples from non-stimulation periods by feature selection performed within the consistent biclustering routine. The obtained biclustering results allow us to assume that signals from certain parts of the brain consistently change their characteristics when VNS is switched on and could provide a basis for desirable VNS stimulation parameters. A physiologic marker of optimal VNS effect could greatly reduce the cost, time, and risk of calibrating VNS stimulation parameters in newly implanted patients compared to the current method of clinical response.

  1. Analysis of Epileptic Discharges from Implanted Subdural Electrodes in Patients with Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective Almost two-thirds of patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) have epilepsy, and half of them require surgery for it. However, it is well known that scalp electroencephalography (EEG) does not demonstrate unequivocal epileptic discharges in patients with SWS. Therefore, we analyzed interictal and ictal discharges from intracranial subdural EEG recordings in patients treated surgically for SWS to elucidate epileptogenicity in this disorder. Methods Five intractable epileptic patients with SWS who were implanted with subdural electrodes for presurgical evaluation were enrolled in this study. We examined the following seizure parameters: seizure onset zone (SOZ), propagation speed of seizure discharges, and seizure duration by visual inspection. Additionally, power spectrogram analysis on some frequency bands at SOZ was performed from 60 s before the visually detected seizure onset using the EEG Complex Demodulation Method (CDM). Results We obtained 21 seizures from five patients for evaluation, and all seizures initiated from the cortex under the leptomeningeal angioma. Most of the patients presented with motionless staring and respiratory distress as seizure symptoms. The average seizure propagation speed and duration were 3.1 ± 3.6 cm/min and 19.4 ± 33.6 min, respectively. Significant power spectrogram changes at the SOZ were detected at 10–30 Hz from 15 s before seizure onset, and at 30–80 Hz from 5 s before seizure onset. Significance In patients with SWS, seizures initiate from the cortex under the leptomeningeal angioma, and seizure propagation is slow and persists for a longer period. CDM indicated beta to low gamma-ranged seizure discharges starting from shortly before the visually detected seizure onset. Our ECoG findings indicate that ischemia is a principal mechanism underlying ictogenesis and epileptogenesis in SWS. PMID:27054715

  2. A study on driving status in 98 epileptic patients with driving licences.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, K; Fukushima, Y; Saito, F; Wada, K

    1991-06-01

    As to the driving status in the period between January 1984 and December 1988, 98 epileptic patients with driving licences were examined, paying regard to their clinical conditions. Sixty-one (62%) of the patients were seizure-free for the last five years or more in December 1988. Eighty-one (83%) were actually driving motor vehicles at the time of this study, and 27 (33%) of the 81 drivers still had fits during the past five years. Nine patients (9%) had caused traffic accidents, but no accident had occurred due to seizures. The type of the nine accidents was as follows: One case of a slight physical injury to the other person, four cases of the driver's own car damage without other material damage, and four of the accidents involving other cars. PMID:1762210

  3. [The role of the nurse in the patient education of young epileptic patients].

    PubMed

    Danse, Marion; Goujon, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    An epileptic seizure in a child is a major source of anxiety and turns the family's everyday life upside down. Through therapeutic education, the nurse guides the families towards the autonomous management of the seizures, antiepileptic treatments, adaptations to daily life and potential comorbidities. PMID:26100481

  4. Treating Lennox–Gastaut syndrome in epileptic pediatric patients with third-generation rufinamide

    PubMed Central

    Gresham, Jessica; Eiland, Lea S; Chung, Allison M

    2010-01-01

    Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a rare but debilitating pediatric epileptic encephalopathy characterized by multiple intractable seizure types. Treatment of LGS is challenging because of the small number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are effective for this syndrome, as well as the need for polytherapy in the majority of patients. This review focuses on the treatment of LGS with rufinamide, a recently approved third-generation AED with reported efficacy as adjunctive therapy for LGS. All relevant papers identified through a PubMed search on the treatment of LGS with rufinamide were reviewed. To date, the literature suggests improvements in seizure frequency for pediatric patients with LGS on rufinamide. Rufinamide appears to be especially effective for atonic or drop attack seizures. Rufinamide also displays a favorable adverse event profile compared with the older anticonvulsants, as well as a minimal number of drug interactions, making it a promising option for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with LGS. PMID:20957124

  5. Copy number variant analysis from exome data in 349 patients with epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Coe, Bradley P.; Cook, Joseph; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Johnson, Michael R.; Krumm, Nik; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nelson, Ben; Esmaeeli Nieh, Sahar; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Stephen; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Raja, Archana; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott; Abou‐Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Amron, Dina; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renée A.; Sherr, Elliott; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joe; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P.G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess‐Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.

    2015-01-01

    Infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS) are epileptic encephalopathies characterized by early onset, intractable seizures, and poor developmental outcomes. De novo sequence mutations and copy number variants (CNVs) are causative in a subset of cases. We used exome sequence data in 349 trios with IS or LGS to identify putative de novo CNVs. We confirm 18 de novo CNVs in 17 patients (4.8%), 10 of which are likely pathogenic, giving a firm genetic diagnosis for 2.9% of patients. Confirmation of exome‐predicted CNVs by array‐based methods is still required due to false‐positive rates of prediction algorithms. Our exome‐based results are consistent with recent array‐based studies in similar cohorts and highlight novel candidate genes for IS and LGS. Ann Neurol 2015;78:323–328 PMID:26068938

  6. Beta-endorphin, somatostatin, and prolactin levels in cerebrospinal fluid of epileptic patients after generalised convulsion.

    PubMed Central

    Pitkänen, A; Jolkkonen, J; Riekkinen, P

    1987-01-01

    The possible role of different peptidergic systems in the postictal stage of human epilepsy was studied by measuring beta-endorphin, somatostatin, and prolactin levels by radioimmunoassay of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from nine epileptic patients. The first sample was taken within 2 hours after generalised tonic-clonic convulsion, and the second sample was obtained interictally after 1-4 days without any kind of clinically observable seizures. beta-endorphin was elevated postictally (p = 0.044) compared with interictal levels. SLI and PROL were similar in both samples. The present study suggests that in humans beta-endorphin is released into CSF during generalised seizures. This may indicate that neurons containing beta-endorphin are activated during a seizure. PMID:2890716

  7. II. An altered proliferation response due to the anticonvulsant phenytoin (PHT) in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Kaul, A; Kalla, N R; Goyle, S

    2001-01-01

    Lymphocyte proliferation kinetics (LPK) is an end point used in genetic toxicology that was proposed as an alternative for the screening of anticonvulsant drugs. The effect of phenytoin (PHT) was investigated on the mitotic and proliferation indices in cultured blood lymphocytes of 33 sporadically collected untreated and 42 PHT-treated epileptics, where the duration of treatment was 3, 6, and 9 months, and 40 control subjects (age range 10-30 years). PHT induced mitotic delays and decreased the mitotic index. A significant heterogeneity of the first, second and the third metaphases between treated and untreated groups was revealed. A reduction of the proliferation index (P < 0.001) and proliferation delay per cycle (P < 0.001) was also observed. There was little variation between the controls and untreated patients (P > 0.05). The results have confirmed that PHT can affect responses leading to genotoxicity. Teratogenesis Carcinog. Mutagen. 21:151-164, 2001. PMID:11223892

  8. Dissociative experiences and quality of life in patients with non-epileptic attack disorder.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, James W; Ali, Fizzah; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2012-11-01

    Dissociative experiences are commonly reported by patients with non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD). This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence and characteristics of dissociative experiences in patients with NEAD and assessed their association with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Fifty-three patients diagnosed with NEAD were consecutively recruited (70.0% female, mean age=42 years, 22.0% with comorbid epilepsy) from a specialist neuropsychiatric clinic. Our sample reported high levels of dissociative experiences, with 36.7% of patients scoring ≥30 on the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Significant negative correlations were found between total DES scores and HRQoL, as measured by the QOLIE-31 questionnaire (r=-0.64, p<0.001). This association remained significant when accounting for symptoms of depression and anxiety, other psychiatric comorbidities, and attack frequency and severity. These findings suggest a high prevalence of dissociative experiences in this patient population, highlighting the importance of routinely screening patients for dissociative symptoms and their impact on patients' lives. PMID:23099232

  9. Differential effects of valproic acid and enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants on nimodipine pharmacokinetics in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tartara, A.; Galimberti, C.A.; Manni, R.; Parietti, L.; Zucca, C.; Baasch, H.; Caresia, L.; Mück, W.; Barzaghi, N.; Gatti, G.; Perucca, E.

    1991-01-01

    1 The single dose pharmacokinetics of orally administered nimodipine (60 mg) were investigated in normal subjects and in two groups of epileptic patients receiving chronic treatment with hepatic microsomal enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, phenobarbitone or phenytoin) and sodium valproate, respectively. 2 Compared with the values found in the control group, mean areas under the plasma nimodipine concentration curve were lowered by about seven-fold (P < 0.01) in patients taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants and increased by about 50% (P < 0.05) in patients taking sodium valproate. 3 Nimodipine half-lives were shorter in enzyme-induced patients than in controls (3.9 ± 2.0 h vs 9.1 ± 3.4 h, means ± s.d., P < 0.01), but this difference could be artifactual since in the patients drug concentrations declined rapidly below the limit of assay, thus preventing identification of a possible slower terminal phase. In valproate-treated patients, half-lives (8.2 ± 1.8 h) were similar to those found in controls. PMID:1777370

  10. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment. PMID:23623332

  11. Seizure, Fit or Attack? The Use of Diagnostic Labels by Patients with Epileptic or Non-Epileptic Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the use of diagnostic labels such as "seizure", "attack", "fit", and "blackout" by patients who experience seizures. While previous research on patients' preferences for diagnostic terminology has relied on questionnaires, we assess patients' own preferences and their responses to a doctor's use of different labels…

  12. Phenytoin influence on human lymphocyte mitogen response: a prospective study of epileptic and nonepileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Gabourel, J D; Davies, G H; Bardana, E J; Ratzlaff, N A

    1982-08-01

    The results of this prospective study fail to confirm previously reported phenytoin suppression of lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogens. Our data show a significantly greater than expected percentage (p less than 0.0001) of patients requiring phenytoin treatment have low lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogens prior to phenytoin therapy. Analysis of changes in each individual's response during phenytoin treatment as compared with their pre-phenytoin responses shows a consistent trend to increased responsiveness to concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, and to a suboptimal concentration of phytohemagglutinin. This trend was most pronounced for patients whose serum IgA concentration was decreased while taking phenytoin, whereas there was no such trend for individuals whose serum IgA levels were not decreased. This phenomenon was not related to neurological disease classification. Phenytoin added directly to lymphocyte cultures depressed lymphocyte responses to all mitogens in a small (less than 20%) but significant degree, confirming similar in vitro studies by other investigators. Because of limited serum proteins for phenytoin binding in culture medium, these in vitro studies have little application to possible phenytoin effects on lymphocytes of patients taking it to prevent seizures. Thus, the suggestion that phenytoin causes depressed lymphocyte responses to mitogens in epileptic patients appears unwarranted. PMID:7094904

  13. Simultaneous impairment of neuronal and metabolic function of mutated gephyrin in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Borislav; Djémié, Tania; Grünewald, Nora; Suls, Arvid; Kress, Vanessa; Hetsch, Florian; Craiu, Dana; Zemel, Matthew; Gormley, Padhraig; Lal, Dennis; Myers, Candace T; Mefford, Heather C; Palotie, Aarno; Helbig, Ingo; Meier, Jochen C; De Jonghe, Peter; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic inhibition is essential for shaping the dynamics of neuronal networks, and aberrant inhibition plays an important role in neurological disorders. Gephyrin is a central player at inhibitory postsynapses, directly binds and organizes GABAA and glycine receptors (GABAARs and GlyRs), and is thereby indispensable for normal inhibitory neurotransmission. Additionally, gephyrin catalyzes the synthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) in peripheral tissue. We identified a de novo missense mutation (G375D) in the gephyrin gene (GPHN) in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy resembling Dravet syndrome. Although stably expressed and correctly folded, gephyrin-G375D was non-synaptically localized in neurons and acted dominant-negatively on the clustering of wild-type gephyrin leading to a marked decrease in GABAAR surface expression and GABAergic signaling. We identified a decreased binding affinity between gephyrin-G375D and the receptors, suggesting that Gly375 is essential for gephyrin-receptor complex formation. Surprisingly, gephyrin-G375D was also unable to synthesize MoCo and activate MoCo-dependent enzymes. Thus, we describe a missense mutation that affects both functions of gephyrin and suggest that the identified defect at GABAergic synapses is the mechanism underlying the patient's severe phenotype. PMID:26613940

  14. Modeling the MagnetoencephaloGram (MEG) Of Epileptic Patients Using Genetic Programming and Minimizing the Derived Models Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Efstratios; Likothanassis, Spiridon

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, a variation of traditional Genetic Programming(GP) is used to model the MagnetoencephaloGram(MEG) of Epileptic Patients. This variation is Linear Genetic Programming(LGP). LGP is a particular subset of GP wherein computer programs in population are represented as a sequence of instructions from imperative programming language or machine language. The derived models from this method were simplified using genetic algorithms. The proposed method was used to model the MEG signal of epileptic patients using 6 different datasets. Each dataset uses different number of previous values of MEG to predict the next value. The models were tested in datasets different from the ones which were used to produce them and the results were very promising.

  15. Factors influencing plasma concentrations of carbamazepine and carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide in epileptic children and adults.

    PubMed

    Lanchote, V L; Bonato, P S; Campos, G M; Rodrigues, I

    1995-02-01

    Plasma carbamazepine (CBZ) and carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide (CBZ-E) concentrations were measured in 160 epileptic patients in order to determine the effect of factors such as age, daily dosing schedule, formulation, and combination with other antiepileptic drugs on these concentrations in relation to the daily dose. The results showed that the CBZ plasma level/dose ratio was affected by all factors studied, whereas the CBZ-E plasma level/dose ratio was affected only by formulation and age. The ratio of CBZ-E to CBZ plasma levels (CBZ-E/CBZ) was affected by daily dosing schedule, age, and combination with other antiepileptic drugs. The present study demonstrated that many factors affect plasma CBZ/dose ratios, explaining the discrepancies observed in the literature. PMID:7725376

  16. Comparison of the health-related quality of life between epileptic patients with partial and generalized seizure

    PubMed Central

    Ashjazadeh, Nahid; Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Ayoobzadehshirazi, Anaheed; Sadraii, Nazanin; Hadi, Negin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is defined as recurrent unprovoked febrile seizures, which cause disability in patients. This study aims to assess the health-related quality-of-life (QOL) in epileptic patients in Fars Province, southern Iran. Methods:One-hundred epileptic patients, above 18 years, referred to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences affiliated clinics, were included. The QOL of patients with generalized and partial seizure were assessed using the Iranian valid and reliable Sf-36 questionnaire. Patients’ socio-demographic and their disease features were also compared with each other using a questionnaire. Results: In partial epilepsy group (n = 24), the married patients in social functioning (SF) aspect of QOL (64.42 ± 14.29) (P = 0.024), the patients on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) monotherapy in both physical functioning (PF) (88.75 ± 11.57) (P = 0.030) and SF (75.00 ± 6.68) (P = 0.022) aspects, the employed patients in PF aspect of QOL (P = 0.023) (91.87 ± 8.83) and those with high income in mental health aspect of QOL (P = 0.036 and correlation coefficient = 0.413) got better scores compared with the partial epileptic patients who were single, on polytherapy, unemployed and had low to moderate income. In generalized epilepsy group (n = 76), patients on AEDs monotherapy in PF aspect of QOL (P = 0.025) (78.33 ± 24.36) and employed patients in vitality aspect (P = 0.023) (57.00 ± 28.25) had better scores. Data were analyzed using SPSS for windows. Conclusion: Epilepsy can affect patient’s life in a number of ways such as their lives, marriage, occupation, and education. We can encourage patients to find a partner, continue higher education and try to find a job. PMID:25295153

  17. Eigenvector methods for automated detection of electrocardiographic changes in partial epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, the automated diagnostic systems trained on diverse and composite features were presented for detection of electrocardiographic changes in partial epileptic patients. In practical applications of pattern recognition, there are often diverse features extracted from raw data that require recognizing. Methods of combining multiple classifiers with diverse features are viewed as a general problem in various application areas of pattern recognition. Two types (normal and partial epilepsy) of ECG beats (180 records from each class) were obtained from the Physiobank database. The multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN), combined neural network (CNN), mixture of experts (ME), and modified mixture of experts (MME) were tested and benchmarked for their performance on the classification of the studied ECG signals, which were trained on diverse or composite features. Decision making was performed in two stages: feature extraction by eigenvector methods and classification using the classifiers trained on the extracted features. The present research demonstrated that the MME trained on the diverse features achieved accuracy rates (total classification accuracy is 99.44%) that were higher than that of the other automated diagnostic systems. PMID:19273021

  18. Effects of Vitamin E on seizure frequency, electroencephalogram findings, and oxidative stress status of refractory epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehvari, Jafar; Motlagh, Fataneh Gholami; Najafi, Mohamad; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye; Naeini, Amirmansour Alavi; Zare, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been a frequent finding in epileptic patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In this study, the influence of Vitamin E on the antiseizure activity and redox state of patients treated with carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and levetiracetam has been investigated. Materials and Methods: This double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out on 65 epileptic patients with chronic antiepileptic intake. The subjects received 400 IU/day of Vitamin E or placebo for 6 months. Seizure frequency, electroencephalogram (EEG), and redox state markers were measured monthly through the study. Results: Total antioxidant capacity, catalase and glutathione were significantly higher in Vitamin E received group compared with controls (P < 0.05) whereas malodialdehyde levels did not differ between two groups (P < 0.07). Vitamin E administration also caused a significant decrease in the frequency of seizures (P < 0.001) and improved EEG findings (P = 0.001). Of 32 patients in case group, the positive EEG decreased in 16 patients (50%) whereas among 33 patients in control group only 4 patients (12.1%) showed decreased positive EEG. Conclusion: The results of this preliminary study indicate that coadministration of antioxidant Vitamin E with AEDs improves seizure control and reduces oxidative stress. PMID:27099849

  19. Altered regional homogeneity in epileptic patients with infantile spasm: A resting-state fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhen; Li, Yongxin; Zang, Dongdong; Zhang, Heye; Zhao, Cailei; Jiang, Haibo; Chen, Yan; Cao, Dezhi; Chen, Li; Liao, Jianxiang; Chen, Qian; Luan, Guoming

    2016-01-01

    Infantile spasm (IS) syndrome is an age-related epileptic encephalopathy that occurs in children. The purpose of this study was to investigate regional homogeneity (ReHo) changes in IS patients. Resting-state fMRI was performed on 11 patients with IS, along with 35 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Group comparisons between the two groups demonstrate that the pattern of regional synchronization synchronization in IS patients is changed. Decreased ReHo values were found in default mode network, bilateral motor-related areas and left occipital gyrus of the patient group. Increased ReHo was found in regions of cingulum, cerebellum, supplementary motor area and brain deep nucleus, such as hippocampus, caudate, thalamus and insula. The significant differences might indicate that epileptic action have some injurious effects on the motor, executive and cognitive related regions. In addition, ReHo values of left precuneus and right superior frontal gyrus were associated with the epilepsy duration in the IS group. The correlation results indicate that the involvement of these regions may be related to the seizure generation. Our results suggest that IS may have an injurious effect on the brain activation. The findings may shed new light on the understanding the neural mechanism of IS epilepsy. PMID:27002912

  20. Patient-Specific Detection of Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by Arterial Spin Labeling in Drug-Resistant Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Del Felice, Alessandra; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; Arcaro, Chiara; Formaggio, Emanuela; Mai, Roberto; Chappell, Michael; Beltramello, Alberto; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological and hemodynamic data can be integrated to accurately and precisely identify the generators of abnormal electrical activity in drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for quantitative noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), can provide a direct measure of variations in cerebral perfusion associated with the epileptic focus. In this study, we aimed to confirm the ASL diagnostic value in the identification of the epileptogenic zone, as compared to electrical source imaging (ESI) results, and to apply a template-based approach to depict statistically significant CBF alterations. Standard video-electroencephalography (EEG), high-density EEG, and ASL were performed to identify clinical seizure semiology and noninvasively localize the epileptic focus in 12 drug-resistant focal epilepsy patients. The same ASL protocol was applied to a control group of 17 healthy volunteers from which a normal perfusion template was constructed using a mixed-effect approach. CBF maps of each patient were then statistically compared to the reference template to identify perfusion alterations. Significant hypo- and hyperperfused areas were identified in all cases, showing good agreement between ASL and ESI results. Interictal hypoperfusion was observed at the site of the seizure in 10/12 patients and early postictal hyperperfusion in 2/12. The epileptic focus was correctly identified within the surgical resection margins in the 5 patients who underwent lobectomy, all of which had good postsurgical outcomes. The combined use of ESI and ASL can aid in the noninvasive evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients. PMID:25946055

  1. Genotoxicity of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT): a follow-up study of PHT-untreated epileptic patients. I. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaul, A; Goyle, S

    1999-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT) is a widely prescribed antiepileptic drug. Its potential to interact with genetic material was investigated in a set of 30 epileptic patients (age 10-30 years) prior to and following the administration of PHT over a period of 9 months (grouped in a multiple of 3 months) and 40 control subjects in relation to age, sex, duration of drug therapy, and plasma concentration of PHT, using the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency assay. Plasma levels of the phenytoin were measured by biochemical assay in epileptic patients before and after the PHT therapy. The peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 72 h. The frequency of SCE was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in both age groups (10-20 and 21-30 years) for PHT-treated epileptics compared to PHT-untreated and control subjects. However, there were no considerable variations in SCE finding between the control and PHT-untreated patients. Between the two age groups, a significantly higher SCE frequency was observed in PHT-treated patients (P < 0.01) in the older age group (21-30 years). Mean SCE frequency did not differ between the male and female in the controls, PHT-untreated, or treated epileptics. Correlation between the plasma concentration of PHT and the incidence of SCE among 30 patients was insignificant. PHT monotherapy appears to have genotoxic effect as expressed by the induction of increased SCE rates in treated epileptics, while disease does not play any role in inducing genetic damage as shown by no difference in SCE frequencies between control subjects and PHT-untreated epileptic patients. PMID:10321411

  2. The effects of Mozart's music on interictal activity in epileptic patients: systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dastgheib, Samaneh Sadat; Layegh, Parvaneh; Sadeghi, Ramin; Foroughipur, Mohsen; Shoeibi, Ali; Gorji, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Mozart's music has been shown to have promising effects on nervous system functions. In this study, the effects of Mozart's work on epilepsy were reviewed. Articles were obtained from a variety of sources. The results of 12 studies were extracted. Three different meta-analyses were performed to examine (i) the percentage of patients who had changes in their interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) by music therapy; and the changes of IEDs (ii) during and (iii) after exposure to Mozart's music. Data analysis indicated that 84% of patients listening to Mozart's music showed a significant decrease in IEDs. In addition, IEDs were decreased during (31.24%) and after (23.74%) listening to Mozart's compositions. A noteworthy response to music therapy in patients with a higher intelligence quotient, generalized or central discharges, and idiopathic epilepsy was demonstrated. The effect of Mozart's music on epilepsy seems to be significant. However, more randomized control studies are needed to determine its clinical efficacy. PMID:24272274

  3. The re-organization of functional brain networks in pharmaco-resistant epileptic patients who respond to VNS.

    PubMed

    Fraschini, Matteo; Demuru, Matteo; Puligheddu, Monica; Floridia, Simona; Polizzi, Lorenzo; Maleci, Alberto; Bortolato, Marco; Hillebrand, Arjan; Marrosu, Francesco

    2014-09-19

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) is a therapeutic add-on treatment for patients with pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. The mechanism of action is still largely unknown. Previous studies have shown that brain network topology during the inter-ictal period in epileptic patients deviates from normal configuration. In the present paper, we investigate the relationship between clinical improvement induced by VNS and alterations in brain network topology. We hypothesize that, as a consequence of the VNS add-on treatment, functional brain network architecture shifts back toward a more efficient configuration in patients responding to VNS. Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from ten patients affected by pharmaco-resistant epilepsy were analyzed in the classical EEG frequency bands. The phase lag index (PLI) was used to estimate functional connectivity between EEG channels and the minimum spanning tree (MST) was computed in order to characterize VNS-induced alterations in network topology in a bias-free way. Our results revealed a clear network re-organization, in terms of MST modification, toward a more integrated architecture in patients responding to the VNS. In particular, the results show a significant interaction effect between benefit from VNS (responders/non-responders) and condition (pre/post VNS implantation) in the theta band. This finding suggests that the positive effect induced by VNS add-on treatment in epileptic patients is related to a clear network re-organization and that this network modification can reveal the long debated mechanism of action of VNS. Therefore, MST analysis could be useful in evaluating and monitoring the efficacy of VNS add-on treatment potentially in both epilepsy and psychiatric diseases. PMID:25123446

  4. Referral of epileptic patients in North East Coast of West Malaysia an area with poor MRI coverage: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Y; Alias, N N; Shuaib, I L; Tharakan, J; Abdullah, J; Munawir, A H; Naing, N N

    2006-11-01

    Advances in neuroimaging techniques, particularly Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), have proved invaluable in detecting structural brain lesions in patients with epilepsy in developed countries. In Malaysia, a few electroencephalography facilities available in rural district hospitals run by trained physician assistants have Internet connections to a government neurological center in Kuala Lumpur. These facilities are more commonly available than MRI machines, which require radiological expertise and helium replacement, which may problematic in Southeast Asian countries where radiologists are found in mainly big cities or towns. We conducted a cross-sectional study over a two year period begining January 2001 on rural patients, correlating EEG reports and MRI images with a clinical diagnosis of epilepsy to set guidelines for which rural patients need to be referred to a hospital with MRI facilities. The patients referred by different hospitals without neurological services were classified as having generalized, partial or unclassified seizures based on the International Classification of Epileptic Seizures proposed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). The clinical parameters studied were seizure type, seizure frequency, status epilepticus and duration of seizure. EEG reports were reviewed for localized and generalized abnormalities and epileptiform changes. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression and area under the curve. The association between clinical and radiological abnormalities was evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Twenty-six males and 18 females were evaluated. The mean age was 20.7 +/- 13.3 years. Nineteen (43.2%) had generalized seizures, 22 (50.0%) had partial seizures and 3 (6.8%) presented with unclassified seizures. The EEG was abnormal in 30 patients (20 with generalized abnormalities and 10 localized abnormalities). The MRI was abnormal in 17 patients (38.6%); the abnormalities observed were cerebral

  5. Bilateral Femoral Neck Fractures in A Young Patient Suffering from Hypophosphatasia, Due to A First Time Epileptic Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, N; Bache, E; Clare, T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We report a case of an adolescent sustaining bilateral femoral neck fractures due to a first time epileptic seizure, as a result of expansion of his known syrinx. Case Report: A 19-year-old patient suffering from hypophosphatasia (HPP), Arnold-Chiari malformation, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt sustained a trivial fall with profound pain and an inability to mobilize. Radiographs demonstrated a right-sided Garden-4 femoral neck and left-sided multi-fragmentary intracapsular/extracapsular fractures. The patient had previously suffered bilateral proximal femoral shaft fractures, treated with intramedullary unlocked nail fixation that was still in situ. Operative treatment with an exchange to Synthes Adolescent Lateral Recon nail was performed on the right with two Recon screws inserted into the femoral head. On the left, the existing Pedinail was preserved with an additional single screw inserted into the femoral head. In addition, 3 months of non-mobilization was required for adequate bone healing. After 1-year from time of injury, there is no avascular necrosis on radiographs and the patient is mobilizing pain-free. Conclusion: Patients with hypophosphatasia have delayed bone healing. We recommend surgical fixation with an intramedullary device and periods of non-mobilization until there is radiographical evidence of adequate bone healing. PMID:27299074

  6. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe. PMID:22903808

  7. Population pharmacokinetic analysis for 10-monohydroxy derivative of oxcarbazepine in pediatric epileptic patients shows no difference between Japanese and other ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Bouillon, Thomas; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hikoe; Hirota, Takashi; Fink, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Oxcarbazepine is an anti-epileptic drug, which is almost completely metabolized by cytosolic enzymes in the liver to the active 10-monohyroxy metabolite (MHD) following oral administration. The pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of MHD were evaluated in pediatric epileptic patients and a possible ethnic difference in PK of MHD between Japanese and non-Japanese pediatric patients was assessed. A non-linear mixed effect modeling approach was used to determine the PK of MHD. A one-compartment population model with first-order absorption appropriately described the PK of MHD. No clinically relevant differences were found for using body surface area or weight to explain between-patient variability, therefore the final model included the effects of body weight on apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution (V/F) of MHD, and in addition, the effect of 3 concomitant anti-epileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin) on CL/F of MHD. Inclusion of ethnicity as a covariate in the final model, concluded no ethnic difference with respect to CL/F of MHD between Japanese and non-Japanese patients. Hence, oxcarbazepine can be generally applied using the same dosage and administration for the treatment of partial onset seizures in pediatric patients, regardless of ethnicity. PMID:25989891

  8. Impaired neurovascular coupling to ictal epileptic activity and spreading depolarization in a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage: possible link to blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Maren K L; Chassidim, Yoash; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Revankar, Gajanan S; Major, Sebastian; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I; Woitzik, Johannes; Sandow, Nora; Scheel, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Dreier, Jens P

    2012-11-01

    Spreading depolarization describes a sustained neuronal and astroglial depolarization with abrupt ion translocation between intraneuronal and extracellular space leading to a cytotoxic edema and silencing of spontaneous activity. Spreading depolarizations occur abundantly in acutely injured human brain and are assumed to facilitate neuronal death through toxic effects, increased metabolic demand, and inverse neurovascular coupling. Inverse coupling describes severe hypoperfusion in response to spreading depolarization. Ictal epileptic events are less frequent than spreading depolarizations in acutely injured human brain but may also contribute to lesion progression through increased metabolic demand. Whether abnormal neurovascular coupling can occur with ictal epileptic events is unknown. Herein we describe a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in whom spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events were measured using subdural opto-electrodes for direct current electrocorticography and regional cerebral blood flow recordings with laser-Doppler flowmetry. Simultaneously, changes in tissue partial pressure of oxygen were recorded with an intraparenchymal oxygen sensor. Isolated spreading depolarizations and clusters of recurrent spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity were recorded over several days followed by a status epilepticus. Both spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events where accompanied by hyperemic blood flow responses at one optode but mildly hypoemic blood flow responses at another. Of note, quantitative analysis of Gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detected impaired blood-brain barrier integrity in the region where the optode had recorded the mildly hypoemic flow responses. The data suggest that abnormal flow responses to spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events, respectively, may be associated with blood-brain barrier

  9. Calcification of the pineal gland: relationship to laterality of the epileptic foci in patients with complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1992-01-01

    The right and left temporal lobes differ from each other with respect to the rate of intrauterine growth, the timing of maturation, rate of aging, anatomical organization, neurochemistry, metabolic rate, electroencephalographic measures, and function. These functional differences between the temporal lobes underlies the different patterns of psychopathology and endocrine reproductive disturbances noted in patients with temporolimbic epilepsy. The right hemisphere has greater limbic and reticular connections than the left. Since the pineal gland receives direct innervation from the limbic system and the secretion of melatonin is influenced by an input from the reticular system, I propose that lesions in the right temporal lobe have a greater impact on pineal melatonin functions as opposed to those in the left dominant temporal lobe. Consequently, since calcification of the pineal gland is thought to reflect past secretory activity of the gland, I predicted a higher prevalence of pineal calcification (PC) in epileptic patients with right temporal lobe as opposed to those with left temporal lobe foci. To investigate this hypothesis, the prevalence of PC on CT scan was studied in a sample of 70 patients (43 men, 27 women, mean age: 29.2 years, range 9-58; SD = 10.1) with complex partial seizures, of whom 49 (70.0%) had a right temporal lobe focus. PC was present in 51 patients (72.8%) and was unrelated to any of the historical and demographic data surveyed. In the patients with a focus in the right temporal lobe, PC was present in 46 cases (93.8%) as compared to 5 of 21 patients (23.8%) with left temporal lobe foci.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1341678

  10. Novel CDKL5 Mutations in Czech Patients with Phenotypes of Atypical Rett Syndrome and Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Záhoráková, D; Langová, M; Brožová, K; Laštůvková, J; Kalina, Z; Rennerová, L; Martásek, P

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked CDKL5 gene, which encodes cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 protein, has been implicated in early-onset encephalopathy and atypical Rett syndrome with early-onset seizures. The CDKL5 protein is a kinase required for neuronal development and morphogenesis, but its precise functions are still largely unexplored. Individuals with CDKL5 mutations present with severe global developmental delay, intractable epilepsy, and Rett-like features. A clear genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established due to an insufficient number of reported cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the CDKL5 gene in Czech patients with early-onset seizures and Rett-like features. We performed mutation screening in a cohort of 83 individuals using high-resolution melting analysis, DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification. Molecular analyses revealed heterozygous pathogenic mutations in three girls with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy starting at the age of two months. All three identified mutations, c.637G>A, c.902_977+29del105, and c.1757_1758delCT, are novel, thus significantly extending the growing spectrum of known pathogenic CDKL5 sequence variants. Our results support the importance of genetic testing of the CDKL5 gene in patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and Rett-like features with early-onset seizures. This is the first study referring to molecular defects of CDKL5 in Czech cases. PMID:27187038

  11. Plic-1, a new target in repressing epileptic seizure by regulation of GABAAR function in patients and a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Zengyou; Gu, Juan; Zhang, Yanke; Wang, Wei; Shen, Hui; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunction of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors (GABAARs) is a prominent factor affecting intractable epilepsy. Plic-1, an ubiquitin-like protein enriched in the inhibitory synapses connecting GABAARs and the ubiquitin protease system (UPS), plays a key role in the modification of GABAAR functions. However, the relationship between Plic-1 and epileptogenesis is not known. In the present study, we aimed to investigate Plic-1 levels in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as the role of Plic-1 in regulating onset and progression of epilepsy in animal models. We found that Plic-1 expression was significantly decreased in patients with epilepsy as well as pilocarpine- and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced rat epileptic models. Intrahippocampal injection of the PePα peptide, which disrupts Plic-1 binding to GABAARs, significantly shortened the latency of seizure onset, and increased the seizure severity and duration in these two epileptic models. Overexpressed Plic-1 through lentivirus transfection into a PTZ model resulted in a reduction in both seizure severity and generalized tonic-clonic seizure duration. Whole-cell clamp recordings revealed that the PePα peptide decreased miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) whereas overexpressed Plic-1 increased mIPSCs in the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. These effects can be blocked by picrotoxin, a GABAAR inhibitor. Our results indicate that Plic-1 plays an important role in managing epileptic seizures by enhancing seizure inhibition through regulation of GABAARs at synaptic sites. PMID:26415648

  12. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  13. Post-epileptic headache and migraine.

    PubMed Central

    Schon, F; Blau, J N

    1987-01-01

    One hundred epileptic patients were questioned about their headaches. Post-ictal headaches occurred in 51 of these patients and most commonly lasted 6-72 hours. Major seizures were more often associated with post-epileptic headaches than minor attacks. Nine patients in this series of 100 also had migraine: in eight of these nine a typical, albeit a mild, migraine attack was provoked by fits. The post-ictal headache in the 40 epileptics who did not have migraine was accompanied by vomiting in 11 cases, photophobia in 14 cases and vomiting with photophobia in 4 cases. Furthermore, post-epileptic headache was accentuated by coughing, bending and sudden head movements and relieved by sleep. It is, therefore, clear that seizures provoke a syndrome similar to the headache phase of migraine in 50% of epileptics. It is proposed that post-epileptic headache arises intracranially and is related to the vasodilatation known to follow seizures. The relationship of post-epileptic headache to migraine is discussed in the light of current ideas on migraine pathogenesis, in particular the vasodilation which accompanies Leao's spreading cortical depression. PMID:3117978

  14. Real-Time Management of Multimodal Streaming Data for Monitoring of Epileptic Patients.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllopoulos, Dimitrios; Korvesis, Panagiotis; Mporas, Iosif; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2016-03-01

    New generation of healthcare is represented by wearable health monitoring systems, which provide real-time monitoring of patient's physiological parameters. It is expected that continuous ambulatory monitoring of vital signals will improve treatment of patients and enable proactive personal health management. In this paper, we present the implementation of a multimodal real-time system for epilepsy management. The proposed methodology is based on a data streaming architecture and efficient management of a big flow of physiological parameters. The performance of this architecture is examined for varying spatial resolution of the recorded data. PMID:26643075

  15. Determining the disease management process for epileptic patients: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Nazafarin; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Zare, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy exposes patients to many physical, social, and emotional challenges. Thus, it seems to portray a complex picture and needs holistic care. Medical treatment and psychosocial part of epilepsy remain central to managing and improving the patient's qualify of life through team efforts. Some studies have shown the dimensions of self-management, but its management process of epilepsy patients, especially in Iran, is not clear. This study aimed to determine the disease management process in patients with epilepsy in Iran. Materials and Methods: This qualitative approach and grounded theory study was conducted from January 2009 to February 2012 in Isfahan city (Iran). Thirty-two participants were recruited by the goal-oriented, and snowball sample selection and theoretical sampling methods. After conducting a total of 43 in-depth interviews with the participants, the researchers reached data saturation. Data were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin method. Results: With a focus on disease management process, researchers found three main themes and seven sub-themes as a psychosocial process (PSP). The main themes were: perception of threat to self-identity, effort to preserve self-identity, and burn out. The psychosocial aspect of the disease generated one main variable “the perception of identity loss” and one central variable “searching for self-identity.” Conclusions: Participants attributed threat to self-identity and burn out to the way their disease was managed requiring efforts to preserve their identity. Recommendations consist of support programs and strategies to improve the public perception of epilepsy in Iran, help patients accept their condition and preserve self-identity, and most importantly, enhance medical management of epilepsy. PMID:26985223

  16. Fixed Drug Eruption in an Epileptic Patient Previously Receiving Treatment With Phenytoin for Seven Years

    PubMed Central

    Smetana, Keaton S.; Hamilton, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old African American female presented with severe left thigh pain of unknown etiology. She had a past medical history of generalized seizure disorder treated with phenytoin for 7 years without incident. During admission a nurse witnessed a seizure, and consequently loading and maintenance doses of phenytoin were administered to obtain a therapeutic serum concentration. The patient had a history of noncompliance with multiple subtherapeutic phenytoin levels. Subsequently, unifocal blue discolored spots appeared, progressing to a bullous component that was positive for skin sloughing. Drug-induced fixed drug eruption was diagnosed and attributed to phenytoin. Clinicians should be cognizant of drug-induced fixed drug eruption in patients just initiated and those receiving long-term treatment with phenytoin. The administration rate of phenytoin may be associated with the development of fixed drug eruption. PMID:26425589

  17. A comparative pharmacokinetic study of conventional and chewable carbamazepine in epileptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Patsalos, P N

    1990-01-01

    Using an open substitution study design, conventional carbamazepine (Tegretol, CBZ-C and a chewable carbamazepine formulation (Tegretol Chewtabs, CBZ-CHEW) were compared in 12 patients with severe intractable epilepsy. During a dosing interval, no significant differences were observed with respect to trough or peak serum concentrations of CBZ and CBZ-10,11-epoxide (CBZ-E), the active metabolite. The area under the serum CBZ concentration-time curve for a dosing interval was (mean +/- s.e. mean) 146 +/- 10 mumols l-1 h on CBZ-C and 143 +/- 9 mumols l-1 h on CBZ-CHEW. The two formulations, therefore, have a similar pharmacokinetic profile and could be used interchangeably in the management of patients with epilepsy. PMID:2350535

  18. Influence of coadministered antiepileptic drugs on serum zonisamide concentrations in epileptic patients: quantitative analysis based on suitable transforming factor.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Noriyasu; Tsukamoto, Toyohisa; Uno, Junji; Kimura, Michio; Morita, Shushi

    2003-12-01

    We conducted a study to clarify the most suitable transforming factor related to the daily zonisamide dose (D) providing a steady-state serum concentration (C(t)) and analyzed the influences of the concomitant use of antiepileptic drugs on C(t) quantitatively. Data obtained by routine therapeutic drug monitoring from a total of 175 epileptic patients treated with the multiple oral administrations of zonisamide (ZNS) as a powder/tablets, were used for the analysis. Employing the extracellular water volume (V(ECW)) as a transforming factor, led the level/dose (L/D) ratio (:C(t)/(D/V(ECW))) to be independent of the patient's age and sex for the administration of ZNS alone. C(t) was revealed to be dependent on only one variable regarding D/V(ECW) and expressed as C(t)=0.604x(D/V(ECW)). Phenytoin (PHT) significantly lowered (p<0.01) the L/D ratio to 0.76 of the value for ZNS alone. For a more detailed analysis, we defined the parameter R(i) (i=1, 2, em leader, 6) as an alteration ratio, representing the influence of each antiepileptic drug on the L/D ratio of ZNS alone. A model based on the assumption that each R(i) value was independent from one another and multiplicative, was adopted. The analysis clarified that phenobarbital, valproic acid, carbamazepine, and PHT significantly lowered (p<0.05) the L/D ratio of ZNS to 0.849, 0.865, 0.846, and 0.804, respectively. In the case of the addition or discontinuance of concomitant treatment with antiepileptic drugs in the same patient, the estimated L/D ratios were calculated using the value of each R(i) and compared with the measured ones. The mean of prediction error was calculated as 22.9%. Our results appear valid and R(i) should be available for clinical use. PMID:14646181

  19. Electroencephalographic source imaging: a prospective study of 152 operated epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Brodbeck, Verena; Spinelli, Laurent; Lascano, Agustina M.; Wissmeier, Michael; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Vulliemoz, Serge; Pollo, Claudio; Schaller, Karl; Michel, Christoph M.

    2011-01-01

    Electroencephalography is mandatory to determine the epilepsy syndrome. However, for the precise localization of the irritative zone in patients with focal epilepsy, costly and sometimes cumbersome imaging techniques are used. Recent small studies using electric source imaging suggest that electroencephalography itself could be used to localize the focus. However, a large prospective validation study is missing. This study presents a cohort of 152 operated patients where electric source imaging was applied as part of the pre-surgical work-up allowing a comparison with the results from other methods. Patients (n = 152) with >1 year postoperative follow-up were studied prospectively. The sensitivity and specificity of each imaging method was defined by comparing the localization of the source maximum with the resected zone and surgical outcome. Electric source imaging had a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 88% if the electroencephalogram was recorded with a large number of electrodes (128–256 channels) and the individual magnetic resonance image was used as head model. These values compared favourably with those of structural magnetic resonance imaging (76% sensitivity, 53% specificity), positron emission tomography (69% sensitivity, 44% specificity) and ictal/interictal single-photon emission-computed tomography (58% sensitivity, 47% specificity). The sensitivity and specificity of electric source imaging decreased to 57% and 59%, respectively, with low number of electrodes (<32 channels) and a template head model. This study demonstrated the validity and clinical utility of electric source imaging in a large prospective study. Given the low cost and high flexibility of electroencephalographic systems even with high channel counts, we conclude that electric source imaging is a highly valuable tool in pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation. PMID:21975586

  20. Effect of CYP3A-inducing anti-epileptics on sorafenib exposure: results of a phase II study of sorafenib plus daily temozolomide in adults with recurrent glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Vredenburgh, James J.; Desjardins, Annick; Peters, Katherine; Gururangan, Sridharan; Sampson, John H.; Marcello, Jennifer; Herndon, James E.; McLendon, Roger E.; Janney, Dorothea; Friedman, Allan H.; Bigner, Darell D.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2011-01-01

    Sorafenib, an oral VEGFR-2, Raf, PDGFR, c-KIT and Flt-3 inhibitor, is active against renal cell and hepatocellular carcinomas, and has recently demonstrated promising activity for lung and breast cancers. In addition, various protracted temozolomide dosing schedules have been evaluated as a strategy to further enhance its anti-tumor activity. We reasoned that sorafenib and protracted, daily temozolomide may provide complementary therapeutic benefit, and therefore performed a phase 2 trial among recurrent glioblastoma patients. Adult glioblastoma patients at any recurrence after standard temozolomide chemoradiotherapy received sorafenib (400 mg twice daily) and continuous daily temozolomide (50 mg/m2/day). Assessments were performed every eight weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and secondary end points were radiographic response, overall survival (OS), safety and sorafenib pharmacokinetics. Of 32 enrolled patients, 12 (38%) were on CYP3-A inducing anti-epileptics (EIAEDs), 17 (53%) had 2 or more prior progressions, 15 had progressed while receiving 5-day temozolomide, and 12 (38%) had failed either prior bevacizumab or VEGFR inhibitor therapy. The most common grade ≥ 3 toxicities were palmer-planter erythrodysesthesia (19%) and elevated amylase/lipase (13%). Sorafenib pharmacokinetic exposures were comparable on day 1 regardless of EIAED status, but significantly lower on day 28 for patients on EIAEDs (P = 0.0431). With a median follow-up of 93 weeks, PFS-6 was 9.4%. Only one patient (3%) achieved a partial response. In conclusion, sorafenib can be safely administered with daily temozolomide, but this regimen has limited activity for recurrent GBM. Co-administration of EIAEDs can lower sorafenib exposures in this population. PMID:20443129

  1. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  2. Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Grafted into the Adult Epileptic Brain Restrain Seizures in Rat Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haejin; Yun, Seokhwan; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Won-Joo; Park, Kook In

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) because this can suppress spontaneous recurrent seizures in animal models. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of human neural stem/progenitor cells (huNSPCs) for treating TLE, we transplanted huNSPCs, derived from an aborted fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation and expanded in culture as neurospheres over a long time period, into the epileptic hippocampus of fully kindled and pilocarpine-treated adult rats exhibiting TLE. In vitro, huNSPCs not only produced all three central nervous system neural cell types, but also differentiated into ganglionic eminences-derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons and released GABA in response to the depolarization induced by a high K+ medium. NSPC grafting reduced behavioral seizure duration, afterdischarge duration on electroencephalograms, and seizure stage in the kindling model, as well as the frequency and the duration of spontaneous recurrent motor seizures in pilocarpine-induced animals. However, NSPC grafting neither improved spatial learning or memory function in pilocarpine-treated animals. Following transplantation, grafted cells showed extensive migration around the injection site, robust engraftment, and long-term survival, along with differentiation into β-tubulin III+ neurons (∼34%), APC-CC1+ oligodendrocytes (∼28%), and GFAP+ astrocytes (∼8%). Furthermore, among donor-derived cells, ∼24% produced GABA. Additionally, to explain the effect of seizure suppression after NSPC grafting, we examined the anticonvulsant glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels in host hippocampal astrocytes and mossy fiber sprouting into the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the epileptic brain. Grafted cells restored the expression of GDNF in host astrocytes but did not reverse the mossy fiber sprouting, eliminating the latter as potential mechanism. These results suggest that human fetal

  3. Influence of coadministered antiepileptic drugs on serum phenobarbital concentrations in epileptic patients: quantitative analysis based on a suitable transforming factor.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Noriyasu; Tsukamoto, Toyohisa; Uno, Junji; Kimura, Michio; Morita, Shushi

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated most suitable transforming factor related to the daily Phenobarbital dose (D) providing a steady-state serum concentration (Ct) and analyzed the influences of concomitant antiepileptic drugs on Ct quantitatively. Data obtained by routine therapeutic drug monitoring from a total of 326 epileptic patients treated with multiple oral administrations of phenobarbital (PB) as a powder, were used for the analysis. A total of 156 patients were administered PB alone, and 92, 57, and 21 patients were coadministered one, two, and three different antiepileptic drugs, respectively. Valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), zonisamide (ZNS), clonazepam, and ethosuximide were coadministered with PB. For administration of PB alone, four types of transforming factor corresponding to clearance, i.e., total body weight, total body water volume, body surface area and extracellular water volume (VECW) were proposed. With VECW as a transforming factor, the level/dose (L/D) ratio (:Ct/(D/VECW)) was independent of the patient's age and gender. Ct was dependent on only one variable regarding D/VECW and expressed as Ct=0.989 x (D/VECW). The coadministration of one drug caused a difference in the gradient of the regression line of PB alone, and the influence of each drug was detected by dividing each mean L/D ratio of PB plus one other drug by that of PB alone. VPA, CBZ, and PHT significantly increased (p<0.01) the L/D ratio to 1.48, 1.35, and 1.23 of the value for PB alone, respectively. With coadministration of multiple drugs, the L/D ratio rose significantly (p<0.05) as the number (< or =2) of drugs coadministered increased regardless of the type, and also increased with the concomitant use of 3 drugs compared with 2 drugs. For a more detailed analysis, we defined the parameter eta(i) (i=1, 2, ..., 6) and an alteration ratio Ri, representing the influence of each antiepileptic drug on the L/D ratio of PB alone. A model based on the assumption that

  4. Distortion of time interval reproduction in an epileptic patient with a focal lesion in the right anterior insular/inferior frontal cortices.

    PubMed

    Monfort, Vincent; Pfeuty, Micha; Klein, Madelyne; Collé, Steffie; Brissart, Hélène; Jonas, Jacques; Maillard, Louis

    2014-11-01

    This case report on an epileptic patient suffering from a focal lesion at the junction of the right anterior insular cortex (AIC) and the adjacent inferior frontal cortex (IFC) provides the first evidence that damage to this brain region impairs temporal performance in a visual time reproduction task in which participants had to reproduce the presentation duration (3, 5 and 7s) of emotionally-neutral and -negative pictures. Strikingly, as compared to a group of healthy subjects, the AIC/IFC case considerably overestimated reproduction times despite normal variability. The effect was obtained in all duration and emotion conditions. Such a distortion in time reproduction was not observed in four other epileptic patients without insular or inferior frontal damage. Importantly, the absolute extent of temporal over-reproduction increased in proportion to the magnitude of the target durations, which concurs with the scalar property of interval timing, and points to an impairment of time-specific rather than of non temporal (such as motor) mechanisms. Our data suggest that the disability in temporal reproduction of the AIC/IFC case would result from a distorted memory representation of the encoded duration, occurring during the process of storage and/or of recovery from memory and leading to a deviation of the temporal judgment during the reproduction task. These findings support the recent proposal that the anterior insular/inferior frontal cortices would be involved in time interval representation. PMID:25223467

  5. [Drivers license qualification for epileptics].

    PubMed

    Egli, M; Hartmann, H; Hess, R

    1977-03-26

    The question whether a person with epilepsy qualified for a driving licence must be examined from the point of view of the individual as well as that of the community. The general public should be protected against unduly high risks from epileptic drivers, whereas the patient has a right to live as normal a life as possible, which includes driving an automobile. Too rigid criteria for obtaining the license increase the number of persons who evade medical control and drive "illegally". To require physicians to report their epileptic patients to the authorities would be counterproductive; it would also destroy the personal confidence between physician and patient which is so essential for successful treatment. Epileptic persons endanger safety on the road only slightly: 0.1-0.3% of all traffic accidents are due to epileptic seizures. In contrast, abuse of alcohol plays a major role in 6-9% of all accidents, whereas 80-90% are attributable to evident mistakes by the driver. Epileptic patients under regular medical supervision who are licenced on grounds of approved criteria do not cause more accidents than the general population. A dangerous group are, however, those with mental alterations (organic or reactive) and particularly patients with aggressive and expansive-compensatory traits, as well as those driving without permission. Prognostic criteria as to the further course of the disease are paramount for the assessment of qualification for the licence. The following rules have proved their worth: 2 years freedom from seizures (with or without therapy), no abnormalities specific for epilepsy in the EEG, no serious mental changes, regular medical supervision and treatment mus be guaranteed. Departures from these rules should be confined to exceptional cases with the consent of a physician specialized in epileptology. The same holds for admission to higher categories of driving licence, the only practical eventuality being category D (lorries), and even this only in

  6. [Influence of coadministered antiepileptic drugs on serum antiepileptic drug concentrations in epileptic patients -quantitative analysis based on suitable transforming factor].

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Noriyasu

    2004-07-01

    We conducted a study to clarify the most suitable transforming factor related to the daily dose of antiepileptic drugs (D) providing a steady-state serum concentration (C(t)) and analyzed the influences of the concomitant use of antiepileptic drugs on C(t) quantitatively. Data obtained by routine therapeutic drug monitoring from epileptic patients treated with the multiple oral administration of valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), zonisamide (ZNS), phenobarbital (PB), and phenytoin (PHT) were used for the analysis. Employing the ideal body weight or the extracellular water volume as a transforming factor, allowed the level/dose (L/D) ratio to be independent of the patient's age and gender for monotherapy with VPA or CBZ, ZNS, PB, and PHT, respectively. Each C(t) was revealed to be dependent on only one variable in terms of the transformed daily dose (D'). C(t) was proportional to the power function of D' for VPA and CBZ and was linearly proportional to D' for ZNS and PB. The L/D ratio is expressed as a linear function of C(t) for PHT. For a detailed analysis of the influences of the coadministered antiepileptic drugs, we defined the parameter as an alteration ratio, representing the influence of each antiepileptic drug on the C(t) of VPA and CBZ alone, and on the L/D ratio of ZNS and PB alone, respectively. A model based on the assumption that each value of an alteration ratio was independent from one other and multiplicative for VPA, CBZ, and ZNS, and that the coadministered drug inhibited the drug-metabolizing enzyme competitively for PB, was adopted. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic model was adopted for PHT. The analysis clarified that CBZ, PB, and PHT significantly lowered (P<0.05) C(t) to 0.81, 0.88, and 0.83 compared with the value of VPA alone, that PB and PHT significantly lowered C(t) to 0.77 and 0.71 compared with the value of CBZ alone, and that VPA, CBZ, PB, and PHT significantly lowered the L/D ratio of ZNS alone to 0.87, 0.85, 0.85, and 0

  7. Two Patients Diagnosed with Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy by First-Ever Status Epilepticus in Adult Life

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hye Seon; Moon, Jeong Soo; Oh, Eung Seok; Kim, Jae Moon

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is an idiopathic, age-related generalized epileptic syndrome. Status epilepticus (SE) in JME is very rare, and little is known about its etiology. We report 2 cases of adult patients, retrospectively diagnosed as JME by non convulsive status epilepticus which occurred for the first time. One patient was a 52-year-old woman who was presented with confusion and brief generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS) for the first time. The other patient, a 39 year-old woman, visited the ER with transient LOC following confused mental state. Electroencephalograms of both patients repetitively showed generalized polyspikes and slow waves which were disappeared after IV injection of lorazepam. With careful history taking, both of them the patients were diagnosed as JME, and the seizures stopped just after sodium valproate medication. NCSE in patients with JME is rare but detailed history taking and suspicion of the disorder is helpful for diagnosis. PMID:24649443

  8. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-05-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character. PMID:26575850

  10. Domoic acid epileptic disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, John S; Gulland, Frances M

    2014-03-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  11. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Gulland, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  12. Assessment of quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkhute, Sonali A.; Bajait, Chaitali S.; Dakhale, Ganesh N.; Sontakke, Smita D.; Jaiswal, Kavita M.; Kinge, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Health-related quality of life (QOL) is an important outcome in epilepsy treatment. Very few studies have been carried out on the quality of life in epilepsy (QOLIE-31) in India. The present study aimed to determine the level of health-related QOLIE-31 in patients of epilepsy. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Respondents were adults aged at least 18-year-old with a diagnosis of epilepsy. QOLIE-31 was used for collecting data on health-related QOL. The unpaired t-test or one-way analysis of variance was used to compare means of QOL scores between groups. Results: Totally, 60 patients of epilepsy were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation) total score of QOLIE-31 was 64.61. A score of cognitive and medication effect were significantly better in carbamazepine group as compared to valproate group. Conclusions: Patients on monotherapy had a better QOL as compared to patients receiving polytherapy. PMID:26600647

  13. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome. PMID:27222793

  14. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  15. Intractable epileptic spasms in a patient with Pontocerebellar hypoplasia: Severe phenotype of type 2 or another subtype?

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Debopam; Willis, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) involves a diverse range of etiologies including a group of single gene disorders. Mutations in the tRNA splicing endonuclease complex (TSEN) 54 gene can be responsible for PCH type 2, 4 and 5. The more common and less severe PCH 2 phenotype is caused by homozygosity for the common missense mutation A307S, while the severe phenotype seen in type 4 and 5 is caused by compound heterozygosity of the A307S mutation along with a nonsense or splice site mutation. Report: We report a 4- month-old girl who presented with epileptic spasms that remained intractable to several antiepileptic medications. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain showed fairly severe hypoplasia with superimposed atrophy of the cerebellum and brainstem with prominent extra-axial fluid spaces. Extensive metabolic testing was negative. Commercial testing for PCH via TSEN54 gene revealed missense mutation of Ala307Ser. A novel sequence variant, designated c.17_40 del, was also found and was predictive of an in-frame deletion of eight amino acids. Follow-up over 2 years revealed intractable epileptic spasms, progressive microcephaly and development of prominent choreoathetosis. Conclusion: This case report describes a rare case of PCH with overlapping features of the less severe PCH2 and the more severe PCH4/5 phenotype. It also adds another new entity in the list of genetic conditions where West syndrome and pontocerebellar hypoplasia can be seen together, emphasizing the need for further investigations of the genotype-phenotype correlation of mutations in order to advance our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanism in these rare conditions. PMID:27570394

  16. Design considerations for adult patient education.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P L

    1982-01-01

    A variety of factors require attention in the design of patient education programs for adults. Andragogy, the art and science of helping adults learn, describes certain conditions of learning that are more conducive to growth and development for adults and prescribes practices in the learning-teaching transaction to meet them. Stigma, a special discrepancy between virtual and actual social identity, reduces a patient's self-esteem and fosters a feeling of dependence on others for care. Anxiety related to diagnosis and illness creates a situation in which patients cannot productively learn. The stages in acceptance of diagnosis provide a roadmap for understanding a patient's feelings/psychological processes and insight into opportunities to intervene with patient education. The specific disease a patient has effects his ability to learn. Each of these factors is considered with implications described for designing and implementing patient education activities for adults. PMID:10258421

  17. Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes and waves in the occipito-temporal region during slow-wave sleep in two patients with acquired Kanji dysgraphia.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Ichiro; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Okazaki, Shin; Ikeda, Hiroko; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka

    2014-12-01

    We encountered two patients with acquired Kanji dysgraphia in whom continuous spikes and waves, dominant in the occipito-temporal region, were recorded during slow-wave sleep. Electrical status epileptics during sleep (ESES) was demonstrated on overnight electroencephalography, and dipoles clustered in and around the posterior inferior temporal cortex on magnetoencephalography. Functional neuroimaging suggested dysfunction in the left posterior temporal lobe, including the posterior inferior temporal cortex. The patients had normal intelligence with no problems in reading and writing Kana, as well as copying, reading aloud, and identifying Kanjis, but showed Kanji dysgraphia (morphological, phonemic, and semantic error) accompanied by impaired visual processing. ESES was resolved by sodium valproate, clonazepam, and acetazolamide in Patient 1, and by adrenocorticotropic hormone, sodium valproate, and clorazepate in Patient 2. The present cases had the unique cognitive dysfunction of Kanji dysgraphia, which is distinct from that of Landau-Kleffner syndrome and continuous spikes and waves during slow-wave sleep. However, the present cases also share common features with these two encephalopathies in terms of the clinical course, pathophysiology, neuroimaging, and response to steroids and antiepileptic drugs. In the context of the Japanese language, acquired Kanji dysgraphia may occur due to electrical dysfunction of left posterior inferior temporal cortex in patients with ESES. PMID:25333864

  18. [Unusual dreams in epileptics].

    PubMed

    Boldyrev, A I

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses bizarre dreams characteristic of epileptics and never occurring in normal subjects which have an important practical implication especially for early detection of epilepsy and the prevention of severe forms of the disease. This group of dreams includes vivid nightmares with vital fear, dreams not infrequently transforming into pro-dream states; persistently repeated stereotyped dreams and dreams with invariably the same unpleasant sensations representing an isolated aura of subsequent epileptic attacks. Diagnostically important may also be dreams with the symptoms of derealization and depersonalization, vague dream images and the deja vu phenomenon. PMID:6464602

  19. [Civil and criminal responsibility of epileptics].

    PubMed

    Villanueva, F

    1997-03-01

    Since the new Penal Code has come into force, certain sections have been altered, such as those dealing with exculpatory circumstances, and as specialists treating patients with possible mental changes, we should be aware that section 20 now takes the place of the former section 8. The situation of the epileptic with regard to civil and criminal responsibility, has hardly changed. This is not surprising in view of current clinico-therapeutic knowledge. Epileptic patients are legally able to testify, inherit etc. and also have the obligation to compensate for damage they have caused. An attempt is made to define the immunity from prosecution of epileptics in accordance with non-static criteria, and to use a mixed biological-mental formula, which would make it possible to discover whether there was an alteration or anomaly of mental state at the time of the criminal offence, which would mean that the patient was unable to understand the unlawfulness of his action, or to act in accordance with such understanding. The deed itself is considered, without labelling illnesses or persons, seeking a simple definition of immunity from prosecution. The epileptic is immune from prosecution during a full attack, whilst during the rest of the time each case has to be decided individually. We emphasize the necessity of 'declassifying' epilepsy as a typical endogenous psychosis, which puts these patients into the group of the insane, although this term is no longer included in the new legal code. PMID:9147782

  20. Hospital Patients Are Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffarella, Rosemary S.

    Patient education is recognized by health care providers and patients themselves as an important component of adequate health care for hospital patients. Through this informational process, patients receive information about specific health problems, learn the necessary competencies to deal with them, and develop accepting attitudes toward the…

  1. Spread of epileptic activity in human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, John

    1997-03-01

    For many patients with medically refractory epilepsy surgical resection of the site of seizure onset (epileptic focus) offers the best hope for cure. Determination of the nature of seizure propagation should lead to improved methods for locating the epileptic focus (and hence reduce patient morbidity) and possibly to new treatment modalities directed at blocking seizure spread. Theoretical studies of neural networks emphasize the role of traveling waves for the propagation of activity. However, the nature of seizure propagation in human brain remains poorly characterized. The spread of epileptic activity in patients undergoing presurgical evaluation for epilepsy surgery was measured by placing subdural grids of electrodes (interelectrode spacings of 3-10 mm) over the frontal and temporal lobes. The exact location of each electrode relative to the surface of the brain was determined using 3--D MRI imaging techniques. Thus it is possible to monitor the spread of epileptic activity in both space and time. The observations are discussed in light of models for seizure propagation.

  2. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis. PMID:26857767

  3. Using patient-specific hemodynamic response function in epileptic spike analysis of human epilepsy: a study based on EEG-fNIRS.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ke; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Vannasing, Phetsamone; Tremblay, Julie; Lesage, Frédéric; Pouliot, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be combined with electroencephalography (EEG) to continuously monitor the hemodynamic signal evoked by epileptic events such as seizures or interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs, aka spikes). As estimation methods assuming a canonical shape of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) might not be optimal, we sought to model patient-specific HRF (sHRF) with a simple deconvolution approach for IED-related analysis with EEG-fNIRS data. Furthermore, a quadratic term was added to the model to account for the nonlinearity in the response when IEDs are frequent. Prior to analyzing clinical data, simulations were carried out to show that the HRF was estimable by the proposed deconvolution methods under proper conditions. EEG-fNIRS data of five patients with refractory focal epilepsy were selected due to the presence of frequent clear IEDs and their unambiguous focus localization. For each patient, both the linear sHRF and the nonlinear sHRF were estimated at each channel. Variability of the estimated sHRFs was seen across brain regions and different patients. Compared with the SPM8 canonical HRF (cHRF), including these sHRFs in the general linear model (GLM) analysis led to hemoglobin activations with higher statistical scores as well as larger spatial extents on all five patients. In particular, for patients with frequent IEDs, nonlinear sHRFs were seen to provide higher sensitivity in activation detection than linear sHRFs. These observations support using sHRFs in the analysis of IEDs with EEG-fNIRS data. PMID:26619785

  4. Epileptic encephalopathies: Optimizing seizure control and developmental outcome.

    PubMed

    Jehi, Lara; Wyllie, Elaine; Devinsky, Orrin

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive and developmental outcomes in patients with epileptic encephalopathy are hypothesized to result from an interplay between the underlying epileptic pathologic substrate and the acquired consequences of frequent and repetitive seizures and epileptiform discharges that often straddle the interictal and ictal boundaries. This article briefly reviews the evidence related to this assumption, presents critical questions that need to be answered to clarify this relationship, and advances a set of concrete steps that may help improve developmental patient outcomes. PMID:26293588

  5. Treatment of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    McTague, Amy; Cross, J Helen

    2013-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is defined as a condition where the epileptic activity itself may contribute to the severe neurological and cognitive impairment seen, over and above that which would be expected from the underlying pathology alone. The epilepsy syndromes at high risk of this are a disparate group of conditions characterized by epileptic seizures that are difficult to treat and developmental delay. In this review, we discuss the ongoing debate regarding the significance of inter-ictal discharges and the impact of the seizures themselves on the cognitive delay or regression that is a common feature of these syndromes. The syndromes also differ in many ways and we provide a summary of the key features of the early-onset epileptic encephalopathies including Ohtahara and West syndromes in addition to later childhood-onset syndromes such as Lennox Gastaut and Doose syndromes. An understanding of the various severe epilepsy syndromes is vital to understanding the rationale for treatment. For example, the resolution of hypsarrhythmia in West syndrome is associated with an improvement in cognitive outcome and drives treatment choice, but the same cannot be applied to frequent inter-ictal discharges in Lennox Gastaut syndrome. We discuss the evidence base for treatment where it is available and describe current practice where it is not. For example, in West syndrome there is some evidence for preference of hormonal treatments over vigabatrin, although the choice and duration of hormonal treatment remains unclear. We describe the use of conventional and newer anti-epileptic medications in the various syndromes and discuss which medications should be avoided. Older possibly forgotten treatments such as sulthiame and potassium bromide also have a role in the severe epilepsies of childhood. We discuss hormonal treatment with particular focus on the treatment of West syndrome, continuous spike wave in slow wave sleep (CSWS)/electrical status epilepticus in slow wave

  6. Sleep Disorders in Adult Sickle Cell Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Efird, Jimmy T.; Knupp, Charles; Kadali, Renuka; Liles, Darla; Shiue, Kristin; Boettger, Peter; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: While sleep apnea has been studied in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), little is known about sleep disorders in adult sickle cell patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate sleep disordered breathing and its polysomnographic characteristics in adult patients with sickle cell disease. Methods: The analysis cohort included 32 consecutive adult SCD patients who underwent a comprehensive sleep evaluation and overnight polysomnography in an accredited sleep center after reporting symptoms suggesting disordered sleep or an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score ≥ 10. Epworth score, sleep parameters, comorbid conditions, and narcotic use were reviewed and compared in patients with and without sleep disordered breathing. SCD complication rates in the two groups also were compared. Results: In adult SCD patients who underwent overnight polysomnography, we report a high prevalence (44%) of sleep disordered breathing. Disease severity was mild to moderate (mean apnea-hypopnea index = 17/h (95% CI: 10–24/h). Concomitant sleep disorders, including insomnia complaints (57%) and delayed sleep-phase syndrome (57%), also were common in this population. In this limited cohort, we did not find increased SCD complications associated with sleep disordered breathing in adult patients with sickle cell disease. Conclusions: A high burden of sleep disordered breathing and other sleep-related complaints were identified in the adult sickle cell population. Our results provide important information on this unique population. Citation: Sharma S, Efird JT, Knupp C, Kadali R, Liles D, Shiue K, Boettger P, Quan SF. Sleep disorders in adult sickle cell patients. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):219–223. PMID:25515282

  7. SCN1A and SCN1B gene polymorphisms and their association with plasma concentrations of carbamazepine and carbamazepine 10, 11 epoxide in Iranian epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Soha; Azarpira, Negar; Javidnia, Katayoon; Emami, Mehrdad; Rahjoo, Rahimeh; Berahmand, Razieh; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Objective (s): From a genetic point of view, epilepsy is a polygenic multifactorial syndrome. The SCN1A and B genes belong to a family of genes that provide instructions for making sodium channels. Understanding the relevance of SCN1A and SCN1B gene polymorphisms to plasma concentration of carbamazepine (CBZ) and ’its active metabolite carbamazepine 10, 11 epoxide (CBZE), may shed more light on inter-individual variations in response to CBZ. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, genotype distribution and allele frequency of six non-synonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the SCN1A and B genes were selected and determined using PCR-RFLP in 70 epileptic patients treated with CBZ for at least 6 months. The patients had no hepatic or renal diseases and received no medications known to have a major interaction with CBZ. Serum concentrations of CBZ and CBZE were measured using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Results: The AA, AG and GG alleles of SCN1A were found in 23, 37 and 10 patients, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean (± standard deviation) of plasma concentrations of CBZ (P=0.8) and CBZE (P=0.1) among these 3 groups. Likewise, there was no statistically significant relationship between SCN1A polymorphisms and CBZ concentration/dose ratio (P=0.7). A significant association was found between CBZ plasma level and CBZ concentration/dose with CBZ daily dose. All patients had the same genotype of SCN1B gene(CC). and no statistical analysis was performed. Conclusion: No significant association between SCN1A gene polymorphisms and plasma levels of CBZ and CBZE were found[u1]. PMID:26877851

  8. [An epileptic syndrome in infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Sumerkina, M L

    1997-01-01

    The results of examination of 102 patients with infantile cerebral paralysis (ICP) with epileptic syndrome (ES) at the age from 3 months to 14 years are presented. Epileptic fits predominated in patients with hemiparetic form of ICP (40.8%) and spastic diplegia (32.4%). ES manifestations were observed in ICP during the first 3 years of life (more than 80% of cases). The peculiarities of ES clinical course were revealed. There were determined the main types of seizures in patients with ICP which depended on age of their manifestation, as well as their further transformation and prognosis. Computer tomographic and EEG-correlations were established in different forms of ICP. They permitted to revealed pathogenetic mechanisms of ES development in patients with ICP and to determine therapeutic policy and prognosis of the disease. PMID:9163254

  9. The diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuyk, J; Leijten, F; Meinardi, H; Spinhoven; Van Dyck, R

    1997-08-01

    Diagnosing psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is a clinical challenge. There is neither a standard in diagnosing PNES nor a comprehensive theoretical framework for this type of seizure. The diagnosis of PNES must be made by excluding epilepsy. However, epilepsy cannot always be determined and PNES and epileptic seizures may coexist. In this study, the characteristics of PNES and patients are discussed. The diagnosis of PNES and epileptic seizures was facilitated by the simultaneous recording of seizures on video tape and EEG. Seizure provoking techniques, hormonal indices, and psychological methods were also used. The benefits and limitations of these techniques are discussed and proposals are made for clinical guidelines. PMID:9304716

  10. A 1.83 μJ/Classification, 8-Channel, Patient-Specific Epileptic Seizure Classification SoC Using a Non-Linear Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Bin Altaf, Muhammad Awais; Yoo, Jerald

    2016-02-01

    A non-linear support vector machine (NLSVM) seizure classification SoC with 8-channel EEG data acquisition and storage for epileptic patients is presented. The proposed SoC is the first work in literature that integrates a feature extraction (FE) engine, patient specific hardware-efficient NLSVM classification engine, 96 KB SRAM for EEG data storage and low-noise, high dynamic range readout circuits. To achieve on-chip integration of the NLSVM classification engine with minimum area and energy consumption, the FE engine utilizes time division multiplexing (TDM)-BPF architecture. The implemented log-linear Gaussian basis function (LL-GBF) NLSVM classifier exploits the linearization to achieve energy consumption of 0.39 μ J/operation and reduces the area by 28.2% compared to conventional GBF implementation. The readout circuits incorporate a chopper-stabilized DC servo loop to minimize the noise level elevation and achieve noise RTI of 0.81 μ Vrms for 0.5-100 Hz bandwidth with an NEF of 4.0. The 5 × 5 mm (2) SoC is implemented in a 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process consuming 1.83 μ J/classification for 8-channel operation. SoC verification has been done with the Children's Hospital Boston-MIT EEG database, as well as with a specific rapid eye-blink pattern detection test, which results in an average detection rate, average false alarm rate and latency of 95.1%, 0.94% (0.27 false alarms/hour) and 2 s, respectively. PMID:25700471

  11. Two types of isolated epileptic nystagmus: case report

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yunfeng; Wang, Juan; Li, Desheng; Lang, Senyang

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic nystagmus (EN) is a quick, repetitive jerky movement of the eyeball caused by seizure activity, unaccompanied by other ictal phenomena rare. Here, we described two cases, one characterized by binocular and the other by monocular isolated epileptic nystagmus (IEN), and we identified the characteristics of the etiology, clinical manifestations, electroencephalogram, imaging, treatment and prognosis in epileptic nystagmus through reviewing literature. We found IEN occurs more frequently in children than in adults. Etiological factors included trauma, cerebral vascular disease, tumor, and anoxia. The frequency of IEN was high, which varied from several to hundreds of times per day, and the duration of it was usually less than 1 minute. EN and its subtypes, such as epileptic monocular nystagmus, vertical epileptic nystagmus, epileptic skew deviation, periodic alternating nystagmus, and partial oculo-clonic status, are rare. The fast phase of the nystagmus was contralateral to the epileptogenic zone in most cases. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) is a distinct EEG pattern in EN. Our findings suggested that the occipital lobe may plays a key role in the origin of EN. PMID:26550287

  12. Cortical GABAergic excitation contributes to epileptic activities around human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Cresto, Noemie; Baulac, Michel; Duyckaerts, Charles; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chazal, Geneviève; Devaux, Bertrand; Rivera, Claudio; Miles, Richard; Capelle, Laurent; Huberfeld, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Diffuse brain gliomas induce seizures in a majority of patients. As in most epileptic disorders, excitatory glutamatergic mechanisms are involved in the generation of epileptic activities in the neocortex surrounding gliomas. However, chloride homeostasis is known to be perturbed in glial tumor cells. Thus the contribution of GABAergic mechanisms which depend on intracellular chloride and which are defective or pro-epileptic in other structural epilepsies merits closer study. Objective We studied in neocortical slices from the peritumoral security margin resected around human brain gliomas, the occurrence, networks, cells and signaling basis of epileptic activities. Results Postoperative glioma tissue from 69% of patients spontaneously generated interictal-like discharges. These events were synchronized, with a high frequency oscillation signature, in superficial layers of neocortex around glioma areas with tumor infiltration. Interictal-like events depended on both glutamatergic transmission and on depolarizing GABAergic signaling. About 65% of pyramidal cells were depolarized by GABA released by interneurons. This effect was related to perturbations in Chloride homeostasis, due to changes in expression of chloride co-transporters: KCC2 was reduced and expression of NKCC1 increased. Ictal-like activities were initiated by convulsant stimuli exclusively in these epileptogenic areas. Conclusions Epileptic activities are sustained by excitatory effects of GABA in the peritumoral human neocortex, as in temporal lobe epilepsies. Glutamate and GABA signaling are involved in oncogenesis and chloride homeostasis is perturbed. These same factors, induce an imbalance between synaptic excitatory and inhibition underly epileptic discharges in tumor patients. PMID:25009229

  13. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  14. Localization Accuracy of Distributed Inverse Solutions for Electric and Magnetic Source Imaging of Interictal Epileptic Discharges in Patients with Focal Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Heers, Marcel; Chowdhury, Rasheda A; Hedrich, Tanguy; Dubeau, François; Hall, Jeffery A; Lina, Jean-Marc; Grova, Christophe; Kobayashi, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Distributed inverse solutions aim to realistically reconstruct the origin of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) from noninvasively recorded electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. Our aim was to compare the performance of different distributed inverse solutions in localizing IEDs: coherent maximum entropy on the mean (cMEM), hierarchical Bayesian implementations of independent identically distributed sources (IID, minimum norm prior) and spatially coherent sources (COH, spatial smoothness prior). Source maxima (i.e., the vertex with the maximum source amplitude) of IEDs in 14 EEG and 19 MEG studies from 15 patients with focal epilepsy were analyzed. We visually compared their concordance with intracranial EEG (iEEG) based on 17 cortical regions of interest and their spatial dispersion around source maxima. Magnetic source imaging (MSI) maxima from cMEM were most often confirmed by iEEG (cMEM: 14/19, COH: 9/19, IID: 8/19 studies). COH electric source imaging (ESI) maxima co-localized best with iEEG (cMEM: 8/14, COH: 11/14, IID: 10/14 studies). In addition, cMEM was less spatially spread than COH and IID for ESI and MSI (p < 0.001 Bonferroni-corrected post hoc t test). Highest positive predictive values for cortical regions with IEDs in iEEG could be obtained with cMEM for MSI and with COH for ESI. Additional realistic EEG/MEG simulations confirmed our findings. Accurate spatially extended sources, as found in cMEM (ESI and MSI) and COH (ESI) are desirable for source imaging of IEDs because this might influence surgical decision. Our simulations suggest that COH and IID overestimate the spatial extent of the generators compared to cMEM. PMID:25609211

  15. Interictal SPECT in the presurgical evaluation in epileptic patients with normal MRI or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Lucia H N; Ferraz-Filho, José R L; Lins-Filho, Mário L M; Maciel, Marina G; Yoshitake, Rafael; Filetti, Sarah V

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of interictal compared to ictal SPECT in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients that present with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Thirty patients with TLE, for whom MRI examinations were normal or who presented with bilateral MTS, were retrospectively studied. Using a confidence interval of 95% and a level of significance for p-value <0.05, an estimated agreement rate of 73% with a minimum agreement rate of 57% was calculated comparing interictal and ictal SPECTs. In conclusion the interictal SPECT is only useful when associated with the ictal SPECT and does not substitute it in the localization of epileptogenic areas in patients with normal MRI or bilateral MTS. PMID:19722041

  16. Convulsive Syncope Induced by Ventricular Arrhythmia Masquerading as Epileptic Seizures: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sabu, John; Regeti, Kalyani; Mallappallil, Mary; Kassotis, John; Islam, Hamidul; Zafar, Shoaib; Khan, Rafay; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Kanta, Romana; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla; Nai, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    It is important but difficult to distinguish convulsive syncope from epileptic seizure in many patients. We report a case of a man who presented to emergency department after several witnessed seizure-like episodes. He had a previous medical history of systolic heart failure and automated implantable converter defibrillator (AICD) in situ. The differential diagnoses raised were epileptic seizures and convulsive syncope secondary to cardiac arrhythmia. Subsequent AICD interrogation revealed ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (v-tach/fib). Since convulsive syncope and epileptic seizure share many similar clinical features, early diagnosis is critical for choosing the appropriate management and preventing sudden cardiac death in patients with presumed epileptic seizure. PMID:27429683

  17. Convulsive Syncope Induced by Ventricular Arrhythmia Masquerading as Epileptic Seizures: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sabu, John; Regeti, Kalyani; Mallappallil, Mary; Kassotis, John; Islam, Hamidul; Zafar, Shoaib; Khan, Rafay; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Kanta, Romana; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla; Nai, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    It is important but difficult to distinguish convulsive syncope from epileptic seizure in many patients. We report a case of a man who presented to emergency department after several witnessed seizure-like episodes. He had a previous medical history of systolic heart failure and automated implantable converter defibrillator (AICD) in situ. The differential diagnoses raised were epileptic seizures and convulsive syncope secondary to cardiac arrhythmia. Subsequent AICD interrogation revealed ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (v-tach/fib). Since convulsive syncope and epileptic seizure share many similar clinical features, early diagnosis is critical for choosing the appropriate management and preventing sudden cardiac death in patients with presumed epileptic seizure. PMID:27429683

  18. Constrained fixed-fulcrum reverse shoulder arthroplasty improves functional outcome in epileptic patients with recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Higgs, Deborah; Bayley, J I L; Lambert, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted at a single facility. Cases were identified using a computerized database and all clinic notes and operative reports were reviewed. All patients with epilepsy and recurrent shoulder instability were included for study. Between July 2003 and August 2011 five shoulders in five consecutive patients with epilepsy underwent fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The mean duration of epilepsy in the cohort was 21 years (range, 5-51) and all patients suffered from grand mal seizures. RESULTS: Mean age at the time of surgery was 47 years (range, 32-64). The cohort consisted of four males and one female. Mean follow-up was 4.7 years (range, 4.3-5 years). There were no further episodes of instability, and no further stabilisation or revision procedures were performed. The mean Oxford shoulder instability score improved from 8 preoperatively (range, 5-15) to 30 postoperatively (range, 16-37) (P = 0.015) and the mean subjective shoulder value improved from 20 (range, 0-50) preoperatively to 60 (range, 50-70) postoperatively (P = 0.016). Mean active forward elevation improved from 71° preoperatively (range, 45°-130°) to 100° postoperatively (range, 80°-90°) and mean active external rotation improved from 15° preoperatively (range, 0°-30°) to 40° (20°-70°) postoperatively. No cases of scapular notching or loosening were noted. CONCLUSION: Fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty should be considered for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. PMID:27458554

  19. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew S; Berkovic, Samuel F; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E; Epstein, Michael P; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B; Johnson, Michael R; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R Z; Marson, Anthony G; Mefford, Heather C; Esmaeeli Nieh, Sahar; O'Brien, Terence J; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Sherr, Elliott H; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K; Bautista, Jocelyn F; Berkovic, Samuel F; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E; Knowlton, Robert C; Kossoff, Eric H; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; McGuire, Shannon M; Motika, Paul V; Novotny, Edward J; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M; Parent, Jack M; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sherr, Elliott H; Shih, Jerry J; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C; Sullivan, Joseph; Lin Thio, Liu; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P G; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Weisenberg, Judith L; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R

    2013-09-12

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown. Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115). We sequenced the exomes of 264 probands, and their parents, and confirmed 329 de novo mutations. A likelihood analysis showed a significant excess of de novo mutations in the ∼4,000 genes that are the most intolerant to functional genetic variation in the human population (P = 2.9 × 10(-3)). Among these are GABRB3, with de novo mutations in four patients, and ALG13, with the same de novo mutation in two patients; both genes show clear statistical evidence of association with epileptic encephalopathy. Given the relevant site-specific mutation rates, the probabilities of these outcomes occurring by chance are P = 4.1 × 10(-10) and P = 7.8 × 10(-12), respectively. Other genes with de novo mutations in this cohort include CACNA1A, CHD2, FLNA, GABRA1, GRIN1, GRIN2B, HNRNPU, IQSEC2, MTOR and NEDD4L. Finally, we show that the de novo mutations observed are enriched in specific gene sets including genes regulated by the fragile X protein (P < 10(-8)), as has been reported previously for autism spectrum disorders. PMID:23934111

  20. Toward Epileptic Brain Region Detection Based on Magnetic Nanoparticle Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Pedram, Maysam Z.; Shamloo, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the epilepsy foci is the best treatment for more than 15% of epileptic patients or 50% of patients who are refractory to all forms of medical treatment. Accurate mapping of the locations of epileptic neuronal networks can result in the complete resection of epileptic foci. Even though currently electroencephalography is the best technique for mapping the epileptic focus, it cannot define the boundary of epilepsy that accurately. Herein we put forward a new accurate brain mapping technique using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs). The main hypothesis in this new approach is the creation of super-paramagnetic aggregates in the epileptic foci due to high electrical and magnetic activities. These aggregates may improve tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that results in improving the resection of epileptic foci. In this paper, we present the mathematical models before discussing the simulation results. Furthermore, we mimic the aggregation of SPMNs in a weak magnetic field using a low-cost microfabricated device. Based on these results, the SPMNs may play a crucial role in diagnostic epilepsy and the subsequent treatment of this disease. PMID:26402686

  1. Toward Epileptic Brain Region Detection Based on Magnetic Nanoparticle Patterning.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Maysam Z; Shamloo, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the epilepsy foci is the best treatment for more than 15% of epileptic patients or 50% of patients who are refractory to all forms of medical treatment. Accurate mapping of the locations of epileptic neuronal networks can result in the complete resection of epileptic foci. Even though currently electroencephalography is the best technique for mapping the epileptic focus, it cannot define the boundary of epilepsy that accurately. Herein we put forward a new accurate brain mapping technique using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs). The main hypothesis in this new approach is the creation of super-paramagnetic aggregates in the epileptic foci due to high electrical and magnetic activities. These aggregates may improve tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that results in improving the resection of epileptic foci. In this paper, we present the mathematical models before discussing the simulation results. Furthermore, we mimic the aggregation of SPMNs in a weak magnetic field using a low-cost microfabricated device. Based on these results, the SPMNs may play a crucial role in diagnostic epilepsy and the subsequent treatment of this disease. PMID:26402686

  2. Resetting of Brain Dynamics: Epileptic versus Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Balu; Faith, Aaron; Vlachos, Ioannis; Roth, Austin; Williams, Korwyn; Noe, Katie; Drazkowski, Joe; Tapsell, Lisa; Sirven, Joseph; Iasemidis, Leon

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the possibility of differential diagnosis of patients with epileptic seizures (ES) and patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) by an advanced analysis of dynamics of the patients' scalp electroencephalograms (EEG). The underlying principle was the presence of resetting of brain's pre-ictal spatiotemporal entrainment following onset of ES and the absence of resetting following PNES. Long-term (days) scalp EEGs recorded from five ES and six PNES patients were analyzed. It was found that: (a) Pre-ictal entrainment of brain sites was reset by epileptic seizures (p<0.05) in 4 out of the 5 patients with ES, and not reset (p=0.28) in the fifth patient. (b) Resetting did not occur (p>0.1) in any of the 6 patients with PNES. These preliminary results in patients with ES are in agreement with our previous findings from intracranial EEG recordings on resetting of brain dynamics at ES and it is expected to constitute the basis for the development of a reliable and supporting tool in the differential diagnosis between ES and PNES. Finally, we believe that these results shed a novel light on the electrophysiology of psychogenic epilepsy by showing that occurrence of PNES does not assist patients to overcome a pathological entrainment of brain dynamics. PMID:22078523

  3. Correlation Between IL-10 and microRNA-187 Expression in Epileptic Rat Hippocampus and Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Alsharafi, Walid A.; Xiao, Bo; Abuhamed, Mutasem M.; Bi, Fang-Fang; Luo, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence is emerging that microRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators in controlling neuroinflammatory responses that are known to play a potential role in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of the present study was to investigate the dynamic expression pattern of interleukin (IL)-10 as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and miR-187 as a post-transcriptional inflammation-related miRNA in the hippocampus of a rat model of status epilepticus (SE) and patients with TLE. We performed a real-time quantitative PCR and western blot on rat hippocampus 2 h, 7 days, 21 days and 60 days following pilocarpine-induced SE, and on hippocampus obtained from TLE patients and normal controls. To detect the relationship between IL-10 and miR-187 on neurons, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IL-10-stimulated neurons were performed. Furthermore, we identified the effect of antagonizing miR-187 by its antagomir on IL-10 secretion. Here, we reported that IL-10 secretion and miR-187 expression levels are inversely correlated after SE. In patients with TLE, the expression of IL-10 was also significantly upregulated, whereas miR-187 expression was significantly downregulated. Moreover, miR-187 expression was significantly reduced following IL-10 stimulation in an IL-10–dependent manner. On the other hand, antagonizing miR-187 promoted the production of IL-10 in hippocampal tissues of rat model of SE. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of miR-187 in the physiological regulation of IL-10 anti-inflammatory responses and elucidate the role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of TLE. Therefore, modulation of the IL-10 / miR-187 axis may be a new therapeutic approach for TLE. PMID:26696826

  4. [Difficult situations in radiotherapy: agitated adult patients].

    PubMed

    Noël, S; Noël, G

    2013-10-01

    The causes of agitation in adult patients are numerous. Agitation may cause difficulty or impossibility to initiate the radiotherapy technique but also can lead to accidents harmful to patients. However, the decision to not irradiate agitated patients may lead to a loss of curability chance or chance to palliate symptoms. Before taking such a decision, thinking about the possibilities available to calm the patient should be undertaken with the patient and the referring practitioners to attempt to make this therapy if it is considered major in the management of cancer. In all cases, current adaptations of radiotherapy should be used to deliver an effective radiation of a suitable time and safely. It is notable that the medical literature is extremely rare on this subject. PMID:23932645

  5. Occipital gamma-oscillations modulated during eye movement tasks: simultaneous eye tracking and electrocorticography recording in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Juhász, Csaba; Hanazawa, Akitoshi; Shah, Aashit; Mittal, Sandeep; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2011-10-15

    We determined the spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical gamma-oscillations modulated during eye movement tasks, using simultaneous eye tracking and intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG) recording. Patients with focal epilepsy were instructed to follow a target moving intermittently and unpredictably from one place to another either in an instantaneous or smooth fashion during extraoperative ECoG recording. Target motion elicited augmentation of gamma-oscillations in the lateral, inferior and polar occipital regions in addition to portions of parietal and frontal regions; subsequent voluntary eye movements elicited gamma-augmentation in the medial occipital region. Such occipital gamma-augmentations could not be explained by contaminations of ocular or myogenic artifacts. The degree of gamma-augmentation was generally larger during saccade compared to pursuit trials, while a portion of the polar occipital region showed pursuit-preferential gamma-augmentations. In addition to the aforementioned eye movement task, patients were asked to read a single word popping up on the screen. Gamma-augmentation was elicited in widespread occipital regions following word presentation, while gamma-augmentation in the anterior portion of the medial occipital region was elicited by an involuntary saccade following word presentation rather than word presentation itself. Gamma-augmentation in the lateral, inferior and polar occipital regions can be explained by increased attention to a moving target, whereas gamma-augmentation in the anterior-medial occipital region may be elicited by images in the peripheral field realigned following saccades. In functional studies comparing brain activation between two tasks, eye movement patterns during tasks may need to be considered as confounding factors. PMID:21816225

  6. In vivo detection of epileptic brain tissue using static fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Nitin; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Ragheb, John; Mehta, Rupal; Jayakar, Prasanna; Yong, William; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to detect histopathological abnormalities of an epileptic brain in a human subject study. Static diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra are acquired from normal and epileptic brain areas, defined by electrocorticography (ECoG), from pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Biopsy specimens are taken from the investigated sites within an abnormal brain. Spectral analysis reveals significant differences in diffuse reflectance spectra and the ratio of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra from normal and epileptic brain areas defined by ECoG and histology. Using these spectral differences, tissue classification models with accuracy above 80% are developed based on linear discriminant analysis. The differences between the diffuse reflectance spectra from the normal and epileptic brain areas observed in this study are attributed to alterations in the static hemodynamic characteristics of an epileptic brain, suggesting a unique association between the histopathological and the hemodynamic abnormalities in an epileptic brain.

  7. In vivo measurements of limbic glutamate and GABA concentrations in epileptic patients during affective and cognitive tasks: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert J; Gjini, Klevest; Modur, Pradeep; Meier, Kevin T; Nadasdy, Zoltan; Robinson, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Limbic system structures such as the amygdala (AMG) and the hippocampus (HIPP) are involved in affective and cognitive processing. However, because of the limitations in noninvasive technology, absolute concentrations of the neurotransmitters underlying limbic system engagement are not known. Here, we report changes in the concentrations of the neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the HIPP and the AMG of patients with nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing surgery for intracranial subdural and depth electrode implantation. We utilized an in-vivo microdialysis technique while subjects were engaged in cognitive tasks with or without emotional content. The performance of an emotion learning task (EmoLearn) was associated with a significant increase in the concentration of glutamate in the HIPP when images with high valence content were processed, as compared to its concentration while processing images with low valence. In addition, significantly decreased levels of glutamate were found in the AMG when images with predominantly low valence content were processed, as compared to its concentration at baseline. The processing of face stimuli with anger/fear content (FaceMatch task) was accompanied with significantly decreased concentrations of GABA in the AMG and HIPP compared to its levels at the baseline. The processing of shapes on the other hand was accompanied with a significantly decreased concentration of the glutamate in the AMG as well as in the HIPP compared to the baseline. Finally, the performance of a nondeclarative memory task (weather prediction task-WPT) was associated with relatively large and opposite changes in the GABA levels compared to the baseline in the AMG (decrease) and the HIPP (increase). These data are relevant for showing an involvement of the amygdala and the hippocampus in emotional processing and provide additional neurochemical clues towards a more refined model of the functional circuitry of the

  8. Clustering Approach to Quantify Long-Term Spatio-Temporal Interactions in Epileptic Intracranial Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Anant; Erdogmus, Deniz; Shiau, Deng S.; Principe, Jose C.; Sackellares, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    Abnormal dynamical coupling between brain structures is believed to be primarily responsible for the generation of epileptic seizures and their propagation. In this study, we attempt to identify the spatio-temporal interactions of an epileptic brain using a previously proposed nonlinear dependency measure. Using a clustering model, we determine the average spatial mappings in an epileptic brain at different stages of a complex partial seizure. Results involving 8 seizures from 2 epileptic patients suggest that there may be a fixed pattern associated with regional spatio-temporal dynamics during the interictal to pre-post-ictal transition. PMID:18317515

  9. [Genes Responsible for Epileptic Syndromes].

    PubMed

    Kato, Mitsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    The first causative gene for epileptic syndrome was revealed 20 years ago. Since then, many genes responsible for epileptic syndrome, particularly sporadic epileptic encephalopathies, such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, and focal cortical dysplasia, have been identified. Although epilepsy was recognized as a channelopathy in the beginning stages of gene discovery, other molecular mechanisms for epileptic syndromes, such as interneuronopathy, synaptic vesicle release, and mTOR signal transduction, are emerging. A new technique for gene analysis using the next-generation sequencer is now available for clinical purpose abroad and precision medicine based on the molecular mechanisms has started. Infrastructural development of the official framework, from molecular diagnosis to personalized therapy, is urgently required in Japan. PMID:26873236

  10. Polymorphic Variants of SCN1A and EPHX1 Influence Plasma Carbamazepine Concentration, Metabolism and Pharmacoresistance in a Population of Kosovar Albanian Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Daci, Armond; Beretta, Giangiacomo; Vllasaliu, Driton; Shala, Aida; Govori, Valbona; Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Krasniqi, Shaip

    2015-01-01

    Aim The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of gene variants in key genes influencing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic of carbamazepine (CBZ) on the response in patients with epilepsy. Materials & Methods Five SNPs in two candidate genes influencing CBZ transport and metabolism, namely ABCB1 or EPHX1, and CBZ response SCN1A (sodium channel) were genotyped in 145 epileptic patients treated with CBZ as monotherapy and 100 age and sex matched healthy controls. Plasma concentrations of CBZ, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide (CBZE) and carbamazepine-10,11-trans dihydrodiol (CBZD) were determined by HPLC-UV-DAD and adjusted for CBZ dosage/kg of body weight. Results The presence of the SCN1A IVS5-91G>A variant allele is associated with increased epilepsy susceptibility. Furthermore, carriers of the SCN1A IVS5-91G>A variant or of EPHX1 c.337T>C variant presented significantly lower levels of plasma CBZ compared to carriers of the common alleles (0.71±0.28 vs 1.11±0.69 μg/mL per mg/Kg for SCN1A IVS5-91 AA vs GG and 0.76±0.16 vs 0.94±0.49 μg/mL per mg/Kg for EPHX1 c.337 CC vs TT; P<0.05 for both). Carriers of the EPHX1 c.416A>G showed a reduced microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity as reflected by a significantly decreased ratio of CBZD to CBZ (0.13±0.08 to 0.26±0.17, p<0.05) also of CBZD to CBZE (1.74±1.06 to 3.08±2.90; P<0.05) and CDRCBZD (0.13±0.08 vs 0.24±0.19 μg/mL per mg/Kg; P<0.05). ABCB1 3455C>T SNP and SCN1A 3148A>G variants were not associated with significant changes in CBZ pharmacokinetic. Patients resistant to CBZ treatment showed increased dosage of CBZ (657±285 vs 489±231 mg/day; P<0.001) but also increased plasma levels of CBZ (9.84±4.37 vs 7.41±3.43 μg/mL; P<0.001) compared to patients responsive to CBZ treatment. CBZ resistance was not related to any of the SNPs investigated. Conclusions The SCN1A IVS5-91G>A SNP is associated with susceptibility to epilepsy. SNPs in EPHX1 gene are influencing CBZ metabolism and disposition. CBZ plasma

  11. A Novel Dynamic Update Framework for Epileptic Seizure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghui; Hong, Xiaojun; Han, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizure prediction is a difficult problem in clinical applications, and it has the potential to significantly improve the patients' daily lives whose seizures cannot be controlled by either drugs or surgery. However, most current studies of epileptic seizure prediction focus on high sensitivity and low false-positive rate only and lack the flexibility for a variety of epileptic seizures and patients' physical conditions. Therefore, a novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction is proposed in this paper. In this framework, two basic sample pools are constructed and updated dynamically. Furthermore, the prediction model can be updated to be the most appropriate one for the prediction of seizures' arrival. Mahalanobis distance is introduced in this part to solve the problem of side information, measuring the distance between two data sets. In addition, a multichannel feature extraction method based on Hilbert-Huang transform and extreme learning machine is utilized to extract the features of a patient's preseizure state against the normal state. At last, a dynamic update epileptic seizure prediction system is built up. Simulations on Freiburg database show that the proposed system has a better performance than the one without update. The research of this paper is significantly helpful for clinical applications, especially for the exploitation of online portable devices. PMID:25050381

  12. A novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction.

    PubMed

    Han, Min; Ge, Sunan; Wang, Minghui; Hong, Xiaojun; Han, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizure prediction is a difficult problem in clinical applications, and it has the potential to significantly improve the patients' daily lives whose seizures cannot be controlled by either drugs or surgery. However, most current studies of epileptic seizure prediction focus on high sensitivity and low false-positive rate only and lack the flexibility for a variety of epileptic seizures and patients' physical conditions. Therefore, a novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction is proposed in this paper. In this framework, two basic sample pools are constructed and updated dynamically. Furthermore, the prediction model can be updated to be the most appropriate one for the prediction of seizures' arrival. Mahalanobis distance is introduced in this part to solve the problem of side information, measuring the distance between two data sets. In addition, a multichannel feature extraction method based on Hilbert-Huang transform and extreme learning machine is utilized to extract the features of a patient's preseizure state against the normal state. At last, a dynamic update epileptic seizure prediction system is built up. Simulations on Freiburg database show that the proposed system has a better performance than the one without update. The research of this paper is significantly helpful for clinical applications, especially for the exploitation of online portable devices. PMID:25050381

  13. [Intracranial tumors and epileptic seizures: treatment principles].

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2016-04-27

    Epileptic seizures represent a relatively frequent issue in patients with intracranial neoplasms, and very frequently imply the start of an antiepileptic treatment as secondary prophylaxis. Even if the current level of evidence is relatively low, compounds with a limited risk of pharmacokinetic interactions are clearly preferred. Levetiracetam is probably the most prescribed agent in this setting, while pregabalin, valproate, lacosamide and lamotrigine are valuable alternatives. The treatment choice has to consider the different profiles of side effects and should be tailored to each patient. In this setting, a multidisciplinary approach including general practicioner, oncologist and neurologist is strongly advocated. PMID:27281943

  14. [Myasthenia in an epileptic patient].

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, P

    1996-01-01

    The author described a case of myasthenia and epilepsy in a female aged 36 years. The relationship between myasthenia and epilepsy was discussed. The additional factor which made the diagnosis difficult is bilateral deafness. PMID:9148180

  15. Impaired picture recognition in transient epileptic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Michaela; Hoefeijzers, Serge; Zeman, Adam; Butler, Christopher; Della Sala, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is an epileptic syndrome characterized by recurrent, brief episodes of amnesia. Transient epileptic amnesia is often associated with the rapid decline in recall of new information over hours to days (accelerated long-term forgetting - 'ALF'). It remains unknown how recognition memory is affected in TEA over time. Here, we report a systematic study of picture recognition in patients with TEA over the course of one week. Sixteen patients with TEA and 16 matched controls were presented with 300 photos of everyday life scenes. Yes/no picture recognition was tested 5min, 2.5h, 7.5h, 24h, and 1week after picture presentation using a subset of target pictures as well as similar and different foils. Picture recognition was impaired in the patient group at all test times, including the 5-minute test, but it declined normally over the course of 1week. This impairment was associated predominantly with an increased false alarm rate, especially for similar foils. High performance on a control test indicates that this impairment was not associated with perceptual or discrimination deficits. Our findings suggest that, at least in some TEA patients with ALF in verbal recall, picture recognition does not decline more rapidly than in controls over 1week. However, our findings of an early picture recognition deficit suggest that new visual memories are impoverished after minutes in TEA. This could be the result of deficient encoding or impaired early consolidation. The early picture recognition deficit observed could reflect either the early stages of the process that leads to ALF or a separable deficit of anterograde memory in TEA. Lastly, our study suggests that at least some patients with TEA are prone to falsely recognizing new everyday visual information that they have not in fact seen previously. This deficit, alongside their ALF in free recall, likely affects everyday memory performance. PMID:25506793

  16. Uncommon t12 burst fracture after an epileptic crisis.

    PubMed

    Alian, Akiki

    2011-01-01

    People having an epileptic crisis present to the hospital with an altered mental status and generalised fatigue. The most common orthopaedic pathology associated to epilepsy is the undiagnosed posterior shoulder dislocation. These same patients often complain from back pain that is often neglected and misdiagnosed as muscular contracture following the epilepsy crisis. We describe here the case of a patient who presented after here epilepsy crisis with back pain. Investigations revealed an uncommon burst fracture that needed a surgical treatment. Conclusion. Back pain after an epileptic crisis should be investigated more seriously with an adequate clinical examination and a minimum of a radiography of the back. PMID:23198223

  17. Uncommon T12 Burst Fracture after an Epileptic Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Akiki

    2011-01-01

    People having an epileptic crisis present to the hospital with an altered mental status and generalised fatigue. The most common orthopaedic pathology associated to epilepsy is the undiagnosed posterior shoulder dislocation. These same patients often complain from back pain that is often neglected and misdiagnosed as muscular contracture following the epilepsy crisis. We describe here the case of a patient who presented after here epilepsy crisis with back pain. Investigations revealed an uncommon burst fracture that needed a surgical treatment. Conclusion. Back pain after an epileptic crisis should be investigated more seriously with an adequate clinical examination and a minimum of a radiography of the back. PMID:23198223

  18. Global Interactions Analysis of Epileptic ECoG Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Guillermo J.; Sola, Rafael G.; Pastor, Jesús

    2007-05-01

    Localization of the epileptogenic zone is an important issue in epileptology, even though there is not a unique definition of the epileptic focus. The objective of the present study is to test ultrametric analysis to uncover cortical interactions in human epileptic data. Correlation analysis has been carried out over intraoperative Electro-Corticography (ECoG) data in 2 patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recordings were obtained using a grid of 20 electrodes (5×4) covering the lateral temporal lobe and a strip of either 4 or 8 electrodes at the mesial temporal lobe. Ultrametric analysis was performed in the averaged final correlation matrices. By using the matrix of linear correlation coefficients and the appropriate metric distance between pairs of electrodes time series, we were able to construct Minimum Spanning Trees (MST). The topological connectivity displayed by these trees gives useful and valuable information regarding physiological and pathological information in the temporal lobe of epileptic patients.

  19. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  20. Comparison of personality characteristics on the bear-fedio inventory between patients with epilepsy and those with non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Tremont, Geoffrey; Smith, Megan M; Bauer, Lyndsey; Alosco, Michael L; Davis, Jennifer D; Blum, Andrew S; LaFrance, W Curt

    2012-01-01

    This study used the Bear-Fedio Personality Inventory (BFI) to compare 41 individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 37 with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (NES). Both groups exhibited similar elevations on the BFI, although TLE individuals show greater endorsement of at least one hypergraphia symptom, as compared with those with NES. The correlates of the BFI with demographic and seizure characteristics differed between the groups. These results argue against a specific TLE personality syndrome and suggest that personality characteristics may be related to the experience of having repeated seizures, rather than the specific underlying pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22450613

  1. Assisting sexually abused adults. Practical guide to interviewing patients.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, M. M.; Bethune, C.

    1996-01-01

    Millions of adults have been sexually abused. Patients often confide in their family physicians concerning their abuse. Physicians must understand their own issues surrounding sexual abuse and its sequelae before they attempt to treat sexually abused patients. The PLISSIT model offers a practical guide for assisting abused adult patients. PMID:8924817

  2. Epileptic activity recognition in EEG recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diambra, L.; de Figueiredo, J. C. Bastos; Malta, C. P.

    1999-12-01

    We apply Approximate Entropy (ApEn) algorithm in order to recognize epileptic activity in electroencephalogram recordings. ApEn is a recently developed statistical quantity for quantifying regularity and complexity. Our approach is illustrated regarding different types of epileptic activity. In all segments associated with epileptic activity analyzed here the complexity of the signal measured by ApEn drops abruptly. This fact can be useful for automatic recognition and detection of epileptic seizures.

  3. [Non-epileptic motor paroxysmal phenomena in wakefulness in childhood].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2013-09-01

    Paroxysmal events in childhood are a challenge for pediatric neurologists, given its highly heterogeneous clinical manifestations, often difficult to distinguish between phenomena of epileptic seizure or not. The non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes are neurological phenomena, with motor, sensory symptoms, and/or sensory impairments, with or without involvement of consciousness, epileptic phenomena unrelated, so no electroencephalographic correlative expression between or during episodes. From the clinical point of view can be classified into four groups: motor phenomena, syncope, migraine (and associated conditions) and acute psychiatric symptoms. In this paper we analyze paroxysmal motor phenomena in awake children, dividing them according to their clinical manifestations: extrapyramidal episodes (paroxysmal kinesiogenic, non kinesiogenic and not related to exercise dyskinesias, Dopa responsive dystonia) and similar symptoms of dystonia (Sandifer syndrome); manifestations of startle (hyperekplexia); episodic eye and head movements (benign paroxysmal tonic upward gaze nistagmus deviation); episodic ataxia (familial episodic ataxias, paroxysmal benign vertigo); stereotyped and phenomena of self-gratification; and myoclonic events (benign myoclonus of early infancy). The detection of these syndromes will, in many cases, allow an adequate genetic counseling, initiate a specific treatment and avoid unnecessary additional studies. Molecular studies have demonstrated a real relationship between epileptic and non-epileptic basis of many of these entities and surely the identification of the molecular basis and understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in many of them allow us, in the near future will benefit our patients. PMID:23897137

  4. [Clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic auras].

    PubMed

    Barletova, E I; Kremenchugskaia, M R; Mukhin, K Iu; Glukhova, L Iu; Mironov, M B

    2012-01-01

    To define clinical presentations of visual auras and to reveal their clinical, encephalographic and neuroimaging correlates, we examined 23 patients, aged from 5 to 25 years (mean 14±6 years), with focal forms of epilepsy. Patients had visual auras regardless of the etiology of epilepsy which developed immediately before epileptic seizures or were isolated. Patients had simple or complex visual hallucinations, the former occurring more frequently, visual illusions and ictal amaurosis. Positive visual phenomena were noted more frequently than negative ones. In most of the patients, visual hallucinations were associated with the pathological activity in cortical occipital regions of the brain and, in some cases, in temporal and parietal regions. The different pathologies (developmental defects, post-ischemic, atrophic and other disturbances) identified by MRI were found in a half of patients. PMID:23120768

  5. Genotoxicity of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT): a follow-up study of PHT-untreated epileptic patients. II. Mitotic index (MI) and proliferation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kaul, A; Goyle, S

    1999-01-01

    The mitotic index and proliferation rate index were investigated to determine the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in cultured blood lymphocytes of epileptics prior to and following administration of PHT over a period of 9 months (grouped in multiples of 3 months) and 40 control subjects (age range 10-30 years). Treatment with PHT brought inhibition of the mitotic index (MI) and proliferation rate index (PRI), which were significantly higher in treated subjects or which were more expressive in treated lymphocytes (P < 0.001) for all the three durations of treatment. In addition, statistically significant heterogeneity of first, second, and third metaphases between the treated, untreated, and control subjects was found. Mean PRI values were used to estimate cell cycle delays, showing the highest effect in treated lymphocytes (P < 0.001). There was no considerable variation between the control and untreated (P > 0.05). The study demonstrates that PHT may be potentially genotoxic and hence the usefulness of MI and PRI in monitoring epileptics on anticonvulsant treatment. PMID:10321412

  6. A new approach towards predictability of epileptic seizures: KLT dimension.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Rajeshkumar; Narayanan, K; Prasad, Awadhesh; Spanias, A; Sackellares, J C; Iasemidis, L D

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a measure of complexity of the epileptic electroencephalogram (EEG) based on the dimensionality of the Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT) in the time domain. We estimate the KLT dimensionality by assuming the same observation noise level in the EEG during the interictal period (between the seizures) as the one during an epileptic seizure (ictal period). Utilizing an optimality criterion based on the T-index [1] and the predictability time, derived from the created KLT dimensionality profiles, we show that 10 out of 15 seizures in one patient with temporal lobe epilepsy were predictable with an average predictability time of about 36 minutes. PMID:12724880

  7. Transient epileptic amnesia--a clinical update and a reformulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, N

    1993-01-01

    While absence attacks and complex partial seizures have been well documented in patients with epilepsy, the delineation of pure episodes of memory loss without additional clinical manifestations remains poorly characterised. The recently described condition of transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is critically examined, and four new cases are described, in each of which there were episodes of pure memory loss which subsequently proved to be epileptic in origin. The anatomical and pathophysiological basis of TEA is presumed to be similar to transient global amnesia (TGA), that is, it is likely to be primarily hippocampal in origin, but with more variable involvement of limbic and adjacent temporal lobe neocortical structures. PMID:8229029

  8. [Cortical dysgenesis with epileptic syndromes and symptomatic epilepsy in children].

    PubMed

    Milovanova, O A

    2015-01-01

    Cortical dysgenesis (CD) is a frequent inherited brain malformation. CD is a key cause of epileptic syndrome in children. In this review, the author presents a current classification of CD, etiological factors of their development, including gene mutations and adverse effects of various toxins and perinatal factors. A spectrum of clinical symptoms of CD with epileptic seizures is discussed in details. A role of current MRI-regimes in the diagnosis, the management of patients and prognosis of the course of CD are highlighted. PMID:26978511

  9. Imaging DC MEG Fields Associated with Epileptic Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, B. J.; Bowyer, S. M.; Moran, J. E.; Jenrow, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging modality, with high spatial and temporal resolution, used to evaluate and quantify the magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity. Complex partial epileptic seizures are characterized by hypersynchronous neuronal activity believed to arise from a zone of epileptogenesis. This study investigated the characteristics of direct current (DC) MEG shifts arising at epileptic onset. MEG data were acquired with rats using a six-channel first order gradiometer system. Limbic status epilepticus was induced by IA (femoral) administration of kainic acid. DC-MEG shifts were observed at the onset of epileptic spike train activity and status epilepticus. Epilepsy is also being studied in patients undergoing presurgical mapping from the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Henry Ford Hospital using a whole head Neuromagnetometer. Preliminary data analysis shows that DC-MEG waveforms, qualitatively similar to those seen in the animal model, are evident prior to seizure activity in human subjects.

  10. New avenues for anti-epileptic drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Klitgaard, Henrik; Twyman, Roy E; Schmidt, Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Despite the introduction of over 15 third-generation anti-epileptic drugs, current medications fail to control seizures in 20-30% of patients. However, our understanding of the mechanisms mediating the development of epilepsy and the causes of drug resistance has grown substantially over the past decade, providing opportunities for the discovery and development of more efficacious anti-epileptic and anti-epileptogenic drugs. In this Review we discuss how previous preclinical models and clinical trial designs may have hampered the discovery of better treatments. We propose that future anti-epileptic drug development may be improved through a new joint endeavour between academia and the industry, through the identification and application of tools for new target-driven approaches, and through comparative preclinical proof-of-concept studies and innovative clinical trials designs. PMID:24052047

  11. Oxidative Status in Epileptic Children Using Carbamazepine

    PubMed Central

    Tutanc, Murat; Aras, Mustafa; Dokuyucu, Recep; Altas, Murat; Zeren, Cem; Arica, Vefik; Ozturk, Oktay Hasan; Motor, Sedat; Yilmaz, Cahide

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing attention towards the relationship between oxidative stress and epilepsy. The effect of antiepileptic drugs on oxidant status is of major interest. Antiepileptic drugs can increase levels of free radicals, which consequently might lead to seizures. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is an antiepileptic drug commonly used in childhood and adolescence. Objectives: Therefore we aimed to investigate the effects of CBZ on total antioxidant status, total oxidant stress, and oxidative stress index. Patients and Methods: The study included 40 epileptic patients and 31 healthy children between 4 and 12 years of age. Serum CBZ level, total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status were measured. Oxidative stress index was also calculated both in controls and patients. Results: In the epileptic group, decreased levels of total antioxidant capacity, increased total oxidative stress and oxidative stress index levels were found. Positive correlation between plasma CBZ levels and total oxidant status was observed. Conclusions: Antioxidant action could not be playing any role in antiepileptic effect of CBZ. Furthermore, increased oxidative stress induced by CBZ could be the cause of CBZ-induced seizures. Therefore combining CBZ with antioxidants could be beneficial. PMID:26635944

  12. GRIN1 Mutations in Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjuan; Yuan, Hongjie

    2015-06-01

    Investigators from Yokohama City University and other medical centers in Israel and Japan reported mutations on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors subunit GRIN1 (GluN1) identified in patients with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:26933583

  13. Epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia in infancy and childhood: tonic spasms as a seizure type.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Luciana R De; Seraphim, Evelyn A; Corso, Jeana T; Naves, Pedro Vf; Carvalho, Kelly Cristina de; Ramirez, Milton David H; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Guaranha, Mirian Sb; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

    2015-06-01

    Epileptic spasms were defined by the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force on Classification and Terminology in 2001 as a specific seizure type. Epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia have been described in some series of patients, occurring either in infancy or childhood. More prolonged epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia were previously defined as a different seizure type, and referred to as "tonic spasm seizures". Here, we present a 5-year-old boy who started having epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia at 8 months of age, effectively treated with oxcarbazepine. With the withdrawal of medication, epileptic spasms returned. Video-EEG monitoring revealed high-voltage slow waves superimposed by low-voltage fast activity, followed by an electrodecremental phase and a burst of asymmetric fast activity, time-locked to clinical tonic spasm seizures. Brain MRI showed left temporal atrophy with temporal pole grey/white matter junction blurring and ictal PET-CT showed left basal frontal hypermetabolism. Seizures were refractory to several AEDs and vigabatrin was introduced with seizure cessation. Despite efforts to classify epileptic spasms, these are still considered as part of the group of unknown seizure types. In some cases, a focal origin has been suggested, leading to the term "periodic spasms" and "focal spasms". In this case, epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia, associated with tonic spasms, may be a variant of focal spasms and might be considered as an epileptic syndrome. [Published with video sequence]. PMID:25895540

  14. How Sleep Activates Epileptic Networks?

    PubMed Central

    Halász, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. The relationship between sleep and epilepsy has been long ago studied, and several excellent reviews are available. However, recent development in sleep research, the network concept in epilepsy, and the recognition of high frequency oscillations in epilepsy and more new results may put this matter in a new light. Aim. The review address the multifold interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy networks and with networks of cognitive functions. Material and Methods. The work is a conceptual update of the available clinical data and relevant studies. Results and Conclusions. Studies exploring dynamic microstructure of sleep have found important gating mechanisms for epileptic activation. As a general rule interictal epileptic manifestations seem to be linked to the slow oscillations of sleep and especially to the reactive delta bouts characterized by A1 subtype in the CAP system. Important link between epilepsy and sleep is the interference of epileptiform discharges with the plastic functions in NREM sleep. This is the main reason of cognitive impairment in different forms of early epileptic encephalopathies affecting the brain in a special developmental window. The impairment of cognitive functions via sleep is present especially in epileptic networks involving the thalamocortical system and the hippocampocortical memory encoding system. PMID:24159386

  15. Epileptic Seizure Forewarning by Nonlinear Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    2002-04-19

    This report describes work that was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (Contractor) and a commercial participant, VIASYS Healthcare Inc. (formerly Nicolet Biomedical, Inc.). The Contractor has patented technology that forewarns of impending epileptic events via scalp electroencephalograph (EEG) data and successfully demonstrated this technology on 20 datasets from the Participant under pre-CRADA effort. This CRADA sought to bridge the gap between the Contractor's existing research-class software and a prototype medical device for subsequent commercialization by the Participant. The objectives of this CRADA were (1) development of a combination of existing computer hardware and Contractor-patented software into a clinical process for warning of impending epileptic events in human patients, and (2) validation of the epilepsy warning methodology. This work modified the ORNL research-class FORTRAN for forewarning to run under a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI-FORTRAN software subsequently was installed on desktop computers at five epilepsy monitoring units. The forewarning prototypes have run for more than one year without any hardware or software failures. This work also reported extensive analysis of model and EEG datasets to demonstrate the usefulness of the methodology. However, the Participant recently chose to stop work on the CRADA, due to a change in business priorities. Much work remains to convert the technology into a commercial clinical or ambulatory device for patient use, as discussed in App. H.

  16. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  17. Fractal Dimension in Epileptic EEG Signal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthayakumar, R.

    greater speed and the criterion to choose the maximum and minimum values for time intervals. Comparisons with the other waveform fractal dimension algorithms are also demonstrated. In order to discriminate the Healthy and the Epileptic EEGs, an improved method of Multifractal Measure such as Generalized Fractal Dimensions (GFD) is also proposed. Finally we conclude that there are significant differences between the Healthy and Epileptic Signals in the designed method than the GFD through graphical and statistical tools. The improved multifractal measure is very efficient technique to analyze the EEG Signals and to compute the state of illness of the Epileptic patients.

  18. Phase I trial with biomarker studies of vatalanib (PTK787) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs and standard radiation and temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Eichler, April F; Plotkin, Scott R; Drappatz, Jan; Doyle, Colin L; Xu, Lei; Duda, Dan G; Wen, Patrick Y; Jain, Rakesh K; Batchelor, Tracy T

    2011-06-01

    Targeting angiogenesis in glioblastoma (GBM) may improve patient outcome by normalizing tumor vasculature and improving delivery of chemotherapeutics and oxygen. Consequently, concomitant administration of small molecule inhibitors of the VEGF pathway will likely have a positive impact on chemoradiation treatment outcome. We conducted a Phase I study of vatalanib, a small molecule inhibitor of VEGFR, PDGFR, and c-kit in patients with newly diagnosed GBM receiving radiation, temozolomide, and an enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drug in order to determine the MTD of vatalanib in this patient population. We incorporated circulating biomarker and SNP analyses and pharmacokinetic studies. Nineteen patients were enrolled and the MTD was not reached at the time of study termination. Vatalanib was well tolerated with only 2 DLTs (thrombocytopenia and elevated transaminases). Other grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia, lymphopenia, neutropenia, and hand-foot syndrome. There were no wound-healing complications. Of the 13 patients evaluable for a radiographic response, 2 had a partial response and 9 had stable disease. Vatalanib significantly increased PlGF and sVEGFR1 in plasma circulation and decreased sVEGFR2 and sTie2. Plasma collagen IV increased significantly by day 50 of treatment. Vatalanib was well tolerated and this study demonstrates the safety of oral small molecule inhibitors in newly diagnosed GBM patients. Blood biomarkers may be useful as pharmacodynamic markers of response to anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:20821342

  19. Mozart's music in children with drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Toro, Annacarmela; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Ferrarioli, Giuseppe; Pisano, Simone; Viggiano, Andrea; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in both adults and young patients. In this prospective, open-label study, we evaluated the effect of listening to a set of Mozart's compositions, according to the Tomatis method, on sleep quality and behavioral disorders, including auto-/hetero-aggression, irritability, and hyperactivity, in a group of children and adolescents with drug-resistant epilepsy. The study group was composed of 11 outpatients (7 males and 4 females), between 1.5years and 21years of age (mean age: 11.9years), all suffering from drug-resistant epileptic encephalopathy (n=11). All of them had a severe/profound intellectual disability associated with cerebral palsy. During the study period, each patient had to listen to a set of Mozart's compositions 2h per day for fifteen days for a total of 30h, which could be distributed over the day depending on the habits and compliance of each patient. The music was filtered by a device preferably delivering higher sound frequencies (>3000Hz) according to the Tomatis principles. The antiepileptic drug therapy remained unchanged throughout the study period. During the 15-day music therapy, 2 out of 11 patients had a reduction of 50-75% in seizure recurrence, and 3 out of 12 patients had a reduction of 75-89%. Overall, 5 (45.4%) out of 11 patients had a ≥50% reduction in the total number of seizures, while the percentage decrease of the total seizure number (11/11) compared with baseline was -51.5% during the 15-day music therapy and -20.7% in the two weeks after the end of treatment. All responders also had an improvement in nighttime sleep and daytime behavior. PMID:26093514

  20. In silico prioritization based on coexpression can aid epileptic encephalopathy gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Karen L.; Lukic, Vesna; Freytag, Saskia; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of an in silico prioritization approach that was applied to 179 epileptic encephalopathy candidate genes in 2013 and to expand the application of this approach to the whole genome based on expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas. Methods: PubMed searches determined which of the 179 epileptic encephalopathy candidate genes had been validated. For validated genes, it was noted whether they were 1 of the 19 of 179 candidates prioritized in 2013. The in silico prioritization approach was applied genome-wide; all genes were ranked according to their coexpression strength with a reference set (i.e., 51 established epileptic encephalopathy genes) in both adult and developing human brain expression data sets. Candidate genes ranked in the top 10% for both data sets were cross-referenced with genes previously implicated in the epileptic encephalopathies due to a de novo variant. Results: Five of 6 validated epileptic encephalopathy candidate genes were among the 19 prioritized in 2013 (odds ratio = 54, 95% confidence interval [7,∞], p = 4.5 × 10−5, Fisher exact test); one gene was false negative. A total of 297 genes ranked in the top 10% for both the adult and developing brain data sets based on coexpression with the reference set. Of these, 9 had been previously implicated in the epileptic encephalopathies (FBXO41, PLXNA1, ACOT4, PAK6, GABBR2, YWHAG, NBEA, KNDC1, and SELRC1). Conclusions: We conclude that brain gene coexpression data can be used to assist epileptic encephalopathy gene discovery and propose 9 genes as strong epileptic encephalopathy candidates worthy of further investigation. PMID:27066588

  1. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Anand K; Khandker, Nabil; Kurczewski, Lisa; Brophy, Gretchen M

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical–psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and “pseudoseizure” patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who deals with the acute management of seizures may encounter. The document also highlights the numerous avenues for new research that would help practitioners optimize epilepsy management. PMID:26966367

  2. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Anand K; Khandker, Nabil; Kurczewski, Lisa; Brophy, Gretchen M

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical-psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and "pseudoseizure" patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who deals with the acute management of seizures may encounter. The document also highlights the numerous avenues for new research that would help practitioners optimize epilepsy management. PMID:26966367

  3. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  4. Epileptic palatal myoclonus

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, W.O.; Sperling, M.R.; Jacobstein, J.G. )

    1991-08-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is usually caused by lesions of the brainstem. The authors report a case of PM of focal cortical origin in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua. The PM sometimes occurred in isolation, and at other times was accompanied by unilateral face, neck, and arm twitching. This was documented by both EEG and SPECT.

  5. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  6. Advances in anti-epileptic drug testing.

    PubMed

    Krasowski, Matthew D; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2014-09-25

    In the past twenty-one years, 17 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States and/or Europe. These drugs are clobazam, ezogabine (retigabine), eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. Therapeutic drug monitoring is often used in the clinical dosing of the newer anti-epileptic drugs. The drugs with the best justifications for drug monitoring are lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, and zonisamide. Perampanel, stiripentol and tiagabine are strongly bound to serum proteins and are candidates for monitoring of the free drug fractions. Alternative specimens for therapeutic drug monitoring are saliva and dried blood spots. Therapeutic drug monitoring of the new antiepileptic drugs is discussed here for managing patients with epilepsy. PMID:24925169

  7. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Day, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming. 76 figs.

  8. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Clapp, Ned E.; Daw, C. Stuart; Lawkins, William F.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming.

  9. Pulmonary manifestations in adult patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Salvator, Hélène; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Catherinot, Emilie; Rivaud, Elisabeth; Pilmis, Benoit; Borie, Raphael; Crestani, Bruno; Tcherakian, Colas; Suarez, Felipe; Dunogue, Bertrand; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Dreyfus, Jean-François; Durieu, Isabelle; Fouyssac, Fanny; Hermine, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier; Fischer, Alain; Couderc, Louis-Jean

    2015-06-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by failure of superoxide production in phagocytic cells. The disease is characterised by recurrent infections and inflammatory events, frequently affecting the lungs. Improvement of life expectancy now allows most patients to reach adulthood. We aimed to describe the pattern of pulmonary manifestations occurring during adulthood in CGD patients. This was a retrospective study of the French national cohort of adult patients (≥16 years old) with CGD. Medical data were obtained for 67 adult patients. Pulmonary manifestations affected two-thirds of adult patients. Their incidence was significantly higher than in childhood (mean annual rate 0.22 versus 0.07, p=0.01). Infectious risk persisted despite anti-infectious prophylaxis. Invasive fungal infections were frequent (0.11 per year per patient) and asymptomatic in 37% of the cases. They often required lung biopsy for diagnosis (10 out of 30). Noninfectious respiratory events concerned 28% of adult patients, frequently associated with a concomitant fungal infection (40%). They were more frequent in patients with the X-linked form of CGD. Immune-modulator therapies were required in most cases (70%). Respiratory manifestations are major complications of CGD in adulthood. Noninfectious pulmonary manifestations are as deleterious as infectious pneumonia. A specific respiratory monitoring is necessary. PMID:25614174

  10. Mediastinal Tuberculosis in an Adult Patient with Cystic Fibrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C.; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Carlotti, Agnès; Desmazes-Dufeu, Nadine; Farhi, David; Martin, Clémence; Kanaan, Reem; Mangialavori, Luigi; Palangié, Estelle; Dusser, Daniel; Poyart, Claire; Hubert, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is rarely observed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We report the first case of mediastinal TB, associated with leg pain and skin rash, in an adult patient with CF, and discuss factors suggestive of TB in the course of CF. PMID:21106788

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of non-triggered single epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Juarez, I E; Moreno, J; Ladino, L D; Castro, N; Hernandez-Vanegas, L; Burneo, J G; Hernandez-Ronquillo, L; Tellez-Zenteno, J F

    2016-08-16

    Epileptic seizures are one of the main reasons for neurological visits in an emergency department. Convulsions represent a traumatic event for the patient and the family, with significant medical and social consequences. Due to their prevalence and impact, the initial management is of vital importance. Although following the first epileptic seizure, early recurrence diminishes after establishing treatment with antiepileptic drugs, the forecast for developing epilepsy and long-term outcomes are not altered by any early intervention. Detailed questioning based on the symptoms of the convulsions, the patient's medical history and a full electroencephalogram and neuroimaging study make it possible to define the risk of recurrence of the seizure and the possible diagnosis of epilepsy. Epileptic abnormalities, the presence of old or new potentially epileptogenic brain lesions, as well as nocturnal seizures, increase the risk of recurrence. Physicians must assess each patient on an individual basis to determine the most suitable treatment, and explain the risk of not being treated versus the risk that exists if treatment with antiepileptic drugs is established. PMID:27439486

  12. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria) and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies). Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category. PMID:23762547

  13. Wilms Tumor: An Uncommon Entity in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Fade; Allen, M Brandon; Cox, Roni; Davis, Rodney

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor, the most common kidney tumor in children, is rarely seen in adults, making it a challenge for the adult oncologist to diagnose and treat. Unlike with renal cell carcinoma, patients with Wilms tumor should receive adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Adult oncologists may not be familiar with pediatric oncology protocols, so it is important to consult with pediatric oncologists who have more experience in this disease. Multimodal therapy based on pediatric protocols improved the outcomes of adults with Wilms tumor worldwide. We report a rare case of a 24-year-old woman with a slow-growing mass of the left kidney during a 4-year period. The mass was surgically removed and final diagnosis confirmed by pathology to be Wilms tumor. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and has been free of disease since 2014. PMID:27043834

  14. [Mesial temporal sclerosis syndrome in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Consalvo, D; Giobellina, R; Silva, W; Rugilo, C; Saidón, P; Schuster, G; Kochen, S; Sica, R

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential tool in the work-up of epilepsy. Since its appearance it has been possible to identify pathologies, such as hippocampal sclerosis (HS), that had previously only been detected by histopathological assays. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical manifestations, EEG and the outcome of patients with HS as shown by MRI. We revised the clinical histories of 384 outpatients from the Epilepsy Center, Ramos Mejía Hospital, who had been studied by MRI. Thirty five of them (15.5%) had a diagnosis of HS, based on the structural changes observed on the images. Six patients were excluded because of incomplete clinical data. Therefore, we studied 29 patients including 15 men. The mean age was 32.7 +/- 10.2 years (range: 19-58). All of them had partial seizures. Ten subjects had had febrile convulsions (34.5%) in childhood. Neurological examination was normal in all subjects. Interictal EEG showed focal abnormalities that were coincident in their location with the MRI abnormalities in 16 patients (55.1%). Fourteen patients (48.3%) showed right side hippocampal lesions on MRI, thirteen on the left side (44.9%) and 2 bilateral HS (6.8%). Twenty-seven patients (93.1%) had intractable epilepsy. Anterior temporal lobectomy was performed in 3 subjects with good outcome. The identification of these patients who present certain clinical and MRI characteristics, provides an opportunity to define the mesial temporal sclerosis syndrome. This could benefit patients in their prognosis and for specific treatments. PMID:10962804

  15. Assortative mixing in functional brain networks during epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialonski, Stephan; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    We investigate assortativity of functional brain networks before, during, and after one-hundred epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations. We construct binary functional networks from multi-channel electroencephalographic data recorded from 60 epilepsy patients; and from time-resolved estimates of the assortativity coefficient, we conclude that positive degree-degree correlations are inherent to seizure dynamics. While seizures evolve, an increasing assortativity indicates a segregation of the underlying functional network into groups of brain regions that are only sparsely interconnected, if at all. Interestingly, assortativity decreases already prior to seizure end. Together with previous observations of characteristic temporal evolutions of global statistical properties and synchronizability of epileptic brain networks, our findings may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying generation, propagation, and termination of seizures.

  16. Current understanding and neurobiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Auvin, Stéphane; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2016-08-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a group of diseases in which epileptic activity itself contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone. These impairments can worsen over time. This concept has been continually redefined since its introduction. A few syndromes are considered epileptic encephalopathies: early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome or infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome during infancy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-and-waves during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner syndrome during childhood. The inappropriate use of this term to refer to all severe epilepsy syndromes with intractable seizures and severe cognitive dysfunction has led to confusion regarding the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. Here, we review our current understanding of those epilepsy syndromes considered to be epileptic encephalopathies. Genetic studies have provided a better knowledge of neonatal and infantile epilepsy syndromes, while neuroimaging studies have shed light on the underlying causes of childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Apart from infantile spasm models, we lack animal models to explain the neurobiological mechanisms at work in these conditions. Experimental studies suggest that neuroinflammation may be a common neurobiological pathway that contributes to seizure refractoriness and cognitive involvement in the developing brain. PMID:26992889

  17. Practical fluoride and remineralization protocols for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel C N; Wefel, James S; Caughman, W Frank

    2004-12-01

    There is a wealth of information on preventive measures and procedures that can be used to care for paediatric and adolescent patients. However, few studies have been conducted in adult or geriatric populations, and an understanding of preventive and non-surgical treatment regimens for these patients is lacking. Traditionally, caries incidence is high among risk groups of low income, low dental IQ and certain ethnic subgroups, but we are now witnessing a high incidence of caries among middle-income and healthy adult patients with an imbalance of protective factors and cariogenic factors. We will direct our attention to the adult population and attempt to address some of the most common questions. PMID:15736834

  18. Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Shinkai, Kanade

    2012-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common reason why adult women present to dermatologists and can be a clinical challenge to treat. It may also be an important sign of an underlying endocrine disease such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although standard acne therapies can be successfully used to treat acne in adult female patients, hormonal treatment is a safe and effective therapeutic option that may provide an opportunity to better target acne in this population, even when other systemic therapies have failed. In this article, a practical approach to the adult female patient with acne will be reviewed to enhance the dermatologist's ability to use hormonal acne therapies and to better identify and evaluate patients with acne in the setting of a possible endocrine disorder. PMID:22994662

  19. Detection of Epileptic Seizure Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Borujeny, Golshan Taheri; Yazdi, Mehran; Keshavarz-Haddad, Alireza; Borujeny, Arash Rafie

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of epileptic seizures is mainly done by means of electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. Although this method is accurate, it is not comfortable for the patient as the EEG-electrodes have to be attached to the scalp which hampers the patient's movement. This makes long-term home monitoring not feasible. In this paper, the aim is to propose a seizure detection system based on accelerometry for the detection of epileptic seizure. The used sensors are wireless, which can improve quality of life for the patients. In this system, three 2D accelerometer sensors are positioned on the right arm, left arm, and left thigh of an epileptic patient. Datasets from three patients suffering from severe epilepsy are used in this paper for the development of an automatic detection algorithm. This monitoring system is based on Wireless Sensor Networks and can determine the location of the patient when a seizure is detected and then send an alarm to hospital staff or the patient's relatives. Our wireless sensor nodes are MICAz Motes developed by Crossbow Technology. The proposed system can be used for patients living in a clinical environment or at their home, where they do only their daily routines. The analysis of the recorded data is done by an Artificial Neural Network and K Nearest-Neighbor to recognize seizure movements from normal movements. The results show that K Nearest Neighbor performs better than Artificial Neural Network for detecting these seizures. The results also show that if at least 50% of the signal consists of seizure samples, we can detect the seizure accurately. In addition, there is no need for training the algorithm for each new patient. PMID:24098859

  20. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels. PMID:26418265

  1. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  2. Approach to Adult Patients with Acute Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    DeVos, Elizabeth; Jacobson, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Undifferentiated patients in respiratory distress require immediate attention in the emergency department. Using a thorough history and clinical examination, clinicians can determine the most likely causes of dyspnea. Understanding the pathophysiology of the most common diseases contributing to dyspnea guides rational testing and informed, expedited treatment decisions. PMID:26614245

  3. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility. PMID:27052242

  4. Newer anti-epileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Aneja, S; Newton, R W

    1996-01-01

    During the past few years, a number of drugs have been added to the anti-epileptic arsenal. This review focusses on five of these drugs which have undergone extensive trials: Vigabatrin, Lamotrigine, Gabapentin, Felbamate and Oxcarbazepine. Some of these antiepileptic drugs appear to be helpful for treatment of catastrophic childhood epilepsies. Vigabatrin appears promising in children with infantile spasms who do not respond to ACTH or Prednisolone. Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may respond to treatment with Lamotrigine or Vigabatrin. Gabapentin and vigabatrin have proved to be effective in refractory partial seizures. Oxcarbazepine, a ketoderivative of carbamazepine, is as effective as Carbamazepine but has a better safety profile. Lesser neurotoxicity and fewer drug interactions is another advantage with these drugs. However monitoring is required to determine the long term safety with their usage. These drugs have a definite role in childhood epilepsies refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs. PMID:10829995

  5. Focal seizures and epileptic spasms in a child with Down syndrome from a family with a PRRT2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ayuko; Okumura, Akihisa; Shimojima, Keiko; Abe, Shinpei; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    We describe a girl with Down syndrome who experienced focal seizures and epileptic spasms during infancy. The patient was diagnosed as having trisomy 21 during the neonatal period. She had focal seizures at five months of age, which were controlled with phenobarbital. However, epileptic spasms appeared at seven months of age in association with hypsarrhythmia. Upon treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone, her epileptic spasms disappeared. Her younger brother also had focal seizures at five months of age. His development and interictal electroencephalogram were normal. The patient's father had had infantile epilepsy and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. We performed a mutation analysis of the PRRT2 gene and found a c.841T>C mutation in the present patient, her father, and in her younger brother. We hypothesized that the focal seizures in our patient were caused by the PRRT2 mutation, whereas the epileptic spasms were attributable to trisomy 21. PMID:26867511

  6. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  7. Peculiarities of Anxiety Score Distribution in Adult Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Blank, Mikhail; Blank, Olga; Myasnikova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present research is to investigate and analyze possible peculiarities of the psychological state of cancer patients undergoing treatment. Scores characterizing the trait and state anxiety were acquired using the Integrative Anxiety Test from four groups: adults with no appreciable disease, pregnant women, cancer patients examined during the specific antitumor treatment, and cancer patients brought into lasting clinical remission. Statistical analysis of the testing results revealed the bimodal type of the distribution of scores. The only statistically significant exception was the distribution of the state anxiety scores in cancer patients undergoing treatment that was clearly unimodal. PMID:26176239

  8. Nutritional profile of adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, L; Delibasic, M; Peta, V; Turkulov, V; De Lorenzo, A; Medić-Stojanoska, M

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated gluten dependent enteropathy induced by ingestion of gluten, characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotals or total atrophy of intestinal villi. The predominant consequence of CD in untreated patients, is malnutrition as a result of malabsorption. Moreover, several and increasing extra-intestinal clinical manifestations have been described in the CD patients. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves nutritional status, inducing an increase in fat and bone compartments, but does not completely normalize body composition and nutritional deficiencies. An early and accurate evaluation of nutritional status can be of the pivotal step in the clinical management of the adult CD patients. The aim of this review is to present the most important and recent data on nutritional and metabolic features in the CD adult patients, the related implications and the effects of the GFD on these conditions. PMID:26636515

  9. Rhabdomyosarcoma in adolescent and young adult patients: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Egas-Bejar, Daniela; Huh, Winston W

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant tumor of mesenchymal origin, is the third most common extracranial malignant solid tumor in children and adolescents. However, in adults, RMS represents <1% of all solid tumor malignancies. The embryonal and alveolar histologic variants are more commonly seen in pediatric patients, while the pleomorphic variant is rare in children and seen more often in adults. Advances in the research of the embryonal and alveolar variants have improved our understanding of certain genes and biologic pathways that are involved in RMS, but much less is known for the other variants. Multimodality therapy that includes surgery and chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is the mainstay of treatment for RMS. Improvements in the risk stratification of the pediatric patients based on presurgical (primary tumor site, tumor size, regional lymph node involvement, presence of metastasis) and postsurgical parameters (completeness of resection or presence of residual disease or metastasis) has allowed for the treatment assignment of patients in different studies and therapeutic trials, leading to increases in 5-year survival from 25%–70% over the past 40 years. However, for adult patients, in great part due to rarity of the disease and the lack of consensus on optimal treatment, clinical outcome is still poor. Many factors have been implicated for the differing outcomes between pediatric RMS versus adult RMS, such as the lack of standardized treatment protocols for adult RMS patients and the increased prevalence of advanced presentations. Now that there are increased numbers of survivors, we can appreciate the sequelae from therapy in these patients, such as bone growth abnormalities, endocrinopathies, and infertility. Improvements in risk stratification have led to clinical trials using lower doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy with the intention of decreasing the incidence of side effects without compromising survival outcome. PMID

  10. Pain Assessment in Noncommunicative Adult Palliative Care Patients.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Deborah B; Kaiser, Karen Snow; Haisfield-Wolfe, Mary Ellen; Iyamu, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Palliative care patients who have pain are often unable to self-report their pain, placing them at increased risk for underrecognized and undertreated pain. Use of appropriate pain assessment tools significantly enhances the likelihood of effective pain management and improved pain-related outcomes. This paper reviews selected tools and provides palliative care clinicians with a practical approach to selecting a pain assessment tool for noncommunicative adult patients. PMID:27497016

  11. Efficacy of Attribution Retraining on Mental Health of Epileptic Children

    PubMed Central

    Pourmohamadreza Tajrishi, Masoume; Abbasi, Saeid; Najafi Fard, Tahereh; Yousefi, Saheb; Mohammadi Malek Abadi, Athar; Delavar Kasmaei, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy affects children’s quality of life and leads to social and mental problems. Promoting the mental health of children, especially epileptic ones, and preventing problems affecting them constitute major concerns for every country. Mental health promotion requires intervention programs. Objectives: We sought to assess the efficacy of attribution retraining on the mental health of epileptic children. Patients and Methods: The present study is a semi-experimental investigation with a pretest and posttest design and includes a control group. Thirty children, comprising 17 boys and 13 girls, were selected randomly from the Iranian epilepsy association in Tehran and assigned to experimental and control groups. They answered to the general health questionnaire (Goldberg and Hiller, 1979). The experimental group participated in 11 training sessions (twice a week; 45 minutes for each session) and received attribution retraining. The data were analyzed using the multiple analysis of covariance. Results: The findings showed that the experimental group, in comparison with the control group, experienced a reduction in physical symptoms, anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction, and depression and an increase in mental health significantly (P < 0.01) after the training sessions. There were no significant differences, however, between the two groups at 6 weeks’ follow-up. Conclusions: Attribution retraining improved mental health in the epileptic children in our study. It, therefore, seems to be an appropriate intervention for promoting the mental health of children. PMID:26568854

  12. [Portable Epileptic Seizure Monitoring Intelligent System Based on Android System].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wu, Shufeng; Yang, Chunlin; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Yu, Tao; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    The clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring systems based on personal computer system can not meet the requirements of portability and home usage. The epilepsy patients have to be monitored in hospital for an extended period of time, which imposes a heavy burden on hospitals. In the present study, we designed a portable 16-lead networked monitoring system based on the Android smart phone. The system uses some technologies including the active electrode, the WiFi wireless transmission, the multi-scale permutation entropy (MPE) algorithm, the back-propagation (BP) neural network algorithm, etc. Moreover, the software of Android mobile application can realize the processing and analysis of EEG data, the display of EEG waveform and the alarm of epileptic seizure. The system has been tested on the mobile phones with Android 2. 3 operating system or higher version and the results showed that this software ran accurately and steadily in the detection of epileptic seizure. In conclusion, this paper provides a portable and reliable solution for epileptic seizure monitoring in clinical and home applications. PMID:27382736

  13. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  14. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  15. Medication adherence among adult patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik M; Alyousif, Sarah M; Alshabanah, Najla; Albekairy, Abdulkareem M; Alharbi, Shemylan; Alhejaili, Fayze F; Alsayyari, Abdullah A; Qandil, Abeer Ma; Qandil, Amjad M

    2014-07-01

    Medication adherence was assessed in 89 patients on hemodialysis (HD) at the King Abdul Aziz Medical City using an Arabic version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MASS-8). The results of the study revealed that 31.46% and 40.45% of the participants showed low and medium adherence, respectively, while 28.09% showed high medication adherence. Accordingly, 71.91% of the patients visiting the dialysis unit were considered medication non-adherent. While being of older age (P = 0.012), being married (P = 0.012) increased the level of adherence, being of medium level of education (P = 0.024) decreased adherence levels. On the other hand, gender, presence of a care-giver, number of members in the household and employment status seems to have no effect on the level of medication adherence. These results call upon the practitioners in HD units to develop intervention programs that can increase the level of medication adherence. PMID:24969185

  16. Nonlinear times series analysis of epileptic human electroencephalogram (EEG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dingzhou

    The problem of seizure anticipation in patients with epilepsy has attracted significant attention in the past few years. In this paper we discuss two approaches, using methods of nonlinear time series analysis applied to scalp electrode recordings, which is able to distinguish between epochs temporally distant from and just prior to, the onset of a seizure in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. First we describe a method involving a comparison of recordings taken from electrodes adjacent to and remote from the site of the seizure focus. In particular, we define a nonlinear quantity which we call marginal predictability. This quantity is computed using data from remote and from adjacent electrodes. We find that the difference between the marginal predictabilities computed for the remote and adjacent electrodes decreases several tens of minutes prior to seizure onset, compared to its value interictally. We also show that these difl'crcnc es of marginal predictability intervals are independent of the behavior state of the patient. Next we examine the please coherence between different electrodes both in the long-range and the short-range. When time is distant from seizure onsets ("interictally"), epileptic patients have lower long-range phase coherence in the delta (1-4Hz) and beta (18-30Hz) frequency band compared to nonepileptic subjects. When seizures approach (''preictally"), we observe an increase in phase coherence in the beta band. However, interictally there is no difference in short-range phase coherence between this cohort of patients and non-epileptic subjects. Preictally short-range phase coherence also increases in the alpha (10-13Hz) and the beta band. Next we apply the quantity marginal predictability on the phase difference time series. Such marginal predictabilities are lower in the patients than in the non-epileptic subjects. However, when seizure approaches, the former moves asymptotically towards the latter.

  17. Epileptic encephalopathies: new genes and new pathways.

    PubMed

    Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Sherr, Elliott H

    2014-10-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a group of devastating epileptic disorders that occur early in life and are often characterized by pharmaco-resistant epilepsy, persistent severe electroencephalographic abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction or decline. Next generation sequencing technologies have increased the speed of gene discovery tremendously. Whereas ion channel genes were long considered to be the only significant group of genes implicated in the genetic epilepsies, a growing number of non-ion-channel genes are now being identified. As a subgroup of the genetically mediated epilepsies, epileptic encephalopathies are complex and heterogeneous disorders, making diagnosis and treatment decisions difficult. Recent exome sequencing data suggest that mutations causing epileptic encephalopathies are often sporadic, typically resulting from de novo dominant mutations in a single autosomal gene, although inherited autosomal recessive and X-linked forms also exist. In this review we provide a summary of the key features of several early- and mid-childhood onset epileptic encephalopathies including Ohtahara syndrome, Dravet syndrome, Infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome. We review the recent next generation sequencing findings that may impact treatment choices. We also describe the use of conventional and newer anti-epileptic and hormonal medications in the various syndromes based on their genetic profile. At a biological level, developments in cellular reprogramming and genome editing represent a new direction in modeling these pediatric epilepsies and could be used in the development of novel and repurposed therapies. PMID:25266964

  18. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  19. [Chemotherapy for brain tumors in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Weller, M

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapy has become a third major treatment option for patients with brain tumors, in addition to surgery and radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gliomas is no longer limited to recurrent disease. Temozolomide has become the standard of care in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Several ongoing trials seek to define the role of chemotherapy in the primary care of other gliomas. Some of these studies are no longer only based on histological diagnoses, but take into consideration molecular markers such as MGMT promoter methylation and loss of genetic material on chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Outside such clinical trials chemotherapy is used in addition to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic astrocytoma, medulloblastoma or germ cell tumors, or as an alternative to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors or low-grade gliomas. In contrast, there is no established role for chemotherapy in other tumors such as ependymomas, meningiomas or neurinomas. Primary cerebral lymphomas are probably the only brain tumors which can be cured by chemotherapy alone and only by chemotherapy. The chemotherapy of brain metastases follows the recommendations for the respective primary tumors. Further, strategies of combined radiochemotherapy using mainly temozolomide or topotecan are currently explored. Leptomeningeal metastases are treated by radiotherapy or systemic or intrathecal chemotherapy depending on their pattern of growth. PMID:18253773

  20. Effect of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Serum Level of IgG Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Mahmoud-Reza; Hosseini, Seyed-Ahmad; Biglari, Mohammad; Abolmaali, Sarah; Azizi Malamiri, Reza; Mombeini, Hoda; Pourpak, Zahra; Saladjegheh, Narges; Rezaei, Nima; Samadian, Azam; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2010-01-01

    Objective There are some controversial studies on effects of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum IgG subclasses; however, the role of these medications is still unclear. The aim of this study was evaluation the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on serum concentration of IgG and its subclasses Methods Serum IgG and IgG subclasses of 61 newly diagnosed epileptic patients were measured at the beginning of monotherapy with carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and phenobarbital, and 6 months later. Measurement of IgG and its subclasses was performed using nephlometry and ELISA techniques, respectively. Findings Reduction of at least one IgG subclass was found in 6 patients 6 months after treatment with AEDs. Among 27 patients receiving carbamazepine, decrease in at least one serum IgG subclass level was found in 5 patients. Among 20 patients using sodium valproate, only one patient showed decrease in IgG2 subclass. None of the 14 patients using phenobarbital revealed significant decrease in IgG subclasses. No infection was seen in the patients with reduction of subclasses. Conclusion Although in our study, children with selective IgG subclass deficiency were asymptomatic, assessment of serum immunoglobulin levels could be recommended at starting the administration of AEDs and in serial intervals afterward in epileptic patients. PMID:23056716

  1. Continuous EEG-fMRI in Pre-Surgical Evaluation of a Patient with Symptomatic Seizures: Bold Activation Linked to Interictal Epileptic Discharges Caused by Cavernoma.

    PubMed

    Avesani, M; Formaggio, E; Milanese, F; Baraldo, A; Gasparini, A; Cerini, R; Bongiovanni, L G; Pozzi Mucelli, R; Fiaschi, A; Manganotti, P

    2008-04-01

    We used continuous electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) to identify the linkage between the "epileptogenic" and the "irritative" area in a patient with symptomatic epilepsy (cavernoma, previously diagnosed and surgically treated), i.e. a patient with a well known "epileptogenic area", and to increase the possibility of a non invasive pre-surgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsies. A compatible MRI system was used (EEG with 29 scalp electrodes and two electrodes for ECG and EMG) and signals were recorded with a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. After the recording session and MRI artifact removal, EEG data were analyzed offline and used as paradigms in fMRI study. Activation (EEG sequences with interictal slow-spiked-wave activity) and rest (sequences of normal EEG) conditions were compared to identify the potential resulting focal increase in BOLD signal and to consider if this is spatially linked to the interictal focus used as a paradigm and to the lesion. We noted an increase in the BOLD signal in the left neocortical temporal region, laterally and posteriorly to the poro-encephalic cavity (residual of cavernoma previously removed), that is around the "epileptogenic area". In our study "epileptogenic" and "irritative" areas were connected with each other. Combined EEG-fMRI may become routine in clinical practice for a better identification of an irritative and lesional focus in patients with symptomatic drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:24256824

  2. Are brief or recurrent transient global amnesias of epileptic origin?

    PubMed Central

    Melo, T P; Ferro, J M; Paiva, T

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate if short (less than one hour) or recurrent, or both, episodes of transient global amnesia (TGA) have an epileptic origin or carry a subsequent risk of epilepsy a group of patients with these types of TGA attacks was studied. The group was selected from a prospective series of 103 patients with TGA. Sixteen patients had an episode lasting less than one hour, 13 had more than one episode, and five patients had both short and recurrent attacks. For each patient the number of recurrences was small (four or less) and they were separated by months or years. During short attacks of TGA many subjects showed other typical features of TGA including repeated questioning (12 subjects) and performance of purposeful complex acts (eight subjects). Twelve short attacks were closely related to a characteristic precipitating event. During follow up only one patient had a seizure (partial motor). No other association between either short or repeated attacks of TGA and past history of epilepsy or paroxysmal discharges were seen on the EEG. Short or recurrent, or both, attacks of TGA are not epileptic and do not carry a relevant risk of subsequent seizures. Images PMID:8201337

  3. [Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: issues of comorbidity in the diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, E L; Serli, T; Rezvyi, G

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a case report of seizures in a man of 40 years who was assessed by neurologists and psychiatrists for 15 years. Due to the low efficacy of treatment and permanent health deterioration, the patient was recognized as disabled. Later initial diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures was completed by comorbid diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder, type II. Treatment with lamotrigine improved the patient's condition. It has been regarded as a positive effect on organic changes in the brain that are associated with affective and epileptic disorders. PMID:27240050

  4. Canine and feline epileptic seizures and the lunar cycle: 2,507 seizures (2000-2008).

    PubMed

    Browand-Stainback, Laura; Levesque, Donald; McBee, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures in 211 canine and feline patients diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy were evaluated for temporal significance in relation to the lunar cycle. Seizure counts were compared among each of the eight individual lunar phases, among each of eight exact lunar phase dates, and by percent of lunar illumination using generalized estimating equations. No statistical significance was found in any of these comparisons excluding a relationship between the onset of epileptic seizures and the phases of the moon. Alteration in anticonvulsant treatment or monitoring of canine and feline patients with idiopathic epilepsy at large was not warranted based on the lunar cycle. PMID:21852516

  5. Cell Signaling Underlying Epileptic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bozzi, Yuri; Dunleavy, Mark; Henshall, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is a complex disease, characterized by the repeated occurrence of bursts of electrical activity (seizures) in specific brain areas. The behavioral outcome of seizure events strongly depends on the brain regions that are affected by overactivity. Here we review the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the generation of seizures in epileptogenic areas. Pathways activated by modulatory neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin), involving the activation of extracellular-regulated kinases and the induction of immediate early genes (IEGs) will be first discussed in relation to the occurrence of acute seizure events. Activation of IEGs has been proposed to lead to long-term molecular and behavioral responses induced by acute seizures. We also review deleterious consequences of seizure activity, focusing on the contribution of apoptosis-associated signaling pathways to the progression of the disease. A deep understanding of signaling pathways involved in both acute- and long-term responses to seizures continues to be crucial to unravel the origins of epileptic behaviors and ultimately identify novel therapeutic targets for the cure of epilepsy. PMID:21852968

  6. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient. PMID:26952578

  7. [Site and propagation of focal epileptic activity: multichannel MEG/EEG analysis].

    PubMed

    Stefan, H; Abraham-Fuchs, K; Schüler, P; Schneider, S; Neubauer, P U; Huk, H J; Neundörfer, B

    1991-12-01

    Electrophysiological examinations provide the basis for a deeper pathophysiological understanding of focal epileptic activity. In addition to electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography from field measurements is now available for biomagnetic diagnosis. As magnetoencephalography (MEG) is basically better suited for the localization of focal epileptic activity than EEG, an increase in MEG measurements has taken place over the last years. In this study we discuss magnetic source localization which was combined with anatomical 3-D-MR-images and compared with the results of EEG-registration carried out simultaneously and with other investigative procedures of presurgical diagnosis. The results of investigation show that simultaneous magnetic field measurements over one hemisphere of the skull allow localization of sources both in the temporal lobe and in deeper areas of the brain. Furthermore, propagation of epileptic activity can be registered not only in neighbouring areas of the epileptogenic source but also in regions localized deeper in the temporal lobe. This opens new possibilities for presurgical evaluation as well as an understanding of partial and generalized epilepsies. The results of investigation show primary focal epileptic activity neocortex laterally or surrounding a mesio-temporal lesion in all investigated patients with partial (temporal, frontal) and secondary generalized epilepsies. Furthermore, a pattern of propagation of focal epileptic activity which is directed from neocortical-lateral to mediobasal-limbic brain structures is found in most of these patients. PMID:1795752

  8. The Lombrosian prejudice in medicine. The case of epilepsy. Epileptic psychosis. Epilepsy and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Granieri, Enrico; Fazio, Patrik

    2012-02-01

    In the nineteenth century, epilepsy became subject of experimental research. Lombroso established a relationship between epilepsy and criminality believing in the existence of epileptoid traits and atavism. He tried to demonstrate the common origin of epilepsy, criminality, and genius; factors deteriorating the CNS would act upon centers, which control behavior and ethics. This impairment would cause a lack of control on the lower nervous centers, reducing restraints of instincts and criminal behavior. He described developmental frontal cortex lesions in epileptic patients (today Taylor's dysplasia) and these observations supported the erroneous conviction of a relationship between criminality and epilepsy. Neurological, behavioral, and criminological sciences analyzed Lombroso's doctrine, whereas it was controversial that epileptic patients should be prone to violent actions and aggressive behavior. Today, there is an international panel of experts on epilepsy, which suggests five relevant criteria to determine if a crime committed with aggressiveness could result from epileptic seizures. PMID:21538126

  9. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  10. The contribution of raised intraneuronal chloride to epileptic network activity.

    PubMed

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Merricks, Edward M; Codadu, Neela K; Cunningham, Mark O; Deisseroth, Karl; Racca, Claudia; Trevelyan, Andrew J

    2015-05-20

    Altered inhibitory function is an important facet of epileptic pathology. A key concept is that GABAergic activity can become excitatory if intraneuronal chloride rises. However, it has proved difficult to separate the role of raised chloride from other contributory factors in complex network phenomena, such as epileptic pathology. Therefore, we asked what patterns of activity are associated with chloride dysregulation by making novel use of Halorhodopsin to load clusters of mouse pyramidal cells artificially with Cl(-). Brief (1-10 s) activation of Halorhodopsin caused substantial positive shifts in the GABAergic reversal potential that were proportional to the charge transfer during the illumination and in adult neocortical pyramidal neurons decayed with a time constant of τ = 8.0 ± 2.8s. At the network level, these positive shifts in EGABA produced a transient rise in network excitability, with many distinctive features of epileptic foci, including high-frequency oscillations with evidence of out-of-phase firing (Ibarz et al., 2010). We show how such firing patterns can arise from quite small shifts in the mean intracellular Cl(-) level, within heterogeneous neuronal populations. Notably, however, chloride loading by itself did not trigger full ictal events, even with additional electrical stimulation to the underlying white matter. In contrast, when performed in combination with low, subepileptic levels of 4-aminopyridine, Halorhodopsin activation rapidly induced full ictal activity. These results suggest that chloride loading has at most an adjunctive role in ictogenesis. Our simulations also show how chloride loading can affect the jitter of action potential timing associated with imminent recruitment to an ictal event (Netoff and Schiff, 2002). PMID:25995461

  11. The Contribution of Raised Intraneuronal Chloride to Epileptic Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Merricks, Edward M.; Codadu, Neela K.; Cunningham, Mark O.; Deisseroth, Karl; Racca, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Altered inhibitory function is an important facet of epileptic pathology. A key concept is that GABAergic activity can become excitatory if intraneuronal chloride rises. However, it has proved difficult to separate the role of raised chloride from other contributory factors in complex network phenomena, such as epileptic pathology. Therefore, we asked what patterns of activity are associated with chloride dysregulation by making novel use of Halorhodopsin to load clusters of mouse pyramidal cells artificially with Cl−. Brief (1–10 s) activation of Halorhodopsin caused substantial positive shifts in the GABAergic reversal potential that were proportional to the charge transfer during the illumination and in adult neocortical pyramidal neurons decayed with a time constant of τ = 8.0 ± 2.8s. At the network level, these positive shifts in EGABA produced a transient rise in network excitability, with many distinctive features of epileptic foci, including high-frequency oscillations with evidence of out-of-phase firing (Ibarz et al., 2010). We show how such firing patterns can arise from quite small shifts in the mean intracellular Cl− level, within heterogeneous neuronal populations. Notably, however, chloride loading by itself did not trigger full ictal events, even with additional electrical stimulation to the underlying white matter. In contrast, when performed in combination with low, subepileptic levels of 4-aminopyridine, Halorhodopsin activation rapidly induced full ictal activity. These results suggest that chloride loading has at most an adjunctive role in ictogenesis. Our simulations also show how chloride loading can affect the jitter of action potential timing associated with imminent recruitment to an ictal event (Netoff and Schiff, 2002). PMID:25995461

  12. Effects of EPHX1 and CYP3A4*22 genetic polymorphisms on carbamazepine metabolism and drug response among Tunisian epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Chbili, Chahra; Fathallah, Neila; Laouani, Aicha; Nouira, Manel; Hassine, Anis; Ben Amor, Sana; Ben Ammou, Sofiene; Ben Salem, Chaker; Saguem, Saad

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of polymorphisms in the EPHX1 (c.416A > G, c.337T > C) and CYP3A4*22 genes involved in carbamazepine (CBZ) metabolism and pharmacoresistance among 118 Tunisian patients with epilepsy under maintenance dose of CBZ. These genetic polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Associations between plasma CBZ concentration, CBZ-E concentration, maintenance doses and metabolic ratio (CBZ-E:CBZ, CBZ-D:CBZ-E) were analyzed with each polymorphism. Both variants of EPHX1 c.416A > G and c.337T > C are significantly associated with higher metabolic ratio CBZ-E:CBZ and seem to decrease the activity of the epoxide hydrolase. The CYP3A4*22 variant allele is significantly associated with lower CBZ-D:CBZ-E ratio and seems also to be associated with less activity of the cytochrome. Our data suggest that certain polymorphisms of metabolizing enzyme genes could influence inter-individual variability of CBZ metabolism. PMID:27276192

  13. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. Results: The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Conclusions: Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients. PMID:26578130

  14. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  15. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  16. Osteosarcoma in Adult Patients Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Leonard C.; Ferreira, Nando

    2013-01-01

    Background. HIV infection has reached epidemic proportions in South Africa, with an estimated prevalence of 21.5% in adults living in the province of KwaZulu-Natal. Several malignancies have been identified as part of the spectrum of immunosuppression-related manifestations of HIV infection. Very few reports, however, exist regarding the occurrence of non-AIDS-defining sarcomas in the extremities or limb girdles. Methods. A retrospective review was performed on all adult patients, between the ages of 30 and 60 years, with histologically confirmed osteosarcomas of the appendicular skeleton referred to a tertiary-level orthopaedic oncology unit. Results. Five out of the nine patients (62.5%) included in the study were found to be HIV positive. The average CD4 count of these patients was 278 (237–301) cells/mm3, indicating advanced immunological compromise. Three of the malignancies in HIV-positive patients occurred in preexisting benign or low-grade tumours. Conclusion. A heightened index of suspicion is required in HIV patients presenting with unexplained bone and joint pain or swelling. Judicious use of appropriate radiological investigation, including magnetic resonance imaging of suspicious lesions and timely referral to an appropriate specialized orthopaedic oncology unit, is recommended. PMID:23762607

  17. Concepts of Connectivity and Human Epileptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Louis; Daunizeau, Jean; Walker, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    This review attempts to place the concept of connectivity from increasingly sophisticated neuroimaging data analysis methodologies within the field of epilepsy research. We introduce the more principled connectivity terminology developed recently in neuroimaging and review some of the key concepts related to the characterization of propagation of epileptic activity using what may be called traditional correlation-based studies based on EEG. We then show how essentially similar methodologies, and more recently models addressing causality, have been used to characterize whole-brain and regional networks using functional MRI data. Following a discussion of our current understanding of the neuronal system aspects of the onset and propagation of epileptic discharges and seizures, we discuss the most advanced and ambitious framework to attempt to fully characterize epileptic networks based on neuroimaging data. PMID:21472027

  18. Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies: Pathophysiology and Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Rong; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are syndromes in which seizures or interictal epileptiform activity contribute to or exacerbate brain function, beyond that caused by the underlying pathology. These severe epilepsies begin early in life, are associated with poor lifelong outcome, and are resistant to most treatments. Therefore, they represent an immense challenge for families and the medical care system. Furthermore, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the epileptic encephalopathies are poorly understood, hampering attempts to devise novel treatments. This article reviews animal models of the three classic epileptic encephalopathies-West syndrome (infantile spasms), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and continuous spike waves during sleep or Landau-Kleffner syndrome-with discussion of how animal models are revealing underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that might be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:27544466

  19. Analysis of epileptic seizures with complex network.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Wang, Yinghua; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of abnormal neural activities involving large area of brain networks. Until now the nature of functional brain network associated with epilepsy is still unclear. Recent researches indicate that the small world or scale-free attributes and the occurrence of highly clustered connection patterns could represent a general organizational principle in the human brain functional network. In this paper, we seek to find whether the small world or scale-free property of brain network is correlated with epilepsy seizure formation. A mass neural model was adopted to generate multiple channel EEG recordings based on regular, small world, random, and scale-free network models. Whether the connection patterns of cortical networks are directly associated with the epileptic seizures was investigated. The results showed that small world and scale-free cortical networks are highly correlated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures. In particular, the property of small world network is more significant during the epileptic seizures. PMID:25147576

  20. Sleep in epileptic beagles and antiepileptics.

    PubMed

    Wauquier, A; Van den Broeck, W A; Edmonds, H L

    1986-01-01

    The sleep-wakefulness (S-W) patterns in 4 genetically epileptic beagles were studied. As compared to normal beagles, there was no change in the percentage time spent in the different stages of S-W. However, epileptic dogs tended towards more and shorter S-W epochs and they had a statistically significant shortening of both REM and deep slow wave sleep (dSWS) latency. The antiepileptics diazepam, phenytoin, flunarizine and phenobarbital did not yield marked effects on S-W patterns, but the REM and dSWS latencies were affected. It is suggested that epileptic beagles may be useful in experimental analysis of epilepsy as well as in drug development. PMID:3609846

  1. Seizures Related to Vitamin B6 Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, Yeonkyung; Shin, Hyeeun; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kwon, Ohyun; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is closely associated with functions of the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Its deficiency may result in neurological disorders including convulsions and epileptic encephalopathy. Until today, this has only been reported in infants, children, and critically ill adult patients. We report a case of a 36year-old man with chronic alcoholism who presented with seizures after gastrointestinal disturbance. His seizures persisted even after treatment with antiepileptic drugs, but eventually disappeared after administration of pyridoxine. Hence, vitamin B6 deficiency may cause seizures in adult patients with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26157671

  2. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-01

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup. PMID:26920507

  3. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES).

    PubMed

    Hingray, C; Biberon, J; El-Hage, W; de Toffol, B

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are defined as change in behavior or consciousness resembling epileptic seizures but which have a psychological origin. PNES are categorized as a manifestation of dissociative or somatoform (conversion) disorders. Video-EEG recording of an event is the gold standard for diagnosis. PNES represent a symptom, not the underlying disease and the mechanism of dissociation is pivotal in the pathophysiology. Predisposing, precipitating and perpetuating factors should be carefully assessed on a case-by-case basis. The process of communicating the diagnosis using a multidisciplinary approach is an important and effective therapeutic step. PMID:27117433

  4. [Psychodynamic aspects of the epileptic experience].

    PubMed

    Mazza, S; Azzoni, A

    1989-01-01

    The authors deal with the problem of epileptic manifestations from a psychodynamic point of view. The complex aspects of "mind-body" relationship are pointed out. Starting from Freud's theory, several interpretations of the epileptic experience are reviewed. A special attention is drawn to Bion's theory of "protomental apparatus". The authors conclude that it is possible to integrate neuro-physiologic data with psychic aspects of the phenomenon, through a search of its roots in the early phases of Self-setting. PMID:2467374

  5. Approach to the Patient: The Adult With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies. PMID:23837188

  6. Stimulus-induced reflex epileptic spasms in 5p- syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kentaro; Saito, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Atushi; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Here we describe two patients with 5p- syndrome who suffered from epilepsy characterised by stimulus-induced epileptic spasms manifesting as head nodding. In patient 1, a series of spasms were exclusively triggered by eating, and were associated with diffuse high-voltage slow waves on ictal EEG, particularly presenting as a positive slow potential at the left mid-temporal area. Clusters of sharp waves with negative polarity emerged in the same area during the inter-spasm periods during eating. In patient 2, spasms were provoked by either eating or micturition. Ictal EEG of clustered spasms after micturition showed positive slow or triphasic waves, which correlated with each spasm, over the bifrontal and vertex areas. These findings suggest that the focal cortical areas act as trigger regions in reflex epilepsies, and that a spasm-generator responsible for the execution of reflex spasms exists either in other cortical areas or in the subcortical structures. Although epilepsy is an unusual complication of 5p- syndrome, this syndrome may have a propensity to develop reflex epilepsy, particularly epileptic spasms. However, identification of responsible genes and their roles in this phenotype requires further investigations. PMID:26298410

  7. [Epileptic manifestations following head injury (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wessely, P

    1977-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the findings in a group of 300 patients with head injury, aged 15 years or over at the time of the accident, who subsequently developed epileptic manifestations. Early fits (including one case of immediate onset) were found in 33% of the cases (99 patients). In contrast to post-traumatic late epilepsy (PTE), which is a manifestation of a static process, early fits are triggered off by a dynamic process (brain oedema, haemorrhage) and are a sign of cerebral irritation, but do not represent a true form of epilepsy. Early fits are related to the acute traumatic state; the time limit is flexible, but lies in the region of 4 weeks following injury. Conversion of early fits to PTE (with or without a latent interval) occurred in 72% of the cases. This percentage is higher than the average incidence quoted in the literature and presumably arises partly from the selection criteria applied in this study. The time of appearance of early fits following injury is one factor which determines the prognosis. Fits appearing on the first day carry a relatively favourable prognosis and do not proceed to PTE in 41% of the cases, whereas this percentage shrinks to 15% in the case of fits appearing from the second week onwards. Early fits are an isolated occurrence in one third of the cases; progression to PTE is less frequent in these patients than following frequent, repeated convulsions. Furthermore, the incidence of early fits is dependent, to a large extent, on traumatological and clinical factors: the combination of unconsciousness of over three hours' duration, neurological signs referable to the central nervous system, persistent organic psychotic syndrome and intracranial bleeding leads to a significantly higher incidence of early fits than unconsciousness of less than three hours' duration and absence of neurological signs in patients who, moreover, do not display features of the psychotic syndrome, and shows a greater tendency to early fits even

  8. Neurophysiological activity underlying altered brain metabolism in epileptic encephalopathies with CSWS.

    PubMed

    De Tiège, Xavier; Trotta, Nicola; Op de Beeck, Marc; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Marty, Brice; Wens, Vincent; Nonclercq, Antoine; Goldman, Serge; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the neurophysiological correlate of altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism observed in children with epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during sleep (CSWS) by using a multimodal approach combining time-sensitive magnetic source imaging (MSI) and positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Six patients (4 boys and 2 girls, age range: 4-8 years, 3 patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), 3 patients with atypical rolandic epilepsy (ARE)) were investigated by FDG-PET and MSI at the acute phase of CSWS. In all patients, the onset(s) of spike-waves discharges were associated with significant focal hypermetabolism. The propagation of epileptic discharges to other brain areas was associated with focal hypermetabolism (five patients), hypometabolism (one patient) or the absence of any significant metabolic change (one patient). Interestingly, most of the hypometabolic areas were not involved in the epileptic network per se. This study shows that focal hypermetabolism observed at the acute phase of CSWS are related to the onset or propagation sites of spike-wave discharges. Spike-wave discharges propagation can be associated to other types of metabolic changes, suggesting the occurrence of various neurophysiological mechanisms at the cellular level. Most of the hypometabolic areas are not involved in the epileptic network as such and are probably related to a mechanism of remote inhibition. These findings highlight the critical value of combining FDG-PET with time-sensitive functional neuroimaging approaches such as MSI to assess CSWS epileptic network when surgery is considered as a therapeutic approach. PMID:23561286

  9. Clinical features in adult patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, E; Rodríguez-González, F

    2014-06-01

    The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) encompasses deletions at the distal part of the short arm of one chromosome 4 (4p16 region). Clinical signs frequently include a typical facial appearance, mental retardation, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, hypotonia with decreased muscle bulk and seizures besides congenital heart malformations, midline defects, urinary tract malformations and brain, hearing and ophthalmologic malformations. Pathogenesis of WHS is multigenic and many factors are involved in prediction of prognosis such as extent of deletion, the occurrence of severe chromosome anomalies, the severe of seizures, the existence of serious internal, mainly cardiac, abnormalities and the degree of mental retardation. The phenotype of adult with WHS is in general similar to that of childhood being facial dysmorphism, growth retardation and mental retardation the rule in both adults and children. Avoid long-term complications and provide rehabilitation programs and genetic counseling may be essential in these patients. PMID:24656633

  10. Urinary considerations for adult patients with spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Veenboer, Paul W; de Kort, Laetitia M O; Chrzan, Rafal J; de Jong, Tom P V M

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of newborns with spinal dysraphism is diminishing worldwide, although survival of individuals with this condition into adulthood continues to improve. The number of adults with spinal dysraphism will, therefore, increase in the coming years, which will pose new challenges in patient management. Urological manifestations of spinal dysraphism can include increased risks of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infection, urinary calculi, sexual dysfunction, end-stage renal disease and iatrogenic metabolic disturbances; however, the severity and incidence of these symptoms varies substantially between patients. Owing to the presence of multiple comorbidities, treatment and follow-up protocols often have to be adapted to best suit the needs of specific patients. Authors describe bladder and kidney function and long-term complications of treatments initiated in childhood, as well as the potential for improvements in quality of life through better follow-up schedules and future developments. PMID:25963964

  11. Clostridium difficile infections among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Nasereddin, Lina M; Bakri, Fares G; Shehabi, Asem A

    2009-12-01

    This prospective study investigated the important epidemiologic aspects of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients. A total of 300 stool specimens were investigated using culture and polymerase chain reaction methods for detection of C difficile, its toxins, and fluoroquinolone resistance. C difficile-positive cultures were found in 13.7% of the patients, and 73% of the isolates carried tcdA and/or tcdB toxin genes, and all C difficile isolates were negative for binary toxin. The isolates showed moderate level of resistance to both ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, whereas metronidazole and vancomycin were highly susceptible. This study indicates the need for early detection of CDIs and prevention of its severe disease in hospitalized patients. PMID:19712999

  12. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-01

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI. PMID:24201615

  13. Asthma Economic Costs in Adult Asthmatic Patients in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    SHARIFI, Laleh; POURPAK, Zahra; FAZLOLLAHI, Mohammad Reza; BOKAIE, Saied; MOEZZI, Hamid Reza; KAZEMNEJAD, Anoushirvan; MOIN, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: High prevalence and increasing rate of asthmatic patients around the word witnesses the high burden of asthma. We have limited data on asthma burden and economic costs in Iran. This study aimed to find direct and indirect economic costs of asthma and their association with some background factors in one of the referral tertiary centers for adult patients with asthma. Methods: We surveyed asthma related economic costs of 197 adult patients who referred to Milad Hospital, Tehran, Iran from Jun 2007 to January 2010. The patients were followed up for a period of one-year ±1 month and asthma related costs and its control status were registered. Results: Patients were consisted of 125 (64.1%) females and 70 (35.9%) males. Total cost of asthma was 590.22 ±32.18 USD for one patient per one year, the cost of drug, paraclinic, doctor visit, hospitalization, emergency, transportation, and absent days were 327.02, 4.76, 35.44, 3.82, 0.26, 113.03, 105.89 USD respectively. Men showed a significant elevation in their total (P=0.009) and drug costs (P=0.028). In addition, we found significant differences between total asthma costs and asthma control status (P=0.002). Conclusions: According to the high proportion of asthma, related cost compare to Total Income of an Iranian family, the necessity of public coverage of health assurance is quite clear. We suggest that improving asthma management and accessibility to specialized treatment centers can result in decreasing asthma medication and transportation costs as major direct and indirect asthma related costs. PMID:26587495

  14. Sex hormones, sexual activity and plasma anticonvulsant levels in male epileptics.

    PubMed Central

    Toone, B K; Wheeler, M; Nanjee, M; Fenwick, P; Grant, R

    1983-01-01

    Testosterone, LH, FSH, PRL, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in 72 male epileptic patients on chronic anticonvulsant drug regimes. Sexual activity was estimated and plasma anticonvulsants measured. Total testosterone (TT), LH, FSH, PRL, and SHBG were increased; free testosterone (FT) was decreased. Sexual activity appeared diminished particularly in relation to reduced FT. PMID:6413659

  15. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  16. Biallelic CACNA1A mutations cause early onset epileptic encephalopathy with progressive cerebral, cerebellar, and optic nerve atrophy.

    PubMed

    Reinson, Karit; Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Talvik, Inga; Vaher, Ulvi; Õunapuu, Anne; Ennok, Margus; Teek, Rita; Pajusalu, Sander; Murumets, Ülle; Tomberg, Tiiu; Puusepp, Sanna; Piirsoo, Andres; Reimand, Tiia; Õunap, Katrin

    2016-08-01

    The CACNA1A gene encodes the transmembrane pore-forming alpha-1A subunit of the Cav 2.1 P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel. Several heterozygous mutations within this gene, including nonsense mutations, missense mutations, and expansion of cytosine-adenine-guanine repeats, are known to cause three allelic autosomal dominant conditions-episodic ataxia type 2, familial hemiplegic migraine type 1, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. An association with epilepsy and CACNA1A mutations has also been described. However, the link with epileptic encephalopathies has emerged only recently. Here we describe two patients, sister and brother, with compound heterozygous mutations in CACNA1A. Exome sequencing detected biallelic mutations in CACNA1A: A missense mutation c.4315T>A (p.Trp1439Arg) in exon 27, and a seven base pair deletion c.472_478delGCCTTCC (p.Ala158Thrfs*6) in exon 3. Both patients were normal at birth, but developed daily recurrent seizures in early infancy with concomitant extreme muscular hypotonia, hypokinesia, and global developmental delay. The brain MRI images showed progressive cerebral, cerebellar, and optic nerve atrophy. At the age of 5, both patients were blind and bedridden with a profound developmental delay. The elder sister died at that age. Their parents and two siblings were heterozygotes for one of those pathogenic mutations and expressed a milder phenotype. Both of them have intellectual disability and in addition the mother has adult onset cerebellar ataxia with a slowly progressive cerebellar atrophy. Compound heterozygous mutations in the CACNA1A gene presumably cause early onset epileptic encephalopathy, and progressive cerebral, cerebellar and optic nerve atrophy with reduced lifespan. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27250579

  17. Increased stathmin expression strengthens fear conditioning in epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linna; Feng, Danni; Tao, Hong; DE, Xiangyan; Chang, Qing; Hu, Qikuan

    2015-01-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy have inexplicable fear attack as the aura. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of seizure-modulated fear are not clarified. Recent studies identified stathmin as one of the key controlling molecules in learning and innate fear. Stathmin binds to tubulin, inhibits microtubule assembly and promotes microtubule catastrophes. Therefore, stathmin is predicted to play a crucial role in the association of epilepsy seizures with fear conditioning. Firstly, a pilocarpine model of epilepsy in rats was established, and subsequently the fear condition training was performed. The epileptic rats with fear conditioning (epilepsy + fear) had a much longer freezing time compared to each single stimulus. The increased freezing levels revealed a significantly strengthened effect of the epileptic seizures on the learned fear of the tone-shock contextual. Subsequently, the stathmin expression was compared in the hippocampus, the amygdale, the insular cortex and the temporal lobe. The significant change of stathmin expression occurred in the insular and the hippocampus, but not in the amygdale. Stathmin expression and dendritic microtubule stability were compared between fear and epilepsy in rats. Epilepsy was found to strengthen the fear conditioning with increased expression of stathmin and a decrease in microtubule stability. Fear conditioning slightly increased the expression of stathmin, whereas epilepsy with fear conditioning increased it significantly in the hippocampus, insular cortex and hypothalamus. The phosphorylated stathmin slightly increased in the epilepsy with fear conditioning. The increased expression of stathmin was contrary to the decrease of the stathmin microtubule-associated protein (MAP2) and α-tubulin in the epileptic rats with fear conditioning in all three areas of the brain. The most significant change of the ratio of MAP2 and α-tubulin/stathmin occurred in the insular cortex and hippocampus. In conclusion

  18. Embryonal Sarcoma of the Liver in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Nicole; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcomas (UESs) are uncommon tumours that are seen predominantly in late childhood. Cases in adults are rare and generally present once a large mass develops and may be mistaken for other tumours. A case of an UES of the liver with an isolated peritoneal metastasis is described. The patient presented with a palpable mass with imaging findings suggestive of a cystic tumour. She had complete surgical resection of the liver mass and isolated peritoneal metastasis. She was tumour-free on imaging at 6 months without adjuvant chemotherapy. An UES should be considered in the differential of large cystic hepatic lesions, with aggressive surgical resection considered when possible. PMID:22690347

  19. Midface fracture in an unoperated adult patient with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Sanyog; Baliga, Shridhar; Kotrashetti, Sharadaindu Mahadevappa; Pillai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    In western countries, it is hard to find an unoperated cleft palate due to better healthcare services and awareness. Here, we present an unoperated adult case of cleft palate that had midfacial fractures following a road traffic accident. The patient's cleft lip was repaired when he was 2 years old but the palate was not operated because of poor follow-up. We would like to share the difficulties encountered in diagnosis and treatment planning for this rare kind of trauma case. After routine investigations, a palatal acrylic splint was constructed for fixation and an acceptable degree of function and aesthetics was achieved postoperatively. PMID:25150231

  20. Epileptic encephalopathy: Use and misuse of a clinically and conceptually important concept.

    PubMed

    Howell, Katherine B; Harvey, A Simon; Archer, John S

    2016-03-01

    The term epileptic encephalopathy (EE) denotes a process by which epileptic activity adversely affects brain function over and above the underlying etiology. Underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, but recent studies demonstrate that seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges can disrupt distributed neural networks that underpin cognitive functions, both temporarily and permanently. EE is just one of a number of factors that can affect development in epilepsy. The presence and relative contribution of EE to cognitive impairment is often difficult to separate from that of the underlying etiology or even effects of antiepileptic medication (AEM). This difficulty has led to the increasing use of the term EE to encapsulate "severe" epileptic syndromes, or etiologies associated with severe epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID), regardless of evidence that the epileptic process has impacted cognition. The use of the term EE in the literature to describe both the process of cognitive impairment by epileptic activity and as a category for severe epilepsy syndromes is creating confusion. We propose that use of the term EE be restricted to the central concept of a pervasive epileptic process disrupting development, and that the use of EE as a classifier be avoided. A different term is needed to encapsulate the broad and heterogenous group of patients with severe epilepsy and ID, for which the mechanisms may be unknown but are often closely related to the underlying genetic, metabolic, or structural etiology. An improved understanding of the mechanisms by which EE develops is of critical importance, potentially leading to identification of biomarkers for early detection and treatment. PMID:26778176

  1. Compulsive versifying after treatment of transient epileptic amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Woollacott, Ione O. C.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Massey, Luke A.; Pasupathy, Amirtha; Rossor, Martin N.; Caine, Diana; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Compulsive production of verse is an unusual form of hypergraphia that has been reported mainly in patients with right temporal lobe seizures. We present a patient with transient epileptic amnesia and a left temporal seizure focus, who developed isolated compulsive versifying, producing multiple rhyming poems, following seizure cessation induced by lamotrigine. Functional neuroimaging studies in the healthy brain implicate left frontotemporal areas in generating novel verbal output and rhyme, while dysregulation of neocortical and limbic regions occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy. This case complements previous observations of emergence of altered behavior with reduced seizure frequency in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Such cases suggest that reduced seizure frequency has the potential not only to stabilize or improve memory function, but also to trigger complex, specific behavioral alterations. PMID:25157425

  2. Psychopharmacological options for adult patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Miniati, Mario; Mauri, Mauro; Ciberti, Agnese; Mariani, Michela Giorgi; Marazziti, Donatella; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize evidence from research on psychopharmacological options for adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Database searches of MEDLINE and PsycINFO (from January 1966 to January 2014) were performed, and original articles published as full papers, brief reports, case reports, or case series were included. Forty-one papers were screened in detail, and salient characteristics of pharmacological options for AN were summarized for drug classes. The body of evidence for the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in AN was unsatisfactory, the quality of observations was questionable (eg, the majority were not blinded), and sample size was often small. More trials are needed, while considering that nonresponse and nonremission are typical of patients with AN. PMID:26145463

  3. [Salmonella enteritidis: an unusual meningitis agent in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Metan, Gökhan; Alp, Emine; Eşel, Duygu; Aygen, Bilgehan; Sümerkan, Bülent

    2005-10-01

    Salmonella species may cause wide spectrum of infections changing from enterocolitis to sepsis. However, Salmonella meningitis in adults is a rare but important clinical condition with a high mortality rate. In this report, a 71 years old male patient with Salmonella enteritidis meningitis who was followed-up with the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and had been administered azothioprin and prednisolone, has been presented and similar cases in the literature have been reviewed. The cerebrospinal fluid culture yielded S. enteritidis, and the isolate was intermediate susceptible to ampicillin, susceptible to cefotaxime, trimethoprim-sulphametoxasole, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. Our patient was successfully treated with ceftriaxone (2 x 2 gr i.v.) and discharged with total cure. PMID:16544553

  4. Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources Reveals Different Network Connectivity Underlying the Generation and Perpetuation of Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Raethjen, Jan; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone) and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS), an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity) between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis. PMID:24194931

  5. A Study into the Possible Link between Anti-Epileptic Drugs and the Risk of Fractures in Muckamore Abbey Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tohill, Carmel

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated whether the effects of anti-epileptic drugs were (carbamazepine, phenobarbitone, and phenytoin) related, to the incidence of fractures in 85 Irish patients. If patients were only on one antiepileptic drug, there appeared to be no correlation; however, if patients were taking a combination of three drugs, they were more likely…

  6. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  7. Prosthodontic treatment of the edentulous adult cleft palate patient.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Leanne M

    2003-03-01

    Clefts of the upper lip and plate are relatively common, yet dental treatment of these patients is still very poor and many grow up suffering dental neglect. Dental practitioners should become involved in the treatment team as dental needs are present from birth to death. Adult cleft patients often need tooth replacement with obturation of any residual clefts. They are best treated with tooth-supported removable appliances including partial and complete overdentures, thus preservation of their natural dentition is desirable. Edentulous cleft palate patients present with restorative difficulties due to their compromised maxillary arches as well as the presence of scar tissue in their palates and lips. An outline of these complications and guidelines for their treatment is illustrated in the form of three case reports from members of one family all presenting with varying cleft lip and palate defects. This article highlights the need for dental students to be exposed to dentally compromised patients so that they will feel confident enough to treat them in private practice. PMID:12800267

  8. The quantitative measurement of consciousness during epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Nani, Andrea; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of consciousness is a fundamental element in the classification of epileptic seizures. It is, therefore, of great importance for clinical practice to develop instruments that enable an accurate and reliable measurement of the alteration of consciousness during seizures. Over the last few years, three psychometric scales have been specifically proposed to measure ictal consciousness: the Ictal Consciousness Inventory (ICI), the Consciousness Seizure Scale (CSS), and the Responsiveness in Epilepsy Scale--versions I and II (RES-I and RES-II). The ICI is a self-report psychometric instrument which retrospectively assesses ictal consciousness along the dimensions of the level/arousal and contents/awareness. The CSS has been used by clinicians to quantify the impairment of consciousness in order to establish correlations with the brain mechanisms underlying alterations of consciousness during temporal lobe seizures. The most recently developed observer-rated instrument is the RES-I, which has been used to assess responsiveness during epileptic seizures in patients undergoing video-EEG. The implementation of standardized psychometric tools for the assessment of ictal consciousness can complement clinical observations and contribute to improve accuracy in seizure classification. PMID:24113569

  9. Clinical and electrographic findings in epileptic vertigo and dizziness

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Han; Robinson, Karen A.; Kaplan, Peter W.; Newman-Toker, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Seizures can cause vestibular symptoms, even without obvious epileptic features. We sought to characterize epileptic vertigo or dizziness (EVD) to improve differentiation from nonepileptic causes, particularly when vestibular symptoms are the sole manifestation. Methods: We conducted a systematic review with electronic (Medline) and manual search for English-language studies (1955–2014). Two independent reviewers selected studies. Study/patient characteristics were abstracted. We defined 3 study population types: (1) seizures, some experiencing vertigo/dizziness (disease cohort); (2) vertigo/dizziness, some due to seizures (symptom cohort); (3) vertigo/dizziness due to seizures in all patients (EVD-only cohort). Results: We identified 84 studies describing 11,354 patients (disease cohort = 8,129; symptom cohort = 2,965; EVD-only cohort = 260). Among 1,055 EVD patients in whom a distinction could be made, non-isolated EVD was present in 8.5%, isolated EVD in 0.8%. Thorough diagnostic workups (ictal EEG, vestibular testing, and brain MRI to exclude other causes) were rare (<0.1%). Ictal EEG was reported in 487 (4.3%), formal neuro-otologic assessment in 1,107 (9.7%). Localized EEG abnormalities (n = 350) were most frequently temporal (79.8%) and uncommonly parietal (11.8%). Duration of episodic vestibular symptoms varied, but was very brief (<30 seconds) in 69.6% of isolated EVD and 6.9% of non-isolated EVD. Conclusions: Non-isolated EVD is much more prevalent than isolated EVD, which appears to be rare. Diagnostic evaluations for EVD are often incomplete. EVD is primarily associated with temporal lobe seizures; whether this reflects greater epidemiologic prevalence of temporal lobe seizures or a tighter association with dizziness/vertigo presentations than with other brain regions remains unknown. Consistent with clinical wisdom, isolated EVD spells often last just seconds, although many patients experience longer spells. PMID:25795644

  10. Systematic review of surgical treatment techniques for adult and pediatric patients with pectus excavatum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This compares outcome measures of current pectus excavatum (PEx) treatments, namely the Nuss and Ravitch procedures, in pediatric and adult patients. Original investigations that stratified PEx patients based on current treatment and age (pediatric = 0–21; adult 17–99) were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures were: operation duration, analgesia duration, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), outcome ratings, complications, and percentage requiring reoperations. Adult implant patients (18.8%) had higher reoperation rates than adult Nuss or Ravitch patients (5.3% and 3.3% respectively). Adult Nuss patients had longer LOS (7.3 days), more strut/bar displacement (6.1%), and more epidural analgesia (3 days) than adult Ravitch patients (2.9 days, 0%, 0 days). Excluding pectus bar and strut displacements, pediatric and adult Nuss patients tended to have higher complication rates (pediatric - 38%; adult - 21%) compared to pediatric and adult Ravitch patients (12.5%; 8%). Pediatric Ravitch patients clearly had more strut displacements than adult Ravitch patients (0% and 6.4% respectively). These results suggest significantly better results in common PEx surgical repair techniques (i.e. Nuss and Ravitch) than uncommon techniques (i.e. Implants and Robicsek). The results suggest slightly better outcomes in pediatric Nuss procedure patients as compared with all other groups. We recommend that symptomatic pediatric patients with uncomplicated PEx receive the Nuss procedure. We suggest that adult patients receive the Nuss or Ravitch procedure, even though the long-term complication rates of the adult Nuss procedure require more investigation. PMID:24506826