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Sample records for adult low-grade gliomas

  1. Adult Supratentorial Low-Grade Glioma: Long-Term Experience at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, Glenn; Fisher, Barbara; Watling, Christopher; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Macdonald, David

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term follow-up of a cohort of adult patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma treated at a single institution. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 145 adult patients treated at the London Regional Cancer Program between 1979 and 1995 was reviewed. Results: With a median follow-up of 105 months, the median progression-free survival was 61 months (95% confidence interval, 53-77), and the median overall survival was 118 months (95% confidence interval, 93-129). The 10- and 20-year progression-free and overall survival rate was 18% and 0% and 48% and 22%, respectively. Cox regression analysis confirmed the importance of age, histologic type, presence of seizures, Karnofsky performance status, and initial extent of surgery as prognostic variables for overall and cause-specific survival. Function among long-term survivors without tumor progression was good to excellent for most patients. Conclusion: Low-grade glioma is a chronic disease, with most patients dying of their disease. However, long-term survival with good function is possible. Survival is determined primarily by the disease factors with selection and timing of adjuvant treatments having less influence on outcome.

  2. Neurocognitive effects of proton radiation therapy in adults with low-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Janet Cohen; Colvin, Mary K; Mancuso, Sarah M; Batchelor, Tracy T; Oh, Kevin S; Loeffler, Jay S; Yeap, Beow Y; Shih, Helen A

    2016-01-01

    To understand neurocognitive effects of proton radiation therapy (PRT) in patients with low-grade glioma, we evaluated 20 patients who received this therapy prospectively and over 5 years with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. 20 patients were evaluated at baseline and at yearly intervals for up to 5 years with a battery of neuropsychological measures that assessed intellectual, attention, executive, visuospatial and memory functions as well as mood and functional status. We evaluated change in cognitive functioning over time. We analyzed the relationship between cognitive performance and tumor location and also examined whether patients' performance differed from that reported in a study of normative practice effects. Overall, patients exhibited stability in cognitive functioning. Tumor location played a role in performance; those with tumors in the left hemisphere versus in the right hemisphere were more impaired at baseline on verbal measures (p < .05). However, we found greater improvement in verbal memory over time in patients with left than with right hemisphere tumors (p < .05). Results of our study, the first to investigate, in depth, neurocognitive effects of PRT in adults with low-grade gliomas, are promising. We hypothesize that the conformal advantage of PRT may contribute to preservation of cognitive functioning, although larger sample sizes and a longer period of study are required. Our study also highlights the need to consider normative practice effects when studying neurocognitive functioning in response to treatment over time, and the need to utilize comprehensive neuropsychological batteries given our findings that differentiate patients with left and right hemisphere tumors. PMID:26498439

  3. Diffuse low-grade gliomas and neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Duffau, H

    2014-10-01

    The traditional approach in neuro-oncology is to study the tumor in great detail and ultimately give little consideration to the brain itself. Choosing the best treatment strategy for each patient with a diffuse low-grade glioma, in other words optimizing the oncologic and functional balance, implies not only a full knowledge of the natural history of this chronic disease, but also an understanding of the adaptation of the brain in response to growth and spread of the glioma. The aim of this review is to examine the mechanisms underlying this neuroplasticity, allowing functional compensation when the tumor progresses, and opening the way to new treatments with the principle of shifting towards "functional personalized neuro-oncology", improving both median survival and quality of life. PMID:25218490

  4. Subjective Quality of Life in Persons with Low-Grade Glioma and Their Next of Kin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edvardsson, Tanja I.; Ahlstrom, Gerd I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma have a longer survival than patients with highly malignant glioma, and for this reason questions of quality of life (QoL) are of particular importance to such patients as well as to their next of kin. No studies have been found in which both adult patients with low-grade glioma and their next of kin have estimated…

  5. Neurofibromatosis type 1 associated low grade gliomas: A comparison with sporadic low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Helfferich, Jelte; Nijmeijer, Ronald; Brouwer, Oebele F; Boon, Maartje; Fock, Annemarie; Hoving, Eelco W; Meijer, Lisethe; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; de Bont, Eveline S J M

    2016-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder, associated with a variable clinical phenotype including café-au-lait spots, intertriginous freckling, Lisch nodules, neurofibromas, optic pathway gliomas and distinctive bony lesions. NF1 is caused by a mutation in the NF1 gene, which codes for neurofibromin, a large protein involved in the MAPK- and the mTOR-pathway through RAS-RAF signalling. NF1 is a known tumour predisposition syndrome, associated with different tumours of the nervous system including low grade gliomas (LGGs) in the paediatric population. The focus of this review is on grade I pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs), the most commonly observed histologic subtype of low grade gliomas in NF1. Clinically, these PAs have a better prognosis and show different localisation patterns than their sporadic counterparts, which are most commonly associated with a KIAA1549:BRAF fusion. In this review, possible mechanisms of tumourigenesis in LGGs with and without NF1 will be discussed, including the contribution of different signalling pathways and tumour microenvironment. Furthermore we will discuss how increased understanding of tumourigenesis may lead to new potential targets for treatment. PMID:27263935

  6. Validation of EORTC Prognostic Factors for Adults With Low-Grade Glioma: A Report Using Intergroup 86-72-51

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Thomas B.; Brown, Paul D.; Felten, Sara J.; Wu, Wenting; Buckner, Jan C.; Arusell, Robert M.; Curran, Walter J.; Abrams, Ross A.; Schiff, David; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: A prognostic index for survival was constructed and validated from patient data from two European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) radiation trials for low-grade glioma (LGG). We sought to independently validate this prognostic index with a separate prospectively collected data set (Intergroup 86-72-51). Methods and Materials: Two hundred three patients were treated in a North Central Cancer Treatment Group-led trial that randomized patients with supratentorial LGG to 50.4 or 64.8 Gy. Risk factors from the EORTC prognostic index were analyzed for prognostic value: histology, tumor size, neurologic deficit, age, and tumor crossing the midline. The high-risk group was defined as patients with more than two risk factors. In addition, the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score, extent of surgical resection, and 1p19q status were also analyzed for prognostic value. Results: On univariate analysis, the following were statistically significant (p < 0.05) detrimental factors for both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS): astrocytoma histology, tumor size, and less than total resection. A Mini Mental Status Examination score of more than 26 was a favorable prognostic factor. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size and MMSE score were significant predictors of OS whereas tumor size, astrocytoma histology, and MMSE score were significant predictors of PFS. Analyzing by the EORTC risk groups, we found that the low-risk group had significantly better median OS (10.8 years vs. 3.9 years, p < 0.0001) and PFS (6.2 years vs. 1.9 years, p < 0.0001) than the high-risk group. The 1p19q status was available in 66 patients. Co-deletion of 1p19q was a favorable prognostic factor for OS vs. one or no deletion (median OS, 12.6 years vs. 7.2 years; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Although the low-risk group as defined by EORTC criteria had a superior PFS and OS to the high-risk group, this is primarily because of the influence of

  7. Second Surgery in Insular Low-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ius, Tamara; Pauletto, Giada; Cesselli, Daniela; Isola, Miriam; Turella, Luca; Budai, Riccardo; DeMaglio, Giovanna; Eleopra, Roberto; Fadiga, Luciano; Lettieri, Christian; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Skrap, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Background. Given the technical difficulties, a limited number of works have been published on insular gliomas surgery and risk factors for tumor recurrence (TR) are poorly documented. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine TR in adult patients with initial diagnosis of insular Low-Grade Gliomas (LGGs) that subsequently underwent second surgery. Methods. A consecutive series of 53 patients with insular LGGs was retrospectively reviewed; 23 patients had two operations for TR. Results. At the time of second surgery, almost half of the patients had experienced progression into high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Univariate analysis showed that TR is influenced by the following: extent of resection (EOR) (P < 0.002), ΔVT2T1 value (P < 0.001), histological diagnosis of oligodendroglioma (P = 0.017), and mutation of IDH1 (P = 0.022). The multivariate analysis showed that EOR at first surgery was the independent predictor for TR (P < 0.001). Conclusions. In patients with insular LGG the EOR at first surgery represents the major predictive factor for TR. At time of TR, more than 50% of cases had progressed in HGG, raising the question of the oncological management after the first surgery. PMID:26539503

  8. Adult Brainstem Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Mokhtari, Karima; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are uncommon in adults and account for only 1%–2% of intracranial gliomas. They represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that differ from those found in their pediatric counterparts. In adults, a low-grade phenotype predominates, which is a feature that likely explains their better prognosis compared to that in children. Because biopsies are rarely performed, classifications based on the radiological aspect of magnetic resonance imaging results have been proposed to establish treatment strategies and to determine outcomes: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade, (b) enhancing malignant glioma, (c) focal tectal gliomas, and (d) exophytic gliomas. Despite significant advances in neuroradiology techniques, a purely radiological classification remains imperfect in the absence of a histological diagnosis. Whereas a biopsy may often be reasonably avoided in the diffuse nonenhancing forms, obtaining histological proof seems necessary in many contrast-enhanced brainstem lesions because of the wide variety of differential diagnoses in adults. Conventional radiotherapy is the standard treatment for diffuse intrinsic low-grade brainstem gliomas in adults (the median survival is 5 years). In malignant brainstem gliomas, radiotherapy is the standard treatment. However, the possible benefit of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide or other agents) has not been thoroughly evaluated in adults. The role of anti-angiogenic therapies in brainstem gliomas remains to be defined. A better understanding of the biology of these tumors is of primary importance for identifying homogeneous subgroups and for improving therapy options and outcomes. PMID:22382458

  9. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Children with Low-Grade Gliomas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ris, M. Douglas; Beebe, Dean W.

    2008-01-01

    As a group, children with low-grade gliomas (LGGs) enjoy a high rate of long-term survival and do not require the intensity of neurotoxic treatments used with higher risk pediatric brain tumors. Because they are generally considered to have favorable neurobehavioral outcomes, they have not been studied as thoroughly as higher-grade brain tumors by…

  10. The evolving molecular genetics of low-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Venneti, Sriram; Huse, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    Low-grade gliomas (LGG) constitute grade I and grade II tumors of astrocytic and grade II tumors of oligodendroglial lineage. Although these tumors are typically slow growing, they may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to recurrence and malignant progression, even in the setting of optimal resection. LGG in pediatric and adult age groups are currently classified by morphologic criteria. Recent years have heralded a molecular revolution in understanding brain tumors, including LGG. Next generation sequencing has definitively demonstrated that pediatric and adult LGG fundamentally differ in their underlying molecular characteristics, despite being histologically similar. Pediatric LGG show alterations in FGFR1 and BRAF in pilocytic astrocytomas and FGFR1 alterations in diffuse astrocytomas, each converging on the MAP kinase-signaling pathway. Adult LGG are characterized by IDH1/2 mutations and ATRX mutations in astrocytic tumors and IDH1/2 mutations and 1p/19q codeletions in oligodendroglial tumors. TERT promoter mutations are also noted in LGG and are mainly associated with oligodendrogliomas. These findings have considerably refined approaches to classifying these tumors. Moreover, many of the molecular alterations identified in LGG directly impact on prognosis, tumor biology, and the development of novel therapies. PMID:25664944

  11. Activation of PI3K/mTOR pathway occurs in most adult low-grade gliomas and predicts patient survival.

    PubMed

    McBride, Sean M; Perez, Daniel A; Polley, Mei-Yin; Vandenberg, Scott R; Smith, Justin S; Zheng, Shichun; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Wiencke, John K; Chang, Susan M; Prados, Michael D; Berger, Mitchel S; Stokoe, David; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A

    2010-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests the Akt-mTOR pathway may play a role in development of low-grade gliomas (LGG). We sought to evaluate whether activation of this pathway correlates with survival in LGG by examining expression patterns of proteins within this pathway. Forty-five LGG tumor specimens from newly diagnosed patients were analyzed for methylation of the putative 5'-promoter region of PTEN using methylation-specific PCR as well as phosphorylation of S6 and PRAS40 and expression of PTEN protein using immunohistochemistry. Relationships between molecular markers and overall survival (OS) were assessed using Kaplan-Meier methods and exact log-rank test. Correlation between molecular markers was determined using the Mann-Whitney U and Spearman Rank Correlation tests. Eight of the 26 patients with methylated PTEN died, as compared to 1 of 19 without methylation. There was a trend towards statistical significance, with PTEN methylated patients having decreased survival (P = 0.128). Eight of 29 patients that expressed phospho-S6 died, whereas all 9 patients lacking p-S6 expression were alive at last follow-up. There was an inverse relationship between expression of phospho-S6 and survival (P = 0.029). There was a trend towards decreased survival in patients expressing phospho-PRAS40 (P = 0.077). Analyses of relationships between molecular markers demonstrated a statistically significant positive correlation between expression of p-S6(235) and p-PRAS40 (P = 0.04); expression of p-S6(240) correlated positively with PTEN methylation (P = 0.04) and negatively with PTEN expression (P = 0.03). Survival of LGG patients correlates with phosphorylation of S6 protein. This relationship supports the use of selective mTOR inhibitors in the treatment of low grade glioma. PMID:19705067

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery of deeply seated low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Barcia, J A; Barcia-Salorio, J L; Ferrer, C; Ferrer, E; Algás, R; Hernández, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the results of a series of 16 cases of low-grade gliomas in whom radiosurgery was performed. This series started in 1977. All the tumours received a single radiosurgical session (with a mean dose of 21.7 Gy, 5-10 mm. collimator; one patient received two sessions and in another patient two different targets were irradiated in the same session). Prior to radiosurgery, six patients received conventional external fractionated radiotherapy, with two lateral fields of up to 10 x 10 cm. and a mean dose of 55.1 Gy and another six patients with tumours less than 5 cm. in diameter, received stereotactic radiotherapy using four fields of up to 5 x 5 cm. and a mean dose of 53.1 Gy. In both cases, conventional fractionation was used, giving a dose of 1.8 to 2 Gy/day. The tumour disappeared in 8 cases (50%) and shunk or ceased its growth in 5 additional cases (31%). In 3 cases of brainstem gliomas in which the clinical condition was previously very poor there was no evolutional change and the patients eventually died. We conclude that radiosurgery is effective in the treatment of deeply seated low-grade gliomas, where it may become the treatment of choice in the absence of other more definitive choices. PMID:7717138

  13. Clinical ramifications of "genomic staging" of low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Mehta, Minesh P

    2016-09-01

    "Low-grade gliomas" (LGGs), classification of which is derived from histopathological observations, exhibit significant heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to genomic analyses of these tumors, to aid in treatment and prognostic decision-making. We discuss herein the recent genomic analysis of gliomas from two major recent publications, and also the results of seminal LGG trials in the context of molecular and genomic stratification, with respect to both prognosis and response to therapy. We also analyze implications of these "molecular classifications". We propose separating out the worst prognostic subsets, whose outcomes resemble those of glioblastoma patients. Lastly, a brief discussion is provided regarding translating this collective knowledge into the clinic and in treatment decisions; also addressed are some of the many questions that still need to be examined in light of these strong and emerging data. PMID:27401152

  14. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  15. Incidental diffuse low-grade gliomas: from early detection to preventive neuro-oncological surgery.

    PubMed

    Lima, Guilherme Lucas de Oliveira; Zanello, Marc; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Taillandier, Luc; Pallud, Johan; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Although a large amount of data supports early surgical resection for symptomatic diffuse low-grade glioma, the therapeutic strategy is still a matter of debate regarding incidentally discovered diffuse low-grade glioma. Indeed, early and "preventive" surgery has recently been proposed in asymptomatic patients with silent diffuse low-grade glioma with better outcomes. The present review discusses the importance of an early diagnosis and of a preventive surgical treatment to improve the outcomes of incidental diffuse low-grade glioma and suggests the possible relevance of a tailored screening policy. PMID:26610909

  16. Outcomes of Multidisciplinary Management in Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Kevin S.; Hung, Jonathan; Robertson, Patricia L.; Garton, Hugh J.; Muraszko, Karin M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes in pediatric low-grade gliomas managed in a multidisciplinary setting. Methods and Materials: We conducted a single-institution retrospective study of 181 children with Grade I-II gliomas. Log-rank and stepwise Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze freedom from progression (FFP) and overall survival (OS). Results: Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Thirty-four (19%) of patients had neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) and because of their favorable prognosis were evaluated separately. In the 147 (81%) of patients without NF1, actuarial 7-year FFP and OS were 67 {+-} 4% (standard error) and 94 {+-} 2%, respectively. In this population, tumor location in the optic pathway/hypothalamus was associated with worse FFP (39% vs. 76%, p < 0.0003), but there was no difference in OS. Age {<=}5 years was associated with worse FFP (52% vs. 75%, p < 0.02) but improved OS (97% vs. 92%, p < 0.05). In those with tissue diagnosis, gross total resection (GTR) was associated with improved 7-year FFP (81% vs. 56%, p < 0.02) and OS (100% vs. 90%, p < 0.03). In a multivariate model, only location in the optic pathway/hypothalamus predicted worse FFP (p < 0.01). Fifty patients received radiation therapy (RT). For those with less than GTR, adjuvant RT improved FFP (89% vs. 49%, p < 0.003) but not OS. There was no difference in OS between patient groups given RT as adjuvant vs. salvage therapy. In NF1 patients, 94% of tumors were located in the optic pathway/hypothalamus. With a conservative treatment strategy in this population, actuarial 7-year FFP and OS were 73 {+-} 9% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Low-grade gliomas in children {<=}5 years old with tumors in the optic pathway/hypothalamus are more likely to progress, but this does not confer worse OS because of the success of salvage therapy. When GTR is not achieved, adjuvant RT improves FFP but not OS. Routine adjuvant RT can be avoided and instead reserved as salvage.

  17. Mouse low-grade gliomas contain cancer stem cells with unique molecular and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hsien; McGowan, Lucy D'Agostino; Cimino, Patrick J; Dahiya, Sonika; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Lee, Da Yong; Gutmann, David H

    2015-03-24

    The availability of adult malignant glioma stem cells (GSCs) has provided unprecedented opportunities to identify the mechanisms underlying treatment resistance. Unfortunately, there is a lack of comparable reagents for the study of pediatric low-grade glioma (LGG). Leveraging a neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) genetically engineered mouse LGG model, we report the isolation of CD133(+) multi-potent low-grade glioma stem cells (LG-GSCs), which generate glioma-like lesions histologically similar to the parent tumor following injection into immunocompetent hosts. In addition, we demonstrate that these LG-GSCs harbor selective resistance to currently employed conventional and biologically targeted anti-cancer agents, which reflect the acquisition of new targetable signaling pathway abnormalities. Using transcriptomic analysis to identify additional molecular properties, we discovered that mouse and human LG-GSCs harbor high levels of Abcg1 expression critical for protecting against ER-stress-induced mouse LG-GSC apoptosis. Collectively, these findings establish that LGG cancer stem cells have unique molecular and functional properties relevant to brain cancer treatment. PMID:25772366

  18. Sexuality after surgery for diffuse low-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Surbeck, Werner; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Background Although neurological and neurocognitive outcomes have previously been studied after resection of diffuse low-grade glioma (DLGG), the impact of surgery on sexual life has not been investigated. Our aim was to assess whether DLGG surgery could have consequences on sexual experience. Methods Anonymous standardized questionnaires concerning sexual functioning, including the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX) and a subjective statement, were completed by 32 patients who underwent surgery for DLGG. All patients returned to a normal social and professional life following resection, with neither neurological deficits nor depression. No radiotherapy was administered, and patients who received chemotherapy were without treatment for at least 1 year. Results Seventeen patients (53%) reported a postoperative sexual change, with subjective deterioration in 15 (88%) and improvement in 2 (12%). Sexual dysfunction according to ASEX affected 9 of 15 women (60%) and 5 of 17 men (29%). Right-sided resections were associated with more difficulties in reaching orgasm than left-sided resections (P < .02). Men with temporal lobe resection displayed more reduction in sexual drive (P < .003) and sexual arousal (P < .004) than women, resulting in significant higher overall ASEX scores for temporal lobe resections in men (P = .01). Men remaining on antiepileptic drugs who underwent right-sided resection displayed higher overall ASEX scores than women (P = .031). Conclusions This first evaluation of sexual life after surgery for DLGG suggests that sexual dysfunction is common in this population. Therefore, we suggest that sexual health should consistently be addressed during routine pre- and postoperative examination of patients with DLGG. PMID:25699682

  19. Plasticity of language pathways in patients with low-grade glioma: A diffusion tensor imaging study☆

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Xiaolei; Xu, Bainan; Zhang, Jiashu; Lv, Xueming; Li, Jinjiang; Li, Fangye; Hu, Shen; Zhang, Ting; Li, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the plasticity of language pathways in patients with low-grade glioma is important for neurosurgeons to achieve maximum resection while preserving neurological function. The current study sought to investigate changes in the ventral language pathways in patients with low-grade glioma located in regions likely to affect the dorsal language pathways. The results revealed no significant difference in fractional anisotropy values in the arcuate fasciculus between groups or between hemispheres. However, fractional anisotropy and lateralization index values in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus and lateralization index values in the left inferior fronto-occpital fasciculus were higher in patients than in healthy subjects. These results indicate plasticity of language pathways in patients with low-grade glioma. The ventral language pathways may perform more functions in patients than in healthy subjects. As such, it is important to protect the ventral language pathways intraoperatively. PMID:25206710

  20. Exploring the role of inflammation in the malignant transformation of low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Michelson, Nicole; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2016-08-15

    Studies of inflammatory mediators have established the tumor micro-environment as a driver of oncogenesis. This inflammatory milieu often precedes cancer, however recent data also point to the ability of oncogenic changes to induce inflammatory responses that are later harnessed by the tumor to survive and proliferate. In this review, we propose that the IDH1 mutation, present in the majority of low-grade gliomas (LGGs), initiates an inflammatory cascade that is ultimately hijacked by the tumor. Glioma infiltrating macrophages and microglia (GIMs) are polarized to the M2 phenotype, subverting the host's adaptive immune response, and fostering a tumor milieu ripe for angiogenesis, migration, and metastasis. As data continue to expand the role of inflammation in low-grade gliomas, new molecular pathways may emerge as therapeutic targets that offer a window of opportunity to intervene before the malignant transformation (MT) of LGGs occurs. PMID:27397086

  1. IDH mutation is associated with higher risk of malignant transformation in low-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Leu, Severina; von Felten, Stefanie; Frank, Stephan; Boulay, Jean-Louis; Mariani, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Acquisition of IDH1 or IDH2 mutation (IDHmut) is among the earliest genetic events that take place in the development of most low-grade glioma (LGG). IDHmut has been associated with longer overall patient survival. However, its impact on malignant transformation (MT) remains to be defined. A collection of 210 archived adult LGG previously stratified by IDHmut, MGMT methylation (MGMTmet), 1p/19q combined loss of heterozygosity (1p19qloh) and TP53 immunopositivity (TP53pos) status was analyzed. We used multistate models to assess MT-free survival, considering one initial, one transient (MT), and one absorbing state (death). Missing explanatory variables were multiply imputed. Overall, although associated with a lower risk of death (HR(DEATH) = 0.35, P = 0.0023), IDHmut had a non-significantly higher risk of MT (HR(MT) = 1.84; P = 0.1683) compared to IDH wild type (IDHwt). The double combination of IDHmut and MGMTmet and the triple combination of IDHmut, MGMTmet and 1p/19qloh, despite significantly lower hazards for death (HR(DEATH) versus IDHwt: 0.35, P = 0.0194 and 0.15, P = 0.0008, respectively), had non-significantly different hazards for MT. Conversely, the triple combination of IDHmut/MGMTmet/TP53pos, with a non-significantly different hazard for death, had a significantly higher hazard for MT than IDHwt (HR(MT) versus IDHwt: 2.83; P = 0.0452). Although IDHmut status is associated with longer overall patient survival, all IDHmut/MGMTmet subsets consistently showed higher risks of MT than of death, compared to IDHwt LGG. This supports the findings that molecular events relevant to IDH mutations impact early glioma development prior to malignant transformation. PMID:26780338

  2. Exploiting molecular biology for diagnosis and targeted management of pediatric low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Michael A; Solomon, David A; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A

    2016-06-01

    The majority of brain tumors arising in children are low-grade gliomas. Although historically categorized together as pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs), there is significant histologic and genetic diversity within this group. In general, prognosis for PLGGs is excellent, and limitation of sequelae from tumor and treatment is paramount. Advances in high-throughput genetic sequencing and gene expression profiling are fundamentally changing the way PLGGs are classified and managed. Here, we review the histologic subtypes and highlight how recent advances in elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors have refined diagnosis and prognostication. Additionally, we discuss how characterizing specific genetic alterations has paved the way for the rational use of targeted therapies that are currently in various phase clinical trials. PMID:27072750

  3. Distinction of brain tissue, low grade and high grade glioma with time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yong, William H; Butte, Pramod V; Pikul, Brian K; Jo, Javier A; Fang, Qiyin; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Black, Keith; Marcu, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Neuropathology frozen section diagnoses are difficult in part because of the small tissue samples and the paucity of adjunctive rapid intraoperative stains. This study aims to explore the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as a rapid adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of glioma specimens and for distinction of glioma from normal tissues intraoperatively. Ten low grade gliomas, 15 high grade gliomas without necrosis, 6 high grade gliomas with necrosis and/or radiation effect, and 14 histologically uninvolved "normal" brain specimens are spectroscopicaly analyzed and contrasted. Tissue autofluorescence was induced with a pulsed Nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1.2 ns) and the transient intensity decay profiles were recorded in the 370-500 nm spectral range with a fast digitized (0.2 ns time resolution). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters derived from the time-resolved spectra of each site were used for tissue characterization. A linear discriminant analysis diagnostic algorithm was used for tissue classification. Both low and high grade gliomas can be distinguished from histologically uninvolved cerebral cortex and white matter with high accuracy (above 90%). In addition, the presence or absence of treatment effect and/or necrosis can be identified in high grade gliomas. Taking advantage of tissue autofluorescence, this technique facilitates a direct and rapid investigation of surgically obtained tissue. PMID:16368511

  4. The microtubule binding drug EM011 inhibits the growth of paediatric low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ajeawung, Norbert F; Joshi, Harish C; Kamnasaran, Deepak

    2013-07-10

    Low grade gliomas are a heterogeneous group of tumours representing the most common form of neoplasms in the central nervous system among children. Although gross total resection remains the principal treatment, it is often impractical especially for the resection of tumours within eloquent regions of the brain. Instead Radiotherapy is utilised in such cases, but because of its associated toxicities, it is refrained from use among younger children. These limitations coupled with hypersensitivity and toxicities associated with some commonly used chemotherapeutic agents, have ignited the need to search for safer and more effective treatments for paediatric low grade gliomas. In this study, we investigated the EM011 drug on the growth of two pilocytic and one diffuse paediatric astrocytoma cell lines, using an assortment of cancer assays. We discovered that treatments of low grade gliomas with EM011 abrogated cell viability by inducing a decrease in cell proliferation and an arrest in the S and G2M cell cycle phases, followed by a converse increase in apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner. The cell migratory and invasion indices, as well as anchorage independent growth in soft agarose, were significantly attenuated. These findings were mechanistically associated with a transient release of AIF, a disruption of microtubule architecture, and a decline in the expression of key genes which drive cancer progression including EGFR, mTORC1, JUN and multiple MMPs. In fact, the activity of MMP2 was also perturbed by EM011. These findings, in conjunction with the insignificant adverse side effects established from other studies, make EM011 an appealing chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of paediatric low grade gliomas. PMID:23402815

  5. Human leukocyte antigen-G overexpression predicts poor clinical outcomes in low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Wang, Yinyan; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Xing; Qian, Zenghui; Jiang, Tao

    2016-05-15

    Overexpression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G), a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class-I molecule associated with immunosuppression, has been reported in various human malignancies. In the present study, we examined the role of HLA-G in gliomas. Clinical characteristics, mRNA expression microarrays and follow-up data pertaining to 293 patients with histologically confirmed gliomas were analyzed. The expression levels of HLA-G were compared between different grades of gliomas and correlated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) to evaluate its prognostic value. We found that HLA-G was overexpressed in gliomas as compared to that in normal brain tissue samples (-1.288±0.265). The highest expression levels were in glioblastomas (GBMs), anaplastic gliomas (AGs) and low-grade gliomas (LGGs), in that order (0.328±0.778, 0.176±0.881, -0.388±0.686, respectively). Significant inter-group differences were observed between low-grade and high-grade glioma tissues (p<0.001 and p<0.001, t-test, AGs and GBMs, respectively). More astrocytoma patients exhibited increased HLA-G expression as compared to other LGG patients (p=0.004, Chi-square test). Significant differences were observed with respect to PFS and OS (p=0.009 and 0.032, log-rank test, for PFS and OS, respectively) between the high- and low-expression subgroups in patients with LGGs. On Cox regression analysis, overexpression of HLA-G appeared to be an independent predictor of clinical outcomes (p=0.007 and 0.026, for PFS and OS, respectively). Our results suggest that HLA-G expression may serve as a potential biomarker for predicting aggressive tumor grades of gliomas and for histological subtype of LGGs. Elevated HLA-G expression could serve as an independent predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients with low-grade gliomas. PMID:27138095

  6. Molecular features assisting in diagnosis, surgery, and treatment decision making in low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ricky; Ravindra, Vijay M; Cohen, Adam L; Jensen, Randy L; Salzman, Karen L; Prescot, Andrew P; Colman, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The preferred management of suspected low-grade gliomas (LGGs) has been disputed, and the implications of molecular changes for medical and surgical management of LGGs are important to consider. Current strategies that make use of molecular markers and imaging techniques and therapeutic considerations offer additional options for management of LGGs. Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes suggest a role for this abnormal metabolic pathway in the pathogenesis and progression of these primary brain tumors. Use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide preoperative detection of IDH-mutated gliomas and affect surgical planning. In addition, IDH1 and IDH2 mutation status may have an effect on surgical resectability of gliomas. The IDH-mutated tumors exhibit better prognosis throughout every grade of glioma, and mutation may be an early genetic event, preceding lineage-specific secondary and tertiary alterations that transform LGGs into secondary glioblastomas. The O6-methylguanine-DNAmethyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation and 1p19q codeletion status can predict sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation in low- and intermediate-grade gliomas. Thus, these recent advances, which have led to a better understanding of how molecular, genetic, and epigenetic alterations influence the pathogenicity of the different histological grades of gliomas, can lead to better prognostication and may lead to specific targeted surgical interventions and medical therapies. PMID:25727224

  7. Cognitive function after radiotherapy for supratentorial low-grade glioma: A North Central Cancer Treatment Group prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Laack, Nadia N.; Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Ivnik, Robert J.; Furth, Alfred F. M.S.; Ballman, Karla V.; Hammack, Julie E.; Arusell, Robert M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Buckner, Jan C.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of cranial radiotherapy (RT) on cognitive function in patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Twenty adult patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma were treated with 50.4 Gy (10 patients) or 64.8 Gy (10 patients) localized RT. The patients then were evaluated with an extensive battery of psychometric tests at baseline (before RT) and at approximately 18-month intervals for as long as 5 years after completing RT. To allow patients to serve as their own controls, cognitive performance was evaluated as change in scores over time. All patients underwent at least two evaluations. Results: Baseline test scores were below average compared with age-specific norms. At the second evaluation, the groups' mean test scores were higher than their initial performances on all psychometric measures, although the improvement was not statistically significant. No changes in cognitive performance were seen during the evaluation period when test scores were analyzed by age, treatment, tumor location, tumor type, or extent of resection. Conclusions: Cognitive function was stable after RT in these patients evaluated prospectively during 3 years of follow-up. Slight improvements in some cognitive areas are consistent with practice effects attributable to increased familiarity with test procedures and content.

  8. Brainstem Glioma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jethro; Western, Stephen; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are not nearly as common in adults as they are in children. They are likely the final common consequence not of a single disease process but of several. They can be difficult to diagnose, and are challenging to treat. Clinical studies of this diagnosis are few and generally small. Because of these factors, our understanding of the biology of adult brainstem glioma is incomplete. However, the knowledge base is growing and progress is being made. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge for brainstem glioma in adults and identify key areas for which additional information is required. PMID:27556016

  9. Methylation of the PTEN promoter defines low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wiencke, John K.; Zheng, Shichun; Jelluma, Nanette; Tihan, Tarik; Vandenberg, Scott; Tamgüney, Tanja; Baumber, Rachel; Parsons, Ramon; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne Adele; Stokoe, David

    2007-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can present as either de novo or secondary tumors arising from previously diagnosed low-grade gliomas. Although these tumor types are phenotypically indistinguishable, de novo and secondary GBMs are associated with distinct genetic characteristics. PTEN mutations, which result in activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signal transduction pathway, are frequent in de novo but not in secondary GBMs or their antecedent low-grade tumors. Results we present here show that grade II astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, and oligoastrocytomas commonly display methylation of the PTEN promoter, a finding that is absent in nontumor brain specimens and rare in de novo GBMs. Methylation of the PTEN promoter correlates with protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) phosphorylation, reflecting functional activation of the PI3K pathway. Our results also demonstrate frequent methylation of the PTEN promoter in grade III astrocytomas and secondary GBMs, consistent with the hypothesis that these tumors arise from lower grade precursors. PTEN methylation is rare in de novo GBMs and is mutually exclusive with PTEN mutations. We conclude that methylation of the PTEN promoter may represent an alternate mechanism by which PI3K signaling is increased in grade II and III gliomas as well as secondary GBMs, a finding that offers new therapeutic approaches in these patients. PMID:17504928

  10. Methylation of the PTEN promoter defines low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Zheng, Shichun; Jelluma, Nanette; Tihan, Tarik; Vandenberg, Scott; Tamgüney, Tanja; Baumber, Rachel; Parsons, Ramon; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Wrensch, Margaret R; Haas-Kogan, Daphne Adele; Stokoe, David

    2007-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can present as either de novo or secondary tumors arising from previously diagnosed low-grade gliomas. Although these tumor types are phenotypically indistinguishable, de novo and secondary GBMs are associated with distinct genetic characteristics. PTEN mutations, which result in activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signal transduction pathway, are frequent in de novo but not in secondary GBMs or their antecedent low-grade tumors. Results we present here show that grade II astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, and oligoastrocytomas commonly display methylation of the PTEN promoter, a finding that is absent in nontumor brain specimens and rare in de novo GBMs. Methylation of the PTEN promoter correlates with protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) phosphorylation, reflecting functional activation of the PI3K pathway. Our results also demonstrate frequent methylation of the PTEN promoter in grade III astrocytomas and secondary GBMs, consistent with the hypothesis that these tumors arise from lower grade precursors. PTEN methylation is rare in de novo GBMs and is mutually exclusive with PTEN mutations. We conclude that methylation of the PTEN promoter may represent an alternate mechanism by which PI3K signaling is increased in grade II and III gliomas as well as secondary GBMs, a finding that offers new therapeutic approaches in these patients. PMID:17504928

  11. Transformation of low grade glioma and correlation with outcome: an NCCTG database analysis.

    PubMed

    Jaeckle, K A; Decker, P A; Ballman, K V; Flynn, P J; Giannini, C; Scheithauer, B W; Jenkins, R B; Buckner, J C

    2011-08-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) may originate de novo (primary), or following transformation from a lower grade glioma (secondary), and it has been postulated that these tumors may have different biological behaviors. We performed a correlative analysis involving 204 patients with glioma treated prospectively on NCCTG clinical trials. Central pathology review of tumor tissues taken at the time of initial diagnosis and at recurrence were performed in all patients. Tumors progressed from low (WHO grade 2) to high (grade 3-4) at recurrence in 45% low grade oligodendroglioma patients, in 70% with low grade oligoastrocytoma, and 74% with low grade astrocytoma (P = 0.031). Median overall survival (OS) from initial diagnosis varied by histology: oligodendroglioma, 8.8 years; (95% CI 5.7-10.2); oligoastrocytoma, 4.4 years (95% CI 3.5-5.6); astrocytoma grade 2 3.1 years (astrocytoma grade 2-4, 2.1 years) (95% CI 1.7-2.5, P < 0.001). Mean time to recurrence (TTR) also varied between patients with de novo GBM, those secondary GBM, and those that remained non-GBM at recurrence (1.1 ± 1.1 vs. 2.9 ± 1.8 vs. 4.0 ± 2.9 years, respectively, P < 0.001). Median OS from time of recurrence also varied between these three categories (0.7 years, 95% CI: 0.5-1.1 vs. 0.6 years, CI: 0.5-1.0 vs. 1.4 years, 95% CI: 1.1-2.0, respectively) (P < 0.001). At time of relapse, transformation to higher grade is frequent in low grade pure and mixed astrocytomas, but is observed in less than half of those with low grade oligodendroglioma. From time of recurrence, OS was not significantly different for those with primary versus secondary GBM, and it may thus be reasonable include patients with secondary GBM in clinical therapeutic trials for recurrent disease. PMID:21153680

  12. Prognostic value of increase in transcript levels of Tp73 DeltaEx2-3 isoforms in low-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Wager, M; Guilhot, J; Blanc, J-L; Ferrand, S; Milin, S; Bataille, B; Lapierre, F; Denis, S; Chantereau, T; Larsen, C-J; Karayan-Tapon, L

    2006-10-23

    Glial tumours are a devastating, poorly understood condition carrying a gloomy prognosis for which clinicians sorely lack reliable predictive parameters facilitating a sound treatment strategy. Tp73, a p53 family member, expresses two main classes of isoforms--transactivatory activity (TA)p73 and DeltaTAp73--exhibiting tumour suppressor gene and oncogene properties, respectively. The authors examined their expression status in high- and low-grade adult gliomas. Isoform-specific real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used for the analysis of Tp73 isoform transcript expression in a series of 51 adult patients harbouring glial tumours, in order to compare tumour grades with each other, and with non-tumoural samples obtained from epileptic patients as well. Our data demonstrate increase of TAp73 and DeltaTAp73 transcript levels at onset and early stage of the disease. We also show that DeltaEx2-3 isoform expression in low-grade tumours anticipates clinical and imaging progression to higher grades, and correlates to the patients' survival. Expression levels of P1 promoter generated Tp73 isoforms--and particularly DeltaEx2-3--indeed allow for prediction of the clinical progression of low-grade gliomas in adults. Our data are the first such molecular biology report regarding low-grade tumours and as such should be of help for sound decision-making. PMID:17047653

  13. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for hippocampal-sparing radiotherapy in transformed low-grade glioma: A treatment planning case report.

    PubMed

    Kazda, T; Pospisil, P; Vrzal, M; Sevela, O; Prochazka, T; Jancalek, R; Slampa, P; Laack, N N

    2015-05-01

    Timing of radiotherapy for low-grade gliomas is still controversial due to concerns of possible adverse late effects. Prevention of possible late cognitive sequelae by hippocampal avoidance has shown promise in phase II trials. A patient with progressive low-grade glioma with gradual dedifferentiation into anaplastic astrocytoma is presented along with description of radiotherapy planning process attempting to spare the hippocampus. To our knowledge, this is the first described case using volumetric modulated arc technique to spare hippocampus during transformed low-grade glioma radiotherapy. Using modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy systems it is possible to selectively spare hippocampus together with other standard organs at risk. For selected patients, an attempt to spare hippocampus can be considered as long as other dose characteristics are not significantly compromised compared to standard treatment plan created without any effort to avoid hippocampus. PMID:25835374

  14. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genetic alterations in pediatric low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Miller, Claudia P; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Orisme, Wilda; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Parker, Matthew; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Boop, Fredrick A; Lu, Charles; Kandoth, Cyriac; Ding, Li; Lee, Ryan; Huether, Robert; Chen, Xiang; Hedlund, Erin; Nagahawatte, Panduka; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Cheng, Jinjun; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Song, Guangchun; Li, Yongjin; Wei, Lei; Wang, Jianmin; Shurtleff, Sheila; Easton, John; Zhao, David; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Dooling, David J; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Mulder, Heather L; Tang, Chunlao; Ochoa, Kerri; Mullighan, Charles G; Gajjar, Amar; Kriwacki, Richard; Sheer, Denise; Gilbertson, Richard J; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Baker, Suzanne J; Ellison, David W

    2013-06-01

    The most common pediatric brain tumors are low-grade gliomas (LGGs). We used whole-genome sequencing to identify multiple new genetic alterations involving BRAF, RAF1, FGFR1, MYB, MYBL1 and genes with histone-related functions, including H3F3A and ATRX, in 39 LGGs and low-grade glioneuronal tumors (LGGNTs). Only a single non-silent somatic alteration was detected in 24 of 39 (62%) tumors. Intragenic duplications of the portion of FGFR1 encoding the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) and rearrangements of MYB were recurrent and mutually exclusive in 53% of grade II diffuse LGGs. Transplantation of Trp53-null neonatal astrocytes expressing FGFR1 with the duplication involving the TKD into the brains of nude mice generated high-grade astrocytomas with short latency and 100% penetrance. FGFR1 with the duplication induced FGFR1 autophosphorylation and upregulation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K pathways, which could be blocked by specific inhibitors. Focusing on the therapeutically challenging diffuse LGGs, our study of 151 tumors has discovered genetic alterations and potential therapeutic targets across the entire range of pediatric LGGs and LGGNTs. PMID:23583981

  15. A clinicopathologic study of diencephalic pediatric low-grade gliomas with BRAF V600 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Mobley, Bret C; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; VandenBussche, Christopher J; Mason, Gary E; Bornhorst, Miriam; Esbenshade, Adam J; Tehrani, Mahtab; Orr, Brent A; LaFrance, Delecia R; Devaney, Joseph M; Meltzer, Beatrix W; Hofherr, Sean E; Burger, Peter C; Packer, Roger J; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-10-01

    Among brain tumors, the BRAF (V600E) mutation is frequently associated with pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas (PXAs) and gangliogliomas (GGs). This oncogenic mutation is also detected in ~5 % of other pediatric low-grade gliomas (LGGs) including pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and diffuse astrocytomas. In the current multi-institutional study of 56 non-PXA/non-GG diencephalic pediatric LGGs, the BRAF (V600) mutation rate is 36 %. V600-mutant tumors demonstrate a predilection for infants and young children (low-grade astrocytomas (LGAs) was 22 ± 12 %, shorter than BRAF (V600)-WT PAs (52 ± 13 %) but higher than PMAs (10 ± 6 %). Of note, long-term PFS was observed in several adolescent patients with BRAF (V600)-mutant tumors. In children aged 0-12 years, 5-year PFS rate and median PFS in BRAF (V600)-mutant LGAs are 9 ± 9 % and 19 months (95 % CI 3-37 months), respectively. The PFS is comparable to that in BRAF (V600)-WT PMAs (5-year PFS rate: 10 ± 9 %; median PFS: 15 months, 95 % CI 3-32 months; p = 0.96) and significantly shorter than BRAF (V600)-WT PAs (5-year PFS rate: 46 ± 13 %; median PFS: 51 months, 95 % CI 20-∞ months; p < 0.05). In summary, diencephalic BRAF (V600)-mutant pediatric LGAs are associated with unique clinicopathologic features and have a more aggressive clinical course, especially in children

  16. Phase II TPDCV protocol for pediatric low-grade hypothalamic/chiasmatic gliomas: 15-year update

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Kavita K.; Squire, Sarah; Lamborn, Kathleen; Banerjee, Anuradha; Gupta, Nalin; Wara, William M.; Prados, Michael D.; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2010-01-01

    To report long-term results for children with low-grade hypothalamic/chiasmatic gliomas treated on a phase II chemotherapy protocol. Between 1984 and 1992, 33 children with hypothalamic/chiasmatic LGGs received TPDCV chemotherapy on a phase II prospective trial. Median age was 3.0 years (range 0.3–16.2). Twelve patients (36%) underwent STRs, 14 (42%) biopsy only, and seven (21%) no surgery. Twenty patients (61%) had pathologic JPAs, nine (27%) grade II gliomas, and four (12%) no surgical sampling. Median f/u for surviving patients was 15.2 years (range 5.3–20.7); 20 of the 23 surviving patients had 14 or more years of follow-up. Fifteen-year PFS and OS were 23.4 and 71.2%, respectively. Twenty-five patients progressed, of whom 13 are NED, two are AWD, and 10 have died. All children who died were diagnosed and first treated at age three or younger. Age at diagnosis was significantly associated with relapse and survival (P = 0.004 for PFS and P = 0.037 for OS). No PFS or OS benefit was seen with STR versus biopsy/no sampling (P = 0.58 for PFS, P = 0.59 for OS). For patients with JPAs and WHO grade II tumors, the 15-year PFS was 18.8 and 22.2% (P = 0.95) and 15-year OS was 73.7 and 55.6% (P = 0.17), respectively. Upfront TPDCV for children with hypothalamic/chiasmatic LGGs resulted in 15-year OS of 71.2% and 15-year PFS of 23.4%. No survival benefit is demonstrated for greater extent of resection. Age is a significant prognostic factor for progression and survival. PMID:20221671

  17. Phase II TPDCV protocol for pediatric low-grade hypothalamic/chiasmatic gliomas: 15-year update.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Kavita K; Squire, Sarah; Lamborn, Kathleen; Banerjee, Anuradha; Gupta, Nalin; Wara, William M; Prados, Michael D; Berger, Mitchel S; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A

    2010-10-01

    To report long-term results for children with low-grade hypothalamic/chiasmatic gliomas treated on a phase II chemotherapy protocol. Between 1984 and 1992, 33 children with hypothalamic/chiasmatic LGGs received TPDCV chemotherapy on a phase II prospective trial. Median age was 3.0 years (range 0.3-16.2). Twelve patients (36%) underwent STRs, 14 (42%) biopsy only, and seven (21%) no surgery. Twenty patients (61%) had pathologic JPAs, nine (27%) grade II gliomas, and four (12%) no surgical sampling. Median f/u for surviving patients was 15.2 years (range 5.3-20.7); 20 of the 23 surviving patients had 14 or more years of follow-up. Fifteen-year PFS and OS were 23.4 and 71.2%, respectively. Twenty-five patients progressed, of whom 13 are NED, two are AWD, and 10 have died. All children who died were diagnosed and first treated at age three or younger. Age at diagnosis was significantly associated with relapse and survival (P = 0.004 for PFS and P = 0.037 for OS). No PFS or OS benefit was seen with STR versus biopsy/no sampling (P = 0.58 for PFS, P = 0.59 for OS). For patients with JPAs and WHO grade II tumors, the 15-year PFS was 18.8 and 22.2% (P = 0.95) and 15-year OS was 73.7 and 55.6% (P = 0.17), respectively. Upfront TPDCV for children with hypothalamic/chiasmatic LGGs resulted in 15-year OS of 71.2% and 15-year PFS of 23.4%. No survival benefit is demonstrated for greater extent of resection. Age is a significant prognostic factor for progression and survival. PMID:20221671

  18. The Changing Landscape of Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas: Clinical Challenges and Emerging Therapies.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro Stucklin, Ana S; Tabori, Uri; Grotzer, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) are the most common brain tumors in children. Though histologically benign and associated with excellent outcome, patients with unresectable lesions-mostly young children with midline tumors-experience multiple progressions and are at increased risk for long-term neurological sequelae. PLGGs in children with underlying genetic predisposition syndromes-especially neurofibromatosis type 1 and tuberous sclerosis-have a distinct natural history and biology with important treatment implications. Given the complexity of medical issues, optimal management requires a large network of health care providers; treatment decisions must address both tumor control and potential side effects of the therapy. Current treatment strategies often fail to induce sustained tumor regression and many children require several lines of therapy, highlighting the need for novel therapies. Here, we review the current management of PLGG and discuss how new molecular targets-in particular alterations of the Ras/MAPK pathway-are rapidly changing our approach to PLGG. PMID:26764564

  19. Clinical Management of Seizures in Patients With Low-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowski, Anna F.; Blakeley, Jaishri

    2015-01-01

    Seizures, transient disruptions of normal brain electrical activity, are common for patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) and significantly affect quality of life. Up to 75% of patients with a LGG will have seizures in the course of their disease (compared with 1%–2% of the general population). Depending on the type of abnormal electrical activity, the functional implications of seizure can impact any domain, including mental status, sensation or strength. In most cases, either the seizure or the medications used to treat the seizure may contribute to cognitive and psychosocial difficulties of various degrees of severity. Hence, effective management of seizures is a major priority for patients with LGG. Evidence-based guidelines suggest that levetiracetam is the best first-line agent for treatment of seizures in this population due to both its efficacy and tolerability. An important consideration in the field of neuro-oncology is that levetiracetam has very few drug interactions. Unfortunately, approximately one-third of patients with LGG have refractory epilepsy where additional agents such as valproic acid, or lacosamide, lamotrigine and nonpharmacologic therapies such as diet-based interventions, epilepsy surgery, and devices are considered. PMID:26050593

  20. Fluorine F 18 Fluorodopa-Labeled PET Scan in Planning Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High- or Low-Grade Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  1. Retrospective protein expression and epigenetic inactivation studies of CDH1 in patients affected by low-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    D'Urso, Pietro Ivo; D'Urso, Oscar Fernando; Storelli, Carlo; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gianfreda, Cosimo Damiano; Montinaro, Antonio; Muscella, Antonella; Marsigliante, Santo

    2011-08-01

    Aberrant methylation of CpG islands in the promoter regions of tumour cells results in loss of gene function. In addition to genetic lesions, changes in the methylation profile of the promoters may be considered a factor for tumour-specific aberrant expression of the genes.We investigated the methylation status of E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter in low-grade glioma and correlated it with clinical outcome. Eighty-four cases of low-grade glioma (43 diffuse astrocytomas, 27 oligodendrogliomas and 14 oligoastrocytomas) with assessable paraffin-embedded tumour blocks and normal brain tissue, derived from non-cancerous tissue adjacent to tumour and commercially normal brain tissue, were collected, from which we determined CDH1 promoter methylation status and E-cadherin protein expression by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. CDH1 promoter was found hypermethylated in 54 out of 84 low grade gliomas (64%) compared with 84 normal brain tissue. CDH1 hypermethylation was found in 65% astrocytomas, 66% oligodendrogliomas and 57% oligoastrocytomas. A significant correlation between hypermethylation status, patient survival and progression-free survival was found (P = 0.04). Survival and progression-free survival were lower in patients with hypermethylated CDH1 promoter. We found that 15 astrocytomas, 9 oligodendrogliomas and 6 oligoastrocytomas were immunoreactive for E-cadherin. The incidence of loss of immunoreactivity for E-cadherin decreased significantly with age, overall survival and progression-free survival (P = 0.001, Kaplan-Meier test). We have demonstrated that CDH1 promoter hypermethylation significantly associated with down-regulated E-cadherin expression and overall survival of patients. This may have a bearing on the prognosis of low-grade glioma. PMID:21127944

  2. Quality of life in low-grade glioma patients receiving temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Raymond; Solheim, Karla; Polley, Mei-Yin; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Page, Margaretta; Fedoroff, Anne; Rabbitt, Jane; Butowski, Nicholas; Prados, Michael; Chang, Susan M

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the quality of life (QOL) of low-grade glioma (LGG) patients at baseline prior to chemotherapy and through 12 cycles of temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. Patients with histologically confirmed LGG with only prior surgery were given TMZ for 12 cycles. QOL assessments by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) were obtained at baseline prior to chemotherapy and at 2-month intervals while receiving TMZ. Patients with LGG at baseline prior to chemotherapy had higher reported social well-being scores (mean difference = 5.0; p < 0.01) but had lower reported emotional well-being scores (mean difference = 2.2; p < 0.01) compared to a normal population. Compared to patients with left hemisphere tumors, patients with right hemisphere tumors reported higher physical well-being scores (p = 0.01): 44% could not drive, 26% did not feel independent, and 26% were afraid of having a seizure. Difficulty with work was noted in 24%. Mean change scores at each chemotherapy cycle compared to baseline for all QOL subscales showed either no significant change or were significantly positive (p < 0.01). Patients with LGG on TMZ at baseline prior to chemotherapy reported QOL comparable to a normal population with the exception of social and emotional well-being, and those with right hemisphere tumors reported higher physical well-being scores compared to those with left hemisphere tumors. While remaining on therapy, LGG patients were able to maintain their QOL in all realms. LGG patients' QOL may be further improved by addressing their emotional well-being and their loss of independence in terms of driving or working. PMID:18713953

  3. Quality of life in low-grade glioma patients receiving temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Raymond; Solheim, Karla; Polley, Mei-Yin; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Page, Margaretta; Fedoroff, Anne; Rabbitt, Jane; Butowski, Nicholas; Prados, Michael; Chang, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the quality of life (QOL) of low-grade glioma (LGG) patients at baseline prior to chemotherapy and through 12 cycles of temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. Patients with histologically confirmed LGG with only prior surgery were given TMZ for 12 cycles. QOL assessments by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Brain (FACT-Br) were obtained at baseline prior to chemotherapy and at 2-month intervals while receiving TMZ. Patients with LGG at baseline prior to chemotherapy had higher reported social well-being scores (mean difference = 5.0; p < 0.01) but had lower reported emotional well-being scores (mean difference = 2.2; p < 0.01) compared to a normal population. Compared to patients with left hemisphere tumors, patients with right hemisphere tumors reported higher physical well-being scores (p = 0.01): 44% could not drive, 26% did not feel independent, and 26% were afraid of having a seizure. Difficulty with work was noted in 24%. Mean change scores at each chemotherapy cycle compared to baseline for all QOL subscales showed either no significant change or were significantly positive (p < 0.01). Patients with LGG on TMZ at baseline prior to chemotherapy reported QOL comparable to a normal population with the exception of social and emotional well-being, and those with right hemisphere tumors reported higher physical well-being scores compared to those with left hemisphere tumors. While remaining on therapy, LGG patients were able to maintain their QOL in all realms. LGG patients’ QOL may be further improved by addressing their emotional well-being and their loss of independence in terms of driving or working. PMID:18713953

  4. Learning and Memory Following Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Di Pinto, Marcos; Conklin, Heather M.; Li, Chenghong; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to examine whether children with low-grade glioma (LGG) or craniopharyngioma had impaired learning and memory after conformal radiation therapy (CRT). A secondary objective was to determine whether children who received chemotherapy before CRT, a treatment often used to delay radiation therapy in younger children with LGG, received any protective benefit with respect to learning. Methods and Materials: Learning and memory in 57 children with LGG and 44 children with craniopharyngioma were assessed with the California Verbal Learning Test-Children's Version and the Visual-Auditory Learning tests. Learning measures were administered before CRT, 6 months later, and then yearly for a total of 5 years. Results: No decline in learning scores after CRT was observed when patients were grouped by diagnosis. For children with LGG, chemotherapy before CRT did not provide a protective effect on learning. Multiple regression analyses, which accounted for age and tumor volume and location, found that children treated with chemotherapy before CRT were at greater risk of decline on learning measures than those treated with CRT alone. Variables predictive of learning and memory decline included hydrocephalus, shunt insertion, younger age at time of treatment, female gender, and pre-CRT chemotherapy. Conclusions: This study did not reveal any impairment or decline in learning after CRT in overall aggregate learning scores. However, several important variables were found to have a significant effect on neurocognitive outcome. Specifically, chemotherapy before CRT was predictive of worse outcome on verbal learning in LGG patients. In addition, hydrocephalus and shunt insertion in craniopharyngioma were found to be predictive of worse neurocognitive outcome, suggesting a more aggressive natural history for those patients.

  5. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21 years –17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20 years–19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at pre-irradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. A total of 588 evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (p < .05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and pre-irradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r = .34; p = .01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (p < .05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (p < .05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions There was relative sparing of post-irradiation functional outcomes over time

  6. A disconnection account of subjective empathy impairments in diffuse low-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Herbet, Guillaume; Lafargue, Gilles; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Costi, Emanuele; Bonnetblanc, François; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-04-01

    Human empathic experience is a multifaceted psychological construct which arises from functional integration of multiple neural networks. Despite accumulating knowledge about the cortical circuitry of empathy, almost nothing is known about the connectivity that may be concerned in conveying empathy-related neural information. To bridge this gap in knowledge, we studied dispositional empathy in a large-sized cohort of 107 patients who had undergone surgery for a diffuse low-grade glioma. The self-report questionnaire used enabled us to obtain a global measure of subjective empathy but also, importantly, to assess the two main components of empathy (cognitive and emotional). Data were processed by combining voxelwise and tractwise lesion-symptom analyses. Several major findings emerged from our analyses. First of all, topological voxelwise analyses were inconclusive. Conversely, tractwise multiple regression analyses, including all major associative white matter pathways as potential predictors, yielded to significant models explaining substantial part of the behavioural variance. Among the main results, we found that disconnection of the left cingulum bundle was a strong predictor of a low cognitive empathy (p<0.0005 Bonferroni-corrected). Similarly, we found that disconnection of the right uncinate fasciculus and the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus predicted, respectively, a low (p<0.05 Bonferroni-corrected) and a high (p<0.05 Bonferroni-corrected) subjective empathy. Finally, although we failed to relate emotional empathy to disruption of a specific tract, correlation analyses indicated a positive association between this component of empathy and the volumes of residual lesion infiltration in the right hemisphere (p<0.01). Taken as a whole, these findings provide key fundamental insights into the anatomical connectivity of empathy. They may help to better understand the pathophysiology of empathy impairments in pathological conditions characterized by

  7. The effect of pregnancy on survival in a low-grade glioma cohort.

    PubMed

    Rønning, Pål A; Helseth, Eirik; Meling, Torstein R; Johannesen, Tom B

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The impact of pregnancy on survival in female patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) is unknown and controversial. The authors designed a retrospective cohort study on prospectively collected registry data to assess the influence of pregnancy and child delivery on the survival of female patients with LGG. METHODS In Norway, the reporting of all births and cancer diagnoses to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN) and the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), respectively, is compulsory by law. Furthermore, every individual has a unique 11-digit identification number. The CRN was searched to identify all female patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of World Health Organization (WHO) Grade II astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, or pilocytic astrocytoma who were 16-40 years of age at the time of diagnosis during the period from January 1, 1970, to December 31, 2008. Obstetrical information was obtained from the MBRN for each patient. The effect of pregnancy on survival was evaluated using a Cox model with parity as a time-dependent variable. RESULTS The authors identified 65 patients who gave birth to 95 children after an LGG diagnosis. They also identified 281 patients who did not give birth after an LGG diagnosis. The median survival was 14.3 years (95% CI 11.7-20.6 years) for the entire study population. The effect of pregnancy was insignificant in the multivariate model (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.35-1.42). CONCLUSIONS Pregnancy does not seem to have an impact on the survival of female patients with LGG. PMID:26722849

  8. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent-living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials: Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21-17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20-19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at preirradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. Five hundred eighty-eight evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results: Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and preirradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r=0.34; P=.01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (P<.05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions: There was relative sparing of postirradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample

  9. GE-01MOLECULAR AND PATHOLOGIC SUBSETS OF LOW GRADE GLIOMAS AND GLIONEURONAL TUMORS IDENTIFIED BY microRNA PROFILING

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Heather; Vizcaino, M. Adelita; Rodriguez, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade (WHO I-II) gliomas represent the most frequent primary tumors of the central nervous system in children. They often have a good prognosis following total resection, however they can create many neurological complications due to mass effect, and may be difficult to resect depending on anatomic location. MicroRNAs have been identified as molecular regulators of protein expression that can repress multiple mRNAs concurrently through base pairing. Specific microRNAs are often suppressed during early cell differentiation to promote the expression of mitogenic proteins that are associated with the maintenance of specific stem cell types, a mechanism for growth and survival that is frequently exploited in cancer cells. Identification of these microRNA signatures present in low grade glioma and glioneuronal tumor sub-types could therefore lead to a wealth of candidate biomarkers. We used NanoString technology to analyze the expression levels of 800 microRNAs in nine low-grade glial and glioneuronal tumor subtypes (n = 45) using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. We then generated hierarchical clusters following evaluation via significant analysis of microarrays (SAMs). Hierarchical clustering separated tumors from non-neoplastic brain. When looking at individual tumors, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGA) clustered sharply together, consistent with a unique microRNA expression signature in this tuberous sclerosis associated tumor subtype, compared to other low grade glial and glioneuronal tumors. Candidate microRNAs were validated using qRT-PCR. In SEGAs, microRNAs miR-219-5p, miR-129-2-3p, miR-338-3p, miR-487b, miR-885-5p, and miR-323-3p were significantly down-regulated by more than 15 fold as compared to normal brain and were also significantly down-regulated as compared to other low grade gliomas. In summary, altered microRNA expression is a feature of low grade glial and glioneuronal tumors. MicroRNA profiling may therefore be useful in

  10. Molecular fingerprinting reflects different histotypes and brain region in low grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paediatric low-grade gliomas (LGGs) encompass a heterogeneous set of tumours of different histologies, site of lesion, age and gender distribution, growth potential, morphological features, tendency to progression and clinical course. Among LGGs, Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) are the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children. They are typically well-circumscribed, classified as grade I by the World Health Organization (WHO), but recurrence or progressive disease occurs in about 10-20% of cases. Despite radiological and neuropathological features deemed as classic are acknowledged, PA may present a bewildering variety of microscopic features. Indeed, tumours containing both neoplastic ganglion and astrocytic cells occur at a lower frequency. Methods Gene expression profiling on 40 primary LGGs including PAs and mixed glial-neuronal tumours comprising gangliogliomas (GG) and desmoplastic infantile gangliogliomas (DIG) using Affymetrix array platform was performed. A biologically validated machine learning workflow for the identification of microarray-based gene signatures was devised. The method is based on a sparsity inducing regularization algorithm l1l2 that selects relevant variables and takes into account their correlation. The most significant genetic signatures emerging from gene-chip analysis were confirmed and validated by qPCR. Results We identified an expression signature composed by a biologically validated list of 15 genes, able to distinguish infratentorial from supratentorial LGGs. In addition, a specific molecular fingerprinting distinguishes the supratentorial PAs from those originating in the posterior fossa. Lastly, within supratentorial tumours, we also identified a gene expression pattern composed by neurogenesis, cell motility and cell growth genes which dichotomize mixed glial-neuronal tumours versus PAs. Our results reinforce previous observations about aberrant activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase

  11. Early versus delayed postoperative radiotherapy for treatment of low-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiento, J Manuel; Venteicher, Andrew S; Patil, Chirag G

    2015-01-01

    Background In most people with low-grade gliomas (LGG), the primary treatment regimen remains a combination of surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy. However, the optimal timing of radiotherapy is controversial. It is unclear whether to use radiotherapy in the early postoperative period, or whether radiotherapy should be delayed until tumour progression occurs. Objectives To assess the effects of early postoperative radiotherapy versus radiotherapy delayed until tumour progression for low-grade intracranial gliomas in people who had initial biopsy or surgical resection. Search methods We searched up to September 2014 the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 8, 2014), MEDLINE (1948 to Aug week 3, 2014), and EMBASE (1980 to Aug week 3, 2014) to identify trials for inclusion in this Cochrane review. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared early versus delayed radiotherapy following biopsy or surgical resection for the treatment of people with newly diagnosed intracranial LGG (astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, mixed oligoastrocytoma, astroblastoma, xanthoastrocytoma, or ganglioglioma). Radiotherapy may include conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with linear accelerator or cobalt-60 sources, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and risk of bias, and extracted study data. We resolved any differences between review authors by discussion. Adverse effects were also extracted from the study report. We performed meta-analyses using a random-effects model with inverse variance weighting. Main results We included one large, multi-institutional, prospective RCT, involving 311 participants; the risk of bias in this study was unclear. This study found that early postoperative radiotherapy is associated with an increase in time to

  12. Bevacizumab and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma, or Low Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

  13. Detection of KIAA1549-BRAF Fusion Transcripts in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yongji; Rich, Benjamin E.; Vena, Natalie; Craig, Justin M.; MacConaill, Laura E.; Rajaram, Veena; Goldman, Stewart; Taha, Hala; Mahmoud, Madeha; Ozek, Memet; Sav, Aydin; Longtine, Janina A.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Garraway, Levi A.; Ligon, Azra H.; Stiles, Charles D.; Santagata, Sandro; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kieran, Mark W.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations of BRAF are the most common known genetic aberrations in pediatric gliomas. They frequently are found in pilocytic astrocytomas, where genomic duplications involving BRAF and the poorly characterized gene KIAA1549 create fusion proteins with constitutive B-Raf kinase activity. BRAF V600E point mutations are less common and generally occur in nonpilocytic tumors. The development of BRAF inhibitors as drugs has created an urgent need for robust clinical assays to identify activating lesions in BRAF. KIAA1549-BRAF fusion transcripts have been detected in frozen tissue, however, methods for FFPE tissue have not been reported. We developed a panel of FFPE-compatible quantitative RT-PCR assays for the most common KIAA1549-BRAF fusion transcripts. Application of these assays to a collection of 51 low-grade pediatric gliomas showed 97% sensitivity and 91% specificity compared with fluorescence in situ hybridization or array comparative genomic hybridization. In parallel, we assayed samples for the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation by PCR pyrosequencing. The data further support previous observations that these two alterations of the BRAF, KIAA1549 fusions and V600E point mutations, are associated primarily with pilocytic astrocytomas and nonpilocytic gliomas, respectively. These results show that fusion transcripts and mutations can be detected reliably in standard FFPE specimens and may be useful for incorporation into future studies of pediatric gliomas in basic science or clinical trials. PMID:21884820

  14. Indications for Treatment: Is Observation or Chemotherapy Alone a Reasonable Approach in the Management of Low-Grade Gliomas?

    PubMed

    Schaff, Lauren R; Lassman, Andrew B

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of newly diagnosed low-grade gliomas remains controversial. Recently published results from the long-term follow-up of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial 9802 demonstrated medically meaningful and statistically significant survival prolongation by adding chemotherapy with procarbazine, lomustine (CCNU), and vincristine after radiotherapy (RT) vs RT alone for "high"-risk patients (median 13.3 vs 7.8 years, hazard ratio = 0.59, P = 0.03). However, in the 17 years since that trial was launched, there have been advances in the understanding of low-grade gliomas biology and patient heterogeneity, an increased recognition of late neurocognitive injury from early RT, and the emergence of temozolomide as an alternative chemotherapy to procarbazine, lomustine (CCNU), and vincristine. These and other changes in the treatment landscape make the applicability of results from RTOG 9802 to all patients less clear. Moreover, in some patients, especially those at the lowest risk for early disease progression, deferred RT in favor of active surveillance or chemotherapy alone may remain a reasonable treatment approach. PMID:26050591

  15. Clinical Outcomes and Late Endocrine, Neurocognitive, and Visual Profiles of Proton Radiation for Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, Benjamin A.; Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Ebb, David H.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Jones, Robin M.; Butler, William E.; Huang, Mary S.; Marcus, Karen J.; Oberg, Jennifer A.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Primary low-grade gliomas are common brain tumors of childhood, many of which require radiation therapy (RT) as definitive treatment. Increased conformality of RT could decrease the incidence and severity of late effects. We report our experience with 32 pediatric patients treated with proton RT. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two pediatric patients with low-grade gliomas of the brain or spinal cord were treated with proton RT from 1995 to 2007. Sixteen patients received at least 1 regimen of chemotherapy before definitive RT. The median radiation dose was 52.2 Gy{sub RBE} (48.6-54 Gy{sub RBE}). Results: The median age at treatment was 11.0 years (range, 2.7-21.5 years), with a median follow-up time of 7.6 years (range, 3.2-18.2 years). The 6-year and 8-year rates of progression-free survival were 89.7% and 82.8%, respectively, with an 8-year overall survival of 100%. For the subset of patients who received serial neurocognitive testing, there were no significant declines in Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (P=.80), with a median neurocognitive testing interval of 4.5 years (range, 1.2-8.1 years) from baseline to follow-up, but subgroup analysis indicated some significant decline in neurocognitive outcomes for young children (<7 years) and those with significant dose to the left temporal lobe/hippocampus. The incidence of endocrinopathy correlated with a mean dose of ≥40 Gy{sub RBE} to the hypothalamus, pituitary, or optic chiasm. Stabilization or improvement of visual acuity was achieved in 83.3% of patients at risk for radiation-induced injury to the optic pathways. Conclusions: This report of late effects in children with low-grade gliomas after proton RT is encouraging. Proton RT appears to be associated with good clinical outcome, especially when the tumor location allows for increased sparing of the left temporal lobe, hippocampus, and hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  16. Two-peaked 5-ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence emission spectrum distinguishes glioblastomas from low grade gliomas and infiltrative component of glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Montcel, Bruno; Mahieu-Williame, Laurent; Armoiry, Xavier; Meyronet, David; Guyotat, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence enables to guiding in intra-operative surgical glioma resection. However at present, it has yet to be shown that this method is able to identify infiltrative component of glioma. In extracted tumor tissues we measured a two-peaked emission in low grade gliomas and in the infiltrative component of glioblastomas due to multiple photochemical states of PpIX. The second emission peak appearing at 620 nm (shifted by 14 nm from the main peak at 634 nm) limits the sensibility of current methods to measured PpIX concentration. We propose new measured parameters, by taking into consideration the two-peaked emission, to overcome these limitations in sensitivity. These parameters clearly distinguish the solid component of glioblastomas from low grade gliomas and infiltrative component of glioblastomas. PMID:23577290

  17. Long-Term Results of Brachytherapy With Temporary Iodine-125 Seeds in Children With Low-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Neuburger, Daniela; Trippel, Michael; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of temporary I-125 brachytherapy in 94 children and adolescents with low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Treatment was performed in progressive tumors roughly spherical in shape with a diameter of up to 5 cm, including 79 astrocytomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 4 oligoastrocytomas, 1 ependymoma, and 5 other tumors. Location was suprasellar/chiasmal in 44, thalamic/basal ganglia in 18, hemispheric in 15, midbrain/pineal region in 13, and lower brainstem in 3. Initially, 8% of patients were free of symptoms, 47% were symptomatic but not disabled, and 30% were slightly, 6% moderately, and 3% severely disabled. Results: 5- and 10-year survival was 97% and 92%. The response to I-125 brachytherapy over the long term was estimated after a median observation period of 38.4 (range, 6.4-171.0) months. At that time, 4 patients were in complete, 27 in partial, and 18 in objective remission; 15 showed stable and 30 progressive tumors. Treatment results did not correlate with age, sex, histology, tumor size, location, or demarcation of the tumor. Secondary treatment became necessary in 36 patients, including 19 who underwent repeated I-125 brachytherapy. At final follow-up, the number of symptom-free patients had risen to 21%. Thirty-eight percent showed symptoms without functional impairment, 19% were slightly and 11% moderately disabled, and only 4% were severely disabled. Conclusions: Response rates similar to those of conventional radiotherapy or chemotherapy can be anticipated with I-125 brachytherapy in tumors of the appropriate size and shape. We believe it to be a useful contribution to the treatment of low-grade gliomas in children.

  18. Delay effects in the response of low-grade gliomas to radiotherapy: a mathematical model and its therapeutical implications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Víctor M; Bogdanska, Magdalena; Martínez-González, Alicia; Belmonte-Beitia, Juan; Schucht, Philippe; Pérez-Romasanta, Luis A

    2015-09-01

    Low-grade gliomas (LGGs) are a group of primary brain tumours usually encountered in young patient populations. These tumours represent a difficult challenge because many patients survive a decade or more and may be at a higher risk for treatment-related complications. Specifically, radiation therapy is known to have a relevant effect on survival but in many cases it can be deferred to avoid side effects while maintaining its beneficial effect. However, a subset of LGGs manifests more aggressive clinical behaviour and requires earlier intervention. Moreover, the effectiveness of radiotherapy depends on the tumour characteristics. Recently Pallud et al. (2012. Neuro-Oncology, 14: , 1-10) studied patients with LGGs treated with radiation therapy as a first-line therapy and obtained the counterintuitive result that tumours with a fast response to the therapy had a worse prognosis than those responding late. In this paper, we construct a mathematical model describing the basic facts of glioma progression and response to radiotherapy. The model provides also an explanation to the observations of Pallud et al. Using the model, we propose radiation fractionation schemes that might be therapeutically useful by helping to evaluate tumour malignancy while at the same time reducing the toxicity associated to the treatment. PMID:24860116

  19. Current Understanding of BRAF Alterations in Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Therapeutic Targeting in Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Penman, Catherine Louise; Faulkner, Claire; Lowis, Stephen P.; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is known to play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of many tumors as well as normal development. This often occurs through mutation of the genes encoding RAS and RAF proteins which are involved in signal transduction in this pathway. BRAF is one of three RAF kinases which act as downstream effectors of growth factor signaling leading to cell cycle progression, proliferation, and survival. Initially reported as a point mutation (V600E) in the majority of metastatic melanomas, other alterations in the BRAF gene have now been reported in a variety of human cancers including papillary thyroid cancer, colon carcinomas, hairy cell leukemia, and more recently in gliomas. The identification of oncogenic mutations in the BRAF gene have led to a revolution in the treatment of metastatic melanoma using targeted molecular therapies that affect the MAPK pathway either directly through BRAF inhibition or downstream through inhibition of MEK. This review describes the molecular biology of BRAF in the context of pediatric low-grade gliomas, the role of BRAF as a diagnostic marker, the prognostic implications of BRAF, and evidence for therapeutic targeting of BRAF. PMID:25785246

  20. Detection of Human Herpesvirus-6 Variants in Pediatric Brain Tumors: Association of Viral Antigen in Low Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John R.; Santi, Maria R.; Thorarinsdottir, Halldora K.; Cornelison, Robert; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Zhang, Huizhen; Yao, Karen; Jacobson, Steven; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) has been associated with a diverse spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and reported glial tropism. Objective To determine if HHV-6 is present in a series of pediatric brain tumors. Study Design Pediatric gliomas from 88 untreated patients represented in a tissue microarray (TMA) were screened for HHV-6 by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in situ hybridization (ISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and compared to non glial tumors (N=22) and control brain (N=32). Results were correlated with tumor grade and overall survival. Results HHV-6 U57 was detected by nested PCR in 68/120 (57%) tumors and 7/32 (22%) age-matched non-tumor brain (P=0.001). HHV-6 U31 was positive in 73/120 (61%) tumors and 11/32 (34%) controls (P=0.019). Seventy-two percent (43/60) of tumors were HHV-6 Variant A. HHV-6 U57 was confirmed by ISH in 83/150 (54%) tumors and 10/32 (31%) controls (P=0.021), revealing a non-lymphocytic origin of HHV-6. HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 late antigen was detected by IHC in 50/124 (40%) tumors and 6/32 (18%) controls (P=0.013). Interestingly, 58% of low grade gliomas (N=67) were IHC positive compared to 19% of high grade gliomas (N=21, P=0.002) and 25% of non gliomas (N=36; P=0.001). HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 antigen co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein, confirming the astrocytic origin of antigen. Overall, there was no primary association between HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 antigen detection and survival (P=0.861). Conclusions We provide the first reported series of HHV-6 detection in pediatric brain tumors. The predominance of HHV-6 in glial tumors warrants further investigation into potential neurooncologic disease mechanisms. PMID:19505845

  1. Resecting diffuse low-grade gliomas to the boundaries of brain functions: a new concept in surgical neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Duffau, H

    2015-12-01

    The traditional dilemma making surgery for diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGGs) challenging is underlain by the need to optimize tumor resection in order to significantly increase survival versus the risk of permanent neurological morbidity. Development of neuroimaging led neurosurgeons to achieve tumorectomy according to the oncological limits provided by preoperative or intraoperative structural and metabolic imaging. However, this principle is not coherent, neither with the infiltrative nature of DLGGs nor with the limited resolution of current neuroimaging. Indeed, despite technical advances, MRI still underestimates the actual spatial extent of gliomas, since tumoral cells are present several millimeters to centimeters beyond the area of signal abnormalities. Furthermore, cortical and subcortical structures may be still crucial for brain functions despite their invasion by this diffuse tumoral disease. Finally, the lack of reliability of functional MRI has also been demonstrated. Therefore, to talk about "maximal safe resection" based upon neuroimaging is a non-sense, because oncological MRI does not show the tumor and functional MRI does not show critical neural pathways. This review proposes an original concept in neuro-oncological surgery, i.e. to resect DLGG to the boundaries of brain functions, thanks to intraoperative electrical mapping performed in awake patients. This paradigmatic shift from image-guided resection to functional mapping-guided resection, based upon an accurate study of brain connectomics and neuroplasticity in each patient throughout tumor removal has permitted to solve the classical dilemma, by increasing both survival and quality of life in DLGG patients. With this in mind, brain surgeons should also be neuroscientists. PMID:25907410

  2. Indications for Treatment: Is Observation or Chemotherapy Alone a Reasonable Approach in the Management of Low Grade Gliomas?

    PubMed Central

    Schaff, Lauren R.; Lassman, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of newly diagnosed low grade gliomas (LGG) remains controversial. Recently published results from the long-term follow up of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial 9802 demonstrated medically meaningful and statistically significant survival prolongation by adding chemotherapy with procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) after radiotherapy vs. radiotherapy alone for “high” risk patients (median 13.3 vs. 7.8 years, HR 0.59, p=0.03). However, in the 17 years since that trial was launched there have been advances in the understanding of LGG biology and patient heterogeneity, an increased recognition of late neuro-cognitive injury from early radiotherapy and the emergence of temozolomide as an alternative chemotherapy to PCV. These and other changes in the treatment landscape make the applicability of results from RTOG 9802 to all patients less clear. Moreover, in some patients, especially those at the lowest risk for early disease progression, deferred radiotherapy in favor of active surveillance or chemotherapy alone may remain reasonable treatment approaches. PMID:26050591

  3. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma - A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm(3). Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  4. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma – A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A.; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm3. Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  5. Comparing high-resolution microscopy techniques for potential intraoperative use in guiding low-grade glioma resections

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Daphne; Wang, Danni; Wang, Yu “Winston”; Borwege, Sabine; Sanai, Nader; Liu, Jonathan T.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS), with contrast provided by 5-ALA-induced-PpIX, has been shown to enable a higher extent of resection of high-grade gliomas. However, conventional FIGS with low-power microscopy lacks the sensitivity to aid in low-grade glioma (LGG) resection because PpIX signal is weak and sparse in such tissues. Intraoperative high-resolution microscopy of PpIX fluorescence has been proposed as a method to guide LGG resection, where sub-cellular resolution allows for the visualization of sparse and punctate mitochondrial PpIX production in tumor cells. Here, we assess the performance of three potentially portable high-resolution microscopy techniques that may be used for the intraoperative imaging of human LGG tissue samples with PpIX contrast: high-resolution fiber-optic microscopy (HRFM), high-resolution wide-field microscopy (WFM), and dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscopy. Materials and Methods Thick unsectioned human LGG tissue samples (n = 7) with ALA-induced-PpIX contrast were imaged using three imaging techniques (HRFM, WFM, DAC). The average signal-to-background ratio (SBR) was then calculated for each imaging modality (5 images per tissue, per modality). Results HRFM provides the ease of use and portability of a flexible fiber bundle, and is simple and inexpensive to build. However, in most cases (6/7), HRFM is not capable of detecting PpIX signal from LGGs due to high autofluorescence, generated by the fiber bundle under laser illumination at 405 nm, which overwhelms the PpIX signal and impedes its visualization. WFM is a camera-based method possessing high lateral resolution but poor axial resolution, resulting in sub-optimal image contrast. Conclusions Consistent successful detection of PpIX signal throughout our human LGG tissue samples (n = 7), with an acceptable image contrast (SBR > 2), was only achieved using DAC microscopy, which offers superior image resolution and contrast that is comparable to

  6. Right inferior frontal gyrus activation is associated with memory improvement in patients with left frontal low-grade glioma resection.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Eliane C; Balardin, Joana B; Vieira, Gilson; Sato, Joao R; Martin, Maria da Graça M; Scaff, Milberto; Teixeira, Manoel J; Junior, Edson Amaro

    2014-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) have been studied as a model of functional brain reorganization due to their slow-growing nature. However, there is no information regarding which brain areas are involved during verbal memory encoding after extensive left frontal LGG resection. In addition, it remains unknown whether these patients can improve their memory performance after instructions to apply efficient strategies. The neural correlates of verbal memory encoding were investigated in patients who had undergone extensive left frontal lobe (LFL) LGG resections and healthy controls using fMRI both before and after directed instructions were given for semantic organizational strategies. Participants were scanned during the encoding of word lists under three different conditions before and after a brief period of practice. The conditions included semantically unrelated (UR), related-non-structured (RNS), and related-structured words (RS), allowing for different levels of semantic organization. All participants improved on memory recall and semantic strategy application after the instructions for the RNS condition. Healthy subjects showed increased activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and middle frontal gyrus (MFG) during encoding for the RNS condition after the instructions. Patients with LFL excisions demonstrated increased activation in the right IFG for the RNS condition after instructions were given for the semantic strategies. Despite extensive damage in relevant areas that support verbal memory encoding and semantic strategy applications, patients that had undergone resections for LFL tumor could recruit the right-sided contralateral homologous areas after instructions were given and semantic strategies were practiced. These results provide insights into changes in brain activation areas typically implicated in verbal memory encoding and semantic processing. PMID:25157573

  7. The role of up-front radiation therapy for incompletely resected pediatric WHO grade II low-grade gliomas1

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Kavita K.; Puri, Dev R.; Missett, Brian T.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Prados, Michael D.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Banerjee, Anuradha; Gupta, Nalin; Wara, William M.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of early radiation therapy and extent of surgical resection on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in children with WHO grade II low-grade gliomas (LGGs). We conducted a historical cohort study of 90 patients, ages 21 or younger, diagnosed with WHO grade II LGGs between 1970 and 1995. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.4 years (range, 0.5–22.6 years). Tests for variables correlating with OS and PFS were conducted by using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards models. Eleven patients underwent gross total resections (GTRs), 43 had subtotal resections, and 34 underwent biopsy only at diagnosis. Two patients underwent biopsy at time of recurrence. Of the 90 patients, 52 received radiation as part of their initial therapy following diagnosis (early-RT group). The overall five-year PFS and OS rates ± SE were 56% ± 5% and 90% ± 3%, respectively. Ten-year PFS and OS rates were 42% ± 6% and 81% ± 5%, respectively. For patients older than three years and without GTRs, administration of early radiation did not appear to influence PFS or OS (P = 0.98 and P = 0.40, respectively; log-rank test). This was confirmed by multivariate analyses (P = 0.95 and P = 0.33 for PFS and OS, respectively). Of the 11 patients with GTRs, disease progressed in only two, and all were alive with no evidence of disease at last follow-up. Patients who underwent GTRs had significantly longer PFS (P = 0.02), but did not have significantly improved OS. Excellent long-term survival rates were achieved for children with WHO grade II LGGs. We were unable to demonstrate a benefit for administering radiation as part of initial treatment. An outcome benefit was seen with greater extent of resection. PMID:16495375

  8. Molecular analysis of diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Botero, German; Giry, Marine; Mokhtari, Karima; Labussière, Marianne; Idbaih, Ahmed; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Laigle-Donadey, Florence; Sanson, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas (DIBG) account for 1-2 % of adult gliomas. Their biological characteristics are scarcely understood and whether DIBG are biologically different from supratentorial gliomas remains to be established. We analyzed 17 DIBG samples for IDH1 R132H, alpha internexin, p53, and Ki67 expression, and, in a subset with sufficient DNA amount, for IDH1 and histone H3 mutational status, genomic profiling and MGMT promoter methylation status. A series of 738 adult supratentorial gliomas was used for comparison. Median age at diagnosis was 41 years (range 18.9-65.3 years). Median overall survival was 48.7 months (57 months for low-grade vs. 16 months for high-grade gliomas, p < 0.01). IDH1 sequencing revealed two mutations (IDH1 (R132G) , IDH1 (R132C) ) out of 7 DIBG whereas the R132H IDH1 enzyme was detected in 1/17 DIBG, suggesting that IDH1 mutations are mostly non R132H in DIBG (2/2), in contrast to supratentorial gliomas (31/313; p = 0.01). Mutations in histone genes H3F3A (encoding H3.3) and HIST1H3B (encoding H3.1) were found in 3/8 (37.5 %) of the DIBG (two H3F3A (K27M) and one HIST1H3B (K27M) ) versus 6/205 (2.9 %) of the supratentorial high-grade gliomas (four H3F3A (G34R) and two H3F3A (K27M) ) (p = 0.002). The CGH array showed a higher frequency of chromosome arm 1q gain, 9q gain and 11q loss in DIBG compared to the supratentorial high-grade gliomas, which had a less frequent chromosome 7 gain, and a less frequent chromosome 10 loss. No EGFR amplification was found. These data suggest that adult DIBG differ from adult supratentorial gliomas. In particular, histone genes (H3F3A (K27M) , HIST1H3B (K27M) ) mutations are frequent in adult DIBG whereas IDH1 (R132H) mutations are rare. PMID:24242757

  9. Imaging signatures of meningioma and low-grade glioma: a diffusion tensor, magnetization transfer and quantitative longitudinal relaxation time MRI study.

    PubMed

    Piper, Rory J; Mikhael, Shadia; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Laidlaw, David H; Whittle, Ian R; Bastin, Mark E

    2016-05-01

    Differentiation of cerebral tumor pathology currently relies on interpretation of conventional structural MRI and in some cases histology. However, more advanced MRI methods may provide further insight into the organization of cerebral tumors and have the potential to aid diagnosis. The objective of this study was to use multimodal quantitative MRI to measure the imaging signatures of meningioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). Nine adults with meningioma and 11 with LGG were identified, and underwent standard structural, quantitative longitudinal relaxation time (T1) mapping, magnetization transfer and diffusion tensor MRI. Maps of mean (〈D〉), axial (λAX) and radial (λRAD) diffusivity, fractional anisotropy (FA), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and T1 were generated on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Using structural and echo-planar T2-weighted MRI, manual region-of-interest segmentation of brain tumor, edema, ipsilateral and contralateral normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) was performed. Differences in imaging signatures between the different tissue types, both absolute mean values and ratios relative to contralateral NAWM, were assessed using t-tests with statistical significance set at p<0.05. For both absolute mean values and ratios relative to contralateral NAWM, there were significant differences in 〈D〉, λAX, λRAD, FA, MTR and T1 between meningioma and LGG tumor tissue, respectively. Only T1 and FA differed significantly between edematous tissue associated with the two tumor types. These results suggest that multimodal MRI biomarkers are significantly different, particularly in tumor tissue, between meningioma and LGG. By using quantitative multimodal MRI it may be possible to identify tumor pathology non-invasively. PMID:26708035

  10. Can metronomic maintenance with weekly vinblastine prevent early relapse/progression after bevacizumab-irinotecan in children with low-grade glioma?

    PubMed

    Heng, Marie Amélie; Padovani, Laetitia; Dory-Lautrec, Philippe; Gentet, Jean Claude; Verschuur, Arnaud; Pasquier, Eddy; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Scavarda, Didier; André, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The association of bevacizumab and irinotecan has been shown to display a quick efficacy in low-grade glioma (LGG), but most patients relapse within months after cessation of therapy. From October 2012 to March 2014, four patients have been treated with irinotecan-bevacizumab followed by a metronomic maintenance with weekly vinblastine to try to prevent relapses. After a median follow-up of 23 months after the end of the bevacizumab-irinotecan induction, no patient relapsed. These observations suggest that maintenance chemotherapy with weekly vinblastine after an induction by irinotecan-bevacizumab can improve progression-free survival in children with LGG. PMID:27037940

  11. Severe Radiation Necrosis Successfully Treated With Bevacizumab in an Infant with Low-Grade Glioma and Tumor-Associated Intractable Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Pillay Smiley, Natasha; Alden, Tord; Hartsell, William; Fangusaro, Jason

    2016-09-01

    We present a unique case of radiation necrosis in a child with brain stem low-grade glioma (LGG) presenting with trigeminal neuralgia. Despite extensive therapies, severe pain persisted. She received proton beam radiation with significant improvement. However, she developed radiation necrosis and hydrocephalus. Despite surgical correction of hydrocephalus, the patient remained critically ill. She was treated with dexamethasone and bevacizumab with rapid clinical improvement. Subsequent MRIs revealed almost complete resolution of the necrosis. This case illustrates the successful treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with radiation and a rare case of radiation necrosis in an LGG successfully treated with bevacizumab and dexamethasone. PMID:27187113

  12. Neurological Impairment Linked with Cortico-Subcortical Infiltration of Diffuse Low-Grade Gliomas at Initial Diagnosis Supports Early Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Anja; Zetterling, Maria; Lundin, Margareta; Melin, Beatrice; Fahlström, Markus; Grabowska, Anna; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGG) are slow-growing brain tumors that in spite of an indolent behavior at onset show a continuous expansion over time and inevitably transform into malignant gliomas. Extensive tumor resections may be performed with preservation of neurological function due to neuroplasticity that is induced by the slow tumor growth. However, DLGG prefer to migrate along subcortical pathways, and white matter plasticity is considerably more limited than gray matter plasticity. Whether signs of functional decompensating white matter that may be found as early as at disease presentation has not been systematically studied. Here, we examined 52 patients who presented with a DLGG at the time of radiological diagnosis. We found a significant correlation between neurological impairment and eloquent cortico-subcortical tumor localization, but not between neurological function and tumor volume. These results suggest that even small tumors invading white matter pathways may lack compensatory mechanisms for functional reorganization already at disease presentation. PMID:26113841

  13. O8.07HISTOLOGY, LOCALISATION, TREATMENT AND OUTCOME OF 339 CONSECUTIVE CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH LOW GRADE GLIOMAS TREATED AT THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF VIENNA BETWEEN 1993 AND 2012

    PubMed Central

    Slavc, I.; Chocholous, M.; Woehrer, A.; Heumesser, R.; Azizi, A.; Haberler, C.; Peyrl, A.; Dorfer, C.; Dieckmann, K.; Czech, T.

    2014-01-01

    Low grade gliomas (LGG) comprise a spectrum of different tumor entities corresponding to WHO grade I and II, including pilocytic astrocytoma, diffuse glioma and glioneuronal tumors. LGG in children differ in histologic distribution, molecular profile, localisation in the CNS and outcome from LGGs in adults. We report on a series of patients treated at a single center over 20 years. PATIENTS: Between 1993 and 2012, 339 consecutive patients with a median age of 8 years (range 4 months - 18 years, p25 = 3.7 years, p75 = 13.4 years) were treated at the Medical University of Vienna. 19.5% of the patients were <3 years of age at diagnosis. Gender distribution was equal. Tumors were associated with syndromes in 84 of the patients (NF1: n = 64, TSC: n = 17, and other: n = 3). Localisation was supratentorial midline in 112, cerebral hemispheres in 105, posterior fossa in 86, ventricular system in 27 and spinal in 9 patients. 66 patients with a median age of 4.4 years had optic pathway gliomas. RESULTS: Gross total resection was performed in 109, subtotal resection in 49, partial resection in 57, and biopsy in 22 patients. 83 patients had no surgery (patients with NF1, TSC, tectal glioma or tumors confined to the optic nerves and chiasm), and in the remaining the degree of resection was not evaluable. 37 patients had 2 tumor surgeries, 14 three, 5 four and one had 5 tumor surgeries during their course of disease. Histology was pilocytic astrocytoma in 122, pilomyxoid astrocytoma in 10, diffuse astrocytoma in 42, ganglioglioma in 30, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in 17, oligoastrocytoma in 11, and other rarer histologies in the remaining patients. Twelve patients (3.5%) died and 84 patients (24.8%) had at least one event. After a median follow-up of 107 months (14-300) the 1-year overall survival (OS) was 100%, the 10-year OS 96.1 ± 1.2%, and the 20-year OS 95.3 ± 1.4%. Event-free survival (EFS) after 1 year was 92.9 ± 1.4%, after 10 years 73.8 ± 2.6% and after 20

  14. Where are we now? And where are we going? A report from the Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure (ABC2) Low-grade Glioma Research Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Huse, Jason T.; Wallace, Max; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Bettegowda, Chetan; Brat, Daniel J.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; Marra, Marco; Miller, C. Ryan; Nelson, Sarah J.; Salama, Sofie R.; Soffietti, Riccardo; Wen, Patrick Y.; Yip, Stephen; Yen, Katharine; Costello, Joseph F.; Chang, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse gliomas consist of both low- and high-grade varieties, each with distinct morphological and biological features. The often extended periods of relative indolence exhibited by low-grade gliomas (LGG; WHO grade II) differ sharply from the aggressive, rapidly fatal clinical course of primary glioblastoma (GBM; WHO grade IV). Nevertheless, until recently, the molecular foundations underlying this stark biological contrast between glioma variants remained largely unknown. The discoveries of distinctive and highly recurrent genomic and epigenomic abnormalities in LGG have both informed a more accurate classification scheme and pointed to viable avenues for therapeutic development. As such, the field of neuro-oncology now seems poised to capitalize on these gains to achieve significant benefit for LGG patients. This report will briefly recount the proceedings of a workshop held in January 2013 and hosted by Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure (ABC2) on the subject of LGG. While much of the meeting covered recent insights into LGG biology, its focus remained on how best to advance the clinical management, whether by improved preclinical modeling, more effective targeted therapeutics and clinical trial design, or innovative imaging technology. PMID:24305708

  15. Prospective longitudinal evaluation of emotional and behavioral functioning in pediatric patients with low-grade glioma treated with conformal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Willard, Victoria W; Conklin, Heather M; Wu, Shengjie; Merchant, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) who are successfully treated with irradiation are at increased risk for cognitive and psychosocial late effects. Conformal radiation therapy (CRT) allows sparing of cognitive deficits, but how it affects emotional and behavioral functioning remains unclear. We performed a prospective longitudinal study of the emotional and behavioral functioning of pediatric patients with LGG in the first 5 years post-CRT. Ninety-five pediatric patients with LGG treated on an institutional Phase II trial (August 1997-June 2009) underwent neuropsychological assessments pre-CRT and 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months post-CRT. Parent-reported scores on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) were analyzed. Three competence scales (School Competence, Social Competence, and Activities), two summary scales (Internalizing Problems and Externalizing Problems), and two subscales of theoretical interest (Attention Problems and Social Problems) from the CBCL were used. Among 80 eligible patients [44 female, 68 white], 51 had pilocytic astrocytoma and 13 had optic pathway glioma. Mean age at diagnosis was 6.8 years (SD = 4.3 years) and at CRT initiation was 8.9 years (SD = 3.4 years). Before CRT, deficits were demonstrated on the competence scales (mean scores below normative mean) and the Attention Problems and Social Problems subscales (mean scores above normative means). This trend continued at 5 years post-CRT. Longitudinal trajectories of emotional and behavioral functioning were stable over 5 years. Emotional and behavioral deficits remain relatively stable over the 5 years post-CRT in patients with LGG, suggesting that CRT may not exacerbate pre-existing psychosocial difficulties in this population. PMID:25573605

  16. Neuropsychological status in children and young adults with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with focal stereotactic conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Rakesh . E-mail: rjalali@medscape.com; Goswami, Savita; Sarin, Rajiv; More, Niteen; Siddha, Manish; Kamble, Rashmi

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To present prospective neuropsychological data at baseline and follow-up in children and young adults with benign and low-grade gliomas treated with focal stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients (age 4-25 years) with residual/progressive benign and low-grade brain tumors considered suitable for SCRT underwent detailed and in-depth neuropsychological and cognitive testing at baseline before SCRT. The test battery included measurement of age-adjusted intelligence quotients (IQs) and cognitive parameters of visual, spatial, visuomotor, and attention concentrations. Anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale for patients >16 years old. Patients were treated with high-precision conformal radiotherapy under stereotactic guidance to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All neuropsychological assessments were repeated at 6 and 24 months after SCRT completion and compared with the baseline values. Results: The baseline mean full-scale IQ before starting RT for patients <16 years was 82 (range, 33-105). For those >16 years, the corresponding value was 72 (range, 64-129). Of 20 evaluable patients, 14 (70%) had less than average IQs at baseline, even before starting radiotherapy. The verbal IQ, performance IQ, and full-scale IQ, as well as other cognitive scores, did not change significantly at the 6- and 24-month follow-up assessments for all patients. The memory quotient in older children and young adults was maintained at 6 and 24 months after SCRT, with a mean value of 93 and 100, respectively, compared with a mean baseline value of 81 before RT. The mean anxiety score in children measured by the C1 and C2 components of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) was 48 and 40, respectively, which improved significantly to mean values of 30 and 26, respectively, at the 24-month follow-up assessment (p = 0.005). The mean depression score in

  17. Clinical multiplexed exome sequencing distinguishes adult oligodendroglial neoplasms from astrocytic and mixed lineage gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Cryan, Jane B.; Haidar, Sam; Ramkissoon, Lori A.; Bi, Wenya Linda; Knoff, David S.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Brown, Loreal; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Dunn, Ian F.; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Santagata, Sandro; Lindeman, Neal I.; Ligon, Azra H.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Hornick, Jason L.; Alexander, Brian M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.

    2014-01-01

    Classifying adult gliomas remains largely a histologic diagnosis based on morphology; however astrocytic, oligodendroglial and mixed lineage tumors can display overlapping histologic features. We used multiplexed exome sequencing (OncoPanel) on 108 primary or recurrent adult gliomas, comprising 65 oligodendrogliomas, 28 astrocytomas and 15 mixed oligoastrocytomas to identify lesions that could enhance lineage classification. Mutations in TP53 (20/28, 71%) and ATRX (15/28, 54%) were enriched in astrocytic tumors compared to oligodendroglial tumors of which 4/65 (6%) had mutations in TP53 and 2/65 (3%) had ATRX mutations. We found that oligoastrocytomas harbored mutations in TP53 (80%, 12/15) and ATRX (60%, 9/15) at frequencies similar to pure astrocytic tumors, suggesting that oligoastrocytomas and astrocytomas may represent a single genetic or biological entity. p53 protein expression correlated with mutation status and showed significant increases in astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas compared to oligodendrogliomas, a finding that also may facilitate accurate classification. Furthermore our OncoPanel analysis revealed that 15% of IDH1/2 mutant gliomas would not be detected by traditional IDH1 (p.R132H) antibody testing, supporting the use of genomic technologies in providing clinically relevant data. In all, our results demonstrate that multiplexed exome sequencing can support evaluation and classification of adult low-grade gliomas with a single clinical test. PMID:25257301

  18. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  19. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Barbara J.; Hu, Chen; Macdonald, David R.; Lesser, Glenn J.; Coons, Stephen W.; Brachman, David G.; Ryu, Samuel; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Liu, Junfeng; Chakravarti, Arnab; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  20. Comparison of long-term survival between temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone for patients with low-grade gliomas after surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Xiu-juan; Wei, Yu-mei; Tao, Heng-min; An, Dian-zheng; Sun, Jia-teng; Li, Bao-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the survival outcomes of temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy (TMZ + RT) vs radiotherapy alone (RT-alone) for low-grade gliomas (LGGs) after surgical resection. Patients and methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed postoperative records of 69 patients with LGGs treated with TMZ + RT (n=31) and RT-alone (n=38) at the Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University between June 2011 and December 2013. Patients in the TMZ + RT group were administered 50–100 mg oral TMZ every day until the radiotherapy regimen was completed. Results The median follow-up since surgery was 33 months and showed no significant intergroup differences (P=0.06). There were statistically significant intergroup differences in the progression-free survival rate (P=0.037), with 83.9% for TMZ-RT group and 60.5% for RT-alone group. The overall 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 89.86%. Age distribution (≥45 years and <45 years) and resection margin (complete resection or not) were significantly associated with OS (P=0.03 and P=0.004, respectively). Conclusion Although no differences were found in the 2-year OS between the TMZ + RT and RT-alone groups, there was a trend toward increased 2-year progression-free survival in the TMZ + RT group. With better tolerability, concurrent TMZ chemoradiotherapy may be beneficial for postoperative patients with LGGs. Age distribution and surgical margin are likely potential indicators of disease prognosis. The possible differences in long-term survival between the two groups and the links between prognostic factors and long-term survival may be worthy of further investigation. PMID:27574452

  1. Hippocampal Dosimetry Predicts Neurocognitive Function Impairment After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Benign or Low-Grade Adult Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Hermann, Bruce P.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the association between hippocampal dose and long-term neurocognitive function (NCF) impairment for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients with benign or low-grade adult brain tumors were treated with FSRT per institutional practice. No attempt was made to spare the hippocampus. NCF testing was conducted at baseline and 18 months follow-up, on a prospective clinical trial. Regression-based standardized z scores were calculated by using similar healthy control individuals evaluated at the same test-retest interval. NCF impairment was defined as a z score {<=}-1.5. After delineation of the bilateral hippocampi according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring atlas, dose-volume histograms were generated for the left and right hippocampi and for the composite pair. Biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}) assuming an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 2 Gy were computed. Fisher's exact test and binary logistic regression were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Dose-response data were fit to a nonlinear model. Results: Of 29 patients enrolled in this trial, 18 completed both baseline and 18-month NCF testing. An EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi >7.3 Gy was associated with impairment in Wechsler Memory Scale-III Word List (WMS-WL) delayed recall (odds ratio [OR] 19.3; p = 0.043). The association between WMS-WL delayed recall and EQD{sub 2} to 100% of the bilateral hippocampi >0.0 Gy trended to significance (OR 14.8; p = 0.068). Conclusion: EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi greater than 7.3 Gy is associated with long-term impairment in list-learning delayed recall after FSRT for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors. Given that modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques can reduce the dose to the bilateral hippocampi below this dosimetric threshold, patients

  2. Hippocampal Dosimetry Predicts Neurocognitive Function Impairment After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Benign or Low-Grade Adult Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Hermann, Bruce P.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the association between hippocampal dose and long-term neurocognitive function (NCF) impairment for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients with benign or low-grade adult brain tumors were treated with FSRT per institutional practice. No attempt was made to spare the hippocampus. NCF testing was conducted at baseline and 18 months follow-up, on a prospective clinical trial. Regression-based standardized z scores were calculated by using similar healthy control individuals evaluated at the same test-retest interval. NCF impairment was defined as a z score {<=}-1.5. After delineation of the bilateral hippocampi according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring atlas, dose-volume histograms were generated for the left and right hippocampi and for the composite pair. Biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}) assuming an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 2 Gy were computed. Fisher's exact test and binary logistic regression were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Dose-response data were fit to a nonlinear model. Results: Of 29 patients enrolled in this trial, 18 completed both baseline and 18-month NCF testing. An EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi >7.3 Gy was associated with impairment in Wechsler Memory Scale-III Word List (WMS-WL) delayed recall (odds ratio [OR] 19.3; p = 0.043). The association between WMS-WL delayed recall and EQD{sub 2} to 100% of the bilateral hippocampi >0.0 Gy trended to significance (OR 14.8; p = 0.068). Conclusion: EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi greater than 7.3 Gy is associated with long-term impairment in list-learning delayed recall after FSRT for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors. Given that modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques can reduce the dose to the bilateral hippocampi below this dosimetric threshold, patients

  3. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  4. Adult brainstem gliomas: Correlation of clinical and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Theeler, Brett J.; Ellezam, Benjamin; Melguizo-Gavilanes, Isaac; de Groot, John F.; Mahajan, Anita; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Bruner, Janet M.; Puduvalli, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Brainstem gliomas are rare in adults and overall have superior survival outcomes compared to pediatric brainstem gliomas. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective data and tissue analysis of all adult patients (≥18 years old) with World Health Organization (WHO) Grade II, III, and IV brainstem gliomas in the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center institutional database from 1990 to 2012. Results We identified 143 cases in adults ages 18 and over. There were 28 glioblastomas, 43 anaplastic astrocytomas, 15 diffuse astrocytomas, and 11 gliomas not otherwise specified, and in 46 cases the diagnosis was made radiographically. 128 (89.5%) cases were classified radiographically as diffuse and of the focal tumors, 9 of the 15 were WHO Grade III or IV tumors. Increasing tumor grade and contrast enhancement were associated with significantly reduced overall survival. The median overall survival for the entire cohort was 32.1 months similar to previously published studies. Two of 25 grade II and III tumors, and 1 of 17 glioblastomas had IDH1 mutations on immunohistochemical testing. Nine cases had sufficient tissue for mutation profiling, 1 case had a BRAF V600E mutation and 2 had 2 PIK3CA mutations. Conclusions Survival outcomes for adult WHO Grade II to IV brainstem gliomas were similar to supratentorial IDH1 wild-type tumors of similar grade and histology. Potentially actionable mutations can be identified from small biopsy samples in a subset of adult brainstem gliomas. PMID:25934342

  5. BRAF V600E-mutated diffuse glioma in an adult patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuta; Takahashi-Fujigasaki, Junko; Akasaki, Yasuharu; Matsushima, Satoshi; Mori, Ryosuke; Karagiozov, Kostadin; Joki, Tatsuhiro; Ikeuchi, Satoshi; Ikegami, Masahiro; Manome, Yoshinobu; Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology and genome-wide analysis have identified key molecular alterations that are relevant to the diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumors. Molecular information such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes or 1p/19q co-deletion status will be more actively incorporated into the histological classification of diffuse gliomas. BRAF V600E mutations are found frequently in circumscribed low-grade gliomas such as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) and extra-cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, or epithelioid glioblastomas (E-GBM), a rare variant of GBM. This mutation is relatively rare in other types of diffuse gliomas, especially in adult onset cases. Here, we present an adult onset case of IDH wild-type/BRAF V600E-mutated diffuse glioma, evolving from grade III to grade IV. The tumor displayed atypical exophytic growth and had unusual histological features not fully compatible with, but indicative of PXA and E-GBM. We discuss differential diagnosis of the tumor, and review previously described diffuse gliomas with the BRAF V600E mutation. PMID:26445861

  6. Telomere maintenance and the etiology of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Wiencke, John K; Lachance, Daniel H; Wiemels, Joseph L; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of epidemiologic and tumor genomic research has identified an important role for telomere maintenance in glioma susceptibility, initiation, and prognosis. Telomere length has long been investigated in relation to cancer, but whether longer or shorter telomere length might be associated with glioma risk has remained elusive. Recent data address this question and are reviewed here. Common inherited variants near the telomerase-component genes TERC and TERT are associated both with longer telomere length and increased risk of glioma. Exome sequencing of glioma patients from families with multiple affected members has identified rare inherited mutations in POT1 (protection of telomeres protein 1) as high-penetrance glioma risk factors. These heritable POT1 mutations are also associated with increased telomere length in leukocytes. Tumor sequencing studies further indicate that acquired somatic mutations of TERT and ATRX are among the most frequent alterations found in adult gliomas. These mutations facilitate telomere lengthening, thus bypassing a critical mechanism of apoptosis. Although future research is needed, mounting evidence suggests that glioma is, at least in part, a disease of telomere dysregulation. Specifically, several inherited and acquired variants underlying gliomagenesis affect telomere pathways and are also associated with increased telomere length. PMID:26014050

  7. FINAL RESULTS OF A PROSPECTIVE MULTI-INSTITUTIONAL PHASE II STUDY OF EVEROLIMUS (RAD001), AN MTOR INHIBITOR, IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT OR PROGRESSIVE LOW-GRADE GLIOMA. A POETIC CONSORTIUM TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Kieran, Mark W.; Yao, X.; Macy, M.; Leary, S.; Cohen, K.; MacDonald, T.; Allen, J.; Boklan, J.; Smith, A.; Nazemi, K.; Gore, L.; Trippett, T.; DiRenzo, J.; Narendran, A.; Perentesis, J.; Prabhu, S.; Pinches, N.; Robison, N.; Manley, P.; Chi, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Purpose: The ras/raf signaling pathway is crucial in the development of pediatric low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Aberrant ras/raf signaling is involved in tumorigenesis through promotion of cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in sporadic LGG. Everolimus (RAD001) is a potent and selective inhibitor of mTOR, a downstream element of the ras/raf pathway. The activity, safety and pharmacokinetics of everolimus in pediatric patients with radiographic recurrent/progressive LGG are presented. METHODS: Pediatric patients with radiographic progressive or recurrent LGGs without neurofibromatosis type I were treated with oral everolimus 5mg/m2/dose once daily. Therapy was provided for 28 days (one cycle) and could be repeated for a total of 12 cycles. Response, as determined by standard 2-D MRI criteria, was assessed for all patients. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics, pharmacodynamic parameters including inhibition of p70s6 kinase activity, 4E-BP1 phosphorylation inhibition and suppression of cMyc expression, as well as the toxicity profile of everolimus were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with a median age of 9 years (range, 3–17 years) were enrolled, all of whom had received prior chemotherapy (average # regimens = 2.7) including progression after a carboplatin-containing regimen. Median number of cycles of therapy was 10 (range, 1-12). Responses were determined by blinded central review and included 4 patients with PR (>50% decrease) and 13 with stable disease. Six patients had progressive disease by one year. Overall therapy was well tolerated; two patients discontinued therapy due to mouth sores (n = 1) and withdrawal of consent (n = 1). Everolimus PK parameters were similar to those previously reported in both adult and pediatric patients and drug trough levels were maintained above 5ng/ml. Pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated inhibition of downstream targets of mTOR including phospho-S6 kinase, 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and c

  8. Analysis of IDH mutation, 1p/19q deletion, and PTEN loss delineates prognosis in clinical low-grade diffuse gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabha, Nesrin; Knobbe, Christiane B.; Maganti, Majula; Al Omar, Soha; Bernstein, Mark; Cairns, Rob; Çako, Besmira; von Deimling, Andreas; Capper, David; Mak, Tak W.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Carvalho, Philippe; Garrett, Evelyn; Perry, Arie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Guha, Abhijit; Croul, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Background Grades II and III gliomas have unpredictable rates of progression, making management decisions difficult. Currently, several clinical and radiological characteristics are utilized to predict progression and survival but collectively are suboptimal. Methods In this study, we analyzed a set of 108 nonenhancing hemispheric grade II–III gliomas. Demographic variables, including patient age, tumor diameter, extent of resection, and performance status, were combined with molecular data (IDH mutation status [mIDH], 1p/19q codeletion, PTEN deletion, and EGFR amplification). A complete dataset for all variables was compiled for 70 of the 108 patients. Both univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to determine whether the molecular data singly or in combination offer advantages over tumor type and grade for prediction of overall survival (OS) and/or progression-free rate (PFR). Results Patient age, clinical variables (tumor diameter, extent of resection, performance status), and pathology (tumor type and grade) were not predictive of OS or PFR. IDH mutation status alone was predictive of longer OS and PFR for the entire group of tumors; 1p/19q deletion alone was predictive of OS but not PFR. In the multivariable analysis, none of the clinical or demographic factors were predictive of OS or PFR. IDH mutation status, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion were predictive of OS (P = .003, P = .005, P = .02, respectively). Both mIDH (P < .001) and the interaction term of 1p/19q and PTEN (P < .001) were found to be predictive of PFR. Conclusions We conclude that the combination of mIDH, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion may be particularly effective in discriminating good prognosis from poor prognosis hemispheric gliomas. We propose that such a scheme merits testing on larger prospective cohorts. Should our findings be confirmed, routine clinical analysis of hemispheric gliomas for mIDH, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion would be justified. PMID

  9. The H3.3 K27M mutation results in a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas than thalamic gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hao, Shuyu; Pan, Changcun; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Yan, Hai; Zhang, Liwei; Wan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem and thalamic gliomas are rare, and they are poorly understood in adults. Genetic aberrations that occur in these tumors are still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether thalamic gliomas have different genetic aberrations and clinical outcomes compared with brainstem gliomas in adults. Forty-three glioma samples were selected, including 28 brainstem and 15 thalamic gliomas. The frequency of the K27M mutation in adult midline gliomas was 58.1%. High-grade gliomas in the thalamus were statistically significantly more numerous than brainstem gliomas. Patients with K27M mutant brainstem gliomas had a significantly shorter overall survival than patients with wild-type tumors (P = .020) by Cox regression after adjustment for other independent risk factors. However, there was no statistical tendency toward a poorer overall survival in thalamic gliomas containing the K27M mutation compared with wild-type tumors. The presence of the K27M mutation significantly corresponded with mutations in TP53 in thalamic gliomas. Interestingly, the K27M mutation was mutually exclusive with mutations in IDH1, which was detected only in brainstem gliomas. The microarray data identified 86 differentially expressed genes between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with the K27M mutation. The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) gene, which plays an important role in cancer pathways, was found to be differentially expressed between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with K27M mutations. Although the K27M mutation was frequently observed in adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, this mutation tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas but not in thalamic gliomas. Brainstem gliomas may present different genetic aberrations from thalamic gliomas. These differences may provide guidance for therapeutic decisions for the treatment of adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, which may have different molecular targets. PMID:26297251

  10. Pediatric gliomas as neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Baker, Suzanne J; Ellison, David W; Gutmann, David H

    2016-06-01

    Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumor of childhood, with gliomas comprising the largest fraction of these cancers. Several features distinguish them from their adult counterparts, including their natural history, causative genetic mutations, and brain locations. These unique properties suggest that the cellular and molecular etiologies that underlie their development and maintenance might be different from those that govern adult gliomagenesis and growth. In this review, we discuss the genetic basis for pediatric low-grade and high-grade glioma in the context of developmental neurobiology, and highlight the differences between histologically-similar tumors arising in children and adults. GLIA 2016;64:879-895. PMID:26638183

  11. IDH1 Mutation in Gliomas in Mosul City - Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohammed Sami

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IDH1 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1) mutation might be encounter in the low grade glioma and directs the progression of the tumor to a higher grade. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of IDH1 mutations in gliomas and to correlate the IDH1 positivity with the type and grade of tumors, the age and sex of the patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retro– and prospective case series study. One hundred and nine cases of intracranial gliomas were collected between 2008 and 2014 from Mosul Private Laboratories and Al-Jamboree Teaching Hospitals in Mosul. IDH1 mutations were assessed immunohistochemically using anti-IDH1 R132H mouse monoclonal antibody. RESULTS: IDH1 mutation was perceived in 34.86% of gliomas. In adult gliomas, the secondary glioblastoma and the low-grade astrocytoma had the greatest values of IDH1 positivity (88.88% and 62.5% respectively), followed by oligoastrocytoma/oligodendroglioma (50.0%), and anaplastic astrocytoma (47.36%). The primary glioblastomsa showed 17.64% IDH1 positivity. Males and females expressed the IDH1 equally. While, there was no role of IDH1 in pediatric gliomas. CONCLUSION: IDH1 mutation is commonly present in adult gliomas particularly in low-grade gliomas, and secondary glioblastoma, with equal sex distribution, but it has no role in pediatric gliomas.

  12. The Value of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid in Low-grade Gliomas and High-grade Gliomas Lacking Glioblastoma Imaging Features: An Analysis Based on Fluorescence, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 18F-Fluoroethyl Tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography, and Tumor Molecular Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Mohammed; Wölfer, Johannes; Ewelt, Christian; Holling, Markus; Hasselblatt, Martin; Niederstadt, Thomas; Zoubi, Tarek; Weckesser, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 20% of grade II and most grade III gliomas fluoresce after 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) application. Conversely, approximately 30% of nonenhancing gliomas are actually high grade. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify preoperative factors (ie, age, enhancement, 18F-fluoroethyl tyrosine positron emission tomography [18F-FET PET] uptake ratios) for predicting fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastomas imaging features and to determine whether fluorescence will allow prediction of tumor grade or molecular characteristics. METHODS: Patients harboring gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features were given 5-ALA. Fluorescence was recorded intraoperatively, and biopsy specimens collected from fluorescing tissue. World Health Organization (WHO) grade, Ki-67/MIB-1 index, IDH1 (R132H) mutation status, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status, and 1p/19q co-deletion status were assessed. Predictive factors for fluorescence were derived from preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-FET PET. Classification and regression tree analysis and receiver-operating-characteristic curves were generated for defining predictors. RESULTS: Of 166 tumors, 82 were diagnosed as WHO grade II, 76 as grade III, and 8 as glioblastomas grade IV. Contrast enhancement, tumor volume, and 18F-FET PET uptake ratio >1.85 predicted fluorescence. Fluorescence correlated with WHO grade (P < .001) and Ki-67/MIB-1 index (P < .001), but not with MGMT promoter methylation status, IDH1 mutation status, or 1p19q co-deletion status. The Ki-67/MIB-1 index in fluorescing grade III gliomas was higher than in nonfluorescing tumors, whereas in fluorescing and nonfluorescing grade II tumors, no differences were noted. CONCLUSION: Age, tumor volume, and 18F-FET PET uptake are factors predicting 5-ALA-induced fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features. Fluorescence was associated with an increased

  13. Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, as well as changes in behavior and personality, are also fairly common in mixed glioma patients. ... Cerebri: Symptoms are often nonspecific and can include personality and behavioral changes, memory disturbance, increased intracranial pressure ...

  14. 18F FDOPA PET/CT or PET/MRI in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Recurrent Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-22

    Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood

  15. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process

    PubMed Central

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S.; Harbin, Jordan E.; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C. Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-01-01

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas. PMID:25246577

  16. Clinicopathological and molecular features of malignant optic pathway glioma in an adult.

    PubMed

    Nagaishi, Masaya; Sugiura, Yoshiki; Takano, Issei; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Kensuke; Yokoo, Hideaki; Hyodo, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas of the optic pathway are rare, and their genetic alterations are poorly understood. We describe a 64-year-old woman with anaplastic astrocytoma originating from the optic pathway, together with the molecular features. She presented with progressive visual field loss, and a biopsy sample was obtained from the lesion in the optic chiasm. She underwent radiosurgery concomitant with temozolomide chemotherapy, and subsequently remained stable for 10 months after initial presentation. Molecular analysis indicated that the mass may have shared common molecular genetic features with conventional primary astrocytic gliomas but not pilocytic gliomas, which supported the morphologic diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma. Molecular analysis of malignant optic pathway gliomas in adults is useful for distinguishing between high-grade gliomas and anaplastic pilocytic astrocytomas, and for determining further therapy. PMID:25150758

  17. The epidemiology of glioma in adults: a “state of the science” review

    PubMed Central

    Ostrom, Quinn T.; Bauchet, Luc; Davis, Faith G.; Deltour, Isabelle; Fisher, James L.; Langer, Chelsea Eastman; Pekmezci, Melike; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Turner, Michelle C.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumor, representing 81% of malignant brain tumors. Although relatively rare, they cause significant mortality and morbidity. Glioblastoma, the most common glioma histology (∼45% of all gliomas), has a 5-year relative survival of ∼5%. A small portion of these tumors are caused by Mendelian disorders, including neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genomic analyses of glioma have also produced new evidence about risk and prognosis. Recently discovered biomarkers that indicate improved survival include O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation, and a glioma cytosine–phosphate–guanine island methylator phenotype. Genome-wide association studies have identified heritable risk alleles within 7 genes that are associated with increased risk of glioma. Many risk factors have been examined as potential contributors to glioma risk. Most significantly, these include an increase in risk by exposure to ionizing radiation and a decrease in risk by history of allergies or atopic disease(s). The potential influence of occupational exposures and cellular phones has also been examined, with inconclusive results. We provide a “state of the science” review of current research into causes and risk factors for gliomas in adults. PMID:24842956

  18. Association between Serum Ferritin Concentrations and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Adults: A Population Study from the Tianjin Chronic Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIHealth) Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Su, Qian; Gu, Yeqing; Yu, Bin; Yu, Fei; He, Haiyan; Zhang, Qing; Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Du, Huanmin; Liu, Li; Shi, Hongbin; Xia, Yang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xing; Li, Chunlei; Bao, Xue; Liu, Fangfang; Fang, Liyun; Yang, Huijun; Sun, Shaomei; Wang, Xing; Zhou, Ming; Jia, Qiyu; Zhao, Honglin; Song, Kun; Niu, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms have become the most important global public health issue. Iron plays an important role in brain function, cognition, and behavior, and its impacts on depressive symptoms may be multifactorial with both positive and negative effects. Previous observational studies focusing on the association between iron status and depressive symptoms showed inconsistent results. Ferritin is a ubiquitous intracellular protein that can store and release iron and is widely used as a clinical biomarker to evaluate iron status. We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the relationship between serum ferritin and depressive symptoms among 3,839 subjects who were from the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIHealth) cohort. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Chinese version of 20-item self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) with 4 cutoffs (40, 45, 48 and 50) to indicate elevated depressive symptoms (40 was the primary cut-off). The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 36.5%, 17.6%, 11.0% and 7.0% for SDS ≥40, ≥45, ≥48 and ≥50, respectively. With the primary cut-off point of 40, multiple potential confounding factors were adjusted and the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of having elevated depressive symptoms by quartiles of serum ferritin concentrations were 1.00 (reference), 1.10 (0.91, 1.34), 0.81 (0.66, 1.01) and 1.02 (0.81, 1.28) for the first, second, third and fourth quartile, respectively (P for trend = 0.76). Similar relations were observed with the use of other cut-offs as a definition of depressive symptoms. In conclusion, there is no significant relationship between serum ferritin concentrations and depressive symptoms among Chinese adults. PMID:27611581

  19. Malignant brainstem gliomas in adults: clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ranjith; Kranz, Peter G.; McLendon, Roger E.; Thomas, Steven; Friedman, Allan H.; Bigner, Darell D.; Adamson, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Adult malignant brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are poorly characterized due to their relative rarity. We have examined histopathologically confirmed cases of adult malignant BSGs to better characterize the patient and tumor features and outcomes, including the natural history, presentation, imaging, molecular characteristics, prognostic factors, and appropriate treatments. A total of 34 patients were identified, consisting of 22 anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs) and 12 glioblastomas (GBMs). The overall median survival for all patients was 25.8 months, with patients having GBMs experiencing significantly worse survival (12.1 vs. 77.0 months, p = 0.0011). The majority of tumors revealed immunoreactivity for EGFR (93.3 %) and MGMT (64.7 %). Most tumors also exhibited chromosomal abnormalities affecting the loci of epidermal growth factor receptor (92.9 %), MET (100 %), PTEN (61.5 %), and 9p21 (80 %). AAs more commonly appeared diffusely enhancing (50.0 vs. 27.3 %) or diffusely nonenhancing (25.0 vs. 0.0 %), while GBMs were more likely to exhibit focal enhancement (54.6 vs. 10.0 %). Multivariate analysis revealed confirmed histopathology for GBM to significantly affect survival (HR 4.80; 95 % CI 1.86–12.4; p = 0.0012). In conclusion, adult malignant BSGs have an overall poor prognosis, with GBM tumors faring significantly worse than AAs. As AAs and GBMs have differing imaging characteristics, tissue diagnosis may be necessary to accurately determine patient prognosis and identify molecular characteristics which may aid in the treatment of these aggressive tumors. PMID:24838419

  20. Low-grade astrocytoma in a child with encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Brassesco, María Sol; Valera, Elvis Terci; Becker, Aline Paixão; Castro-Gamero, Angel Mauricio; de Aboim Machado, André; Santos, Antônio Carlos; Scrideli, Carlos Alberto; Oliveira, Ricardo Santos; Machado, Hélio Rubens; Tone, Luiz Gonzaga

    2010-02-01

    Encephalocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL), or Haberland syndrome, is an uncommon congenital disorder with unique cutaneous, ocular and neurological features. In the present article, we describe a 3-year-old boy with ECCL who developed an extensive and recurring intraventricular low-grade glioma with atypical pathological features and elevated mitotic index. Cytogenetic analysis from tumor sample was also performed. This is the first report of a low-grade astrocytoma occurring in a child with ECCL. Whether or not the origin of the tumor is associated to the pathogenesis of the underlying syndrome is a matter for further investigation. PMID:19652916

  1. Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Adult and Pediatric Gliomas: Toward Personalized Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Harry R.; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that both adult and pediatric glial tumor entities represent collections of neoplastic lesions, each with individual pathological molecular events and treatment responses. In this review, we discuss the current prognostic biomarkers validated for clinical use or with future clinical validity for gliomas. Accurate prognostication is crucial for managing patients as treatments may be associated with high morbidity and the benefits of high risk interventions must be judged by the treating clinicians. We also review biomarkers with predictive validity, which may become clinically relevant with the development of targeted therapies for adult and pediatric gliomas. PMID:24716189

  2. Biomarker-driven diagnosis of diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Appin, Christina L; Brat, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    The diffuse gliomas are primary central nervous system tumors that arise most frequently in the cerebral hemispheres of adults. They are currently classified as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas or oligoastrocytomas and range in grade from II to IV. Glioblastoma (GBM), grade IV, is the highest grade and most common form. The diagnosis of diffuse gliomas has historically been based primarily on histopathologic features, yet these tumors have a wide range of biological behaviors that are only partially explained by morphology. Biomarkers have now become an established component of the neuropathologic diagnosis of gliomas, since molecular alterations aid in classification, prognostication and prediction of therapeutic response. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are frequent in grades II and III infiltrating gliomas of adults, as well as secondary GBMs, and are a major discriminate of biologic class. IDH mutant infiltrating astrocytomas (grades II and III), as well as secondary GBMs, are characterized by TP53 and ATRX mutations. Oligodendrogliomas are also IDH mutant, but instead are characterized by 1p/19q co-deletion and mutations of CIC, FUBP1, Notch1 and the TERT promoter. Primary GBMs typically lack IDH mutations and demonstrate EGFR, PTEN, TP53, PDGFRA, NF1 and CDKN2A/B alterations and TERT promoter mutations. Pediatric gliomas differ in their spectrum of disease from those in adults; high grade gliomas occurring in children frequently have mutations in H3F3A, ATRX and DAXX, but not IDH. Circumscribed, low grade gliomas, such as pilocytic astrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma and ganglioglioma, need to be distinguished from diffuse gliomas in the pediatric population. These gliomas often harbor mutations or activating gene rearrangements in BRAF. PMID:26004297

  3. Longer genotypically-estimated leukocyte telomere length is associated with increased adult glioma risk

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kyle M.; Codd, Veryan; Rice, Terri; Nelson, Christopher P.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Hansen, Helen M.; Elhauge, Edward; Ojha, Juhi; Francis, Stephen S.; Madsen, Nils R.; Bracci, Paige M.; Pico, Alexander R.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere maintenance has emerged as an important molecular feature with impacts on adult glioma susceptibility and prognosis. Whether longer or shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with glioma risk remains elusive and is often confounded by the effects of age and patient treatment. We sought to determine if genotypically-estimated LTL is associated with glioma risk and if inherited single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with LTL are glioma risk factors. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we assessed differences in genotypically-estimated relative LTL in two independent glioma case-control datasets from the UCSF Adult Glioma Study (652 patients and 3735 controls) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (478 non-overlapping patients and 2559 controls). LTL estimates were based on a weighted linear combination of subject genotype at eight SNPs, previously associated with LTL in the ENGAGE Consortium Telomere Project. Mean estimated LTL was 31bp (5.7%) longer in glioma patients than controls in discovery analyses (P = 7.82×10-8) and 27bp (5.0%) longer in glioma patients than controls in replication analyses (1.48×10-3). Glioma risk increased monotonically with each increasing septile of LTL (O.R.=1.12; P = 3.83×10-12). Four LTL-associated SNPs were significantly associated with glioma risk in pooled analyses, including those in the telomerase component genes TERC (O.R.=1.14; 95% C.I.=1.03-1.28) and TERT (O.R.=1.39; 95% C.I.=1.27-1.52), and those in the CST complex genes OBFC1 (O.R.=1.18; 95% C.I.=1.05-1.33) and CTC1 (O.R.=1.14; 95% C.I.=1.02-1.28). Future work is needed to characterize the role of the CST complex in gliomagenesis and further elucidate the complex balance between ageing, telomere length, and molecular carcinogenesis. PMID:26646793

  4. Longer genotypically-estimated leukocyte telomere length is associated with increased adult glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Codd, Veryan; Rice, Terri; Nelson, Christopher P; Smirnov, Ivan V; McCoy, Lucie S; Hansen, Helen M; Elhauge, Edward; Ojha, Juhi; Francis, Stephen S; Madsen, Nils R; Bracci, Paige M; Pico, Alexander R; Molinaro, Annette M; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchel S; Chang, Susan M; Prados, Michael D; Jenkins, Robert B; Wiemels, Joseph L; Samani, Nilesh J; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2015-12-15

    Telomere maintenance has emerged as an important molecular feature with impacts on adult glioma susceptibility and prognosis. Whether longer or shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with glioma risk remains elusive and is often confounded by the effects of age and patient treatment. We sought to determine if genotypically-estimated LTL is associated with glioma risk and if inherited single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with LTL are glioma risk factors. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we assessed differences in genotypically-estimated relative LTL in two independent glioma case-control datasets from the UCSF Adult Glioma Study (652 patients and 3735 controls) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (478 non-overlapping patients and 2559 controls). LTL estimates were based on a weighted linear combination of subject genotype at eight SNPs, previously associated with LTL in the ENGAGE Consortium Telomere Project. Mean estimated LTL was 31bp (5.7%) longer in glioma patients than controls in discovery analyses (P = 7.82x10-8) and 27bp (5.0%) longer in glioma patients than controls in replication analyses (1.48x10-3). Glioma risk increased monotonically with each increasing septile of LTL (O.R.=1.12; P = 3.83x10-12). Four LTL-associated SNPs were significantly associated with glioma risk in pooled analyses, including those in the telomerase component genes TERC (O.R.=1.14; 95% C.I.=1.03-1.28) and TERT (O.R.=1.39; 95% C.I.=1.27-1.52), and those in the CST complex genes OBFC1 (O.R.=1.18; 95% C.I.=1.05-1.33) and CTC1 (O.R.=1.14; 95% C.I.=1.02-1.28). Future work is needed to characterize the role of the CST complex in gliomagenesis and further elucidate the complex balance between ageing, telomere length, and molecular carcinogenesis. PMID:26646793

  5. Dietary Components Related to N-Nitroso Compound Formation: A Prospective Study of Adult Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Dubrow, Robert; Darefsky, Amy S.; Park, Yikyung; Mayne, Susan T.; Moore, Steven C.; Kilfoy, Briseis; Cross, Amanda J.; Sinha, Rashmi; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Ward, Mary H.

    2010-01-01

    Background N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) are found in processed meat and are formed endogenously from intake of nitrite and nitrate. Endogenous NOC formation is antagonized by nitrosation inhibitors in fruit and vegetables (e.g., vitamin C) and promoted by heme in red meat. It has been hypothesized that a diet resulting in high exposure to NOCs increases adult glioma risk. Methods Using proportional hazards models, we tested this hypothesis among 545,770 participants in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, which assessed dietary intake at baseline (1995–96) with a comprehensive food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and at ages 12–13 years with an abbreviated FFQ. Results During follow-up through 2003, 585 participants were diagnosed with glioma. We found no significant trends in glioma risk for consumption of processed or red meat, nitrate, or vitamin C or E. We found significant positive trends for nitrite intake from plant sources (hazard ratio [HR] for quintile 5 vs. 1, 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–2.10; p-trend = 0.028) and, unexpectedly, for fruit and vegetable intake (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.08–1.86; p-trend = .0081). Examination of interactions between dietary intakes (e.g., nitrite and vitamin C) and a limited analysis of diet at ages 12–13 provided no support for the NOC hypothesis. Conclusions Our results cast doubt on the NOC hypothesis in relation to dietary intake and adult glioma risk. Impact Further work is needed on early life diet, adult intake of nitrite from plant sources, and adult intake of fruit and vegetables in relation to adult glioma risk. PMID:20570910

  6. TERT promoter mutations and telomere length in adult malignant gliomas and recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Heidenreich, Barbara; Rachakonda, P. Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; Volz, Florian; Hemminki, Kari; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    In this report on 303 gliomas we show the highest frequency of TERT promoter mutations in gliobastomas (80%) followed by oligodendrogliomas (70%) and astrocytomas (39%). We observed positive association between TERT promoter and IDH mutations in oligodendroglial tumors (OR = 26.3; 95% CI 2.5–250.2) and inverse association in primary glioblastomas (OR = 0.13; 95% CI 0.03–0.58). Tumors with TERT promoter mutations compared to those without showed increased TERT transcription; we also showed difference in the transcription levels due to the two main mutations. Tumors with TERT promoter mutations had shorter telomeres than those without. The patients with only TERT promoter mutations showed worst survival (median survival 14.6 months) and patients with both IDH and TERT promoter mutations showed best survival (246.5 months). In patients with astrocytoma, the TERT promoter mutations only associated with poor survival (P < 0.0001); IDH mutations and 1p/19q deletions associated with increased survival (P = 0.0004). TERT promoter mutations in low grade gliomas associated with reduced progression free survival (HR 10.2; 95% CI 1.9 – 55.9). While our data affirm the role of TERT promoter mutations in glial tumors, effects on transcription and telomere length emphasise the importance of telomere biology in disease genesis and outcome. PMID:25797251

  7. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  8. Serum YKL-40 is a marker of prognosis and disease status in high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Fabio M; Hottinger, Andreas F; Karimi, Sasan; Riedel, Elyn; Dantis, Jocelynn; Jahdi, Maryam; Panageas, Katherine S; Lassman, Andrew B; Abrey, Lauren E; Fleisher, Martin; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Holland, Eric C; Hormigo, Adília

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether longitudinal levels of serum YKL-40 correlate with disease status or survival in adults with gliomas. Patients with histologically confirmed gliomas were eligible for this longitudinal study. Serum samples were collected prospectively and concurrently with MRI scans at multiple time points during the course of the disease. YKL-40 levels determined by ELISA were correlated with radiographic disease status and survival. We performed a multivariate survival analysis including well-known prognostic factors such as age, performance status, and extent of surgical resection. Three hundred and forty-three patients with gliomas (41 low-grade, 105 anaplastic, and 197 glioblastoma) were accrued. Two-year survival from registration was 29% for glioblastomas, 62% for anaplastic gliomas, and 83% for low-grade gliomas. A total of 1740 serum samples were collected, and 95.6% of samples had matching MRI scans. Serum YKL-40 level was significantly lower in patients with no radiographic disease compared with patients with radiographic disease in both the anaplastic glioma (P= .0008) and the glioblastoma (P= .0006) cohorts. Serum levels of YKL-40 in patients with low-grade gliomas were not associated with radiographic disease status. Increases in YKL-40 were independently associated with worse survival in anaplastic gliomas (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.4, P= .01) and glioblastomas (HR = 1.4, P< .0001). Longitudinal increases in serum YKL-40 are associated with increased risk of death in patients with glioblastomas and anaplastic gliomas. YKL-40 is also a putative indicator of disease status in these patients. PMID:21831900

  9. Reduced immunoglobulin E and allergy among adults with glioma compared with controls.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Wiencke, John K; Patoka, Joseph; Moghadassi, Michelle; Chew, Terri; McMillan, Alex; Miike, Rei; Barger, Geoffrey; Wrensch, Margaret

    2004-11-15

    We and others have reported previously that adults with glioma are 1.5- to 4-fold less likely than controls to report a variety of allergic conditions. The consistent nature of this relationship calls for a biological explanation so that preventative or therapeutic modalities can be explored. We enrolled 403 newly diagnosed adult glioma cases in the San Francisco Bay Area over a 3-year period using a population-based cancer registry and 402 age/gender/ethnicity frequency-matched controls identified via random digit dialing. We assessed total, food-specific, and respiratory-specific IgE in available case (n = 228) and control (n = 289) serum samples. IgE levels were associated with gender, age, smoking status, and ethnicity among cases and/or controls. Among the cases, IgE levels were not associated with aspects of glioma therapy including radiation, chemotherapy, or tumor resection. Total IgE levels were lower in cases than controls: age/gender/ethnicity/education/smoking-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for elevated versus normal total IgE was 0.37 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.64]. For the food panel, OR was 0.12 (95% CI, 0.04-0.41). For the respiratory panel, OR was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.52-1.1). Among respiratory allergies, late age of onset (>12 years) but not IgE levels defined a group with strong associations with risk (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.33-0.75). These results corroborate and strengthen our findings of an inverse association between allergic reactions and glioma by showing a relationship with a biomarker for allergy and cancer for the first time. Furthermore, the results indicate a complex relationship between allergic disease and glioma risk that varies by allergen and allergic pathology. PMID:15548720

  10. Longitudinal prospective study of matrix metalloproteinase-9 as a serum marker in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Fabio M; Hottinger, Andreas F; Karimi, Sasan; Riedel, Elyn; Dantis, Jocelynn; Jahdi, Maryam; Panageas, Katherine S; Lassman, Andrew B; Abrey, Lauren E; Fleisher, Martin; Deangelis, Lisa M; Holland, Eric C; Hormigo, Adília

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if longitudinal measurements of serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) correlated with disease status or survival in adults with gliomas. Serum samples were collected prospectively and concurrently with MRI scans at multiple time points during the course of the disease. MMP-9 levels were determined by ELISA and correlated with radiographic disease status and survival. Forty-one patients with low-grade gliomas, 105 with anaplastic gliomas, and 197 with glioblastoma enrolled in this study from August 2002 to September 2008. A total of 1,684 serum samples (97.1% of all MMP-9 samples) had a matching MRI scan. No statistically significant association was observed between levels of serum MMP-9 and radiographic disease status in low-grade gliomas (P = 0.98), anaplastic gliomas (P = 0.39) or glioblastomas (P = 0.33). Among patients with glioblastoma, longitudinal increases in MMP-9 had a weak association with shorter survival (HR = 1.1 per each doubling in MMP-9 levels, 95% CI, 1.0-1.3, P = 0.04) but they were not independently associated with survival when adjusted for age, extent of resection, and performance status. Changes in serum MMP-9 were not associated with survival in the anaplastic glioma cohort. Serum MMP-9 showed no utility in determining glioma disease status and was not a clinically relevant prognostic marker of survival. PMID:21710351

  11. Pseudoprogression in children, adolescents and young adults with non-brainstem high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Carceller, Fernando; Fowkes, Lucy A; Khabra, Komel; Moreno, Lucas; Saran, Frank; Burford, Anna; Mackay, Alan; Jones, David T W; Hovestadt, Volker; Marshall, Lynley V; Vaidya, Sucheta; Mandeville, Henry; Jerome, Neil; Bridges, Leslie R; Laxton, Ross; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Pfister, Stefan M; Leach, Martin O; Pearson, Andrew D J; Jones, Chris; Koh, Dow-Mu; Zacharoulis, Stergios

    2016-08-01

    Pseudoprogression (PsP) is a treatment-related phenomenon which hinders response interpretation. Its prevalence and clinical impact have not been evaluated in children/adolescents. We assessed the characteristics, risk factors and prognosis of PsP in children/adolescents and young-adults diagnosed with non-brainstem high grade gliomas (HGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG). Patients aged 1-21 years diagnosed with HGG or DIPG between 1995 and 2012 who had completed radiotherapy were eligible. PsP was assessed according to study-specific criteria and correlated with first-line treatment, molecular biomarkers and survival. Ninety-one patients (47 HGG, 44 DIPG) were evaluable. Median age: 10 years (range, 2-20). Eleven episodes of PsP were observed in 10 patients (4 HGG, 6 DIPG). Rates of PsP: 8.5 % (HGG); 13.6 % (DIPG). Two episodes of PsP were based on clinical findings alone; nine episodes had concurrent radiological changes: increased size of lesions (n = 5), new focal enhancement (n = 4). Temozolomide, MGMT methylation or H3F3A mutations were not found to be associated with increased occurrence of PsP. For HGG, 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 41.9 % no-PsP versus 100 % PsP (p = 0.041); differences in 1-year overall survival (OS) were not significant. For DIPG, differences in 1-year PFS and OS were not statistically significant. Hazard ratio (95 %CI) of PsP for OS was 0.551 (0.168-1.803; p = 0.325) in HGG; and 0.308 (0.107-0.882; p = 0.028) in DIPG. PsP occurred in both pediatric HGG and DIPG patients at a comparable rate to adult HGG. PsP was associated with improved 1-yr PFS in HGG patients. PsP had a protective effect upon OS in DIPG patients. PMID:27180091

  12. CGCG clinical practice guidelines for the management of adult diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Mao, Ying; Ma, Wenbin; Mao, Qing; You, Yongping; Yang, Xuejun; Jiang, Chuanlu; Kang, Chunsheng; Li, Xuejun; Chen, Ling; Qiu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Weimin; Li, Wenbin; Yao, Yu; Li, Shaowu; Li, Shouwei; Wu, Anhua; Sai, Ke; Bai, Hongmin; Li, Guilin; Chen, Baoshi; Yao, Kun; Wei, Xinting; Liu, Xianzhi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Dai, Yiwu; Lv, Shengqing; Wang, Liang; Lin, Zhixiong; Dong, Jun; Xu, Guozheng; Ma, Xiaodong; Cai, Jinquan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hongjun; Chen, Lingchao; Zhang, Chuanbao; Yang, Pei; Yan, Wei; Liu, Zhixiong; Hu, Huimin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Yuqing; Yang, Yuan; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiliang; Wang, Yongzhi; You, Gan; Han, Lei; Bao, Zhaoshi; Liu, Yanwei; Wang, Yinyan; Fan, Xing; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Xing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Qixue

    2016-06-01

    The Chinese Glioma Cooperative Group (CGCG) Guideline Panel for adult diffuse gliomas provided recommendations for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The Panel covered all fields of expertise in neuro-oncology, i.e. neurosurgeons, neurologists, neuropathologists, neuroradiologists, radiation and medical oncologists and clinical trial experts. The task made clearer and more transparent choices about outcomes considered most relevant through searching the references considered most relevant and evaluating their value. The scientific evidence of papers collected from the literature was evaluated and graded based on the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence and recommendations were given accordingly. The recommendations will provide a framework and assurance for the strategy of diagnostic and therapeutic measures to reduce complications from unnecessary treatment and cost. The guideline should serve as an application for all professionals involved in the management of patients with adult diffuse glioma and also as a source of knowledge for insurance companies and other institutions involved in the cost regulation of cancer care in China. PMID:26966000

  13. Low-grade and anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bent, Martin J; Bromberg, Jacolien E C; Buckner, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas have long attracted interest because of their sensitivity to chemotherapy, in particular in the subset of 1p/19q co-deleted tumors. Recent molecular studies have shown that all 1p/19q co-deleted tumors have IDH mutations and most of them also have TERT mutations. Because of the presence of similar typical genetic alterations in astrocytoma and glioblastoma, the current trend is to diagnose these tumors on the basis of their molecular profile. Further long-term follow-up analysis of both EORTC and RTOG randomized studies on (neo)adjuvant procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy have shown that adjuvant chemotherapy indeed improves outcome, and this is now standard of care. It is also equally clear that benefit to PCV chemotherapy is not limited to the 1p/19q co-deleted cases; potential other predictive factors are IDH mutations and MGMT promoter methylation. Moreover, a recent RTOG study on low-grade glioma also noted an improved outcome after adjuvant PCV chemotherapy, thus making (PCV) chemotherapy now standard of care for all 1p/19q co-deleted tumors regardless of grade. It remains unclear whether temozolomide provides the same survival benefit, as no data from well-designed clinical trials on adjuvant temozolomide in this tumor type are available. Another question that remains is whether one can safely leave out radiotherapy as part of initial treatment to avoid cognitive side-effects of radiotherapy. The current data suggest that delaying radiotherapy and treatment with chemotherapy only may be detrimental for overall survival. PMID:26948366

  14. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  15. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma

  16. Mutations in IDH1, IDH2, and in the TERT promoter define clinically distinct subgroups of adult malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Patrick; Reitman, Zachary J.; Lipp, Eric; Rasheed, B. Ahmed; Yang, Rui; Diplas, Bill H.; Wang, Zhaohui; Greer, Paula K.; Zhu, Huishan; Wang, Catherine Y.; Carpenter, Austin B.; Friedman, Henry; Friedman, Allan H.; Keir, Stephen T.; He, Jie; He, Yiping; McLendon, Roger E.; Herndon II, James E.; Yan, Hai; Bigner, Darell D.

    2014-01-01

    Frequent mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) and the promoter of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) represent two significant discoveries in glioma genomics. Understanding the degree to which these two mutations co-occur or occur exclusively of one another in glioma subtypes presents a unique opportunity to guide glioma classification and prognosis. We analyzed the relationship between overall survival (OS) and the presence of IDH1/2 and TERT promoter mutations in a panel of 473 adult gliomas. We hypothesized and show that genetic signatures capable of distinguishing among several types of gliomas could be established providing clinically relevant information that can serve as an adjunct to histopathological diagnosis. We found that mutations in the TERT promoter occurred in 74.2% of glioblastomas (GBM), but occurred in a minority of Grade II-III astrocytomas (18.2%). In contrast, IDH1/2 mutations were observed in 78.4% of Grade II-III astrocytomas, but were uncommon in primary GBM. In oligodendrogliomas, TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations co-occurred in 79% of cases. Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit TERT promoter mutations alone predominately have primary GBMs associated with poor median OS (11.5 months). Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit IDH1/2 mutations alone predominately have astrocytic morphologies and exhibit a median OS of 57 months while patients whose tumors exhibit both TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations predominately exhibit oligodendroglial morphologies and exhibit median OS of 125 months. Analyzing gliomas based on their genetic signatures allows for the stratification of these patients into distinct cohorts, with unique prognosis and survival. PMID:24722048

  17. Neural stem cells display extensive tropism for pathology in adult brain: Evidence from intracranial gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Aboody, Karen S.; Brown, Alice; Rainov, Nikolai G.; Bower, Kate A.; Liu, Shaoxiong; Yang, Wendy; Small, Juan E.; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Ourednik, Vaclav; Black, Peter McL.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Snyder, Evan Y.

    2000-01-01

    One of the impediments to the treatment of brain tumors (e.g., gliomas) has been the degree to which they expand, infiltrate surrounding tissue, and migrate widely into normal brain, usually rendering them “elusive” to effective resection, irradiation, chemotherapy, or gene therapy. We demonstrate that neural stem cells (NSCs), when implanted into experimental intracranial gliomas in vivo in adult rodents, distribute themselves quickly and extensively throughout the tumor bed and migrate uniquely in juxtaposition to widely expanding and aggressively advancing tumor cells, while continuing to stably express a foreign gene. The NSCs “surround” the invading tumor border while “chasing down” infiltrating tumor cells. When implanted intracranially at distant sites from the tumor (e.g., into normal tissue, into the contralateral hemisphere, or into the cerebral ventricles), the donor cells migrate through normal tissue targeting the tumor cells (including human glioblastomas). When implanted outside the CNS intravascularly, NSCs will target an intracranial tumor. NSCs can deliver a therapeutically relevant molecule—cytosine deaminase—such that quantifiable reduction in tumor burden results. These data suggest the adjunctive use of inherently migratory NSCs as a delivery vehicle for targeting therapeutic genes and vectors to refractory, migratory, invasive brain tumors. More broadly, they suggest that NSC migration can be extensive, even in the adult brain and along nonstereotypical routes, if pathology (as modeled here by tumor) is present. PMID:11070094

  18. DNA repair gene polymorphisms and risk of adult meningioma, glioma, and acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Preetha; Hutchinson, Amy; Wichner, Sara; Black, Peter M; Fine, Howard A; Loeffler, Jay S; Selker, Robert G; Shapiro, William R; Rothman, Nathaniel; Linet, Martha S; Inskip, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Although the etiology of primary brain tumors is largely unknown, prior studies suggest that DNA repair polymorphisms may influence risk of glioma. Altered DNA repair is also likely to affect the risk of meningioma and acoustic neuroma, but these tumors have not been well studied. We estimated the risk of glioma (n = 362), meningioma (n = 134), and acoustic neuroma (n = 69) in non-Hispanic whites with respect to 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 26 genes involved in DNA repair in a hospital-based, case-control study conducted by the National Cancer Institute. We observed significantly increased risk of meningioma with the T variant of GLTSCR1 rs1035938 (OR(CT/TT) = 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.9; P(trend) .0006), which persisted after controlling for multiple comparisons (P = .019). Significantly increased meningioma risk was also observed for the minor allele variants of ERCC4 rs1800067 (P(trend) .01); MUTYH rs3219466 (P(trend) .02), and PCNA rs25406 (P(trend) .03). The NBN rs1805794 minor allele variant was associated with decreased meningioma risk (P(trend) .006). Risk of acoustic neuroma was increased for the ERCC2 rs1799793 (P(trend) .03) and ERCC5 rs17655 (P(trend) .05) variants and decreased for the PARP1 rs1136410 (P(trend) .03). Decreased glioma risk was observed with the XRCC1 rs1799782 variant (P(trend) .04). Our results suggest that common DNA repair variants may affect the risk of adult brain tumors, especially meningioma. PMID:20150366

  19. Adding chemo after radiation treatment improves survival for adults with a type of brain tumor

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain tumor, who received chemotherapy following completion of radiation therapy lived longer than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to long-term follow-up results from a NIH-supported random

  20. Prognostic Relevance of Histomolecular Classification of Diffuse Adult High-Grade Gliomas with Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokhtari, Karima; Colin, Carole; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Jouvet, Anne; Dehais, Caroline; Carpentier, Catherine; Villa, Chiara; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Eimer, Sandrine; Polivka, Marc; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Laquerriere, Annie; Sevestre, Henri; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Viennet, Gabriel; Adam, Clovis; Loussouarn, Delphine; Michalak, Sophie; Rigau, Valérie; Heitzmann, Anne; Vandenbos, Fanny; Forest, Fabien; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Tortel, Marie-Claire; Labrousse, François; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Varlet, Pascale; Kemeny, Jean Louis; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Richard, Pomone; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse adult high-grade gliomas (HGGs) with necrosis encompass anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs) with necrosis (grade III), glioblastomas (GBM, grade IV) and glioblastomas with an oligodendroglial component (GBMO, grade IV). Here, we aimed to search for prognostic relevance of histological classification and molecular alterations of these tumors. About 210 patients were included (63 AO, 56 GBM and 91 GBMO). GBMO group was split into "anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) with necrosis grade IV/GBMO," restricted to tumors showing intermingled astrocytic and oligodendroglial component, and "GBM/GBMO" based on tumors presenting oligodendroglial foci and features of GBM. Genomic arrays, IDH1 R132H expression analyses and IDH direct sequencing were performed. 1p/19q co-deletion characterized AO, whereas no IDH1 R132H expression and intact 1p/19q characterized both GBM and GBM/GBMO. AOA with necrosis/GBMO mainly demonstrated IDH1 R132H expression and intact 1p/19q. Other IDH1 or IDH2 mutations were extremely rare. Both histological and molecular classifications were predictive of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 10(-4) ). Diffuse adult HGGs with necrosis can be split into three histomolecular groups of prognostic relevance: 1p/19q co-deleted AO, IDH1 R132H-GBM and 1p/19q intact IDH1 R132H+ gliomas that might be classified as IDH1 R132H+ GBM. Because of histomolecular heterogeneity, we suggest to remove the name GBMO. PMID:25407774

  1. Integrated Molecular Genetic Profiling of Pediatric High-Grade Gliomas Reveals Key Differences With the Adult Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paugh, Barbara S.; Qu, Chunxu; Jones, Chris; Liu, Zhaoli; Adamowicz-Brice, Martyna; Zhang, Junyuan; Bax, Dorine A.; Coyle, Beth; Barrow, Jennifer; Hargrave, Darren; Lowe, James; Gajjar, Amar; Zhao, Wei; Broniscer, Alberto; Ellison, David W.; Grundy, Richard G.; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To define copy number alterations and gene expression signatures underlying pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG). Patients and Methods We conducted a high-resolution analysis of genomic imbalances in 78 de novo pediatric HGGs, including seven diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas, and 10 HGGs arising in children who received cranial irradiation for a previous cancer using single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis. Gene expression was analyzed with gene expression microarrays for 53 tumors. Results were compared with publicly available data from adult tumors. Results Significant differences in copy number alterations distinguish childhood and adult glioblastoma. PDGFRA was the predominant target of focal amplification in childhood HGG, including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas, and gene expression analyses supported an important role for deregulated PDGFRα signaling in pediatric HGG. No IDH1 hotspot mutations were found in pediatric tumors, highlighting molecular differences with adult secondary glioblastoma. Pediatric and adult glioblastomas were clearly distinguished by frequent gain of chromosome 1q (30% v 9%, respectively) and lower frequency of chromosome 7 gain (13% v 74%, respectively) and 10q loss (35% v 80%, respectively). PDGFRA amplification and 1q gain occurred at significantly higher frequency in irradiation-induced tumors, suggesting that these are initiating events in childhood gliomagenesis. A subset of pediatric HGGs showed minimal copy number changes. Conclusion Integrated molecular profiling showed substantial differences in the molecular features underlying pediatric and adult HGG, indicating that findings in adult tumors cannot be simply extrapolated to younger patients. PDGFRα may be a useful target for pediatric HGG, including diffuse pontine gliomas. PMID:20479398

  2. Association between lesion location and language function in adult glioma using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Pia; Leu, Kevin; Harris, Robert J.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L.; Pope, Whitney B.; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Ellingson, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of language difficulties is an important aspect of clinical care for glioma patients, and accurately identifying the possible language deficits in patients based on lesion location would be beneficial to clinicians. To that end, we examined the relationship between lesion presence and language performance on tests of receptive language and expressive language using a highly specific voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping (VLSM) approach in glioma patients. Methods 98 adults with primary glioma, who were pre-surgical candidates, were administered seven neurocognitive tests within the domains of receptive language and expressive language. The association between language performance and lesion presence was examined using VLSM. Statistical parametric maps were created for each test, and composite maps for both receptive language and expressive language were created to display the significant voxels common to all tests within these language domains. Results We identified clusters of voxels with a significant relationship between lesion presence and language performance. All tasks were associated with several white matter pathways. The receptive language tasks were additionally all associated with regions primarily within the lateral temporal lobe and medial temporal lobe. In contrast, the expressive language tasks shared little overlap, despite each task being independently associated with large anatomic areas. Conclusions Our findings identify the key anatomic structures involved in language functioning in adult glioma patients using an innovative lesion analysis technique and suggest that expressive language abilities may be more task-dependent and distributed than receptive language abilities. PMID:26740915

  3. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. METHODS We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. RESULTS Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. CONCLUSIONS The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q

  4. Plerixafor After Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-21

    Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglial Tumors; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET)

  5. Temsirolimus and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  6. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  7. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  8. Molecular Analysis of Pediatric Oligodendrogliomas Highlights Genetic Differences with Adult Counterparts and Other Pediatric Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nauen, David; Haley, Lisa; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Perry, Arie; Giannini, Caterina; Burger, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendroglioma represents a distinctive neoplasm in adults but similar neoplasms occur rarely in children. We studied 20 cases of pediatric oligodendroglioma by SNP array (median age 9 years, range 1–19; 15 grade II and 5 grade III). Cytogenetic abnormalities were present in 8 (53%) grade II and all five anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Most changes were in the form of deletion and copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The most common abnormality was 1p deletion (n = 5). Whole arm 1p19q co-deletion was present in three cases from adolescent patients and 9p loss in 3, including one low-grade oligodendroglioma with CDKN2A homozygous deletion. Common losses were largely limited to the anaplastic subset (n = 5) and included 3q29 (n = 3), 11p (n = 3), 17q (n = 3), 4q (n = 2), 6p (n = 2), 13q (n = 2), 14q (n = 2), 17p (n = 2) and whole Ch 18 loss (n = 2). Gains were non-recurrent except for whole Ch 7 (n = 2) and gain on 12q (n = 2) including the MDM2 locus. Possible germ line LOH (or uniparental disomy) was present in seven cases (35%), with one focal abnormality (22q13.1-13.2) in two. BRAF-KIAA1549 fusions and BRAF p.V600E mutations were absent (n = 13 and 8). In summary, cytogenetic alterations in pediatric oligodendrogliomas are characterized mostly by genomic losses, particularly in anaplastic tumors. PMID:26206478

  9. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in adult gliomas].

    PubMed

    Kantor, G; Loiseau, H; Vital, A; Mazeron, J J

    2001-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiform and astrocytoma are the most frequent primary cancer of the central nervous system of adult. Definitions of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are based on the confrontation of clinical presentation (age, performance status, neurologic symptoms...), histological type and imaging aspects. For glioblastoma multiform, the GTV can be defined by the area of contrast enhancement observed on the CT scan or MRI. Definition of the CTV can be more difficult and have to take into account the risk of presence of isolated malignant cells in the oedema surrounding the tumor or in the adjacent brain structures. The classical concept of GTV plus a safety margin of 2 cm around is discussed with a CTV containing at least all the oedematous area and eventually adjacent brain structures (nuclei, corpus callosum or other long associative fibers...). For low grade astrocytoma, the definition of GTV can be difficult if the tumoral infiltration is diffuse without nodular visible tumor. CTV corresponds to at least T2 MRI hypersignal area when visible. For postoperative tumor, technical considerations are important for the detection of residual tumor. A safety margin around the resected area is designed according to the risk of presence of isolated cells or involvement of adjacent brain structures. PMID:11715309

  10. EEG, transmission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose /sup 18/F. Their use in adults with gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, M.E.; Theodore, W.H.; Sato, S.; De La Paz, R.; Patronas, N.; Brooks, R.; Jabbari, B.; Di Chiro, G.

    1983-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between findings from EEG, transmission computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography in 23 adults with gliomas. The cortical metabolic rate was suppressed in patients with and without focal slowing. Focal delta activity was not related to involvement of gray or white matter. Rhythmic delta activity and focal attenuation of background amplitude on EEG, however, were correlated with involvement of the thalamus.

  11. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; To, Shing shun Tony; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-11-24

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation. PMID:26485760

  12. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; Tony To, Shing-shun; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation. PMID:26485760

  13. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  14. The Role of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Primary Adult High Grade Gliomas: Assessment of Patients for These Treatment Approaches and the Common Immediate Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Philip-Ephraim, E. E.; Eyong, K. I.; Williams, U. E.; Ephraim, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas are the commonest primary brain tumours in adults. They are usually classified and graded according to the criteria by the World Health Organisation. High-grade gliomas are the most malignant primary brain tumours. Conventional therapies include surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The tumours often demonstrate high levels of resistance to these conventional therapies, and in spite of treatment advances the prognosis remains poor. PMID:23304556

  15. Association and Interactions between DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Adult Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanhong; Scheurer, Michael E.; El-Zein, Randa; Cao, Yumei; Do, Kim-Anh; Gilbert, Mark; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Wei, Qingyi; Etzel, Carol; Bondy, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that glioma develops through accumulation of genetic alterations. We hypothesized that polymorphisms of candidate genes involved in the DNA repair pathways may contribute to susceptibility to glioma. To address this possibility, we conducted a study of 373 Caucasian glioma cases and 365 cancer-free Caucasian controls to assess associations between glioma risk and 18 functional SNPs in DNA repair genes. We evaluated potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions using a multi-analytic strategy combining logistic regression, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and classification and regression tree (CART) approaches. In the single-locus analysis, six SNPs (ERCC1 3’ UTR, XRCC1 R399Q, APEX1 E148D, PARP1 A762V, MGMT F84L, and LIG1 5’UTR) showed a significant association with glioma risk. In the analysis of cumulative genetic risk of multiple SNPs, a significant gene-dosage effect was found for increased glioma risk with increasing numbers of adverse genotypes involving the above-mentioned six SNPs (P trend = 0.0004). Further, both the MDR and CART analyses identified MGMT F84L as the predominant risk factor for glioma, and revealed strong interactions among ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, PARP1 A762V, MGMT F84L and APEX1 E148D. Interestingly, the risk for glioma was dramatically increased in IR exposure individuals who had the wild-type genotypes of both MGMT F84L and PARP1 A762V [adjusted odds ratios (OR), 5.95; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 2.21–16.65]. Taken together, these results suggest that polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may act individually or together to contribute to glioma risk. PMID:19124499

  16. Molecular biology of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Casado Sáenz, Enrique; Cejas Guerrero, Paloma; Perona, Rosario; González Barón, Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours. In keeping with the degree of aggressiveness, gliomas are divided into four grades, with different biological behaviour. Furthermore, as different gliomas share a predominant histological appearance, the final classification includes both, histological features and degree of malignancy. For example, gliomas of astrocytic origin (astrocytomas) are classified into pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), astrocytoma (grade II), anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma multiforme (GMB) (grade IV). Tumors derived from oligodendrocytes include grade II (oliogodendrogliomas) and grade III neoplasms (oligoastrocytoma). Each subtype has a specific prognosis that dictates the clinical management. In this regard, a patient diagnosed with an oligodendroglioma totally removed has 10-15 years of potential survival. On the opposite site, patients carrying a glioblastoma multiforme usually die within the first year after the diagnosis is made. Therefore, different approaches are needed in each case. Obviously, prognosis and biological behaviour of malignant gliomas are closely related and supported by the different molecular background that possesses each type of glioma. Furthermore, the ability that allows several low-grade gliomas to progress into more aggressive tumors has allowed cancer researchers to elucidate several pathways implicated in molecular biology of these devastating tumors. In this review, we describe classical pathways involved in human malignant gliomas with special focus with recent advances, such as glioma stem-like cells and expression patterns from microarray studies. PMID:17005465

  17. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Intratumoral Reovirus Infusion for the Treatment of Recurrent Malignant Gliomas in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kicielinski, Kimberly P; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, John S; Gill, George M; Coffey, Matt; Markert, James M

    2014-01-01

    Reovirus, an oncolytic RNA virus exhibiting antiglioma activity, was shown in a previous single institution phase 1 study found that the inoculation of the virus to be well tolerated in patients with recurrent malignant glioma (MG). The goals of multicenter study reported herein were to determine the dose-limiting toxicity, maximum tolerated dose, and target lesion response rate when reovirus was administered in a novel fashion via intratumoral infusion for 72 hours in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Fifteen adult patients were treated in a dose escalation study ranging from 1 × 108 to 1 × 1010 tissue culture infectious dose 50, tentimes the dose achieved in the previous trial. Neurological, functional examinations, and imaging studies were completed pre- and postinfusion. There was one grade 3 adverse event (convulsions) felt to be possibly related to treatment, but no grade 4 adverse events considered probably or definitely related to treatment. Dose-limiting toxicity were not identified and a maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Evidence of antiglioma activity was seen in some patients. This first report of intratumoral infusion of reovirus in patients with recurrent malignant glioma demonstrated the approach to be safe and well tolerated, warranting further studies. PMID:24553100

  18. Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATOC Positron Emission Tomography (PET) CT in Children and Young Adults With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Newly Diagnosed Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood

  19. Prevalence and profile of cognitive impairment in adult glioma: a sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Boone, Mathieu; Roussel, Martine; Chauffert, Bruno; Le Gars, Daniel; Godefroy, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive impairment has been reported in 27-83 % of adults with World Health Organization (WHO) grade I-III glioma. However, the few studies in this field used different methods for cognitive assessment. The objective of the present study was to establish the prevalence of cognitive impairment in patients with WHO grade I-III primary brain tumors and determine the effect sizes of a comprehensive battery of tests. This study used a comprehensive neuropsychological battery to examine 27 patients. To control for false positives, prevalence was estimated from the overall neuropsychological score. Size effects were determined using Cohen's d. Cognitive impairment was observed in 51.9 % (95 % CI 33-70.7 %) of the patients; the impairment affected action speed (38.5 %), cognitive (33 %) and behavioral (21.7 %) executive functions, oral expression (29.6 %), episodic memory (29.6 %) and visuoconstructive abilities (19.2 %). The largest effect sizes (d ≥ 1.645) were observed for the Digit Symbol Substitution test, global hypoactivity, free recall, Stroop time, the Boston Naming test (BNT), the Trail Making test B (TMTB), verbal fluency and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. Four of these scores (global hypoactivity, the Digit Symbol Substitution test, the TMTB perseveration, and the BNT) were combined to make a shortened battery (AUC 0.872; 95 % CI 0.795-0.949). The overall neuropsychological score was the sole factor associated with the functional outcome. Our results suggest that about half of survivors with a grade I-III primary brain tumor suffer from cognitive impairment. Tests with a large effect size should be included in future large-scale studies. PMID:27241133

  20. Prolonged survival in adult neurofibromatosis type I patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Theeler, Brett J; Ellezam, Benjamin; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Slopis, John M; Loghin, Monica E; de Groot, John F

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytic tumors, especially optic pathway pilocytic astrocytomas, are common in pediatric NF1 patients. High-grade gliomas (HGGs) appear to be rare in adult and pediatric NF1 patients. This is a series of five consecutive, adult NF1 patients with recurrent HGGs treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Four patients met consensus clinical criteria for NF1 and one patient had presumed segmental NF1. Three patients had glioblastomas, one gliosarcoma, and one progressive, enhancing optic pathway glioma which was not biopsied. Two tumors had molecular testing performed; both were IDH wild type and activating oncogene mutations (1 BRAFV600E and 1 PIK3CA mutation) were found in these tumors. All five patients received bevacizumab-containing regimens at tumor recurrence. The median number of 4-week cycles of bevacizumab was 20. All five patients experienced prolonged post-recurrence survival following bevacizumab treatment ranging from ten to 72 months. The median overall survival from HGG diagnosis was 72.6 months with three patients alive and progression free at last follow-up. Three out of five patients developed vascular complications leading to bevacizumab discontinuation. In this case series, adult NF1 patients with recurrent HGGs had prolonged, post-recurrence survival after treatment with bevacizumab-containing regimens. Based on these results, further study of antiangiogenic therapy in NF1 patients with HGGs and bevacizumab-response in sporadic HGG patients with NF1-mutated tumors is warranted. PMID:24859329

  1. Pediatric and Adult High-Grade Glioma Stem Cell Culture Models Are Permissive to Lytic Infection with Parvovirus H-1

    PubMed Central

    Josupeit, Rafael; Bender, Sebastian; Kern, Sonja; Leuchs, Barbara; Hielscher, Thomas; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schlehofer, Jörg R.; Dinsart, Christiane; Witt, Olaf; Rommelaere, Jean; Lacroix, Jeannine

    2016-01-01

    Combining virus-induced cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic effects, oncolytic virotherapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for high-grade glioma (HGG). A clinical trial has recently provided evidence for the clinical safety of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) in adult glioblastoma relapse patients. The present study assesses the efficacy of H-1PV in eliminating HGG initiating cells. H-1PV was able to enter and to transduce all HGG neurosphere culture models (n = 6), including cultures derived from adult glioblastoma, pediatric glioblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Cytotoxic effects induced by the virus have been observed in all HGG neurospheres at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) doses of input virus between 1 and 10 plaque forming units per cell. H-1PV infection at this dose range was able to prevent tumorigenicity of NCH421k glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) “stem-like” cells in NOD/SCID mice. Interestingly NCH421R, an isogenic subclone with equal capacity of xenograft formation, but resistant to H-1PV infection could be isolated from the parental NCH421k culture. To reveal changes in gene expression associated with H-1PV resistance we performed a comparative gene expression analysis in these subclones. Several dysregulated genes encoding receptor proteins, endocytosis factors or regulators innate antiviral responses were identified and represent intriguing candidates for to further study molecular mechanisms of H-1PV resistance. PMID:27213425

  2. Dissecting DNA repair in adult high grade gliomas for patient stratification in the post-genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christina; Agarwal, Devika; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M.A.; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Grundy, Richard; Auer, Dorothee T.; Walker, David; Lakhani, Ravi; Scott, Ian S.; Chan, Stephen; Ball, Graham; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of multiple DNA repair pathways may contribute to aggressive biology and therapy resistance in gliomas. We evaluated transcript levels of 157 genes involved in DNA repair in an adult glioblastoma Test set (n=191) and validated in ‘The Cancer Genome Atlas’ (TCGA) cohort (n=508). A DNA repair prognostic index model was generated. Artificial neural network analysis (ANN) was conducted to investigate global gene interactions. Protein expression by immunohistochemistry was conducted in 61 tumours. A fourteen DNA repair gene expression panel was associated with poor survival in Test and TCGA cohorts. A Cox multivariate model revealed APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN as independently associated with poor prognosis. A DNA repair prognostic index incorporating APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN stratified patients in to three prognostic sub-groups with worsening survival. APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN also have predictive significance in patients who received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. ANN analysis of APE1, NBN, PMS2, MGMT and PTEN revealed interactions with genes involved in transcription, hypoxia and metabolic regulation. At the protein level, low APE1 and low PTEN remain associated with poor prognosis. In conclusion, multiple DNA repair pathways operate to influence biology and clinical outcomes in adult high grade gliomas. PMID:25026297

  3. Pediatric and Adult High-Grade Glioma Stem Cell Culture Models Are Permissive to Lytic Infection with Parvovirus H-1.

    PubMed

    Josupeit, Rafael; Bender, Sebastian; Kern, Sonja; Leuchs, Barbara; Hielscher, Thomas; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schlehofer, Jörg R; Dinsart, Christiane; Witt, Olaf; Rommelaere, Jean; Lacroix, Jeannine

    2016-01-01

    Combining virus-induced cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic effects, oncolytic virotherapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for high-grade glioma (HGG). A clinical trial has recently provided evidence for the clinical safety of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) in adult glioblastoma relapse patients. The present study assesses the efficacy of H-1PV in eliminating HGG initiating cells. H-1PV was able to enter and to transduce all HGG neurosphere culture models (n = 6), including cultures derived from adult glioblastoma, pediatric glioblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Cytotoxic effects induced by the virus have been observed in all HGG neurospheres at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) doses of input virus between 1 and 10 plaque forming units per cell. H-1PV infection at this dose range was able to prevent tumorigenicity of NCH421k glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) "stem-like" cells in NOD/SCID mice. Interestingly NCH421R, an isogenic subclone with equal capacity of xenograft formation, but resistant to H-1PV infection could be isolated from the parental NCH421k culture. To reveal changes in gene expression associated with H-1PV resistance we performed a comparative gene expression analysis in these subclones. Several dysregulated genes encoding receptor proteins, endocytosis factors or regulators innate antiviral responses were identified and represent intriguing candidates for to further study molecular mechanisms of H-1PV resistance. PMID:27213425

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging suggests extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Bell, W. Robert; Kern, Jason; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Mhlanga, Joyce; Carson, Kathryn A.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To apply DTI to detect early extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma along the corticospinal tracts. Methods In children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, low-grade brainstem glioma, and age-matched controls, DTI metrics were measured in the posterior limb of the internal capsule and posterior centrum semiovale. Histological examination was available in one patient. Results 6 diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, 8 low-grade brainstem glioma, and two groups of 25 controls were included. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to controls, fractional anisotropy was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior centrum semiovale and posterior limb of the internal capsule, while radial diffusivity was higher in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. No significant differences were found between low-grade brainstem glioma and controls. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to low-grade brainstem glioma, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. Histological examination in one child showed tumor cells in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Conclusion Reduction in fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity and increase in radial diffusivity in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma may reflect tumor extension along the corticospinal tracts as shown by histology. DTI may detect early extrapontine tumor extension in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma before it becomes apparent on conventional MRI sequences. PMID:26971411

  5. Utilization of low grade coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    Purpose was to construct and use a pilot furnace that could utilize low-grade coal (steam coal and coal fines) in place of oil or natural gas. This pilot furnace was tested on a 66-inch Raymond H.S. Roller Mill at the No. 1 plant of the James River Limestone Co. Results indicate that the commercial use is feasible; drying costs average $0.36 per ton with coal vs $0.80 per ton on annual basis when oil fired. Results are applicable to limestone manufacturers producing dry pulverized products. (DLC)

  6. Red and processed meat consumption and risk of glioma in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Saneei, Parvane; Willett, Walter; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: These findings from several observational studies, investigated the association between red meat consumption and gliomas, were inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to summarize available date on the relation between meat intake and risk of glioma. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search of relevant reports published until May 2014 of the PubMed/Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Excerpta Medica database, Ovid database, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases was conducted. From 723 articles yielded in the preliminary literature search, data from eighteen publications (14 case-control, three cohort, and one nested case-control study) on unprocessed red meat, processed meat, and/or total red meat consumption in relation to glioma in adults were included in the analysis. Quality assessment of studies was performed. Random effects model was used to conduct the meta-analysis. Results: We found a positive significant association between unprocessed red meat intake and risk of glioma (relative risk [RR] = 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-1.58) after excluding three studies with uncertain type of brain cancer. This analysis included only one cohort study which revealed no relation between unprocessed red meat intake and glioma (RR = 1.75; 95% CI: 0.35-8.77). Consumption of processed meats was not related to increased risk of glioma in population-based case-control studies (RR = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.05-1.51) and reduced risk in hospital-based case-controls (RR = 0.79; 95% CI: 0.65-0.97). No significant association was seen between processed red meat intake and risk of glioma in cohort studies (RR: 1.08; 95% CI: 0.84-1.37). Total red meat consumption was not associated with risk of adult glioma in case-control or cohort studies. Conclusion: In this meta-analysis of 18 observational studies, we found a modest positive association between unprocessed red meat intake and risk of gliomas based almost

  7. A Prospective Study of Height and Body Mass Index in Childhood, Birth Weight, and Risk of Adult Glioma Over 40 Years of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Cari M.; Gamborg, Michael; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Baker, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Greater attained height and greater body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) in young adulthood have been associated with glioma risk, but few studies have investigated the association with body size at birth or during childhood, when the brain undergoes rapid cell growth and differentiation. The Copenhagen School Health Records Register includes data on 320,425 Danish schoolchildren born between 1930 and 1989, with height and weight measurements from ages 7–13 years and parentally recorded birth weights. We prospectively evaluated associations between childhood height and BMI, birth weight, and adult glioma risk. During follow-up (1968–2010), 355 men and 253 women aged ≥18 years were diagnosed with glioma. In boys, height at each age between 7 and 13 years was positively associated with glioma risk; hazard ratios per standard-deviation score at ages 7 (approximately 5.1 cm) and 13 (approximately 7.6 cm) years were 1.17 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.30) and 1.21 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.35), respectively. No associations were observed for childhood height in girls or for BMI. Birth weight was positively associated with risk (per 0.5 kg: hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.24). These results suggest that exposures associated with higher birth weight and, in boys, greater height during childhood may contribute to the etiology of adult glioma. PMID:25205831

  8. IgE, allergy, and risk of glioma: update from the San Francisco Bay Area Adult Glioma Study in the temozolomide era.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Wilson, David; Patil, Chirag; Patoka, Joseph; McCoy, Lucie; Rice, Terri; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Heimberger, Amy; Sampson, John H; Chang, Susan; Prados, Michael; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret

    2009-08-01

    The consistently observed inverse relationship of allergic conditions with glioma risk and our previous demonstration that immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels also were lower in glioma patients than controls suggest that atopic allergy may be related to a mechanism that inhibits or prevents glioma. We sought to extend these results with a new and larger series of patients (n = 535 with questionnaire data; 393 with IgE measures) and controls (n = 532 with questionnaire data; 470 with IgE measures). As expected, glioma cases were less likely than controls to report history of allergies [among self-reported cases, Odds ratios (OR) = 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.41-0.85]. IgE levels also were lower in glioma cases versus controls (OR per unit log IgE = 0.89, 95% CI (0.82-0.98). However, this inverse relationship was only apparent among cases receiving temozolomide, a treatment which became part of the "standard of care" for glioblastoma patients during the study period. Among patients receiving temozolomide, IgE levels in cases whose blood samples were obtained within 30 days of diagnosis were slightly higher than controls, whereas IgE levels in cases whose blood sample was obtained >60 days after diagnosis were significantly lower than controls (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.71-0.89). Thus, although our results robustly confirm the inverse association between allergy and glioma, the results for IgE are affected by temozolomide treatments which may have influenced IgE levels. These results have implications for the study of immunologic factors in glioma as well as for immunotherapy protocols for treating glioma. PMID:19408307

  9. IgE, Allergy, and Risk of Glioma: Update from the San Francisco Bay Area Adult Glioma Study in the Temozolomide Era

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wilson, David; Patel, Chirag; Patoka, Joseph; McCoy, Lucie; Rice, Terri; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Heimberger, Amy; Sampson, John H.; Chang, Susan; Prados, Michael; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The consistently observed inverse relationship of allergic conditions with glioma risk and our previous demonstration that IgE levels also were lower in glioma patients than controls suggest that atopic allergy may be related to a mechanism that inhibits or prevents glioma. We sought to extend these results with a new and larger series of patients (n=535 with questionnaire data; 393 with IgE measures) and controls (n=532 with questionnaire data; 470 with IgE measures). As expected, glioma cases were less likely than controls to report history of allergies (among self-reported cases, OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.41–0.85). IgE levels also were lower in glioma cases versus controls (OR per unit log IgE=0.89, 95% CI (0.82–0.98). However, this inverse relationship was only apparent among cases receiving temozolomide, a treatment which became part of the “standard of care” for glioblastoma patients during the study period. Among patients receiving temozolomide, IgE levels in cases whose blood samples were obtained within 30 days of diagnosis were slightly higher than controls, while IgE levels in cases whose blood sample was obtained >60 days after diagnosis were significantly lower than controls (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.71–0.89). Thus, while our results robustly confirm the inverse association between allergy and glioma, the results for IgE are affected by temozolomide treatments which may have influenced IgE levels. These results have implications for the study of immunologic factors in glioma as well as for immunotherapy protocols for treating glioma. PMID:19408307

  10. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Ian Robins, H; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M; Chang, Susan M

    2009-01-01

    This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Fifty five patients were enrolled in the study. Ten were ineligible after central review of pathology. Eleven percent of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  11. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of Poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D.; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Robins, H. Ian; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M.; Chang, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). Methods and Materials This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Results 55 patients were enrolled in the study. 10 were ineligible after central review of pathology. 11% of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Conclusions Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  12. Dietary factors and the risk of glioma in adults: results of a case-control study in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Giles, G G; McNeil, J J; Donnan, G; Webley, C; Staples, M P; Ireland, P D; Hurley, S F; Salzberg, M

    1994-11-01

    In a population-based case-control study of 416 incident gliomas in adults carried out in Melbourne, Australia, between 1987 and 1991, 409 age-sex-matched case-control pairs (243 male and 166 female) had adequate data available to examine associations between the dietary intake of N-nitroso compounds, N-nitroso precursors, other nutrients including N-nitroso inhibitors, and the risk of glioma. Dietary intakes were based on the reported frequency of consumption of 59 food items. Increased odds ratio (OR) were observed in males who consumed high levels of bacon, corned meats, apples, melons and oil. OR less than unity were observed in men consuming cabbage and cola drinks, and in women who consumed wholegrain bread, pasta, corned meat, bananas, cauliflower, brocoli, cola drinks and nuts. Generally, N-nitroso associations were greater in men and micronutrient associations were greater in women. Elevated OR in men, but not women, were associated with the intake of N-nitroso dimethylamine (NDMA), retinol and vitamin E. The intake of nitrate (largely of vegetable origin) was protective in women but not in men. When analyzed using multiple logistic regression, the association with NDMA intake in males was not modified by dietary micronutrient intakes. In females, beta carotene alone, though not directly associated with risk, modified the effect of NDMA. On balance, this study added only limited support to the N-nitroso hypothesis of glial carcinogenesis. PMID:7927941

  13. An Updated and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis of Association Between Seven Hot Loci Polymorphisms from Eight GWAS and Glioma Risk.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiang; Peng, Yanyan; Zhao, Xiaotao

    2016-09-01

    Eight genome-wide association studies (GWASs) found that seven loci (rs2736100, rs4295627, rs4977756, rs498872, rs11979158, rs2252586, rs6010620) polymorphisms could elevate the risk of glioma, one of the most common types of primary brain cancer in adults. However, the replication studies about these seven loci obtained inconsistent results. In order to derive a more accurate estimation about the relationship between the selected single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and susceptibility to glioma, we conducted a meta-analysis containing all eligible published case control studies to evaluate the association. An overall literature search was conducted using the database of PubMed, Science Direct, China national knowledge infrastructure (CNKI), and Embase. Seventeen articles with 25 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Glioma risk (odds ratio, OR; 95 % confidential interval, 95 %CI) was estimated with the random-effect model or the fixed-effects model. STATA 12.0 was applied to analyze all statistical data. Results showed that seven hot loci were all associated with increased risk of glioma (rs2736100, OR = 1.28, 95 %CI = 1.23-1.32; rs4295627, OR = 1.34, 95 %CI = 1.21-1.47; rs4977756, OR = 1.24, 95 %CI = 1.20-1.28; rs498872, OR = 1.24, 95 %CI = 1.15-1.33; rs6010620, OR = 1.29, 95 %CI = 1.24-1.35; rs11979158: OR = 1.18, 95 %CI = 1.10-1.25; rs2252586: OR = 1.18, 95 %CI = 1.10-1.25). Additionally, subgroup analysis by stages of glioma found that variation of rs11979158 had stronger relationship with high-grade (OR = 1.32, 95 %CI = 1.19-1.45) than low-grade glioma (OR = 1.12, 95 % CI = 1.03-1.21). Similarly, stratified analysis of rs2252586 by stages revealed the similar trend, with OR of 1.26 (95 %CI = 1.17-1.35) in high-grade glioma and OR of 1.15 (95 %CI = 1.08-1.22) in low-grade glioma. In summary, the present study showed that mutations of the seven loci could elevate

  14. Nitinol engine for low grade heat

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.T.

    1981-12-01

    A continuous band of nitinol wrapping in between a cluster of tightly engaged rollers to form a series of s-shaped bends is used as the principle working medium of a thermal engine to convert low grade heat to mechanical power output. The band, together with the rollers, divides the space into an inner and an outer zone. A stream of warmer water and a stream of cooler water are guided to flow separately through one or the other of the two zones to make uniform and intimate contact with the segments of the nitinol band alternatively at appropriate intervals. A well defined four-cycle operation of temperature and stress is thus established and can convert a portion of the energy which is available in the thermal gradient of the two water streams into a mechanical shaft power which may be tapped from one of the rollers.

  15. Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  16. Anatomical Involvement of the Subventricular Zone Predicts Poor Survival Outcome in Low-Grade Astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Wang, Yinyan; Fan, Xing; Ma, Jun; Ma, Wenbin; Wang, Renzhi; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) has been implicated in the origination, development, and biological behavior of gliomas. Tumor-SVZ contact is also postulated to be a poor prognostic factor in glioblastomas. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic consequence of the anatomical involvement of low-grade gliomas with the SVZ. To that end, we reviewed 143 patients with diffuse astrocytomas, and tumor lesions were manually delineated on magnetic resonance images. We initially investigated the prognostic role of SVZ contact in all patients. Additionally, we investigated the influence of the anatomical proximity of the tumor lesion centroids to the SVZ in the SVZ-involved patient cohorts, as well as location within the SVZ. We found SVZ contact with tumors to be a significant prognostic factor of overall survival in all patients with diffuse astrocytomas (p = 0.027). In the SVZ-involved cohort, a shorter distance from the tumor centroid to the SVZ (≤30 mm) correlated with shorter overall survival (p = 0.022) on univariate analysis. However, there was no significant difference in overall survival with respect to the SVZ region involved with the tumor (p = 0.930). Multivariate analysis showed that a shorter distance between the tumor centroid and the SVZ (p = 0.039) was significantly associated with poor overall survival in SVZ-involved patients. Hence, this study helps establish the prognostic role of the anatomical interaction of tumors with the SVZ in low-grade astrocytomas. PMID:27120204

  17. Inverse association of antioxidant and phytoestrogen nutrient intake with adult glioma in the San Francisco Bay Area: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi-Blok, Nicole; Lee, Marion; Sison, Jennette D; Miike, Rei; Wrensch, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence from epidemiologic studies suggest that oxidative stress may play a role in adult glioma. In addition to dietary antioxidants, antioxidant and weak estrogenic properties of dietary phytoestrogens may attenuate oxidative stress. Our hypothesis is that long-term consumption of dietary antioxidants and phytoestrogens such as genistein, daidzein, biochanin A, formononetin, matairesinol, secoisolariciresinol and coumestrol, may reduce the risk of adult glioma. Methods Using unconditional logistic regression models, we compared quartiles of consumption for several specific antioxidants and phytoestrogens among 802 adult glioma cases and 846 controls from two study series from the San Francisco Bay Area Adult Glioma Study, 1991 – 2000, controlling for vitamin supplement usage, age, socioeconomic status, gender, ethnicity and total daily calories. For cases, dietary information was either self-reported or reported by a proxy. For controls, dietary information was self-reported. Gender- and series- specific quartiles of average daily nutrient intake, estimated from food-frequency questionnaires, were computed from controls. Results Significant p-values (trend test) were evaluated using significance levels of either 0.05 or 0.003 (the Bonferroni corrected significance level equivalent to 0.05 adjusting for 16 comparisons). For all cases compared to controls, statistically significant inverse associations were observed for antioxidant index (p < 0.003), carotenoids (alpha- and beta-carotene combined, p < 0.05), daidzein (p = 0.003), matairesinol (p < 0.05), secoisolariciresinol (p < 0.003), and coumestrol (p < 0.003). For self-reported cases compared to controls, statistically significant inverse associations were observed for antioxidant index (p < 0.05) and daidzein (p < 0.05). Conclusion Our results support inverse associations of glioma with higher dietary antioxidant index and with higher intake of certain phytoestrogens, especially

  18. High-Grade Glioma of the Ventrolateral Medulla in an Adult: Case Presentation and Discussion of Surgical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Angela; Le, Viet; Konakondla, Sanjay; Miller, Douglas C.; Hopkins, Tamera; Litofsky, N. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background. High-grade gliomas of the brainstem are rare in adults and are particularly rare in the anterolateral medulla. We describe an illustrative case and discuss the diagnostic and treatment issues associated with a tumor in this location, including differential diagnosis, anatomical considerations for options for surgical management, multimodality treatment, and prognosis. Case Description. A 69-year-old woman presented with a 3-week history of progressive right lower extremity weakness. She underwent an open biopsy via a far lateral approach with partial condylectomy, which revealed a glioblastoma. Concurrent temozolomide and radiation were completed; however, she elected to stop her chemotherapy after 5.5 weeks of treatment. She succumbed to her disease 11 months after diagnosis. Conclusions. Biopsy can be performed relatively safely to provide definitive diagnosis to guide treatment, but long-term prognosis is poor. PMID:27242937

  19. Low-grade oligodendroglioma of the pineal gland: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gliomas are a very rare subtype of pineal region tumours, whereas oligodendrogliomas of the pineal region are exceedingly rare, since there have been only 3 cases of anaplastic oligodedrogliomas reported this far. Methods-Results We present a case of a low-grade oligodendroglioma arising in the pineal gland of a 37 year-old woman. The patient presented with diplopia associated with a cystic pineal region mass demonstrated on MRI. Total resection was performed and histological examination showed that the cystic wall consisted of tumour cells with a central nucleus a perinuclear halo and minimal pleomorphism. Immnunohistochemical analysis showed that these cells were diffusely positive for CD57, and negative for GFAP, CD10, CD99, cytokeratins, neurofilaments and synaptophysin. FISH analysis was performed in a small number of neoplastic cells, which were not exhausted after immunohistochemistry and did not reveal deletion of 1p and 19q chromosome arms. However, the diagnosis of a low grade oligodendroglioma of the pineal gland was assigned. Conclusion Although the spectrum of tumours arising in the pineal gland is broad, the reports of oligodendrogliomas confined to this location are exceedingly rare, and to the best of our knowledge there is no report of a low-grade oligodendroglioma. However, they should be added in the long list of tumours arising in the pineal gland. PMID:20849631

  20. Occupational exposure to chlorinated solvents and risks of glioma and meningioma in adults

    PubMed Central

    Neta, Gila; Stewart, Patricia A.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Hein, Misty J.; Waters, Martha A.; Purdue, Mark P.; Samanic, Claudine; Coble, Joseph B.; Linet, Martha S.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Chlorinated solvents are classified as probable or possible carcinogens. It is unknown whether exposure to these agents increases the risk of malignant or benign brain tumors. Our objective was to evaluate associations of brain tumor risk with occupational exposure to six chlorinated solvents [i.e., dichloromethane, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene]. Methods 489 glioma cases, 197 meningioma cases, and 799 controls were enrolled in a hospital-based case-control study conducted at three U.S. hospitals in Arizona, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. Information about occupational history was obtained through a detailed in-person interview that included job-specific modules of questions such that the interview was tailored to each individual’s particular work history. An industrial hygienist assessed potential solvent exposure based on this information and an exhaustive review of the relevant industrial hygiene literature. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for each solvent for ever/never, duration, cumulative, average weekly, and highest exposure. Results Overall, we found no consistent evidence of an increased risk of glioma or meningioma related to occupational exposure to the six chlorinated solvents evaluated. There was some suggestion of an association between carbon tetrachloride and glioma in analyses restricted to exposed subjects, with average weekly exposure above the median associated with increased risk compared to below-median exposure (OR=7.1, 95%CI: 1.1, 45.2). Conclusions We found no consistent evidence for increased brain tumor risk related to chlorinated solvents. PMID:22864249

  1. Coffee, tea, soda, and caffeine intake in relation to risk of adult glioma in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Dubrow, Robert; Darefsky, Amy S.; Freedman, Neal D.; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Sinha, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We utilized the large, prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study to further explore the hypothesis, suggested by two recent prospective cohort studies, that increased intake of coffee, tea, soda, and/or caffeine is associated with reduced adult glioma risk. Methods At baseline in 1995–1996, dietary intake, including coffee, tea, and soda, was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CI) for glioma risk in relation to beverage intake. Results During follow-up of 545,771 participants through 2006, 904 participants were diagnosed with glioma. We found no trends of decreasing glioma risk with increasing intake of specific beverages or total caffeine. HR patterns for consumption of the caffeinated versus decaffeinated form of each beverage were inconsistent with a specific caffeine effect. HR patterns of reduced glioma risk for most categories of beverage intake greater than “none” prompted a post hoc analysis that revealed borderline-significant inverse associations for any versus no intake of tea (HR = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.69–1.03), total coffee plus tea (HR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.48–1.03), and soda (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67–1.01). Conclusions The borderline-significant inverse associations could be explained by a threshold effect in which any beverage intake above a low level confers a beneficial effect, most likely due to beverage constituents other than caffeine. They also could be explained by non-drinkers of these beverages sharing unknown extraneous characteristics associated with increased glioma risk, or by chance. PMID:22457000

  2. Children are not just little adults: recent advances in understanding of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma biology.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kristin M; Hoeman, Christine M; Becher, Oren J

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a high-grade glioma that originates in the pons and is seen exclusively in children. Despite numerous efforts to improve treatment, DIPG remains incurable with 90% of children dying within 2 y of diagnosis, making it one of the leading causes of death in children with brain tumors. With the advent of new genomic tools, the genetic landscape of DIPG is slowly being unraveled. The most common genetic alterations include a K27M mutation in H3.3 or H3.1, which are found in up to 78% of DIPGs, whereas p53 mutations are found in up to 77%. Other recently discovered alterations include amplification of components of the receptor tyrosine kinase/Ras/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway, particularly platelet-derived growth factor receptor A. Recapitulating such alterations, genetically engineered DIPG preclinical models have been developed, and DIPG xenograft models have also been established. Both models have strengths and weaknesses but can help with the prioritization of novel agents for clinical trials for children with DIPG. As we move forward, it is important that we continue to study the complex and unique biology of DIPG and develop improved preclinical models to increase our understanding of DIPG pathogenesis, allowing translation into successful therapies in the not too distant future. PMID:24192697

  3. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  4. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma or Recurrent or Progressive Meningioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-09

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  5. Palliative and supportive care for glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Chasteen, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of a brain tumor is a life-changing event for patients and families. High-grade gliomas are incurable and long-term survival remains limited. While low-grade glioma patients have better outcomes, their quality of life is often affected by a variety of symptoms as well. Helping glioma patients improve quality of life at all stages of illness is an important goal for the interdisciplinary care team. There is evidence from advanced lung cancer patients that early involvement of a palliative care team can improve patient's quality of life, symptom burden, and even survival and a similar approach benefits glioma patients as well. Patients with high-grade and low-grade glioma often suffer from significant symptom burden. We discuss how validated global symptom assessments and symptom-specific screening tools are useful to identify distressing symptoms. Seizures, fatigue, depression, and anxiety are some of the more common symptoms throughout the disease course and should be managed actively. Patients with glioma also have high symptom burden at the end of life and the majority lose decision-making capacity. Advance care planning conversations early in the disease course are essential to elicit the patient's wishes for end of life care and effective communication with surrogate decision makers during all stages of the disease helps ensure that those wishes are respected. PMID:25468232

  6. Genetic alterations in uncommon low-grade neuroepithelial tumors: BRAF, FGFR1, and MYB mutations occur at high frequency and align with morphology.

    PubMed

    Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Orisme, Wilda; Wen, Ji; Santiago, Teresa; Gupta, Kirti; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Haupfear, Kelly; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Easton, John; Mulder, Heather; Boggs, Kristy; Shao, Ying; Rusch, Michael; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Wang, Shuoguo; Lee, Ryan P; Brat, Daniel; Peter Collins, V; Dahiya, Sonika; George, David; Konomos, William; Kurian, Kathreena M; McFadden, Kathryn; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Nickols, Hilary; Perry, Arie; Shurtleff, Sheila; Gajjar, Amar; Boop, Fredrick A; Klimo, Paul D; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Baker, Suzanne J; Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Downing, James R; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Ellison, David W

    2016-06-01

    Low-grade neuroepithelial tumors (LGNTs) are diverse CNS tumors presenting in children and young adults, often with a history of epilepsy. While the genetic profiles of common LGNTs, such as the pilocytic astrocytoma and 'adult-type' diffuse gliomas, are largely established, those of uncommon LGNTs remain to be defined. In this study, we have used massively parallel sequencing and various targeted molecular genetic approaches to study alterations in 91 LGNTs, mostly from children but including young adult patients. These tumors comprise dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs; n = 22), diffuse oligodendroglial tumors (d-OTs; n = 20), diffuse astrocytomas (DAs; n = 17), angiocentric gliomas (n = 15), and gangliogliomas (n = 17). Most LGNTs (84 %) analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) were characterized by a single driver genetic alteration. Alterations of FGFR1 occurred frequently in LGNTs composed of oligodendrocyte-like cells, being present in 82 % of DNETs and 40 % of d-OTs. In contrast, a MYB-QKI fusion characterized almost all angiocentric gliomas (87 %), and MYB fusion genes were the most common genetic alteration in DAs (41 %). A BRAF:p.V600E mutation was present in 35 % of gangliogliomas and 18 % of DAs. Pathogenic alterations in FGFR1/2/3, BRAF, or MYB/MYBL1 occurred in 78 % of the series. Adult-type d-OTs with an IDH1/2 mutation occurred in four adolescents, the youngest aged 15 years at biopsy. Despite a detailed analysis, novel genetic alterations were limited to two fusion genes, EWSR1-PATZ1 and SLMAP-NTRK2, both in gangliogliomas. Alterations in BRAF, FGFR1, or MYB account for most pathogenic alterations in LGNTs, including pilocytic astrocytomas, and alignment of these genetic alterations and cytologic features across LGNTs has diagnostic implications. Additionally, therapeutic options based upon targeting the effects of these alterations are already in clinical trials. PMID:26810070

  7. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  8. Living longer with adult high-grade glioma: setting a research agenda for patients and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Russell, Bethany; Collins, Anna; Dally, Michael; Dowling, Anthony; Gold, Michelle; Murphy, Michael; Philip, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    The long-term survival of patients with adult high-grade glioma (HGG) remains poor, but for those who do live longer functional status and neurocognitive ability may be influenced by residual or recurrent tumour, or treatment-related complications. The aim of this review was to examine the current literature regarding the quality of life and experience of patients living longer with adult HGG and their caregivers, with a view to understanding the burden of treatment on patient abilities and deficits over time. Medline, PsychINFO and CINAHL databases were searched for the core concept of HGG in combination with an aspect of quality of long-term survival. Key findings of the 12 included studies were identified and synthesised thematically. There is a paucity of dedicated studies which have investigated the experiences of this cohort. The strength of existing literature is limited by the systematic exclusion of the poorest functioning patients and the under-representation of caregiver perspectives. Discrepancies in how patients view their quality of life were highlighted, despite consistent findings of significant physical and functional impairment. This review confirmed the presence of important differences between patient and caregiver views regarding patient abilities following treatment. Caregiver burden was found to be high, due to multiple dynamic and relentless stressors. The true experience of patients living longer with adult HGG and their caregivers remains unclear, particularly for patients with poorer neurocognitive and functional outcomes. Further research is required to clarify and replicate findings, explore discrepancies between patient and caregiver views, and to specifically investigate how caregiver needs and experiences may evolve over time. PMID:24980038

  9. Bafetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma

  10. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  11. Chordoid Glioma with Intraventricular Dissemination: A Case Report with Perfusion MR Imaging Features

    PubMed Central

    Ki, So Yeon; Kim, Seul Kee; Heo, Tae Wook; Baek, Byung Hyun; Kim, Hyung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chordoid glioma is a rare low grade tumor typically located in the third ventricle. Although a chordoid glioma can arise from ventricle with tumor cells having features of ependymal differentiation, intraventricular dissemination has not been reported. Here we report a case of a patient with third ventricular chordoid glioma and intraventricular dissemination in the lateral and fourth ventricles. We described the perfusion MR imaging features of our case different from a previous report. PMID:26798226

  12. Desalination using low grade heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    A new, low temperature, energy-efficient and sustainable desalination system has been developed in this research. This system operates under near-vacuum conditions created by exploiting natural means of gravity and barometric pressure head. The system can be driven by low grade heat sources such as solar energy or waste heat streams. Both theoretical and experimental studies were conducted under this research to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed process. Theoretical studies included thermodynamic analysis and process modeling to evaluate the performance of the process using the following alternate energy sources for driving the process: solar thermal energy, solar photovoltaic/thermal energy, geothermal energy, and process waste heat emissions. Experimental studies included prototype scale demonstration of the process using grid power as well as solar photovoltaic/thermal sources. Finally, the feasibility of the process in reclaiming potable-quality water from the effluent of the city wastewater treatment plant was studied. The following results have been obtained from theoretical analysis and modeling: (1) The proposed process can produce up to 8 L/d of freshwater for 1 m2 area of solar collector and evaporation chamber respectively with a specific energy requirement of 3122 kJ for 1 kg of freshwater production. (2) Photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) energy can produce up to 200 L/d of freshwater with a 25 m2 PV/T module which meets the electricity needs of 21 kWh/d of a typical household as well. This configuration requires a specific energy of 3122 kJ for 1 kg of freshwater production. (3) 100 kg/hr of geothermal water at 60°C as heat source can produce up to 60 L/d of freshwater with a specific energy requirement of 3078 kJ for 1 kg of freshwater production. (4) Waste heat released from an air conditioning system rated at 3.25 kW cooling, can produce up to 125 L/d of freshwater. This configuration requires an additional energy of 208 kJ/kg of

  13. Recent Advances on the Molecular Pathology of Glial Neoplasms in Children and Adults.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Fausto J; Vizcaino, M Adelita; Lin, Ming-Tseh

    2016-09-01

    Gliomas represent the most common primary intraparenchymal tumors of the central nervous system in adults and children and are a genetic and phenotypic heterogeneous group. Large multi-institutional studies and The Cancer Genome Atlas have provided firm insights into the basic genetic drivers in gliomas. The main molecular biomarkers routinely applied to evaluate diffuse gliomas include MGMT promoter methylation, EGFR alterations (eg, EGFRvIII), IDH1 or IDH2 mutations, and 1p19q co-deletion. Many of these markers have become standard of care for molecular testing and prerequisites for clinical trial enrollment. Other recent biomarkers include TERT promoter and ATRX mutations, alterations that identify specific molecular subgroups of diffuse gliomas with biological and clinical relevance. It has also become apparent that distinctive patterns of molecular genetic evolution develop in the context of current therapeutic regimens. Important insights have also been uncovered in the field of pediatric glioma, including the identification of recurrent mutation, fusion, and/or duplication events of the BRAF, FGFR1, MYB, and MYBL1 genes in pediatric low-grade gliomas, mutations affecting histone components (H3F3A p.K27M or p.G34) in pediatric high-grade gliomas, and aggressive subsets developing in midline central nervous system structures. Here, we summarize current concepts in molecular testing for glial tumors, including recent findings by large-scale discovery efforts and technologic advances that are affecting routine diagnostic work. PMID:27444975

  14. Functionally Active Gap Junctions between Connexin 43-Positive Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gabashvili, A N; Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Levinskii, A B; Mel'nikov, P A; Cherepanov, S A; Chekhonin, V P

    2015-05-01

    The formation of functional gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and cells of low-grade rat glioma C6 cells was studied in in vitro experiments. Immunocytochemical analysis with antibodies to connexin 43 extracellular loop 2 showed that mesenchymal stem cells as well as C6 glioma cells express the main astroglial gap junction protein connexin 43. Analysis of migration activity showed that mesenchymal stem cells actively migrate towards C6 glioma cells. During co-culturing, mesenchymal stem cells and glioma C6 form functionally active gap junctions mediating the transport of cytoplasmic dye from glioma cells to mesenchymal stem cells in the opposite direction. Fluorometry showed that the intensity of transport of low-molecular substances through heterologous gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and glioma cells is similar to that through homologous gap junctions between glioma cells. This phenomenon can be used for the development of new methods of cell therapy of high-grade gliomas. PMID:26033611

  15. Cognitive outcomes among survivors of focal low-grade brainstem tumors diagnosed in childhood.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kellie N; Ashford, Jason M; Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S; Klimo, Paul; Merchant, Thomas E; Billups, Catherine A; Conklin, Heather M

    2016-09-01

    Pediatric focal low-grade brainstem tumors are associated with excellent prognosis. Surgical resection and conformal radiation therapy are front-line treatment options; radiation therapy (RT) serves as an excellent treatment for disease progression. Given high survival rates and limited research regarding functional outcomes, the current study examined neurocognitive outcomes in a group of low-grade brainstem glioma survivors. Forty-three survivors of focal low-grade brainstem gliomas underwent neurocognitive assessment (58 % male; median = 6.9 years at diagnosis; median = 14.9 years at latest assessment). Treatment included combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and RT with 70 % ultimately receiving RT. Neurocognitive outcomes were evaluated through retrospective chart review. Intellectual and academic performance were significantly different from normative expectations (full scale IQ = 86.5 ± 16.8; reading comprehension = 91.3 ± 16.4; math reasoning = 88.2 ± 18.9; reference group = 100 ± 15). Further, the percentage performing below average exceeded the expected 16 % in the normative sample (full scale IQ = 43 %; reading comprehension = 37 %; math reasoning = 50 %). Mean parent ratings did not reflect concerns regarding internalizing and externalizing behaviors or executive functioning (internalizing = 54.9 ± 12.7; externalizing = 51.6 ± 14.6, global executive composite = 57.1 ± 16.0; reference group = 50 ± 10); however, the proportion with clinically elevated scores was higher than the expected 16 % (internalizing = 42 %; externalizing = 26 %; global executive composite = 38 %). Mean performance fell below average for visual-motor coordination (81.8 ± 13.2) and parent ratings of adaptive functioning (73.4 ± 24.2), with 65 and 62 % falling outside the average range, respectively. There were no significant differences between

  16. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients. PMID:26948350

  17. Diagnostic, treatment, and demographic factors influencing survival in a population-based study of adult glioma patients in the San Francisco Bay Area1

    PubMed Central

    Wrensch, Margaret; Rice, Terri; Miike, Rei; McMillan, Alex; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Aldape, Kenneth; Prados, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    We compare survival estimates for population-based glioma cases by using two diagnostic coding schemes, (1) the International Classification of Diseases, Oncology, second edition (ICD-O-2) as reported by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program and (2) central neuropathology review diagnosis based on the World Health Organization II classification. In addition, among review categories, we estimate survival in relation to several patient demographic and treatment factors. Eligible cases included adults residing in the San Francisco Bay SEER Area with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioma during the years 1991–1994 and 1997–1999. The study group included participating subjects for whom subsequent central neuropathology review confirmed glioma. We determined treatments, vital status, and other factors by using registry, interview, medical record, and active follow-up data. Survival differences between anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and astrocytoma were apparent from review diagnoses (median months of survival for AA, 13.0 [95% CI, 9.9–19.5], and astrocytoma, 101.3 [95% CI lower limit, 42.1; upper limit not yet reached]), but not with ICD-O-2 diagnoses reported by SEER (median months of survival for AA, 16.6 [95% CI, 12.0–20.7], and astrocytoma, not otherwise specified, 17.2 [95% CI, 10.6–71.6]). This finding emphasizes the need for improvements in coding for nonglioblastoma astrocytomas to provide better population survival estimates. When review diagnosis was used, younger age and resection (vs. biopsy) were statistically significant for all histology groups analyzed by multivariable Cox proportional hazard models. Additional statistically significant variables were as follows: among 517 glioblastoma patients, radiation treatment and being married; among 105 AA patients, inclusion of chemotherapy in the initial treatment; and among 106 patients with nonanaplastic oligodendroglial tumors, college education. Further consideration

  18. Re-irradiation with hypo-fractionated stereotactic robotic radiotherapy for salvage in adult patients with brainstem glioma

    PubMed Central

    Susheela, Sridhar P; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Muzumder, Sandeep; Mallarajapatna, Govindarajan; Kallur, Kumar; Basavalingaiah, Ajaikumar S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Brainstem glioma (BSG) is often treated with definitive irradiation. However, subsequent progression and death occur as a rule rather than the exception, after varying periods of control. The outlook of patients with post-irradiation progression is dismal, and most of these patients are treated with supportive care alone. Despite the obvious risks with an area as critical as the brainstem, it is a possibility to encounter situations wherein the patients (themselves or their associates) ask for re-irradiation, with the hope of a few extra months of life. The risk of radiation-induced brainstem toxicity may be justifiable under the strict assumption that the patients stand a chance of benefiting from re-irradiation but still may not live long enough to manifest brainstem toxicity. Methods Five adult BSG patients were treated with re-irradiation using robotic-arm stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) between September 2009 and July 2012, primarily at the request of the concerned patient parties. Re-irradiation doses ranged from 16 to 25 Gray (Gy) delivered by robotic arm stereotactic irradiation in 2–5 fractions. Results Four out of five patients enjoyed a prolongation of survival in the order of months (three, five, six, and 14 months), which was very significant given that all patients had severe neurological compromise and poor performance status prior to re-irradiation. One patient has survived 36 months after re-irradiation and thus has lived long enough to manifest late radiation-induced brainstem toxicity. Conclusion Despite the obvious risks of brainstem toxicity associated with the use of re-irradiation for BSG, the use of fractionated stereotactic re-irradiation seems to offers prospects of additional periods of local control and augments duration of life. PMID:24171050

  19. RO4929097, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

  20. ARPP-19 promotes proliferation and metastasis of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhao, Bing; Li, Xiaocan; Wan, Jinghai

    2016-09-01

    Glioma is the most common and aggressive type of human primary brain tumor with a poor outcome. The molecular mechanisms underlying glioma development and progression are still poorly understood. Recent studies have reported a novel role of ARPP-19 in the regulation of cell mitosis and cancer progression. However, no study has been carried out to determine the role of ARPP-19 in human glioma cells and assess the expression and clinical significance of ARPP-19 in human glioma. In this study, we systematically examined the role of ARPP-19 in glioma A172 cells and examined the expression of ARPP-19 and CD147 in 81 cases of human glioma tissue specimens and correlated them to clinicopathological parameters and patient survival. We found that ARPP-19 promoted both proliferation and metastasis of human glioma cells and the expression of ARPP-19 and CD147 in high-grade glioma was significantly higher than that in the low-grade glioma. Patients whose tumors were positive for expression of ARPP-19 or CD147 showed lower relapse-free survival and overall survival than patients whose tumors were negative for ARPP-19 or CD147, respectively. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant correlation between ARPP-19 and CD147. Expressions of ARPP-19 and CD147 may serve as biomarkers for high-grade glioma and poor patient survival. PMID:27380244

  1. Treatment of newly diagnosed symptomatic pure low-grade oligodendrogliomas with PCV chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, C; Fontaine, D; Bourg, V; Ramaioli, A; Chanalet, S; Vandenbos, F; Lonjon, M; Fauchon, F; Paquis, P; Frenay, M

    2007-04-01

    Based on studies relating to anaplastic oligodendroglioma (OG) chemosensitivity and benefit of time to progression or overall survival, chemotherapy for pure OG has been proposed. Several studies have reported the efficacy of various chemotherapeutic agents in a small number of patients with low-grade gliomas, e.g. pure astrocytomas, OG or mixed histologies. The 5-year survival rate varies from 61% to 89% with a mean time to progression of 5 years. We report the outcome of 33 consecutive patients with pure low-grade OG diagnosed between 1990 and 2006 systematically treated for residual or non-removable tumor with PCV chemotherapy regimen as the front-line treatment after surgery. All the tumors were low grade (grade II) pure OG according to the WHO classification. All patients were symptomatic at presentation and underwent neurosurgical procedure for histological diagnosis. Response was evaluated by clinical assessment and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-one men and 12 women with a mean age at pathological diagnosis of 46.5 years were studied. The most common first symptom was partial epileptic seizure (73.7%). Six patients (18%) had initial gadolinium enhancement, associated with methoxyisobutyl (MIBI) hypermetabolism (P < 0.001). The resection was partial in seven cases (21%), and 26 patients (79%) had biopsy only. Eleven patients (36%) had a malignant transformation during the follow-up with a median time to progression of 19 months. Favorable prognostic factors were lack of contrast enhancement (P < 0.0001), and age <40 years (P < 0.0003); 90% of patients were progression-free at 1 year. Survival rates at 2, 5 and 10 years were 85%, 75% and 50%, respectively. Up-front chemotherapy with PCV regimen is a good treatment for symptomatic pure low-grade OG, as it increases the number of progression-free patients and time to progression. These results suggest that radiotherapy could be postponed until the malignant transformation occurs to delay cognitive

  2. Is seborrhoeic dermatitis associated with a diffuse, low-grade folliculitis and progressive cicatricial alopecia?

    PubMed

    Pitney, Lucy; Weedon, David; Pitney, Michael

    2016-08-01

    An association between adult scalp seborrhoeic dermatitis and cicatricial hair loss has not previously been convincingly established. This study seeks to demonstrate a unique relationship between a clinically identifiable chronic scalp dermatitis-folliculitis with the characteristic histological features of low-grade inflammatory fibrosing alopecia, resulting in a distinctive progressive cicatricial alopecia which we believe is prevalent and hitherto unrecognised, and befits the description of seborrhoeic folliculitis. The clinical, epidemiological and histopathological features of seborrhoeic folliculitis are demonstrated to establish its unique status among the disorders of adult diffuse cicatricial alopecia. PMID:25753934

  3. Stressed to Death: Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Induced Apoptosis in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Guyla G.; White, Misti C.; Grimaldi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Glial tumors are the main primary adult brain tumor. Even with the most advanced treatments, which include stereotactic microscope aided surgical resection, internal and external radiation therapy and local and systemic chemotherapy, median survival time for patients diagnosed with these malignancies is about 12 months. We explore here the possibility that the endoplasmic reticulum stress response (ERSR) could be a possible target to develop chemotherapeutic agents to induce toxicity in glioma cells. ERSR has the dual capacity of activating repair and/or cytotoxic mechanisms. ERSR is triggered by the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER. The presence of unfolded proteins in the ER regulates, via a complex biochemical cascade, the upregulation of molecular chaperones, inhibition of protein synthesis, and an increase of proteasome mediated unfolded protein degradation. ERSR in particular conditions can also contribute to cell death via activation of programmed cell death. Apoptosis activation during ERSR is usually caused by the activation of one or a combination of three biochemical cascades. Induction of these pathways ultimately leads to caspase 3 activation culminating in apoptosis. Glioma cells are in a condition of constant low grade ERSR, which possibly contributes to their resistance to treatment protocols. It is conceivable that small molecules that interact with this phenomenon ultimately could be used to modulate the system to activate apoptosis and cause gliotoxicity. We will discuss here ERSR biochemically relevant features to death mechanisms and already identified small molecules that by modulating ERSR are able to activate glioma cell death. PMID:21348829

  4. Circulating levels of the innate and humoral immune regulators CD14 and CD23 are associated with adult glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mi; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Bracci, Paige; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Mccoy, Lucie; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jennette; Patoka, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Allergy history has been consistently inversely associated with glioma risk. Two serologic markers, soluble CD23 (sCD23) and soluble CD14 (sCD14), are part of the innate and adaptive humoral immune systems and modulate allergic responses in opposite directions, with sCD23 enhancing and sCD14 blunting inflammatory responses. We measured sCD23 and sCD14 in serum from blood that was drawn at a single time point from 1079 glioma patients post diagnosis and 736 healthy controls. Glioma was strongly associated with high sCD14 (highest vs. lowest quartile OR = 3.94 (95% CI: 2.98-5.21) and low sCD23 (lowest vs. highest quartile OR=2.5 (95% CI: 1.89-3.23)). Results were consistent across glioma histologic types and grades, but were strongest for glioblastoma. While temozolomide treatment was not associated with either sCD14 or sCD23 levels among cases, those taking dexamethasone had somewhat lower sCD23 levels than those not taking dexamethasone. However, sCD23 was associated with case status regardless of dexamethasone treatment. These results augment the long observed association between allergies and glioma and support a role for the innate and adaptive humoral functions of the immune system, and in particular immunoregulatory proteins, in gliomagenesis. PMID:20719886

  5. Circulating levels of the innate and humoral immune regulators CD14 and CD23 are associated with adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Wiemels, Joseph L; Bracci, Paige M; Wrensch, Margaret R; McCoy, Lucie S; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jennette D; Patoka, Joseph S; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-01

    Allergy history has been consistently inversely associated with glioma risk. Two serologic markers, soluble CD23 (sCD23) and soluble CD14 (sCD14), are part of the innate and adaptive humoral immune systems and modulate allergic responses in opposite directions, with sCD23 enhancing and sCD14 blunting inflammatory responses. We measured sCD23 and sCD14 in serum from blood that was drawn at a single time point from 1,079 glioma patients postdiagnosis and 736 healthy controls. Glioma was strongly associated with high sCD14 [highest versus lowest quartile odds ratio (OR), 3.94; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.98-5.21] and low sCD23 (lowest versus highest quartile OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.89-3.23). Results were consistent across glioma histologic types and grades, but were strongest for glioblastoma. Whereas temozolomide treatment was not associated with either sCD14 or sCD23 levels among cases, those taking dexamethasone had somewhat lower sCD23 levels than those not taking dexamethasone. However, sCD23 was associated with case status regardless of dexamethasone treatment. These results augment the long-observed association between allergies and glioma and support a role for the innate and adaptive humoral functions of the immune system, in particular immunoregulatory proteins, in gliomagenesis. PMID:20719886

  6. Pathological and Molecular Advances in Pediatric Low Grade Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Lim, Kah Suan; Bowers, Daniel; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric low grade astrocytomas are the commonest brain tumors in children. They sometimes have similar microscopic and clinical features, making accurate diagnosis difficult. For patients whose tumors are in locations that do not permit full resection, or those with an intrinsically aggressive biology, more effective therapies are required. Until recently, little was known about the molecular changes that drive the initiation and growth of pilocytic and other low grade astrocytomas beyond the association of a minority of cases, primarily in the optic nerve, with neurofibromatosis type 1. Over the last several years, a wide range of studies have implicated the BRAF oncogene and other members of this signaling cascade in the pathobiology of pediatric low grade astrocytoma. In this review, we attempt to summarize this rapidly developing field, and discuss the potential for translating our growing molecular knowledge into improved diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and new targeted therapies. PMID:23121055

  7. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Lulla, Rishi R; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  8. IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Adam; Holmen, Sheri; Colman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2, originally discovered in 2009, occur in the vast majority of low grade gliomas and secondary high grade gliomas. These mutations, which occur early in gliomagenesis, change the function of the enzymes, causing them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate, a possible oncometabolite, and to not produce NADPH. IDH mutations are oncogenic, although whether the mechanism is through alterations in hydroxylases, redox potential, cellular metabolism, or gene expression is not clear. The mutations also drive increased methylation in gliomas. Gliomas with mutated IDH1 and IDH2 have improved prognosis compared to gliomas with wild-type IDH. Mutated IDH can now be detected by immunohistochemistry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No drugs currently target mutated IDH, although this remains an area of active research. PMID:23532369

  9. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Rishi R.; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  10. Epigenetic silencing of KAZALD1 confers a better prognosis and is associated with malignant transformation/progression in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Feng, Ying; Bao, Zhaoshi; Jiang, Chuanlu; Yan, Wei; Wang, Yongzhi; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Yanwei; Zhang, Quangeng; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Chuanlu

    2013-11-01

    In order to more thoroughly analyze aberrant DNA methylation in glioma, we applied a large cohort methylation microarray including 119 glioma samples. Six genes, ADCY1, KAZALD1, KLF4, SLMAP, TETRAN and TP53INP1, were screened out through significance analysis of microarray (SAM), survival Cox-regression and certain other pre-set conditions. We focused on the KAZALD1 oncogene. KAZALD1, also known as IGFBP-rP10, belongs to the IGFBP family. We found that KAZALD1 was hypomethylated in high-grade glioma (anaplastic gliomas and glioblastomas) compared to low-grade glioma (astrocytoma, oligodendrocytoma and oligoastrocytoma) using methylation microarrays (p<0.001). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of 91 glioma samples showed that the KAZALD1 expression scores of high-grade glioma samples were higher compared to the scores of low-grade gliomas (p<0.001). In high-grade gliomas, overall survival (OS) was shorter for patients with KAZALD1 hypomethylation or overexpression compared to those without. Decreased KAZALD1 expression in glioma inhibited cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of these observations and the results from subset analysis, it is reasonable to conclude that KAZALD1 promoter hypomethylation is an important prognostic biomarker in glioma. KAZALD1 promotes glioma malignant progression through invasion and proliferation. PMID:24002581

  11. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... et al. Optic Glioma in Children: A Retrospective Analysis of 101 Cases. American Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2013; 36(3):287-292. Karcioglu ZA, Haik BG. Eye, orbit, and adnexal structures. In: Abeloff MD, Armitage JO, ...

  12. [Diagnostic and prognostic values of 1p and 19q deletions in adult gliomas: critical review of the literature and implications in daily clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Fontaine, D; Vandenbos, F; Lebrun, C; Paquis, V; Frenay, M

    2008-01-01

    Losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q are deemed correlated with diagnosis of oligodendroglioma, higher chemosensitivity and better prognosis. We reviewed the literature to evaluate the usefulness of these correlations in daily clinical practice. The rates of deletions relative to histology (WHO classifications) were extracted from 33 studies, including 2666 patients. The 1p deletions and 1p19q codeletion mean rates were respectively 65.4 and 63.3% in oligodendrogliomas, 28.7 and 21.6% in oligoastrocytomas, 13.2 and 7.5% in astrocytomas, 11.6 and 2.9% in glioblastomas. The presence of 1p deletion and 1p19q codeletion were strongly correlated with the histological diagnosis corresponding to oligodendroglioma. Calculation of specificity, sensitivity, predictive positive values and false negative rates suggests that presence of deletion 1p or codeletion represents a strong argument in favor of the diagnosis of oligodendroglioma. However, considering the high false negative rate, absence of such deletions does not rule out the diagnosis. In grade 3 oligodendroglial tumors, the probability of responding to chemotherapy, and the duration of response, were higher when codeletions were present. This suggests that, in these tumors, the presence of codeletion is a strong argument in favor of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy should not be systematically excluded when codeletions are absent, as the chances of response are about 33% in this situation. Data concerning low-grade gliomas were more controversial. Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p deletion or 1p19q codeletion seemed to have a better prognosis, as five-year survival rates were 50% higher than in tumors without deletion. This might be explained by the correlation between 1p deletion and other identified prognosis factors: (1) higher chemosensitivity, (2) tumor location more frequently in the frontal lobe, leading to better resection and lower risk of neurological deficit, (3) slower growth rate, (4) higher risk

  13. Intraoperative Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Evaluates the Grade of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ling-Gang; He, Wen; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Song, Qian; Ning, Bin; Li, Hui-Zhan; He, Yan; Lin, Song

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to investigate the value of intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for evaluating the grade of glioma and the correlation between microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Methods. We performed intraoperative conventional ultrasound (CUS) and CEUS on 88 patients with gliomas. All of the patients have undergone surgery and obtained the results of pathology. All patients have undergone intraoperative CUS and CEUS to compare the characteristics of different grade gliomas and the results of CUS and CEUS were compared with pathological results. Results. The time to start (TTS) and time to peak (TTP) of low grade glioma (LGG) were similar to those of edema and normal brain surrounding glioma. The enhanced extent of LGG was higher than that of the normal brain and edema. The TTS and TTP of high grade glioma were earlier than those of the edema and normal brain surrounding glioma. The enhancement of HGG was higher than that of LGG. The absolute peak intensity (API) was correlated with MVD and VEGF. Conclusion. Intraoperative CEUS could help in determining boundary of peritumoral brain edema of glioma. Intraoperative CEUS parameters in cerebral gliomas could indirectly reflect the information of MVD and VEGF. PMID:27069921

  14. MYB-QKI rearrangements in angiocentric glioma drive tumorigenicity through a tripartite mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Ramkissoon, Lori A; Jain, Payal; Bergthold, Guillaume; Wala, Jeremiah; Zeid, Rhamy; Schumacher, Steven E; Urbanski, Laura; O'Rourke, Ryan; Gibson, William J; Pelton, Kristine; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Han, Harry J; Zhu, Yuankun; Choudhari, Namrata; Silva, Amanda; Boucher, Katie; Henn, Rosemary E; Kang, Yun Jee; Knoff, David; Paolella, Brenton R; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Varlet, Pascale; Pages, Melanie; Horowitz, Peleg M; Federation, Alexander; Malkin, Hayley; Tracy, Adam A; Seepo, Sara; Ducar, Matthew; Van Hummelen, Paul; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Scagnet, Mirko; Bowers, Daniel C; Giannini, Caterina; Puget, Stephanie; Hawkins, Cynthia; Tabori, Uri; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Burger, Peter C; Eberhart, Charles; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Hill, D Ashley; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Phillips, Joanna J; Santagata, Sandro; Stiles, Charles D; Bradner, James E; Jabado, Nada; Goren, Alon; Grill, Jacques; Ligon, Azra H; Goumnerova, Liliana; Waanders, Angela J; Storm, Phillip B; Kieran, Mark W; Ligon, Keith L; Beroukhim, Rameen; Resnick, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    Angiocentric gliomas are pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) without known recurrent genetic drivers. We performed genomic analysis of new and published data from 249 PLGGs, including 19 angiocentric gliomas. We identified MYB-QKI fusions as a specific and single candidate driver event in angiocentric gliomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies show that MYB-QKI rearrangements promote tumorigenesis through three mechanisms: MYB activation by truncation, enhancer translocation driving aberrant MYB-QKI expression and hemizygous loss of the tumor suppressor QKI. To our knowledge, this represents the first example of a single driver rearrangement simultaneously transforming cells via three genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in a tumor. PMID:26829751

  15. MYB-QKI rearrangements in Angiocentric Glioma drive tumorigenicity through a tripartite mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Ramkissoon, Lori A.; Jain, Payal; Bergthold, Guillaume; Wala, Jeremiah; Zeid, Rhamy; Schumacher, Steven E.; Urbanski, Laura; O’Rourke, Ryan; Gibson, William J.; Pelton, Kristine; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Han, Harry J.; Zhu, Yuankun; Choudhari, Namrata; Silva, Amanda; Boucher, Katie; Henn, Rosemary E.; Kang, Yun Jee; Knoff, David; Paolella, Brenton R.; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Varlet, Pascale; Pages, Melanie; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Federation, Alexander; Malkin, Hayley; Tracy, Adam; Seepo, Sara; Ducar, Matthew; Hummelen, Paul Van; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Scagnet, Mirko; Bowers, Daniel C.; Giannini, Caterina; Puget, Stephanie; Hawkins, Cynthia; Tabori, Uri; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Burger, Peter C.; Eberhart, Charles; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Hill, D. Ashley; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Santagata, Sandro; Stiles, Charles D.; Bradner, James E.; Jabado, Nada; Goren, Alon; Grill, Jacques; Ligon, Azra H.; Goumnerova, Liliana; Waanders, Angela J.; Storm, Phillip B.; Kieran, Mark W.; Ligon, Keith L.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Resnick, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiocentric gliomas are pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) without known recurrent genetic drivers. We performed genomic analysis of new and published data from 249 PLGGs including 19 Angiocentric Gliomas. We identified MYB-QKI fusions as a specific and single candidate driver event in Angiocentric Gliomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies show MYB-QKI rearrangements promote tumorigenesis through three mechanisms: MYB activation by truncation, enhancer translocation driving aberrant MYB-QKI expression, and hemizygous loss of the tumor suppressor QKI. This represents the first example of a single driver rearrangement simultaneously transforming cells via three genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in a tumor. PMID:26829751

  16. Functional reorganization of the attentional networks in low-grade glioma patients: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Charras, Pom; Herbet, Guillaume; Deverdun, Jérémy; de Champfleur, Nicolas M; Duffau, Hugues; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Bonnetblanc, François

    2015-02-01

    Right brain damage often provokes deficits of visuospatial attention. Although the spatial attention networks have been widely investigated in stroke patients as well as in the healthy brain, little is known about the impact of slow growing lesions in the right hemisphere. We here present a longitudinal study of 20 patients who have been undergoing awake brain surgery with per-operative line bisection testing. Our aim was to investigate the impact of tumour presence and of tumour resection on the functional (re)organization of the attention networks. We assessed patients' performance on lateralized target detection, visual exploration and line bisection before surgery, and in the acute and post-acute operative phases after surgery. Clear evidence for transient neglect signs was observed in the acute post-operative phase, although full recovery had invariably occurred in all patients. The resection of the right angular gyrus was associated with transient neglect-like symptoms in all tasks, whereas resection of more anterior regions correlated with transient deficits only in visual exploration or detection (but not in line bisection). The attentional networks showed substantial functional recovery. This impressive pattern of recovery is discussed in terms of involvement of the contralateral left hemisphere and of preservation of long-range white matter pathways within the right hemisphere. PMID:25241396

  17. Low-Grade Epithelial Proliferations of the Sinonasal Tract.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Martin J

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade epithelial proliferations of the sinonasal tract include Schneiderian papillomas, respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma, seromucinous hamartoma and low-grade non-intestinal adenocarcinoma. There is considerable overlap in their clinical presentation, endoscopic appearance, and imaging features. Although well-described diagnostic criteria exist, a definitive diagnosis may be difficult to reach on a small biopsy. Schneiderian papillomas are divided into fungiform, inverted, and oncocytic types, each with characteristic clinical and morphological features. The latter two may progress to malignancy. The majority are still considered to be HPV-related. Two lesions are designated as hamartomas, but their pathogenesis remains uncertain, with inflammatory and neoplastic origins proposed. Respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma is increasingly being recognized for its association with chronic rhinosinusitis and olfactory cleft site of origin. Seromucinous hamartoma has gained attention in recent years and overlaps with both respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma and low-grade non-intestinal adenocarcinoma. Controversy surrounds their distinction, particularly from low-grade adenocarcinoma. The latter generally is cured by complete excision, with a 26 % risk of recurrence but rare metastases and deaths from disease. PMID:26830403

  18. Low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma recurring over three decades.

    PubMed

    Styron, S L; Burke, T W; Linville, W K

    1989-11-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is an uncommon uterine malignancy with a variety of histologic characteristics and clinical courses. We describe a patient who recently underwent her third resection of a locally recurring low-grade ESS 29 years after original diagnosis. Tissue from her recurrent tumor contained high levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors and had a diploid DNA content. In addition to multiple resections, she has previously been treated with vincristine chemotherapy and is now receiving megestrol acetate therapy. Mitotic activity is the most important prognostic feature distinguishing high- and low-grade ESS. The mainstay of therapy for both high- and low-grade tumors is surgical excision. A beneficial adjuvant role for cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiotherapy is yet to be clearly established for low-grade ESS; however, recent reports suggest that progestational agents may produce significant responses in recurrent or persistent disease patients whose tumors produce steroid hormone receptors. Indolent tumors may require years of close observation and multiple treatment approaches to maintain a patient in a functional capacity. PMID:2807024

  19. Malignant Transformation in Glioma Steered by an Angiogenic Switch: Defining a Role for Bone Marrow-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Raymond; Pisapia, David; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade gliomas, such as pilocytic astrocytoma and subependymoma, are often characterized as benign tumors due to their relative circumscription radiologically and typically non-aggressive biologic behavior. In contrast, low-grades that are by their nature diffusely infiltrative, such as diffuse astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, have the potential to transform into malignant high-grade counterparts and, given sufficient time, invariably do so. These high-grade gliomas carry very poor prognoses and are largely incurable, warranting a closer look at what causes this adverse transition. A key characteristic that distinguishes low- and high-grade gliomas is neovascularization: it is absent in low-grade gliomas, but prolific in high-grade gliomas, providing the tumor with ample blood supply for exponential growth. It has been well described in the literature that bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) may contribute to the angiogenic switch that is responsible for malignant transformation of low-grade gliomas. In this review, we will summarize the current literature on BMDCs and their known contribution to angiogenesis-associated tumor growth in gliomas. PMID:26973806

  20. ELTD1, A Potential New Biomarker for Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Rheal A.; Jensen, Randy L.; Colman, Howard; Vaillant, Brian; Smith, Nataliya; Casteel, Rebba; Saunders, Debra; Gillespie, David L.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Giles, Cory B.; Wren, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), high-grade glioma, is characterized by being diffuse, invasive, and highly angiogenic, and has a very poor prognosis. Identification of new biomarkers could help in the further diagnosis of GBM. Objective To identify ELTD1 ([epidermal growth factor (EGF), latrophilin and seven transmembrane domain-containing 1] on chromosome 1) as a putative glioma-associated marker via a bioinformatic method. Methods We used advanced data mining and a novel bioinformatics method to predict ELTD1 as a potential novel biomarker that is associated with gliomas. Validation was done with immunohistochemistry (IHC), which was used to detect levels of ELTD1 in human high-grade gliomas, and rat F98 glioma tumors. In vivo levels of ELTD1 in rat F98 gliomas were assessed using molecular MRI (mMRI). Results ELTD1 was found to be significantly higher (P=.03) in high-grade gliomas (50 patients) compared to low-grade gliomas (21 patients), and compared well to traditional IHC markers including VEGF, GLUT-1,CAIX, and HIF-1α. ELTD1 gene expression indicates an association with grade, survival across grade, and an increase in the mesenchymal subtype. Significantly high (P<0.001) in vivo levels of ELTD1 were additionally found in F98 tumors, compared to normal brain tissue. Conclusion This study strongly suggests that associative analysis was able to accurately identify ELTD1 as a putative glioma-associated biomarker. The detection of ELTD1 was also validated in both rodent and human gliomas, and may serve as an additional biomarker for gliomas in pre-clinical and clinical diagnosis of gliomas. PMID:23096411

  1. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite <5mm) in the concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks. PMID:19398196

  2. Notch Signaling Activation in Pediatric Low-Grade Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, William D.; Schreck, Karisa C.; Bar, Eli E.; Taylor, Isabella; Marchionni, Luigi; Raabe, Eric; Eberhart, Charles G.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common primary brain tumor in children; various signaling pathways have been implicated in its biology. The Notch signaling pathway has been found to play a role in development, stem cell biology, and the pathogenesis of several cancers but its role in PA has not been investigated. We studied alterations in Notch signaling components in tumor tissue from 18 patients with PA and 4 with other low-grade astrocytomas to identify much needed therapeutic targets. We found that Notch pathway members were overexpressed at the mRNA (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HEY1, HEY2) and protein (HES1) levels in PAs at various anatomical sites compared to non-neoplastic brain samples. These changes were not associated with specific BRAF alterations. Inhibiting the Notch pathway in the pediatric low-grade astrocytoma cell lines Res 186 and Res 259 using either RNA interference or a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in variable but significant reduction in cell growth and migration. This study suggests a potential role for Notch signaling in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis and that Notch signaling may be a viable pathway therapeutic target. PMID:25575134

  3. Notch signaling activation in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Brandt, William D; Schreck, Karisa C; Bar, Eli E; Taylor, Isabella; Marchionni, Luigi; Raabe, Eric; Eberhart, Charles G; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-02-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common primary brain tumor in children; various signaling pathways have been implicated in its biology. The Notch signaling pathway has been found to play a role in the development, stem cell biology, and pathogenesis of several cancers, but its role in PA has not been investigated. We studied alterations in Notch signaling components in tumor tissue from 18 patients with PA and 4 with other low-grade astrocytomas to identify much needed therapeutic targets. We found that Notch pathway members were overexpressed at the mRNA (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HEY1, HEY2) and protein (HES1) levels in PAs at various anatomic sites compared with non-neoplastic brain samples. These changes were not associated with specific BRAF alterations. Inhibiting the Notch pathway in the pediatric low-grade astrocytoma cell lines Res186 and Res259 using either RNA interference or a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in variable, but significant, reduction in cell growth and migration. This study suggests a potential role for Notch signaling in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis and that Notch signaling may be a viable pathway therapeutic target. PMID:25575134

  4. Management of Elderly Patients With Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Gállego Pérez-Larraya, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The current progressive aging of the population is resulting in a continuous increase in the incidence of gliomas in elderly people, especially the most frequent subtype, glioblastoma (GBM). This sociohealth shift, known as the “silver tsunami,” has prompted the neuro-oncology community to investigate the role of specific antitumor treatments, such as surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and other targeted therapies, for these traditionally undertreated patients. Advanced age, a widely recognized poor prognostic factor in both low-grade glioma (LGG) and high-grade glioma patients, should no longer be the sole reason for excluding such older patients from receiving etiologic treatments. Far from it, results from recent prospective trials conducted on elderly patients with GBM demonstrate that active management of these patients can have a positive impact on survival without impairing either cognition or quality of life. Although prospective studies specifically addressing the management of grade 2 and 3 gliomas are lacking and thus needed, the aforementioned tendency toward acknowledging a therapeutic benefit for GBM patients might also apply to the treatment of patients with LGG and anaplastic gliomas. In order to optimize such etiologic treatment in conjunction with symptomatic management, neuro-oncology multidisciplinary boards must individually consider important features such as resectability of the tumor, functional and cognitive status, associated comorbidities, and social support. PMID:25342314

  5. Use of thallium-201 SPECT to quantitate malignancy grade of gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Black, K.L.; Hawkins, R.A.; Kim, K.T.; Becker, D.P.; Lerner, C.; Marciano, D. )

    1989-09-01

    A quantitative preoperative technique using thallium-201 single-photon emission computerized tomography is described which predicts whether specific gliomas are of high- or low-grade malignancy. An index, based on the ratio of thallium uptake in the tumor versus the homologous contralateral brain, was calculated and compared with tumor histology. The index in 14 patients with low-grade malignant gliomas was 1.27 {plus minus} 0.40 in contrast to an index of 2.40 {plus minus} 0.61 in 11 patients with high-grade malignant gliomas (p less than 0.0005). Whether gliomas were of low- or high-grade malignancy could be predicted with 89% accuracy using a threshold of 1.5. Low-grade gliomas with an index higher than 1.5 acted biologically more like high-grade tumors, and no tumor histologically classified as being of high-grade malignancy had an index lower than 1.7. This technique could help to reduce unrecognized sampling errors during needle biopsies of brain tumors, particularly of high-grade lesions classified in error as low-grade tumors due to inadequate biopsy material.

  6. Cigarette smoking and risk of adult glioma: a meta-analysis of 24 observational studies involving more than 2.3 million individuals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-xing; Peng, Xiao-xiao; Zong, Qiang; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ming-xin; Liu, Yi-zhe; Han, Guang-liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking has been shown to be a risk factor for adult glioma by some but not all studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to systematically assess the potential association. Methods PubMed and EMBASE were searched from the date of their inception to October 1, 2015, to identify relevant articles. Reference lists from these articles were reviewed to identify additional studies. Both cohort and case–control studies were included. Fixed-effects models were used to calculate the overall relative risk (RR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The final analysis included 24 studies (seven cohort and 17 case–control studies), involving more than 2.3 million individuals. The combined RR was 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.09; P=0.073) for ever-smokers, 0.97 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.07; P=0.574) for current-smokers, and 1.07 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.16; P=0.130) for past smokers, with little evidence of heterogeneity. Omission of any single study from the analysis had little effect on the result. No evidence of publication bias was found. A small but statistically significant increase was found in past smokers in females (RR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.28; P=0.046) but not in males. Conclusion In general, there was no association between cigarette smoking and adult glioma. The small but statistically significant association in females requires further investigation. PMID:27366088

  7. Cerebral low-grade lymphoma and light chain deposition disease: exceedingly high IgG levels in the cerebrospinal fluid as a diagnostic clue.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, G; Psaras, T; Krope, K; von Coelln, R; Fend, F; Bock, T; Schittenhelm, J; Melms, A; Meyermann, R; Bornemann, A

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old male with an exceedingly rare manifestation of a low-grade lymphoma in the brain associated with light chain deposition disease (LCDD). The patient presented with epileptic seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right parietal lobe that were suspicious of vasculitis, low-grade glioma, or neurosarcoidosis. In the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but not in the serum, highly elevated IgG was found. A stereotactic biopsy of one cerebral lesion was performed. Histopathology revealed a low grade lymphoplasmacytic B-cell lymphoma with light chain deposition disease (LCDD). Bone marrow biopsy and laboratory workup did not show any systemic involvement. LCDD exclusively affecting the brain is an exceedingly rare finding. It can be associated with low-grade B-cell lymphoma. This is the first report of LCDD exclusively affecting the brain in an elderly patient. Compared with the two younger patients previously reported, the course of the disease was of a slow-evolving nature. In constellations of highly elevated IgG in CSF and multiple white matter lesions, LCDD should be considered as underlying pathology. PMID:21073842

  8. Cellular Host Responses to Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Barish, Michael E.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Metz, Marianne Z.; Myers, Sarah M.; Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Richard T.; Miletic, Hrvoje; Kendall, Stephen E.; Glackin, Carlotta A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Aboody, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. Methodology/Principal Findings Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a ‘network’ with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a ‘pair-wise’ manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a) low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats) were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b) high-generation xenografts (fifth passage) had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with ‘glomerulus-like’ microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  9. A phase II trial of enzastaurin (LY317615) in combination with bevacizumab in adults with recurrent malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Odia, Yazmin; Iwamoto, Fabio M; Moustakas, Argirios; Fraum, Tyler J; Salgado, Carlos A; Li, Aiguo; Kreisl, Teri N; Sul, Joohee; Butman, John A; Fine, Howard A

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of combination enzastaurin (LY317615) and bevacizumab for recurrent malignant gliomas and explored serologic correlates. We enrolled 81 patients with glioblastomas (GBM, n = 40) and anaplastic gliomas (AG, n = 41). Patients received enzastaurin as a loading dose of 1125 mg, followed by 500 or 875 mg daily for patients on non-enzyme-inducing or enzyme-inducing antiepileptics, respectively. Patients received bevacizumab 10 mg/kg intravenously biweekly. Clinical evaluations were repeated every 4 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained at baseline and every 8 weeks from treatment onset. Phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 levels from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were checked with each MRI. Median overall survival was 7.5 and 12.4 months for glioblastomas and anaplastic glioma cohorts, with median progression-free survivals of 2.0 and 4.4 months, respectively. Of GBM patients, 3/40 (7.5 %) were not evaluable, while 8/37 (22 %) had partial or complete response and 20/37 (54 %) had stable disease for 2+ months. Of the 39 evaluable AG patients, 18 (46 %) had an objective response, and 16 (41 %) had stable disease for 2+ months. The most common grade 3+ toxicities were lymphopenia (15 %), hypophosphatemia (8.8 %) and thrombotic events (7.5 %). Two (2.5 %) GBM patients died suddenly; another death (1.3 %) occurred from intractable seizures. Phosphorylated GSK-3 levels from PBMCs did not correlate with treatment response. A minimally important improvement in health-related quality of life was self-reported in 7-9/24 (29.2-37.5 %). Early response based on Levin criteria was significantly associated with significantly longer progression free survival for glioblastomas. Enzastaurin (LY317615) in combination with bevacizumab for recurrent malignant gliomas is well-tolerated, with response and progression-free survival similar to bevacizumab monotherapy. PMID:26643807

  10. Factors Influencing Neurocognitive Outcomes in Young Patients With Benign and Low-Grade Brain Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Rakesh; Mallick, Indranil; Dutta, Debnarayan

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To present the effect of radiotherapy doses to different volumes of normal structures on neurocognitive outcomes in young patients with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients (median age, 13 years) with residual/progressive brain tumors (10 craniopharyngioma, 8 cerebellar astrocytoma, 6 optic pathway glioma and 4 cerebral low-grade glioma) were treated with SCRT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks. Prospective neuropsychological assessments were done at baseline before RT and at subsequent follow-up examinations. The change in intelligence quotient (IQ) scores was correlated with various factors, including dose-volume to normal structures. Results: Although the overall mean full-scale IQ (FSIQ) at baseline before RT remained unchanged at 2-year follow-up after SCRT, one third of patients did show a >10% decline in FSIQ as compared with baseline. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that patients aged <15 years had a significantly higher chance of developing a >10% drop in FSIQ than older patients (53% vs. 10%, p = 0.03). Dosimetric comparison in patients showing a >10% decline vs. patients showing a <10% decline in IQ revealed that patients receiving >43.2 Gy to >13% of volume of the left temporal lobe were the ones to show a significant drop in FSIQ (p = 0.048). Radiotherapy doses to other normal structures, including supratentorial brain, right temporal lobe, and frontal lobes, did not reveal any significant correlation. Conclusion: Our prospectively collected dosimetric data show younger age and radiotherapy doses to left temporal lobe to be predictors of neurocognitive decline, and may well be used as possible dose constraints for high-precision radiotherapy planning.

  11. Decompression without Fusion for Low-Grade Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Cheung, Prudence Wing Hang; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective series. Purpose Assess results of decompression-only surgery for low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis with consideration of instability. Overview of Literature There is no consensus on whether fusion or decompression-only surgery leads to better outcomes for patients with low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis. Current trends support fusion but many studies are flawed due to over-generalization without consideration of radiological instability and their variable presentations and natural history. Methods Patients with surgically treated degenerative spondylolisthesis from 1990–2013 were included. Clinical and radiological instability measures were included. Any residual or recurrence of symptoms, revision surgery performed and functional outcome scores including the numerical global rate of change scale, visual analogue scale, and modified Barthel index were measured. Follow-up periods for patients were divided into short-term (<5 years), mid-term (5–10 years) and long-term (>10 years). Results A total of 64 patients were recruited. Mechanical low back pain was noted in 48 patients and most (85.4%) had relief of back pain postoperatively. Radiological instability was noted in 4 subjects by flexion-extension radiographs and 12 subjects with prone traction radiographs by increased disc height and reduction of olisthesis and slip angle. From the results of the short-term, mid-term and long-term follow-up, reoperation only occurred within the first 5-year follow-up period. All functional scores improved from preoperative to postoperative 1-year follow-up. Conclusions Decompression-only for low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis has good long-term results despite instability. Further higher-level studies should be performed on this patient group with radiological instability to suggest the superior surgical option. PMID:26949462

  12. Dietary Phthalates and Low-Grade Albuminuria in US Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Trasande, Leonardo; Sathyanarayana, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Low-grade albuminuria is an indicator of endothelial dysfunction and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A graded level of exposure to bisphenol A was recently identified to be associated with increased risk of low-grade albuminuria in children and adults. Because bisphenol A and phthalates coexist as dietary contaminants, this study investigated whether exposure to phthalates is also associated with low-grade albuminuria. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were examined from 667 children who participated in the 2009–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and who had results for urinary phthalate metabolites and albumin excretion. Urinary albumin and creatinine concentrations were measured in a first morning specimen using a solid-phase fluorescent immunoassay and a Roche/Hitachi Modular P Chemistry Analyzer with an enzymatic method, respectively. Phthalate metabolites were analyzed in a separate spot urine sample from each participant, using high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectroscopy. Results For each (roughly) 3-fold increase in metabolites of di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (a high molecular weight phthalate commonly found in foods), a 0.55 mg/g increase in albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) was identified (P=0.02), whereas a 1.30-fold odds of a higher ACR quartile was also identified for each (roughly) 3-fold increase (P=0.02). Higher ACR was not identified in relationship to metabolites of lower molecular phthalates commonly found in lotions or shampoos, suggesting specificity. Conclusions Although reverse causation and unmeasured confounders represent alternative explanations, these findings, in conjunction with our earlier data on bisphenol A, indicate that a wide array of environmental toxins may adversely affect albuminuria and potentially increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. In view of the potential long-term health implications of ongoing exposure in

  13. Histopathological spectrum of polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Surya, Varun; Tupkari, Jagdish V; Joy, Tabita; Verma, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas (PLGA) are distinctive salivary gland neoplasms, with an almost exclusive propensity to arise from the minor salivary glands. PLGA frequently manifests as an asymptomatic, slow-growing mass within the oral cavity, which must be separated from adenoid cystic carcinoma and benign mixed tumor for therapeutic and prognostic considerations. We report a case of a 67-year-old male, who presented with a long-standing mass in the palate. This lesion was diagnosed as PLGA based on histopathological findings, which was further confirmed by the immunohistochemical marker. PMID:26604510

  14. Improving vaccine efficacy against malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ladomersky, Erik; Genet, Matthew; Zhai, Lijie; Gritsina, Galina; Lauing, Kristen L; Lulla, Rishi R; Fangusaro, Jason; Lenzen, Alicia; Kumthekar, Priya; Raizer, Jeffrey J; Binder, David C; James, C David; Wainwright, Derek A

    2016-08-01

    The effective treatment of adult and pediatric malignant glioma is a significant clinical challenge. In adults, glioblastoma (GBM) accounts for the majority of malignant glioma diagnoses with a median survival of 14.6 mo. In children, malignant glioma accounts for 20% of primary CNS tumors with a median survival of less than 1 y. Here, we discuss vaccine treatment for children diagnosed with malignant glioma, through targeting EphA2, IL-13Rα2 and/or histone H3 K27M, while in adults, treatments with RINTEGA, Prophage Series G-100 and dendritic cells are explored. We conclude by proposing new strategies that are built on current vaccine technologies and improved upon with novel combinatorial approaches. PMID:27622066

  15. Low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary or peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Gershenson, D M

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decade, the strategy for clinical trial design in making progress against epithelial cancers of the ovary/peritoneum/fallopian tube has changed dramatically. The NRG (GOG) Rare Tumor Committee has been a leader in this transformation. No longer does 'one size fit all'. Rather, separate clinical trials for rare subtypes have been developed and, in some cases, completed. An enhanced understanding of their pathologic diagnosis, molecular biology, and clinical behavior has galvanized this change. Low-grade serous carcinoma may occur de novo or following an initial diagnosis of serous tumor of low malignant potential. It is characterized by young age at diagnosis, relative chemoresistance, and prolonged survival compared with high-grade serous carcinoma. Historically, conventional chemotherapy has demonstrated very limited activity in this subtype. Hormonal therapy may provide benefit in this subtype. Preclinical studies have identified and elucidated genes and pathways-MAP kinase pathway, IGF1-R, the angiogenesis pathway, and possibly, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in low-grade serous carcinoma. To date, clinical evidence supports the activity of MEK and BRAF inhibitors and bevacizumab. Further pursuit of targeted therapy trials is clearly warranted. PMID:27141071

  16. Ethanol and other oxygenateds from low grade carbonaceous resources

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, O.S.; Jung, K.D.; Han, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    Anhydrous ethanol and other oxygenates of C2 up can be produced quite competitively from low grade carbonaceous resources in high yield via gasification, methanol synthesis, carbonylation of methanol an hydrogenation consecutively. Gas phase carbonylation of methanol to form methyl acetate is the key step for the whole process. Methyl acetate can be produced very selectively in one step gas phase reaction on a fixed bed column reactor with GHSV over 5,000. The consecutive hydrogenation of methyl or ethyl acetate produce anhydrous ethanol in high purity. It is also attempted to co-produce methanol and DME in IGCC, in which low grade carbonaceous resources are used as energy sources, and the surplus power and pre-power gas can be stored in liquid form of methanol and DME during base load time. Further integration of C2 up oxygenate production with IGCC can improve its economics. The attempt of above extensive technology integration can generate significant industrial profitability as well as reduce the environmental complication related with massive energy consumption.

  17. Glioma Association and Balancing Selection of ZFPM2

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Weiqing; Li, Jun; Li, Yi; Zhao, Cunyou; Ding, Xiaofan; Pun, Frank W.; Hu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jianmin; Zhang, Junyi; Luo, Rongcheng; Cheung, Siu-Tim; Leung, Gilberto K. K.; Poon, Wai-Sang; Ng, Ho-Keung; Zhang, Liwei; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    ZFPM2, encoding a zinc finger protein and abundantly expressed in the brain, uterus and smooth muscles, plays important roles in cardiac and gonadal development. Abnormal expression of ZFPM2 in ovarian tumors and neuroblastoma has been reported but hitherto its genetic association with cancer and effects on gliomas have not been studied. In the present study, the hexamer insertion-deletion polymorphism rs71305152, located within a large haplotype block spanning intron 1 to intron 3 of ZFPM2, was genotyped in Chinese cohorts of glioma (n = 350), non-glioma cancer (n = 354) and healthy control (n = 463) by direct sequencing and length polymorphism in gel electrophoresis, and ZFPM2 expression in glioma tissues (n = 69) of different grades was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, potential natural selection pressure acting on the gene was investigated. Disease-association analysis showed that the overall genotype of rs71305152 was significantly associated with gliomas (P = 0.016), and the heterozygous genotype compared to the combined homozygous genotypes was less frequent in gliomas than in controls (P = 0.005) or non-glioma cancers (P = 0.020). ZFPM2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the grades of gliomas (P = 0.002), with higher expression levels in the low-grade gliomas. In the astrocytoma subtype, higher ZFPM2 expression was also correlated with the rs71305152 heterozygous genotype (P = 0.028). In addition, summary statistics tests gave highly positive values, demonstrating that the gene is under the influence of balancing selection. These findings suggest that ZFPM2 is a glioma susceptibility gene, its genotype and expression showing associations with incidence and severity, respectively. Moreover, the balancing selection acting on ZFPM2 may be related to the important roles it has to play in multiple organ development or associated disease etiology. PMID:26207917

  18. Glioma Association and Balancing Selection of ZFPM2.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Shui-Ying; Mei, Lingling; Wan, Weiqing; Li, Jun; Li, Yi; Zhao, Cunyou; Ding, Xiaofan; Pun, Frank W; Hu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jianmin; Zhang, Junyi; Luo, Rongcheng; Cheung, Siu-Tim; Leung, Gilberto K K; Poon, Wai-Sang; Ng, Ho-Keung; Zhang, Liwei; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    ZFPM2, encoding a zinc finger protein and abundantly expressed in the brain, uterus and smooth muscles, plays important roles in cardiac and gonadal development. Abnormal expression of ZFPM2 in ovarian tumors and neuroblastoma has been reported but hitherto its genetic association with cancer and effects on gliomas have not been studied. In the present study, the hexamer insertion-deletion polymorphism rs71305152, located within a large haplotype block spanning intron 1 to intron 3 of ZFPM2, was genotyped in Chinese cohorts of glioma (n = 350), non-glioma cancer (n = 354) and healthy control (n = 463) by direct sequencing and length polymorphism in gel electrophoresis, and ZFPM2 expression in glioma tissues (n = 69) of different grades was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, potential natural selection pressure acting on the gene was investigated. Disease-association analysis showed that the overall genotype of rs71305152 was significantly associated with gliomas (P = 0.016), and the heterozygous genotype compared to the combined homozygous genotypes was less frequent in gliomas than in controls (P = 0.005) or non-glioma cancers (P = 0.020). ZFPM2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the grades of gliomas (P = 0.002), with higher expression levels in the low-grade gliomas. In the astrocytoma subtype, higher ZFPM2 expression was also correlated with the rs71305152 heterozygous genotype (P = 0.028). In addition, summary statistics tests gave highly positive values, demonstrating that the gene is under the influence of balancing selection. These findings suggest that ZFPM2 is a glioma susceptibility gene, its genotype and expression showing associations with incidence and severity, respectively. Moreover, the balancing selection acting on ZFPM2 may be related to the important roles it has to play in multiple organ development or associated disease etiology. PMID:26207917

  19. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-01-01

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma. The kurtosis and conventional diffusion metric values of the tumor were semi-automatically obtained. The relationships of these metrics with the glioma grade and Ki-67 expression were evaluated. The diagnostic efficiency of these metrics in grading was further compared. It was demonstrated that compared with the conventional diffusion metrics, the kurtosis metrics were more promising imaging markers in distinguishing high-grade from low-grade gliomas and distinguishing among grade II, III and IV gliomas; the kurtosis metrics also showed great potential in the prediction of Ki-67 expression. To our best knowledge, we are the first to reveal the ability of DKI to assess the cellular proliferation of gliomas, and to employ the semi-automatic method for the accurate measurement of gliomas. These results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent therapy of glioma. PMID:26544514

  20. Expression and Prognostic Significance of p53 in Glioma Patients: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yueling; Xiao, Weizhong; Song, Tingting; Feng, Guangjia; Dai, Zhensheng

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is a brain tumor deriving from the neoplastic glial cells or neuroglia. Due to its resistance to anticancer drugs and different disease progress of individuals, patients with high-grade glioma are difficult to completely cure, leading to a poor prognosis and low overall survival. Therefore, there is an urgent need to look for prognostic and diagnostic indicators that can predict glioma grades. P53 is one of the widely studied biomarkers in human glioma. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the significance of p53 expression in glioma grades and overall survival. We searched commonly used electronic databases to retrieve related articles of p53 expression in glioma. Overall, a total of 21 studies including 1322 glioma patients were finally screened out. We observed that the frequency of p53 immuno-positivity was higher in high-grade patients than that in low-grade category (63.8 vs. 41.6 %), and our statistic analysis indicated that p53 expression was associated with pathological grade of glioma (OR 2.93, 95 % CI 1.87-4.60, P < 0.00001). This significant correction was also found in 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival. However, no positive relationship was found between age, sex, tumor size and p53 expression in patients with glioma. In conclusion, our results suggested that p53 immunohistochemical expression might have an effective usefulness in predicting the prognosis in patients with glioma. PMID:27038932

  1. A novel, integrated PET-guided MRS technique resulting in more accurate initial diagnosis of high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ellen S; Satter, Martin; Reed, Marilyn; Fadell, Ronald; Kardan, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal malignant glioma in adults. Currently, the modality of choice for diagnosing brain tumor is high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast, which provides anatomic detail and localization. Studies have demonstrated, however, that MRI may have limited utility in delineating the full tumor extent precisely. Studies suggest that MR spectroscopy (MRS) can also be used to distinguish high-grade from low-grade gliomas. However, due to operator dependent variables and the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, the potential for error in diagnostic accuracy with MRS is a concern. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been shown to add additional information with respect to tumor grade, extent, and prognosis based on the premise of biochemical changes preceding anatomic changes. Combined PET/MRS is a technique that integrates information from PET in guiding the location for the most accurate metabolic characterization of a lesion via MRS. We describe a case of glioblastoma multiforme in which MRS was initially non-diagnostic for malignancy, but when MRS was repeated with PET guidance, demonstrated elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio in the right parietal mass consistent with a high-grade malignancy. Stereotactic biopsy, followed by PET image-guided resection, confirmed the diagnosis of grade IV GBM. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an integrated PET/MRS technique for the voxel placement of MRS. Our findings suggest that integrated PET/MRS may potentially improve diagnostic accuracy in high-grade gliomas. PMID:27122050

  2. Low-grade gingival leiomyosarcoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; Martins da Silva, Clóvis; Meneghini, Alexandre João; Silva, Geisa B L; Filho, João Alves A; Batista, Aline Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) of the oral cavity, a rare mesenchymal tumor exhibiting smooth-muscle differentiation, is extremely uncommon in childhood. The most frequent location of childhood LMS is the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the stomach. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of leiomyosarcoma affecting the gingival tissues and mandible of a 9-year-old girl with peculiar clinical, microscopic, and radiographic features. Clinical and radiographical examinations revealed a gingival growth affecting the primary mandibular right first molar with inflammatory features. The lesion was initially suspected to be pyogenic granuloma and was removed by excisional biopsy. Microscopic findings showed a hypercellular proliferation of mesenchymal spindle cells, suggesting malignant spindle cell neoplasm. Immunohistochemical, histochemical, and radiographic studies were undertaken, and the final diagnosis established was a low-grade leiomyosarcoma in the gingiva. PMID:19040818

  3. Reductive Leaching of Low-Grade Pyrolusite with Formic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Youzhi; Ma, Huaju; Huang, Runjun; Yuan, Aiqun; Huang, Zengwei; Zhou, Zeguang

    2015-08-01

    The extraction of manganese from low-grade pyrolusite is investigated using formic acid as reductant in sulfuric acid medium. The effects of volumes of formic acid, concentration of sulfuric acid, liquid to solid ratio (L/S), leaching time, and temperature on leaching efficiency of manganese, iron, and aluminum are valuated with single-factor experiments. The results show that the leaching efficiency of manganese reached 90.08 pct with 80.70 pct of iron and 31.55 pct of aluminum under the optical conditions: 15 pct H2SO4(v/v) 60 ml, 4 ml formic acid, and 2 hours leaching time at 363 K (90 °C).

  4. Interaction of low-grade metamorphic coals with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    S.I. Zherebtsov

    2007-06-15

    How conditions of alkylation of low-grade metamorphic coals with methanol in the presence of benzenesulfonic acid influence the yield of extractable matter was experimentally studied and relevant regression equations were obtained. It was shown that catalytic methylation considerably increases the yield of the extractable matter, as well as reducing the thermal stability of modified samples and alters the elemental composition of the samples and their extracts. A possible mechanism of coal methylation is discussed on the basis of regression models and experimental results. The interaction of the coal matter with the alkylating agent presumably involves the formation of the carbocation and its reaction with the coal organic matter. Both depolymerization reactions and the addition reactions of a portion of extractable compounds, the alkylating agent, and the catalyst with the high-molecular mass coal matrix take place.

  5. Low-grade heat recuperation by the organic Rankine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verneau, A.

    1980-11-01

    The use of an organic Rankine cycle engine in the conversion of low-grade industrial waste heat into mechanical energy is examined. The principles of a Rankine system using a vapor as the working fluid at operating temperatures from 100 to 500 C are presented, and the advantages of using organic vapors rather than water in the Rankine cycle are pointed out. Attention is then given to the Rankine cycle itself, the organic fluids employed, the multistage low-power turbines and the evaporator, which acts as a countercurrent heat exchanger. Economic aspects of the use of Rankine cycle systems for industrial waste heat recovery are then considered, and examples are presented of the calculation of power recovered and investment costs for the examples of heat recovery from diesel exhaust and from low-pressure steam.

  6. Bisphenol A exposure is associated with low-grade urinary albumin excretion in children of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Trasande, Leonardo; Attina, Teresa; Trachtman, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Urinary bisphenol A (BPA), a widely-used biomarker of exposure to BPA, has been associated with cardiometabolic derangements in laboratory studies and with low-grade albuminuria in Chinese adults. Despite the known unique vulnerability of children to environmental chemicals, no studies have examined associations of urinary BPA with albuminuria in children. Since exposure to BPA is widespread in the United States population, we examined data from 710 children in the 2009–10 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with urinary BPA measurements and first morning urine samples with creatinine values. Controlled for a broad array of sociodemographic and environmental risk factors as well as insulin resistance and elevated cholesterol, children with the highest compared to the lowest quartile of urinary BPA had a significant 0.91 mg/g higher albumin-to-creatinine ratio, adjusted for the urinary BPA concentration. When the multivariable model was reprised substituting continuous measures of BPA, a significant 0.28 mg/g albumin-to-creatinine ratio increase was identified for each log unit increase in urinary BPA. Thus, an association of BPA exposure with low-grade albuminuria is consistent with previous results found in Chinese adults and documents this in children in the United States. Our findings broaden the array of adverse effects of BPA to include endothelial dysfunction as evidenced by the low-grade albuminuria and support proactive efforts to prevent harmful exposures. PMID:23302717

  7. Bisphenol A exposure is associated with low-grade urinary albumin excretion in children of the United States.

    PubMed

    Trasande, Leonardo; Attina, Teresa M; Trachtman, Howard

    2013-04-01

    Urinary bisphenol A (BPA), a widely used biomarker of exposure to BPA, has been associated with cardiometabolic derangements in laboratory studies and with low-grade albuminuria in Chinese adults. Despite the known unique vulnerability of children to environmental chemicals, no studies have examined associations of urinary BPA with albuminuria in children. As exposure to BPA is widespread in the United States population, we examined data from 710 children in the 2009-10 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with urinary BPA measurements and first morning urine samples with creatinine values. Controlled for a broad array of sociodemographic and environmental risk factors as well as insulin resistance and elevated cholesterol, children with the highest compared with the lowest quartile of urinary BPA had a significant 0.91 mg/g higher albumin-to-creatinine ratio, adjusted for the urinary BPA concentration. When the multivariable model was reprised substituting continuous measures of BPA, a significant 0.28 mg/g albumin-to-creatinine ratio increase was identified for each log unit increase in urinary BPA. Thus, an association of BPA exposure with low-grade albuminuria is consistent with previous results found in Chinese adults and documents this in children in the United States. Our findings broaden the array of adverse effects of BPA to include endothelial dysfunction as evidenced by the low-grade albuminuria and support proactive efforts to prevent harmful exposures. PMID:23302717

  8. Radiation therapy for localized duodenal low-grade follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Arisa; Oguchi, Masahiko; Terui, Yasuhito; Takeuchi, Kengo; Igarashi, Masahiro; Kozuka, Takuyo; Harada, Ken; Uno, Takashi; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the initial treatment results and toxicities of radiation therapy for patients with early stage low-grade follicular lymphoma (FL) arising from the duodenum. We reviewed 21 consecutive patients with early stage duodenal FL treated with radiation therapy between January 2005 and December 2013 at the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo. The characteristics of patients were: median age 62 years (range, 46–79 years), gender (male, 6; female, 15), clinical stage (I, 20; II1, 1), histological grade (I, 17; II, 4). All patients were treated with radiation therapy alone. The median radiation dose was 30.6 Gy (range, 30.6–39.6) in 17 fractions. The involved-site radiation therapy was delivered to the whole duodenum. The median follow-up time was 43.2 months (range 21.4–109.3). The 3-year overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS) and local control (LC) rates were 94.7%, 79.3% and 100%, respectively. There were four relapses documented outside the treated volumes: two in the gastrointestinal tract (jejunum, terminal ileum), one in an abdominal lymph node (mesenteric lymph node) and one in the bone marrow. None died of the disease; one death was due to acute myeloid leukemia. No toxicities greater than Grade 1 were observed during treatment and over the follow-up time. The 30.6 Gy of involved-site radiation therapy provided excellent local control with very low toxicities. Radiation therapy could be an effective and safe treatment option for patients with localized low grade FL arising from the duodenum. PMID:27009323

  9. Radiation therapy for localized duodenal low-grade follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harada, Arisa; Oguchi, Masahiko; Terui, Yasuhito; Takeuchi, Kengo; Igarashi, Masahiro; Kozuka, Takuyo; Harada, Ken; Uno, Takashi; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the initial treatment results and toxicities of radiation therapy for patients with early stage low-grade follicular lymphoma (FL) arising from the duodenum. We reviewed 21 consecutive patients with early stage duodenal FL treated with radiation therapy between January 2005 and December 2013 at the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo. The characteristics of patients were: median age 62 years (range, 46-79 years), gender (male, 6; female, 15), clinical stage (I, 20; II1, 1), histological grade (I, 17; II, 4). All patients were treated with radiation therapy alone. The median radiation dose was 30.6 Gy (range, 30.6-39.6) in 17 fractions. The involved-site radiation therapy was delivered to the whole duodenum. The median follow-up time was 43.2 months (range 21.4-109.3). The 3-year overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS) and local control (LC) rates were 94.7%, 79.3% and 100%, respectively. There were four relapses documented outside the treated volumes: two in the gastrointestinal tract (jejunum, terminal ileum), one in an abdominal lymph node (mesenteric lymph node) and one in the bone marrow. None died of the disease; one death was due to acute myeloid leukemia. No toxicities greater than Grade 1 were observed during treatment and over the follow-up time. The 30.6 Gy of involved-site radiation therapy provided excellent local control with very low toxicities. Radiation therapy could be an effective and safe treatment option for patients with localized low grade FL arising from the duodenum. PMID:27009323

  10. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2014-06-01

    In human gliomas, tissue factor (TF) is overexpressed, associated with the grade of malignancy and influences tumour biology. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition and activation of the fibrinolytic system also play a role in tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The first aim of the present study was to investigate TF expression and the presence of fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine glioma biopsies, graded according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system. The second aim was to investigate the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine gliomas, as a potential histological marker of glioma type or grade of malignancy. An immunohistochemical study using antibodies against TF, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers was performed with 24 glioma samples, including 15 oligodendrogliomas, 6 astrocytomas and 3 mixed gliomas. Immunohistochemical data were statistically analysed to determine whether there was any relationship between glioma type and grade of malignancy. All gliomas were moderate to strongly positive for TF and the staining score was significantly higher (P = 0.04) in high-grade (III or IV) than in low-grade (II) gliomas. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition was detected in all tumour biopsies assessed, and D-dimers were detected in 17/24 gliomas. IVT was a frequent finding, but was not linked to a specific glioma type or malignancy grade. TF expression, fibrin/fibrinogen deposition, extravascular fibrinolytic system activation and IVT occur in canine gliomas. Canine glioma might be a suitable model for studying coagulation and fibrinolysis as potential therapeutic targets for human gliomas. PMID:24745770

  11. Low-Grade Myofibroblastic Sarcoma in the Mandibular Canal: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yueyuan; Xiao, Jin; Wang, Lan; Yang, Guiqiang

    2016-07-01

    Low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma (LGMS) represents an atypical myofibroblastic tumor characterized by a diffusely infiltrating pattern of spindle-shaped tumor cells. It was classified as a distinct soft tissue tumor by the World Health Organization in 2002. LGMS occurs mostly in adult patients and has a predilection for the head and neck region. So far, only a few cases of LGMS located in the mandible have been reported. Aggressive surgical resection with clear margins is the primary treatment for LGMS. Because of its rarity, reports of radiation therapy are limited, and the therapeutic effect is still controversial. We present the case of an 8-year-old girl with LGMS of the mandibular canal to highlight the clinical features and rarity and to improve the understanding of the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy on LGMS. PMID:27020841

  12. Long-term response in high-grade optic glioma treated with medically induced hypothyroidism and carboplatin: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ashur-Fabian, Osnat; Blumenthal, Deborah T; Bakon, Mati; Nass, Dvora; Davis, Paul J; Hercbergs, Aleck

    2013-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant and frequent brain tumor, with an aggressive growth pattern and poor prognosis despite best treatment modalities. Long-term survival of patients with GBM is rare. Optic glioma represents 0.6-1.2% of all brain tumors. Unlike low-grade optic gliomas in children, optic gliomas in adults are highly aggressive and death usually occurs in less than a year. Prolonged progression-free survival and survival rates have been reported in association with induced hypothyroidism in two clinical trials for recurrent GBM. We present the clinical, radiological, and pathological findings in a patient with inoperable GBM of the optic chiasm. Following failure of initial, standard radiation and temozolomide therapy, chemical hypothyroidism was induced using the antithyroid thioamide, propylthiouracil, followed by carboplatin chemotherapy. Initial thyroid stimulating hormone, free T4, and free T3 analysis was carried out and then monthly. This patient responded rapidly to treatment (clinically and with tumor regression within 4 weeks) on two separate occasions with an extended remission period (2.5 years) and prolonged overall survival (4.5 years). We report the successful long-term tumor response to medically induced chemical hypothyroidism in conjunction with carboplatinum chemotherapy of an adult patient with grade IV GBM of the optic chiasm. These clinical observations find mechanistic support from the recent identification of potent mitogenic actions of the thyroid hormone, L-thyroxine, in malignant glioma through binding to a cognate thyroid hormone receptor on the αvβ3 integrin. Approaches to block its activity are now explored in preclinical studies. PMID:23348245

  13. Low-grade albuminuria in children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Varlami, Vasiliki; Malakasioti, Georgia; Alexopoulos, Emmanouel I; Theologi, Vasiliki; Theophanous, Eleni; Liakos, Nikolaos; Daskalopoulou, Euphemia; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Kaditis, Athanasios G

    2013-06-01

    Small urinary protein loss (low-grade albuminuria or microalbuminuria) may reflect altered permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier. In the present study, it was hypothesized that children with obstructive sleep apnea have an increased risk of microalbuminuria compared with control subjects without sleep-disordered breathing. Albumin-to-creatinine ratio was measured in morning spot urine specimens collected from consecutive children with or without snoring who were referred for polysomnography. Three groups were studied: (i) control subjects (no snoring, apnea-hypopnea index < 1 episode h(-1) ; n = 31); (ii) mild obstructive sleep apnea (snoring, apnea-hypopnea index = 1-5 episodes h(-1) ; n = 71); and (iii) moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (snoring, apnea-hypopnea index > 5 episodes∙h(-1) ; n = 27). Indications for polysomnography in control subjects included nightmares, somnambulism and morning headaches. An albumin-to-creatinine ratio > median value in the control group (1.85 mg of albumin per g of creatinine) was defined as elevated. Logistic regression analysis revealed that children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea, but not those with mild obstructive sleep apnea, had increased risk of elevated albumin-to-creatinine ratio relative to controls (reference) after adjustment for age, gender and presence of obesity: odds ratio 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1-12.6); P = 0.04 and 1.5 (0.6-3.7); P > 0.05, respectively. Oxygen desaturation of hemoglobin and respiratory arousal indices were significant predictors of albumin-to-creatinine ratio (r = 0.31, P = 0.01; and r = 0.43, P < 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea are at significantly higher risk of increased low-grade excretion of albumin in the morning urine as compared with control subjects without obstructive sleep apnea. These findings may reflect altered permeability of the glomerular

  14. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SWAP-70 Modulates the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Ho Jun; Smith, Christian A; Salhia, Bodour; Rutka, James T

    2009-01-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor. Its tendency to invade away from the primary tumor mass is considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Accordingly, the molecular pathogenesis of glioma invasion is currently under investigation. Previously, we examined a gene expression array database comparing human gliomas to nonneoplastic controls and identified several Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors with differential expression. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 has increased expression in malignant gliomas and strongly correlates with lowered patient survival. SWAP-70 is a multifunctional signaling protein involved in membrane ruffling that works cooperatively with activated Rac. Using a glioma tissue microarray, we validated that SWAP-70 demonstrates higher expression in malignant gliomas compared with low-grade gliomas or nonneoplastic brain tissue. Through immunofluorescence, SWAP-70 localizes to membrane ruffles in response to the growth factor, epidermal growth factor. To assess the role of SWAP-70 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited its expression withsmall interfering RNAs and observed decreased glioma cell migration and invasion. SWAP-70 overexpression led to increased levels of active Rac even in low-serum conditions. In addition, when SWAP-70 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhanced membrane ruffle formation followed by increased cellmigration and invasiveness. Taken together, our findings suggest that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 plays an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas into the surrounding tissue. PMID:19956392

  15. Frequent GNAS mutations in low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, G; Sekine, S; Ogawa, R; Matsubara, A; Mori, T; Taniguchi, H; Kushima, R; Hiraoka, N; Tsuta, K; Tsuda, H; Kanai, Y

    2013-01-01

    Background: The molecular basis for the development of appendiceal mucinous tumours, which can be a cause of pseudomyxoma peritonei, remains largely unknown. Methods: Thirty-five appendiceal mucinous neoplasms were analysed for GNAS and KRAS mutations. A functional analysis of mutant GNAS was performed using a colorectal cancer cell line. Results: A mutational analysis identified activating GNAS mutations in 16 of 32 low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (LAMNs) but in none of three mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACs). KRAS mutations were found in 30 LAMNs and in all MACs. We additionally analysed a total of 186 extra-appendiceal mucinous tumours and found that GNAS mutations were highly prevalent in intraductal papillary mucinous tumours of the pancreas (88%) but were rare or absent in mucinous tumours of the colorectum, ovary, lung and breast (0–9%). The prevalence of KRAS mutations was quite variable among the tumours. The introduction of the mutant GNAS into a colorectal cancer cell line markedly induced MUC2 and MUC5AC expression, but did not promote cell growth either in vitro or in vivo. Conclusion: Activating GNAS mutations are a frequent and characteristic genetic abnormality of LAMN. Mutant GNAS might play a direct role in the prominent mucin production that is a hallmark of LAMN. PMID:23403822

  16. [A case of palatal polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, S; Tanaka, T; Nibu, K; Ishibashi, T; Ichimura, K; Yamada, A

    1995-07-01

    We present a 58-year-old male patient with bilateral cheek swelling and an extraorally protruding tumor who has had deaf mutism since birth. He underwent surgery of the right hard palate 11 years ago. Five years later biopsy was performed for a recurrent lesion diagnosed as pleomorphic adenoma. He refused additional treatment and the size of the tumor subsequently increased slowly. As rapid tumor-growth had been observed since autumn of 1992, he was referred to Tokyo University Hospital. We took meticulous care of this deaf-mute patient, especially from the psychological aspect, which caused him to place great reliance upon us. We performed bilateral maxillectomy with partial resection of the right cheek skin and reconstructed his face and palate successfully using both latissmus dorsi and serratus anterior musculocutaneous free flaps with a rib. Histopathological diagnosis of the tumor was polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma, which was registered as a definite entity in the WHO Classification in 1991. There was no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis one year postoperatively. PMID:7562229

  17. Beneficiation and hydroretorting of low grade oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Tippin, R.B.; Hanna, J.; Janka, J.C.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    A new approach to oil recovery from low grade oil shales has been developed jointly by the Mineral Resources Institute (MRI) of The University of Alabama and the HYCRUDE Corporation. The approach is based on the HYTORT process, which utilized hydrogen gas during the retorting process to enhance oil yields from many types of oil shales. The performance of the HYTORT process is further improved by combining it with MRI's froth flotation process. Taking advantage of differences in the surface properties of the kerogen and the inorganic mineral constituents of the oil shales, the MRI process can reject up to three quarters by weight of relatively kerogen-free inorganic fractions of the oil shale before HYTORT processing. The HYTORT and MRI processes are discussed. Results of tests by each process on oil shales of low to moderate inherent kerogen content are presented. Also discussed are the results of the combined processes on an Indiana New Albany oil shale. By combining the two processes, the raw shale which yielded 12 gallons of oil per ton by Fischer Assay was upgraded by flotation to a product yielding 27 gallons of Fischer Assay oil per ton. HYTORT processing of the beneficiated product recovered 54 gallons of oil per ton, an improvement in oil yield by a factor of 4.5 over the raw shale Fischer Assay.

  18. Characterization and Beneficiation Studies of a Low Grade Bauxite Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. S.; Das, B.

    2014-10-01

    A low grade bauxite sample of central India was thoroughly characterized with the help of stereomicroscope, reflected light microscope and electron microscope using QEMSCAN. A few hand picked samples were collected from different places of the mine and were subjected to geochemical characterization studies. The geochemical studies indicated that most of the samples contain high silica and low alumina, except a few which are high grade. Mineralogically the samples consist of bauxite (gibbsite and boehmite), ferruginous mineral phases (goethite and hematite), clay and silicate (quartz), and titanium bearing minerals like rutile and ilmenite. Majority of the gibbsite, boehmite and gibbsitic oolites contain clay, quartz and iron and titanium mineral phases within the sample as inclusions. The sample on an average contains 39.1 % Al2O3 and 12.3 % SiO2, and 20.08 % of Fe2O3. Beneficiation techniques like size classification, sorting, scrubbing, hydrocyclone and magnetic separation were employed to reduce the silica content suitable for Bayer process. The studies indicated that, 50 % by weight with 41 % Al2O3 containing less than 5 % SiO2 could be achieved. The finer sized sample after physical beneficiation still contains high silica due to complex mineralogical associations.

  19. Overexpression of TREM2 enhances glioma cell proliferation and invasion: a therapeutic target in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Tao, Bang-Bao; Li, Bin; Wang, Xu-Hui; Zhang, Wen-Chuan; Wan, Liang; Hua, Xu-Ming; Li, Shi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and aggressive type of primary adult brain tumors. Although TREM2 mutation is reported to be related to Nasu-Hakola disease and Alzheimer's disease, little is known about the association between TREM2 and gliomas. Here, we reported that TREM2 was significantly overexpressed in glioma tissues compared with non-tumorous brain tissues. Furthermore, TREM2 expression was closely related to pathological grade and overall survival of patients with gliomas. Down-regulation of TREM2 in two glioma cell lines, U87 and U373, resulted in a significant reduction in cell proliferation, migration and invasion and a dramatic increase in S phase arrest and apoptosis. In vivo tumorigenesis experiment also revealed that depletion of TREM2 expression inhibited U87 cell proliferation. Moreover, based on gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset, we found that TREM2 was positive related to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) apoptosis, Cromer metastasis and KEGG chemokine pathways, which was further validated by western blot in TREM2 knockdown glioma cells and indicated a possible mechanism underlying its effects on glioma. In summary, our study suggests that TREM2 may work as an oncogene and a new effective therapeutic target for glioma treatment. PMID:26506595

  20. Childhood bullying involvement predicts low-grade systemic inflammation into adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Wolke, Dieter; Lereya, Suzet Tanya; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol; Costello, E. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Bullying is a common childhood experience that involves repeated mistreatment to improve or maintain one’s status. Victims display long-term social, psychological, and health consequences, whereas bullies display minimal ill effects. The aim of this study is to test how this adverse social experience is biologically embedded to affect short- or long-term levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of low-grade systemic inflammation. The prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (n = 1,420), with up to nine waves of data per subject, was used, covering childhood/adolescence (ages 9–16) and young adulthood (ages 19 and 21). Structured interviews were used to assess bullying involvement and relevant covariates at all childhood/adolescent observations. Blood spots were collected at each observation and assayed for CRP levels. During childhood and adolescence, the number of waves at which the child was bullied predicted increasing levels of CRP. Although CRP levels rose for all participants from childhood into adulthood, being bullied predicted greater increases in CRP levels, whereas bullying others predicted lower increases in CRP compared with those uninvolved in bullying. This pattern was robust, controlling for body mass index, substance use, physical and mental health status, and exposures to other childhood psychosocial adversities. A child’s role in bullying may serve as either a risk or a protective factor for adult low-grade inflammation, independent of other factors. Inflammation is a physiological response that mediates the effects of both social adversity and dominance on decreases in health. PMID:24821813

  1. Childhood bullying involvement predicts low-grade systemic inflammation into adulthood.

    PubMed

    Copeland, William E; Wolke, Dieter; Lereya, Suzet Tanya; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol; Costello, E Jane

    2014-05-27

    Bullying is a common childhood experience that involves repeated mistreatment to improve or maintain one's status. Victims display long-term social, psychological, and health consequences, whereas bullies display minimal ill effects. The aim of this study is to test how this adverse social experience is biologically embedded to affect short- or long-term levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of low-grade systemic inflammation. The prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (n = 1,420), with up to nine waves of data per subject, was used, covering childhood/adolescence (ages 9-16) and young adulthood (ages 19 and 21). Structured interviews were used to assess bullying involvement and relevant covariates at all childhood/adolescent observations. Blood spots were collected at each observation and assayed for CRP levels. During childhood and adolescence, the number of waves at which the child was bullied predicted increasing levels of CRP. Although CRP levels rose for all participants from childhood into adulthood, being bullied predicted greater increases in CRP levels, whereas bullying others predicted lower increases in CRP compared with those uninvolved in bullying. This pattern was robust, controlling for body mass index, substance use, physical and mental health status, and exposures to other childhood psychosocial adversities. A child's role in bullying may serve as either a risk or a protective factor for adult low-grade inflammation, independent of other factors. Inflammation is a physiological response that mediates the effects of both social adversity and dominance on decreases in health. PMID:24821813

  2. A Phase II Trial of a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Panobinostat in Patients With Low-Grade Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Sam J.; Mulkerin, Daniel L.; Rajguru, Saurabh; Carmichael, Lakeesha; Chen, Herb; Holen, Kyle D.; LoConte, Noelle K.

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors versus carcinoid tumors should be examined separately in clinical trials. Progression-free survival is more clinically relevant as the primary endpoint (rather than response rate) in phase II trials for low-grade neuroendocrine tumors. Background. The most common subtypes of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are pancreatic islet cell tumors and carcinoids, which represent only 2% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have already been shown to suppress tumor growth and induce apoptosis in various malignancies. In NET cells, HDAC inhibitors have resulted in increased Notch1 expression and subsequent inhibition of growth. We present here a phase II study of the novel HDAC inhibitor panobinostat in patients with low-grade NET. Methods. Adult patients with histologically confirmed, metastatic, low-grade NETs and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of ≤2 were treated with oral panobinostat 20 mg once daily three times per week. Treatment was continued until patients experienced unacceptable toxicities or disease progression. The study was stopped at planned interim analysis based on a Simon two-stage design. Results. Fifteen patients were accrued, and 13 were evaluable for response. No responses were seen, but the stable disease rate was 100%. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.9 months, and the median overall survival was 47.3 months. Fatigue (27%), thrombocytopenia (20%), diarrhea (13%), and nausea (13%) were the most common related grade 3 toxicities. There was one grade 4 thrombocytopenia (7%). These results did not meet the prespecified criteria to open the study to full accrual. Conclusion. The HDAC inhibitor panobinostat has a high stable disease rate and reasonable PFS in low-grade NET, but has a low response rate. PMID:27261467

  3. Genomic dynamics associated with malignant transformation in IDH1 mutated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kee; Park, Inho; Lee, Seungmook; Sun, Choong-Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Ja Eun; Yun, Hongseok; Lee, Se-Hoon

    2015-12-22

    The genomic mechanism responsible for malignant transformation remains an open question for glioma researchers, where differing conclusions have been drawn based on diverse study conditions. Therefore, it is essential to secure direct evidence using longitudinal samples from the same patient. Moreover, malignant transformation of IDH1-mutated gliomas is of potential interest, as its genomic mechanism under influence of oncometabolite remains unclear, and even higher rate of malignant transformation was reported in IDH1-mutated low grade gliomas than in wild-type IDH1 tumors. We have analyzed genomic data using next-generation sequencing technology for longitudinal samples from 3 patients with IDH1-mutated gliomas whose disease had progressed from a low grade to a high grade phenotype. Comprehensive analysis included chromosomal aberrations as well as whole exome and transcriptome sequencing, and the candidate driver genes for malignant transformation were validated with public database. Integrated analysis of genomic dynamics in clonal evolution during the malignant transformation revealed alterations in the machinery regulating gene expression, including the spliceosome complex (U2AF2), transcription factors (TCF12), and chromatin remodelers (ARID1A). Moreover, consequential expression changes implied the activation of genes associated with the restoration of the stemness of cancer cells. The alterations in genetic regulatory mechanisms may be the key factor for the major phenotypic changes in IDH1 mutated gliomas. Despite being limited to a small number of cases, this analysis provides a direct example of the genomic changes responsible for malignant transformation in gliomas. PMID:26524630

  4. Genomic dynamics associated with malignant transformation in IDH1 mutated gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Choong-Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Ja Eun; Yun, Hongseok; Lee, Se-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The genomic mechanism responsible for malignant transformation remains an open question for glioma researchers, where differing conclusions have been drawn based on diverse study conditions. Therefore, it is essential to secure direct evidence using longitudinal samples from the same patient. Moreover, malignant transformation of IDH1-mutated gliomas is of potential interest, as its genomic mechanism under influence of oncometabolite remains unclear, and even higher rate of malignant transformation was reported in IDH1-mutated low grade gliomas than in wild-type IDH1 tumors. We have analyzed genomic data using next-generation sequencing technology for longitudinal samples from 3 patients with IDH1-mutated gliomas whose disease had progressed from a low grade to a high grade phenotype. Comprehensive analysis included chromosomal aberrations as well as whole exome and transcriptome sequencing, and the candidate driver genes for malignant transformation were validated with public database. Integrated analysis of genomic dynamics in clonal evolution during the malignant transformation revealed alterations in the machinery regulating gene expression, including the spliceosome complex (U2AF2), transcription factors (TCF12), and chromatin remodelers (ARID1A). Moreover, consequential expression changes implied the activation of genes associated with the restoration of the stemness of cancer cells. The alterations in genetic regulatory mechanisms may be the key factor for the major phenotypic changes in IDH1 mutated gliomas. Despite being limited to a small number of cases, this analysis provides a direct example of the genomic changes responsible for malignant transformation in gliomas. PMID:26524630

  5. Low-grade myofibroblastic sarcomas of the maxilla

    PubMed Central

    QIU, JIN-YU; LIU, PENG; SHI, CE; HAN, BING

    2015-01-01

    Low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma (LGMS) is a distinct mesenchymal myofibroblastic malignancy. The tumor may occur at a variety of sites, but is particularly associated with the head and neck. Of the two maxillary sarcomas that were analyzed in the present study, one was misdiagnosed as an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor during pre-operative excision biopsy, and later presented with a different immunophenotype upon recurrence. Representative paraffin blocks from formalin-fixed tissues were selected from each patient and designated as case 1 and case 2. Immunohistochemical studies were performed on 3-μm thick sections using primary antibodies against α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), muscle-specific actin (MSA), desmin, vimentin, calponin, h-caldesmon, fibronectin, cytokeratin, cluster of differentiation 34 (CD34), S-100 protein, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and Ki-67. Immunohistochemistry was performed using the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method. The tumor cells from the two maxillary LGMSs, including the recurrent lesion, were positive for vimentin and fibronectin, and negative for S-100 protein, CD34, EMA, h-caldesmon, ALK, MSA and calponin. The tumor cells from case 1 demonstrated positive staining for α-SMA protein and negative staining for desmin. By contrast, the tumor cells from the primary lesion in case 2 presented with negative staining for α-SMA and positive staining for desmin, while the cells of the recurrent lesion were α-SMA-positive and desmin-negative. The present study concluded that cases of LGMS with immunoprofile alterations are predictive of relatively poor prognoses. PMID:25624890

  6. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, −9p, and −11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas. PMID:26558387

  7. Metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from glioma patients correlates with tumor phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Heimberger, Amy B.; Lu, Zhimin; Wu, Xifeng; Hodges, Tiffany R.; Song, Renduo; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-based molecular biomarkers have redefined in the classification gliomas. However, the association of systemic metabolomics with glioma phenotype has not been explored yet. Methods In this study, we conducted two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomic profiling in plasma samples from 87 glioma patients. The metabolomics data were tested for correlation with glioma grade (high vs low), glioblastoma (GBM) versus malignant gliomas, and IDH mutation status. Results Five metabolites, namely uracil, arginine, lactate, cystamine, and ornithine, significantly differed between high- and low-grade glioma patients in both the discovery and validation cohorts. When the discovery and validation cohorts were combined, we identified 29 significant metabolites with 18 remaining significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Those 18 significant metabolites separated high- from low-grade glioma patients with 91.1% accuracy. In the pathway analysis, a total of 18 significantly metabolic pathways were identified. Similarly, we identified 2 and 6 metabolites that significantly differed between GBM and non-GBM, and IDH mutation positive and negative patients after multiple comparison adjusting. Those 6 significant metabolites separated IDH1 mutation positive from negative glioma patients with 94.4% accuracy. Three pathways were identified to be associated with IDH mutation status. Within arginine and proline metabolism, levels of intermediate metabolites in creatine pathway were all significantly lower in IDH mutation positive than in negative patients, suggesting an increased activity of creatine pathway in IDH mutation positive tumors. Conclusion Our findings identified metabolites and metabolic pathways that differentiated tumor phenotypes. These may be useful as host biomarker candidates to further help glioma molecular classification. PMID:26967252

  8. Low-grade myxofibrosarcoma following a metal implantation in femur: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Myxofibrosarcoma is a myxoid variant of malignant fibrous histiocytoma that most commonly involves the extremities of elderly people. However, a primary myxofibrosarcoma with bone invasion in young adults is extremely rare. Herein, we report the case of a 31-year-old male with a gradually enlarging left thigh mass, who had a history of left femur fracture and received an open reduction and internal fixation with titanium alloy plates and screws 33 months previously. Imaging investigations revealed an irregularly shaped soft tissue mass around the left femur shaft and a partial bone defect in the middle one-third of the left femur. Pathological examination of the resected specimen showed a multi-nodular appearance, abundant myxoid matrix and elongated curvilinear capillaries. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the tumor cells was positive for VIM and MDM2, and was negative for CK, MSA, SMA, DES, S-100 and CD34. Labeling index of Ki-67 was 25%. Based on the morphological finding and immunostaining, it was diagnosed as a low-grade myxofibrosarcoma. The clinical and imaging examinations did not reveal the evidence of a primary cancer elsewhere, and the patient had no personal or family history of malignancy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a primary myxofibrosarcoma developed following a fracture and metal implantation in young adults. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1745984882113605 PMID:24444015

  9. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.

    PubMed

    Solga, Anne C; Pong, Winnie W; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J; Toonen, Joseph A; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H; Mardis, Elaine R; Gutmann, David H

    2015-10-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  10. The role of Alix in the proliferation of human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengjin; Ban, Na; Dai, Shirong; Zhang, Xiubing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Peng; Chen, Wenjuan; Sun, Jie; Bao, Zhen; Chang, Hao; Wang, Donglin; Ren, Jianbing

    2016-06-01

    Apoptosis-linked-gene-2-interacting protein 1 (Alix) is involved in the endosome-lysosome system in the cytoplasm. The normal function of Alix may be altered by ALG-2 toward a destructive role during active cell death. Alix also may play a role in regulation of cell proliferation. However, the role of Alix in human glioma has not been elucidated yet. This study intended to clarify the relationship between Alix and glioma pathologic grades and its role in the proliferation of glioma cells. Our findings showed that Alix protein concentrations were significantly elevated in high-grade glioma tissue compared with low-grade glioma (P < .0001). Immunohistochemical study revealed that Alix was overexpressed in 75 resected glioma tissues and may forecast poor survival. Alix expression was increased in resting serum-stimulated glioma cells. Additionally, we reduced Alix expression in U251MG cells and then found that cell viability was decreased significantly when p21 expression increased. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that reduced Alix expression may lead to growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest. In summary, our findings suggest that Alix plays an important role in the proliferation of glioma cells and may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:26980041