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Sample records for adult mice brain

  1. Mice with ablated adult brain neurogenesis are not impaired in antidepressant response to chronic fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Jedynak, Paulina; Kos, Tomasz; Sandi, Carmen; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Filipkowski, Robert K

    2014-09-01

    The neurogenesis hypothesis of major depression has two main facets. One states that the illness results from decreased neurogenesis while the other claims that the very functioning of antidepressants depends on increased neurogenesis. In order to verify the latter, we have used cyclin D2 knockout mice (cD2 KO mice), known to have virtually no adult brain neurogenesis, and we demonstrate that these mice successfully respond to chronic fluoxetine. After unpredictable chronic mild stress, mutant mice showed depression-like behavior in forced swim test, which was eliminated with chronic fluoxetine treatment, despite its lack of impact on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cD2 KO mice. Our results suggest that new neurons are not indispensable for the action of antidepressants such as fluoxetine. Using forced swim test and tail suspension test, we also did not observe depression-like behavior in control cD2 KO mice, which argues against the link between decreased adult brain neurogenesis and major depression. PMID:24931850

  2. Endogenous brain erythropoietin is a potent sex-specific respiratory stimulant in adult and newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Ballot, Orlane; Joseph, Vincent; Soliz, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that endogenous brain Epo is a respiratory stimulant. Adult (3 mo) and newborn (10 days) male and female mice received an intracisternal (cisterna magna) injection of soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR; competes with EpoR to bind Epo; 50 μg/ml) or vehicle (0.1% BSA in PBS). Twenty-four hours after injection, we used whole body plethysmography to record minute ventilation (V̇e) tidal volume (VT), respiratory frequency (fR), O2 consumption (V̇o2), and CO2 production (V̇co2) under normoxia and progressive exposure to hypoxia (12-10-6% O2; 10 min each). In adult male and female mice sEpoR decreased normoxic V̇e (-25%), due to a decrease of VT in males and fR in females. Moreover, sEpoR injection decreased the ventilatory response to 12% O2, assessed as V̇e/V̇o2 or V̇e/V̇co2, in male but not in female mice. In newborn male and female mice sEpoR decreased V̇e (-37% in males, -59% in females) and VT (-38% in males, -47% in females) in normoxia and fR in females. During hypoxia, sEpoR decreased V̇e/V̇o2 and V̇e/V̇co2 in mice of both sexes. Upon extreme hypoxia (6% O2), the newborn mice treated with sEpoR showed respiratory depression, signs of asphyxia (gasping) and a high mortality rate in males and females. We concluded that endogenous brain Epo is a potent respiratory stimulant under normoxia and hypoxia in adult and newborn mice. Because sex-specific effects are different in newborn male and female, sex steroids secreted at different ages mice appear to modulate the effects of Epo on respiratory regulation in normoxia and in response to hypoxia. PMID:25792712

  3. Behavioral responses to and brain distribution of morphine in mature adult and aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, C.K.; Ho, I.K.; Hoskins, B.

    1986-03-01

    Mature adult (3-6 mo old) and aged (2 yr old) male ICR mice were injected with 10 to 100 mg/kg morphine, s.c. The ED50 values for running behavior (as measured using Stoelting activity monitors and having each mouse serve as its own control) representing 5 times control activity was approximately 7.5 mg/kg for aged mice and approximately 17.5 mg/kg for the mature adults. The ED50 values for analgesia 1 hr after morphine administration using the tail-flick method (max. response time = 8 sec) were approx. 70 mg/kg for the aged mice and 15 mg/kg for the mature adults. One hour after injecting /sup 3/H-morphine at doses of 30 and 100 mg/kg, 0.13 and 0.14% of the doses appeared in brains of aged and mature adult mice, respectively. Regional distribution of the morphine was the same for both age groups. Expressed as percent of total brain morphine, it was as follows: cortex, 30%; midbrain, 18%; cerebellum, 17%; medulla, 12%; pons, 9%; striatum, 8% and periaqueductal gray, 6%. Expressed as g morphine/g tissue for the 2 doses, the distribution was; periaqueductal gray, 30 and 80; striatum, 9 and 34; medulla, 6 and 20 pons; 5 and 19; cerebellum, 4 and 13; midbrain 2.5 and 8.5 and cortex, 2 and 8. These results suggest that the differences in response to morphine by the two age groups were due to age-related differences in opioid receptor populations and/or affinities.

  4. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  5. Alternate day fasting impacts the brain insulin-signaling pathway of young adult male C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianghua; E, Lezi; Wang, Wenfang; Frontera, Jennifer; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Phil; Choi, In Young; Brooks, William M; Burns, Jeffrey M; Aires, Daniel; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2011-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five-month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF + AO) fed group. During the 24-h fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 h of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin-signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMP kinase phosphorylation, silent information regulator 2 phosphorylation, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha levels, and cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production. PMID:21244426

  6. Alternate Day Fasting Impacts the Brain Insulin Signaling Pathway of Young Adult Male C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianghua; Lezi, E; Wang, WenFang; Frontera, Jennifer; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Sang-Pil; Choi, In Young; Brooks, William M.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Aires, Daniel; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum (AL) or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF+AO) fed group. During the 24 hour fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 hours of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and GSK3β phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMPK phosphorylation, SIRT1 phosphorylation, PGC1a levels, and COX4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production. PMID:21244426

  7. Pharmacological reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis modifies functional brain circuits in mice exposed to a cocaine conditioned place preference paradigm.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, David; Pedraz, María; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis J

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) behaviour and the functional brain circuitry involved. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was pharmacologically reduced with temozolomide (TMZ), and mice were tested for cocaine-induced CPP to study c-Fos expression in the hippocampus and in extrahippocampal addiction-related areas. Correlational and multivariate analysis revealed that, under normal conditions, the hippocampus showed widespread functional connectivity with other brain areas and strongly contributed to the functional brain module associated with CPP expression. However, the neurogenesis-reduced mice showed normal CPP acquisition but engaged an alternate brain circuit where the functional connectivity of the dentate gyrus was notably reduced and other areas (the medial prefrontal cortex, accumbens and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus) were recruited instead of the hippocampus. A second experiment unveiled that mice acquiring the cocaine-induced CPP under neurogenesis-reduced conditions were delayed in extinguishing their drug-seeking behaviour. But if the inhibited neurons were generated after CPP acquisition, extinction was not affected but an enhanced long-term CPP retention was found, suggesting that some roles of the adult-born neurons may differ depending on whether they are generated before or after drug-contextual associations are established. Importantly, cocaine-induced reinstatement of CPP behaviour was increased in the TMZ mice, regardless of the time of neurogenesis inhibition. The results show that adult hippocampal neurogenesis sculpts the addiction-related functional brain circuits, and reduction of the adult-born hippocampal neurons increases cocaine seeking in the CPP model. PMID:25870909

  8. Transient postnatal fluoxetine leads to decreased brain arachidonic acid metabolism and cytochrome P450 4A in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Epolia; Blanchard, Helene; Cheon, Yewon; Fox, Meredith A.; Chang, Lisa; Chen, Mei; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Basselin, Mireille

    2014-01-01

    Fetal and perinatal exposure to selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been reported to alter childhood behavior, while transient early exposure in rodents is reported to alter their behavior and decrease brain extracellular 5-HT in adulthood. Since 5-HT2A/2C receptor-mediated neurotransmission can involve G-protein coupled activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), releasing arachidonic acid (ARA) from synaptic membrane phospholipid, we hypothesized that transient postnatal exposure to fluoxetine would decrease brain ARA metabolism in adult mice. Brain ARA incorporation coefficients k* and rates Jin were quantitatively imaged following intravenous [1-14C]ARA infusion of unanesthetized adult mice that had been injected daily with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg i.p.) or saline during postnatal days P4–P21. Expression of brain ARA metabolic enzymes and other relevant markers also was measured. On neuroimaging, k* and Jin was decreased widely in early fluoxetine- compared to saline-treated adult mice. Of the enzymes measured, cPLA2 activity was unchanged, while Ca2+-independent iPLA2 activity was increased. There was a significant 74% reduced protein level of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, which can convert ARA to 20-HETE. Reduced brain ARA metabolism in adult mice transiently exposed to postnatal fluoxetine, and a 74% reduction in CYP4A protein, suggest long-term effects independent of drug presence in brain ARA metabolism, and in CYP4A metabolites. Comparable changes in humans might contribute to reported altered behavior following early SSRI. PMID:24529827

  9. Long-Term Intermittent Hypoxia Elevates Cobalt Levels in the Brain and Injures White Matter in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, Sigrid C.; Lear, Jessica; Zhu, Yan; Grinspan, Judith B.; Hare, Dominic J.; Wang, SiHe; Bunch, Dustin; Doble, Philip A.; Robinson, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Exposure to the variable oxygenation patterns in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes oxidative stress within the brain. We hypothesized that this stress is associated with increased levels of redox-active metals and white matter injury. Design: Participants were randomly allocated to a control or experimental group (single independent variable). Setting: University animal house. Participants: Adult male C57BL/6J mice. Interventions: To model OSA, mice were exposed to long-term intermittent hypoxia (LTIH) for 10 hours/day for 8 weeks or sham intermittent hypoxia (SIH). Measurements and Results: Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to quantitatively map the distribution of the trace elements cobalt, copper, iron, and zinc in forebrain sections. Control mice contained 62 ± 7 ng cobalt/g wet weight, whereas LTIH mice contained 5600 ± 600 ng cobalt/g wet weight (P < 0.0001). Other elements were unchanged between conditions. Cobalt was concentrated within white matter regions of the brain, including the corpus callosum. Compared to that of control mice, the corpus callosum of LTIH mice had significantly more endoplasmic reticulum stress, fewer myelin-associated proteins, disorganized myelin sheaths, and more degenerated axon profiles. Because cobalt is an essential component of vitamin B12, serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels were measured. LTIH mice had low MMA levels (P < 0.0001), indicative of increased B12 activity. Conclusions: Long-term intermittent hypoxia increases brain cobalt, predominantly in the white matter. The increased cobalt is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, myelin loss, and axonal injury. Low plasma methylmalonic acid levels are associated with white matter injury in long-term intermittent hypoxia and possibly in obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Veasey SC; Lear J; Zhu Y; Grinspan JB; Hare DJ; Wang S; Bunch D; Doble PA; Robinson SR. Long-term intermittent hypoxia elevates cobalt

  10. Dido mutations trigger perinatal death and generate brain abnormalities and behavioral alterations in surviving adult mice.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Julio; Fütterer, Agnes; Trachana, Varvara; Gutiérrez del Burgo, Fernando; Martínez-A, Carlos

    2015-04-14

    Nearly all vertebrate cells have a single cilium protruding from their surface. This threadlike organelle, once considered vestigial, is now seen as a pivotal element for detection of extracellular signals that trigger crucial morphogenetic pathways. We recently proposed a role for Dido3, the main product of the death inducer-obliterator (dido) gene, in histone deacetylase 6 delivery to the primary cilium [Sánchez de Diego A, et al. (2014) Nat Commun 5:3500]. Here we used mice that express truncated forms of Dido proteins to determine the link with cilium-associated disorders. We describe dido mutant mice with high incidence of perinatal lethality and distinct neurodevelopmental, morphogenetic, and metabolic alterations. The anatomical abnormalities were related to brain and orofacial development, consistent with the known roles of primary cilia in brain patterning, hydrocephalus incidence, and cleft palate. Mutant mice that reached adulthood showed reduced life expectancy, brain malformations including hippocampus hypoplasia and agenesis of corpus callosum, as well as neuromuscular and behavioral alterations. These mice can be considered a model for the study of ciliopathies and provide information for assessing diagnosis and therapy of genetic disorders linked to the deregulation of primary cilia. PMID:25825751

  11. Dido mutations trigger perinatal death and generate brain abnormalities and behavioral alterations in surviving adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Julio; Fütterer, Agnes; Trachana, Varvara; Gutiérrez del Burgo, Fernando; Martínez-A, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all vertebrate cells have a single cilium protruding from their surface. This threadlike organelle, once considered vestigial, is now seen as a pivotal element for detection of extracellular signals that trigger crucial morphogenetic pathways. We recently proposed a role for Dido3, the main product of the death inducer-obliterator (dido) gene, in histone deacetylase 6 delivery to the primary cilium [Sánchez de Diego A, et al. (2014) Nat Commun 5:3500]. Here we used mice that express truncated forms of Dido proteins to determine the link with cilium-associated disorders. We describe dido mutant mice with high incidence of perinatal lethality and distinct neurodevelopmental, morphogenetic, and metabolic alterations. The anatomical abnormalities were related to brain and orofacial development, consistent with the known roles of primary cilia in brain patterning, hydrocephalus incidence, and cleft palate. Mutant mice that reached adulthood showed reduced life expectancy, brain malformations including hippocampus hypoplasia and agenesis of corpus callosum, as well as neuromuscular and behavioral alterations. These mice can be considered a model for the study of ciliopathies and provide information for assessing diagnosis and therapy of genetic disorders linked to the deregulation of primary cilia. PMID:25825751

  12. Early Exposure to Intermediate-Frequency Magnetic Fields Alters Brain Biomarkers without Histopathological Changes in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Recently we have reported that intermediate-frequency magnetic field (IF-MF) exposure transiently altered the mRNA expression levels of memory function-related genes in the hippocampi of adult male mice. However, the effects of IF-MF exposure during brain development on neurological biomarkers have not yet been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the effect of IF-MF exposure during development on neurological and immunological markers in the mouse hippocampus in 3- and 7-week-old male mice. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were exposed to IF-MF (21 kHz, 3.8 mT) for one hour per day from organogenesis period day 7 to 17. At adolescence, some IF-MF-exposed mice were further divided into exposure, recovery, and sham-exposure groups. The adolescent-exposure groups were exposed again to IF-MF from postnatal day 27 to 48. The expression of mRNA in the hippocampi was examined using a real-time RT-PCR method, and microglia activation was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression levels of NR1 and NR2B as well as transcription factors (CaMKIV, CREB1), inflammatory mediators (COX2, IL-1 β,TNF-α), and the oxidative stress marker heme-oxygenase (HO)-1 were significantly increased in the IF-MF-exposed mice, compared with the control group, in the 7-week-old mice, but not in the 3-week-old mice. Microglia activation was not different between the control and other groups. This study provides the first evidence that early exposure to IF-MF reversibly affects the NMDA receptor, its related signaling pathways, and inflammatory mediators in the hippocampus of young adult mice; these changes are transient and recover after termination of exposure without histopathological changes. PMID:25913185

  13. Early exposure to intermediate-frequency magnetic fields alters brain biomarkers without histopathological changes in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-04-01

    Recently we have reported that intermediate-frequency magnetic field (IF-MF) exposure transiently altered the mRNA expression levels of memory function-related genes in the hippocampi of adult male mice. However, the effects of IF-MF exposure during brain development on neurological biomarkers have not yet been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the effect of IF-MF exposure during development on neurological and immunological markers in the mouse hippocampus in 3- and 7-week-old male mice. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were exposed to IF-MF (21 kHz, 3.8 mT) for one hour per day from organogenesis period day 7 to 17. At adolescence, some IF-MF-exposed mice were further divided into exposure, recovery, and sham-exposure groups. The adolescent-exposure groups were exposed again to IF-MF from postnatal day 27 to 48. The expression of mRNA in the hippocampi was examined using a real-time RT-PCR method, and microglia activation was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression levels of NR1 and NR2B as well as transcription factors (CaMKIV, CREB1), inflammatory mediators (COX2, IL-1 b,TNF-α), and the oxidative stress marker heme-oxygenase (HO)-1 were significantly increased in the IF-MF-exposed mice, compared with the control group, in the 7-week-old mice, but not in the 3-week-old mice. Microglia activation was not different between the control and other groups. This study provides the first evidence that early exposure to IF-MF reversibly affects the NMDA receptor, its related signaling pathways, and inflammatory mediators in the hippocampus of young adult mice; these changes are transient and recover after termination of exposure without histopathological changes. PMID:25913185

  14. Behavioral disturbances in adult mice following neonatal virus infection or kynurenine treatment--role of brain kynurenic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Cong; Holtze, Maria; Powell, Susan B; Terrando, Niccolò; Larsson, Markus K; Persson, Anna; Olsson, Sara K; Orhan, Funda; Kegel, Magdalena; Asp, Linnea; Goiny, Michel; Schwieler, Lilly; Engberg, Göran; Karlsson, Håkan; Erhardt, Sophie

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to infections in early life is considered a risk-factor for developing schizophrenia. Recently we reported that a neonatal CNS infection with influenza A virus in mice resulted in a transient induction of the brain kynurenine pathway, and subsequent behavioral disturbances in immune-deficient adult mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential role in this regard of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous antagonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor and at the cholinergic α7 nicotinic receptor. C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with neurotropic influenza A/WSN/33 virus (2400 plaque-forming units) at postnatal day (P) 3 or with L-kynurenine (2×200 mg/kg/day) at P7-16. In mice neonatally treated with L-kynurenine prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle, anxiety, and learning and memory were also assessed. Neonatally infected mice showed enhanced sensitivity to D-amphetamine-induced (5 mg/kg i.p.) increase in locomotor activity as adults. Neonatally L-kynurenine treated mice showed enhanced sensitivity to D-amphetamine-induced (5 mg/kg i.p.) increase in locomotor activity as well as mild impairments in prepulse inhibition and memory. Also, D-amphetamine tended to potentiate dopamine release in the striatum in kynurenine-treated mice. These long-lasting behavioral and neurochemical alterations suggest that the kynurenine pathway can link early-life infection with the development of neuropsychiatric disturbances in adulthood. PMID:24140727

  15. Ultrastructural analysis of blood-brain barrier breakdown in the peri-infarct zone in young adult and aged mice.

    PubMed

    Nahirney, Patrick C; Reeson, Patrick; Brown, Craig E

    2016-02-01

    Following ischemia, the blood-brain barrier is compromised in the peri-infarct zone leading to secondary injury and dysfunction that can limit recovery. Currently, it is uncertain what structural changes could account for blood-brain barrier permeability, particularly with aging. Here we examined the ultrastructure of early and delayed changes (3 versus 72 h) to the blood-brain barrier in young adult and aged mice (3-4 versus 18 months) subjected to photothrombotic stroke. At both time points and ages, permeability was associated with a striking increase in endothelial caveolae and vacuoles. Tight junctions were generally intact although small spaces were detected in a few cases. In young mice, ischemia led to a significant increase in pericyte process area and vessel coverage whereas these changes were attenuated with aging. Stroke led to an expansion of the basement membrane region that peaked at 3 h and partially recovered by 72 h in both age groups. Astrocyte endfeet and their mitochondria were severely swollen at both times points and ages. Our results suggest that blood-brain barrier permeability in young and aged animals is mediated by transcellular pathways (caveolae/vacuoles), rather than tight junction loss. Further, our data indicate that the effects of ischemia on pericytes and basement membrane are affected by aging. PMID:26661190

  16. Alterations in Brain Inflammation, Synaptic Proteins, and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis during Epileptogenesis in Mice Lacking Synapsin2.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Deepti; Ali, Idrish; Bakochi, Anahita; Bahonjic, Elma; Etholm, Lars; Ekdahl, Christine T

    2015-01-01

    Synapsins are pre-synaptic vesicle-associated proteins linked to the pathogenesis of epilepsy through genetic association studies in humans. Deletion of synapsins causes an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance, exemplified by the epileptic phenotype of synapsin knockout mice. These mice develop handling-induced tonic-clonic seizures starting at the age of about 3 months. Hence, they provide an opportunity to study epileptogenic alterations in a temporally controlled manner. Here, we evaluated brain inflammation, synaptic protein expression, and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the epileptogenic (1 and 2 months of age) and tonic-clonic (3.5-4 months) phase of synapsin 2 knockout mice using immunohistochemical and biochemical assays. In the epileptogenic phase, region-specific microglial activation was evident, accompanied by an increase in the chemokine receptor CX3CR1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and a decrease in chemokine keratinocyte chemoattractant/ growth-related oncogene. Both post-synaptic density-95 and gephyrin, scaffolding proteins at excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively, showed a significant up-regulation primarily in the cortex. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the inhibitory adhesion molecules neuroligin-2 and neurofascin and potassium chloride co-transporter KCC2. Decreased expression of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-δ subunit and cholecystokinin was also evident. Surprisingly, hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced in the epileptogenic phase. Taken together, we report molecular alterations in brain inflammation and excitatory/inhibitory balance that could serve as potential targets for therapeutics and diagnostic biomarkers. In addition, the regional differences in brain inflammation and synaptic protein expression indicate an epileptogenic zone from where the generalized seizures in synapsin 2 knockout mice may be initiated or spread. PMID:26177381

  17. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner. PMID:27317840

  18. Litter Environment Affects Behavior and Brain Metabolic Activity of Adult Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Crews, David; Rushworth, David; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco; Ogawa, Sonoko

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, the formative environment for social and anxiety-related behaviors is the family unit; in the case of rodents, this is the litter and the mother-young bond. A deciding factor in this environment is the sex ratio of the litter and, in the case of mice lacking functional copies of gene(s), the ratio of the various genotypes in the litter. Both Sex and Genotype ratios of the litter affect the nature and quality of the individual's behavior later in adulthood, as well as metabolic activity in brain nuclei that underlie these behaviors. Mice were raised in litters reconstituted shortly after to birth to control for sex ratio and genotype ratio (wild type pups versus pups lacking a functional estrogen receptor α). In both males and females, the Sex and Genotype of siblings in the litter affected aggressive behaviors as well as patterns of metabolic activity in limbic nuclei in the social behavior network later in adulthood. Further, this pattern in males varied depending upon the Genotype of their brothers and sisters. Principal Components Analysis revealed two components comprised of several amygdalar and hypothalamic nuclei; the VMH showed strong correlations in both clusters, suggesting its pivotal nature in the organization of two neural networks. PMID:19707539

  19. Regional specific regulation of steroid receptor coactivator-1 immunoreactivity by orchidectomy in the brain of adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Bian, Chen; Zhang, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Yangang; Guo, Qiang; Cai, Wenqin; Zhang, Jiqiang

    2014-10-01

    Androgens including testosterone and dihydrotestosterone play important roles on brain structure and function, either directly through androgen receptor or indirectly through estrogen receptors, which need coactivators for their transcription activation. Steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) has been shown to be multifunctional potentials in the brain, but how it is regulated by androgens in the brain remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of orchidectomy (ORX) on the expression of SRC-1 in the adult male mice using nickel-intensified immunohistochemistry. The results showed that ORX induced dramatic decrease of SRC-1 immunoreactivity in the olfactory tubercle, piriform cortex, ventral pallidum, most parts of the septal area, hippocampus, substantia nigra (compact part), pontine nuclei and nucleus of the trapezoid body (p<0.01). Significant decrease of SRC-1 was noticed in the dorsal and lateral septal nucleus, medial preoptical area, dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and superior paraolivary nucleus (p<0.05). Whereas in other regions examined, levels of SRC-1 immunoreactivity were not obviously changed by ORX (p>0.05). The above results demonstrated ORX downregulation of SRC-1 in specific regions that have been involved in sense of smell, learning and memory, cognition, neuroendocrine, reproduction and motor control, indicating that SRC-1 play pivotal role in the mediating circulating androgenic regulation on these important brain functions. It also indicates that SRC-1 may serve as a novel target for the central disorders caused by the age-related decrease of circulating androgens. PMID:24945110

  20. Serotonin signaling in the brain of adult female mice is required for sexual preference

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shasha; Liu, Yan; Rao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    A role for serotonin in male sexual preference was recently uncovered by our finding that male mutant mice lacking serotonin have lost sexual preference. Here we show that female mouse mutants lacking either central serotonergic neurons or serotonin prefer female over male genital odors when given a choice, and displayed increased female–female mounting when presented either with a choice of a male and a female target or only with a female target. Pharmacological manipulations and genetic rescue experiments showed that serotonin is required in adults. Behavioral changes caused by deficient serotonergic signaling were not due to changes in plasma concentrations of sex hormones. We demonstrate that a genetic manipulation reverses sexual preference without involving sex hormones. Our results indicate that serotonin controls sexual preference. PMID:23716677

  1. Microglial Kv1.3 Channels and P2Y12 Receptors Differentially Regulate Cytokine and Chemokine Release from Brain Slices of Young Adult and Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue damage following stroke or traumatic brain injury is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes, while microglia play a central role in causing and regulating neuroinflammation via production of proinflammatory substances, including cytokines and chemokines. Here, we used brain slices, an established in situ brain injury model, from young adult and aged mice to investigate cytokine and chemokine production with particular focus on the role of microglia. Twenty four hours after slice preparation, higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. TNF-α and IL-6, and chemokines, i.e. CCL2 and CXCL1, were released from brain slices of aged mice than from slices of young adult mice. However, maximal microglial stimulation with LPS for 24 h did not reveal age-dependent differences in the amounts of released cytokines and chemokines. Mechanisms underlying microglial cytokine and chemokine production appear to be similar in young adult and aged mice. Inhibition of microglial Kv1.3 channels with margatoxin reduced release of IL-6, but not release of CCL2 and CXCL1. In contrast, blockade of microglial P2Y12 receptors with PSB0739 inhibited release of CCL2 and CXCL1, whereas release of IL-6 remained unaffected. Cytokine and chemokine production was not reduced by inhibitors of Kir2.1 K+ channels or adenosine receptors. In summary, our data suggest that brain tissue damage-induced production of cytokines and chemokines is age-dependent, and differentially regulated by microglial Kv1.3 channels and P2Y12 receptors. PMID:26011191

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha during neonatal brain development affects anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Babri, Shirin; Doosti, Mohammad-Hossein; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2014-03-15

    A nascent literature suggests that neonatal infection is a risk factor for the development of brain, behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which can affect anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in later life. It has been documented that neonatal infection raises the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in neonate rodents and such infections may result in neonatal brain injury, at least in part, through pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, previous studies have shown that TNF-α is involved in cellular differentiation, neurogenesis and programmed cell death during the development of the central nervous system. We investigated for the first time whether neonatal exposure to TNF-α can affect body weight, stress-induced corticosterone (COR), anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult mice. In the present study, neonatal mice were treated to recombinant mouse TNF-α (0.2, 0.4, 0.7 and 1 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal days 3 and 5, then adult male and female mice were exposed to different behavioral tests. The results indicated that neonatal TNF-α treatment reduced body weight in neonatal period in both sexes. In addition, this study presents findings indicating that high doses of TNF- increase stress-induced COR levels, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult males, but increase levels of anxiety without significantly influencing depression in adult female mice [corrected]. Our findings suggest that TNF-α exposure during neonatal period can alter brain and behavior development in a dose and sex-dependent manner in mice. PMID:24398264

  3. Helicobacter pylori Infection Induces Anemia, Depletes Serum Iron Storage, and Alters Local Iron-Related and Adult Brain Gene Expression in Male INS-GAS Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Monika; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Wang, Timothy C.; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Cunningham, Catriona; Ennis, Kathleen; Georgieff, Michael; Fox, James G.

    2015-01-01

    of Hp SS1-infected INS-GAS mice will be an appropriate animal model for further study of the effects of concurrent H. pylori infection and anemia on iron homeostasis and adult iron-dependent brain gene expression. PMID:26575645

  4. Rapid incorporation of docosahexaenoic acid from dietary sources into brain microsomal, synaptosomal and mitochondrial membranes in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Manabe, S; Wada, O; Crawford, M A

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the incorporation of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from several dietary sources into the brain tissue and intracellular organelles in mice which had been fed a 5% palm oil (low n-3 fatty acid level) diet for 8 or 11 weeks. The percentages of DHA in the tissues of mice fed 5% representative oils for 30 days or 5% purified n-3 fatty acid diets for 6 days were analyzed using gas chromatography. The percentage of DHA in the brain was ranked in the following order: the salmon oil diet group > the sardine oil diet group > > the perilla oil diet group > > the lard and palm oil diet groups for the 30 day feeding trial; and the DHA diet group > > the eicosapentaenoic acid and alpha-linolenic acid diet groups for the 6 day feeding trial. The percentage of arachidonic acid showed a more dramatic decrease than that of docosapentaenoic acid. These results reflected the plasma fatty acid concentrations, but were not as pronounced as the changes observed in the plasma. The majority of the DHA incorporated into the brain was recovered in microsomal, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions separated by density gradient centrifugation. These membrane fractions took up DHA within several days. These results suggest that the intake of DHA itself increases the DHA level of brain membranes more rapidly than intake of the precursors in animals fed a low n-3 fatty acid level diet. PMID:9285258

  5. Adult vitamin D deficiency leads to behavioural and brain neurochemical alterations in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Groves, Natalie J; Kesby, James P; Eyles, Darryl W; McGrath, John J; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Burne, Thomas H J

    2013-03-15

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that low levels of vitamin D may predispose people to develop depression and cognitive impairment. While rodent studies have demonstrated that prenatal vitamin D deficiency is associated with altered brain development, there is a lack of research examining adult vitamin D (AVD) deficiency. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of AVD deficiency on behaviour and brain function in the mouse. Ten-week old male C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice were fed a control or vitamin D deficient diet for 10 weeks prior to, and during behavioural testing. We assessed a broad range of behavioural domains, excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in brain tissue, and, in separate groups of mice, locomotor response to d-amphetamine and MK-801. Overall, AVD deficiency resulted in hyperlocomotion in a novel open field and reduced GAD65/67 levels in brain tissue. AVD-deficient BALB/c mice had altered behaviour on the elevated plus maze, altered responses to heat, sound and shock, and decreased levels of glutamate and glutamine, and increased levels of GABA and glycine. By contrast C57BL/6J mice had a more subtle phenotype with no further behavioural changes but significant elevations in serine, homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. Although the behavioural phenotype of AVD did not seem to model a specific disorder, the overall reduction in GAD65/67 levels associated with AVD deficiency may be relevant to a number of neuropsychiatric conditions. This is the first study to show an association between AVD deficiency and prominent changes in behaviour and brain neurochemistry in the mouse. PMID:23238039

  6. Polycythemia and high levels of erythropoietin in blood and brain blunt the hypercapnic ventilatory response in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Menuet, Clément; Khemiri, Hanan; de la Poëze d'Harambure, Théodora; Gestreau, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Changes in arterial Po2, Pco2, and pH are the strongest stimuli sensed by peripheral and central chemoreceptors to adjust ventilation to the metabolic demand. Erythropoietin (Epo), the main regulator of red blood cell production, increases the hypoxic ventilatory response, an effect attributed to the presence of Epo receptors in both carotid bodies and key brainstem structures involved in integration of peripheral inputs and control of breathing. However, it is not known whether Epo also has an effect on the hypercapnic chemoreflex. In a first attempt to answer this question, we tested the hypothesis that Epo alters the ventilatory response to increased CO2 levels. Basal ventilation and hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) were recorded from control mice and from two transgenic mouse lines constitutively expressing high levels of human Epo in brain only (Tg21) or in brain and plasma (Tg6), the latter leading to polycythemia. To tease apart the potential effects of polycythemia and levels of plasma Epo in the HCVR, control animals were injected with an Epo analog (Aranesp), and Tg6 mice were treated with the hemolytic agent phenylhydrazine after splenectomy. Ventilatory parameters measured by plethysmography in conscious mice were consistent with data from electrophysiological recordings in anesthetized animals and revealed a blunted HCVR in Tg6 mice. Polycythemia alone and increased levels of plasma Epo blunt the HCVR. In addition, Tg21 mice with an augmented level of cerebral Epo also had a decreased HCVR. We discuss the potential implications of these findings in several physiopathological conditions. PMID:26936784

  7. Effects of increased iron intake during the neonatal period on the brain of adult AbetaPP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Liana Lisboa; Carmona, Marga; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Naudi, Alba; Pamplona, Reinald; Schröder, Nadja; Ferrer, Isidro

    2010-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate neuropathological changes in AbetaPP/PS1 transgenic mice (Tg), as a model of Alzheimer's disease, subjected to supplementary iron administration in a critical postnatal period, in order to reveal the interaction of genetic and environmental risk factors in the pathogenesis of the disease. Twelve Tg and 10 wild-type (Wt) littermates were administered iron between the 12th and 14th post-natal days (TgFe, WtFe); 11 Tg and 15 Wt received vehicle (sorbitol 5%) alone in the same period (TgSb, WtSb). Mice were killed at the age of six months and processed for morphological and biochemical studies. No modifications in amyloid-beta burden were seen in iron-treated and non-iron-treated AbetaPP/PS1 mice. No differences in microglial reactions were observed when comparing the four groups of mice. Yet increased astrocytosis, as revealed by densitometry of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes, and increased expression levels of GFAP, as revealed by gel electrophoresis and western blotting, were found in iron-treated mice (both Tg and Wt) when compared with TgSb and WtSb. This was accompanied by significant changes in brain fatty acid composition in AbetaPP/PS1 mice that led to a lower membrane peroxidizability index and to reduced protein oxidative damage, as revealed by reduced percentages of the oxidative stress markers: glutamic semialdehyde, aminoadipic semialdehyde, Nepsilon-carboxymethyl-lysine, Nepsilon-carboxyethyl-lysine, and Nepsilon-malondialdehyde-lysine. These findings demonstrate that transient dietary iron supplementation during the neonatal period is associated with cellular and metabolic imprinting in the brain in adult life, but it does not interfere with the appearance of amyloid plaques in AbetaPP/PS1 transgenic mice. PMID:20157260

  8. Restricted ketogenic diet enhances the therapeutic action of N-butyldeoxynojirimycin towards brain GM2 accumulation in adult Sandhoff disease mice.

    PubMed

    Denny, Christine A; Heinecke, Karie A; Kim, Youngho P; Baek, Rena C; Loh, Katrina S; Butters, Terry D; Bronson, Roderick T; Platt, Frances M; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2010-06-01

    Sandhoff disease is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative disease involving the storage of brain ganglioside GM2 and asialo-GM2. Previous studies showed that caloric restriction, which augments longevity, and N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ, Miglustat), an imino sugar that hinders the glucosyltransferase catalyzing the first step in glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, both increase longevity and improve motor behavior in the beta-hexosaminidase (Hexb) knockout (-/-) murine model of Sandhoff disease. In this study, we used a restricted ketogenic diet (KD-R) and NB-DNJ to combat ganglioside accumulation. Adult Hexb-/- mice were placed into one of the following groups: (i) a standard diet (SD), (ii) a SD with NB-DNJ (SD + NB-DNJ), (iii) a KD-R, and (iv) a KD-R with NB-DNJ (KD-R + NB-DNJ). Forebrain GM2 content (mug sialic acid/100 mg dry wt) in the four groups was 375 +/- 15, 312 +/- 8, 340 +/- 28, and 279 +/- 26, respectively, indicating an additive interaction between NB-DNJ and the KD-R. Most interestingly, brain NB-DNJ content was 3.5-fold greater in the KD-R + NB-DNJ mice than in the SD + NB-DNJ mice. These data suggest that the KD-R and NB-DNJ may be a potential combinatorial therapy for Sandhoff disease by enhancing NB-DNJ delivery to the brain and may allow lower dosing to achieve the same degree of efficacy as high dose monotherapy. PMID:20374428

  9. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channel activity in brain cells of adult offspring mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Juan A.; Busso, Dolores; Ramírez, Gigliola; Campos, Marlys; Rigotti, Attilio; Eugenín, Jaime; von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine, the most important neuroteratogen of tobacco smoke, can reproduce brain and cognitive disturbances per se when administered prenatally. However, it is still unknown if paracrine signaling among brain cells participates in prenatal nicotine-induced brain impairment of adult offspring. Paracrine signaling is partly mediated by unopposed channels formed by connexins hemichannels (HCs) and pannexins serving as aqueous pores permeable to ions and small signaling molecules, allowing exchange between the intra- and extracellular milieus. Our aim was to address whether prenatal nicotine exposure changes the activity of those channels in adult mice offspring under control conditions or subjected to a second challenge during young ages: high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet. To induce prenatal exposure to nicotine, osmotic minipumps were implanted in CF1 pregnant mice at gestational day 5 to deliver nicotine bitartrate or saline (control) solutions. After weaning, offspring of nicotine-treated or untreated pregnant mice were fed ad libitum with chow or HFC diets for 8 weeks. The functional state of connexin 43 (Cx43) and pannexin 1 (Panx1) unopposed channels was evaluated by dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices from 11-week-old mice. We found that prenatal nicotine increased the opening of Cx43 HCs in astrocytes, and Panx1 channels in microglia and neurons only if offspring mice were fed with HFC diet. Blockade of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E receptor 1 (EP1), ionotropic ATP receptor type 7 (P2X7) and NMDA receptors, showed differential inhibition of prenatal nicotine-induced channel opening in glial cells and neurons. Importantly, inhibition of the above mentioned enzymes and receptors, or blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channels greatly reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glutamate release from hippocampal slices of prenatally nicotine-exposed offspring. We propose that unregulated gliotransmitter

  10. Greater neurobehavioral deficits occur in adult mice after repeated, as compared to single, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    PubMed

    Nichols, Jessica N; Deshane, Alok S; Niedzielko, Tracy L; Smith, Cory D; Floyd, Candace L

    2016-02-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for the majority of all brain injuries and affected individuals typically experience some extent of cognitive and/or neuropsychiatric deficits. Given that repeated mTBIs often result in worsened prognosis, the cumulative effect of repeated mTBIs is an area of clinical concern and on-going pre-clinical research. Animal models are critical in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of single and repeated mTBI-associated deficits, but the neurobehavioral sequelae produced by these models have not been well characterized. Thus, we sought to evaluate the behavioral changes incurred after single and repeated mTBIs in mice utilizing a modified impact-acceleration model. Mice in the mTBI group received 1 impact while the repeated mTBI group received 3 impacts with an inter-injury interval of 24h. Classic behavior evaluations included the Morris water maze (MWM) to assess learning and memory, elevated plus maze (EPM) for anxiety, and forced swim test (FST) for depression/helplessness. Additionally, species-typical behaviors were evaluated with the marble-burying and nestlet shredding tests to determine motivation and apathy. Non-invasive vibration platforms were used to examine sleep patterns post-mTBI. We found that the repeated mTBI mice demonstrated deficits in MWM testing and poorer performance on species-typical behaviors. While neither single nor repeated mTBI affected behavior in the EPM or FST, sleep disturbances were observed after both single and repeated mTBI. Here, we conclude that behavioral alterations shown after repeated mTBI resemble several of the deficits or disturbances reported by patients, thus demonstrating the relevance of this murine model to study repeated mTBIs. PMID:26542813

  11. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  12. New Hippocampal Neurons Are Not Obligatory for Memory Formation; Cyclin D2 Knockout Mice with No Adult Brain Neurogenesis Show Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaholkowski, Piotr; Kiryk, Anna; Jedynak, Paulina; Abdallah, Nada M. Ben; Knapska, Ewelina; Kowalczyk, Anna; Piechal, Agnieszka; Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Figiel, Izabela; Lioudyno, Victoria; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Filipkowski, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    The role of adult brain neurogenesis (generating new neurons) in learning and memory appears to be quite firmly established in spite of some criticism and lack of understanding of what the new neurons serve the brain for. Also, the few experiments showing that blocking adult neurogenesis causes learning deficits used irradiation and various drugs…

  13. Strain dependent effects of conditioned fear in adult C57Bl/6 and Balb/C mice following postnatal exposure to chlorpyrifos: relation to expression of brain acetylcholinesterase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Oriel, Sarit; Kofman, Ora

    2015-01-01

    Following reports of emotional psychopathology in children and adults exposed to organophosphates, the effects of postnatal chlorpyrifos (CPF) on fear-conditioning and depression-like behaviors were tested in adult mice. Concomitant changes in expression of mRNA for synaptic and soluble splice variants of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were examined in mouse pups and adults of the Balb/C and C57Bl/6 (B6) strains, which differ in their behavioral and hormonal stress response. Mice were injected subcutaneously with 1 mg/kg CPF on postnatal days 4–10 and tested as adults for conditioned fear, sucrose preference, and forced swim. Acetylcholinesterase activity was assessed in the brains of pups on the first and last day of treatment. Expression of soluble and synaptic AChE mRNA was assessed in brains of treated pups and fear-conditioned adults using real-time PCR. Adult Balb/C mice exposed postnatally to CPF showed exacerbated fear-conditioning and impaired active avoidance. Adult B6 mice exposed postnatally to CPF showed a more specific fear response to tones and less freezing in the inter-tone intervals, in contrast to the vehicle-pretreated mice. Chlorpyrifos also attenuated sweet preference and enhanced climbing in the forced swim test. Chlorpyrifos-treated mice had increased expression of both synaptic and readthrough AChE transcripts in the hippocampus of Balb/C mice and decreased expression in the amygdala following fear-conditioning. In conclusion, postnatal CPF had long-term effects on fear and depression, as well as on expression of AChE mRNA. These changes may be related to alteration in the interaction between hippocampus and amygdala in regulating negative emotions. PMID:25972795

  14. Correction of Neurological Disease of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB in Adult Mice by rAAV9 Trans-Blood–Brain Barrier Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiyan; DiRosario, Julianne; Killedar, Smruti; Zaraspe, Kimberly; McCarty, Douglas M

    2011-01-01

    The greatest challenge in developing therapies for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is to achieve efficient central nervous system (CNS) delivery across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we used the novel ability of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) to cross the BBB from the vasculature to achieve long-term global CNS, and widespread somatic restoration of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. A single intravenous (IV) injection of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU, without extraneous treatment to disrupt the BBB, restored NAGLU activity to normal or above normal levels in adult MPS IIIB mice, leading to the correction of lysosomal storage pathology in the CNS and periphery, and correction of astrocytosis and neurodegeneration. The IV delivered rAAV9 vector also transduced abundant neurons in the myenteric and submucosal plexus, suggesting peripheral nervous system (PNS) targeting. While CNS entry did not depend on osmotic disruption of the BBB, it was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with an IV infusion of mannitol. Most important, we demonstrate that a single systemic rAAV9-NAGLU gene delivery provides long-term (>18 months) neurological benefits in MPS IIIB mice, resulting in significant improvement in behavioral performance, and extension of survival. These data suggest promising clinical potential using the trans-BBB neurotropic rAAV9 vector for treating MPS IIIB and other neurogenetic diseases. PMID:21386820

  15. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes adult neurogenesis in the brains of Alzheimer's disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yufang; Ma, Tuo; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang; Zhang, Xiufang; Gong, Yandao

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we transplanted adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the hippocampi of APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the number of newly generated (BrdU+) cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus was significantly higher in Alzheimer's disease mice after adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, and there was also a significant increase in the number of BrdU+/DCX+ neuroblasts in these animals. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation enhanced neurogenic activity in the subventricular zone as well. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduced oxidative stress and alleviated cognitive impairment in the mice. Based on these findings, we propose that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation enhances endogenous neurogenesis in both the subgranular and subventricular zones in APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice, thereby facilitating functional recovery. PMID:25206892

  16. Lead induces similar gene expression changes in brains of gestationally exposed adult mice and in neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, Francisco Javier; Fan, Yunxia; Lindquist, Diana M; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental toxicants during embryonic life causes changes in the expression of developmental genes that may last for a lifetime and adversely affect the exposed individual. Developmental exposure to lead (Pb), an ubiquitous environmental contaminant, causes deficits in cognitive functions and IQ, behavioral effects, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Long-term effects observed after early life exposure to Pb include reduction of gray matter, alteration of myelin structure, and increment of criminal behavior in adults. Despite growing research interest, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the effects of lead in the central nervous system are still largely unknown. To study the molecular changes due to Pb exposure during neurodevelopment, we exposed mice to Pb in utero and examined the expression of neural markers, neurotrophins, transcription factors and glutamate-related genes in hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus at postnatal day 60. We found that hippocampus was the area where gene expression changes due to Pb exposure were more pronounced. To recapitulate gestational Pb exposure in vitro, we differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) into neurons and treated ESC-derived neurons with Pb for the length of the differentiation process. These neurons expressed the characteristic neuronal markers Tubb3, Syp, Gap43, Hud, Ngn1, Vglut1 (a marker of glutamatergic neurons), and all the glutamate receptor subunits, but not the glial marker Gafp. Importantly, several of the changes observed in Pb-exposed mouse brains in vivo were also observed in Pb-treated ESC-derived neurons, including those affecting expression of Ngn1, Bdnf exon IV, Grin1, Grin2D, Grik5, Gria4, and Grm6. We conclude that our ESC-derived model of toxicant exposure during neural differentiation promises to be a useful model to analyze mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by Pb and other environmental agents. PMID:24260418

  17. Lead Induces Similar Gene Expression Changes in Brains of Gestationally Exposed Adult Mice and in Neurons Differentiated from Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martín, Francisco Javier; Fan, Yunxia; Lindquist, Diana M.; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental toxicants during embryonic life causes changes in the expression of developmental genes that may last for a lifetime and adversely affect the exposed individual. Developmental exposure to lead (Pb), an ubiquitous environmental contaminant, causes deficits in cognitive functions and IQ, behavioral effects, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Long-term effects observed after early life exposure to Pb include reduction of gray matter, alteration of myelin structure, and increment of criminal behavior in adults. Despite growing research interest, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the effects of lead in the central nervous system are still largely unknown. To study the molecular changes due to Pb exposure during neurodevelopment, we exposed mice to Pb in utero and examined the expression of neural markers, neurotrophins, transcription factors and glutamate-related genes in hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus at postnatal day 60. We found that hippocampus was the area where gene expression changes due to Pb exposure were more pronounced. To recapitulate gestational Pb exposure in vitro, we differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) into neurons and treated ESC-derived neurons with Pb for the length of the differentiation process. These neurons expressed the characteristic neuronal markers Tubb3, Syp, Gap43, Hud, Ngn1, Vglut1 (a marker of glutamatergic neurons), and all the glutamate receptor subunits, but not the glial marker Gafp. Importantly, several of the changes observed in Pb-exposed mouse brains in vivo were also observed in Pb-treated ESC-derived neurons, including those affecting expression of Ngn1, Bdnf exon IV, Grin1, Grin2D, Grik5, Gria4, and Grm6. We conclude that our ESC-derived model of toxicant exposure during neural differentiation promises to be a useful model to analyze mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by Pb and other environmental agents. PMID:24260418

  18. Effect of the long-term feeding of dietary lipids on the learning ability, fatty acid composition of brain stem phospholipids and synaptic membrane fluidity in adult mice: a comparison of sardine oil diet with palm oil diet.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Park, S J; Tamura, M; Ando, S

    1998-03-16

    The effect of 12 month feeding of 5% palm oil or sardine oil diet on the maze-learning ability, fatty acid composition of brain stem phospholipids and synaptic membrane fluidity in mice was studied. The time required to reach the maze exit and the number of times that a mouse strayed into blind alleys in the maze were measured three times every 4 days. The time and number of mice fed on the sardine oil diet were less than those of animals fed on the palm oil diet in the first and second trials. The results of fatty acid composition analysis of brain stem phosphatidylethanolamine showed that the percentage of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6, n-3; DHA) was higher, but the arachidonic acid (20:4, n-6; AA) and docosatetraenoic acid (22:4, n-6; DTA) were lower in the sardine oil diet fed-mice than in the palm oil diet fed-animals. Moreover, the microviscosity of the synaptic plasma membrane in the sardine oil diet group was lower than that in the palm oil diet group. These results suggest that the adult mice fed on the sardine oil diet for a long period maintain higher levels of docosahe xaenoic acid in brain phospholipids, synaptic membrane fluidity and maze-learning ability than animals fed on the palm oil diet. PMID:9593318

  19. Brain cholecystokinin and nutritional status in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, B S; Monahan, J W; Hirsch, J

    1979-01-01

    Under certain conditions, exogenously administered cholecystokinin (CCK) or its COOH-terminal octapeptide can terminate feeding and cause behavioral satiety in animals. Furthermore, high concentrations of CCK are normally found in the brains of vertebrate species. It has thus been hypothesized that brain CCK plays a role in the control of appetite. To explore this possibility, a COOH-terminal radioimmunoassay was used to measure concentrations of CCK in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem of rats and mice after a variety of nutritional manipulations. CCK, mainly in the form of its COOH-terminal octapeptide, was found to appear in rat brain shortly before birth and to increase rapidly in cortex and brain stem throughout the first 5 wk of life. Severe early undernutrition had no effect on the normal pattern of CCK development in rat brain. Adult rats deprived of food for up to 72 h and rats made hyperphagic with highly palatable diets showed no alterations in brain CCK concentrations or distribution of molecular forms of CCK as determined by Sephadex gel filtration of brain extracts. Normal CCK concentrations were also found in the brains of four strains of genetically obese rodents and in the brains of six animals made hyperphagic and obese by surgical or chemical lesioning of the ventromedial hypothalamus. It is concluded that despite extreme variations in the nutritional status of rats and mice, CCK concentrations in major structures of the brain are maintained with remarkable constancy. PMID:500815

  20. Fetal brain 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 selectively determines programming of adult depressive-like behaviors and cognitive function, but not anxiety behaviors in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin; Keith, Marianne; Noble, June; Stevenson, Paula L.; Bombail, Vincent; Crombie, Sandra; Evans, Louise C.; Bailey, Matthew A.; Wood, Emma; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Holmes, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stress or elevated glucocorticoids during sensitive windows of fetal development increase the risk of neuropsychiatric disorders in adult rodents and humans, a phenomenon known as glucocorticoid programming. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), which catalyses rapid inactivation of glucocorticoids in the placenta, controls access of maternal glucocorticoids to the fetal compartment, placing it in a key position to modulate glucocorticoid programming of behavior. However, the importance of the high expression of 11β-HSD2 within the midgestational fetal brain is unknown. To examine this, a brain-specific knockout of 11β-HSD2 (HSD2BKO) was generated and compared to wild-type littermates. HSD2BKO have markedly diminished fetal brain 11β-HSD2, but intact fetal body and placental 11β-HSD2 and normal fetal and placental growth. Despite normal fetal plasma corticosterone, HSD2BKO exhibit elevated fetal brain corticosterone levels at midgestation. As adults, HSD2BKO show depressive-like behavior and have cognitive impairments. However, unlike complete feto-placental deficiency, HSD2BKO show no anxiety-like behavioral deficits. The clear mechanistic separation of the programmed components of depression and cognition from anxiety implies distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis, affording potential opportunities for stratified interventions. PMID:26036451

  1. Zika Kills Vital Nervous System Cells in Adult Mice, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160505.html Zika Kills Vital Nervous System Cells in Adult Mice, ... 2016 THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus kills neural stem cells in the brains ...

  2. Visceral adipose tissue inflammation is associated with age-related brain changes and ischemic brain damage in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin A; Jeong, Sae Im; Kim, Minsuk; Yoon, Joo Chun; Kim, Hee-Sun; Park, Eun-Mi

    2015-11-01

    Visceral adipose tissue is accumulated with aging. An increase in visceral fat accompanied by low-grade inflammation is associated with several adult-onset diseases. However, the effects of visceral adipose tissue inflammation on the normal and ischemic brains of aged are not clearly defined. To examine the role of visceral adipose tissue inflammation, we evaluated inflammatory cytokines in the serum, visceral adipose tissue, and brain as well as blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in aged male mice (20 months) underwent sham or visceral fat removal surgery compared with the young mice (2.5 months). Additionally, ischemic brain injury was compared in young and aged mice with sham and visceral fat removal surgery. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in examined organs were increased in aged mice compared with the young mice, and these levels were reduced in the mice with visceral fat removal. Increased BBB permeability with reduced expression of tight junction proteins in aged sham mice were also decreased in mice with visceral fat removal. After focal ischemic injury, aged mice with visceral fat removal showed a reduction in infarct volumes, BBB permeability, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the ischemic brain compared with sham mice, although the neurological outcomes were not significantly improved. In addition, further upregulated visceral adipose tissue inflammation in response to ischemic brain injury was attenuated in mice with visceral fat removal. These results suggest that visceral adipose tissue inflammation is associated with age-related changes in the brain and contributes to the ischemic brain damage in the aged mice. We suggest that visceral adiposity should be considered as a factor affecting brain health and ischemic brain damage in the aged population. PMID:26184082

  3. Experimental evidence that overexpression of NR2B glutamate receptor subunit is associated with brain vacuolation in adult glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient mice: A potential role for glutamatergic-induced excitotoxicity in GA I neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Seminotti, Bianca; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Goodman, Stephen Irwin; Woontner, Michael; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Wajner, Moacir

    2015-12-15

    Glutaric aciduria type I (GA I) is biochemically characterized by accumulation of glutaric and 3-hydroxyglutaric acids in body fluids and tissues, particularly in the brain. Affected patients show progressive cortical leukoencephalopathy and chronic degeneration of the basal ganglia whose pathogenesis is still unclear. In the present work we investigated parameters of bioenergetics and redox homeostasis in various cerebral structures (cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus) and heart of adult wild type (Gcdh(+/+)) and glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient knockout (Gcdh(-/-)) mice fed a baseline chow. Oxidative stress parameters were also measured after acute lysine overload. Finally, mRNA expression of NMDA subunits and GLT1 transporter was determined in cerebral cortex and striatum of these animals fed a baseline or high lysine (4.7%) chow. No significant alterations of bioenergetics or redox status were observed in these mice. In contrast, mRNA expression of the NR2B glutamate receptor subunit and of the GLT1 glutamate transporter was higher in cerebral cortex of Gcdh(-/-) mice. Furthermore, NR2B expression was markedly elevated in striatum of Gcdh(-/-) animals receiving chronic Lys overload. These data indicate higher susceptibility of Gcdh(-/-) mice to excitotoxic damage, implying that this pathomechanism may contribute to the cortical and striatum alterations observed in GA I patients. PMID:26671102

  4. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of SVHRP

  5. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide (SVHRP) Enhances Neurogenesis and Neurite Outgrowth of Immature Neurons in Adult Mice by Up-Regulating Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2’-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU- positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of

  6. Epileptogenesis after traumatic brain injury in Plau-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Rantala, Jukka; Puhakka, Noora; Andrade, Pedro; Pitkänen, Asla

    2015-10-01

    Several components of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-interactome, including uPAR and its ligand sushi-repeat protein 2, X-linked (SRPX2), are linked to susceptibility to epileptogenesis in animal models and/or humans. Recent evidence indicates that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), a uPAR ligand with focal proteinase activity in the extracellular matrix, contributes to recovery-enhancing brain plasticity after various epileptogenic insults such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) and status epilepticus. Here, we examined whether deficiency of the uPA-encoding gene Plau augments epileptogenesis after TBI. Traumatic brain injury was induced by controlled cortical impact in the somatosensory cortex of adult male wild-type and Plau-deficient mice. Development of epilepsy and seizure susceptibility were assessed with a 3-week continuous video-electroencephalography monitoring and a pentylenetetrazol test, respectively. Traumatic brain injury-induced cortical or hippocampal pathology did not differ between genotypes. The pentylenetetrazol test revealed increased seizure susceptibility after TBI (p<0.05) in injured mice. Epileptogenesis was not exacerbated, however, in Plau-deficient mice. Taken together, Plau deficiency did not worsen controlled cortical impact-induced brain pathology or epileptogenesis caused by TBI when assessed at chronic timepoints. These data expand previous observations on Plau deficiency in models of status epilepticus and suggest that inhibition of focal extracellular proteinase activity resulting from uPA-uPAR interactions does not modify epileptogenesis after TBI. PMID:26253597

  7. Assessment of adult neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yung-Wei; Wang, Wenbin; Xia, Zhengui

    2013-05-01

    Adult neurogenesis is a lifelong developmental process that occurs in two discrete regions in the adult mammalian brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ) along the lateral ventricles. Despite immense interest in the therapeutic potential of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) residing along these two neurogenic regions, molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating this process are not fully defined. Defining the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the genesis of new neurons in the adult brain is integral to understanding the basic biology of aNSCs. The techniques described here provide a basic blueprint to isolate, culture, and perform experiments using aNSCs in vitro as well as providing methods to perform immunohistochemistry on brain sections. Curr. Protoc. Toxicol. 56:12.20.1-12.20.16. © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:23670864

  8. Attenuation of microglial activation with minocycline is not associated with changes in neurogenesis after focal traumatic brain injury in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ng, Si Yun; Semple, Bridgette D; Morganti-Kossmann, M Cristina; Bye, Nicole

    2012-05-01

    Neurogenesis is stimulated following injury to the adult brain and could potentially contribute to tissue repair. However, evidence suggests that microglia activated in response to injury are detrimental to the survival of new neurons, thus limiting the neurogenic response. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the anti-inflammatory drug minocycline on neurogenesis and functional recovery after a closed head injury model of focal traumatic brain injury (TBI). Beginning 30 min after trauma, minocycline was administered for up to 2 weeks and bromodeoxyuridine was given on days 1-4 to label proliferating cells. Neurological outcome and motor function were evaluated over 6 weeks using the Neurological Severity Score (NSS) and ledged beam task. Microglial activation was assessed in the pericontusional cortex and hippocampus at 1 week post-trauma, using immunohistochemistry to detect F4/80. Following immunolabeling of bromodeoxyuridine, double-cortin, and NeuN, cells undergoing distinct stages of neurogenesis, including proliferation, neuronal differentiation, neuroblast migration, and long-term survival, were quantified at 1 and 6 weeks in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, as well as in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the pericontusional cortex. Our results show that minocycline successfully reduced microglial activation and promoted early neurological recovery that was sustained over 6 weeks. We also show for the first time in the closed head injury model, that early stages of neurogenesis were stimulated in the hippocampus and subventricular zone; however, no increase in new mature neurons occurred. Contrary to our hypothesis, despite the attenuation of activated microglia, minocycline did not support neurogenesis in the hippocampus, lateral ventricles, or pericontusional cortex, with none of the neurogenic stages being affected by treatment. These data provide evidence that a general suppression of microglial activation is

  9. Organotypic vibrosections from whole brain adult Alzheimer mice (overexpressing amyloid-precursor-protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations) as a model to study clearance of beta-amyloid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a severe neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, pathologically characterized by extracellular beta-amyloid plaques, intraneuronal Tau inclusions, inflammation, reactive glial cells, vascular pathology and neuronal cell death. The degradation and clearance of beta-amyloid plaques is an interesting therapeutic approach, and the proteases neprilysin (NEP), insulysin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are of particular interest. The aim of this project was to establish and characterize a simple in vitro model to study the degrading effects of these proteases. Organoytpic brain vibrosections (120 μm thick) were sectioned from adult (9 month old) wildtype and transgenic mice (expressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) harboring the Swedish K670N/M671L, Dutch E693Q, and Iowa D694N mutations; APP_SDI) and cultured for 2 weeks. Plaques were stained by immunohistochemistry for beta-amyloid and Thioflavin S. Our data show that plaques were evident in 2 week old cultures from 9 month old transgenic mice. These plaques were surrounded by reactive GFAP+ astroglia and Iba1+ microglia. Incubation of fresh slices for 2 weeks with 1–0.1–0.01 μg/ml of NEP, insulysin, MMP-2, or MMP-9 showed that NEP, insulysin, and MMP-9 markedly degraded beta-amyloid plaques but only at the highest concentration. Our data provide for the first time a potent and powerful living brain vibrosection model containing a high number of plaques, which allows to rapidly and simply study the degradation and clearance of beta-amyloid plaques in vitro. PMID:25914642

  10. Visualization and genetic manipulation of adult neurogenesis using transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Jagroop; Lagace, Diane C

    2011-03-01

    Many laboratories have focused efforts on the creation of transgenic mouse models to study adult neurogenesis. In the last decade several constitutive reporter, as well as inducible transgenic lines have been published that allowed for visualization, tracking and alteration of specific neurogenic cell populations in the adult brain. Given the popularity of this approach, multiple mouse lines are available, and this review summarizes the differences in the basic techniques that have been used to create these mice, highlighting the different constructs and reporter proteins used, as well as the strengths and limitations of each of these models. Representative examples from the literature demonstrate some of the diverse and seminal findings that have come to fruition through the laborious, yet highly rewarding work of creating transgenic mouse lines for adult neurogenesis research. PMID:21395845

  11. Human brain disease recreated in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.

    1990-12-14

    In the early 1980s, neurologist Stanley Prusiner suggested that scrapie, an apparently infectious degenerative brain disease of sheep, could be transmitted by prions, infectious particles made just of protein - and containing no nucleic acids. But prion research has come a long way since then. In 1985, the cloning of the gene encoding the prion protein proved that it does in fact exist. And the gene turned out to be widely expressed in the brains of higher organisms, a result suggesting that the prion protein has a normal brain function that can somehow be subverted, leading to brain degeneration. Then studies done during the past 2 years suggested that specific mutations in the prion gene might cause two similar human brain diseases, Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Creutzfelt-Jakob disease. Now, Prusiner's group at the University of California, San Francisco, has used genetic engineering techniques to recreate GSS by transplanting the mutated prion gene into mice. Not only will the animal model help neurobiologists answer the many remaining questions about prions and how they work, but it may also shed some light on other neurodegenerative diseases as well.

  12. TET1 contributes to neurogenesis onset time during fetal brain development in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyerim; Jang, Woo Young; Kang, Min-Cheol; Jeong, Jain; Choi, Minjee; Sung, Yonghun; Park, Song; Kwon, Wookbong; Jang, Soyoung; Kim, Myoung Ok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2016-03-18

    Epigenetic mechanisms are relevant to development and contribute to fetal neurogenesis. DNA methylation and demethylation contribute to neural gene expression during mouse brain development. Ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) regulates DNA demethylation by converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). TET1 specifically regulates 5hmC in the central nervous system (CNS), including during neurogenesis in the adult brain. However little is known about its function in fetal neurogenesis. In order to evaluate the role of TET1 in fetal brain development, we generated TET1-overexpressing transgenic (TG) mice. TET1 overexpression was confirmed in the brains of fetal mice, and we detected 5hmC overexpression in the TG brains compared to that in the wild type (WT) brains, using a dot-blot assay. In order to observe the role of TET1 in fetal brain development, we examined fetal brain samples at varied time points by using real-time PCR, Western blotting, and Immunofluorescence (IF). We confirmed that TET1 contributes to neurogenesis by upregulating the protein expressions of neuronal markers in the TG mouse brains, as determined by Western blotting. However the cortex structure or brain mass between WT and TG mice showed no significant difference by IF. In conclusion, TET1 makes the start time of neurogenesis earlier in the TG brains compared to that in the WT brains during fetal brain development. PMID:26902115

  13. Neural repair in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury to the adult brain often results in substantial loss of neural tissue and subsequent permanent functional impairment. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been developed to harness the regenerative potential of neural stem cells and the existing fate plasticity of neural cells in the nervous system to prevent tissue loss or to enhance structural and functional regeneration upon injury. Here, we review recent advances of stem cell-associated neural repair in the adult brain, discuss current challenges and limitations, and suggest potential directions to foster the translation of experimental stem cell therapies into the clinic. PMID:26918167

  14. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kesby, James P.; Kim, Jane J.; Scadeng, Miriam; Woods, Gina; Kado, Deborah M.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Jeste, Dilip V.; Achim, Cristian L.; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old) and aged (15 months old) mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26448649

  15. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Kim, Jane J; Scadeng, Miriam; Woods, Gina; Kado, Deborah M; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Jeste, Dilip V; Achim, Cristian L; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old) and aged (15 months old) mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26448649

  16. Impaired brain development and reduced cognitive function in phospholipase D-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Ute; Stegner, David; Hattingen, Elke; Beyer, Sandra; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Klein, Jochen

    2014-06-20

    The phospholipases D (PLD1 and 2) are signaling enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidic acid, a lipid second messenger involved in cell proliferation, and choline, a precursor of acetylcholine (ACh). In the present study, we investigated development and cognitive function in mice that were deficient for PLD1, or PLD2, or both. We found that PLD-deficient mice had reduced brain growth at 14-27 days post partum when compared to wild-type mice. In adult PLD-deficient mice, cognitive function was impaired in social and object recognition tasks. Using brain microdialysis, we found that wild-type mice responded with a 4-fold increase of hippocampal ACh release upon behavioral stimulation in the open field, while PLD-deficient mice released significantly less ACh. These results may be relevant for cognitive dysfunctions observed in fetal alcohol syndrome and in Alzheimer' disease. PMID:24813107

  17. Conditional Ablation of Nonmuscle Myosin II-B Delineates Heart Defects in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuefei; Takeda, Kazuyo; Singh, Aman; Yu, Zu-Xi; Zerfas, Patricia; Blount, Anthony; Liu, Chengyu; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Schneider, Michael D.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Wei, Qize

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Germline ablation of the cytoskeletal protein nonmuscle myosin II-B (NMII-B) results in embryonic lethality with defects in both the brain and heart. Tissue specific ablation of NMII-B by a Cre-recombinase strategy should avoid embryonic lethality and permit study of the function of NMII-B in adult hearts. Objective To understand the function of NMII-B in adult mouse hearts and to see if the brain defects found in germline ablated mice influence cardiac development. Methods and Results We used a loxP/Cre-recombinase strategy to specifically ablate NMII-B in the brains or hearts of mice. Mice ablated for NMII-B in neural tissues, die between postnatal day 12 and 22 without showing cardiac defects. Mice deficient in NMII-B only in cardiac myocytes (BαMHC/BαMHC mice) do not show brain defects. However BαMHC/BαMHC mice display novel cardiac defects not seen in NMII-B germline ablated mice. Most of the BαMHC/BαMHC mice are born with enlarged cardiac myocytes some of which are multinucleated, reflecting a defect in cytokinesis. Between 6–10 months they develop a cardiomyopathy which includes interstitial fibrosis and infiltration of the myocardium and pericardium with inflammatory cells. Four of five BαMHC/BαMHC hearts develop marked widening of intercalated discs. Conclusion By avoiding the embryonic lethality found in germline-ablated mice we were able to study the function of NMII-B in adult mice and show that absence of NMII-B in cardiac myocytes results in cardiomyopathy in the adult heart. We also define a role for NMII-B in maintaining the integrity of intercalated discs. PMID:19815823

  18. Brain size and limits to adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Mercedes F; Sorrells, Shawn F; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-02-15

    The walls of the cerebral ventricles in the developing embryo harbor the primary neural stem cells from which most neurons and glia derive. In many vertebrates, neurogenesis continues postnatally and into adulthood in this region. Adult neurogenesis at the ventricle has been most extensively studied in organisms with small brains, such as reptiles, birds, and rodents. In reptiles and birds, these progenitor cells give rise to young neurons that migrate into many regions of the forebrain. Neurogenesis in adult rodents is also relatively widespread along the lateral ventricles, but migration is largely restricted to the rostral migratory stream into the olfactory bulb. Recent work indicates that the wall of the lateral ventricle is highly regionalized, with progenitor cells giving rise to different types of neurons depending on their location. In species with larger brains, young neurons born in these spatially specified domains become dramatically separated from potential final destinations. Here we hypothesize that the increase in size and topographical complexity (e.g., intervening white matter tracts) in larger brains may severely limit the long-term contribution of new neurons born close to, or in, the ventricular wall. We compare the process of adult neuronal birth, migration, and integration across species with different brain sizes, and discuss how early regional specification of progenitor cells may interact with brain size and affect where and when new neurons are added. PMID:26417888

  19. Mice overexpressing corticotropin-releasing factor show brain atrophy and motor dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Miriam; Fleming, Sheila M.; Million, Mulugeta; Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2010-01-01

    Chronic stress and persistently high glucocorticoid levels can induce brain atrophy. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model of chronic stress with elevated brain CRF and plasma corticosterone levels and Cushing’s syndrome. The brain structural alterations in the CRF-OE mice, however, are not well known. We found that adult male and female CRF-OE mice had significantly lower whole brain and cerebellum weights than their wild type (WT) littermates (347.7 ± 3.6 vs. 460.1 ± 4.3 and 36.3 ± 0.8 vs. 50.0 ± 1.3 mg, respectively) without sex-related difference. The epididymal/parametrial fat mass was significantly higher in CRF-OE mice. The brain weight was inversely correlated to epididymal/parametrial fat weight, but not to body weight. Computerized image analysis system in Nissl stained brain sections of female mice showed that the anterior cingulate and sensorimotor cortexes of CRF-OE mice were significantly thinner, and the volumes of the hippocampus, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and amygdala were significantly reduced compared to WT, while the locus coeruleus showed a non-significant increase. Motor functions determined by beam crossing and gait analysis showed that CRF-OE mice took longer time and more steps to traverse a beam with more errors, and displayed reduced stride length compared to their WT littermates. These data show that CRF-OE mice display brain size reduction associated with alterations of motor coordination and an increase in visceral fat mass providing a novel animal model to study mechanisms involved in brain atrophy under conditions of sustained elevation of brain CRF and circulating glucocorticoid levels. PMID:20132869

  20. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  1. Adaptation of Enterovirus 71 to Adult Interferon Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Elizabeth A.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Santangelo, Joseph D.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses, including enterovirus 71 (EV71), have caused severe and fatal cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in the Asia-Pacific region. The development of a vaccine or antiviral against these pathogens has been hampered by the lack of a reliable small animal model. In this study, a mouse adapted EV71 strain was produced by conducting serial passages through A129 (α/β interferon (IFN) receptor deficient) and AG129 (α/β, γ IFN receptor deficient) mice. A B2 sub genotype of EV71 was inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) into neonatal AG129 mice and brain-harvested virus was subsequently passaged through 12 and 15 day-old A129 mice. When tested in 10 week-old AG129 mice, this adapted strain produced 100% lethality with clinical signs including limb paralysis, eye irritation, loss of balance, and death. This virus caused only 17% mortality in same age A129 mice, confirming that in the absence of a functional IFN response, adult AG129 mice are susceptible to infection by adapted EV71 isolates. Subsequent studies in adult AG129 and young A129 mice with the adapted EV71 virus examined the efficacy of an inactivated EV71 candidate vaccine and determined the role of humoral immunity in protection. Passive transfer of rabbit immune sera raised against the EV71 vaccine provided protection in a dose dependent manner in 15 day-old A129 mice. Intramuscular injections (i.m.) in five week-old AG129 mice with the alum adjuvanted vaccine also provided protection against the mouse adapted homologous strain. No clinical signs of disease or mortality were observed in vaccinated animals, which received a prime-and-boost, whereas 71% of control animals were euthanized after exhibiting systemic clinical signs (P<0.05). The development of this animal model will facilitate studies on EV71 pathogenesis, antiviral testing, the evaluation of immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccine candidates, and has the potential to establish correlates of protection studies. PMID

  2. Disrupting Jagged1-Notch signaling impairs spatial memory formation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Derya; Botly, Leigh C P; Higgs, Gemma; Marsolais, Alexander; Frankland, Paul W; Egan, Sean E; Josselyn, Sheena A

    2013-07-01

    It is well-known that Notch signaling plays a critical role in brain development and growing evidence implicates this signaling pathway in adult synaptic plasticity and memory formation. The Notch1 receptor is activated by two subclasses of ligands, Delta-like (including Dll1 and Dll4) and Jagged (including Jag1 and Jag2). Ligand-induced Notch1 receptor signaling is modulated by a family of Fringe proteins, including Lunatic fringe (Lfng). Although Dll1, Jag1 and Lfng are critical regulators of Notch signaling, their relative contribution to memory formation in the adult brain is unknown. To investigate the roles of these important components of Notch signaling in memory formation, we examined spatial and fear memory formation in adult mice with reduced expression of Dll1, Jag1, Lfng and Dll1 plus Lfng. We also examined motor activity, anxiety-like behavior and sensorimotor gating using the acoustic startle response in these mice. Of the lines of mutant mice tested, we found that only mice with reduced Jag1 expression (mice heterozygous for a null mutation in Jag1, Jag1(+/-)) showed a selective impairment in spatial memory formation. Importantly, all other behavior including open field activity, conditioned fear memory (both context and discrete cue), acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition, was normal in this line of mice. These results provide the first in vivo evidence that Jag1-Notch signaling is critical for memory formation in the adult brain. PMID:23567106

  3. Reprint of: disrupting Jagged1-Notch signaling impairs spatial memory formation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Derya; Botly, Leigh C P; Higgs, Gemma; Marsolais, Alexander; Frankland, Paul W; Egan, Sean E; Josselyn, Sheena A

    2013-10-01

    It is well-known that Notch signaling plays a critical role in brain development and growing evidence implicates this signaling pathway in adult synaptic plasticity and memory formation. The Notch1 receptor is activated by two subclasses of ligands, Delta-like (including Dll1 and Dll4) and Jagged (including Jag1 and Jag2). Ligand-induced Notch1 receptor signaling is modulated by a family of Fringe proteins, including Lunatic fringe (Lfng). Although Dll1, Jag1 and Lfng are critical regulators of Notch signaling, their relative contribution to memory formation in the adult brain is unknown. To investigate the roles of these important components of Notch signaling in memory formation, we examined spatial and fear memory formation in adult mice with reduced expression of Dll1, Jag1, Lfng and Dll1 plus Lfng. We also examined motor activity, anxiety-like behavior and sensorimotor gating using the acoustic startle response in these mice. Of the lines of mutant mice tested, we found that only mice with reduced Jag1 expression (mice heterozygous for a null mutation in Jag1, Jag1(+/-)) showed a selective impairment in spatial memory formation. Importantly, all other behavior including open field activity, conditioned fear memory (both context and discrete cue), acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition, was normal in this line of mice. These results provide the first in vivo evidence that Jag1-Notch signaling is critical for memory formation in the adult brain. PMID:23850596

  4. The gut microbiota influences blood-brain barrier permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Braniste, Viorica; Al-Asmakh, Maha; Kowal, Czeslawa; Anuar, Farhana; Abbaspour, Afrouz; Tóth, Miklós; Korecka, Agata; Bakocevic, Nadja; Ng, Lai Guan; Guan, Ng Lai; Kundu, Parag; Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer; Hultenby, Kjell; Nilsson, Harriet; Hebert, Hans; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty; Pettersson, Sven

    2014-11-19

    Pivotal to brain development and function is an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB), which acts as a gatekeeper to control the passage and exchange of molecules and nutrients between the circulatory system and the brain parenchyma. The BBB also ensures homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). We report that germ-free mice, beginning with intrauterine life, displayed increased BBB permeability compared to pathogen-free mice with a normal gut flora. The increased BBB permeability was maintained in germ-free mice after birth and during adulthood and was associated with reduced expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-5, which are known to regulate barrier function in endothelial tissues. Exposure of germ-free adult mice to a pathogen-free gut microbiota decreased BBB permeability and up-regulated the expression of tight junction proteins. Our results suggest that gut microbiota-BBB communication is initiated during gestation and propagated throughout life. PMID:25411471

  5. Drebrin A regulates hippocampal LTP and hippocampus-dependent fear learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kojima, N; Yasuda, H; Hanamura, K; Ishizuka, Y; Sekino, Y; Shirao, T

    2016-06-01

    Structural plasticity of dendritic spines, which underlies higher brain functions including learning and memory, is dynamically regulated by the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Drebrin A is an F-actin-binding protein preferentially expressed in the brain and localized in the dendritic spines of mature neurons. Isoform conversion from drebrin E to drebrin A and accumulation of the latter in dendritic spines occurs during synapse maturation. We have previously demonstrated that drebrin A plays a pivotal role in spine morphogenesis and plasticity. However, it is unclear whether drebrin A plays a specific role in processes required for structural plasticity, and whether drebrin E can substitute in this role. To answer these questions, we analyzed mutant mice (named DAKO mice), in which isoform conversion from drebrin E to drebrin A is disrupted. In DAKO mouse brain, drebrin E continues to be expressed throughout life instead of drebrin A. Electrophysiological studies using hippocampal slices revealed that long-term potentiation of CA1 synapses was impaired in adult DAKO mice, but not in adolescents. In parallel with this age-dependent impairment, DAKO mice exhibited impaired hippocampus-dependent fear learning in an age-dependent manner; the impairment was evident in adult mice, but not in adolescents. In addition, histological investigation revealed that the spine length of the apical dendrite of CA1 pyramidal cells was significantly longer in adult DAKO mice than in wild-type mice. Our data indicate that the roles of drebrin E and drebrin A in brain function are different from each other, that the isoform conversion of drebrin is critical, and that drebrin A is indispensable for normal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent fear memory in the adult brain. PMID:26970584

  6. Insulin-like growth factor I is required for vessel remodeling in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Lopez, C.; LeRoith, D.; Torres-Aleman, I.

    2004-01-01

    Although vascular dysfunction is a major suspect in the etiology of several important neurodegenerative diseases, the signals involved in vessel homeostasis in the brain are still poorly understood. We have determined whether insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a wide-spectrum growth factor with angiogenic actions, participates in vascular remodeling in the adult brain. IGF-I induces the growth of cultured brain endothelial cells through hypoxiainducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor, a canonical angiogenic pathway. Furthermore, the systemic injection of IGF-I in adult mice increases brain vessel density. Physical exercise that stimulates widespread brain vessel growth in normal mice fails to do so in mice with low serum IGF-I. Brain injury that stimulates angiogenesis at the injury site also requires IGF-I to promote perilesion vessel growth, because blockade of IGF-I input by an anti-IGF-I abrogates vascular growth at the injury site. Thus, IGF-I participates in vessel remodeling in the adult brain. Low serum/brain IGF-I levels that are associated with old age and with several neurodegenerative diseases may be related to an increased risk of vascular dysfunction. PMID:15210967

  7. Brain effects of manganese exposure in mice pups during prenatal and breastfeeding periods.

    PubMed

    Okada, Monica Akemi; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Noso, Cassio Hideo; Voigt, Carmen Lúcia; Campos, Sandro Xavier; Alberto de Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro

    2016-07-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a trace element essential for brain development and functioning of the central nervous system. However, there is a lack of information concerning the neurotoxicity of Mn under realistic doses in early stages of development, though excess of Mn results in a progressive disorder of the nervous system called manganism. In the current study, adult mice were exposed to three doses of Mn for 60 days through daily gavages, while mice pups were exposed to the same Mn doses during developmental period (gestational and breast-feeding). From the latter group of mice, a group was exposed for more 60 days to the same Mn doses. Chemical analysis revealed a dose-dependent bioaccumulation of Mn in mice's brain. Biochemical parameters revealed that (1) Mn affects non-protein thiol levels, glutathione S-tranferase and acetylcholinesterase activities, as well as the levels of oxidized lipids and proteins in mice brain, though lipids and proteins alterations were found only after exposure to high and unrealistic doses; (2) Realistic doses of Mn affects the activity of brain AChE and finally; (3) Pups' brain were affected by Mn even whether only the parental females had been previously exposed. The current study shows evidences of chemical stress in mice exposed to Mn during the early period of development and an efficient mechanism of Mn elimination under higher doses. These findings open new lines of investigation regarding manganese toxicity in vertebrates mainly in the early stages of development. PMID:26972613

  8. Brain-specific Crmp2 deletion leads to neuronal development deficits and behavioural impairments in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongsheng; Kang, Eunchai; Wang, Yaqing; Yang, Chaojuan; Yu, Hui; Wang, Qin; Chen, Zheyu; Zhang, Chen; Christian, Kimberly M; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-Li; Xu, Zhiheng

    2016-01-01

    Several genome- and proteome-wide studies have associated transcription and translation changes of CRMP2 (collapsing response mediator protein 2) with psychiatric disorders, yet little is known about its function in the developing or adult mammalian brain in vivo. Here we show that brain-specific Crmp2 knockout (cKO) mice display molecular, cellular, structural and behavioural deficits, many of which are reminiscent of neural features and symptoms associated with schizophrenia. cKO mice exhibit enlarged ventricles and impaired social behaviour, locomotor activity, and learning and memory. Loss of Crmp2 in the hippocampus leads to reduced long-term potentiation, abnormal NMDA receptor composition, aberrant dendrite development and defective synapse formation in CA1 neurons. Furthermore, knockdown of crmp2 specifically in newborn neurons results in stage-dependent defects in their development during adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Our findings reveal a critical role for CRMP2 in neuronal plasticity, neural function and behavioural modulation in mice. PMID:27249678

  9. Brain-specific Crmp2 deletion leads to neuronal development deficits and behavioural impairments in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongsheng; Kang, Eunchai; Wang, Yaqing; Yang, Chaojuan; Yu, Hui; Wang, Qin; Chen, Zheyu; Zhang, Chen; Christian, Kimberly M.; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li; Xu, Zhiheng

    2016-01-01

    Several genome- and proteome-wide studies have associated transcription and translation changes of CRMP2 (collapsing response mediator protein 2) with psychiatric disorders, yet little is known about its function in the developing or adult mammalian brain in vivo. Here we show that brain-specific Crmp2 knockout (cKO) mice display molecular, cellular, structural and behavioural deficits, many of which are reminiscent of neural features and symptoms associated with schizophrenia. cKO mice exhibit enlarged ventricles and impaired social behaviour, locomotor activity, and learning and memory. Loss of Crmp2 in the hippocampus leads to reduced long-term potentiation, abnormal NMDA receptor composition, aberrant dendrite development and defective synapse formation in CA1 neurons. Furthermore, knockdown of crmp2 specifically in newborn neurons results in stage-dependent defects in their development during adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Our findings reveal a critical role for CRMP2 in neuronal plasticity, neural function and behavioural modulation in mice. PMID:27249678

  10. Influence of caloric restriction on motor behavior, longevity, and brain lipid composition in Sandhoff disease mice.

    PubMed

    Denny, Christine A; Kasperzyk, Julie L; Gorham, Kristen N; Bronson, Roderick T; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2006-05-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), which improves health and increases longevity, was studied as a therapy in a hexosaminidase beta knockout mouse model of Sandhoff disease (SD), an incurable neurodegenerative disease involving accumulation of brain ganglioside GM2 and asialo-GM2 (GA2). Adult mice were fed a rodent chow diet either ad libitum (AL) or restricted to reduce body weight by 15-18% (CR). Although GM2 and GA2 were elevated, no significant differences were seen between the Hexb-/- and the Hexb+/- mice for most brain phospholipids and cholesterol. Cerebrosides and sulfatides were reduced in the Hexb-/- mice. In addition, rotorod performance was significantly worse in the Hexb-/- mice than in the Hexb+/- mice. CR, which decreased circulating glucose and elevated ketone bodies, significantly improved rotorod performance and extended longevity in the Hexb-/- mice but had no significant effect on brain lipid composition or on cytoplasmic neuronal vacuoles. The expression of CD68 and F4/80 was significantly less in the CR-fed than in the AL-fed Hexb-/- mice. We suggest that the CR delays disease progression in SD and possibly in other ganglioside storage diseases through anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16521125

  11. Changes in Brain Tissue and Behavior Patterns Induced by Single Short-Term Fasting in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hisatomi, Yuko; Asakura, Kyo; Kugino, Kenji; Kurokawa, Mamoru; Asakura, Tomiko; Nakata, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In humans, emaciation from long-term dietary deficiencies, such as anorexia, reportedly increases physical activity and brain atrophy. However, the effects of single short-term fasting on brain tissue or behavioral activity patterns remain unclear. To clarify the impact of malnutrition on brain function, we conducted a single short-term fasting study as an anorexia model using male adult mice and determined if changes occurred in migratory behavior as an expression of brain function and in brain tissue structure. Sixteen-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were divided into either the fasted group or the control group. Experiments were conducted in a fixed indoor environment. We examined the effects of fasting on the number of nerve cells, structural changes in the myelin and axon density, and brain atrophy. For behavior observation, the amount of food and water consumed, ingestion time, and the pattern of movement were measured using a time-recording system. The fasted mice showed a significant increase in physical activity and their rhythm of movement was disturbed. Since the brain was in an abnormal state after fasting, mice that were normally active during the night became active regardless of day or night and performed strenuous exercise at a high frequency. The brain weight did not change by a fast, and brain atrophy was not observed. Although no textural change was apparent by fasting, the neuronal neogenesis in the subventricular zone and hippocampus was inhibited, causing disorder of the brain function. A clear association between the suppression of encephalic neuropoiesis and overactivity was not established. However, it is interesting that the results of this study suggest that single short-term fasting has an effect on encephalic neuropoiesis. PMID:24224039

  12. Effect of chronic social defeat stress on behaviors and dopamine receptor in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guang-Biao; Zhao, Tong; Gao, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Xu, Yu-Ming; Li, Hao; Lv, Lu-Xian

    2016-04-01

    Victims of bullying often undergo depression, low self-esteem, high anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. The social defeat model has become widely accepted for studying experimental animal behavior changes associated with bullying; however, differences in the effects in susceptible and unsusceptible individuals have not been well studied. The present study investigated the effects of social defeat stress on behavior and the expression of dopamine receptors D1 and D2 in the brains of adult mice. Adult mice were divided into susceptible and unsusceptible groups after 10days of social defeat stress. Behavioral tests were conducted, and protein levels in the brains were assessed by Western blotting. The results indicate that all mice undergo decreased locomotion and increased anxiety behavior. However, decreased social interaction and impaired memory performance were only observed in susceptible mice. A significantly decreased expression of D1 was observed in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of susceptible mice only. No significant differences in D2 expression were shown between control and defeated mice in any area studied. These data indicate that depression-like behavior and cognition impairment caused by social defeat stress in susceptible mice may be related to changes in the dopamine receptor D1. PMID:26655446

  13. No Evidence of Persisting Unrepaired Nuclear DNA Single Strand Breaks in Distinct Types of Cells in the Brain, Kidney, and Liver of Adult Mice after Continuous Eight-Week 50 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure with Flux Density of 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT

    PubMed Central

    Korr, Hubert; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Born, Tatjana B.; Bosse, Kerstin; Brauns, Birka; Demmler, Martin; Fueller, Katja; Kántor, Orsolya; Kever, Barbara M.; Rahimyar, Navida; Salimi, Sepideh; Silny, Jiri; Schmitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized in the literature that exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (50 or 60 Hz) may lead to human health effects such as childhood leukemia or brain tumors. In a previous study investigating multiple types of cells from brain and kidney of the mouse (Acta Neuropathologica 2004; 107: 257–264), we found increased unrepaired nuclear DNA single strand breaks (nDNA SSB) only in epithelial cells of the choroid plexus in the brain using autoradiographic methods after a continuous eight-week 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) exposure of adult mice with flux density of 1.5 mT. Methods In the present study we tested the hypothesis that MF exposure with lower flux densities (0.1 mT, i.e., the actual exposure limit for the population in most European countries, and 1.0 mT) shows similar results to those in the previous study. Experiments and data analysis were carried out in a similar way as in our previous study. Results Continuous eight-week 50 Hz MF exposure with 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT did not result in increased persisting unrepaired nDNA SSB in distinct types of cells in the brain, kidney, and liver of adult mice. MF exposure with 1.0 mT led to reduced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in epithelial cells in the choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle in the brain (EC-CP) and epithelial cells of the cortical collecting duct in the kidney, as well as to reduced mtDNA synthesis in neurons of the caudate nucleus in the brain and in EC-CP. Conclusion No evidence was found for increased persisting unrepaired nDNA SSB in distinct types of cells in the brain, kidney, and liver of adult mice after continuous eight-week 50 Hz magnetic field exposure with flux density of 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT. PMID:25302592

  14. Acute brain slice methods for adult and aging animals: application of targeted patch clampanalysis and optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Chen, Qian; Feng, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Summary The development of the living acute brain slice preparation for analyzing synaptic function roughly a half century ago was a pivotal achievement that greatly influenced the landscape of modern neuroscience. Indeed, many neuroscientists regard brain slices as the gold-standard model system for detailed cellular, molecular, and circuitry level analysis and perturbation of neuronal function. A critical limitation of this model system is the difficulty in preparing slices from adult and aging animals, and over the past several decades few substantial methodological improvements have emerged to facilitate patch clamp analysis in the mature adult stage. In this chapter we describe a robust and practical protocol for preparing brain slices from mature adult mice that are suitable for patch clamp analysis. This method reduces swelling and damage in superficial layers of the slices and improves the success rate for targeted patch clamp recordings, including recordings from fluorescently labeled populations in slices derived from transgenic mice. This adult brain slice method is suitable for diverse experimental applications, including both monitoring and manipulating neuronal activity with genetically encoded calcium indicators and optogenetic actuators, respectively. We describe the application of this adult brain slice platform and associated methods for screening kinetic properties of Channelrhodopsin (ChR) variants expressed in genetically-defined neuronal subtypes. PMID:25023312

  15. Ethanol Induced Brain Lipid Changes in Mice Assessed by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roux, Aurelie; Jackson, Shelley N; Muller, Ludovic; Barbacci, Damon; O'Rourke, Joseph; Thanos, Panayotis K; Volkow, Nora D; Balaban, Carey; Schultz, J Albert; Woods, Amina S

    2016-08-17

    Alcohol abuse is a chronic disease characterized by the consumption of alcohol at a level that interferes with physical and mental health and causes serious and persistent changes in the brain. Lipid metabolism is of particular interest due to its high concentration in the brain. Lipids are the main component of cell membranes, are involved in cell signaling, signal transduction, and energy storage. In this study, we analyzed lipid composition of chronically ethanol exposed mouse brains. Juvenile (JUV) and adult (ADU) mice were placed on a daily limited-access ethanol intake model for 52 days. After euthanasia, brains were harvested, and total lipids were extracted from brain homogenates. Samples were analyzed using high resolution mass spectrometry and processed by multivariate and univariate statistical analysis. Significant lipid changes were observed in different classes including sphingolipids, fatty acids, lysophosphatidylcholines, and other glycerophospholipids. PMID:27269520

  16. Influence of Age on Brain Edema Formation, Secondary Brain Damage and Inflammatory Response after Brain Trauma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Luh, Clara; Gotthardt, Philipp; Huang, Changsheng; Schäfer, Michael K.; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C.

    2012-01-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI) elderly patients suffer from higher mortality rate and worse functional outcome compared to young patients. However, experimental TBI research is primarily performed in young animals. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether age affects functional outcome, neuroinflammation and secondary brain damage after brain trauma in mice. Young (2 months) and old (21 months) male C57Bl6N mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) on the right parietal cortex. Animals of both ages were randomly assigned to 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h survival. At the end of the observation periods, contusion volume, brain water content, neurologic function, cerebral and systemic inflammation (CD3+ T cell migration, inflammatory cytokine expression in brain and lung, blood differential cell count) were determined. Old animals showed worse neurological function 72 h after CCI and a high mortality rate (19.2%) compared to young (0%). This did not correlate with histopathological damage, as contusion volumes were equal in both age groups. Although a more pronounced brain edema formation was detected in old mice 24 hours after TBI, lack of correlation between brain water content and neurological deficit indicated that brain edema formation is not solely responsible for age-dependent differences in neurological outcome. Brains of old naïve mice were about 8% smaller compared to young naïve brains, suggesting age-related brain atrophy with possible decline in plasticity. Onset of cerebral inflammation started earlier and primarily ipsilateral to damage in old mice, whereas in young mice inflammation was delayed and present in both hemispheres with a characteristic T cell migration pattern. Pulmonary interleukin 1β expression was up-regulated after cerebral injury only in young, not aged mice. The results therefore indicate that old animals are prone to functional deficits and strong ipsilateral cerebral inflammation

  17. Rotarod training in mice is associated with changes in brain structure observable with multimodal MRI.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Jan; Niibori, Yosuke; Frankland, Paul W; Lerch, Jason P

    2015-02-15

    The brain has been shown to remain structurally plastic even throughout adulthood. However, little is known how motor-skill training affects different MRI modalities in the adult mouse brain. The aim of this study is to investigate whether rotarod training, a simple motor training task taken from the standard test battery, is associated with structural plasticity observable with different MRI modalities in adult C57BL/6 mice. The rotarod is a standard test that taxes motor coordination and balance. We use T2-weighted MRI followed by deformation-based morphometry to assess local volume and fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from diffusion MRI to assess microstructure ex-vivo. Using deformation-based morphometry we found that the hippocampus, frontal cortex and amygdala are larger in rotarod-trained mice compared to untrained controls. Surprisingly, the cerebellum and white matter in the corpus callosum underlying the primary motor cortex are smaller after training. We also found that the volume of the motor cortex is positively correlated with better rotarod performance. Diffusion imaging indicates group differences and behavioral correlations with FA, a measure of microstructure. Trained mice have higher FA in the hippocampus. Better rotarod performance is associated with higher FA in the hippocampus and lower FA in the primary visual cortex. This is the first study to reveal the substantial structural reorganization of the adult mouse brain following only a relatively brief period of motor-skill training by using complementary measures of microstructure and volume. PMID:25497397

  18. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28–37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility. PMID:24275185

  19. Experience-Dependent Neural Plasticity in the Adult Damaged Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Abigail L.; Cheng, Shao-Ying; Jones, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral experience is at work modifying the structure and function of the brain throughout the lifespan, but it has a particularly dramatic influence after brain injury. This review summarizes recent findings on the role of experience in reorganizing the adult damaged brain, with a focus on findings from rodent stroke models of chronic upper…

  20. Sex-specific attentional deficits in adult vitamin D deficient BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Groves, Natalie J; Burne, Thomas H J

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment. However, there is a paucity of preclinical data showing that vitamin D deficiency is a causal factor for impaired cognitive processing. The aim of this study was to assess two cognitive tasks, the 5 choice-serial reaction task and the 5 choice-continuous performance task in adult vitamin D (AVD) deficient BALB/c mice. Ten-week old male and female BALB/c mice were fed a control or vitamin D deficient diet for 10 weeks prior to, and during behavioural testing. We found sex-dependent impairments in attentional processing and showed that male AVD-deficient mice were less accurate, took longer to respond when making a correct choice and were more likely to make an omission, without a change in the motivation to collect reward. By contrast, female AVD-deficient mice had a reduced latency to collect reward, but no changes on any other measures compared to controls. Therefore, we have shown that in otherwise healthy adult mice, vitamin D deficiency led to mild cognitive impairment in male but not female mice and therefore this model will be useful for future investigations into unravelling the mechanism by which vitamin D affects the adult brain and cognitive function. PMID:26836278

  1. Automated monitoring of early neurobehavioral changes in mice following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wenrui; Liu, Nai-Kui; Xie, Xin-Min Simon; Li, Rui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury often causes a variety of behavioral and emotional impairments that can develop into chronic disorders. Therefore, there is a need to shift towards identifying early symptoms that can aid in the prediction of traumatic brain injury outcomes and behavioral endpoints in patients with traumatic brain injury after early interventions. In this study, we used the SmartCage system, an automated quantitative approach to assess behavior alterations in mice during an early phase of traumatic brain injury in their home cages. Female C57BL/6 adult mice were subjected to moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. The mice then received a battery of behavioral assessments including neurological score, locomotor activity, sleep/wake states, and anxiety-like behaviors on days 1, 2, and 7 after CCI. Histological analysis was performed on day 7 after the last assessment. Spontaneous activities on days 1 and 2 after injury were significantly decreased in the CCI group. The average percentage of sleep time spent in both dark and light cycles were significantly higher in the CCI group than in the sham group. For anxiety-like behaviors, the time spent in a light compartment and the number of transitions between the dark/light compartments were all significantly reduced in the CCI group than in the sham group. In addition, the mice suffering from CCI exhibited a preference of staying in the dark compartment of a dark/light cage. The CCI mice showed reduced neurological score and histological abnormalities, which are well correlated to the automated behavioral assessments. Our findings demonstrate that the automated SmartCage system provides sensitive and objective measures for early behavior changes in mice following traumatic brain injury. PMID:27073377

  2. Automated monitoring of early neurobehavioral changes in mice following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wenrui; Liu, Nai-kui; Xie, Xin-min (Simon); Li, Rui; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury often causes a variety of behavioral and emotional impairments that can develop into chronic disorders. Therefore, there is a need to shift towards identifying early symptoms that can aid in the prediction of traumatic brain injury outcomes and behavioral endpoints in patients with traumatic brain injury after early interventions. In this study, we used the SmartCage system, an automated quantitative approach to assess behavior alterations in mice during an early phase of traumatic brain injury in their home cages. Female C57BL/6 adult mice were subjected to moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. The mice then received a battery of behavioral assessments including neurological score, locomotor activity, sleep/wake states, and anxiety-like behaviors on days 1, 2, and 7 after CCI. Histological analysis was performed on day 7 after the last assessment. Spontaneous activities on days 1 and 2 after injury were significantly decreased in the CCI group. The average percentage of sleep time spent in both dark and light cycles were significantly higher in the CCI group than in the sham group. For anxiety-like behaviors, the time spent in a light compartment and the number of transitions between the dark/light compartments were all significantly reduced in the CCI group than in the sham group. In addition, the mice suffering from CCI exhibited a preference of staying in the dark compartment of a dark/light cage. The CCI mice showed reduced neurological score and histological abnormalities, which are well correlated to the automated behavioral assessments. Our findings demonstrate that the automated SmartCage system provides sensitive and objective measures for early behavior changes in mice following traumatic brain injury. PMID:27073377

  3. Stress does not increase blood-brain barrier permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Roszkowski, Martin; Bohacek, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have reported that exposure to acute psychophysiological stressors can lead to an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability, but these findings remain controversial and disputed. We thoroughly examined this issue by assessing the effect of several well-established paradigms of acute stress and chronic stress on blood-brain barrier permeability in several brain areas of adult mice. Using cerebral extraction ratio for the small molecule tracer sodium fluorescein (NaF, 376 Da) as a sensitive measure of blood-brain barrier permeability, we find that neither acute swim nor restraint stress lead to increased cerebral extraction ratio. Daily 6-h restraint stress for 21 days, a model for the severe detrimental impact of chronic stress on brain function, also does not alter cerebral extraction ratio. In contrast, we find that cold forced swim and cold restraint stress both lead to a transient, pronounced decrease of cerebral extraction ratio in hippocampus and cortex, suggesting that body temperature can be an important confounding factor in studies of blood-brain barrier permeability. To additionally assess if stress could change blood-brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, we measured cerebral extraction ratio for fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (70 kDa). We find that neither acute restraint nor cold swim stress affected blood-brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, thus corroborating our findings that various stressors do not increase blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:27146513

  4. Astrocyte Leptin Receptor (ObR) and Leptin Transport in Adult-Onset Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihong; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Sakharkar, Amul; Cain, Courtney; Yu, Chuanhui; Kastin, Abba J.

    2008-01-01

    The agouti viable yellow (Avy) spontaneous mutation generates an unusual mouse phenotype of agouti-colored coat and adult-onset obesity with metabolic syndrome. Persistent production of agouti signaling protein in Avy mice antagonizes melanocortin receptors in the hypothalamus. To determine how this disruption of neuroendocrine circuits affects leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we measured leptin influx in Avy and B6 control mice after the development of obesity, hyperleptinemia, and increased adiposity. After iv bolus injection, 125I-leptin crossed the BBB significantly faster in young (2 month old) B6 mice than in young Avy mice or in older (8 month old) mice of either strain. This difference was not observed by in situ brain perfusion studies, indicating the cause being circulating factors, such as elevated leptin levels or soluble receptors. Thus, Avy mice showed peripheral leptin resistance. ObRa, the main transporting receptor for leptin at the BBB, showed no change in mRNA expression in the cerebral microvessels between the age-matched (2 month old) Avy and B6 mice. Higher ObRb mRNA was seen in the Avy microvasculature with unknown significance. Immunofluorescent staining unexpectedly revealed that many of the ObR(+) cells were astrocytes and that the Avy mice showed significantly more ObR(+) astrocytes in the hypothalamus than the B6 mice. Although leptin permeation from the circulation was slower in the Avy mice, the increased ObR expression in astrocytes and increased ObRb mRNA in microvessels suggest the possibility of heightened central nervous system sensitivity to circulating leptin. PMID:18292187

  5. Increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein concentrations in mice lacking brain serotonin.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Mosienko, Valentina; Gertz, Karen; Alenina, Natalia; Hellweg, Rainer; Klempin, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between BDNF signaling and the serotonergic system remains incompletely understood. Using a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we studied BDNF concentrations in hippocampus and cortex of two mouse models of altered serotonin signaling: tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)2-deficient (Tph2 (-/-)) mice lacking brain serotonin and serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient (SERT(-/-)) mice lacking serotonin re-uptake. Surprisingly, hippocampal BDNF was significantly elevated in Tph2 (-/-) mice, whereas no significant changes were observed in SERT(-/-) mice. Furthermore, BDNF levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex of Tph2 (-/-) but not of SERT(-/-) mice. Our results emphasize the interaction between serotonin signaling and BDNF. Complete lack of brain serotonin induces BDNF expression. PMID:26100147

  6. Guidelines for Better Communication with Brain Impaired Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... A You are here Home Guidelines for Better Communication with Brain Impaired Adults Printer-friendly version Communicating ... easy solutions, following some basic guidelines should ease communication, and lower levels of stress both for you ...

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-deficient mice develop aggressiveness and hyperphagia in conjunction with brain serotonergic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, W. Ernest; Mamounas, Laura A.; Ricaurte, George A.; Coppola, Vincenzo; Reid, Susan W.; Bora, Susan H.; Wihler, Cornelia; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.; Tessarollo, Lino

    1999-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has trophic effects on serotonergic (5-HT) neurons in the central nervous system. However, the role of endogenous BDNF in the development and function of these neurons has not been established in vivo because of the early postnatal lethality of BDNF null mice. In the present study, we use heterozygous BDNF+/− mice that have a normal life span and show that these animals develop enhanced intermale aggressiveness and hyperphagia accompanied by significant weight gain in early adulthood; these behavioral abnormalities are known to correlate with 5-HT dysfunction. Forebrain 5-HT levels and fiber density in BDNF+/− mice are normal at an early age but undergo premature age-associated decrements. However, young adult BDNF+/− mice show a blunted c-fos induction by the specific serotonin releaser-uptake inhibitor dexfenfluramine and alterations in the expression of several 5-HT receptors in the cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The heightened aggressiveness can be ameliorated by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Our results indicate that endogenous BDNF is critical for the normal development and function of central 5-HT neurons and for the elaboration of behaviors that depend on these nerve cells. Therefore, BDNF+/− mice may provide a useful model to study human psychiatric disorders attributed to dysfunction of serotonergic neurons. PMID:10611369

  8. Pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of carbapenems in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Kurihara, Yuji; Kuroda, Yuko; Hori, Seiji; Kizu, Junko

    2016-05-01

    An adverse effect associated with the administration of carbapenems is central nervous system (CNS) toxicity, with higher brain concentrations of carbapenems being linked to an increased risk of seizures. However, the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of carbapenems have not yet been examined. Thus, the aim of this in vivo investigation was to determine the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of carbapenems in mice. Blood samples and brain tissue samples were obtained 10, 20, 30, 60, and 120 min after the subcutaneous administration of carbapenems (91 mg/kg). We obtained the following values for the pharmacokinetic parameters of carbapenems in mice: 1.20-1.71 L/h/kg for CLtotal/F, 1.41-2.03 h(-1) for Ke, 0.34-0.51 h for T1/2, 0.66-0.95 L/kg for Vss/F, 0.49-0.73 h for MRT, 83.46-110.58 μg/mL for Cmax, plasma, and 0.28-0.83 μg/g for Cmax, brain tissue. The AUC0-∞ of the carbapenems tested in plasma were in the following order: doripenem > meropenem > biapenem > imipenem, and in brain tissue were: imipenem > doripenem > meropenem > biapenem. The degrees of brain tissue penetration, defined as the AUC0-∞, brain tissue/fAUC0-∞, plasma ratio, were 0.016 for imipenem, 0.004 for meropenem, 0.002 for biapenem, and 0.008 for doripenem. The results of the present study demonstrated that, of the carbapenems examined, imipenem penetrated brain tissue to the greatest extent. PMID:26809218

  9. Noninvasive Blood-Brain Barrier Opening in Live Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.; Pernot, Mathieu; Small, Scott; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2006-05-01

    Most therapeutic agents cannot be delivered to the brain because of brain's natural defense: the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). It has recently been shown that Focused Ultrasound (FUS) can produce reversible and localized BBB opening in the brain when applied in the presence of ultrasound contrast agents post-craniotomy in rabbits [1]. However, a major limitation of ultrasound in the brain is the strong phase aberration and attenuation of the skull bone, and, as a result, no study of trans-cranial ultrasound-targeted drug treatment in the brain in vivo has been reported as of yet. In this study, the feasibility of BBB opening in the hippocampus of wildtype mice using FUS through the intact skull and skin was investigated. In order to investigate the effect of the skull, simulations of ultrasound wave propagation (1.5 MHz) through the skull using μCT data, and needle hydrophone measurements through an ex-vivo skull were made. The pressure field showed minimal attenuation (18% of the pressure amplitude) and a well-focused pattern through the left and right halves of the parietal bone. In experiments in vivo, the brains of four mice were sonicated through intact skull and skin. Ultrasound sonications (burst length: 20 ms; duty cycle: 20%; acoustic pressure range: 2.0 to 2.7 MPa) was applied 5 times for 30 s per shot with a 30 s delay between shots. Prior to sonication, ultrasound contrast agents (Optison; 10 μL) were injected intravenously. Contrast material enhanced high resolution MR Imaging (9.4 Tesla) was able to distinguish opening of large vessels in the region of the hippocampus. These results demonstrate the feasibility of locally opening the BBB in the mouse hippocampus using focused ultrasound through intact skull and skin. Future investigations will deal with optimization and reproducibility of the technique as well as application on Alzheimer's-model mice.

  10. Melatonin prevents learning disorders in brain-lesioned newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Bouslama, M; Renaud, J; Olivier, P; Fontaine, R H; Matrot, B; Gressens, P; Gallego, J

    2007-12-12

    Perinatal brain injuries often result in irreversible learning disabilities, which manifest in early childhood. These injuries are chiefly ascribable to marked susceptibility of the immature brain to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. No treatments are available. One well-characterized model of perinatal brain injuries consists in injecting the glutamate analog ibotenate into the brain of 5-day-old mice. The resulting excitotoxic lesions resemble the hypoxic-ischemic gray-matter lesions seen in full-term and near-term newborns, as well as the white-matter lesions of preterm newborns. We previously reported that these lesions disrupted odor preference conditioning in newborn mice. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the neuroprotector melatonin in preventing learning disabilities in newborn mice with ibotenate-induced brain injury. In postnatal day (P) 6-P7 pups, we tested psychomotor reflexes, spontaneous preference for maternal odors as an index of memory, ultrasonic vocalization responses to stroking as an index of sensitivity to tactile stimuli, and conditioned preference for an odor previously paired with stroking as an index of learning abilities. Without melatonin, conditioning was abolished, whereas spontaneous odor preference, psychomotor reflexes, and sensitivity to tactile stimuli were normal. Thus, abolition of conditioning was not associated with sensorimotor impairments. Histological analysis confirmed the efficacy of melatonin in reducing white-matter lesions induced by ibotenate. Furthermore, treatment with melatonin protected the ability to develop conditioning. Thus, melatonin, which easily crosses the blood-brain barrier and has been proven safe in children, may be effective in preventing learning disabilities caused by perinatal brain injuries in human preterm infants. PMID:17950543

  11. Memory and Brain Volume in Adults Prenatally Exposed to Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Claire D.; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Chen, Xiangchuan; Kable, Julie A.; Johnson, Katrina C.; Hu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on memory and brain development was investigated in 92 African-American, young adults who were first identified in the prenatal period. Three groups (Control, n = 26; Alcohol-related Neurodevelopmental Disorder, n = 36; and Dysmorphic, n = 30) were imaged using structural MRI with brain volume calculated for…

  12. Epileptogenesis after traumatic brain injury in Plaur-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-07-01

    Binding of the extracellular matrix proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its receptor, uPAR, regulates tissue remodeling during development and after injury in different organs, including the brain. Accordingly, mutations in the Plaur gene, which encodes uPAR, have been linked to language deficits, autism, and epilepsy, both in mouse and human. Whether uPAR deficiency modulates epileptogenesis and comorbidogenesis after brain injury, however, is unknown. To address this question, we induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) by controlled cortical impact (CCI) in 10 wild-type (Wt-CCI) and 16 Plaur-deficient (uPAR-CCI) mice. Sham-operated mice served as controls (10 Wt-sham, 10 uPAR-sham). During the 4-month follow-up, the mice were neurophenotyped by assessing the somatomotor performance with the composite neuroscore test, emotional learning and memory with fear conditioning to tone and context, and epileptogenesis with videoelectroencephalography monitoring and the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure susceptibility test. At the end of the testing, the mice were perfused for histology to analyze cortical and hippocampal neurodegeneration and mossy fiber sprouting. Fourteen percent (1/7) of the mice in the Wt-CCI and 0% in the uPAR-CCI groups developed spontaneous seizures (p>0.05; chi-square). Both the Wt-CCI and uPAR-CCI groups showed increased seizure susceptibility in the PTZ test (p<0.05), impaired recovery of motor function (p<0.001), and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus and cortex (p<0.05) compared with the corresponding sham-operated controls. Motor recovery and emotional learning showed a genotype effect, being more impaired in uPAR-CCI than in Wt-CCI mice (p<0.05). The findings of the present study indicate that uPAR deficiency does not increase susceptibility to epileptogenesis after CCI injury but has an unfavorable comorbidity-modifying effect after TBI. PMID:27208924

  13. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: Cortical Brain Abnormalities as Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Deanna; Lerch, Jason; Shaw, Philip; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith; Gogtay, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare but severe form of the adult onset disorder. While structural brain imaging studies show robust, widespread, and progressive gray matter loss in COS during adolescence, there have been no longitudinal studies of sufficient duration to examine comparability with the more common adult onset…

  14. Psychotropic effects of Lactobacillus plantarum PS128 in early life-stressed and naïve adult mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Wenn; Liu, Wei-Hsien; Wu, Chien-Chen; Juan, Yi-Chen; Wu, Yu-Chen; Tsai, Huei-Ping; Wang, Sabrina; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2016-01-15

    Ingestion of specific probiotics, namely "psychobiotics", produces psychotropic effects on behavior and affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and neurochemicals in the brain. We examined the psychotropic effects of a potential psychobiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus plantarum strain PS128 (PS128), on mice subjected to early life stress (ELS) and on naïve adult mice. Behavioral tests revealed that chronic ingestion of PS128 increased the locomotor activities in both ELS and naïve adult mice in the open field test. In the elevated plus maze, PS128 significantly reduced the anxiety-like behaviors in naïve adult mice but not in the ELS mice; whereas the depression-like behaviors were reduced in ELS mice but not in naïve mice in forced swimming test and sucrose preference test. PS128 administration also reduced ELS-induced elevation of serum corticosterone under both basal and stressed states but had no effect on naïve mice. In addition, PS128 reduced inflammatory cytokine levels and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine level in the serum of ELS mice. Furthermore, the dopamine level in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was significantly increased in PS128 treated ELS and naïve adult mice whereas serotonin (5-HT) level was increased only in the naïve adult mice. These results suggest that chronic ingestion of PS128 could ameliorate anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and modulate neurochemicals related to affective disorders. Thus PS128 shows psychotropic properties and has great potential for improving stress-related symptoms. PMID:26620542

  15. Resveratrol attenuates peripheral and brain inflammation and reduces ischemic brain injury in aged female mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sae Im; Shin, Jin A; Cho, Sunghee; Kim, Hye Won; Lee, Ji Yoon; Kang, Jihee Lee; Park, Eun-Mi

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol is known to improve metabolic dysfunction associated with obesity. Visceral obesity is a sign of aging and is considered a risk factor for ischemic stroke. In this study, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on inflammation in visceral adipose tissue and the brain and its effects on ischemic brain injury in aged female mice. Mice treated with resveratrol (0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) for 10 days showed reduced levels of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, as well as a reduction in the size of adipocytes in visceral adipose tissue. Resveratrol also reduced interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α protein levels and immunoglobulin G extravasation in the brain. Mice treated with resveratrol demonstrated smaller infarct size, improved neurological function, and blunted peripheral inflammation at 3 days postischemic stroke. These results showed that resveratrol counteracted inflammation in visceral adipose tissue and in the brain and reduced stroke-induced brain injury and peripheral inflammation in aged female mice. Therefore, resveratrol administration can be a valuable strategy for the prevention of age-associated and disease-provoked inflammation in postmenopausal women. PMID:27318135

  16. Heart regeneration in adult MRL mice

    PubMed Central

    Leferovich, John M.; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Samulewicz, Stefan; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Zwas, Donna; Lankford, Edward B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    The reaction of cardiac tissue to acute injury involves interacting cascades of cellular and molecular responses that encompass inflammation, hormonal signaling, extracellular matrix remodeling, and compensatory adaptation of myocytes. Myocardial regeneration is observed in amphibians, whereas scar formation characterizes cardiac ventricular wound healing in a variety of mammalian injury models. We have previously shown that the MRL mouse strain has an extraordinary capacity to heal surgical wounds, a complex trait that maps to at least seven genetic loci. Here, we extend these studies to cardiac wounds and demonstrate that a severe transmural, cryogenically induced infarction of the right ventricle heals extensively within 60 days, with the restoration of normal myocardium and function. Scarring is markedly reduced in MRL mice compared with C57BL/6 mice, consistent with both the reduced hydroxyproline levels seen after injury and an elevated cardiomyocyte mitotic index of 10–20% for the MRL compared with 1–3% for the C57BL/6. The myocardial response to injury observed in these mice resembles the regenerative process seen in amphibians. PMID:11493713

  17. Heart regeneration in adult MRL mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leferovich, John M.; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Samulewicz, Stefan; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Zwas, Donna; Lankford, Edward B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2001-08-01

    The reaction of cardiac tissue to acute injury involves interacting cascades of cellular and molecular responses that encompass inflammation, hormonal signaling, extracellular matrix remodeling, and compensatory adaptation of myocytes. Myocardial regeneration is observed in amphibians, whereas scar formation characterizes cardiac ventricular wound healing in a variety of mammalian injury models. We have previously shown that the MRL mouse strain has an extraordinary capacity to heal surgical wounds, a complex trait that maps to at least seven genetic loci. Here, we extend these studies to cardiac wounds and demonstrate that a severe transmural, cryogenically induced infarction of the right ventricle heals extensively within 60 days, with the restoration of normal myocardium and function. Scarring is markedly reduced in MRL mice compared with C57BL/6 mice, consistent with both the reduced hydroxyproline levels seen after injury and an elevated cardiomyocyte mitotic index of 10-20% for the MRL compared with 1-3% for the C57BL/6. The myocardial response to injury observed in these mice resembles the regenerative process seen in amphibians.

  18. Learning and Memory Deficits in Male Adult Mice Treated with a Benzodiazepine Sleep-Inducing Drug during the Juvenile Period

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Tanemura, Kentaro; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Ideta-Otsuka, Maky; Aisaki, Ken-Ichi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kanno, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is also known to be important for brain development. Therefore, disturbances of GABA receptor (GABA-R) mediated signaling (GABA-R signal) during brain development may influence normal brain maturation and cause late-onset brain malfunctions. In this study, we examined whether the stimulation of the GABA-R signal during brain development induces late-onset adverse effects on the brain in adult male mice. To stimulate the GABA-R signal, we used either the benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drug triazolam (TZ) or the non-benzodiazepine drug zolpidem (ZP). We detected learning and memory deficits in mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period, as seen in the fear conditioning test. On the other hand, ZP administration during the juvenile period had little effect. In addition, decreased protein expression of GluR1 and GluR4, which are excitatory neurotransmitter receptors, was detected in the hippocampi of mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period. We measured mRNA expression of the immediate early genes (IEGs), which are neuronal activity markers, in the hippocampus shortly after the administration of TZ or ZP to juvenile mice. Decreased IEG expression was detected in mice with juvenile TZ administration, but not in mice with juvenile ZP administration. Our findings demonstrate that TZ administration during the juvenile period can induce irreversible learning and memory deficits in adult mice. It may need to take an extra care for the prescription of benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drugs to juveniles because it might cause learning and memory deficits. PMID:27489535

  19. Learning and Memory Deficits in Male Adult Mice Treated with a Benzodiazepine Sleep-Inducing Drug during the Juvenile Period.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Tanemura, Kentaro; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Ideta-Otsuka, Maky; Aisaki, Ken-Ichi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kanno, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is also known to be important for brain development. Therefore, disturbances of GABA receptor (GABA-R) mediated signaling (GABA-R signal) during brain development may influence normal brain maturation and cause late-onset brain malfunctions. In this study, we examined whether the stimulation of the GABA-R signal during brain development induces late-onset adverse effects on the brain in adult male mice. To stimulate the GABA-R signal, we used either the benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drug triazolam (TZ) or the non-benzodiazepine drug zolpidem (ZP). We detected learning and memory deficits in mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period, as seen in the fear conditioning test. On the other hand, ZP administration during the juvenile period had little effect. In addition, decreased protein expression of GluR1 and GluR4, which are excitatory neurotransmitter receptors, was detected in the hippocampi of mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period. We measured mRNA expression of the immediate early genes (IEGs), which are neuronal activity markers, in the hippocampus shortly after the administration of TZ or ZP to juvenile mice. Decreased IEG expression was detected in mice with juvenile TZ administration, but not in mice with juvenile ZP administration. Our findings demonstrate that TZ administration during the juvenile period can induce irreversible learning and memory deficits in adult mice. It may need to take an extra care for the prescription of benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drugs to juveniles because it might cause learning and memory deficits. PMID:27489535

  20. Gold nanoparticle imaging and radiotherapy of brain tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hainfeld, James F; Smilowitz, Henry M; O'Connor, Michael J; Dilmanian, Farrokh Avraham; Slatkin, Daniel N

    2013-01-01

    Aim To test intravenously injected gold nanoparticles for x-ray imaging and radiotherapy enhancement of large, imminently lethal, intracerebral malignant gliomas. Materials & methods Gold nanoparticles approximately 11 nm in size were injected intravenously and brains imaged using microcomputed tomography. A total of 15 h after an intravenous dose of 4 g Au/kg was administered, brains were irradiated with 30 Gy 100 kVp x-rays. Results Gold uptake gave a 19:1 tumor-to-normal brain ratio with 1.5% w/w gold in tumor, calculated to increase local radiation dose by approximately 300%. Mice receiving gold and radiation (30 Gy) demonstrated 50% long term (>1 year) tumor-free survival, whereas all mice receiving radiation only died. Conclusion Intravenously injected gold nanoparticles cross the blood–tumor barrier, but are largely blocked by the normal blood–brain barrier, enabling high-resolution computed tomography tumor imaging. Gold radiation enhancement significantly improved long-term survival compared with radiotherapy alone. This approach holds promise to improve therapy of human brain tumors and other cancers. PMID:23265347

  1. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  2. Impaired acquisition of swimming navigation in adult mice exposed prenatally to oxazepam.

    PubMed

    Dell'Omo, G; Wolfer, D; Alleva, E; Lipp, H P

    1993-01-01

    Prenatally administered oxazepam (OX) impairs adult radial maze performance in mice, possibly by permanent hippocampal changes. CDI mice were tested in swimming navigation, a sensitive indicator for hippocampal damage. Ten males and ten females were exposed to OX on fetal days 12-16 by maternal administration PO of 30 mg/kg/day and fostered at birth to untreated dams, while control mice received vehicle solution. All mice were tested at 8-9 weeks for ability to find a submerged platform in a fixed location (acquisition: 18 trials, 6 trials per day) and for capacity to re-orient towards a new platform position (reversal: 12 trials, 6 trials per day). OX mice showed a slight but significant impairment of swimming navigation during the initial part of training, as indicated by longer swimming paths during the fourth and fifth trial (day 1), an impairment due both to delayed habituation to the novel stressfull condition and acquisition of platform climbing but unrelated to navigational abilities. No treatment-dependent differences were observed in the reversal phase. During reversal, both OX and control females spent significantly more time in swimming across the location of the old platform. Unrelated to navigational performance, females showed a slightly but significantly higher swimming speed than males. Due to the absence of any navigational impairment, data suggest that prenatal exposure to oxazepam exerts long-term influence on adult learning capacities primarily through interaction with brain systems located outside the hippocampus. PMID:7870931

  3. Brain Morphological Defects in Prolidase Deficient Mice: First Report

    PubMed Central

    Insolia, V.

    2014-01-01

    Prolidase gene (PEPD) encodes prolidase enzyme, which is responsible for hydrolysis of dipeptides containing proline or hydroxypro-line at their C-terminal end. Mutations in PEPD gene cause, in human, prolidase deficiency (PD), a rare autosomal recessive disorder. PD patients show reduced or absent prolidase activity and a broad spectrum of phenotypic traits including various degrees of mental retardation. This is the first report correlating PD and brain damages using as a model system prolidase deficient mice, the so called dark-like (dal) mutant mice. We focused our attention on dal postnatal brain development, revealing a panel of different morphological defects in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, such as undulations of the cerebral cortex, cell rarefaction, defects in cerebellar cortex lobulation, and blood vessels overgrowth. These anomalies might be ascribed to altered angiogenic process and loss of pial basement membrane integrity. Further studies will be directed to find a correlation between neuroarchitecture alterations and functional consequences. PMID:25308848

  4. New Nerve Cells for the Adult Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempermann, Gerd; Gage, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to dogma, the human brain does produce new nerve cells in adulthood. The mature human brain spawns neurons routinely in the hippocampus, an area important to memory and learning. This research can make it possible to ease any number of disorders involving neurological damage and death. (CCM)

  5. Folate Deficiency Induces Neurodegeneration and Brain Dysfunction in Mice Lacking Uracil DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Christoph; Sobol, Robert W.; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Linhart, Heinz; Winter, Benjamin; Balkaya, Mustafa; Gertz, Karen; Gay, Shanna B.; Cox, David; Eckart, Sarah; Ahmadi, Michael; Juckel, Georg; Kempermann, Gerd; Hellweg, Rainer; Sohr, Reinhard; Hörtnagl, Heide; Wilson, Samuel H.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Folate deficiency and resultant increased homocysteine levels have been linked experimentally and epidemiologically with neurodegenerative conditions like stroke and dementia. Moreover, folate deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, most notably depression. We hypothesized that the pathogenic mechanisms include uracil misincorporation and, therefore, analyzed the effects of folate deficiency in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung−/−) versus wild-type controls. Folate depletion increased nuclear mutation rates in Ung−/− embryonic fibroblasts, and conferred death of cultured Ung−/− hippocampal neurons. Feeding animals a folate-deficient diet (FD) for 3 months induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons in Ung−/− but not Ung+/+ mice along with decreased hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and decreased brain levels of antioxidant glutathione. Furthermore, FD induced cognitive deficits and mood alterations such as anxious and despair-like behaviors that were aggravated in Ung−/− mice. Independent of Ung genotype, FD increased plasma homocysteine levels, altered brain monoamine metabolism, and inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that impaired uracil repair is involved in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric dysfunction induced by experimental folate deficiency. PMID:18614692

  6. PRENATAL TCDD IN MICE INCREASES ADULT AUTOIMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, Steven D.; Gogal, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Two immunologically-different mouse strains, C57BL/6 and SNF1, were exposed to a mid-gestation dose of TCDD. The C57BL/6 mouse has a high-affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and is sensitive to TCDD. The SNF1 mouse has a low-affinity AhR but spontaneously develops autoimmune nephritis. Autoreactive Vβ+CD4+17a and Vβ+CD3+ T cells were increased at 24-weeks-of-age in offspring of C57BL/6 mice, more so in females than males. The cytokine IFN-γ was elevated in the females, while IL-10 was elevated in males. Phenotypic changes in B-lineage cells were present in bone marrow and spleen, and circulating autoantibodies were increased after prenatal TCDD. Kidneys of males showed significant anti-IgG and anti-C3 deposition, suggesting early-stage autoimmune disease. The SNF1 offspring similarly showed increased peripheral Vβ+ cells in the females, increased autoantibody production in both sexes, and increased IFN-γ production in females. Male SNF1 mice had increased anti-IgG and anti-C3 deposition in kidneys. Both mouse models therefore showed clear signatures of enhanced autoimmunity after prenatal TCDD. PMID:20728533

  7. Substance use and brain reward mechanisms in older adults.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Marsha; Platt, Lois

    2013-07-01

    Substance use among older adults is on the rise, with statistics indicating this to be a growing health problem. Brain changes in the reward center of the brain that naturally occur with aging are offered as one source of these statistics. Aging is generally associated with increased prevalence of chronic disease, disability, and death, and therefore a public health goal for older adults is to maintain health, independence, and function. Psychiatric-mental health nurses are uniquely positioned to assist older adults in achievement of these goals through health assessment and promotion. The use of client-centered counseling approaches that recognize the older adult's developmental need for autonomy and choice in decision making have been shown to be effective in increasing motivation in this adult population. PMID:23758223

  8. Brain-wide map of projections from mice ventral subiculum.

    PubMed

    Tang, He; Wu, Gui-Sheng; Xie, Jing; He, Xiaobin; Deng, Ke; Wang, Huadong; Xu, Fuqiang; Luo, Huai-Rong

    2016-08-26

    The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in episodic memory formation and spatial navigation. Within the hippocampus, the subiculum is considered to be a hub connecting the hippocampal formation to the remainder of the brain. There are functional differences between the dorsal and ventral part of subiculum, while the ventral subiculum (vSub) plays a role in anxiety, stress and emotion. In the present study, we examined the projection of the ventral subiculum to the whole brain in mice by using a modified herpes simplex virus 1 strain H129 with an inserted fluorescent protein gene. In our experiments, the modified H129 transits the primary-order, second-order, and third-order neuronal projections at 36-44, 52-60 and 68-76h after inoculation in mice, respectively. Our data revealed that vSub directly projects to the medial entorhinal cortex, amygdalohippocampal area, anterodorsal thalamic nucleus, medial hypothalamus, supramammillary nucleus, medial septal nucleus and adjacent diagonal band, the connections between median raphe nucleus and interpeduncular nucleus in brain stem, while ventral prefrontal cortex, laterodorsal tegmental nucleus and locus coeruleus receives second-order projections from vSub. Our data would help further understanding the functional connections of vSub with other brain regions. PMID:27422730

  9. A Safe and Stable Neonatal Vaccine Targeting GAPDH Confers Protection against Group B Streptococcus Infections in Adult Susceptible Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Joana; Madureira, Pedro; Baltazar, Maria Teresa; Barros, Leandro; Oliveira, Liliana; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Andrade, Elva Bonifácio; Ribeiro, Adília; Vieira, Luís Mira; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Duarte, José Alberto; Carvalho, Félix; Ferreira, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS), a commensal organism, can turn into a life-threatening pathogen in neonates and elderly, or in adults with severe underlying diseases such as diabetes. We developed a vaccine targeting the GBS glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a glycolytic enzyme detected at the bacterial surface, which was proven to be effective in a neonatal mouse model of infection. Since this bacterium has emerged as an important pathogen in non-pregnant adults, here we investigated whether this vaccine also confers protection in an adult susceptible and in a diabetic mouse model of infection. For immunoprotection studies, sham or immunized adult mice were infected with GBS serotype Ia and V strains, the two most prevalent serotypes isolated in adults. Sham and vaccinated mice were also rendered diabetic and infected with a serotype V GBS strain. For toxicological (pre-clinical) studies, adult mice were vaccinated three times, with three concentrations of recombinant GAPDH adjuvanted with Allydrogel, and the toxicity parameters were evaluated twenty-four hours after the last immunization. For the stability tests, the vaccine formulations were maintained at 4°C for 6 and 12 months prior immunization. The results showed that all tested doses of the vaccine, including the stability study formulations, were immunogenic and that the vaccine was innocuous. The organs (brain, blood, heart, and liver) of vaccinated susceptible or diabetic adult mice were significantly less colonized compared to those of control mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the GAPDH-based vaccine is safe and stable and protects susceptible and diabetic adult mice against GBS infections. It is therefore a promising candidate as a global vaccine to prevent GBS-induced neonatal and adult diseases. PMID:26673420

  10. A Safe and Stable Neonatal Vaccine Targeting GAPDH Confers Protection against Group B Streptococcus Infections in Adult Susceptible Mice.

    PubMed

    Alves, Joana; Madureira, Pedro; Baltazar, Maria Teresa; Barros, Leandro; Oliveira, Liliana; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Andrade, Elva Bonifácio; Ribeiro, Adília; Vieira, Luís Mira; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Duarte, José Alberto; Carvalho, Félix; Ferreira, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS), a commensal organism, can turn into a life-threatening pathogen in neonates and elderly, or in adults with severe underlying diseases such as diabetes. We developed a vaccine targeting the GBS glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a glycolytic enzyme detected at the bacterial surface, which was proven to be effective in a neonatal mouse model of infection. Since this bacterium has emerged as an important pathogen in non-pregnant adults, here we investigated whether this vaccine also confers protection in an adult susceptible and in a diabetic mouse model of infection. For immunoprotection studies, sham or immunized adult mice were infected with GBS serotype Ia and V strains, the two most prevalent serotypes isolated in adults. Sham and vaccinated mice were also rendered diabetic and infected with a serotype V GBS strain. For toxicological (pre-clinical) studies, adult mice were vaccinated three times, with three concentrations of recombinant GAPDH adjuvanted with Allydrogel, and the toxicity parameters were evaluated twenty-four hours after the last immunization. For the stability tests, the vaccine formulations were maintained at 4°C for 6 and 12 months prior immunization. The results showed that all tested doses of the vaccine, including the stability study formulations, were immunogenic and that the vaccine was innocuous. The organs (brain, blood, heart, and liver) of vaccinated susceptible or diabetic adult mice were significantly less colonized compared to those of control mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the GAPDH-based vaccine is safe and stable and protects susceptible and diabetic adult mice against GBS infections. It is therefore a promising candidate as a global vaccine to prevent GBS-induced neonatal and adult diseases. PMID:26673420

  11. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  12. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint

    PubMed Central

    Zapala, Matthew A.; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A.; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S.; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S.; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J.; Reilly, John F.; Young, Warren G.; Bloom, Floyd E.; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-01-01

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional “imprint” consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior–posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org). PMID:16002470

  13. Whole chromosome aneuploidy in the brain of Bub1bH/H and Ercc1-/Δ7 mice.

    PubMed

    Andriani, Grasiella A; Faggioli, Francesca; Baker, Darren; Dollé, Martijn E T; Sellers, Rani S; Hébert, Jean M; Van Steeg, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Vijg, Jan; Montagna, Cristina

    2016-02-15

    High levels of aneuploidy have been observed in disease-free tissues, including post-mitotic tissues such as the brain. Using a quantitative interphase-fluorescence in situ hybridization approach, we previously reported a chromosome-specific, age-related increase in aneuploidy in the mouse cerebral cortex. Increased aneuploidy has been associated with defects in DNA repair and the spindle assembly checkpoint, which in turn can lead to premature aging. Here, we quantified the frequency of aneuploidy of three autosomes in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of adult and developing brain of Bub1b(H/H) mice, which have a faulty mitotic checkpoint, and Ercc1(-/Δ7) mice, defective in nucleotide excision repair and inter-strand cross-link repair. Surprisingly, the level of aneuploidy in the brain of these murine models of accelerated aging remains as low as in the young adult brains from control animals, i.e. <1% in the cerebral cortex and ∼0.1% in the cerebellum. Therefore, based on aneuploidy, these adult mice with reduced life span and accelerated progeroid features are indistinguishable from age-matched, normal controls. Yet, during embryonic development, we found that Bub1b(H/H), but not Ercc1(-/Δ7) mice, have a significantly higher frequency of aneuploid nuclei relative to wild-type controls in the cerebral cortex, reaching a frequency as high as 40.3% for each chromosome tested. Aneuploid cells in these mutant mice are likely eliminated early in development through apoptosis and/or immune-mediated clearance mechanisms, which would explain the low levels of aneuploidy during adulthood in the cerebral cortex of Bub1b(H/H) mice. These results shed light on the mechanisms of removal of aneuploidy cells in vivo. PMID:26681803

  14. Social Isolation Stress Induces Anxious-Depressive-Like Behavior and Alterations of Neuroplasticity-Related Genes in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Popoli, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a major risk factor in the onset of several neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. Although several studies have shown that social isolation stress during postweaning period induces behavioral and brain molecular changes, the effects of social isolation on behavior during adulthood have been less characterized. Aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between the behavioral alterations and brain molecular changes induced by chronic social isolation stress in adult male mice. Plasma corticosterone levels and adrenal glands weight were also analyzed. Socially isolated (SI) mice showed higher locomotor activity, spent less time in the open field center, and displayed higher immobility time in the tail suspension test compared to group-housed (GH) mice. SI mice exhibited reduced plasma corticosterone levels and reduced difference between right and left adrenal glands. SI showed lower mRNA levels of the BDNF-7 splice variant, c-Fos, Arc, and Egr-1 in both hippocampus and prefrontal cortex compared to GH mice. Finally, SI mice exhibited selectively reduced mGluR1 and mGluR2 levels in the prefrontal cortex. Altogether, these results suggest that anxious- and depressive-like behavior induced by social isolation stress correlates with reduction of several neuroplasticity-related genes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of adult male mice. PMID:26881124

  15. Neonatal Leptin Deficiency Reduces Frontal Cortex Volumes and Programs Adult Hyperactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, Benjamin C; Rahmouni, Kamal; Cushman, Taylor; Hermann, Gregory M; Ni, Charles; Nopoulos, Peg C; Thedens, Daniel L; Roghair, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction and premature delivery decrease circulating levels of the neurotrophic hormone leptin and increase the risk of adult psychiatric disease. In mouse models, neonatal leptin replacement normalizes brain growth and improves the neurodevelopmental outcomes of growth restricted mice, but leptin supplementation of well-grown mice decreases adult locomotor activity. We hypothesized isolated neonatal leptin deficiency is sufficient to reduce adult brain volumes and program behavioral outcomes, including hyperactivity. C57Bl/6 pups were randomized to daily injections of saline or PEG-leptin antagonist (LX, 12.5 mg/kg) from postnatal day 4 to 14. After 4 months, fear conditioning and open field testing were performed followed by carotid radiotelemetry for the measurement of baseline activity and blood pressure. Neonatal LX did not significantly increase cue-based fear or blood pressure, but increased adult locomotor activity during assessment in both the open field (beam breaks: control 930±40, LX 1099±42, P<0.01) and the home cage (radiotelemetry counts: control 4.5±0.3, LX 5.6±0.3, P=0.02). Follow-up MRI revealed significant reductions in adult frontal cortex volumes following neonatal LX administration (control 45.1±0.4 mm3, LX 43.8±0.4 mm3, P=0.04). This was associated with a significant increase in cerebral cortex leptin receptor mRNA expression. In conclusion, isolated neonatal leptin deficiency increases cerebral cortex leptin receptor expression and reduces frontal cortex volumes in association with increased adult locomotor activity. We speculate neonatal leptin deficiency may contribute to the adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with perinatal growth restriction, and postnatal leptin therapy may be protective. PMID:24472638

  16. The effects of vitamin D on brain development and adult brain function.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Eyles, Darryl W; Burne, Thomas H J; McGrath, John J

    2011-12-01

    A role for vitamin D in brain development and function has been gaining support over the last decade. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that this vitamin is actually a neuroactive steroid that acts on brain development, leading to alterations in brain neurochemistry and adult brain function. Early deficiencies have been linked with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, and adult deficiencies have been associated with a host of adverse brain outcomes, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression and cognitive decline. This review summarises the current state of research on the actions of vitamin D in the brain and the consequences of deficiencies in this vitamin. Furthermore, we discuss specific implications of vitamin D status on the neurotransmitter, dopamine. PMID:21664231

  17. Effects of postnatal alcohol exposure on hippocampal gene expression and learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Moon, Jihye; Ryu, Jinhyun; Jeong, Joo Yeon; Roh, Gu Seob; Kim, Hyun Joon; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Kang, Sang Soo

    2016-04-28

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a condition resulting from excessive drinking by pregnant women. Symptoms of FAS include abnormal facial features, stunted growth, intellectual deficits and attentional dysfunction. Many studies have investigated FAS, but its underlying mechanisms remain unknown. This study evaluated the relationship between alcohol exposure during the synaptogenesis period in postnatal mice and subsequent cognitive function in adult mice. We delivered two injections, separated by 2 h, of ethanol (3 g/kg, ethanol/saline, 20% v/v) to ICR mice on postnatal day 7. After 10 weeks, we conducted a behavioral test, sacrificed the animals, harvested brain tissue and analyzed hippocampal gene expression using a microarray. In ethanol-treated mice, there was a reduction in brain size and decreased neuronal cell number in the cortex, and also cognitive impairment. cDNA microarray results indicated that 1,548 genes showed a > 2-fold decrease in expression relative to control, whereas 974 genes showed a > 2-fold increase in expression relative to control. Many of these genes were related to signal transduction, synaptogenesis and cell membrane formation, which are highlighted in our findings. PMID:26960969

  18. Impaired Survival of Neural Progenitor Cells in Dentate Gyrus of Adult Mice Lacking FMRP

    PubMed Central

    Lazarov, Orly; Demars, Michael P.; Zhao, Kai Da Tommy; Ali, Haroon M.; Grauzas, Vanessa; Kney, Adam; Larson, John

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability in humans. Individuals affected with the disorder exhibit a deficiency of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), due to transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene. It is widely accepted that learning deficits in FXS result from impaired synaptic function and/or plasticity in the brain. Interestingly, recent evidence suggests that conditional knockout of Fmr1 in neural progenitor cells in mice impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, which in turn contributes to learning impairments. To examine the nature of the neurogenic impairments and determine whether they impact the morphology of the dentate gyrus, we assessed the extent of neural progenitor cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in older adult Fmr1 knockout mice. Here we show that the number of fast- proliferating cells in the subgranule layer of the dentate gyrus, as well as the subsequent survival of these cells, are dramatically reduced in Fmr1 knockout mice. In addition, the number of mature neurons in the granule layer of the dentate gyrus of these mice is significantly smaller than in WT littermate controls, suggesting that impaired proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells compromises the structure of the dentate gyrus. Impaired adult neurogenesis may underlie, at least in part, the learning deficits that characterize fragile X syndrome. PMID:22128095

  19. The Protein Kinase KIS Impacts Gene Expression during Development and Fear Conditioning in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Valérie; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Maucuer, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The brain-enriched protein kinase KIS (product of the gene UHMK1) has been shown to phosphorylate the human splicing factor SF1 in vitro. This phosphorylation in turn favors the formation of a U2AF65-SF1-RNA complex which occurs at the 3′ end of introns at an early stage of spliceosome assembly. Here, we analyzed the effects of KIS knockout on mouse SF1 phosphorylation, physiology, adult behavior, and gene expression in the neonate brain. We found SF1 isoforms are differently expressed in KIS-ko mouse brains and fibroblasts. Re-expression of KIS in fibroblasts restores a wild type distribution of SF1 isoforms, confirming the link between KIS and SF1. Microarray analysis of transcripts in the neonate brain revealed a subtle down-regulation of brain specific genes including cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels and metabolic enzymes. Q-PCR analyses confirmed these defects and point to an increase of pre-mRNA over mRNA ratios, likely due to changes in splicing efficiency. While performing similarly in prepulse inhibition and most other behavioral tests, KIS-ko mice differ in spontaneous activity and contextual fear conditioning. This difference suggests that disregulation of gene expression due to KIS inactivation affects specific brain functions. PMID:22937132

  20. A brain sexual dimorphism controlled by adult circulating androgens.

    PubMed

    Cooke, B M; Tabibnia, G; Breedlove, S M

    1999-06-22

    Reports of structural differences between the brains of men and women, heterosexual and homosexual men, and male-to-female transsexuals and other men have been offered as evidence that the behavioral differences between these groups are likely caused by differences in the early development of the brain. However, a possible confounding variable is the concentration of circulating hormones seen in these groups in adulthood. Evaluation of this possibility hinges on the extent to which circulating hormones can alter the size of mammalian brain regions as revealed by Nissl stains. We now report a sexual dimorphism in the volume of a brain nucleus in rats that can be completely accounted for by adult sex differences in circulating androgen. The posterodorsal nucleus of the medial amygdala (MePD) has a greater volume in male rats than in females, but adult castration of males causes the volume to shrink to female values within four weeks, whereas androgen treatment of adult females for that period enlarges the MePD to levels equivalent to normal males. This report demonstrates that adult hormone manipulations can completely reverse a sexual dimorphism in brain regional volume in a mammalian species. The sex difference and androgen responsiveness of MePD volume is reflected in the soma size of neurons there. PMID:10377450

  1. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  2. Brain Phenotype of Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Cystathionine β-Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Régnier, Vinciane; Billard, Jean-Marie; Gupta, Sapna; Potier, Brigitte; Woerner, Stéphanie; Paly, Evelyne; Ledru, Aurélie; David, Sabrina; Luilier, Sabrina; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Vacano, Guido; Kraus, Jan P.; Patterson, David; Kruger, Warren D.; Delabar, Jean M.; London, Jaqueline

    2012-01-01

    Background The cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) gene, located on human chromosome 21q22.3, is a good candidate for playing a role in the Down Syndrome (DS) cognitive profile: it is overexpressed in the brain of individuals with DS, and it encodes a key enzyme of sulfur-containing amino acid (SAA) metabolism, a pathway important for several brain physiological processes. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have studied the neural consequences of CBS overexpression in a transgenic mouse line (60.4P102D1) expressing the human CBS gene under the control of its endogenous regulatory regions. These mice displayed a ∼2-fold increase in total CBS proteins in different brain areas and a ∼1.3-fold increase in CBS activity in the cerebellum and the hippocampus. No major disturbance of SAA metabolism was observed, and the transgenic mice showed normal behavior in the rotarod and passive avoidance tests. However, we found that hippocampal synaptic plasticity is facilitated in the 60.4P102D1 line. Conclusion/Significance We demonstrate that CBS overexpression has functional consequences on hippocampal neuronal networks. These results shed new light on the function of the CBS gene, and raise the interesting possibility that CBS overexpression might have an advantageous effect on some cognitive functions in DS. PMID:22253703

  3. Fetal Alcohol Exposure Reduces Adult Brain Plasticity. Science Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This Brief summarizes the findings and implications of "Moderate Fetal Alcohol Exposure Impairs the Neurogenic Response to an Enriched Environment in Adult Mice" (I. Y. Choi; A. M. Allan; and L. A. Cunningham). Observations of mice…

  4. Inflammation is detrimental for neurogenesis in adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Christine T.; Claasen, Jan-Hendrik; Bonde, Sara; Kokaia, Zaal; Lindvall, Olle

    2003-11-01

    New hippocampal neurons are continuously generated in the adult brain. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, which gives rise to microglia activation in the area where the new neurons are born, strongly impairs basal hippocampal neurogenesis in rats. The increased neurogenesis triggered by a brain insult is also attenuated if it is associated with microglia activation caused by tissue damage or lipopolysaccharide infusion. The impaired neurogenesis in inflammation is restored by systemic administration of minocycline, which inhibits microglia activation. Our data raise the possibility that suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis by activated microglia contributes to cognitive dysfunction in aging, dementia, epilepsy, and other conditions leading to brain inflammation.

  5. Neonatal Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination alleviates lipopolysaccharide-induced neurobehavioral impairments and neuroinflammation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junhua; Qi, Fangfang; Yao, Zhibin

    2016-08-01

    The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is routinely administered to human neonates worldwide. BCG has recently been identified as a neuroprotective immune mediator in several neuropathological conditions, exerting neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease and slowing the progression of clinically isolated syndrome in patients with multiple sclerosis. The immune system is significantly involved in brain development, and several types of neonatal immune activations exert influences on the brain and behavior following a secondary immune challenge in adulthood. However, whether the neonatal BCG vaccination affects the brain in adulthood remains to be elucidated. In the present study, newborn C57BL/6 mice were injected subcutaneously with BCG (105 colony forming units) or phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS). A total of 12 weeks later, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with 330 µg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PBS. The present study reported that the neonatal BCG vaccination alleviated sickness, anxiety and depression‑like behavior, lessened the impairments in hippocampal cell proliferation and downregulated the proinflammatory responses in the serum and brain that were induced by the adult LPS challenge. However, BCG vaccination alone had no evident influence on the brain and behavior in adulthood. In conclusion, the neonatal BCG vaccination alleviated the neurobehavioral impairments and neuroinflammation induced by LPS exposure in adult mice, suggesting a potential neuroprotective role of the neonatal BCG vaccination in adulthood. PMID:27357155

  6. Neonatal Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination alleviates lipopolysaccharide-induced neurobehavioral impairments and neuroinflammation in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhua; Qi, Fangfang; Yao, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is routinely administered to human neonates worldwide. BCG has recently been identified as a neuroprotective immune mediator in several neuropathological conditions, exerting neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease and slowing the progression of clinically isolated syndrome in patients with multiple sclerosis. The immune system is significantly involved in brain development, and several types of neonatal immune activations exert influences on the brain and behavior following a secondary immune challenge in adulthood. However, whether the neonatal BCG vaccination affects the brain in adulthood remains to be elucidated. In the present study, newborn C57BL/6 mice were injected subcutaneously with BCG (105 colony forming units) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A total of 12 weeks later, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with 330 µg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PBS. The present study reported that the neonatal BCG vaccination alleviated sickness, anxiety and depression-like behavior, lessened the impairments in hippocampal cell proliferation and downregulated the proinflammatory responses in the serum and brain that were induced by the adult LPS challenge. However, BCG vaccination alone had no evident influence on the brain and behavior in adulthood. In conclusion, the neonatal BCG vaccination alleviated the neurobehavioral impairments and neuroinflammation induced by LPS exposure in adult mice, suggesting a potential neuroprotective role of the neonatal BCG vaccination in adulthood. PMID:27357155

  7. Litter Size Predicts Adult Stereotypic Behavior in Female Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bechard, Allison; Nicholson, Anthony; Mason, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Stereotypic behaviors are repetitive invariant behaviors that are common in many captive species and potentially indicate compromised welfare and suitability as research subjects. Adult laboratory mice commonly perform stereotypic bar-gnawing, route-tracing, and back-flipping, although great individual variation in frequency occurs. Early life factors (for example, level of maternal care received) have lasting effects on CNS functioning and abilities to cope with stress and therefore may also affect stereotypic behavior in offspring. Access to maternal resources and care are influenced by the number of pups in a litter; therefore, we examined both litter size and its potential correlate, weight at weaning, as early environmental predictors of adult stereotypic behavior in laboratory mice. Further, we assessed the effects on offspring stereotypic behavior of delaying the separation of mother and pups (weaning) beyond the standard 21 d of age. Analyzing stereotypic behavior in 3 different mouse colonies composed of 2 inbred strains (C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J) and an outbred stock (CD1[ICR]) revealed significant positive correlation between litter size and stereotypic behavior in female, but not male, mice. Weight and age at weaning did not significantly affect levels of stereotypy in either sex. Litter size therefore may be a useful indicator of individual predisposition to stereotypic behavior in female laboratory mice. PMID:23043805

  8. Traumatic brain injury in mice and pentadecapeptide BPC 157 effect.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Mario; Jandric, Ivan; Marovic, Anton; Gjurasin, Miroslav; Perovic, Darko; Radic, Bozo; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, an anti-ulcer peptide, efficient in inflammatory bowel disease trials (PL 14736), no toxicity reported, improved muscle crush injury. After an induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice by a falling weight, BPC 157 regimens (10.0microg, 10.0ng/kgi.p.) demonstrated a marked attenuation of damage with an improved early outcome and a minimal postponed mortality throughout a 24h post-injury period. Ultimately, the traumatic lesions (subarachnoidal and intraventricular haemorrhage, brain laceration, haemorrhagic laceration) were less intense and consecutive brain edema had considerably improved. Given prophylactically (30 min before TBI) the improved conscious/unconscious/death ratio in TBI-mice was after force impulses of 0.068 Ns, 0.093 Ns, 0.113 Ns, 0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, and 0.159 Ns. Counteraction (with a reduction of unconsciousness, lower mortality) with both microg- and ng-regimens included the force impulses of 0.068-0.145 Ns. A higher regimen presented effectiveness also against the maximal force impulse (0.159 Ns). Furthermore, BPC 157 application immediately prior to injury was beneficial in mice subjected to force impulses of 0.093 Ns-TBI. For a more severe force impulse (0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, or 0159 Ns), the time-relation to improve the conscious/unconscious/death ratio was: 5 min (0.130 Ns-TBI), 20 min (0.145 Ns-TBI) or 30 min (0.159 Ns-TBI). PMID:19931318

  9. Brain levels of the neurotoxic pyridinium metabolite HPP+ and extrapyramidal symptoms in haloperidol-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Crowley, James J; Ashraf-Khorassani, Mehdi; Castagnoli, Neal; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2013-12-01

    The typical antipsychotic haloperidol is a highly effective treatment for schizophrenia but its use is limited by a number of serious, and often irreversible, motor side effects. These adverse drug reactions, termed extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS), result from an unknown pathophysiological mechanism. One theory relates to the observation that the haloperidol metabolite HPP+ (4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-oxobutyl]-pyridinium) is structurally similar to MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium), a neurotoxin responsible for an irreversible neurodegenerative condition similar to Parkinson's disease. To determine whether HPP+ contributes to haloperidol-induced EPS, we measured brain HPP+ and haloperidol levels in strains of mice at high (C57BL/6J and NZO/HILtJ) and low (BALB/cByJ and PWK/PhJ) liability to haloperidol-induced EPS following chronic treatment (7-10 adult male mice per strain). Brain levels of HPP+ and the ratio of HPP+ to haloperidol were not significantly different between the haloperidol-sensitive and haloperidol-resistant strain groups (P=0.50). Within each group, however, strain differences were seen (P<0.01), indicating that genetic variation regulating steady-state HPP+ levels exists. Since the HPP+ levels that we observed in mouse brain overlap the range of those detected in post-mortem human brains following chronic haloperidol treatment, the findings from this study are physiologically relevant to humans. The results suggest that strain differences in steady-state HPP+ levels do not explain sensitivity to haloperidol-induced EPS in the mice we studied. PMID:24107597

  10. Abnormal Brain Iron Metabolism in Irp2 Deficient Mice Is Associated with Mild Neurological and Behavioral Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B.; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M.; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Romney, Steven J.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2−/− mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2−/− mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments. PMID:24896637

  11. [Chemotherapy for brain tumors in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Weller, M

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapy has become a third major treatment option for patients with brain tumors, in addition to surgery and radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gliomas is no longer limited to recurrent disease. Temozolomide has become the standard of care in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Several ongoing trials seek to define the role of chemotherapy in the primary care of other gliomas. Some of these studies are no longer only based on histological diagnoses, but take into consideration molecular markers such as MGMT promoter methylation and loss of genetic material on chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Outside such clinical trials chemotherapy is used in addition to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic astrocytoma, medulloblastoma or germ cell tumors, or as an alternative to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors or low-grade gliomas. In contrast, there is no established role for chemotherapy in other tumors such as ependymomas, meningiomas or neurinomas. Primary cerebral lymphomas are probably the only brain tumors which can be cured by chemotherapy alone and only by chemotherapy. The chemotherapy of brain metastases follows the recommendations for the respective primary tumors. Further, strategies of combined radiochemotherapy using mainly temozolomide or topotecan are currently explored. Leptomeningeal metastases are treated by radiotherapy or systemic or intrathecal chemotherapy depending on their pattern of growth. PMID:18253773

  12. Early gestational exposure to moderate concentrations of ethanol alters adult behaviour in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Vega, Michelle C; Chong, Suyinn; Burne, Thomas H J

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy has deleterious effects on the developing foetus ranging from subtle physical deficits to severe behavioural abnormalities and is encompassed under a broad umbrella term, foetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). High levels of exposure show distinct effects, whereas the consequences of moderate exposures have been less well studied. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a moderate dose ethanol exposure using an ad libitum drinking procedure during the first eight days of gestation in mice on the behavioural phenotype of adult offspring. Adult female C57Bl/6J mice were mated and exposed to either 10% (v/v) ethanol or water for the first 8 days of gestation (GD 0-8), and then offered water for the rest of gestation. Early developmental milestone achievement was assessed in offspring at postnatal days (P) 7, 14 and 21. Adult offspring underwent a comprehensive battery of behavioural tests to examine a range of behavioural domains including locomotion, exploration, anxiety, social behaviour, learned helplessness, sensorimotor gating, and nociception, as well as spatial memory in a water maze. Ethanol-exposed mice had similar postnatal developmental trajectories to water-exposed mice. However, the ethanol-exposed mice showed increased hyperlocomotion at P 14, 21 and 70 (p<0.05). Increased exploration and heightened motivation were also observed in adult mice. Furthermore, ethanol-exposed mice showed a significant improvement in memory in the water maze. The main findings were that mice had persistent and long lasting alterations in behaviour, including hyperactivity and enhanced spatial memory. These data suggest that even moderate dose ethanol exposure in early gestation has long term consequences on brain function and behaviour in mice. PMID:23756143

  13. Muscle stem cells contribute to myofibers in sedentary adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Alexandra C.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Flygare, Steven D.; Fox, Zachary D.; Colasanto, Mary P.; Mathew, Sam J.; Yandell, Mark; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is essential for mobility, stability, and whole body metabolism, and muscle loss, for instance during sarcopenia, has profound consequences. Satellite cells (muscle stem cells) have been hypothesized, but not yet demonstrated, to contribute to muscle homeostasis and a decline in their contribution to myofiber homeostasis to play a part in sarcopenia. To test their role in muscle maintenance, we genetically labeled and ablated satellite cells in adult sedentary mice. We demonstrate via genetic lineage experiments that even in the absence of injury, satellite cells contribute to myofibers in all adult muscles, although the extent and timing differs. However, genetic ablation experiments showed that satellite cells are not globally required to maintain myofiber cross-sectional area of uninjured adult muscle. PMID:25971691

  14. Bilateral Brain Regions Associated with Naming in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obler, Loraine K.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Schnyer, David; Clark-Cotton, Manuella R.; Spiro, Avron, III; Hyun, JungMoon; Kim, Dae-Shik; Goral, Mira; Albert, Martin L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine structural brain correlates of naming abilities in older adults, we tested 24 individuals aged 56-79 on two confrontation-naming tests (the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT)), then collected from these individuals structural Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data. Overall,…

  15. FGF-2 regulation of neurogenesis in adult hippocampus after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Shinichi; Takagi, Yasushi; Harada, Jun; Teramoto, Tetsuyuki; Thomas, Sunu S.; Waeber, Christian; Bakowska, Joanna C.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Moskowitz, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) promotes proliferation of neuroprogenitor cells in culture and is up-regulated within brain after injury. Using mice genetically deficient in FGF-2 (FGF-2−/− mice), we addressed the importance of endogenously generated FGF-2 on neurogenesis within the hippocampus, a structure involved in spatial, declarative, and contextual memory, after seizures or ischemic injury. BrdUrd incorporation was used to mark dividing neuroprogenitor cells and NeuN expression to monitor their differentiation into neurons. In the wild-type strain, hippocampal FGF-2 increased after either kainic acid injection or middle cerebral artery occlusion, and the numbers of BrdUrd/NeuN-positive cells significantly increased on days 9 and 16 as compared with the controls. In FGF-2−/− mice, BrdUrd labeling was attenuated after kainic acid or middle cerebral artery occlusion, as was the number of neural cells colabeled with both BrdUrd and NeuN. After FGF-2−/− mice were injected intraventricularly with a herpes simplex virus-1 amplicon vector carrying FGF-2 gene, the number of BrdUrd-labeled cells increased significantly to values equivalent to wild-type littermates after kainate seizures. These results indicate that endogenously synthesized FGF-2 is necessary and sufficient to stimulate proliferation and differentiation of neuroprogenitor cells in the adult hippocampus after brain insult. PMID:11320217

  16. Preferential Delivery of an Opioid Antagonist to the Fetal Brain in Pregnant Mice.

    PubMed

    Oberdick, John; Ling, Yonghua; Phelps, Mitch A; Yudovich, Max S; Schilling, Karl; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Prolonged fetal exposure to opioids results in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a major medical problem requiring intensive care and increased hospitalization times for newborns with NAS. Multiple strategies are currently available to alleviate withdrawal in infants with NAS. To prevent NAS caused by opioid maintenance programs in pregnant women, blocking fetal dependence without compromising the mother's opiate therapy is desirable. Here we tested in pregnant mice whether a peripherally selective opioid antagonist can preferentially enter the fetal brain and, thereby, in principle, selectively protect the fetus. We show using mass spectrometry that 6β-naltrexol, a neutral opioid antagonist with very limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), readily crosses the placental barrier and enters the fetal brain at high levels, although it is relatively excluded from the maternal brain. Furthermore, owing to the late development of the BBB in postnatal mice, we show that 6β-naltrexol can readily enter the juvenile mouse brain until at least postnatal day 14. Taking advantage of this observation, we show that long-term exposure to morphine starting in the second postnatal week causes robust and quantifiable dependence behaviors that are suppressed by concomitant administration of 6β-naltrexol with much greater potency (ID50 0.022-0.044 mg/kg, or 1/500 the applied dose of morphine) than previously demonstrated for either the suppression of central nervous system opioid effects or the induction of withdrawal in adults. These results indicate that peripherally selective opioid antagonists capable of penetrating the placenta may be beneficial for preventing or reducing neonatal dependence and NAS in a dose range that should not interfere with maternal opioid maintenance. PMID:27189967

  17. Pedophilic brain potential responses to adult erotic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Knott, Verner; Impey, Danielle; Fisher, Derek; Delpero, Emily; Fedoroff, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive mechanisms associated with the relative lack of sexual interest in adults by pedophiles are poorly understood and may benefit from investigations examining how the brain processes adult erotic stimuli. The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERP) to investigate the time course of the explicit processing of erotic, emotional, and neutral pictures in 22 pedophilic patients and 22 healthy controls. Consistent with previous studies, early latency anterior ERP components were highly selective for erotic pictures. Although the ERPs elicited by emotional stimuli were similar in patients and controls, an early frontal positive (P2) component starting as early as 185 ms was significantly attenuated and slow to onset in pedophilia, and correlated with a clinical measure of cognitive distortions. Failure of rapid attentional capture by erotic stimuli suggests a relative reduction in early processing in pedophilic patients which may be associated with relatively diminished sexual interest in adults. PMID:26683083

  18. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  19. Dairy fat blend improves brain DHA and neuroplasticity and regulates corticosterone in mice.

    PubMed

    Dinel, A L; Rey, C; Bonhomme, C; Le Ruyet, P; Joffre, C; Layé, S

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the breast milk lipid composition appears to be necessary for infant formula to cover the brain's needs in n-3 PUFA. In this study, we evaluated the impact of partial replacement of vegetable oil (VL) in infant formula by dairy fat (DL) on docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) brain level, neuroplasticity and corticosterone in mice. Mice were fed with balanced VL or balanced DL diets enriched or not in DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) from the first day of gestation. Brain DHA level, microglia number, neurogenesis, corticosterone and glucocorticoid receptor expression were measured in the offsprings. DL diet increased DHA and neuroplasticity in the brain of mice at postnatal day (PND) 14 and at adulthood compared to VL. At PND14, ARA and DHA supplementation increased DHA in VL but not in DL mice brain. Importantly, DHA and ARA supplementation further improved neurogenesis and decreased corticosterone level in DL mice at adulthood. In conclusion, dairy lipids improve brain DHA level and neuroplasticity. PMID:27269711

  20. Impaired Memory in OT-II Transgenic Mice Is Associated with Decreased Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis Possibly Induced by Alteration in Th2 Cytokine Levels.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seong Gak; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Chung, Hyunju; Choi, Junghyun; Song, Eun Ji; Han, Seung-Yun; Oh, Myung Sook; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Il; Moon, Minho

    2016-08-31

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have focused on the effects of CD4+ T cell on cognitive function. However, the changes of Th2 cytokines in restricted CD4+ T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire model and their effects on the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether and how the mice with restricted CD4+ repertoire TCR exhibit learning and memory impairment by using OT-II mice. OT-II mice showed decreased adult neurogenesis in hippocampus and short- and long- term memory impairment. Moreover, Th2 cytokines in OT-II mice are significantly increased in peripheral organs and IL-4 is significantly increased in brain. Finally, IL-4 treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells. Taken together, abnormal level of Th2 cytokines can lead memory dysfunction via impaired adult neurogenesis in OT-II transgenic. PMID:27432189

  1. Impaired Memory in OT-II Transgenic Mice Is Associated with Decreased Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis Possibly Induced by Alteration in Th2 Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Seong Gak; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Chung, Hyunju; Choi, Junghyun; Song, Eun Ji; Han, Seung-Yun; Oh, Myung Sook; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jin-il; Moon, Minho

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have focused on the effects of CD4+ T cell on cognitive function. However, the changes of Th2 cytokines in restricted CD4+ T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire model and their effects on the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether and how the mice with restricted CD4+ repertoire TCR exhibit learning and memory impairment by using OT-II mice. OT-II mice showed decreased adult neurogenesis in hippocampus and short- and long- term memory impairment. Moreover, Th2 cytokines in OT-II mice are significantly increased in peripheral organs and IL-4 is significantly increased in brain. Finally, IL-4 treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells. Taken together, abnormal level of Th2 cytokines can lead memory dysfunction via impaired adult neurogenesis in OT-II transgenic. PMID:27432189

  2. Bovine brain phosphatidylserine attenuates scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Claro, Flavia T; Patti, Camilla L; Abílio, Vanessa C; Frussa-Filho, Roberto; Silva, Regina H

    2006-07-01

    This study verifies the effects of bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS) on passive avoidance (PA) and contextual fear conditioning (CFC) tests in scopolamine-treated mice. Mice received daily i.p. 50 mg/kg PS or 0.2 M Tris pH 7.4 (TRIS) for 5 days. On day 6, mice received saline (TRIS-SAL and PS-SAL) or 1 mg/kg SCO (TRIS-SCO and PS-SCO) i.p. After 20 min, the animals were submitted to PA (experiment 1) or CFC (experiment 2) training sessions, and tests were performed 24 h later. Latency in entering the dark chamber of the PA apparatus presented by TRIS-SCO (but not PS-SCO) group in the test was significantly higher than those presented by controls. Except for TRIS-SCO, all the groups presented higher latencies in the test compared to the training session. In experiment 2, the TRIS-SCO (but not PS-SCO) group presented significantly lower freezing duration than that presented by the TRIS-SAL group in the test. Animals treated with PS alone presented higher freezing duration than that presented by the TRIS-SAL group. The results demonstrate that PS attenuates SCO-induced amnesia in both PA and CFC tests. In addition, PS per se improves retention in the CFC test. PMID:16624469

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is altered in the forebrain of Engrailed-2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zunino, G; Messina, A; Sgadò, P; Baj, G; Casarosa, S; Bozzi, Y

    2016-06-01

    Engrailed-2 (En2), a homeodomain transcription factor involved in regionalization and patterning of the midbrain and hindbrain regions has been associated to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). En2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice show ASD-like features accompanied by a significant loss of GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus and neocortex. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a crucial factor for the postnatal development of forebrain GABAergic neurons, and altered GABA signaling has been hypothesized to underlie the symptoms of ASD. Here we sought to determine whether interneuron loss in the En2(-/-) forebrain might be related to altered expression of BDNF and its signaling receptors. We first evaluated the expression of different BDNF mRNA isoforms in the neocortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT) and En2(-/-) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR showed a marked down-regulation of several splicing variants of BDNF mRNA in the neocortex but not hippocampus of adult En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT controls. Accordingly, levels of mature BDNF protein were lower in the neocortex but not hippocampus of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT. Increased levels of phosphorylated TrkB and decreased levels of p75 receptor were also detected in the neocortex of mutant mice. Accordingly, the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and RhoA, two genes regulated via p75 was significantly altered in forebrain areas of mutant mice. These data indicate that BDNF signaling alterations might be involved in the anatomical changes observed in the En2(-/-) forebrain and suggest a pathogenic role of altered BDNF signaling in this mouse model of ASD. PMID:26987954

  4. Discovery of nigral dopaminergic neurogenesis in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brad E.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. As a result, intensive efforts have focused upon mechanisms that facilitate the death of mature dopaminergic neurons. Unfortunately, these efforts have been unsuccessful in providing an effective treatment to address neurodegeneration in this disease. Therefore, alternative theories of pathogenesis are being explored. Adult neurogenesis of dopaminergic neurons is an attractive concept that would provide a possible mechanism of neurodegeneration as well as offer an endogenous means to replenish affected neurons. To determine whether dopaminergic neurons experience neurogenesis in adult mice we developed a novel cell lineage tracing model that permitted detection of neurogenesis without many of the issues associated with popular techniques. Remarkably, we discovered that dopaminergic neurons are replenished in adult mice by Nestin+/Sox2- progenitor cells. What's more, the rate of neurogenesis is similar to the rate of dopaminergic neuron loss reported using a chronic, systemic inflammatory response mouse model. This observation may indicate that neuron loss in Parkinson's disease results from inhibition of neurogenesis. PMID:27482200

  5. Prostatic inflammation induces urinary frequency in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghee; Yang, Guang; Bushman, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) including urinary frequency and nocturia are common in aging men. Recent studies have revealed a strong association of prostatic inflammation with LUTS. We developed an animal model of bacterial induced, isolated prostatic inflammation and examined the effect of prostatic inflammation on voiding behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice. Prostatic inflammation was induced by transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic E. coli-1677. Bacterial cystitis was prevented by continuous administration of nitrofurantoin. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and bacterial culture were preformed to validate our animal model. Voiding behavior was examined by metabolic cage testing on post-instillation day 1 (PID 1), PID 4, PID 7 and PID 14 and both voiding frequency and volume per void were determined. Mice with prostatic inflammation showed significantly increased voiding frequency at PID 1, 7 and 14, and decreased volume per void at all time points, as compared to mice instilled with saline and receiving nitrofurantoin (NTF). Linked analysis of voiding frequency and voided volumes revealed an overwhelming preponderance of high frequency, low volume voiding in mice with prostatic inflammation. These observations suggest that prostatic inflammation may be causal for symptoms of urinary frequency and nocturia. PMID:25647072

  6. Prostatic Inflammation Induces Urinary Frequency in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sanghee; Yang, Guang; Bushman, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) including urinary frequency and nocturia are common in aging men. Recent studies have revealed a strong association of prostatic inflammation with LUTS. We developed an animal model of bacterial induced, isolated prostatic inflammation and examined the effect of prostatic inflammation on voiding behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice. Prostatic inflammation was induced by transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic E. coli—1677. Bacterial cystitis was prevented by continuous administration of nitrofurantoin. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and bacterial culture were preformed to validate our animal model. Voiding behavior was examined by metabolic cage testing on post-instillation day 1 (PID 1), PID 4, PID 7 and PID 14 and both voiding frequency and volume per void were determined. Mice with prostatic inflammation showed significantly increased voiding frequency at PID 1, 7 and 14, and decreased volume per void at all time points, as compared to mice instilled with saline and receiving nitrofurantoin (NTF). Linked analysis of voiding frequency and voided volumes revealed an overwhelming preponderance of high frequency, low volume voiding in mice with prostatic inflammation. These observations suggest that prostatic inflammation may be causal for symptoms of urinary frequency and nocturia. PMID:25647072

  7. Growth Hormone Inhibits Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Majumdar, Neena; List, Edward O; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frank, Stuart J; Manzano, Anna; Bartrons, Ramon; Puchowicz, Michelle; Kopchick, John J; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2015-09-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are reported to have low growth hormone (GH) production and/or hepatic GH resistance. GH replacement can resolve the fatty liver condition in diet-induced obese rodents and in GH-deficient patients. However, it remains to be determined whether this inhibitory action of GH is due to direct regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Therefore, an adult-onset, hepatocyte-specific, GH receptor (GHR) knockdown (aLivGHRkd) mouse was developed to model hepatic GH resistance in humans that may occur after sexual maturation. Just 7 days after aLivGHRkd, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) was increased in male and female chow-fed mice, compared with GHR-intact littermate controls. However, hepatosteatosis developed only in male and ovariectomized female aLivGHRkd mice. The increase in DNL observed in aLivGHRkd mice was not associated with hyperactivation of the pathway by which insulin is classically considered to regulate DNL. However, glucokinase mRNA and protein levels as well as fructose-2,6-bisphosphate levels were increased in aLivGHRkd mice, suggesting that enhanced glycolysis drives DNL in the GH-resistant liver. These results demonstrate that hepatic GH actions normally serve to inhibit DNL, where loss of this inhibitory signal may explain, in part, the inappropriate increase in hepatic DNL observed in NAFLD patients. PMID:26015548

  8. Life Satisfaction in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crom, Deborah B.; Li, Zhenghong; Brinkman, Tara M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Neglia, Joseph; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors experience multiple, significant, life-long deficits as a consequence of their malignancy and therapy. Current survivorship literature documents the substantial impact such impairments have on survivors’ physical health and quality of life. Psychosocial reports detail educational, cognitive, and emotional limitations characterizing survivors as especially fragile, often incompetent, and unreliable in evaluating their circumstances. Anecdotal data suggests some survivors report life experiences similar to those of healthy controls. The aim of our investigation was to determine whether life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors differs from that of healthy controls and to identify potential predictors of life satisfaction in survivors. This cross-sectional study compared 78 brain tumor survivors with population–based matched controls. Chi-square tests, t-tests, and linear regression models were used to investigate patterns of life satisfaction and identify potential correlates. Results indicated life satisfaction of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors was similar to that of healthy controls. Survivors’ general health expectations emerged as the primary correlate of life satisfaction. Understanding life satisfaction as an important variable will optimize the design of strategies to enhance participation in follow-up care, reduce suffering, and optimize quality of life in this vulnerable population. PMID:25027187

  9. Comparison of catalase immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between young, adult and aged mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Choong-Hyun; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Yun Lyul; Choi, Soo Young; Hong, Seongkweon

    2016-07-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme and is crucial in modulating synaptic plasticity in the brain. In this study, CAT expression as well as neuronal distribution was compared in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged mice and rats. Male ICR mice and Sprague Dawley rats were used at postnatal month (PM) 1, PM 6 and PM 24 as the young, adult and aged groups, respectively (n=14/group). CAT expression was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, neuronal distribution was examined by NeuN immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the mean number of NeuN‑immunoreactive neurons was marginally decreased in mouse and rat hippocampi during aging, although this change was not identified to be significantly different. However, CAT immunoreactivity was significantly increased in pyramidal and granule neurons in the adult mouse and rat hippocampi and was significantly decreased in the aged mouse and rat hippocampi compared with that in the young animals. CAT protein levels in the hippocampus were also lowest in the aged mouse and rat hippocampus. These results indicate that CAT expression is significantly decreased in the hippocampi of aged animals and decreased CAT expression may be closely associated with aging. PMID:27221506

  10. Comparison of catalase immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between young, adult and aged mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    AHN, JI HYEON; CHEN, BAI HUI; SHIN, BICH-NA; LEE, TAE-KYEONG; CHO, JEONG HWI; KIM, IN HYE; PARK, JOON HA; LEE, JAE-CHUL; TAE, HYUN-JIN; LEE, CHOONG-HYUN; WON, MOO-HO; LEE, YUN LYUL; CHOI, SOO YOUNG; HONG, SEONGKWEON

    2016-01-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme and is crucial in modulating synaptic plasticity in the brain. In this study, CAT expression as well as neuronal distribution was compared in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged mice and rats. Male ICR mice and Sprague Dawley rats were used at postnatal month (PM) 1, PM 6 and PM 24 as the young, adult and aged groups, respectively (n=14/group). CAT expression was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, neuronal distribution was examined by NeuN immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the mean number of NeuN-immunoreactive neurons was marginally decreased in mouse and rat hippocampi during aging, although this change was not identified to be significantly different. However, CAT immunoreactivity was significantly increased in pyramidal and granule neurons in the adult mouse and rat hippocampi and was significantly decreased in the aged mouse and rat hippocampi compared with that in the young animals. CAT protein levels in the hippocampus were also lowest in the aged mouse and rat hippocampus. These results indicate that CAT expression is significantly decreased in the hippocampi of aged animals and decreased CAT expression may be closely associated with aging. PMID:27221506

  11. Behavioural Effects of Adult Vitamin D Deficiency in BALB/c Mice Are not Associated with Proliferation or Survival of Neurons in the Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Natalie J.; Bradford, DanaKai; Sullivan, Robert K. P.; Conn, Kyna-Anne; Aljelaify, Rasha Fahad; McGrath, John J.; Burne, Thomas H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that up to one third of adults have insufficient levels of vitamin D and there is an association between low vitamin D concentrations and adverse brain outcomes, such as depression. Vitamin D has been shown to be involved in processes associated with neurogenesis during development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that adult vitamin D (AVD) deficiency in BALB/c mice was associated with (a) adult hippocampal neurogenesis at baseline, b) following 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running and (c) a depressive-like phenotype on the forced swim test (FST), which may be linked to alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis. We assessed proliferation and survival of adult born hippocampal neurons by counting the number of cells positive for Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX), and incorporation of 5-Bromo-2’-Deoxyuridine (BrdU) within newly born mature neurons using immunohistochemistry. There were no significant effects of diet on number of Ki67+, DCX+ or BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus. All mice showed significantly increased number of Ki67+ cells and BrdU incorporation, and decreased immobility time in the FST, after voluntary wheel running. A significant correlation was found in control mice between immobility time in the FST and level of hippocampal neurogenesis, however, no such correlation was found for AVD-deficient mice. We conclude that AVD deficiency was not associated with impaired proliferation or survival of adult born neurons in BALB/c mice and that the impact on rodent behaviour may not be due to altered neurogenesis per se, but to altered function of new hippocampal neurons or processes independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27043014

  12. A revised dosimetric model of the adult head and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, L.G.; Bolch, W.E.; Weber, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    During the last decade, new radiopharmaceutical have been introduced for brain imaging. The marked differences of these tracers in tissue specificity within the brain and their increasing use for diagnostic studies support the need for a more anthropomorphic model of the human brain and head. Brain and head models developed in the past have been only simplistic representations of this anatomic region. For example, the brain within the phantom of MIRD Pamphlet No. 5 Revised is modeled simply as a single ellipsoid of tissue With no differentiation of its internal structures. To address this need, the MIRD Committee established a Task Group in 1992 to construct a more detailed brain model to include the cerebral cortex, the white matter, the cerebellum, the thalamus, the caudate nucleus, the lentiform nucleus, the cerebral spinal fluid, the lateral ventricles, and the third ventricle. This brain model has been included within a slightly modified version of the head model developed by Poston et al. in 1984. This model has been incorporated into the radiation transport code EGS4 so as to calculate photon and electron absorbed fractions in the energy range 10 keV to 4 MeV for each of thirteen sources in the brain. Furthermore, explicit positron transport have been considered, separating the contribution by the positron itself and its associated annihilations photons. No differences are found between the electron and positron absorbed fractions; however, for initial energies of positrons greater than {approximately}0.5 MeV, significant differences are found between absorbed fractions from explicit transport of annihilation photons and those from an assumed uniform distribution of 0.511-MeV photons. Subsequently, S values were calculated for a variety of beta-particle and positron emitters brain imaging agents. Moreover, pediatric head and brain dosimetric models are currently being developed based on this adult head model.

  13. The adult human brain harbors multipotent perivascular mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gesine; Özen, Ilknur; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Reinbothe, Thomas; Bengzon, Johan; Visse, Edward; Jansson, Katarina; Dannaeus, Karin; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Roybon, Laurent; Anisimov, Sergey V; Renström, Erik; Svensson, Mikael; Haegerstrand, Anders; Brundin, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels and adjacent cells form perivascular stem cell niches in adult tissues. In this perivascular niche, a stem cell with mesenchymal characteristics was recently identified in some adult somatic tissues. These cells are pericytes that line the microvasculature, express mesenchymal markers and differentiate into mesodermal lineages but might even have the capacity to generate tissue-specific cell types. Here, we isolated, purified and characterized a previously unrecognized progenitor population from two different regions in the adult human brain, the ventricular wall and the neocortex. We show that these cells co-express markers for mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes in vivo and in vitro, but do not express glial, neuronal progenitor, hematopoietic, endothelial or microglial markers in their native state. Furthermore, we demonstrate at a clonal level that these progenitors have true multilineage potential towards both, the mesodermal and neuroectodermal phenotype. They can be epigenetically induced in vitro into adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts but also into glial cells and immature neurons. This progenitor population exhibits long-term proliferation, karyotype stability and retention of phenotype and multipotency following extensive propagation. Thus, we provide evidence that the vascular niche in the adult human brain harbors a novel progenitor with multilineage capacity that appears to represent mesenchymal stem cells and is different from any previously described human neural stem cell. Future studies will elucidate whether these cells may play a role for disease or may represent a reservoir that can be exploited in efforts to repair the diseased human brain. PMID:22523602

  14. Immunological regulation of neurogenic niches in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Fernando; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Collas-Aguilar, Jorge; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis are germinal processes that occur in the adult brain throughout life. The subventricular (SVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones are the main neurogenic regions in adult brain. Therein, it resides a subpopulation of astrocytes that act as neural stem cells. Increasing evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory and other immunological mediators are important regulators of neural precursors into the SVZ and the SGZ. There are a number of inflammatory cytokines that regulate the function of neural stem cells. Some of the most studied include: interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin-like growth factor-1, growth-regulated oncogene-alpha, leukemia inhibitory factor, cardiotrophin-1, ciliary neurotrophic factor, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. This plethora of immunological mediators can control the migration, proliferation, quiescence, cell-fate choices and survival of neural stem cells and their progeny. Thus, systemic or local inflammatory processes represent important regulators of germinal niches in the adult brain. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the regulation of adult neural stem cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Additionally, we described the role of proinflammatory cytokines in neurodegenerative diseases and some therapeutical approaches for the immunomodulation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:22986164

  15. Mice lacking brain-type creatine kinase activity show defective thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Streijger, Femke; Pluk, Helma; Oerlemans, Frank; Beckers, Gaby; Bianco, Antonio C.; Ribeiro, Miriam O.; Wieringa, Bé; Van der Zee, Catharina E.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    The cytosolic brain-type creatine kinase and mitochondrial ubiquitous creatine kinase (CK-B and UbCKmit) are expressed during the prepubescent and adult period of mammalian life. These creatine kinase (CK) isoforms are present in neural cell types throughout the central and peripheral nervous system and in smooth muscle containing tissues, where they have an important role in cellular energy homeostasis. Here, we report on the coupling of CK activity to body temperature rhythm and adaptive thermoregulation in mice. With both brain-type CK isoforms being absent, the body temperature reproducibly drops ~1.0°C below normal during every morning (inactive) period in the daily cycle. Facultative non-shivering thermogenesis is also impaired, since CK−−/−− mice develop severe hypothermia during 24 h cold exposure. A relationship with fat metabolism was suggested because comparison of CK−−/−− mice with wildtype controls revealed decreased weight gain associated with less white and brown fat accumulation and smaller brown adipocytes. Also, circulating levels of glucose, triglycerides and leptin are reduced. Extensive physiological testing and uncoupling protein1 analysis showed, however, that the thermogenic problems are not due to abnormal responsiveness of brown adipocytes, since noradrenaline infusion produced a normal increase of body temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cyclic drop in morning temperature is also not related to altered rhythmicity with reduced locomotion, diminished food intake or increased torpor sensitivity. Although several integral functions appear altered when CK is absent in the brain, combined findings point into the direction of inefficient neuronal transmission as the dominant factor in the thermoregulatory defect. PMID:19419668

  16. Non-amyloid and amyloid prion protein deposits in prion-infected mice differ in blockage of interstitial brain fluid

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Alejandra; Race, Brent; Striebel, James; Chesebro, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Aims Prion diseases are characterized by brain deposits of misfolded aggregated protease-resistant prion protein (PrP), termed PrPres. In humans and animals, PrPres is found as either disorganized non-amyloid aggregates or organized amyloid fibrils. Both PrPres forms are found in extracellular spaces of the brain. Thus, both might block drainage of brain interstitial fluid (ISF). The present experiments studied whether ISF blockage occurred during amyloid and/or non-amyloid prion diseases. Methods Various-sized fluorescein-labeled ISF tracers were stereotactically inoculated into the striatum of adult mice. At times from 5 min to 77 hours, uninfected and scrapie-infected mice were compared. C57BL/10 mice expressing wild-type anchored PrP, which develop non-amyloid PrPres similar to humans with sporadic CJD, were compared with Tg44+/+ mice expressing anchorless PrP, which develop amyloid PrPres similar to certain human familial prion diseases. Results In C57BL/10 mice, extensive non-amyloid PrPres aggregate deposition was not associated with abnormal clearance kinetics of tracers. In contrast, scrapie-infected Tg44+/+ mice showed blockage of tracer clearance and co-localization of tracer with perivascular PrPres amyloid. Conclusions Since tracer localization and clearance was normal in infected C57BL/10 mice, ISF blockage was not an important pathogenic mechanism in this model. Therefore, ISF blockage is unlikely to be a problem in non-amyloid human prion diseases such as sporadic CJD. In contrast, partial ISF blockage appeared to be a possible pathogenic mechanism in Tg44+/+ mice. Thus this mechanism might also influence human amyloid prion diseases where expression of anchorless or mutated PrP results in perivascular amyloid PrPres deposition and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). PMID:22998478

  17. Ghrelin signaling in heart remodeling of adult obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lacerda-Miranda, Glauciane; Soares, Vivian M; Vieira, Anatalia K G; Lessa, Juliana G; Rodrigues-Cunha, Alessandra C S; Cortez, Erika; Garcia-Souza, Erica P; Moura, Anibal S

    2012-05-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), has been suggested to be associated to obesity, insulin secretion, cardiovascular growth and homeostasis. GHS-R has been found in most of the tissues, and among the hormone action it is included the regulation of heart energy metabolism. Therefore, hypernutrition during early life leads to obesity, induces cardiac hypertrophy, compromises myocardial function, inducing heart failure in adulthood. We examined ghrelin signaling process in cardiac remodeling in these obese adult mice. The cardiomyocytes (cmy) of left ventricle were analyzed by light microscopy and stereology, content and phosphorilation of cardiac proteins: ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, GHSR-1a), protein kinase B (AKT and pAKT), phosphatidil inositol 3 kinase (PI3K), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and pAMPK) and actin were achieved by Western blotting. GHSR-1a gene expression was analyzed by Real Time-PCR. We observed hyperglycemia and higher liver and visceral fat weight in obese when compared to control group. Obese mice presented a marked increase in heart weight/tibia length, indicating an enlarged heart size or a remodeling process. Obese mice had increased GHSR-1a content and expression in the heart associated to PI3K content and increased AKT content and phosphorylation. In contrast, AMPK content and phosphorylation in heart was not different between experimental groups. Ghrelin plasma levels in obese group were decreased when compared to control group. Our data suggest that remodeled myocardial in adult obese mice overnourished in early life are associated with higher phosphorylation of GHSR-1a, PI3K and AKT but not with AMPK. PMID:22407166

  18. Hepatic isometallothioneins in mice: induction in adults and postnatal ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, W C; Lehman-McKeeman, L D; Klaassen, C D

    1990-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate hepatic metallothionein-I (MT-I) and metallothionein-II (MT-II) in adult mice pretreated with various dosages of selected inorganic and organic compounds and in nonchemically treated neonatal mice. Male CF-1 mice received Zn (0.38-6.0 mmol/kg, sc), Cd (5-80 mumol/kg, sc), dexamethasone (10-1000 mumol/kg, sc), or ethanol (60-180 mmol/kg, po). Liver cytosol was prepared 24 hr after the administration of each compound. In another experiment, liver cytosols were prepared from male and female neonates 1 to 35 days after parturition. MT-I and MT-II in liver cytosols were isolated by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography and quantitated by atomic absorption spectrometry. Hepatic MT-I and MT-II concentrations in adult controls were 5.1 +/- 1.3 and 3.7 +/- 1.0 micrograms/g liver, respectively. All compounds increased hepatic MT levels in a dose-dependent manner over a narrow range of dosages. The lowest dosages of Zn, Cd, dexamethasone, and ethanol that produced a significant increase in total MT content (MT-I plus MT-II) were 0.38, 0.005, 0.3, and 90 mmol/kg, respectively. Maximal induction of total MT following the highest dosages of Zn, Cd, ethanol, and dexamethasone was 58, 34, 24, and 13 times the control value (8.8 +/- 2.4 micrograms total MT/g liver), respectively. The relationship between dose and hepatic MT content was linear following ethanol administration and log-linear following Zn, Cd, and dexamethasone administration. The ratio of MT-I/MT-II was approximately 2.4 following all dosages of metals. Following low and high dosages of organic compounds, the ratio of MT-I/MT-II was approximately 1.0 and 1.5, respectively. Total MT concentration in livers of 1- to 14-day-old mice was approximately 40 times that observed in adult liver (5.5 +/- 1.6 micrograms total MT/g liver) and returned toward adult levels 21 days after parturition. The ratio of MT-I/MT-II was approximately 1.8 during Postpartum Days 1 through 14

  19. Isolation and culture of neurospheres from the adult newt brain.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Liyakath Ali Shahul; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to neurons in the adult brain and are possible targets in regenerative therapies. In vitro cultures of NSCs as neurospheres have been established from cells isolated from diverse species. Newts are exceptional regenerators among vertebrates. These animals are able to efficiently replace neurons following ablation of those by activation and subsequent differentiation of NSCs. Here we describe the method for isolating and culturing of NSCs from the newt brain both during self-renewing and differentiating conditions. Newt NSC culture provides a useful tool for functional studies of NSC fate with the potential of resulting in novel regenerative strategies. PMID:25740488

  20. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis has developmental and adult forms in mice, with the male bias in the developmental form being dependent on testicular AMH.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Walter; McLennan, Ian S

    2013-09-01

    Canonically, the sexual dimorphism in the brain develops perinatally, with adult sexuality emerging due to the activating effects of pubescent sexual hormones. This concept does not readily explain why children have a gender identity and exhibit sex-stereotypic behaviours. These phenomena could be explained if some aspects of the sexual brain networks have childhood forms, which are transformed at puberty to generate adult sexuality. The bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) is a dimorphic nucleus that is sex-reversed in transsexuals but not homosexuals. We report here that the principal nucleus of the BNST (BNSTp) of mice has developmental and adult forms that are differentially regulated. In 20-day-old prepubescent mice, the male bias in the principal nucleus of the BNST (BNSTp) was moderate (360 ± 6 vs 288 ± 12 calbindin(+ve) neurons, p < 0.0001), and absent in mice that lacked a gonadal hormone, AMH. After 20 days, the number of BNSTp neurons increased in the male mice by 25% (p < 0.0001) and decreased in female mice by 15% (p = 0.0012), independent of AMH. Adult male AMH-deficient mice had a normal preference for sniffing female pheromones (soiled bedding), but exhibited a relative disinterest in both male and female pheromones. This suggests that male mice require AMH to undergo normal social development. The reported observations provide a rationale for examining AMH levels in children with gender identity disorders and disorders of socialization that involve a male bias. PMID:24012942

  1. Comparison of the deleterious effects of binge drinking-like alcohol exposure in adolescent and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lacaille, Hélène; Duterte-Boucher, Dominique; Liot, Donovan; Vaudry, Hubert; Naassila, Mickael; Vaudry, David

    2015-03-01

    A major cause of alcohol toxicity is the production of reactive oxygen species generated during ethanol metabolism. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of binge drinking-like alcohol exposure on a panel of genes implicated in oxidative mechanisms in adolescent and adult mice. In adolescent animals, alcohol decreased the expression of genes involved in the repair and protection of oxidative DNA damage such as atr, gpx7, or nudt15 and increased the expression of proapoptotic genes such as casp3. In contrast, in the adult brain, genes activated by alcohol were mainly associated with protective mechanisms that prevent cells from oxidative damage. Whatever the age, iterative binge-like episodes provoked the same deleterious effects as those observed after a single binge episode. In adolescent mice, multiple binge ethanol exposure substantially reduced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and impaired short-term memory in the novel object and passive avoidance tests. Taken together, our results indicate that alcohol causes deleterious effects in the adolescent brain which are distinct from those observed in adults. These data contribute to explain the greater sensitivity of the adolescent brain to alcohol toxicity. The effects of alcohol exposure were investigated on genes involved in oxidative mechanisms. In adolescent animals, alcohol decreased the expression of genes involved in DNA repair, a potential cause of the observed decrease of neurogenesis. In contrast, in the adult brain, alcohol increased the expression of genes associated with antioxidant mechanisms. Apoptosis was increase in all groups and converged with other biochemical alterations to enhance short-term memory impairment in the adolescent brain. These data contribute to explain the greater sensitivity of the adolescent brain to alcohol toxicity. PMID:25556946

  2. Electrophysiological recording in the brain of intact adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lindsey; Ball, Rebecca E; Acuff, Seth; Gaudet, John; Sornborger, Andrew; Lauderdale, James D

    2013-01-01

    Previously, electrophysiological studies in adult zebrafish have been limited to slice preparations or to eye cup preparations and electrorentinogram recordings. This paper describes how an adult zebrafish can be immobilized, intubated, and used for in vivo electrophysiological experiments, allowing recording of neural activity. Immobilization of the adult requires a mechanism to deliver dissolved oxygen to the gills in lieu of buccal and opercular movement. With our technique, animals are immobilized and perfused with habitat water to fulfill this requirement. A craniotomy is performed under tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222; tricaine) anesthesia to provide access to the brain. The primary electrode is then positioned within the craniotomy window to record extracellular brain activity. Through the use of a multitube perfusion system, a variety of pharmacological compounds can be administered to the adult fish and any alterations in the neural activity can be observed. The methodology not only allows for observations to be made regarding changes in neurological activity, but it also allows for comparisons to be made between larval and adult zebrafish. This gives researchers the ability to identify the alterations in neurological activity due to the introduction of various compounds at different life stages. PMID:24300281

  3. REGULATION OF NETRIN-1 RECEPTORS BY AMPHETAMINE IN THE ADULT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    YETNIKOFF, L.; LABELLE-DUMAIS, C.; FLORES, C.

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1 is a guidance cue molecule fundamental to the organization of neuronal connectivity during development. Netrin-1 and its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and UNC-5 homologues (UNC-5), continue to be expressed in the adult brain, although neither their function nor the kinds of events that activate their expression are known. Two lines of evidence suggest a role for netrin-1 in amphetamine-induced dopamine plasticity in the adult. First, DCC is highly expressed by adult dopamine neurons. Second, adult mice with reduced DCC levels do not develop amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization. To explore the role of netrin-1 in amphetamine-induced plasticity, we examined the effects of sensitizing treatment regimens of amphetamine on DCC and/or UNC-5 protein expression in the adult rat. These treatments produced striking and enduring increases in DCC and UNC-5 expression in the cell body, but not terminal regions, of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Notably, neuroadaptations in the cell body region of mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons underlie the development of sensitization to the effects of amphetamine. Furthermore, these localized amphetamine-induced changes were prevented by co-treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, a treatment known to block the development of amphetamine-induced sensitization of behavioral activation, dopamine release and motivated behavior. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that both DCC and UNC-5 receptors are highly expressed by adult mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons. These results provide the first evidence that repeated exposure to a stimulant drug such as amphetamine affects netrin-1 receptor expression in the adult brain. Taken together, our findings suggest that changes in netrin-1 receptor expression may play a role in the lasting effects of exposure to amphetamine and other stimulant drugs. PMID:17996376

  4. Regulation of netrin-1 receptors by amphetamine in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Yetnikoff, L; Labelle-Dumais, C; Flores, C

    2007-12-19

    Netrin-1 is a guidance cue molecule fundamental to the organization of neuronal connectivity during development. Netrin-1 and its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and UNC-5 homologues (UNC-5), continue to be expressed in the adult brain, although neither their function nor the kinds of events that activate their expression are known. Two lines of evidence suggest a role for netrin-1 in amphetamine-induced dopamine plasticity in the adult. First, DCC is highly expressed by adult dopamine neurons. Second, adult mice with reduced DCC levels do not develop amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization. To explore the role of netrin-1 in amphetamine-induced plasticity, we examined the effects of sensitizing treatment regimens of amphetamine on DCC and/or UNC-5 protein expression in the adult rat. These treatments produced striking and enduring increases in DCC and UNC-5 expression in the cell body, but not terminal regions, of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Notably, neuroadaptations in the cell body region of mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons underlie the development of sensitization to the effects of amphetamine. Furthermore, these localized amphetamine-induced changes were prevented by co-treatment with an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, a treatment known to block the development of amphetamine-induced sensitization of behavioral activation, dopamine release and motivated behavior. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that both DCC and UNC-5 receptors are highly expressed by adult mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons. These results provide the first evidence that repeated exposure to a stimulant drug such as amphetamine affects netrin-1 receptor expression in the adult brain. Taken together, our findings suggest that changes in netrin-1 receptor expression may play a role in the lasting effects of exposure to amphetamine and other stimulant drugs. PMID:17996376

  5. Lateral fluid percussion: model of traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-01-01

    mass on the closed skull (18). Among the TBI models, LFP is the most established and commonly used model to evaluate mixed focal and diffuse brain injury (19). It is reproducible and is standardized to allow for the manipulation of injury parameters. LFP recapitulates injuries observed in humans, thus rendering it clinically relevant, and allows for exploration of novel therapeutics for clinical translation (20). We describe the detailed protocol to perform LFP procedure in mice. The injury inflicted is mild to moderate, with brain regions such as cortex, hippocampus and corpus callosum being most vulnerable. Hippocampal and motor learning tasks are explored following LFP. PMID:21876530

  6. Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P.; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-01-01

    skull 18. Among the TBI models, LFP is the most established and commonly used model to evaluate mixed focal and diffuse brain injury 19. It is reproducible and is standardized to allow for the manipulation of injury parameters. LFP recapitulates injuries observed in humans, thus rendering it clinically relevant, and allows for exploration of novel therapeutics for clinical translation 20. We describe the detailed protocol to perform LFP procedure in mice. The injury inflicted is mild to moderate, with brain regions such as cortex, hippocampus and corpus callosum being most vulnerable. Hippocampal and motor learning tasks are explored following LFP. PMID:21876530

  7. Histological, cellular and behavioral assessments of stroke outcomes after photothrombosis-induced ischemia in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Following the onset of focal ischemic stroke, the brain experiences a series of alterations including infarct evolvement, cellular proliferation in the penumbra, and behavioral deficits. However, systematic study on the temporal and spatial dependence of these alterations has not been provided. Results Using multiple approaches, we assessed stroke outcomes by measuring brain injury, dynamic cellular and glial proliferation, and functional deficits at different times up to two weeks after photothrombosis (PT)-induced ischemic stroke in adult mice. Results from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Nissl staining showed a maximal infarction, and brain edema and swelling 1–3 days after PT. The rate of Bromodeoxyuridine (Brdu)-labeled proliferating cell generation is spatiotemporal dependent in the penumbra, with the highest rate in post ischemic days 3–4, and higher rate of proliferation in the region immediate to the ischemic core than in the distant region. Similar time-dependent generation of proliferating GFAP+ astrocytes and Iba1+ microglia/macrophage were observed in the penumbra. Using behavioral tests, we showed that PT resulted in the largest functional deficits during post ischemic days 2–4. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that first a few days is a critical period that causes brain expansion, cellular proliferation and behavioral deficits in photothrombosis-induced ischemic model, and proliferating astrocytes only have a small contribution to the pools of proliferating cells and reactive astrocytes. PMID:24886391

  8. Brain-reactive autoantibody levels in the sera of ageing autoimmune mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, S A; Arbogast, D N; Ford, P M; Shucard, D W; Harbeck, R J

    1987-01-01

    Brain-reactive autoantibodies are thought to play an important role in mediating central nervous system (CNS) disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this paper the developmental occurrence of these antibodies in the sera of autoimmune mice, i.e. NZB, NZB/W, MRL/l and BXSB mice were examined. All murine strains tested, whether autoimmune or not, showed some degree of serum reactivity toward brain antigens. Autoimmune mice, however, displayed higher levels of serum brain-reactive antibodies, and at earlier ages, than non-autoimmune mice. Immunofluorescence assays against brain sections and adsorption assays, with both neural and non-neural tissue, indicated a heterogeneity in the specificity of the populations of brain-reactive antibodies present. These studies provide an important step in characterizing the appearance and diversity of brain-reactive autoantibodies, with the goal of better understanding their significance and potential role in mediating CNS dysfunction in SLE. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3319304

  9. Exploration and visualization of connectivity in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Feng, David; Lau, Chris; Ng, Lydia; Li, Yang; Kuan, Leonard; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. All data were aligned to a common template in 3D space to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. A suite of computational tools were developed to search and visualize the projection labeling experiments, available at http://connectivity.brain-map.org. We present three use cases illustrating how these publicly-available tools can be used to perform analyses of long range brain region connectivity. The use cases make extensive use of advanced visualization tools integrated with the atlas including projection density histograms, 3D computed anterograde and retrograde projection paths, and multi-specimen projection composites. These tools offer convenient access to detailed axonal projection information in the adult mouse brain and the ability to perform data analysis and visualization of projection fields and neuroanatomy in an integrated manner. PMID:25637033

  10. Adolescent mice are less sensitive to the effects of acute nicotine on context pre-exposure than adults.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Braak, David C; Tumolo, Jessica M; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Adolescence is a critical developmental period associated with both increased vulnerability to substance abuse and maturation of certain brain regions important for learning and memory such as the hippocampus. In this study, we employed a hippocampus-dependent learning context pre-exposure facilitation effect (CPFE) paradigm in order to test the effects of acute nicotine on contextual processing during adolescence (post-natal day (PND) 38) and adulthood (PND 53). In Experiment 1, adolescent or adult C57BL6/J mice received either saline or one of three nicotine doses (0.09, 0.18, and 0.36mg/kg) prior to contextual pre-exposure and testing. Our results demonstrated that both adolescent and adult mice showed CPFE in the saline groups. However, adolescent mice only showed acute nicotine enhancement of CPFE with the highest nicotine dose whereas adult mice showed the enhancing effects of acute nicotine with all three doses. In Experiment 2, to determine if the lack of nicotine's effects on CPFE shown by adolescent mice is specific to the age when they are tested, mice were either given contextual pre-exposure during adolescence or adulthood and received immediate shock and testing during adulthood after a 15day delay. We found that both adolescent and adult mice showed CPFE in the saline groups when tested during adulthood. However, like Experiment 1, mice that received contextual pre-exposure during adolescence did not show acute nicotine enhancement except at the highest dose (0.36mg/kg) whereas both low (0.09mg/kg) and high (0.36mg/kg) doses enhanced CPFE in adult mice. Finally, we showed that the enhanced freezing response found with 0.36mg/kg nicotine in the 15-day experiment may be a result of decreased locomotor activity as mice that received this dose of nicotine traveled shorter distances in an open field paradigm. Overall, our results indicate that while adolescent mice showed normal contextual processing when tested both during adolescence and adulthood, they

  11. Therapeutic Effects of Pharmacologically Induced Hypothermia against Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hwan; Wei, Ling; Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng; Dix, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical and clinical studies have shown therapeutic potential of mild-to-moderate hypothermia for treatments of stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Physical cooling in humans, however, is usually slow, cumbersome, and necessitates sedation that prevents early application in clinical settings and causes several side effects. Our recent study showed that pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using a novel neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) agonist, HPI-201 (also known as ABS-201), is efficient and effective in inducing therapeutic hypothermia and protecting the brain from ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in mice. The present investigation tested another second-generation NTR1 agonist, HPI-363, for its hypothermic and protective effect against TBI. Adult male mice were subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) (velocity=3 m/sec, depth=1.0 mm, contact time=150 msec) to the exposed cortex. Intraperitoneal administration of HPI-363 (0.3 mg/kg) reduced body temperature by 3–5°C within 30–60 min without triggering a shivering defensive reaction. An additional two injections sustained the hypothermic effect in conscious mice for up to 6 h. This PIH treatment was initiated 15, 60, or 120 min after the onset of TBI, and significantly reduced the contusion volume measured 3 days after TBI. HPI-363 attenuated caspase-3 activation, Bax expression, and TUNEL-positive cells in the pericontusion region. In blood–brain barrier assessments, HPI-363 ameliorated extravasation of Evans blue dye and immunoglobulin G, attenuated the MMP-9 expression, and decreased the number of microglia cells in the post-TBI brain. HPI-363 decreased the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), but increased IL-6 and IL-10 levels. Compared with TBI control mice, HPI-363 treatments improved sensorimotor functional recovery after TBI. These findings suggest that the second generation NTR-1 agonists, such as HPI-363, are efficient

  12. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  13. Blockage of VIP during mouse embryogenesis modifies adult behavior and results in permanent changes in brain chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joanna M; Hauser, Janet M; Sheppard, Lia M; Abebe, Daniel; Spivak-Pohis, Irit; Kushnir, Michal; Deitch, Iris; Gozes, Illana

    2007-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) regulates growth and development during the early postimplantation period of mouse embryogenesis. Blockage of VIP with a VIP antagonist during this period results in growth restriction, microcephaly, and developmental delays. Similar treatment of neonatal rodents also causes developmental delays and impaired diurnal rhythms, and the adult brains of these animals exhibit neuronal dystrophy and increased VIP binding. These data suggest that blockage of VIP during the development of the nervous system can result in permanent changes to the brain. In the current study, pregnant mice were treated with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10. The adult male offspring were examined in tests of novelty, paired activity, and social recognition. Brain tissue was examined for several measures of chemistry and gene expression of VIP and related compounds. Glial cells from the cortex of treated newborn mice were plated with neurons and examined for VIP binding and their ability to enhance neuronal survival. Treated adult male mice exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior and deficits in social behavior. Brain tissue exhibited regionally specific changes in VIP chemistry and a trend toward increased gene expression of VIP and related compounds that reached statistical significance in the VIP receptor, VPAC-1, in the female cortex. When compared to control astrocytes, astrocytes from treated cerebral cortex produced further increases in neuronal survival with excess synaptic connections and reduced VIP binding. In conclusion, impaired VIP activity during mouse embryogenesis resulted in permanent changes to both adult brain chemistry/cell biology and behavior with aspects of autism-like social deficits. PMID:17726225

  14. Brain Network Activity in Monolingual and Bilingual Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Cheryl L.; Luk, Gigi; Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Bilingual older adults typically have better performance on tasks of executive control (EC) than do their monolingual peers, but differences in brain activity due to language experience are not well understood. Based on studies showing a relation between the dynamic range of brain network activity and performance on EC tasks, we hypothesized that life-long bilingual older adults would show increased functional connectivity relative to monolinguals in networks related to EC. We assessed intrinsic functional connectivity and modulation of activity in task vs. fixation periods in two brain networks that are active when EC is engaged, the frontoparietal control network (FPC) and the salience network (SLN). We also examined the default mode network (DMN), which influences behavior through reduced activity during tasks. We found stronger intrinsic functional connectivity in the FPC and DMN in bilinguals than in monolinguals. Although there were no group differences in the modulation of activity across tasks and fixation, bilinguals showed stronger correlations than monolinguals between intrinsic connectivity in the FPC and task-related increases of activity in prefrontal and parietal regions. This bilingual difference in network connectivity suggests that language experience begun in childhood and continued throughout adulthood influences brain networks in ways that may provide benefits in later life. PMID:25445783

  15. Adult Behavior in Male Mice Exposed to E-Cigarette Nicotine Vapors during Late Prenatal and Early Postnatal Life

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dani; Aherrera, Angela; Lopez, Armando; Neptune, Enid; Winickoff, Jonathan P.; Klein, Jonathan D.; Chen, Gang; Lazarus, Philip; Collaco, Joseph M.; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine exposure has been associated with an increased likelihood of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in offspring of mothers who smoked during pregnancy. The goal of this study was to determine if exposure to E-cigarette nicotine vapors during late prenatal and early postnatal life altered behavior in adult mice. Methods Timed-pregnant C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2.4% nicotine in propylene glycol (PG) or 0% nicotine /PG once a day from gestational day 15 until delivery. After delivery, offspring and mothers were exposed to E-cigarette vapors for an additional 14 days from postnatal day 2 through 16. Following their last exposure serum cotinine levels were measured in female juvenile mice. Male mice underwent behavioral testing at 14 weeks of age to assess sensorimotor, affective, and cognitive functional domains. Results Adult male mice exposed to 2.4% nicotine/PG E-cigarette vapors had significantly more head dips in the zero maze test and higher levels of rearing activity in the open field test compared to 0% nicotine/PG exposed mice and untreated controls. In the water maze test after reversal training, the 2.4% nicotine/PG mice spent more than 25% of time in the new location whereas the other groups did not. Conclusion Adult male mice exhibited increased levels of activity in the zero maze and open field tests when exposed to E-cigarette vapor containing nicotine during late prenatal and early postnatal life. These findings indicate that nicotine exposure from E-cigarettes may cause persistent behavioral changes when exposure occurs during a period of rapid brain growth. PMID:26372012

  16. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces lung growth in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Drager, Luciano F.; Myers, Allen C.; Wise, Robert A.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Mitzner, Wayne; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which have been attributed to intermittent hypoxia (IH). The effects of IH on lung structure and function are unknown. We used a mouse model of chronic IH, which mimics the O2 profile in patients with OSA. We exposed adult C57BL/6J mice to 3 mo of IH with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) nadir of 5% 60 times/h during the 12-h light phase. Control mice were exposed to room air. Lung volumes were measured by quasistatic pressure-volume (PV) curves under anesthesia and by water displacement postmortem. Lungs were processed for morphometry, and the mean airspace chord length (Lm) and alveolar surface area were determined. Lung tissue was stained for markers of proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling), and type II alveolar epithelial cells (surfactant protein C). Gene microarrays were performed, and results were validated by real-time PCR. IH increased lung volumes by both PV curves (air vs. IH, 1.16 vs. 1.44 ml, P < 0.0001) and water displacement (P < 0.01) without changes in Lm, suggesting that IH increased the alveolar surface area. IH induced a 60% increase in cellular proliferation, but the number of proliferating type II alveolocytes tripled. There was no increase in apoptosis. IH upregulated pathways of cellular movement and cellular growth and development, including key developmental genes vascular endothelial growth factor A and platelet-derived growth factor B. We conclude that IH increases alveolar surface area by stimulating lung growth in adult mice. PMID:21131398

  17. Bone status of adult female butyrylcholinesterase gene-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Malte; Kauschke, Vivien; Sender, Jonas; Kampschulte, Marian; Kovtun, Anna; Dürselen, Lutz; Heiss, Christian; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) degrades acetylcholine in addition to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which is involved in embryonic development of limbs. Since BChE is expressed by osteoblast-like cells we asked whether it is functional in adult bone remodeling. We addressed this issue by analyzing BChE gene-deficient mice (BChE-KO). Bones were extracted from 16-week old female BChE-KO and corresponding wild type mice (WT). Femoral bones were used for biomechanical testing and μCT evaluation of cancellous and cortical bone. Also vertebrae Th12 and L1 were investigated with μCT while L3 was used for tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP) histomorphometry and Th10 for gene expression analysis by means of real-time RT-PCR. BChE-KO did not reveal significant differences in biomechanical bone strength and bone mineral density determined by μCT. Microarchitecture of cancellous and cortical bone showed an increase in μCT parameters like trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, and relative cortical bone area of femoral BChE-KO bone compared to WT. In vertebrae no changes of microstructure and mRNA expression were detected. However, osteoclast histomorphometry with TRAP stained sections demonstrated a significant increase in relative osteoclast number. In conclusion, in adult murine bone the role of BChE is limited to bone specific changes in microarchitecture and to an increase in relative number of bone resorbing osteoclasts whereas the main collagen resorbing enzyme Cathepsin-K (CtsK) was stably expressed. Besides, AChE might be able to compensate the lack of BChE. Thus, further analyses using bone tissue specific AChE BChE cre-lox double knockout mice would be helpful. PMID:26138460

  18. DESCRIPTION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ANALYSIS OF BRAIN GROWTH IN SUCKLING MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth pattern of the brains of normal CD-1 mice was studied from day 1 through day 21 after birth. The main purpose of the study was to decide on suitable methods of statistical analysis of these kinds of data including whether to analyze brain weight or the brain-to-body we...

  19. A history of chronic morphine exposure during adolescence increases despair-like behaviour and strain-dependently promotes sociability in abstinent adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, PE; Reiss, D; Ouagazzal, AM; Kieffer, BL

    2013-01-01

    A crucial issue in treating opiate addiction, a chronic relapsing disorder, is to maintain a drug-free abstinent state. Prolonged abstinence associates with mood disorders, strongly contributing to relapse. In particular, substance use disorders occurring during adolescence predispose to depression later in adulthood. Using our established mouse model of opiate abstinence, we characterized emotional consequences into adulthood of morphine exposure during adolescence. Our results indicate that morphine treatment in adolescent mice has no effect on anxiety-like behaviours in adult mice, after abstinence. In contrast, morphine treatment during adolescence increases behavioural despair in adult mice. We also show that morphine exposure strain-dependently enhances sociability in adult mice. Additional research will be required to understand where and how morphine acts during brain maturation to affect emotional and social behaviours into adulthood. PMID:23295400

  20. Delayed Invasion of the Kidney and Brain by Borrelia crocidurae in Plasminogen-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nordstrand, Annika; Shamaei-Tousi, Alireza; Ny, Annelii; Bergström, Sven

    2001-01-01

    Borrelia crocidurae is an etiologic agent of relapsing fever in Africa and is transmitted to humans by the bite of soft ticks of the genus Ornithodoros. The role of the plasminogen (Plg) activation system for the pathogenicity of B. crocidurae was investigated by infection of Plg-deficient (plg−/−) and Plg wild-type (plg+/+) mice. No differences in spirochetemia were observed between the plg−/− and plg+/+ mice. However, signs indicative of brain invasion, such as neurological symptoms and/or histopathological changes, were more common in plg+/+ mice. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated infection of spirochetes in kidney interstitium and brain as soon as 2 days postinoculation. Lower numbers of extravascular spirochetes in plg−/− mice during the first days of infection suggested a less efficient invasion mechanism in these mice than in the plg+/+ mice. The invasion of the kidneys in plg−/− mice produced no significant inflammation, as seen by quantitative immunohistochemistry of the CD45 common leukocyte marker. However, significant kidney inflammation was observed with infection in the plg+/+ mice. In brain, inflammation was more severe in plg+/+ mice than in plg−/− mice, and the numbers of CD45+ cells increased significantly with duration of infection in the plg+/+ mice. The results show that invasion of brain and kidney occurs as early as 2 days after inoculation. Also, Plg is not required for establishment of spirochetemia by the organism, whereas it is involved in the invasion of organs. PMID:11500461

  1. Specific ablation of thyroid follicle cells in adult transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wallace, H; Ledent, C; Vassart, G; Bishop, J O; al-Shawi, R

    1991-12-01

    The coding region of the herpes simplex type 1 virus thymidine kinase gene was coupled to the promoter of the bovine thyroglobulin gene and introduced into the genome of mice. The viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) was expressed mainly in the thyroid glands and testis. Upon treatment of transgenic females with the antiherpetic agent Ganciclovir the thyroid regressed, while the parathyroid gland was unaffected. The number of thyroid follicle cells was greatly reduced after 3 days, and they were completely absent after 7 days of treatment. After 14 days, the levels of circulating T4 and T3 were below the limits of detection, total soluble protein recovered from the thyroid and parathyroid glands together was 10% of the control value, and the level of thyroid HSV1-TK was more than 100-fold lower than that in transgenic controls. Levels of circulating PTH and calcitonin remained normal. At the time of treatment the mice were adults. Thus, the thyroid follicle cells were selectively ablated after normal development with a functional thyroid gland. When treatment with Ganciclovir was terminated after 14 days, no circulating T4 or T3 or other indications of thyroid regeneration were detected for a subsequent period of 90 days. During this time the mice gained weight more slowly than controls, at a rate consistent with the suppression of GH synthesis by thyroid deficiency. The production of mouse major urinary protein (MUP) ceased in the treated mice and was completely restored by the administration of T4. MUP production was not restored by GH, demonstrating that the expression of the Mup genes requires T4 in addition to GH. PMID:1659524

  2. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  3. Chronic Fluoxetine Increases Extra-Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic treatment with antidepressants has been shown to enhance neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain. Although this effect was initially reported to be restricted to the hippocampus, recent work has suggested that fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, also promotes neurogenesis in the cortex. However, whether antidepressants target neural progenitor cells in other brain regions has not been examined. Methods: Here, we used BrdU labeling and immunohistochemistry with a transgenic mouse line in which nestin+ neural progenitor cells can be inducibly labeled with the fluorescent protein, Tomato, following tamoxifen administration. We investigated the effects of chronic fluoxetine on cell proliferation and nestin+ progenitor cells in periventricular areas in the medial hypothalamus and medial habenula, two brain areas involved in stress and anxiety responses. Results: Our data provide the first in vivo evidence that fluoxetine promotes cell proliferation and neurogenesis and increases the mRNA levels of BDNF in the hypothalamus and habenula. Conclusions: By identifying novel cellular targets of fluoxetine, our results may provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying antidepressant responses. PMID:25583694

  4. Overexpression of Thioredoxin in Transgenic Mice Attenuates Focal Ischemic Brain Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yasushi; Mitsui, Akira; Nishiyama, Akira; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Sono, Hiroshi; Gon, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Yodoi, Junji

    1999-03-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) plays important biological roles both in intra- and extracellular compartments, including in regulation of various intracellular molecules via thiol redox control. We produced TRX overexpressing mice and confirmed that there were no anatomical and physiological differences between wild-type (WT) mice and TRX transgenic (Tg) mice. In the present study we subjected mice to focal brain ischemia to shed light on the role of TRX in brain ischemic injury. At 24 hr after middle cerebral artery occlusion, infarct areas and volume were significantly smaller in Tg mice than in WT mice. Moreover neurological deficit was ameliorated in Tg mice compared with WT mice. Protein carbonyl content, a marker of cellular protein oxidation, in Tg mice showed less increase than did that of WT mice after the ischemic insult. Furthermore, c-fos expression in Tg mice was stronger than in WT mice 1 hr after ischemia. Our results suggest that transgene expression of TRX decreased ischemic neuronal injury and that TRX and the redox state modified by TRX play a crucial role in brain damage during stroke.

  5. Prenatal nicotine exposure increases anxiety and modifies sensorimotor integration behaviors in adult female mice.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Sarah E; Huffman, Kelly J

    2014-02-01

    Prenatal exposure to nicotine (PNE) has been associated with a myriad of physiological, cognitive, and behavioral effects in the developing offspring. In this study, CD-1 dams were given injections of nicotine or control vehicle throughout gestation and their offspring were raised to 6 months of age. Adult mice were administered a battery of behavioral tests (the Suok test, the elevated platform test, and the elevated plus maze test) to assess anxiety and sensorimotor integration. PNE resulted in a decreased likelihood of jumping during the elevated platform test and decreased directed exploration in the Suok test, both indicative of increased anxiety. Also, PNE mice showed increased numbers of missteps while traversing an elevated rod in the Suok test, demonstrating altered sensorimotor integration. No significant differences were found in falls, segments traveled, latency to leave the central zone, vegetative responses, risk assessment behaviors, or autogroom behaviors. The elevated plus maze test revealed no significant differences between groups. No significant differences in body and brain weights, or cortical thickness within motor, somatosensory, and visual cortices were observed between PNE and control mice. Although neuroanatomical effects of PNE may be rescued as development progresses, defects in sensorimotor integration and increased anxiety persist into adulthood. PMID:24157430

  6. The impact of Ly6Clow monocytes after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro Moreno; Tremblay, Yannick; Rivest, Serge

    2014-01-01

    After an ischemic stroke, mononuclear phagocytic cells such as microglia, macrophages, and monocytes migrate to the lesion site and coordinate an immune response. Monocytes, which are recruited from the bloodstream after ischemic brain injury, can be categorized into two subsets in mice: inflammatory and patrolling monocytes. Although inflammatory monocytes (Ly6Chi) seem to have a protective role in stroke progression, the impact of patrolling monocytes (Ly6Clow) is unknown. To address the role of Ly6Clow monocytes in stroke, we generated bone marrow chimeric mice in which their hematopoietic system was replaced by Nr4a1−/− cells, allowing the complete and permanent ablation of Ly6Clow monocytes without affecting the Ly6Chi subset. We then subjected adult mice to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia using the Levine/Vannucci model. Functional outcomes after stroke such as body weight change, neurologic score, motor functions and spatial learning were not affected. Moreover, depletion in Ly6Clow monocytes did not change significantly the total infarct size, cell loss, atrophy, the number, or the activation state of microglia/macrophages at the lesion site. These data suggest that Ly6Clow patrolling monocytes are redundant in the progression and recovery of ischemic stroke. PMID:24780898

  7. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N.; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.—Shen, H., Kuo, C.-C., Chou, J., Delvolve, A., Jackson, S. N., Post, J., Woods, A. S., Hoffer, B. J., Wang, Y., Harvey, B. K. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. PMID:19218497

  8. Acute moderate exercise enhances compensatory brain activation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Kazuki; Dan, Ippeita; Suwabe, Kazuya; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Yamada, Yuhki; Akahori, Mitsuya; Byun, Kyeongho; Kato, Morimasa; Soya, Hideaki

    2012-11-01

    A growing number of reports state that regular exercise enhances brain function in older adults. Recently a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) study revealed that an acute bout of moderate exercise enhanced activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC) associated with Stroop interference in young adults. Whether this acute effect is also applicable to older adults was examined. Sixteen older adults performed a color-word matching Stroop task before and after 10 minutes of exercise on a cycle ergometer at a moderate intensity. Cortical hemodynamics of the prefrontal area was monitored with a fNIRS during the Stroop task. We analyzed Stroop interference (incongruent-neutral) as Stroop performance. Though activation for Stroop interference was found in the bilateral prefrontal area before the acute bout of exercise, activation of the right frontopolar area (R-FPA) was enhanced after exercise. In the majority of participants, this coincided with improved performance reflected in Stroop interference results. Thus, an acute bout of moderate exercise improved Stroop performance in older adults, and this was associated with contralateral compensatory activation. PMID:22300952

  9. A highly secreted sulphamidase engineered to cross the blood-brain barrier corrects brain lesions of mice with mucopolysaccharidoses type IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Nicolina Cristina; D'Orsi, Luca; Sambri, Irene; Nusco, Edoardo; Monaco, Ciro; Spampanato, Carmine; Polishchuk, Elena; Saccone, Paola; De Leonibus, Elvira; Ballabio, Andrea; Fraldi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses type IIIA (MPS-IIIA) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) caused by inherited defects of the sulphamidase gene. Here, we used a systemic gene transfer approach to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of a chimeric sulphamidase, which was engineered by adding the signal peptide (sp) from the highly secreted iduronate-2-sulphatase (IDS) and the blood-brain barrier (BBB)-binding domain (BD) from the Apolipoprotein B (ApoB-BD). A single intravascular administration of AAV2/8 carrying the modified sulphamidase was performed in adult MPS-IIIA mice in order to target the liver and convert it to a factory organ for sustained systemic release of the modified sulphamidase. We showed that while the IDS sp replacement results in increased enzyme secretion, the addition of the ApoB-BD allows efficient BBB transcytosis and restoration of sulphamidase activity in the brain of treated mice. This, in turn, resulted in an overall improvement of brain pathology and recovery of a normal behavioural phenotype. Our results provide a novel feasible strategy to develop minimally invasive therapies for the treatment of brain pathology in MPS-IIIA and other neurodegenerative LSDs. PMID:23568409

  10. Early-Onset Convulsive Seizures Induced by Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Aging Mice: Effects of Anticonvulsive Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H.; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increased risk of seizures/epilepsy. Stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) and cardiac arrest related brain injury are two major causative factors for seizure development in this patient population. With either etiology, seizures are a poor prognostic factor. In spite of this, the underlying pathophysiology of seizure development is not well understood. In addition, a standardized treatment regimen with anticonvulsants and outcome assessments following treatment has yet to be established for these post-ischemic seizures. Previous studies have modeled post-ischemic seizures in adult rodents, but similar studies in aging/aged animals, a group that mirrors a higher risk elderly population, remain sparse. Our study therefore aimed to investigate early-onset seizures in aging animals using a hypoxia-ischemia (HI) model. Male C57 black mice 18-20-month-old underwent a unilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery followed by a systemic hypoxic episode (8% O2 for 30 min). Early-onset seizures were detected using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. Brain injury was assessed histologically at different times post HI. Convulsive seizures were observed in 65% of aging mice post-HI but not in control aging mice following either sham surgery or hypoxia alone. These seizures typically occurred within hours of HI and behaviorally consisted of jumping, fast running, barrel-rolling, and/or falling (loss of the righting reflex) with limb spasms. No evident discharges during any convulsive seizures were seen on cortical-hippocampal EEG recordings. Seizure development was closely associated with acute mortality and severe brain injury on brain histological analysis. Intra-peritoneal injections of lorazepam and fosphenytoin suppressed seizures and improved survival but only when applied prior to seizure onset and not after. These findings together suggest that seizures are a major contributing factor to acute mortality in aging

  11. Evaluation of Oogenesis Aspects in Neonatal and Adult Mice after Toloaldoxime Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fazeltabar Malekshah, Mohammad; Sedighi, Mahsa; Parivar, Kazem; Mohseni Kouchesfahani, Homa; Bigdeli, Mohamadali

    2015-01-01

    Objective Oximes are important materials in organic chemistry. Synparamethyl benzal- dehyde oxime (toloaldoxime) is structurally similar to other oximes, hence we have studied its effects on the neonatal and adult female Balb/c mice reproductive systems in order to provide a platform for future studies on the production of female contraceptive drugs. Materials and Methods In experimental study, we studied the effects of toloaldoxime on ovary growth and gonadal hormones of neonatal and adult Balb/c mice. A regression model for prediction was presented. Results The effects of toloaldoxime on neonatal mice were more than adult mice. The greatest effect was on the number of Graafian follicles (59.6% in adult mice and 31.83% in neonatal mice). The least effect was on ovary weight, and blood serum lev- els of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Conclusion According to the data obtained, toloaldoxime can be considered an anti- pregnancy substance. PMID:26464830

  12. Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography Visualizes Microvasculature Changes in Mice Brains after Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Xie, Bohua; Lin, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    Imaging brain microvasculature is important in plasticity studies of cerebrovascular diseases. Applying contrast agents, traditional μCT and μMRI methods gain imaging contrast for vasculature. The aim of this study is to develop a synchrotron radiation X-ray inline phase-contrast tomography (SRXPCT) method for imaging the intact mouse brain (micro)vasculature in high resolution (~3.7 μm) without contrast agent. A specific preparation protocol was proposed to enhance the phase contrast of brain vasculature by using density difference over gas-tissue interface. The CT imaging system was developed and optimized to obtain 3D brain vasculature of adult male C57BL/6 mice. The SRXPCT method was further applied to investigate the microvasculature changes in mouse brains (n = 14) after 14-day reperfusion from transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). 3D reconstructions of brain microvasculature demonstrated that the branching radius ratio (post- to preinjury) of small vessels (radius < 7.4 μm) in the injury group was significantly smaller than that in the sham group (p < 0.05). This result revealed the active angiogenesis in the recovery brain after stroke. As a high-resolution and contrast-agent-free method, the SRXPCT method demonstrates higher potential in investigations of functional plasticity in cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:27563468

  13. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers.

    PubMed

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings. PMID:26229677

  14. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  15. Ablation of huntingtin in adult neurons is nondeleterious but its depletion in young mice causes acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohao; Liu, Xudong; Gaertig, Marta A; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-03-22

    The Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is essential for early development. Because suppressing the expression of mutantHTTis an important approach to treat the disease, we must first understand the normal function of Htt in adults versus younger animals. Using inducibleHttknockout mice, we found thatHttdepletion does not lead to adult neurodegeneration or animal death at >4 mo of age, which was also verified by selectively depletingHttin neurons. On the other hand, young Htt KO mice die at 2 mo of age of acute pancreatitis due to the degeneration of pancreatic acinar cells. Importantly, Htt interacts with the trypsin inhibitor, serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 3 (Spink3), to inhibit activation of digestive enzymes in acinar cells in young mice, and transgenicHTTcan rescue the early death of Htt KO mice. These findings point out age- and cell type-dependent vital functions of Htt and the safety of knocking down neuronal Htt expression in adult brains as a treatment. PMID:26951659

  16. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  17. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  18. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  19. The relationship between numbers of larvae recovered from the brain of Toxocara canis-infected mice and social behaviour and anxiety in the host.

    PubMed

    Cox, D M; Holland, C V

    1998-06-01

    The effect of the nematode Toxocara canis on social behaviour and anxiety levels of adult male outbred (LACA) mice was examined following infection with a single dose of 2000 ova. The actual number of larvae recovered from the brain of each individual mouse was determined after behavioural testing. The effect of the parasite on mouse behaviour was analysed by both the initial dose administered (i.e. infected versus control) and the degree of infection in the brain. There was substantial variation in the number of larvae recovered from the brains of the individual mice and the magnitude of behavioural change was associated with the level of infection. Examination of social behaviour for both analyses revealed that the infection reduced levels of aggressive behaviour and increased levels of flight and defensive behaviours. High infection in the brain induced the greatest degree of behavioural change which decreased in mice with lower infections. In contrast the analysis of anxiety levels in mice by initial dose administered revealed no difference between infected and control mice. Mice with low infection in the brain, however, displayed a greater level of risk behaviour by spending more time in the vicinity of a predator odour and in the light area of a light/dark paradigm than control or high infection mice. The results suggest that the behaviour of mice infected with T. canis is influenced by the number of larvae accumulated in the brain. This may have important consequences for the conclusions drawn on the effect of this parasite on murine behaviour. PMID:9651941

  20. Spinosin, a C-glycoside flavonoid, enhances cognitive performance and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghwan; Jeon, Se Jin; Lee, Hyung Eun; Jung, In Ho; Jo, Yeong-Woo; Lee, Sunhee; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis has received much attention due to its potential role in neurological or psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we examined whether spinosin, a C-glycoside flavonoid from the seeds of Zizyphus jujuba var. spinosa, affects cognitive performance and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in normal naïve mice. The subchronic administration of spinosin (5mg/kg) for 14days significantly increased the latency time in the passive avoidance task. Doublecortin and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining revealed that the subchronic administration of spinosin (5mg/kg) significantly increased the proliferation and survival of neuronal cells and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus region. In addition, we observed an increase in the percentage of BrdU-incorporated cells co-localized with NeuN, a mature neuronal marker, which indicated that spinosin stimulates the differentiation of newly generated cells into mature neurons. Also, the subchronic treatment with spinosin (5mg/kg) increased the expression levels of phosphorylated extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (mBDNF) in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that spinosin has the potential for therapeutic use in treating the cognitive dysfunction observed in neurological or psychiatric disorders by up-regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis or activating of the ERK-CREB-BDNF signaling pathway. PMID:26997033

  1. Roles for Oestrogen Receptor β in Adult Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Handa, R. J.; Ogawa, S.; Wang, J. M.; Herbison, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Oestradiol exerts a profound influence upon multiple brain circuits. For the most part, these effects are mediated by oestrogen receptor (ER)α. We review here the roles of ERβ, the other ER isoform, in mediating rodent oestradiol-regulated anxiety, aggressive and sexual behaviours, the control of gonadotrophin secretion, and adult neurogenesis. Evidence exists for: (i) ERβ located in the paraventricular nucleus underpinning the suppressive influence of oestradiol on the stress axis and anxiety-like behaviour; (ii) ERβ expressed in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones contributing to oestrogen negative-feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion; (iii) ERβ controlling the offset of lordosis behaviour; (iv) ERβ suppressing aggressive behaviour in males; (v) ERβ modulating responses to social stimuli; and (vi) ERβ in controlling adult neurogenesis. This review highlights two major themes; first, ERβ and ERα are usually tightly inter-related in the oestradiol-dependent control of a particular brain function. For example, even though oestradiol feedback to control reproduction occurs principally through ERα-dependent mechanisms, modulatory roles for ERβ also exist. Second, the roles of ERα and ERβ within a particular neural network may be synergistic or antagonistic. Examples of the latter include the role of ERα to enhance, and ERβ to suppress, anxiety-like and aggressive behaviours. Splice variants such as ERβ2, acting as dominant negative receptors, are of further particular interest because their expression levels may reflect preceeding oestradiol exposure of relevance to oestradiol replacement therapy. Together, this review highlights the predominant modulatory, but nonetheless important, roles of ERβ in mediating the many effects of oestradiol upon adult brain function. PMID:21851428

  2. Neurogenesis in the adult brain: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Veronica; Bredesen, Dale E

    2007-10-01

    The function of neurogenesis in the adult brain is still unknown. Interventions such as environmental enrichment and exercise impinge on neurogenesis, suggesting that the process is regulated by experience. Conversely, a role for neurogenesis in learning has been proposed through 'cellular plasticity', a process akin to synaptic plasticity but operating at the network level. Although neurogenesis is stimulated by acute injury, and possibly by neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it does not suffice to restore function. While the role and direction of change in the neurogenic response at different stages of AD is still a matter of debate, it is possible that a deficit in neurogenesis may contribute to AD pathogenesis since at least one of the two regions ostensibly neurogenic in the adult human brain (the subgranular zone of the dentage gyrus and the ventriculo-olfactory neurogenic system) support high-level functions affected in early AD (associative memory and olfaction respectively). The age of onset and the rate of progression of sporadic forms of AD are highly variable. Sporadic AD may have a component of insufficient neurogenic replacement or insufficient neurogenic stimulation that is correlated with traits of personal history; the rate of neurogenesis and the survival of replicating progenitors is strongly modified by behavioral interventions known to impinge on the rate of neurogenesis and the probability of survival of newly born neurons--exercise, enriched experience, and learning. This view is consistent with epidemiological data suggesting that higher education and increased participation in intellectual, social and physical aspects of daily life are associated with slower cognitive decline in healthy elderly ("cognitive reserve") and may reduce the risk of AD. Although neurogenesis can be modulated exogenously by growth factors, stimulation of neurogenesis as a mean to treat neurodegeneration is still for the most part

  3. Are age and sex differences in brain oxytocin receptors related to maternal and infanticidal behavior in naïve mice?

    PubMed

    Olazábal, Daniel E; Alsina-Llanes, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". There is significant variability in the behavioral responses displayed by naïve young and adult mice when first exposed to pups. This variability has been associated with differences in the expression of oxytocin receptors (OXTRs) in the brain in several species. Experiment I investigated the behavioral responses of juvenile, adolescent, and adult CB57BL/6 males and females when first exposed to pups. We found an age increase in maternal females (11% of juveniles, 20% of adolescents, and 50% of young adults), and infanticidal males (0% of juveniles, 30% of adolescents, 44.5% of young adults, and 100% of older adults). Experiment II investigated OXTR density in the brain of juvenile and adult mice. Our results revealed an age decline in the density of OXTR in several brain regions, including the lateral septum, cingulated and posterior paraventricular thalamic nucleus in both males and females. Adult females had higher OXTR density in the ventromedial nucleus/postero-ventral hypothalamus (VMH) and the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), but lower density in the ventral region of the lateral septum (LSv) than juveniles. Males had lower OXTR density in the anterior olfactory area (AOA) compared to juveniles. No age or sex differences were found in the medial preoptic area, and amygdaloid nuclei, among other brain regions. This study suggests that 1) maturation of parental and infanticidal behavioral responses is not reached until adulthood; 2) the pattern of development of OXTR in the mouse brain is unique, region specific, and differs from that observed in other rodents; 3) either up or down regulation of OXTR in a few brain regions (VMH/AOB/LSv/AOA) might contribute to age or sex differences in parental or infanticidal behavior. PMID:25910577

  4. TrkB gene transfer does not alter hippocampal neuronal loss and cognitive deficits following traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Valeria; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Watson, Deborah J.; Fujimoto, Scott; Royo, Nicolas C.; Marklund, Niklas; Stocchetti, Nino; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The ability of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to attenuate secondary damage and influence behavioral outcome after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains controversial. Because TBI can result in decreased expression of the trkB receptor, thereby preventing BDNF from exerting potential neuroprotective effects, the contribution of both BDNF and its receptor trkB to hippocampal neuronal loss and cognitive dysfunction were evaluated. Methods Full-length trkB was overexpressed in the left hippocampus of adult C57Bl/6 mice using recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2/5 (rAAV 2/5). EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) expression was present at two weeks after AAV-EGFP injection and remained sustained up to four weeks after the injection. At 2 weeks following gene transduction, mice were subjected to parasagittal controlled cortical impact (CCI) brain injury, followed by either BDNF or PBS infusion into the hippocampus. Results No differences were observed in learning ability at two weeks post-injury or in motor function from 48 hours to two weeks among treatment groups. The number of surviving pyramidal neurons in the CA2-CA3 region of the hippocampus was also not different among treatment groups. Conclusions These data suggest that neither overexpression of trkB, BNDF infusion or their combination affects neuronal survival or behavioral outcome following experimental TBI in mice. PMID:18431005

  5. Hypoxia-ischemia or excitotoxin-induced tissue plasminogen activator- dependent gelatinase activation in mice neonate brain microvessels.

    PubMed

    Omouendze, Priscilla L; Henry, Vincent J; Porte, Baptiste; Dupré, Nicolas; Carmeliet, Peter; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and excitotoxicity are validated causes of neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor-mediated pathways. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from neonates in culture, contain and release more t-PA and gelatinases upon glutamate challenge than adult cells. We have studied t-PA to gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activity links in HI and excitotoxicity lesion models in 5 day-old pups in wild type and in t-PA or its inhibitor (PAI-1) genes inactivated mice. Gelatinolytic activities were detected in SDS-PAGE zymograms and by in situ fluorescent DQ-gelatin microscopic zymographies. HI was achieved by unilateral carotid ligature followed by a 40 min hypoxia (8%O₂). Excitotoxic lesions were produced by intra parenchymal cortical (i.c.) injections of 10 µg ibotenate (Ibo). Gel zymograms in WT cortex revealed progressive extinction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities near day 15 or day 8 respectively. MMP-2 expression was the same in all strains while MMP-9 activity was barely detectable in t-PA⁻/⁻ and enhanced in PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice. HI or Ibo produced activation of MMP-2 activities 6 hours post-insult, in cortices of WT mice but not in t-PA⁻/⁻ mice. In PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice, HI or vehicle i.c. injection increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. In situ zymograms using DQ-gelatin revealed vessel associated gelatinolytic activity in lesioned areas in PAI-1⁻/⁻ and in WT mice. In WT brain slices incubated ex vivo, glutamate (200 µM) induced DQ-gelatin activation in vessels. The effect was not detected in t-PA⁻/⁻ mice, but was restored by concomitant exposure to recombinant t-PA (20 µg/mL). In summary, neonatal brain lesion paradigms and ex vivo excitotoxic glutamate evoked t-PA-dependent gelatinases activation in vessels. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities appeared t-PA-dependent. The data suggest that vascular directed protease inhibition may have neuroprotection

  6. Combination of omega-3 Fatty acids, lithium, and aripiprazole reduces oxidative stress in brain of mice with mania.

    PubMed

    Arunagiri, Pandiyan; Rajeshwaran, Krishnamoorthy; Shanthakumar, Janakiraman; Tamilselvan, Thangavel; Balamurugan, Elumalai

    2014-09-01

    Manic episode in bipolar disorder (BD) was evaluated in the present study with supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in combination with aripiprazole and lithium on methylphenidate (MPD)-induced manic mice model. Administration of MPD 5 mg/kg bw intraperitoneally (i.p.) caused increase in oxidative stress in mice brain. To retract this effect, supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids 1.5 ml/kg (p.o.), aripiprazole 1.5 mg/kg bw (i.p.), and lithium 50 mg/kg bw (p.o) were given to mice. Omega-3 fatty acids alone and in combination with aripiprazole- and lithium-treated groups significantly reduced the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) in the brain. MPD treatment significantly decreased the reduced glutathione (GSH) level and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and they were restored by supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids with aripiprazole and lithium. There is no remarkable difference in the effect of creatine kinase (CK) activity between MPD-induced manic model and the treatment groups. Therefore, our results demonstrate that oxidative stress imbalance and mild insignificant CK alterations induced by administration of MPD can be restored back to normal physiological levels through omega-3 fatty acids combined with lithium and aripiprazole that attributes to effective prevention against mania in adult male Swiss albino mice. PMID:25035188

  7. Detection of biogenic amines in C57BL/6 mice brain by capillary electrophoresis electrokinetic supercharging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-feng; Ju, Fu-rong; Ran, Yan-li; Zhang, Hui-ge; Chen, Xing-guo

    2016-02-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused when blood flow to the brain is stopped and is a major cause of death and long term disability across the globe. Excessive release of neurotransmitters is triggered in the brain by ischemia that mediates neuronal damage and causes ischemic injury. In this study, a simple, sensitive, and on-line preconcentration capillary electrophoresis method based on electrokinetic supercharging (EKS) was developed for the determination of the biogenic amines including dopamine (DA), epinephrine (E), and norepinephrine (NE) in C57BL/6 mice brain. Under the optimized conditions, the analytes were concentrated and detected within 10 min. The detection limits for the analytes ranged from 0.42 to 0.57 ng mL(-1) for a mice brain matrix. With the proposed method, the analyses of three neurochemical amines in C57BL/6 mice brain tissue during cerebral ischemic/reperfusion had been performed successfully. PMID:26658278

  8. Reduced brain injury in CD18 deficient mice after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Titova, Elena; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Kevil, Christopher G.; Tong, Weni; Rojas, Hugo; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have indicated leukocytes as one of the major contributors to brain injuries caused by intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Leukocyte-expressed CD18 is important for neutrophil-endothelial interactions in the vasculature and CD18 deficiency protects against ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated whether CD18 deficiency provides protection against ICH-induced brain injury. Male wild type (WT) CD18+/+ mice and CD18−/− knockout mice were used in this study. ICH was induced by a collagenase injection. Mortality, neurological function, brain edema and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as tissue expression of nitrotyrosine and MPO were evaluated at 24 hours after ICH. We discovered a significantly reduced brain edema and diminished mortality with a concomitant decrease in MPO and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivities in brains of CD18 knockout mice. PMID:18615643

  9. Evaluation of an automatic brain segmentation method developed for neonates on adult MR brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeskops, Pim; Viergever, Max A.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Išgum, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is of clinical relevance in images acquired at all ages. The literature presents a clear distinction between methods developed for MR images of infants, and methods developed for images of adults. The aim of this work is to evaluate a method developed for neonatal images in the segmentation of adult images. The evaluated method employs supervised voxel classification in subsequent stages, exploiting spatial and intensity information. Evaluation was performed using images available within the MRBrainS13 challenge. The obtained average Dice coefficients were 85.77% for grey matter, 88.66% for white matter, 81.08% for cerebrospinal fluid, 95.65% for cerebrum, and 96.92% for intracranial cavity, currently resulting in the best overall ranking. The possibility of applying the same method to neonatal as well as adult images can be of great value in cross-sectional studies that include a wide age range.

  10. Effects of early-onset voluntary exercise on adult physical activity and associated phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early-life exercise on adult physical activity (wheel running, home-cage activity), body mass, food consumption, and circulating leptin levels in males from four replicate lines of mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR) and their four non-selected control (C) lines. Half of the mice were given wheel access shortly after weaning for three consecutive weeks. Wheel access was then removed for 52 days, followed by two weeks of adult wheel access for all mice. A blood sample taken prior to adult wheel testing was analyzed for circulating leptin concentration. Early-life wheel access significantly increased adult voluntary exercise on wheels during the first week of the second period of wheel access, for both HR and C mice, and HR ran more than C mice. During this same time period, activity in the home cages was not affected by early-age wheel access, and did not differ statistically between HR and C mice. Throughout the study, all mice with early wheel access had lower body masses than their sedentary counterparts, and HR mice had lower body masses than C mice. With wheel access, HR mice also ate significantly more than C mice. Early-life wheel access increased plasma leptin levels (adjusted statistically for fat-pad mass as a covariate) in C mice, but decreased them in HR mice. At sacrifice, early-life exercise had no statistically significant effects on visceral fat pad, heart (ventricle), liver or spleen masses (all adjusted statistically for variation in body mass). Results support the hypothesis that early-age exercise in mice can have at least transitory positive effects on adult levels of voluntary exercise, in addition to reducing body mass, and may be relevant for the public policy debates concerning the importance of physical education for children. PMID:26079567

  11. Gestational ketogenic diet programs brain structure and susceptibility to depression & anxiety in the adult mouse offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Dafna; Germann, Jurgen; Henkelman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The ketogenic diet (KD) has seen an increase in popularity for clinical and non-clinical purposes, leading to rise in concern about the diet's impact on following generations. The KD is known to have a neurological effect, suggesting that exposure to it during prenatal brain development may alter neuro-anatomy. Studies have also indicated that the KD has an anti-depressant effect on the consumer. However, it is unclear whether any neuro-anatomical and/or behavioral changes would occur in the offspring and persist into adulthood. Methods To fill this knowledge gap we assessed the brain morphology and behavior of 8-week-old young-adult CD-1 mice, who were exposed to the KD in utero, and were fed only a standard-diet (SD) in postnatal life. Standardized neuro-behavior tests included the Open-Field, Forced-Swim, and Exercise Wheel tests, and were followed by post-mortem Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to assess brain anatomy. Results The adult KD offspring exhibit reduced susceptibility to anxiety and depression, and elevated physical activity level when compared with controls exposed to the SD both in utero and postnatally. Many neuro-anatomical differences exist between the KD offspring and controls, including, for example, a cerebellar volumetric enlargement by 4.8%, a hypothalamic reduction by 1.39%, and a corpus callosum reduction by 4.77%, as computed relative to total brain volume. Conclusions These results suggest that prenatal exposure to the KD programs the offspring neuro-anatomy and influences their behavior in adulthood. PMID:25642385

  12. Chronic intermittent fasting improves cognitive functions and brain structures in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liaoliao; Wang, Zhi; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major health issue. Obesity started from teenagers has become a major health concern in recent years. Intermittent fasting increases the life span. However, it is not known whether obesity and intermittent fasting affect brain functions and structures before brain aging. Here, we subjected 7-week old CD-1 wild type male mice to intermittent (alternate-day) fasting or high fat diet (45% caloric supplied by fat) for 11 months. Mice on intermittent fasting had better learning and memory assessed by the Barnes maze and fear conditioning, thicker CA1 pyramidal cell layer, higher expression of drebrin, a dendritic protein, and lower oxidative stress than mice that had free access to regular diet (control mice). Mice fed with high fat diet was obese and with hyperlipidemia. They also had poorer exercise tolerance. However, these obese mice did not present significant learning and memory impairment or changes in brain structures or oxidative stress compared with control mice. These results suggest that intermittent fasting improves brain functions and structures and that high fat diet feeding started early in life does not cause significant changes in brain functions and structures in obese middle-aged animals. PMID:23755298

  13. Impaired glucose metabolism and exercise capacity with muscle-specific glycogen synthase 1 (gys1) deletion in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Xirouchaki, Chrysovalantou E.; Mangiafico, Salvatore P.; Bate, Katherine; Ruan, Zheng; Huang, Amy M.; Tedjosiswoyo, Bing Wilari; Lamont, Benjamin; Pong, Wynne; Favaloro, Jenny; Blair, Amy R.; Zajac, Jeffrey D.; Proietto, Joseph; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle glucose storage and muscle glycogen synthase (gys1) defects have been associated with insulin resistance. As there are multiple mechanisms for insulin resistance, the specific role of glucose storage defects is not clear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of muscle-specific gys1 deletion on glucose metabolism and exercise capacity. Methods Tamoxifen inducible and muscle specific gys-1 KO mice were generated using the Cre/loxP system. Mice were subjected to glucose tolerance tests, euglycemic/hyperinsulinemic clamps and exercise tests. Results gys1-KO mice showed ≥85% reduction in muscle gys1 mRNA and protein concentrations, 70% reduction in muscle glycogen levels, postprandial hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia and impaired glucose tolerance. Under insulin-stimulated conditions, gys1-KO mice displayed reduced glucose turnover and muscle glucose uptake, indicative of peripheral insulin resistance, as well as increased plasma and muscle lactate levels and reductions in muscle hexokinase II levels. gys1-KO mice also exhibited markedly reduced exercise and endurance capacity. Conclusions Thus, muscle-specific gys1 deletion in adult mice results in glucose intolerance due to insulin resistance and reduced muscle glucose uptake as well as impaired exercise and endurance capacity. In brief This study demonstrates why the body prioritises muscle glycogen storage over liver glycogen storage despite the critical role of the liver in supplying glucose to the brain in the fasting state and shows that glycogen deficiency results in impaired glucose metabolism and reduced exercise capacity. PMID:26977394

  14. Noncanonical Sites of Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, David M; Bordey, Angélique; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) populate some regions of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), deep knowledge has been accumulated on their capacity to generate new neurons in the adult brain. This constitutive adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life primarily within remnants of the embryonic germinal layers known as "neurogenic sites." Nevertheless, some processes of neurogliogenesis also occur in the CNS parenchyma commonly considered as "nonneurogenic." This "noncanonical" cell genesis has been the object of many claims, some of which turned out to be not true. Indeed, it is often an "incomplete" process as to its final outcome, heterogeneous by several measures, including regional location, progenitor identity, and fate of the progeny. These aspects also strictly depend on the animal species, suggesting that persistent neurogenic processes have uniquely adapted to the brain anatomy of different mammals. Whereas some examples of noncanonical neurogenesis are strictly parenchymal, others also show stem cell niche-like features and a strong link with the ventricular cavities. This work will review results obtained in a research field that expanded from classic neurogenesis studies involving a variety of areas of the CNS outside of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ). It will be highlighted how knowledge concerning noncanonical neurogenic areas is still incomplete owing to its regional and species-specific heterogeneity, and to objective difficulties still hampering its full identification and characterization. PMID:26384869

  15. Diminished adult neurogenesis in the marmoset brain precedes old age

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Benedetta; Kozorovitskiy, Yevgenia; Gross, Charles G.; Gould, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    With aging there is a decline in the number of newly generated neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In rodents and tree shrews, this age-related decrease in neurogenesis is evident long before the animals become aged. No previous studies have investigated whether primates exhibit a similar decline in hippocampal neurogenesis with aging. To investigate this possibility, young to middle aged adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were injected with BrdU and perfused 3 weeks later. The number of newly generated cells in the subgranular zone/granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus was significantly lower in older animals and decreased linearly with age. A similar age-related decline in new cells was observed in the subventricular zone but not in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus. These data demonstrate that a substantial decrease in neurogenesis occurs before the onset of old age in the adult marmoset brain, suggesting the possibility that similar alterations occur in the human brain. PMID:17940008

  16. Smad3 is required for the survival of proliferative intermediate progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New neurons are continuously being generated in the adult hippocampus, a phenomenon that is regulated by external stimuli, such as learning, memory, exercise, environment or stress. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neuron production and how they are integrated into existing circuits under such physiological conditions remain unclear. Indeed, the intracellular modulators that transduce the extracellular signals are not yet fully understood. Results We show that Smad3, an intracellular molecule involved in the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling cascade, is strongly expressed by granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adult mice, although the loss of Smad3 in null mutant mice does not affect their survival. Smad3 is also expressed by adult progenitor cells in the subgranular zone (SGZ) and more specifically, it is first expressed by Type 2 cells (intermediate progenitor cells). Its expression persists through the distinct cell stages towards that of the mature neuron. Interestingly, proliferative intermediate progenitor cells die in Smad3 deficiency, which is associated with a large decrease in the production of newborn neurons in Smad3 deficient mice. Smad3 signaling appears to influence adult neurogenesis fulfilling distinct roles in the rostral and mid-caudal regions of the DG. In rostral areas, Smad3 deficiency increases proliferation and promotes the cell cycle exit of undifferentiated progenitor cells. By contrast, Smad3 deficiency impairs the survival of newborn neurons in the mid-caudal region of the DG at early proliferative stages, activating apoptosis of intermediate progenitor cells. Furthermore, long-term potentiation (LTP) after high frequency stimulation (HFS) to the medial perforant path (MPP) was abolished in the DG of Smad3-deficient mice. Conclusions These data show that endogenous Smad3 signaling is central to neurogenesis and LTP induction in the adult DG, these being two forms of hippocampal brain plasticity

  17. Insulin signaling disruption in male mice due to perinatal bisphenol A exposure: Role of insulin signaling in the brain.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fangfang; Gao, Yue; Wang, Tingwei; Chen, Donglong; Liu, Jingli; Qian, Wenyi; Cheng, Jie; Gao, Rong; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2016-03-14

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogenic endocrine disruptor, is widely used for producing polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Available data have shown that perinatal exposure to BPA contributes to peripheral insulin resistance, while in the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of perinatal BPA exposure on insulin signaling and glucose transport in the cortex of offspring mice. The pregnant mice were administrated either vehicle or BPA (100 μg/kg/day) at three perinatal stages. Stage I: from day 6 of gestation until parturition (P6-PND0 fetus exposure); Stage II: from lactation until delactation (PND0-PND21 newborn exposure) and Stage III: from day 6 of pregnancy until delactation (P6-PND21 fetus and newborn exposure). At 8 months of age for the offspring mice, the insulin signaling pathways and glucose transporters (GLUTs) were detected. Our data indicated that the insulin signaling including insulin, phosphorylated insulin receptor (IR), phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-AKT), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β) and phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (p-ERK) were significantly decreased in the brain. In parallel, GLUTs (GLUT1/3/4) were obviously decreased as well in BPA-treated group in mice brain. Noteworthily, the phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were markedly up-regulated in all BPA-treated groups. These results, taken together, suggest the adverse effects of BPA on insulin signaling and GLUTs, which might subsequently contribute to the increment of p-tau and APP in the brain of adult offspring. Therefore, perinatal BPA exposure might be a risk factor for the long-term neurodegenerative changes in offspring male mice. PMID:26779933

  18. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  19. Iron and copper accumulation in the brain of coxsackievirus-infected mice exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Ilbaeck, N.-G. . E-mail: nils-gunnar.ilback@slv.se; Lindh, U.; Minqin, R.; Friman, G.; Watt, F.

    2006-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a potentially toxic metal widely distributed in the environment and known to cause adverse health effects in humans. During coxsackievirus infection, the concentrations of essential and nonessential trace elements (e.g., iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and Cd) change in different target organs of the infection. Fe and Cu are recognized cofactors in host defence reactions, and Fe is known to be associated with certain pathological conditions of the brain. However, whether nonessential trace elements could influence the balance of essential trace elements in the brain is unknown. In this study the brain Fe, Cu, and Cd contents were measured through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and their distributions determined by nuclear microscopy in the early phase (day 3) of coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) infection in nonexposed and in Cd-exposed female Balb/c mice. In CB3 infection the brain is a well-known target that has not been studied with regard to trace element balance. The brain concentration of Cu compared with that of noninfected control mice was increased by 9% (P<0.05) in infected mice not exposed to Cd and by 10% (not significant) in infected Cd-exposed mice. A similar response was seen for Fe, which in infected Cd-exposed mice, compared to noninfected control mice, tended to increase by 16%. Cu showed an even tissue distribution, whereas Fe was distributed in focal deposits. Changes in Cd concentration in the brain of infected mice were less consistent but evenly distributed. Further studies are needed to define whether the accumulation and distribution of trace elements in the brain have an impact on brain function.

  20. Inhibition of brain ST8SiaIII sialyltransferase leads to impairment of procedural memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Rinflerch, Adriana R; Burgos, Valeria L; Ielpi, Marcelo; Quintana, Marcos Ojea; Hidalgo, Alejandra M; Loresi, Monica; Argibay, Pablo F

    2013-11-01

    Several glycoproteins in mammalian brains contain α2,8-linked disialic acid residues. We previously showed a constant expression of disialic acid (DiSia) in the hippocampus, olfactory bulb and cortex, and a gradual decrease of expression in the cerebellum from neonatal to senile mice. Previous publications indicate that neurite extension of neuroblastoma-derived Neuro2A cells is inhibited in the presence of DiSia antibody. Based on this, we treated Neuro2A cell cultures with RNA interference for ST8SiaIII mRNA, the enzyme responsible for DiSia formation. We observed that neurite extension was inhibited by this treatment. Taking this evidence into consideration and the relationship of the cerebellum with learning and memory, we studied the role of DiSia expression in a learning task. Through delivery of pST8SiaIII into the brains of C57BL/6 neonatal mice, we inhibited the expression of ST8SiaIII. ST8SiaIII mRNA and protein expressions were analyzed by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. In this work, we showed that pST8SiaIII-treated mice presented a significantly reduced level of ST8SiaIII mRNA in the cerebellum (p<0.01) in comparison to control mice at 8 days after treatment. It is also noted that these levels returned to baseline values in the adulthood. Then, we evaluated behavioural performance in the T-Maze, a learning task that estimates procedural memory. At all ages, pST8SiaIII-treated mice showed a lower performance in the test session, being most evident at older ages (p<0.001). Taken all together, we conclude that gene expression of ST8SiaIII is necessary for some cognitive tasks at early postnatal ages, since reduced levels impaired procedural memory in adult mice. PMID:23932970

  1. Axonal injury and regeneration in the adult brain of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Derya; Leyssen, Maarten; Koch, Marta; Yan, Jiekun; Srahna, Mohammed; Sheeba, Vasu; Fogle, Keri J.; Holmes, Todd C.; Hassan, Bassem A.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a leading genetic model system in nervous system development and disease research. Using the power of fly genetics in traumatic axonal injury research will significantly speed up the characterization of molecular processes that control axonal regeneration in the Central Nervous System (CNS). We developed a versatile and physiologically robust preparation for the long-term culture of the whole Drosophila brain. We use this method to develop a novel Drosophila model for CNS axonal injury and regeneration. We first show that, similar to mammalian CNS axons, injured adult wild type fly CNS axons fail to regenerate, whereas adult-specific enhancement of Protein Kinase A activity increases the regenerative capacity of lesioned neurons. Combined, these observations suggest conservation of neuronal regeneration mechanisms following injury. We next exploit this model to explore pathways that induce robust regeneration and find that adult-specific activation of JNK signalling is sufficient for de novo CNS axonal regeneration after injury, including the growth of new axons past the lesion site and into the normal target area. PMID:18524906

  2. Stroke Incidence Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jennifer S.; Liu, Xinggang; Smith, Gordon S.; Baumgarten, Mona; Rattinger, Gail B.; Gambert, Steven R.; Langenberg, Patricia; Zuckerman, Ilene H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), older adults are at increased risk of hemorrhagic and thromboembolic events, but it is unclear whether the increased risk continues after hospital discharge. We estimated incidence rates of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke following hospital discharge for TBI among adults ≥65 and compared them with pre-TBI rates. Participants 16,936 Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 with a diagnosis of TBI in any position on an inpatient claim between 6/1/2006 and 12/31/2009 who survived to hospital discharge. Design Retrospective analysis of a random 5% sample of Medicare claims data Main Measures Hemorrhagic stroke was defined as ICD-9 codes 430.xx-432.xx. Ischemic stroke was defined as ICD-9 codes 433.xx-435.xx, 437.0x, and 437.1x. Results There was a six-fold increase in the rate of hemorrhagic stroke following TBI compared to the pre-TBI period (adjusted Rate Ratio (RR) 6.5; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 5.3, 7.8), controlling for age and sex. A smaller increase in the rate of ischemic stroke was observed (adjusted RR 1.3; 95% CI 1.2, 1.4). Conclusion Future studies should investigate causes of increased stroke risk post-TBI as well as effective treatments to reduce stroke risk and improve outcomes post-TBI among older adults. PMID:24816156

  3. Prenatal Exposure to Autism-Specific Maternal Autoantibodies Alters Proliferation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells, Enlarges Brain, and Increases Neuronal Size in Adult Animals.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Camacho, Jasmin; Fox, Elizabeth; Miller, Elaine; Ariza, Jeanelle; Kienzle, Devon; Plank, Kaela; Noctor, Stephen C; Van de Water, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect up to 1 in 68 children. Autism-specific autoantibodies directed against fetal brain proteins have been found exclusively in a subpopulation of mothers whose children were diagnosed with ASD or maternal autoantibody-related autism. We tested the impact of autoantibodies on brain development in mice by transferring human antigen-specific IgG directly into the cerebral ventricles of embryonic mice during cortical neurogenesis. We show that autoantibodies recognize radial glial cells during development. We also show that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies increased stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the embryonic neocortex, increased adult brain size and weight, and increased the size of adult cortical neurons. We propose that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies directly affects radial glial cell development and presents a viable pathologic mechanism for the maternal autoantibody-related prenatal ASD risk factor. PMID:25535268

  4. Resting-State Brain Activity in Adult Males Who Stutter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chaozhe; Wang, Liang; Yan, Qian; Lin, Chunlan; Yu, Chunshui

    2012-01-01

    Although developmental stuttering has been extensively studied with structural and task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), few studies have focused on resting-state brain activity in this disorder. We investigated resting-state brain activity of stuttering subjects by analyzing the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), region of interest (ROI)-based functional connectivity (FC) and independent component analysis (ICA)-based FC. Forty-four adult males with developmental stuttering and 46 age-matched fluent male controls were scanned using resting-state fMRI. ALFF, ROI-based FCs and ICA-based FCs were compared between male stuttering subjects and fluent controls in a voxel-wise manner. Compared with fluent controls, stuttering subjects showed increased ALFF in left brain areas related to speech motor and auditory functions and bilateral prefrontal cortices related to cognitive control. However, stuttering subjects showed decreased ALFF in the left posterior language reception area and bilateral non-speech motor areas. ROI-based FC analysis revealed decreased FC between the posterior language area involved in the perception and decoding of sensory information and anterior brain area involved in the initiation of speech motor function, as well as increased FC within anterior or posterior speech- and language-associated areas and between the prefrontal areas and default-mode network (DMN) in stuttering subjects. ICA showed that stuttering subjects had decreased FC in the DMN and increased FC in the sensorimotor network. Our findings support the concept that stuttering subjects have deficits in multiple functional systems (motor, language, auditory and DMN) and in the connections between them. PMID:22276215

  5. Ultrasonic vocalizations of adult male Foxp2-mutant mice: behavioral contexts of arousal and emotion.

    PubMed

    Gaub, S; Fisher, S E; Ehret, G

    2016-02-01

    Adult mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) occur in multiple behavioral and stimulus contexts associated with various levels of arousal, emotion and social interaction. Here, in three experiments of increasing stimulus intensity (water; female urine; male interacting with adult female), we tested the hypothesis that USVs of adult males express the strength of arousal and emotion via different USV parameters (18 parameters analyzed). Furthermore, we analyzed two mouse lines with heterozygous Foxp2 mutations (R552H missense, S321X nonsense), known to produce severe speech and language disorders in humans. These experiments allowed us to test whether intact Foxp2 function is necessary for developing full adult USV repertoires, and whether mutations of this gene influence instinctive vocal expressions based on arousal and emotion. The results suggest that USV calling rate characterizes the arousal level, while sound pressure and spectrotemporal call complexity (overtones/harmonics, type of frequency jumps) may provide indices of levels of positive emotion. The presence of Foxp2 mutations did not qualitatively affect the USVs; all USV types that were found in wild-type animals also occurred in heterozygous mutants. However, mice with Foxp2 mutations displayed quantitative differences in USVs as compared to wild-types, and these changes were context dependent. Compared to wild-type animals, heterozygous mutants emitted mainly longer and louder USVs at higher minimum frequencies with a higher occurrence rate of overtones/harmonics and complex frequency jump types. We discuss possible hypotheses about Foxp2 influence on emotional vocal expressions, which can be investigated in future experiments using selective knockdown of Foxp2 in specific brain circuits. PMID:26566793

  6. Toxicity of benzyl alcohol in adult and neonatal mice

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Benzyl alcohol (BA) is an aromatic alcohol, which is used as a bacteriostat in a variety of parenteral preparations. In 1982, it was implicated as the agent responsible for precipitating The Gasping Syndrome in premature neonates. The investigate further this toxicity, BA was administered, intraperiotoneally, to adult and neonatal CD-1 male mice. Gross behavioral changes were monitored. Low doses produced minimal toxic effects within an initial 4 hour observation period. At the end of this time, the LD/sub 50/ was determined to be 1000 mg/kg for both age groups. Death was due to respiratory arrest in all cases. Rapid absorption and conversion of BA to its primary metabolite, benzaldehyde, was demonstrated by gas chromatographic analysis of plasma from both experimental groups. The conversion of BA to benzaldehyde was confirmed in in vitro by using both horse-liver and mouse liver ADH. The inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) by pyrazole was similarly demonstrated in both enzyme systems. /sup 14/C-labelled BA was utilized to determine the distribution of BA and its metabolites in the body, and to possibly pinpoint a target organ of toxicity.

  7. Optimal level activity of matrix metalloproteinases is critical for adult visual plasticity in the healthy and stroke-affected brain

    PubMed Central

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Fortuna, Michal G; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the adult brain to undergo plastic changes is of particular interest in medicine, especially regarding recovery from injuries or improving learning and cognition. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been associated with juvenile experience-dependent primary visual cortex (V1) plasticity, yet little is known about their role in this process in the adult V1. Activation of MMPs is a crucial step facilitating structural changes in a healthy brain; however, upon brain injury, upregulated MMPs promote the spread of a lesion and impair recovery. To clarify these seemingly opposing outcomes of MMP-activation, we examined the effects of MMP-inhibition on experience-induced plasticity in healthy and stoke-affected adult mice. In healthy animals, 7-day application of MMP-inhibitor prevented visual plasticity. Additionally, treatment with MMP-inhibitor once but not twice following stroke rescued plasticity, normally lost under these conditions. Our data imply that an optimal level of MMP-activity is crucial for adult visual plasticity to occur. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11290.001 PMID:26609811

  8. Optimal level activity of matrix metalloproteinases is critical for adult visual plasticity in the healthy and stroke-affected brain.

    PubMed

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Fortuna, Michal G; Löwel, Siegrid

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the adult brain to undergo plastic changes is of particular interest in medicine, especially regarding recovery from injuries or improving learning and cognition. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been associated with juvenile experience-dependent primary visual cortex (V1) plasticity, yet little is known about their role in this process in the adult V1. Activation of MMPs is a crucial step facilitating structural changes in a healthy brain; however, upon brain injury, upregulated MMPs promote the spread of a lesion and impair recovery. To clarify these seemingly opposing outcomes of MMP-activation, we examined the effects of MMP-inhibition on experience-induced plasticity in healthy and stoke-affected adult mice. In healthy animals, 7-day application of MMP-inhibitor prevented visual plasticity. Additionally, treatment with MMP-inhibitor once but not twice following stroke rescued plasticity, normally lost under these conditions. Our data imply that an optimal level of MMP-activity is crucial for adult visual plasticity to occur. PMID:26609811

  9. Maternal immune activation differentially impacts mature and adult-born hippocampal neurons in male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; van Praag, Henriette

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in the hippocampus, a brain area important for learning and memory. The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus develops both before and after birth. To study the relative contribution of mature and adult-born DG granule cells to disease etiology, we compared both cell populations in a mouse model of psychiatric illness resulting from maternal immune activation. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (PolyIC, 5mg/kg) or saline was given on gestation day 15 to pregnant female C57Bl/6 mice. Male offspring (n=105), was administered systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, 50mg/kg) (n=52) or intracerebral retroviral injection into the DG (n=53), to label dividing cells at one month of age. Two months later behavioral tests were performed to evaluate disease phenotype. Immunohistochemistry and whole-cell patch clamping were used to assess morphological and physiological characteristics of DG cells. Three-month-old PolyIC exposed male offspring exhibited deficient pre-pulse inhibition, spatial maze performance and motor coordination, as well as increased depression-like behavior. Histological analysis showed reduced DG volume and parvalbumin positive interneuron number. Both mature and new hippocampal neurons showed modifications in intrinsic properties such as increased input resistance and lower current threshold, and decreased action potential number. Reduced GABAergic inhibitory transmission was observed only in mature DG neurons. Differential impairments in mature DG cells and adult-born new neurons may have implications for behavioral deficits associated with maternal immune activation. PMID:25449671

  10. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Gretchen; Ajioka, James W; Kelly, Krystyna A; Mui, Ernest; Roberts, Fiona; Kasza, Kristen; Mayr, Thomas; Kirisits, Michael J; Wollmann, Robert; Ferguson, David JP; Roberts, Craig W; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Trendler, Toria; Kennan, Richard P; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Reardon, Catherine; Hickey, William F; Chen, Lieping; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    , CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and activated microglia in perivascular areas and brain parenchyma. Genetically resistant, chronically infected mice had substantially less inflammation. Conclusion In outbred mice, chronic, adult acquired T. gondii infection causes neurologic and behavioral abnormalities secondary to inflammation and loss of brain parenchyma. Perivascular inflammation is prominent particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of Sylvius and hippocampus. Even resistant mice have perivascular inflammation. This mouse model of chronic T. gondii infection raises questions of whether persistence of this parasite in brain can cause inflammation or neurodegeneration in genetically susceptible hosts. PMID:18947414

  11. Memory-enhancing effects of Cuscuta japonica Choisy via enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Moon, Minho; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Choi, Jin Gyu; Jeon, Seong Gak; Song, Eun Ji; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Oh, Myung Sook

    2016-09-15

    It is generally accepted that functional and structural changes within the hippocampus are involved in learning and memory and that adult neurogenesis in this region may modulate cognition. The extract of Cuscuta japonica Choisy (CJ) is a well-known traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been used since ancient times as a rejuvenation remedy. The systemic effects of this herb are widely known and can be applied for the treatment of a number of physiological diseases, but there is a lack of evidence describing its effects on brain function. Thus, the present study investigated whether CJ would enhance memory function and/or increase hippocampal neurogenesis using mice orally administered with CJ water extract or vehicle for 21days. Performance on the novel object recognition and passive avoidance tests revealed that treatment with CJ dose-dependently improved the cognitive function of mice. Additionally, CJ increased the Ki-67-positive proliferating cells and the number of doublecortin-stained neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and double labeling with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and neuronal specific nuclear protein showed that CJ increased the number of mature neurons in the DG. Finally, CJ resulted in the upregulated expression of neurogenic differentiation factor, which is essential for the maturation and differentiation of granule cells in the hippocampus. Taken together, the present findings indicate that CJ stimulated neuronal cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, which are all processes associated with neurogenesis. Additionally, these findings suggest that CJ may improve learning and memory via the enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27185736

  12. Behavioral and pharmacological phenotypes of brain-specific diacylglycerol kinase δ-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Takako; Takato, Tamae; Lu, Qiang; Sakai, Hiromichi; Bando, Kana; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Sakane, Fumio

    2016-10-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is a lipid-metabolizing enzyme that phosphorylates diacylglycerol to produce phosphatidic acid. Previously, we reported that the δ isozyme of DGK was abundantly expressed in the mouse brain. However, the functions of DGKδ in the brain are still unclear. Because conventional DGKδ-knockout (KO) mice die within 24h after birth, we have generated brain-specific conditional DGKδ-KO mice to circumvent the lethality. In the novel object recognition test, the number of contacts in the DGKδ-KO mice to novel and familiar objects was greatly increased compared to the control mice, indicating that the DGKδ-KO mice showed irrational contacts with objects such as compulsive checking. In the marble burying test, which is used for analyzing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)-like phenotypes, the DGKδ-KO mice buried more marbles than the control mice. Additionally, these phenotypes were significantly alleviated by the administration of an OCD remedy, fluoxetine. These results indicate that the DGKδ-KO mice showed OCD-like behaviors. Moreover, the number of long axon/neurites increased in both DGKδ-KO primary cortical neurons and DGKδ-knockdown neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells compared to control cells. Conversely, overexpression of DGKδ decreased the number of long axon/neurites of Neuro-2a cells. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that a deficiency of DGKδ induces OCD-like behavior through enhancing axon/neurite outgrowth. PMID:27423518

  13. Treatment with Isorhamnetin Protects the Brain Against Ischemic Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-Jing; Song, Jin-Qing; Pan, Shu-Yi; Wang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, yet lacks effective neuroprotective treatments. The aim of this work was to investigate whether treatment with isorhamnetin protected the brain against ischemic injury in mice. Experimental stroke mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion. Treatment with isorhamnetin or vehicle was initiated immediately at the onset of reperfusion. It was found that treatment of experimental stroke mice with isorhamnetin reduced infarct volume and caspase-3 activity (a biomarker of apoptosis), and improved neurological function recovery. Treatment of experimental stroke mice with isorhamnetin attenuated cerebral edema, improved blood-brain barrier function, and upregulated gene expression of tight junction proteins including occludin, ZO-1, and claudin-5. Treatment of experimental stroke mice with isorhamnetin activated Nrf2/HO-1, suppressed iNOS/NO, and led to reduced formation of MDA and 3-NT in ipsilateral cortex. In addition, treatment of experimental stroke mice with isorhamnetin suppressed activity of MPO (a biomarker of neutrophil infiltration) and reduced protein levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in ipsilateral cortex. Furthermore, it was found that treatment of experimental stroke mice with isorhamnetin reduced mRNA and protein expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR1 in ipsilateral cortex. In conclusion, treatment with isorhamnetin protected the brain against ischemic injury in mice. Isorhamnetin could thus be envisaged as a countermeasure for ischemic stroke but remains to be tested in humans. PMID:27161367

  14. Endogenous plasminogen activators mediate progressive intracerebral hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Nuha; Abu Fanne, Rami; Abramovitch, Rinat; Yarovoi, Serge; Higazi, Muhamed; Abdeen, Suhair; Basheer, Maamon; Maraga, Emad; Cines, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for which no medical treatment is available. Delayed bleeding is often ascribed to consumptive coagulopathy initiated by exposed brain tissue factor. We examined an alternative hypothesis, namely, that marked release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) followed by delayed synthesis and release of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from injured brain leads to posttraumatic bleeding by causing premature clot lysis. Using a murine model of severe TBI, we found that ICH is reduced in tPA−/− and uPA−/− mice but increased in PAI-1−/− mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. tPA−/−, but not uPA−/−, mice developed a systemic coagulopathy post-TBI. Tranexamic acid inhibited ICH expansion in uPA−/−mice but not in tPA−/− mice. Catalytically inactive tPA-S481A inhibited plasminogen activation by tPA and uPA, attenuated ICH, lowered plasma d-dimers, lessened thrombocytopenia, and improved neurologic outcome in WT, tPA−/−, and uPA−/− mice. ICH expansion was also inhibited by tPA-S481A in WT mice anticoagulated with warfarin. These data demonstrate that protracted endogenous fibrinolysis induced by TBI is primarily responsible for persistent ICH and post-TBI coagulopathy in this model and offer a novel approach to interrupt bleeding. PMID:25673638

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Precipitates Cognitive Impairment and Extracellular Aβ Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Toru; Arendash, Gary W.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many American soldiers, even those undiagnosed but likely suffering from mild TBI, display Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like cognitive impairments, suggesting a pathological overlap between TBI and AD. This study examined the cognitive and neurohistological effects of TBI in presymptomatic APP/PS1 AD-transgenic mice. AD mice and non-transgenic (NT) mice received an experimental TBI on the right parietal cortex using the controlled cortical impact model. Animals were trained in a water maze task for spatial memory before TBI, and then reevaluated in the same task at two and six weeks post-TBI. The results showed that AD mice with TBI made significantly more errors in the task than AD mice without TBI and NT mice regardless of TBI. A separate group of AD mice and NT mice were evaluated neurohistologically at six weeks after TBI. The number of extracellular beta-amyloid (Aβ)-deposits significantly increased by at least one fold in the cortex of AD mice that received TBI compared to the NT mice that received TBI or the AD and NT mice that underwent sham surgery. A significant decrease in MAP2 positive cells, indicating neuronal loss, was observed in the cortex of both the AD and NT mice that received TBI compared to the AD and NT mice subjected to sham surgery. Similar changes in extracellular Aβ deposits and MAP2 positive cells were also seen in the hippocampus. These results demonstrate for the first time that TBI precipitates cognitive impairment in presymptomatic AD mice, while also confirming extracellular Aβ deposits following TBI. The recognition of this pathological link between TBI and AD should aid in developing novel treatments directed at abrogating cellular injury and extracellular Aβ deposition in the brain. PMID:24223856

  16. Traumatic brain injury precipitates cognitive impairment and extracellular Aβ aggregation in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Kellogg, S Leilani; Shimizu, Toru; Arendash, Gary W; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many American soldiers, even those undiagnosed but likely suffering from mild TBI, display Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like cognitive impairments, suggesting a pathological overlap between TBI and AD. This study examined the cognitive and neurohistological effects of TBI in presymptomatic APP/PS1 AD-transgenic mice. AD mice and non-transgenic (NT) mice received an experimental TBI on the right parietal cortex using the controlled cortical impact model. Animals were trained in a water maze task for spatial memory before TBI, and then reevaluated in the same task at two and six weeks post-TBI. The results showed that AD mice with TBI made significantly more errors in the task than AD mice without TBI and NT mice regardless of TBI. A separate group of AD mice and NT mice were evaluated neurohistologically at six weeks after TBI. The number of extracellular beta-amyloid (Aβ)-deposits significantly increased by at least one fold in the cortex of AD mice that received TBI compared to the NT mice that received TBI or the AD and NT mice that underwent sham surgery. A significant decrease in MAP2 positive cells, indicating neuronal loss, was observed in the cortex of both the AD and NT mice that received TBI compared to the AD and NT mice subjected to sham surgery. Similar changes in extracellular Aβ deposits and MAP2 positive cells were also seen in the hippocampus. These results demonstrate for the first time that TBI precipitates cognitive impairment in presymptomatic AD mice, while also confirming extracellular Aβ deposits following TBI. The recognition of this pathological link between TBI and AD should aid in developing novel treatments directed at abrogating cellular injury and extracellular Aβ deposition in the brain. PMID:24223856

  17. Pannexin 1 regulates bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Toro-Ayala, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Muñoz, Pablo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2014-01-01

    The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca2+ concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1), a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP), it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD) or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory. PMID:25360084

  18. Elevation of Brain Magnesium Potentiates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation in the Hippocampus of Young and Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shanshan; Liu, Yunpeng; Shi, Yang; Ma, Yihe; Hu, Yixin; Wang, Meiyan; Li, Xue

    2016-09-01

    In the adult brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and generate all neural lineage types, and they persist in the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the cortex. Here, we show that dietary-supplemented - magnesium-L-threonate (MgT), a novel magnesium compound designed to elevate brain magnesium regulates the NSC pool in the adult hippocampus. We found that administration of both short- and long-term regimens of MgT, increased the number of hippocampal NSCs. We demonstrated that in young mice, dietary supplementation with MgT significantly enhanced NSC proliferation in the SGZ. Importantly, in aged mice that underwent long-term (12-month) supplementation with MgT, MgT did not deplete the hippocampal NSC reservoir but rather curtailed the age-associated decline in NSC proliferation. We further established an association between extracellular magnesium concentrations and NSC self-renewal in vitro by demonstrating that elevated Mg(2+) concentrations can maintain or increase the number of cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our study also suggests that key signaling pathways for cell growth and proliferation may be candidate targets for Mg(2+) 's effects on NSC self-renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1903-1912, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754806

  19. Postanesthetic Effects of Isoflurane on Behavioral Phenotypes of Adult Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Ayako; Takase, Kenkichi; Goto, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane was previously the major clinical anesthetic agent but is now mainly used for veterinary anesthesia. Studies have reported widespread sites of action of isoflurane, suggesting a wide array of side effects besides sedation. In the present study, we phenotyped isoflurane-treated mice to investigate the postanesthetic behavioral effects of isoflurane. We applied comprehensive behavioral test batteries comprising sensory test battery, motor test battery, anxiety test battery, depression test battery, sociability test battery, attention test battery, and learning test battery, which were started 7 days after anesthesia with 1.8% isoflurane. In addition to the control group, we included a yoked control group that was exposed to the same stress of handling as the isoflurane-treated animals before being anesthetized. Our comprehensive behavioral test batteries revealed impaired latent inhibition in the isoflurane-treated group, but the concentration of residual isoflurane in the brain was presumably negligible. The yoked control group and isoflurane-treated group exhibited higher anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test and impaired learning function in the cued fear conditioning test. No influences were observed in sensory functions, motor functions, antidepressant behaviors, and social behaviors. A number of papers have reported an effect of isoflurane on animal behaviors, but no systematic investigation has been performed. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to systematically investigate the general health, neurological reflexes, sensory functions, motor functions, and higher behavioral functions of mice exposed to isoflurane as adults. Our results suggest that the postanesthetic effect of isoflurane causes attention deficit in mice. Therefore, isoflurane must be used with great care in the clinical setting and veterinary anesthesia. PMID:25806517

  20. Arginine-Vasopressin Receptor Blocker Conivaptan Reduces Brain Edema and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Experimental Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeynalov, Emil; Jones, Susan M.; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Snell, Lawrence D.; Elliott, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke is complicated by brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and is often accompanied by increased release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). AVP acts through V1a and V2 receptors to trigger hyponatremia, vasospasm, and platelet aggregation which can exacerbate brain edema. The AVP receptor blockers conivaptan (V1a and V2) and tolvaptan (V2) are used to correct hyponatremia, but their effect on post-ischemic brain edema and BBB disruption remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate if these drugs can prevent brain edema and BBB disruption in mice after stroke. Methods Experimental mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with reperfusion. Mice were treated with conivaptan, tolvaptan, or vehicle. Treatments were initiated immediately at reperfusion and administered IV (conivaptan) or orally (tolvaptan) for 48 hours. Physiological variables, neurological deficit scores (NDS), plasma and urine sodium and osmolality were recorded. Brain water content (BWC) and Evans Blue (EB) extravasation index were evaluated at the end point. Results Both conivaptan and tolvaptan produced aquaresis as indicated by changes in plasma and urine sodium levels. However plasma and urine osmolality was changed only by conivaptan. Unlike tolvaptan, conivaptan improved NDS and reduced BWC in the ipsilateral hemisphere: from 81.66 ± 0.43% (vehicle) to 78.28 ± 0.48% (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05 vs vehicle). Conivaptan also attenuated the EB extravasation from 1.22 ± 0.08 (vehicle) to 1.01 ± 0.02 (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05). Conclusion Continuous IV infusion with conivaptan for 48 hours after experimental stroke reduces brain edema, and BBB disruption. Conivaptan but not tolvaptan may potentially be used in patients to prevent brain edema after stroke. PMID:26275173

  1. Fibrillin-1 impairment enhances blood-brain barrier permeability and xanthoma formation in brains of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Van der Donckt, C; Roth, L; Vanhoutte, G; Blockx, I; Bink, D I; Ritz, K; Pintelon, I; Timmermans, J-P; Bauters, D; Martinet, W; Daemen, M J; Verhoye, M; De Meyer, G R Y

    2015-06-01

    We recently reported that apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-deficient mice with a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene (ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-)) develop accelerated atherosclerosis with enhanced inflammation, atherosclerotic plaque rupture, myocardial infarction and sudden death. In the brain, fibrillin-1 functions as an attachment protein in the basement membrane, providing structural support to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we investigated whether fibrillin-1 impairment affects the permeability of the BBB proper and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), and whether this leads to the accelerated accumulation of lipids (xanthomas) in the brain. ApoE(-/-) (n=61) and ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) (n=73) mice were fed a Western-type diet (WD). After 14 weeks WD, a significantly higher permeability of the BBB was observed in ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice compared to age-matched ApoE(-/-) mice. This was accompanied by leukocyte infiltration, enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases and transforming growth factor-β, and by decreased expression of tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin. After 20 weeks WD, 83% of ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice showed xanthomas in the brain, compared to 23% of their ApoE(-/-) littermates. Xanthomas were mainly located in fibrillin-1-rich regions, such as the choroid plexus and the neocortex. Our findings demonstrate that dysfunctional fibrillin-1 impairs BBB/BCSFB integrity, facilitating peripheral leukocyte infiltration, which further degrades the BBB/BCSFB. As a consequence, lipoproteins can enter the brain, resulting in accelerated formation of xanthomas. PMID:25797463

  2. Donepezil markedly potentiates memantine neurotoxicity in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Creeley, Catherine E; Wozniak, David F; Nardi, Anthony; Farber, Nuri B; Olney, John W

    2008-02-01

    The NMDA antagonist, memantine (Namenda), and the cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil (Aricept), are currently being used widely, either individually or in combination, for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). NMDA antagonists have both neuroprotective and neurotoxic properties; the latter is augmented by drugs, such as pilocarpine, that increase cholinergic activity. Whether donepezil, by increasing cholinergic activity, might augment memantine's neurotoxic potential has not been investigated. In the present study, we determined that a dose of memantine (20mg/kg, i.p.), considered to be in the therapeutic (neuroprotective) range for rats, causes a mild neurotoxic reaction in the adult rat brain. Co-administration of memantine (20 or 30 mg/kg) with donepezil (2.5-10mg/kg) markedly potentiated this neurotoxic reaction, causing neuronal injury at lower doses of memantine, and causing the toxic reaction to become disseminated and lethal to neurons throughout many brain regions. These findings raise questions about using this drug combination in AD, especially in the absence of evidence that the combination is beneficial, or that either drug arrests or reverses the disease process. PMID:17112636

  3. Exploratory case-control study of brain tumors in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.D.; Craib, K.J.; Choi, B.C.; Miller, A.B.; Risch, H.A.; Howe, G.R.

    1987-04-01

    An exploratory study of brain tumors in adults was carried out using 215 cases diagnosed in Southern Ontario between 1979 and 1982, with an individually matched, hospital control series. Significantly elevated risks were observed for reported use of spring water, drinking of wine, and consumption of pickled fish, together with a significant protective effect for the regular consumption of any of several types of fruit. While these factors are consistent with a role for N-nitroso compounds in the etiology of these tumors, for several other factors related to this hypothesis, no association was observed. Occupation in the rubber industry was associated with a significant relative risk of 9.0, though no other occupational associations were seen. Two previously unreported associations were with smoking nonfilter cigarettes with a significant trend and with the use of hair dyes or sprays. The data do not support an association between physical head trauma requiring medical attention and risk of brain tumors and indicate that exposure to ionizing radiation and vinyl chloride monomer does not contribute any appreciable fraction of attributable risk in the population studied. The findings warrant further detailed investigation in future epidemiologic studies.

  4. Wnts in adult brain: from synaptic plasticity to cognitive deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Carolina A.; Vargas, Jessica Y.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    During development of the central nervous system the Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in a wide spectrum of physiological processes, including neuronal connectivity and synapse formation. Wnt proteins and components of the Wnt pathway are expressed in the brain since early development to the adult life, however, little is known about its role in mature synapses. Here, we review evidences indicating that Wnt proteins participate in the remodeling of pre- and post-synaptic regions, thus modulating synaptic function. We include the most recent data in the literature showing that Wnts are constantly released in the brain to maintain the basal neural activity. Also, we review the evidences that involve components of the Wnt pathway in the development of neurological and mental disorders, including a special emphasis on in vivo studies that relate behavioral abnormalities to deficiencies in Wnt signaling. Finally, we include the evidences that support a neuroprotective role of Wnt proteins in Alzheimer’s disease. We postulate that deregulation in Wnt signaling might have a fundamental role in the origin of neurological diseases, by altering the synaptic function at stages where the phenotype is not yet established but when the cognitive decline starts. PMID:24348327

  5. Selenium status alters the immune response and expulsion of adult Heligmosomodies bakeri in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heligmosomoides bakeri is a nematode with parasitic development exclusively in the small intestine of infected mice that induces a potent STAT6-dependent Th2 immune response. We previously demonstrated that host protective expulsion of adult H. bakeri was delayed in selenium (Se) deficient mice. ...

  6. Traumatic brain injury: endocrine consequences in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Erick; Rogol, Alan D

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of death and disability in young adults with consequences ranging from physical disabilities to long-term cognitive, behavioral, psychological and social defects. Recent data suggest that pituitary hormone deficiency is not infrequent among TBI survivors; the prevalence of reported hypopituitarism following TBI varies widely among published studies. The most common cause of TBI is motor vehicle accidents, including pedestrian-car and bicycle car encounters, falls, child abuse, violence and sports injuries. Prevalence of hypopituitarism, from total to isolated pituitary deficiency, ranges from 5 to 90 %. The time interval between TBI and pituitary function evaluation is one of the major factors responsible for variations in the prevalence of hypopituitarism reported. Endocrine dysfunction after TBI in children and adolescents is common. Adolescence is a time of growth, freedom and adjustment, consequently TBI is also common in this group. Sports-related TBI is an important public health concern, but many cases are unrecognized and unreported. Sports that are associated with an increased risk of TBI include those involving contact and/or collisions such as boxing, football, soccer, ice hockey, rugby, and the martial arts, as well as high velocity sports such as cycling, motor racing, equestrian sports, skiing and roller skating. The aim of this paper is to summarize the best evidence of TBI as a cause of pituitary deficiency in children and adults. PMID:24030696

  7. Enhanced penetration of exogenous EPCs into brains of APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyang; Mei, Bin; Zhang, Le; Zhang, Cuntai; Zheng, Miao; Liang, Huifang; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Jie; Ding, Ling; Zheng, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the repair function of exogenous Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for brain microvascular damage of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study used a density-gradient centrifugation method to isolate mononuclear cells (MNCs) from mouse bone marrow, which were subsequently seeded and cultured. Cells were characterized by morphology and detection of the surface markers CD34 and CD133 at different time points by immunofluorescence (IF) and flow cytometry (FCM). Then, EPCs were transfected with GFP adenoviral vectors (GFP-EPCs). Wild-type (WT) and APP/PS1 transgenic mice both received GFP-EPCs injection through the tail vein, and using a PBS buffer injection as the control. Seven days later, the animals' brain tissue was isolated. Expression of GFP was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western-blot (WB), while the fluorescence of GFP within the brains of mice was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Higher mRNA and protein expression of GFP, accompanied with increased green fluorescence, were detected in the brain of GFP-EPCs-injected APP/PS1 mice, as compared with GFP-EPCs-injected WT mice. The results show that the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD exhibited enhanced penetration of exogenous EPCs into brains than the WT mice. PMID:27186272

  8. Enhanced penetration of exogenous EPCs into brains of APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoyang; Mei, Bin; Zhang, Le; Zhang, Cuntai; Zheng, Miao; Liang, Huifang; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Jie; Ding, Ling; Zheng, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the repair function of exogenous Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for brain microvascular damage of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This study used a density-gradient centrifugation method to isolate mononuclear cells (MNCs) from mouse bone marrow, which were subsequently seeded and cultured. Cells were characterized by morphology and detection of the surface markers CD34 and CD133 at different time points by immunofluorescence (IF) and flow cytometry (FCM). Then, EPCs were transfected with GFP adenoviral vectors (GFP-EPCs). Wild-type (WT) and APP/PS1 transgenic mice both received GFP-EPCs injection through the tail vein, and using a PBS buffer injection as the control. Seven days later, the animals’ brain tissue was isolated. Expression of GFP was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western-blot (WB), while the fluorescence of GFP within the brains of mice was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Higher mRNA and protein expression of GFP, accompanied with increased green fluorescence, were detected in the brain of GFP-EPCs-injected APP/PS1 mice, as compared with GFP-EPCs-injected WT mice. The results show that the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD exhibited enhanced penetration of exogenous EPCs into brains than the WT mice. PMID:27186272

  9. Impact of gold nanoparticles on brain of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Dkhil, Mohamed A; Bauomy, Amira A; Diab, Marwa S M; Wahab, Rizwan; Delic, Denis; Al-Quraishy, Saleh

    2015-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is a condition characterized by high rates of morbidity and cognitive impairment. It afflicts many people in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Our study aimed to investigate the protective role of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the brain of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Characterizations of GNPs were determined by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Three doses of GNPs (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg body weight) were used to treat animals after S. mansoni infection. The infection induced impairments in histological picture as a result of schistosome infection resulting in a disturbance in the content of the brain neurotransmitters, norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA). Also, the infection induced significant reduction in glutathione level; oppositely, the levels of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde were increased significantly. In addition, S. mansoni was able to disregulate the infected mice brain Cacnb4, Cabp4, Vdac3, Glrb, and Adam23 messenger RNA (mRNA). On the other hand, treatment of mice with GNPs could alleviate the histological impairments, the changes in the content of NE and DA, and the brain oxidative damage. Also, GNPs could regulate the gene expression due to S. mansoni infection. Generally, GNPs could decrease the neurooxidative stress and regulated the gene expression in the brain of infected mice. Consequently, our results revealed an anti-neuroschistosomal effect of GNPs in mice infected with S. mansoni. PMID:26122996

  10. Adult neurogenesis in the decapod crustacean brain: A hematopoietic connection?

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Barbara S.; Zhang, Yi; Benton, Jeanne L.; Sandeman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are produced and integrated into circuits in the adult brains of many organisms, including crustaceans. In some crustacean species, the 1st- generation neuronal precursors reside in a niche exhibiting characteristics analogous to mammalian neurogenic niches. However, unlike mammalian niches where several generations of neuronal precursors coexist, the lineage of precursor cells in crayfish is spatially separated allowing the influence of environmental and endogenous regulators on specific generations in the neuronal precursor lineage to be defined. Experiments also demonstrate that the 1st-generation neuronal precursors in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii are not self-renewing. A source external to the neurogenic niche must therefore provide cells that replenish the 1st-generation precursor pool, because although these cells divide and produce a continuous efflux of 2nd-generation cells from the niche, the population of 1st-generation niche precursors is not diminished with growth and aging. In vitro studies show that cells extracted from the hemolymph, but not other tissues, are attracted to and incorporated into the neurogenic niche, a phenomenon that appears to involve serotonergic mechanisms. We propose that in crayfish, the hematopoietic system may be a source of cells that replenish the niche cell pool. These and other studies reviewed here establish decapod crustaceans as model systems in which the processes underlying adult neurogenesis, such as stem cell origins and transformation, can be readily explored. Studies in diverse species where adult neurogenesis occurs will result in a broader understanding of fundamental mechanisms and how evolutionary processes may have shaped the vertebrate/mammalian condition. PMID:21929622