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Sample records for adult rat dorsal

  1. Both dorsal and ventral spinal cord pathways contribute to overground locomotion in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Loy, David N; Talbott, Jason F; Onifer, Stephen M; Mills, Michael D; Burke, Darlene A; Dennison, Jessica B; Fajardo, Lili C; Magnuson, David S K; Whittemore, Scott R

    2002-10-01

    Identification of long tracts responsible for spontaneous locomotion is critical for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair strategies. We recently demonstrated that extensive demyelination of adult rat thoracic ventral columns, ventromedial, and ventrolateral white matter produces persistent, significant open-field hindlimb locomotor deficits. Locomotor movements resulting from stimulation of the pontomedullary locomotor region are inhibited by dorsolateral funiculus (DLF) lesions suggesting that important pathways for locomotion may also exist in the dorsal white matter. However, dorsal hemisections that interrupt dorsal columns/dorsal corticospinal tract (DC/CST) and DLF pathways do not produce persistent, severe locomotor deficits in the adult rat. We studied the contributions of myelinated tracts in the DLF and DC/CST to overground locomotion following complete conduction blockade of axons in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF), a region important for locomotor movements and for transcranial magnetic motor-evoked potentials (tcMMEP). Animals received ethidium bromide plus photon irradiation to produce discrete demyelinating lesions sufficient to stop axonal conduction in the VLF, combined VLF + DLF, or combined VLF + DC/CST. Open-field BBB scores and tcMMEPs were studied at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks postlesion. VLF lesions resulted in mean BBB scores of 17 at 4 weeks. VLF + DC/CST and VLF + DLF lesions resulted in mean BBB scores of 15.9 and 11.1, respectively. TcMMEPs were absent in all lesion types confirming VLF conduction blockade throughout the study. Our data indicate that significant contributions to locomotion from myelinated pathways within the rat DLF can be revealed when combined with simultaneous compromise of the VLF. PMID:12429203

  2. Generation of New Neurons in Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Rats after Peripheral Nerve Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The evidence of neurons generated ex novo in sensory ganglia of adult animals is still debated. In the present study, we investigated, using high resolution light microscopy and stereological analysis, the changes in the number of neurons in dorsal root ganglia after 30 days from a crush lesion of the rat brachial plexus terminal branches. Results showed, as expected, a relevant hypertrophy of dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, we reported, for the first time in the literature, that neuronal hypertrophy was accompanied by massive neuronal hyperplasia leading to a 42% increase of the number of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, ultrastructural analyses on sensory neurons showed that there was not a relevant neuronal loss as a consequence of the nerve injury. The evidence of BrdU-immunopositive neurons and neural progenitors labeled with Ki67, nanog, nestin, and sox-2 confirmed the stereological evidence of posttraumatic neurogenesis in dorsal root ganglia. Analysis of morphological changes following axonal damage in addition to immunofluorescence characterization of cell phenotype suggested that the neuronal precursors which give rise to the newly generated neurons could be represented by satellite glial cells that actively proliferate after the lesion and are able to differentiate toward the neuronal lineage. PMID:25722894

  3. Regulation by equilibrative nucleoside transporter of adenosine outward currents in adult rat spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2004-07-30

    A current response induced by superfusing adenosine was examined in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In 78% of the neurons examined, adenosine induced an outward current at -70 mV [18.8 +/- 1.1 pA (n = 98) at 1mM] in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50) = 177 microM). A similar current was induced by A(1) agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (1 microM), whereas A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (1 microM) reversed the adenosine action. The adenosine current reversed its polarity at a potential being close to the equilibrium potential for K(+), and was attenuated by Ba(2+) (100 microM) and 4-aminopyridine (5mM) but not tetraethylammonium (5mM). The adenosine current was enhanced in duration by equilibrative nucleoside-transport (rENT1) inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (1 microM) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (1 microM), and slowed in falling phase by adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor iodotubercidine (1 microM). We conclude that a Ba(2+)- and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channel in SG neurons is opened via the activation of A(1) receptors by adenosine whose level is possibly regulated by rENT1, adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase. Considering that intrathecally-administered adenosine analogues produce antinociception, the regulatory systems of adenosine may serve as targets for antinociceptive drugs. PMID:15275960

  4. Axon reaction in hypoglossal and dorsal motor vagal neurons of adult rat: incorporation of (3H)leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Aldskogius, H.; Barron, K.D.; Regal, R.

    1984-07-01

    Pairs of adult rats received (/sup 3/H)leucine 0.25, 1, and 16 h before killing and zero to 164 days after unilateral cervical vagotomy and hypoglossal neurotomy. Grain counts and morphometric measurements were made on axotomized and uninjured neurons in histoautoradiographs of the medullary nuclei. Axotomized hypoglossal neurons, which largely survive the injury, both enlarged and incorporated increased amounts of tritiated leucine at each labeling interval, 3 through 28 days postoperatively. In the vagal dorsal motor nucleus (DMN), axotomized cells, which frequently die after neurotomy, enlarged slightly through 28 days postoperatively, then atrophied; DMN neurons increased amino acid uptake for a shorter period (days 7 through 14) than hypoglossal neurons. Axotomized DMN neurons did not sustain increased protein synthesis as long as their hypoglossal counterparts and seemed to fail to increase synthesis of structural proteins with long half-lives (16-h labeling interval). The frequently necrobiotic response of axotomized DMN neurons may relate to these phenomena. From these and earlier results, the authors conclude that axon reaction appears to differ fundamentally in peripheral and central neurons. This difference may have significance for research on regeneration in the central nervous system.

  5. Differential regulation of immune responses and macrophage/neuron interactions in the dorsal root ganglion in young and adult rats following nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain is an apparently spontaneous experience triggered by abnormal physiology of the peripheral or central nervous system, which evolves with time. Neuropathic pain arising from peripheral nerve injury is characterized by a combination of spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. There is no evidence of this type of pain in human infants or rat pups; brachial plexus avulsion, which causes intense neuropathic pain in adults, is not painful when the injury is sustained at birth. Since infants are capable of nociception from before birth and display both acute and chronic inflammatory pain behaviour from an early neonatal age, it appears that the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain are differentially regulated over a prolonged postnatal period. Results We have performed a microarray analysis of the rat L4/L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG), 7 days post spared nerve injury, a model of neuropathic pain. Genes that are regulated in adult rats displaying neuropathic behaviour were compared to those regulated in young rats (10 days old) that did not show the same neuropathic behaviour. The results show a set of genes, differentially regulated in the adult DRG, that are principally involved in immune system modulation. A functional consequence of this different immune response to injury is that resident macrophages cluster around the large A sensory neuron bodies in the adult DRG seven days post injury, whereas the macrophages in young DRG remain scattered evenly throughout the ganglion, as in controls. Conclusions The results show, for the first time, a major difference in the neuroimmune response to nerve injury in the dorsal root ganglion of young and adult rats. Differential analysis reveals a new set of immune related genes in the ganglia, that are differentially regulated in adult neuropathic pain, and that are consistent with the selective activation of macrophages around adult, but not young large A sensory neurons post injury. These

  6. Vitamin D Receptor and Enzyme Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia of Adult Female Rats: Modulation by Ovarian Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Tague, Sarah E.; Smith, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency impacts sensory processes including pain and proprioception, but little is known regarding vitamin D signaling in adult sensory neurons. We analyzed female rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for vitamin receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D metabolizing enzymes CYP27B1 and CYP24. Western blots and immunofluorescence revealed the presence of these proteins in sensory neurons. Nuclear VDR immunoreactivity was present within nearly all neurons, while cytoplasmic VDR was found preferentially in unmyelinated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-positive neurons, colocalizing with CYP27B1 and CYP24. These data suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 may affect sensory neurons through nuclear or extranuclear signaling pathways. In addition, local vitamin D metabolite concentrations in unmyelinated sensory neurons may be controlled through expression of CYP27B1 and CYP24. Because vitamin D deficiency appears to exacerbate some peri-menopausal pain syndromes, we assessed the effect of ovariectomy on vitamin D-related proteins. Two weeks following ovariectomy, total VDR expression in DRG dropped significantly, owing to a slight decrease in the percentage of total neurons expressing nuclear VDR and a large drop in unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons expressing cytoplasmic VDR. Total CYP27B1 expression dropped significantly, predominantly due to decreased expression within unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons. CYP24 expression remained unchanged. Therefore, unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons appear to have a distinct vitamin D phenotype with hormonally-regulated ligand and receptor levels. These findings imply that vitamin D signaling may play a specialized role in a neural cell population that is primarily nociceptive. PMID:20969950

  7. Serotonin Concentrations in the Lumbosacral Spinal Cord of the Adult Rat Following Microinjection or Dorsal Surface Application

    PubMed Central

    Brumley, Michele R.; Hentall, Ian D.; Pinzon, Alberto; Kadam, Brijesh H.; Blythe, Anthony; Sanchez, Francisco J.; Taberner, Annette M.; Noga, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    Application of neuroactive substances, including monoamines, is common in studies examining the spinal mechanisms of sensation and behavior. However, affected regions and time courses of transmitter activity are uncertain. We measured the spatial and temporal distribution of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] in the lumbosacral spinal cord of halothane-anesthetized adult rats, following its intraspinal microinjection or surface application. Carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) were positioned at various locations in the spinal cord and oxidation currents corresponding to extracellular 5-HT were measured by fast cyclic voltammetry. Intraspinal microinjection of 5-HT (100μM, 1–3 μl) produced responses that were most pronounced at CFMEs positioned ≤800 μm from the drug micropipette: 5-HT concentration was significantly higher (1.43 vs. <0.28% of initial concentration) and response latency was shorter (67.1 vs. 598.2 s) compared with more distantly positioned CFMEs. Treatment with the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor clomipramine only slightly affected the spread of microinjected 5-HT. Surface application over several segments led to a transient rise in concentration that was usually apparent within 30 s and was dramatically attenuated with increasing depth: 0.25% of initial concentration (1 mM) within 400 μm of the dorsal surface and <0.001% between 1,170 and 2,000 μm. This initial response to superfusion was sometimes followed by a gradual increase to a new concentration plateau. In sum, compared with bath application, microinjection can deliver about tenfold higher transmitter concentrations, but to much more restricted areas of the spinal cord. PMID:17634342

  8. Activation of the dorsal hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves tamoxifen-induced memory retrieval impairment in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Tajik, Azam; Rezayof, Ameneh; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Sardari, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has frequently been used in the treatment of breast cancer. In view of the fact that cognitive deficits in women who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is a common health problem, using female animal models for investigating the cognitive effects of TAM administration may improve our knowledge of TAM therapy. Therefore, the present study assessed the role of dorsal hippocampal cholinergic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the effect of TAM administration on memory retrieval in ovariectomized (OVX) and non-OVX female rats using a passive avoidance learning task. Our results showed that pre-test administration of TAM (2-6mg/kg) impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.3-0.5μg/rat) reversed TAM-induced memory impairment. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (0.1-0.3μg/rat) plus 2mg/kg (an ineffective dose) of TAM impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of nicotine and mecamylamine by themselves had no effect on memory retrieval. In OVX rats, the administration of TAM (6mg/kg) produced memory impairment but pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.5μg/rat) had no effect on TAM response. Moreover, the administration of an ineffective dose of TAM (2mg/kg) had no effect on memory retrieval in OVX rats, while pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (0.3μg/rat) impaired memory retrieval. Taken together, it can be concluded that the impairing effect of TAM on memory formation may be modulated by nAChRs of the CA1 regions. It seems that memory impairment may be considered as an important side effect of TAM. PMID:27072849

  9. Extensive juvenile "babysitting" facilitates later adult maternal responsiveness, decreases anxiety, and increases dorsal raphe tryptophan hydroxylase-2 expression in female laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Harding, Kaitlyn M; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancy and parturition can dramatically affect female neurobiology and behavior. This is especially true for laboratory-reared rodents, in part, because such rearing prevents a host of developmental experiences that females might undergo in nature, including juvenile alloparenting. We examined the effect of chronic exposure to pups during post-weaning juvenile life (days 22-36) on adult maternal responsiveness, anxiety-related behaviors, and dorsal raphe tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) and serotonin transporter (SERT) levels in nulliparous rats. Adult females with juvenile alloparental experience showed significantly faster sensitized maternal responsiveness, less anxiety, and more dorsal raphe TPH2. Juvenile alloparenting did not affect females' later social novelty and preference behaviors toward adults, suggesting their increased interest in pups did not extend to all social partners. In a second experiment, suckling a pregnant dam (achieved by postpartum estrus reinsemination), interacting with her after standard laboratory weaning age, and a 3-day exposure to younger siblings also reduced juvenile females' later anxiety but did not affect maternal responsiveness or TPH2. Thus, extensive juvenile "babysitting" can have long-term effects reminiscent of pregnancy and parturition on maternal responsiveness and anxiety, and these effects may be driven by upregulated serotonin. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 58: 492-508, 2016. PMID:26806471

  10. Intact sciatic myelinated primary afferent terminals collaterally sprout in the adult rat dorsal horn following section of a neighbouring peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Doubell, T P; Mannion, R J; Woolf, C J

    1997-03-31

    Peripheral nerve section induces sprouting of the central terminals of axotomized myelinated primary afferents outside their normal dorsoventral termination zones in lamina I, III, and IV of the dorsal horn into lamina II, an area that normally only receives unmyelinated C-fiber input. This axotomy-induced regenerative sprouting is confined to the somatotopic boundaries of the injured nerve in the spinal cord. We examined whether intact myelinated sciatic afferents are able to sprout novel terminals into neighbouring areas of the dorsal horn in the adult rat following axotomy of two test nerves, either the posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh or the saphenous nerve. These peripheral nerves have somatotopically organized terminal areas in the dorsal horn that overlap in some areas and are contiguous in others, with that of the sciatic central terminal field. Two weeks after cutting either the posterior cutaneous or the saphenous nerve, intact sciatic myelinated fibers labelled with the B fragment of cholera toxin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP) sprouted into an area of lamina II normally only innervated by the adjacent injured test nerve. This collateral sprouting was strictly limited, however, to those particular areas of the dorsal horn where the A-fiber terminal field of the control sciatic and the C-fiber terminal field of the injured test nerve overlapped in the dorsoventral plane. No mediolateral sprouting was seen into those areas of neuropil solely innervated by the test nerve. We conclude that intact myelinated primary afferents do have the capacity to collaterally sprout, but that any resultant somatotopic reorganization of central projections is limited to the dorsoventral plane. These changes may contribute to sensory hypersensitivity at the edges of denervated skin. PMID:9073085

  11. Sex differences in myelin-associated protein levels within and density of projections between the orbital frontal cortex and dorsal striatum of adult rats: implications for inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Bayless, D W; Daniel, J M

    2015-08-01

    Impulsive actions and decisions often lead to undesirable outcomes. Lesion and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and dorsal striatum (dSTR) play key roles in inhibitory control. It has been proposed that greater OFC input into the dSTR reflects enhanced top-down cognitive control and less impulsive responding. We previously reported a sex difference in inhibitory control, such that female rats make fewer impulsive errors than do male rats. The goal of the present study was to investigate differences in the OFC and dSTR of young adult male and female rats. In Experiment 1, we measured levels of two myelin-associated proteins, myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), in the OFC and dSTR. Western blot data revealed that females had significantly higher levels of both MBP and PLP in the OFC but similar levels in the dSTR as compared to males. In Experiment 2, we infused the anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), into the OFC and measured the density of BDA in the dSTR. BDA was visualized using histochemistry followed by light microscopy imaging and densitometry analysis. Density of BDA in the dSTR was significantly greater in females as compared to males indicating that the projections from the OFC to dSTR may be greater in females as compared to males. Our results suggest a potential neuroanatomical sex difference that may contribute to the reported differences in inhibitory control levels of male and female rats. PMID:26002313

  12. Role of nuclear factor-κB in oxidative stress associated with rabies virus infection of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kammouni, Wafa; Hasan, Leena; Saleh, Ali; Wood, Heidi; Fernyhough, Paul; Jackson, Alan C

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies in an experimental model of rabies showed major structural changes in the brain involving neuronal processes that are associated with severe clinical disease. Cultured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons infected with the challenge virus standard-11 strain of rabies virus (CVS) showed axonal swellings and immunostaining for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), indicating evidence of lipid peroxidation associated with oxidative stress and reduced axonal growth compared to that of mock-infected DRG neurons. We have evaluated whether nuclear factor (NF)-κB might act as a critical bridge linking CVS infection and oxidative stress. On Western immunoblotting, CVS infection induced expression of the NF-κB p50 subunit compared to that of mock infection. Ciliary neurotrophic factor, a potent activator of NF-κB, had no effect on mock-infected rat DRG neurons and reduced the number of 4-HNE-labeled puncta. SN50, a peptide inhibitor of NF-κB, and CVS infection had an additive effect in producing axonal swellings, indicating that NF-κB is neuroprotective. The fluorescent signal for subunit p50 was quantitatively evaluated in the nucleus and cytoplasm of mock- and CVS-infected rat DRG neurons. At 24 h postinfection (p.i.), there was a significant increase in the nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, indicating increased transcriptional activity of NF-κB, perhaps as a response to stress. At both 48 and 72 h p.i., there was significantly reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB. CVS infection may induce oxidative stress by inhibiting nuclear activation of NF-κB. A rabies virus protein may directly inhibit NF-κB activity. Further investigations are needed to gain a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in the oxidative damage associated with rabies virus infection. PMID:22623795

  13. Neuron-enriched cultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglia: establishment, characterization, survival, and neuropeptide expression in response to trophic factors.

    PubMed

    Grothe, C; Unsicker, K

    1987-01-01

    It is unknown whether adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons require trophic factors for their survival and maintenance of neuropeptide phenotypes. We have established and characterized neuron-enriched cultures of adult rat DRGs and investigated their responses to nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neuronotrophic factor (CNTF), pig brain extract (PBE, crude fraction of brain-derived neuronotrophic factor, BDNF), and laminin (LN). DRGs were dissected from levels C1 through L6 and dissociated and freed from myelin fragments and most satellite (S-100-immunoreactive) cells by centrifugation on Percoll and preplating. The enriched neurons, characterized by their morphology and immunoreactivity for neuron-specific enolase, constituted a population representative of the in vivo situation with regard to expression of substance P (SP), somatostatin (SOM), and cholecystokinin-8 (CCK) immunoreactivities. In the absence of trophic factors and using polyornithine (PORN) as a substratum, 60-70% of the neurons present initially (0.5 days) had died after 7 days. LN as a substratum did not prevent a 30% loss of neurons up to day 4.5, but it subsequently maintained DRG neurons at a plateau. This behavior might reflect a cotrophic effect of LN and factors provided by non-neuronal cells, whose proliferation between 4.5 and 7 days could not be prevented by addition of mitotic inhibitors of gamma-irradiation. CNTF, but not NGF, slightly enhanced survival at 7 days on either PORN or LN. No neuronal losses were found in non-enriched cultures or when enriched neurons were supplemented with PBE, indicating that non-neuronal cells and PBE provide factor(s) essential for adult DRG neuron survival. Proportions of SP-, SOM-, and CCK-immunoreactive cells were unaltered under any experimental condition, with the exception of a numerical decline in SP cells in 7-day cultures with LN, but not PORN, as the substratum. Our data, considered in the context of recent in vivo and vitro studies, suggest

  14. Chronic stress reduces the number of GABAergic interneurons in the adult rat hippocampus, dorsal-ventral and region-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Czéh, Boldizsár; Varga, Zsófia K Kalangyáné; Henningsen, Kim; Kovács, Gábor L; Miseta, Attila; Wiborg, Ove

    2015-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is a common and complex mental disorder with unknown etiology. GABAergic dysfunction is likely to contribute to the pathophysiology since disrupted GABAergic systems are well documented in depressed patients. Here we studied structural changes in the hippocampal GABAergic network using the chronic mild stress (CMS) model, as one of the best validated animal models for depression. Rats were subjected to 9 weeks of daily stress and behaviorally characterized using the sucrose consumption test into anhedonic and resilient animals based on their response to stress. Different subtypes of GABAergic interneurons were visualized by immunohistochemistry using antibodies for parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR), calbindin (CB), cholecystokinin (CCK), somatostatin (SOM), and neuropeptide Y (NPY). We used an unbiased quantification method to systematically count labeled cells in different subareas of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Chronic stress reduced the number of specific interneurons in distinct hippocampal subregions significantly. PV+ and CR+ neurons were reduced in all dorsal subareas, whereas in the ventral part only the CA1 was affected. Stress had the most pronounced effect on the NPY+ and SOM+ cells and reduced their number in almost all dorsal and ventral subareas. Stress had no effect on the CCK+ and CB+ interneurons. In most cases the effect of stress was irrespective to the behavioral phenotype. However, in a few specific areas the number of SOM+, NPY+, and CR+ neurons were significantly reduced in anhedonic animals compared to the resilient group. Overall, these data clearly demonstrate that chronic stress affects the structural integrity of specific GABAergic neuronal subpopulations and this should also affect the functioning of these hippocampal GABAergic networks. PMID:25331166

  15. Chronic exposure to WIN55,212-2 affects more potently spatial learning and memory in adolescents than in adult rats via a negative action on dorsal hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abboussi, Oualid; Tazi, Abdelouahhab; Paizanis, Eleni; El Ganouni, Soumaya

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies show an increase in cannabis use among adolescents, especially in Morocco for being one of the major producers in the world. The neurobiological consequences of chronic cannabis use are still poorly understood. In addition, brain plasticity linked to ontogeny portrays adolescence as a period of vulnerability to the deleterious effects of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavioral neurogenic effects of chronic exposure to the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 during adolescence, by evaluating the emotional and cognitive performances, and the consequences on neurogenesis along the dorso-ventral axis of the hippocampus in adult rats. WIN55,212 was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily for 20 days to adolescent (27-30 PND) and adult Wistar rats (54-57 PND) at the dose of 1mg/kg. Following a 20 day washout period, emotional and cognitive functions were assessed by the Morris water maze test and the two-way active avoidance test. Twelve hours after, brains were removed and hippocampal neurogenesis was assessed using the doublecortin (DCX) as a marker for cell proliferation. Our results showed that chronic WIN55,212-2 treatment significantly increased thigmotaxis early in the training process whatever the age of treatment, induced spatial learning and memory deficits in adolescent but not adult rats in the Morris water maze test, while it had no significant effect in the active avoidance test during multitrial training in the shuttle box. In addition, the cognitive deficits assessed in adolescent rats were positively correlated to a decrease in the number of newly generated neurons in dorsal hippocampus. These data suggest that long term exposure to cannabinoids may affect more potently spatial learning and memory in adolescent compared to adult rats via a negative action on hippocampal plasticity. PMID:24582851

  16. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. PMID:27543338

  17. Effects of baclofen on mechanical noxious and innocuous transmission in the spinal dorsal horn of the adult rat: in vivo patch-clamp analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Kaori; Katafuchi, Toshihiko; Yoshimura, Megumu

    2013-11-01

    The effects of a GABAB agonist, baclofen, on mechanical noxious and innocuous synaptic transmission in the substantia gelatinosa (SG) were investigated in adult rats with the in vivo patch-clamp technique. Under current-clamp conditions, perfusion with baclofen (10 μm) on the surface of the spinal cord caused hyperpolarisation of SG neurons and a decrease in the number of action potentials elicited by pinch and touch stimuli applied to the receptive field of the ipsilateral hindlimb. The suppression of action potentials was preserved under blockade of postsynaptic G-proteins, although baclofen-induced hyperpolarisation was completely blocked. These findings suggest presynaptic effects of baclofen on the induced action potentials. Under voltage-clamp conditions, application of baclofen reduced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), whereas the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP55845 increased the frequency of mEPSCs without affecting the amplitude. Furthermore, application of a GABA uptake inhibitor, nipecotic acid, decreased the frequency of mEPSCs; this effect was blocked by CGP55845, but not by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline. Both the frequency and the amplitude of the pinch-evoked barrage of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were suppressed by baclofen in a dose-dependent manner. The frequency and amplitude of touch-evoked EPSCs was also suppressed by baclofen, but the suppression was significantly smaller than that of pinch-evoked EPSCs. We conclude that mechanical noxious transmission is presynaptically blocked through GABAB receptors in the SG, and is more effectively suppressed than innocuous transmission, which may account for a part of the mechanism of the efficient analgesic effects of baclofen. PMID:23961926

  18. Collateral sprouting of uninjured primary afferent A-fibers into the superficial dorsal horn of the adult rat spinal cord after topical capsaicin treatment to the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Doubell, T P; Coggeshall, R E; Woolf, C J

    1996-08-15

    That terminals of uninjured primary sensory neurons terminating in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord can collaterally sprout was first suggested by Liu and Chambers (1958), but this has since been disputed. Recently, horseradish peroxidase conjugated to the B subunit of cholera toxin (B-HRP) and intracellular HRP injections have shown that sciatic nerve section or crush produces a long-lasting rearrangement in the organization of primary afferent central terminals, with A-fibers sprouting into lamina II, a region that normally receives only C-fiber input (Woolf et al., 1992). The mechanism of this A-fiber sprouting has been thought to involve injury-induced C-fiber transganglionic degeneration combined with myelinated A-fibers being conditioned into a regenerative growth state. In this study, we ask whether C-fiber degeneration and A-fiber conditioning are both necessary for the sprouting of A-fibers into lamina II. Local application of the C-fiber-specific neurotoxin capsaicin to the sciatic nerve has previously been shown to result in C-fiber damage and degenerative atrophy in lamina II. We have used B-HRP to transganglionically label A-fiber central terminals and have shown that 2 weeks after topical capsaicin treatment to the sciatic nerve, the pattern of B-HRP staining in the dorsal horn is indistinguishable from that seen after axotomy, with lamina II displaying novel staining in the identical region containing capsaicin-treated C-fiber central terminals. These results suggest that after C-fiber injury, uninjured A-fiber central terminals can collaterally sprout into lamina II of the dorsal horn. This phenomenon may help to explain the pain associated with C-fiber neuropathy. PMID:8756447

  19. Overexpression of the dopamine D3 receptor in the rat dorsal striatum induces dyskinetic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cote, Samantha R; Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Bleickardt, Carina; Sapru, Hreday N; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2014-04-15

    L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID) are motor side effects associated with treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). The etiology of LID is not clear; however, studies have shown that the dopamine D3 receptor is upregulated in the basal ganglia of mice, rats and non-human primate models of LID. It is not known if the upregulation of D3 receptor is a cause or result of LID. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of the dopamine D3 receptor in dorsal striatum, in the absence of dopamine depletion, will elicit LID. Replication-deficient recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 expressing the D3 receptor or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were stereotaxically injected, unilaterally, into the dorsal striatum of adult rats. Post-hoc immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ectopic expression of the D3 receptor was limited to neurons near the injection sites in the dorsal striatum. Following a 3-week recovery period, rats were administered saline, 6 mg/kg L-DOPA, 0.1 mg/kg PD128907 or 10 mg/kg ES609, i.p., and motor behaviors scored. Rats overexpressing the D3 receptor specifically exhibited contralateral axial abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) following administration of L-DOPA and PD128907 but not saline or the novel agonist ES609. Daily injection of 6 mg/kg L-DOPA to the rats overexpressing the D3 receptor also caused increased vacuous chewing behavior. These results suggest that overexpression of the D3 receptor in the dorsal striatum results in the acute expression of agonist-induced axial AIMs and chronic L-DOPA-induced vacuous chewing behavior. Agonists such as ES609 might provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat dyskinesia. PMID:24462727

  20. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E; Detloff, Megan R; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  1. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E.; Detloff, Megan R.; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  2. Intraneuronal angiotensinergic system in rat and human dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Jaspal; Schwab, Alexander; Nussberger, Juerg; Schaffner, Thomas; Saavedra, Juan M.; Imboden, Hans

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the local formation of angiotensin II (Ang II) in the neurons of sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we studied the expression of angiotensinogen (Ang-N)-, renin-, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)- and cathepsin D-mRNA, and the presence of protein renin, Ang II, Substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the rat and human thoracic DRG. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) studies revealed that rat DRG expressed substantial amounts of Ang-N- and ACE mRNA, while renin mRNA as well as the protein renin were untraceable. Cathepsin D-mRNA and cathepsin D-protein were detected in the rat DRG indicating the possibility of existence of pathways alternative to renin for Ang I formation. Angiotensin peptides were successfully detected with high performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay in human DRG extracts. In situ hybridization in rat DRG confirmed additionally expression of Ang-N mRNA in the cytoplasm of numerous neurons. Intracellular Ang II staining could be shown in number of neurons and their processes in both the rat and human DRG. Interestingly we observed neuronal processes with angiotensinergic synapses en passant, colocalized with synaptophysin, within the DRG. In the DRG, we also identified by qRT-PCR, expression of Ang II receptor AT1A and AT2-mRNA while AT1B-mRNA was not traceable. In some neurons Substance P and CGRP were found colocalized with Ang II. The intracellular localization and colocalization of Ang II with Substance P and CGRP in the DRG neurons may indicate a participation and function of Ang II in the regulation of nociception. In conclusion, these results suggest that Ang II may be produced locally in the neurons of rat and human DRG and act as a neurotransmitter. PMID:20346377

  3. Retronasal odor representations in the dorsal olfactory bulb of rats

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shree Hari; Verhagen, Justus V.

    2012-01-01

    Animals perceive their olfactory environment not only from odors originating in the external world (orthonasal route) but also from odors released in the oral cavity while eating food (retronasal route). Retronasal olfaction is crucial for the perception of food flavor in humans. However, little is known about the retronasal stimulus coding in the brain. The most basic question is if and how route affects the odor representations at the level of the olfactory bulb (OB), where odor quality codes originate. We used optical calcium imaging of presynaptic dorsal OB responses to odorants in anesthetized rats to ask whether the rat OB could be activated retronasally, and how these responses compare to orthonasal responses under similar conditions. We further investigated the effects of specific odorant properties on orthoversus retronasal response patterns. We found that at a physiologically relevant flow rate retronasal odorants can effectively reach the olfactory receptor neurons, eliciting glomerular response patterns that grossly overlap with those of orthonasal responses, but differ from the orthonasal patterns in the response amplitude and temporal dynamics. Interestingly, such differences correlated well with specific odorant properties. Less volatile odorants yielded relatively smaller responses retronasally, but volatility did not affect relative temporal profiles. More polar odorants responded with relatively longer onset latency and time to peak retronasally, but polarity did not affect relative response magnitudes. These data provide insight into the early stages of retronasal stimulus coding and establish relationships between ortho- and retronasal odor representations in the rat OB. PMID:22674270

  4. Silent NMDA receptor-mediated synapses are developmentally regulated in the dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Baba, H; Doubell, T P; Moore, K A; Woolf, C J

    2000-02-01

    In vitro whole cell patch-clamp recording techniques were utilized to study silent pure-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic responses in lamina II (substantia gelatinosa, SG) and lamina III of the spinal dorsal horn. To clarify whether these synapses are present in the adult and contribute to neuropathic pain, transverse lumbar spinal cord slices were prepared from neonatal, naive adult and adult sciatic nerve transected rats. In neonatal rats, pure-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were elicited in SG neurons either by focal intraspinal stimulation (n = 15 of 20 neurons) or focal stimulation of the dorsal root (n = 2 of 7 neurons). In contrast, in slices from naive adult rats, no silent pure-NMDA EPSCs were recorded in SG neurons following focal intraspinal stimulation (n = 27), and only one pure-NMDA EPSC was observed in lamina III (n = 23). Furthermore, in rats with chronic sciatic nerve transection, pure-NMDA EPSCs were elicited by focal intraspinal stimulation in only 2 of 45 SG neurons. Although a large increase in Abeta fiber evoked mixed alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and NMDA receptor-mediated synapses was detected after sciatic nerve injury, Abeta fiber-mediated pure-NMDA EPSCs were not evoked in SG neurons by dorsal root stimulation. Pure-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs are therefore a transient, developmentally regulated phenomenon, and, although they may have a role in synaptic refinement in the immature dorsal horn, they are unlikely to be involved in receptive field plasticity in the adult. PMID:10669507

  5. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2011-05-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain. Acute ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending the ankle of a rat hindlimb in a direction of plantarflexion and inversion. The weight-bearing ratio (WBR) of the affected foot was used as an indicator of pain. Single unit activities of dorsal horn neurons in response to plantarflexion and inversion of the foot or ankle compression were recorded from the medial part of the deep dorsal horn, laminae IV-VI, in normal and ankle-sprained rats. One day after ankle sprain, rats showed significantly reduced WBRs on the affected foot, and this reduction was partially restored by systemic morphine. The majority of deep dorsal horn neurons responded to a single ankle stimulus modality. After ankle sprain, the mean evoked response rates were significantly increased, and afterdischarges were developed in recorded dorsal horn neurons. The ankle sprain-induced enhanced evoked responses were significantly reduced by morphine, which was reversed by naltrexone. The data indicate that movement-specific dorsal horn neuron responses were enhanced after ankle sprain in a morphine-dependent manner, thus suggesting that hyperactivity of dorsal horn neurons is an underlying mechanism of pain after ankle sprain. PMID:21389306

  6. Evidence that dorsal locus coeruleus neurons can maintain their spinal cord projection following neonatal transection of the dorsal adrenergic bundle in rats.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, B B

    1989-01-01

    In adult rats, locus coeruleus neurons which extend axons to the spinal cord are found only at mid-rostrocaudal levels of the nucleus, where they are essentially confined to its ventral, wedge-shaped half (Satoh et al. 1980; Westlund et al. 1983; Loughlin et al. 1986). However, during early postnatal development, coeruleospinal cells are found throughout the locus coeruleus (Cabana and Martin 1984; Chen and Stanfield 1987). This developmental restriction of the distribution of coeruleospinal neurons is due to axonal elimination rather than to cell death, since neurons retrogradely labeled through their spinal axons perinatally are still present in the dorsal portion of the locus coeruleus at survival periods beyond the age at which these cells lose their spinal projection (Chen and Stanfield 1987). I now report that if axons ascending from the locus coeruleus are cut by transecting the dorsal adrenergic bundle on the day of birth, a more widespread distribution of coeruleospinal neurons is retained beyond the perinatal period. These results not only indicate that the absence of the normally maintained collateral of a locus coeruleus neuron is sufficient to prevent the elimination of a collateral which would otherwise be lost, but also may imply that during normal postnatal development the presence of the maintained collateral is somehow causally involved in the elimination of the transient collateral. PMID:2612596

  7. Sprouty2 in the Dorsal Hippocampus Regulates Neurogenesis and Stress Responsiveness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Antonia L.; Lin, Tiffany V.; Chartoff, Elena H.; Potter, David; McPhie, Donna L.; Van’t Veer, Ashlee V.; Knoll, Allison T.; Lee, Kristen N.; Neve, Rachael L.; Patel, Tarun B.; Ongur, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M.; Carlezon, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Both the development and relief of stress-related psychiatric conditions such as major depression (MD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been linked to neuroplastic changes in the brain. One such change involves the birth of new neurons (neurogenesis), which occurs throughout adulthood within discrete areas of the mammalian brain, including the dorsal hippocampus (HIP). Stress can trigger MD and PTSD in humans, and there is considerable evidence that it can decrease HIP neurogenesis in laboratory animals. In contrast, antidepressant treatments increase HIP neurogenesis, and their efficacy is eliminated by ablation of this process. These findings have led to the working hypothesis that HIP neurogenesis serves as a biomarker of neuroplasticity and stress resistance. Here we report that local alterations in the expression of Sprouty2 (SPRY2), an intracellular inhibitor of growth factor function, produces profound effects on both HIP neurogenesis and behaviors that reflect sensitivity to stressors. Viral vector-mediated disruption of endogenous Sprouty2 function (via a dominant negative construct) within the dorsal HIP of adult rats stimulates neurogenesis and produces signs of stress resilience including enhanced extinction of conditioned fear. Conversely, viral vector-mediated elevation of SPRY2 expression intensifies the behavioral consequences of stress. Studies of these manipulations in HIP primary cultures indicate that SPRY2 negatively regulates fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), which has been previously shown to produce antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects via actions in the HIP. Our findings strengthen the relationship between HIP plasticity and stress responsiveness, and identify a specific intracellular pathway that could be targeted to study and treat stress-related disorders. PMID:25822989

  8. fMRI Evidence for Dorsal Stream Processing Abnormality in Adults Born Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaminade, Thierry; Leutcher, Russia Ha-Vinh; Millet, Veronique; Deruelle, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the consequences of premature birth on the functional neuroanatomy of the dorsal stream of visual processing. fMRI was recorded while sixteen healthy participants, 8 (two men) adults (19 years 6 months old, SD 10 months) born premature (mean gestational age 30 weeks), referred to as Premas, and 8 (two men) matched controls (20…

  9. Slit1 promotes regenerative neurite outgrowth of adult dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro via binding to the Robo receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai Ying; Zheng, Lin Feng; Yi, Xi Nan; Chen, Zhi Bin; He, Zhong Ping; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Xian Fang; Ma, Zhi Jian

    2010-07-01

    Secreted Slit proteins have previously been shown to signal through Roundabout (Robo) receptors to negatively regulate axon guidance and cell migration. During vertebrate development, Slit proteins have also been shown to stimulate branching and elongation of sensory axons and cortical dendrites. In this study, Slit1/Robo2 mRNA and protein expressions were detected in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and in cultured DRG neurons. Treatment of both models with recombinant, soluble Slit1 protein was found to promote neurite outgrowth and elongation. In contrast, treatment with a recombinant human Robo2/Fc chimera inhibited neurite outgrowth and elongation. When adult DRG and cultured DRG neurons were pretreated with soluble recombinant human Robo2/Fc chimera, neurite outgrowth and elongation was not induced. These findings indicate that Slit1/Robo2 signaling may have a role in regulating peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:20172023

  10. Dorsal root ganglia microenvironment of female BB Wistar diabetic rats with mild neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, D W; Ho, L T; Allison, J A

    1994-12-01

    Abnormalities in the microenvironment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) might play a role in the pathogenesis of sensory abnormalities in human diabetic neuropathy. We examined aspects of DRG microenvironment by measuring local blood flow and oxygen tension in the L4 dorsal root ganglia of female BB Wistar (BBW) diabetic rats with mild neuropathy. The findings were compared with concurrent measurements of local sciatic endoneurial blood flow and oxygen tension. Diabetic rats were treated with insulin and underwent electrophysiological, blood flow and oxygen tension measurements at either 7-11 or 17-23 weeks after the development of glycosuria. Nondiabetic female BB Wistar rats from the same colony served as controls. At both ages, BBW diabetic rats had significant abnormalities in sensory, but not motor conduction compared to nondiabetic controls. Sciatic endoneurial blood flow in the diabetic rats of both ages was similar to control values, but the older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW diabetic rats had a selective reduction in DRG blood flow. Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tensions were not significantly altered in the diabetic rats. DRG oxygen tension appeared lowered in younger (7-11 week diabetic) but not older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW rats. Our findings indicate that there are important changes in the DRG microenvironment of diabetic rats with selective sensory neuropathy. PMID:7699389

  11. Neuroprotective effects of lactation against kainic acid treatment in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Vanoye-Carlo, América; Morales, Teresa; Ramos, Eugenia; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Adriana; Cerbón, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Marked hippocampal changes in response to excitatory amino acid agonists occur during pregnancy (e.g. decreased frequency in spontaneous recurrent seizures in rats with KA lesions of the hippocampus) and lactation (e.g. reduced c-Fos expression in response to N-methyl-d,l-aspartic acid but not to kainic acid). In this study, the possibility that lactation protects against the excitotoxic damage induced by KA in hippocampal areas was explored. We compared cell damage induced 24 h after a single systemic administration of KA (5 or 7.5 mg/kg bw) in regions CA1, CA3, and CA4 of the dorsal hippocampus of rats in the final week of lactation to that in diestrus phase. To determine cellular damage in a rostro-caudal segment of the dorsal hippocampus, we used NISSL and Fluorojade staining, immunohistochemistry for active caspase-3 and TUNEL, and we observed that the KA treatment provoked a significant loss of neurons in diestrus rats, principally in the pyramidal cells of CA1 region. In contrast, in lactating rats, pyramidal neurons from CA1, CA3, and CA4 in the dorsal hippocampus were significantly protected against KA-induced neuronal damage, indicating that lactation may be a natural model of neuroprotection. PMID:17963758

  12. Dorsal and ventral respiratory groups of neurons in the medulla of the rat.

    PubMed

    Saether, K; Hilaire, G; Monteau, R

    1987-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify and localize in rat the medullary neurons involved in respiration. Neural activity was recorded in ketamine-anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated rats. Active sites were marked by electrocoagulation. Neurons firing in relation to phrenic nerve activity were located between 0.5 and 2 mm lateral to the midline, extending from 0.5 mm caudal to 2 mm rostral to the posterior end of the area postrema. Two groups of respiratory neurons were found: a dorsal group located ventrolateral to the tractus solitarius and a ventral group located in the ventrolateral reticular formation close to the nucleus ambiguus. Neurons were classified as bulbospinal or laryngeal if stimulation of the spinal cord or the vagus nerve, respectively, elicited antidromic action potentials, or as propriobulbar if they were not activated. Neurons firing synchronously with lung inflation were termed pump (P) cells. The dorsal respiratory group includes inspiratory (I) bulbospinal and propriobulbar neurons, P cells, but few expiratory (E) propriobulbar neurons. The ventral respiratory group includes bulbospinal, laryngeal and propriobulbar I and E neurons. Laryngeal motoneurons project ipsilaterally whereas bulbospinal neurons project contralaterally. Cross-correlations between inspiratory bulbospinal neuronal activity and phrenic discharge suggest that bulbospinal I neurons of dorsal and ventral groups project monosynaptically to contralateral phrenic motoneurons. These results indicate a similarity of the medullary respiratory centers of rats and cats, suggesting that rats may profitably be used in studies of respiratory rhythmogenesis. PMID:3676744

  13. Electrophysiological properties of rat spinal dorsal horn neurones in vitro: calcium-dependent action potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Murase, K; Randić, M

    1983-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties of dorsal horn neurones have been investigated in the immature rat in vitro spinal cord slice preparation. 2. Intracellular recordings from dorsal horn neurones show that direct or orthodromic stimulation generates action potentials followed by a brief after-hyperpolarization. Synaptic potentials were elicited by the activation of primary afferent fibres in the dorsal root. 3. Input resistance for dorsal horn neurones ranged from 48 to 267 M omega, and the membrane time constant was in the range of 4-19 ms. 4. In response to strong depolarizing currents dorsal horn neurones perfused with TTX and TEA frequently exhibit a slow regenerative depolarizing potential followed by a slow after-hyperpolarization. The depolarizing potential probably results from an influx of Ca. It is blocked by low concentration Ca, Co or Mn, and enhanced by high levels of extracellular Ca. 5. There is, in addition, a low-threshold Ca-dependent response which is activated at membrane potentials more negative than -65 mV and has a maximum rate of rise at the polarization level of about -80 mV. 6. The addition of Ba or TEA to the perfusing medium provided support for the Ca-dependence of the low- and high-threshold responses, and the lack of fast inactivation of the high-threshold Ca potential. Images Plate 1 PMID:6306228

  14. Control of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the rat spinal dorsal horn by the nucleoside transporter ENT1.

    PubMed

    Ackley, Michael A; Governo, Ricardo J M; Cass, Carol E; Young, James D; Baldwin, Stephen A; King, Anne E

    2003-04-15

    Adenosine modulates nociceptive processing in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. In other tissues, membrane transporters influence profoundly the extracellular levels of adenosine. To investigate the putative role of nucleoside transporters in the regulation of excitatory synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn, we employed immunohistochemistry and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of substantia gelatinosa neurons in slices of rat spinal cord in vitro. The rat equilibrative nucleoside transporter (rENT1) was revealed by antibody staining to be abundant in neonatal and mature dorsal horn, especially within laminae I-III. This was confirmed by immunoblots of dorsal horn homogenate. Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), a potent non-transportable inhibitor of rENT1, attenuated synaptically evoked EPSCs onto lamina II neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. Application of an adenosine A1 antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine produced a parallel rightward shift in the NBMPR concentration-effect curve. The effects of NBMPR were partially reversed by adenosine deaminase, which facilitates the metabolic degradation of adenosine. The modulation by NBMPR of evoked EPSCs was mimicked by exogenous adenosine or the selective A1 receptor agonist, 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyl adenosine. NBMPR reduced the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous miniature EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio of evoked currents, an effect that is consistent with presynaptic modulation. These data provide the first direct evidence that nucleoside transporters are able to critically modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission. PMID:12611914

  15. Dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors mediate the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide and MDMA/ecstasy on memory retrieval in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Marzieh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    A combination of cannabis and ecstasy may change the cognitive functions more than either drug alone. The present study was designed to investigate the possible involvement of dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors in the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) and ecstasy/MDMA on memory retrieval. Adult male Wistar rats were cannulated into the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) and memory retrieval was examined using the step-through type of passive avoidance task. Intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective CB1 receptor agonist, ACPA (0.5-4ng/rat) immediately before the testing phase (pre-test), but not after the training phase (post-training), impaired memory retrieval. In addition, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of MDMA (0.5-1μg/rat) dose-dependently decreased step-through latency, indicating an amnesic effect of the drug by itself. Interestingly, pre-test microinjection of a higher dose of MDMA into the CA1 regions significantly improved ACPA-induced memory impairment. Moreover, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (1 and 2μg/rat) inhibited the reversal effect of MDMA on the impairment of memory retrieval induced by ACPA. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 had no effect on memory retrieval alone. These findings suggest that ACPA or MDMA consumption can induce memory retrieval impairment, while their co-administration improves this amnesic effect through interacting with hippocampal glutamatergic-NMDA receptor mechanism. Thus, it seems that the tendency to abuse cannabis with ecstasy may be for avoiding cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26612394

  16. Increased ability to induce long-term potentiation of spinal dorsal horn neurones in monoarthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Vikman, Kristina S; Duggan, Arthur W; Siddall, Philip J

    2003-11-14

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of transmission of impulses in unmyelinated (C-fibre) primary afferents by prior tetanic conditioning stimulation has been demonstrated in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Since this potentiation has been proposed to be relevant to the increased responsiveness of spinal neurones associated with peripheral inflammation (central sensitisation), the present experiments compared the induction of LTP in normal rats and rats with monoarthritis. Monoarthritis was induced by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the left ankle joint of 12 rats. All animals showed behavioural signs of thermal hyperalgesia and were used for electrophysiological experiments after 4-8 days. In each animal, extracellular recordings were obtained from a single, wide dynamic range (WDR) dorsal horn neurone. High frequency tetanic conditioning stimulation of the sciatic nerve gave varying effects on the C-fibre-evoked responses of neurones in the normal rats, with potentiation in two, no change in five and a depression in five. By contrast, conditioning stimulation in rats with inflammation produced a long-lasting potentiation of C-fibre-evoked responses in 11 out of 12 neurones, with no effect in one. The ease with which LTP was induced in animals with inflammation supports the proposal that the underlying mechanisms of LTP are similar to those of the central sensitisation associated with peripheral inflammation. PMID:14568329

  17. Optogenetic Inhibition of Dorsal Medial Prefrontal Cortex Attenuates Stress-Induced Reinstatement of Palatable Food Seeking in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Calu, Donna J.; Kawa, Alex B.; Marchant, Nathan J.; Navarre, Brittany M.; Henderson, Mark J.; Chen, Billy; Yau, Hau-Jie; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey; Deisseroth, Karl; Harvey, Brandon K.; Hope, Bruce T.; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-01-01

    Relapse to maladaptive eating habits during dieting is often provoked by stress. Recently, we identified a role of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons in stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking in male rats. It is unknown whether endogenous neural activity in dorsal mPFC drives stress-induced reinstatement in female rats. Here, we used an optogenetic approach, in which female rats received bilateral dorsal mPFC microinjections of viral constructs coding light-sensitive eNpHR3.0 – eYFP or control eYFP protein and intracranial fiber optic implants. Rats were food restricted and trained to lever press for palatable food pellets. Subsequently, pellets were removed, and lever pressing was extinguished; then the effect of bilateral dorsal mPFC light delivery on reinstatement of food seeking was assessed after injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine (an α-2 andrenoceptor antagonist) or pellet priming, a manipulation known to provoke food seeking in hungry rats. Dorsal mPFC light delivery attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of food seeking in eNpHR3.0-injected but not eYFP-injected rats. This optical manipulation had no effect on pellet-priming-induced reinstatement or ongoing food-reinforced responding. Dorsal mPFC light delivery attenuated yohimbine-induced Fos immuno-reactivity and disrupted neural activity during in vivo electrophysiological recording in awake rats. Optical stimulation caused significant outward currents and blocked electrically evoked action potentials in eNpHR3.0-injected but not eYFP-injected mPFC hemispheres. Light delivery alone caused no significant inflammatory response in mPFC. These findings indicate that intracranial light delivery in eNpHR3.0 rats disrupts endogenous dorsal mPFC neural activity that plays a role in stress-induced relapse to food seeking in female rats. PMID:23283335

  18. Cognitive impairment and morphological changes in the dorsal hippocampus of very old female rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, G R; Andersen, T; Pardo, J; Zuccolilli, G O; Cambiaggi, V L; Hereñú, C B; Goya, R G

    2015-09-10

    The hippocampus, a medial temporal lobe structure necessary for the formation of spatial memory, is particularly affected by both normal and pathologic aging. In previous studies, we observed a significant age-related increase in dopaminergic neuron loss in the hypothalamus and the substantia nigra of female rats, which becomes more conspicuous at extreme ages. Here, we extend our studies by assessing spatial memory in 4-6 month-old (young), 26-month-old (old) and 29-32-month-old (senile) Sprague-Dawley female rats as well as the age-related histopathological changes in their dorsal hippocampus. Age changes in spatial memory performance were assessed with a modified version of the Barnes maze test. We employed two probe trials (PTs), one and five days after training, respectively, in order to evaluate learning ability as well as short-term and longer-term spatial memory retention. A set of relevant hippocampal cell markers was also quantitated in the animals by means of an unbiased stereological approach. The results revealed that old rats perform better than senile rats in acquisition trials and young rats perform better than both aging groups. However, during short-term PT both aging groups showed a preserved spatial memory while in longer-term PT, spatial memory showed deterioration in both aged groups. Morphological analysis showed a marked decrease (94-97%) in doublecortin neuron number in the dentate gyrus in both aged groups and a reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cell number in the stratum radiatum of aging rats. Astroglial process length and branching complexity decreased in aged rats. We conclude that while target-seeking activity and learning ability decrease in aged females, spatial memory only declines in the longer-term tests. The reduction in neuroblast number and astroglial arborescence complexity in the dorsal hippocampus are likely to play a role in the cognitive deficits of aging rats. PMID:26141841

  19. Localization of the NBMPR-sensitive equilibrative nucleoside transporter, ENT1, in the rat dorsal root ganglion and lumbar spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Governo, Ricardo J M; Deuchars, Jim; Baldwin, Stephen A; King, Anne E

    2005-10-19

    ENT1 is an equilibrative nucleoside transporter that enables trans-membrane bi-directional diffusion of biologically active purines such as adenosine. In spinal cord dorsal horn and in sensory afferent neurons, adenosine acts as a neuromodulator with complex pro- and anti-nociceptive actions. Although uptake and release mechanisms for adenosine are believed to exist in both the dorsal horn and sensory afferent neurons, the expression profile of specific nucleoside transporter subtypes such as ENT1 is not established. In this study, immunoblot analysis with specific ENT1 antibodies (anti-rENT1(227-290) or anti-hENT1(227-290)) was used to reveal the expression of ENT1 protein in tissue homogenates of either adult rat dorsal horn or dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Immunoperoxidase labeling with ENT1 antibodies produced specific staining in dorsal horn which was concentrated over superficial laminae, especially the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). Immunofluorescence double-labeling revealed a punctate pattern for ENT1 closely associated, in some instances, with cell bodies of either neurons (confirmed with NeuN) or glia (confirmed with CNPase). Electron microscopy analysis of ENT1 expression in lamina II indicated its presence within pre- and post-synaptic elements, although a number of other structures, including myelinated and unmyelinated, axons were also labeled. In sensory ganglia, ENT1 was localized to a high proportion of cell bodies of all sizes that co-expressed substance P, IB4 or NF, although ENT1 was most highly expressed in the peptidergic population. These data provide the first detailed account of the expression and cellular distribution of ENT1 in rat dorsal horn and sensory ganglia. The functional significance of ENT1 expression with regard to the homeostatic regulation of adenosine at synapses remains to be established. PMID:16226730

  20. Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic diplegia secondary to stroke in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Melissa Ann; Berman, Casey Melissa; Mazzola, Catherine Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is often recommended for children with spastic paraparesis and cerebral palsy. SDR reduces spasticity in the lower extremities for these children with spastic paraplegia. However, SDR is infrequently recommended for adults with spasticity. Spastic diplegia in adult patients can be due to stroke, brain or spinal cord injury from trauma, infection, toxic-metabolic disorders, and other causes. Although rarely considered, SDR is an option for adult patients with spastic diplegia as well. Case Description: The authors describe a patient who underwent a SDR with a successful postoperative outcome. This man suffered a hypertensive and hemorrhagic stroke secondary to intravenous drug abuse at age 46. A SDR was performed after two failed intrathecal baclofen pump placements due to recurrent infections, likely resulting from his immunocompromised status. The patient underwent lumbar laminectomies and dorsal rhizotomies at levels L1-S1 bilaterally. Postoperatively, the patient's spasticity was significantly reduced. His Ashworth spasticity score decreased from 4/5 to 1/5, and the reduction in tone has been durable over 3 years. Conclusion: SDR in older patients with spastic paraparesis may be considered as a treatment option. PMID:26167363

  1. Fos-like immunoreactivity in rat dorsal raphe nuclei induced by alkaloid extract of Mitragyna speciosa.

    PubMed

    Kumarnsit, Ekkasit; Vongvatcharanon, Uraporn; Keawpradub, Niwat; Intasaro, Pranom

    2007-04-12

    Mitragyna speciosa (MS) has been traditionally used for medicinal purposes especially in southern Thailand. Previously, an alkaloid extract of this plant was demonstrated to mediate antinociception, partly, through the descending serotonergic system. The present study investigated the stimulatory effect of the MS extract on the dorsal raphe nucleus and its antidepressant-like activity. The MS extract containing approximately 60% mitragynine as a major indole alkaloid was used to treat the animals. The stimulatory effect of the MS extract was determined by detecting the expression of the immediate early gene, cfos, in the dorsal raphe nucleus of male Wistar rats. The immunohistochemistry was used to detect Fos protein, the protein product of cfos gene. The present data show that a significant increase in Fos expression was observed following long-term administration of the MS extract (40 mg/kg) for 60 consecutive days. In addition, the antidepressant-like activity of the MS extract was determined by using the forced swimming test (FST) in male mice. The results show that a single injection (either 60 or 90 mg/kg doses) significantly decreased immobility time in the FST. These findings indicate that the MS extract has a stimulatory effect on the dorsal raphe nucleus and an antidepressant-like activity. Stimulation of this brain area has been known to cause antinociception. These findings suggest that the MS extract might produce antinociceptive and/or antidepressive actions partly through activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus. Moreover, the dorsal raphe nucleus may be one of site of MS action in the central nervous system. PMID:17316993

  2. fMRI evidence for dorsal stream processing abnormality in adults born preterm.

    PubMed

    Chaminade, Thierry; Leutcher, Russia Ha-Vinh; Millet, Véronique; Deruelle, Christine

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the consequences of premature birth on the functional neuroanatomy of the dorsal stream of visual processing. fMRI was recorded while sixteen healthy participants, 8 (two men) adults (19 years 6 months old, SD 10 months) born premature (mean gestational age 30 weeks), referred to as Premas, and 8 (two men) matched controls (20 years 1 month old, SD 13 months), performed a 1-back memory task of Object or Grip information using a hand grasping a drinking vessel as stimulus. While history of prematurity did not significantly affect task performance, Group by Task analysis of variance in regions of interest spanning the occipital, temporal and parietal lobes revealed main effects of Task and interactions between the two factors. Object processing activated the left inferior occipital cortex and bilateral ventral temporal regions, belonging to the ventral stream, with no effect of Group. Grip processing across groups activated the early visual cortex and the left supramarginal gyrus belonging to the dorsal stream. Group effect on the brain activity during Grip suggested that Controls represented the actions' goal while Premas relied more on low-level visual information. This shift from higher- to lower-order visual processing between Controls and Premas may reflect a more general trend, in which Premas inadequately recruit higher-order visual functions for dorsal stream task performance, and rely more on lower-level functions. PMID:23174430

  3. IMPORTANCE OF D1 AND D2 RECEPTORS IN THE DORSAL CAUDATE-PUTAMEN FOR THE LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY AND STEREOTYPED BEHAVIORS OF PREWEANLING RATS

    PubMed Central

    CHARNTIKOV, S.; DER-GHAZARIAN, T.; HERBERT, M. S.; HORN, L. R.; WIDARMA, C. B.; GUTIERREZ, A.; VARELA, F. A.; MCDOUGALL, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Dopaminergic compounds often affect the unlearned behaviors of preweanling and adult rats differently, although the brain regions underlying these age-dependent behavioral effects have not been specified. A candidate brain region is the dorsal caudate-putamen (CPu); thus, a goal of the present study was to determine whether D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu are capable of modulating the unlearned behaviors of preweanling rats. In Experiments 1 and 2, selective and nonselective dopamine agonists were bilaterally microinjected into the dorsal CPu on postnatal day (PD) 18 and both locomotor activity and stereotypy were measured. In Experiment 3, the functional coupling of D1 and D2 receptors was assessed by microinjecting the D1 agonist SKF-82958 and the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole either alone or in combination. In Experiments 4 and 5, quinpirole and the D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390, or SKF-82958 and the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride, were co-administered into the dorsal CPu to further assess whether a functional D1 or D2 receptor system is necessary for the expression of quinpirole- or SKF-82958-induced behaviors. Results showed that selective stimulation of D1 or D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu increased both the locomotor activity and stereotypy of preweanling rats. Receptor coupling was evident on PD 18 because co-administration of a subthreshold dose of SKF-82958 and quinpirole produced more locomotor activity than either agonist alone. Lastly, the dopamine antagonist experiments showed that both D1 and D2 receptor systems must be functional for SKF-82958- or quinpirole-induced locomotor activity to be fully manifested. When the present data are compared to results from non-ontogenetic studies, it appears that pharmacological manipulation of D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu affects the behavior of preweanling and adult rats in a generally similar manner, although some important age-dependent differences are apparent. For example, D1 and/or D2

  4. Importance of D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal caudate-putamen for the locomotor activity and stereotyped behaviors of preweanling rats.

    PubMed

    Charntikov, S; Der-Ghazarian, T; Herbert, M S; Horn, L R; Widarma, C B; Gutierrez, A; Varela, F A; McDougall, S A

    2011-06-01

    Dopaminergic compounds often affect the unlearned behaviors of preweanling and adult rats differently, although the brain regions underlying these age-dependent behavioral effects have not been specified. A candidate brain region is the dorsal caudate-putamen (CPu); thus, a goal of the present study was to determine whether D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu are capable of modulating the unlearned behaviors of preweanling rats. In Experiments 1 and 2, selective and nonselective dopamine agonists were bilaterally microinjected into the dorsal CPu on postnatal day (PD) 18 and both locomotor activity and stereotypy were measured. In Experiment 3, the functional coupling of D1 and D2 receptors was assessed by microinjecting the D1 agonist SKF-82958 and the D₂/D₃ agonist quinpirole either alone or in combination. In Experiments 4 and 5, quinpirole and the D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390, or SKF-82958 and the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride, were co-administered into the dorsal CPu to further assess whether a functional D1 or D2 receptor system is necessary for the expression of quinpirole- or SKF-82958-induced behaviors. Results showed that selective stimulation of D1 or D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu increased both the locomotor activity and stereotypy of preweanling rats. Receptor coupling was evident on PD 18 because co-administration of a subthreshold dose of SKF-82958 and quinpirole produced more locomotor activity than either agonist alone. Lastly, the dopamine antagonist experiments showed that both D1 and D2 receptor systems must be functional for SKF-82958- or quinpirole-induced locomotor activity to be fully manifested. When the present data are compared to results from non-ontogenetic studies, it appears that pharmacological manipulation of D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu affects the behavior of preweanling and adult rats in a generally similar manner, although some important age-dependent differences are apparent. For example, D1 and/or D2

  5. Vasopressin immunoreactive fibers and neurons in the dorsal pontine tegmentum of the rat, monkey and human.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Holstege, J C; van Leeuwen, F W

    1991-01-01

    It is now well established that extensive extrahypothalamic vasopressin (VP) systems exist in the rat, monkey and human brain. There are marked differences between species, but in each case VP nuclei provide dense afferents to the dorsal pontine tegmentum. Here VP may play a role in the mechanisms exerted by the locus coeruleus (LC) neurons, possibly both as a neurotransmitter and as a neuromodulator. Although we are aware of some properties of VP systems, e.g., gonadal steroid dependency in the rat, major gaps characterize our knowledge of its anatomy. With regard to the interaction of VP with the LC in the brainstem of mammals some of the questions which stand out are: (1) Is VP really being biosynthesized and transported by LC cells and, if not, what is its function within these cells? (2) Is there a structural difference between male and female LC neurons in the rat as a consequence of the sex-dimorphic VP innervation? (3) What is the origin of VP afferents in the dorsal pontine tegmentum of the (non)human primate and are these afferents also controlled by gonadal steroids? Research strategies to answer these questions will provide us with information to resolve some of the current inconsistencies about the anatomy and the function of the VP and LC systems in the brain. PMID:1813922

  6. Decoupling Actions from Consequences: Dorsal Hippocampal Lesions Facilitate Instrumental Performance, but Impair Behavioral Flexibility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Sebastian; Schwarting, Rainer K. W.

    2016-01-01

    The present study is part of a series of experiments, where we analyze why and how damage of the rat’s dorsal hippocampus (dHC) can enhance performance in a sequential reaction time task (SRTT). In this task, sequences of distinct visual stimulus presentations are food-rewarded in a fixed-ratio-13-schedule. Our previous study (Busse and Schwarting, 2016) had shown that rats with lesions of the dHC show substantially shorter session times and post-reinforcement pauses (PRPs) than controls, which allows for more practice when daily training is kept constant. Since sequential behavior is based on instrumental performance, a sequential benefit might be secondary to that. In order to test this hypothesis in the present study, we performed two experiments, where pseudorandom rather than sequential stimulus presentation was used in rats with excitotoxic dorsal hippocampal lesions. Again, we found enhanced performance in the lesion-group in terms of shorter session times and PRPs. During the sessions we found that the lesion-group spent less time with non-instrumental behavior (i.e., grooming, sniffing, and rearing) after prolonged instrumental training. Also, such rats showed moderate evidence for an extinction impairment under devalued food reward conditions and significant deficits in a response-outcome (R-O)-discrimination task in comparison to a control-group. These findings suggest that facilitatory effects on instrumental performance after dorsal hippocampal lesions may be primarily a result of complex behavioral changes, i.e., reductions of behavioral flexibility and/or alterations in motivation, which then result in enhanced instrumental learning. PMID:27375453

  7. Effects of lesions to the dorsal and ventral hippocampus on defensive behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Pentkowski, Nathan S; Blanchard, D Caroline; Lever, Colin; Litvin, Yoav; Blanchard, Robert J

    2006-04-01

    This study investigated the role of the hippocampus in both unconditioned and conditioned defensive behaviors by examining the effects of pretraining ibotenic acid lesions to the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in male Long-Evans hooded rats exposed to three types of threat stimuli: cat-odor, a live cat and footshock. Defensive behaviors were assessed during exposure to cat-odor and a live cat, and immediately following the presentation of footshock. Conditioned defensive behaviors were also assessed in each context 24 h after initial threat exposure. During both unconditioned and conditioned trials, dorsal hippocampal lesions failed to significantly alter any behavioral measure in each test of defense. In contrast, ventral hippocampal lesions significantly reduced unconditioned defensive behaviors during exposure to cat-odor without producing any observable effects during cat exposure. Furthermore, ventral lesions significantly attenuated conditioned defensive behaviors following the administration of footshock and during re-exposure to each context. These results suggest a specific role for the ventral, not dorsal, hippocampus in modulating anxiety-like behaviors in certain animal models of defense. PMID:16630065

  8. Single-prolonged stress induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in the rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that develops after exposure to a life-threatening traumatic experience. Meta-analyses of the brainstem showed that midsagittal area of the pons was significantly reduced in patients with PTSD, suggesting a potential apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus after single-prolonged stress (SPS). The aim of this study is to investigate whether SPS induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in PTSD rats, which may be a possible mechanism of reduced volume of pons and density of gray matter. Methods In this study, rats were randomly divided into 1d, 7d and 14d groups after SPS along with the control group. The apoptosis rate was determined using annexin V-FITC/PI double-labeled flow cytometry (FCM). Levels of Cytochrome c (Cyt-C) was examined by Western blotting. Expression of Cyt-C on mitochondria in the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron was determined by enzymohistochemistry under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The change of thiamine monophosphatase (TMP) levels was assessed by enzymohistochemistry under light microscope and TEM. Morphological changes of the ultrastructure of the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron were determined by TEM. Results Apoptotic morphological alterations were observed in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron for all SPS-stimulate groups of rats. The apoptosis rates were significantly increased in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of SPS rats, along with increased release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, increased expression of Cyt-C and TMP levels in the cytoplasm, which reached to the peak of increase 7 days of SPS. Conclusions The results indicate that SPS induced Cyt-C released from mitochondria into cytosol and apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of rats. Increased TMP in cytoplasm facilitated the clearance of apoptotic cells. We propose that this presents one of the mechanisms that lead to reduced volume of pons and gray matter associated with PTSD. PMID

  9. Deafferentation is insufficient to induce sprouting of A-fibre central terminals in the rat dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Doubell, T P; Gill, H; Woolf, C J

    1998-04-01

    The mechanism by which A-fibres sprout into lamina II of the dorsal horn of the adult rat after peripheral nerve injury, a region which normally receives input from noci- and thermoreceptive C-fibres alone, is not known. Recent findings indicating that selective C-fibre injury and subsequent degenerative changes in this region are sufficient to induce sprouting of uninjured A-fibres have raised the possibility that the structural reorganisation of A-fibre terminals is an example of collateral sprouting, in that deafferentation of C-fibre terminals alone in lamina II may be sufficient to cause A-fibre sprouting. Primary afferents of the sciatic nerve have their cell bodies located predominantly in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), and the A-fibres of each DRG have central termination fields that show an extensive rostrocaudal overlap in lamina III in the L4 and L5 spinal segments. In this study, we have found that C-fibres from either DRG have central terminal fields that overlap much less in lamina II than A-fibres in lamina III. We have exploited this differential terminal organisation to produce deafferentation in lamina II of the L5 spinal segment, by an L5 rhizotomy, and then test whether A-fibres of the intact L4 dorsal root ganglion, which terminate within the L5 segment, sprout into the denervated lamina II in the L5 spinal segment. Neither intact nor peripherally injured A-fibres were seen to sprout into denervated lamina II after L5 rhizotomy. Sprouting was only ever seen into regions of lamina II containing the terminals of peripherally injured C-fibres. Therefore, it seems that the creation of synaptic space within lamina II is not the explanation for A-fibre sprouting after peripheral nerve section or crush, emphasising that injury-induced changes in C-fibres and subsequent chemotrophic effects in the superficial dorsal horn are the likely explanation. PMID:9548693

  10. Prokineticin 2 potentiates acid-sensing ion channel activity in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prokineticin 2 (PK2) is a secreted protein and causes potent hyperalgesia in vivo, and is therefore considered to be a new pronociceptive mediator. However, the molecular targets responsible for the pronociceptive effects of PK2 are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that PK2 potentiates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in the primary sensory neurons. Methods In the present study, experiments were performed on neurons freshly isolated from rat dorsal root ganglion by using whole-cell patch clamp and voltage-clamp recording techniques. Results PK2 dose-dependently enhanced proton-gated currents with an EC50 of 0.22 ± 0.06 nM. PK2 shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 1.81 ± 0.11 fold increase of the maximal current response. PK2 enhancing effect on proton-gated currents was completely blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist. The potentiation was also abolished by intracellular dialysis of GF109203X, a protein kinase C inhibitor, or FSC-231, a protein interacting with C-kinase 1 inhibitor. Moreover, PK2 enhanced the acid-evoked membrane excitability of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, PK2 exacerbated nociceptive responses to the injection of acetic acid in rats. Conclusion These results suggest that PK2 increases the activity of acid-sensing ion channels via the PK2 receptor and protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways in rat primary sensory neurons. Our findings support that PK2 is a proalgesic factor and its signaling likely contributes to acidosis-evoked pain by sensitizing acid-sensing ion channels. PMID:22642848

  11. From innervation density to tactile acuity 2: embryonic and adult pre- and postsynaptic somatotopy in the dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul B; Millecchia, Ronald; Lawson, Jeffrey J; Brown, Alan G; Koerber, H Richard; Culberson, James; Stephens, Stephanie

    2005-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dorsal horn laminae III-IV cell receptive fields (RFs) are initially established in three steps: cutaneous axons penetrate the dorsal horn near their rostrocaudal (RC) levels of entry into the spinal cord. Their terminal branches distribute mediolaterally (ML) according to their relative distoproximal RF locations on the leg, and form nonselective synapses with nearby dorsal horn cell dendrites, establishing the initial dorsal horn cell RFs. Rootlet axon RFs in adult cats were used to approximate the RC entry levels of hindlimb skin input. Cord dorsum recordings of monosynaptic field potentials evoked by electrical skin stimulation provided the RC distributions of synaptic input. These were in close agreement. Simulated projections of all 22,000 hindlimb axons were similar to projections predicted from EPSP distributions, and with the observed projections of dorsal roots, cutaneous nerves, and individual axons. The simulated terminals were connected nonselectively to nearby dendrites of 135,000 simulated lamina III-IV cells whose dendritic surface area distributions were based on intracellularly stained cells. There was an overall similarity among pre- and postsynaptic embryonic and adult somatotopies, with a progressive transformation of RF angular location as a function of RC, ML dorsal horn location from an initial embryonic presynaptic concentric pattern to an adult postsynaptic radial one. The initial embryonic dorsal horn cell RF assembly hypothesis was supported by the simulations, as was the additional hypothesis that further refinement of connections would be necessary to establish sufficient selectivity to account for observed adult RFs and somatotopy. PMID:16125155

  12. MAPK Pathways Are Involved in Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lei; Zhang, Xiao; Wei, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the MAPK pathways were involved in the mechanism of neuropathic pain in rats with chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. We determined the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) of rats before and after CCD surgery and then after p38, JNK, or ERK inhibitors administration. Western blotting, RT-PCR, and immunofluorescence of dorsal root ganglia were performed to investigate the protein and mRNA level of MAPKs and also the alternation in distributions of positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia. Intrathecal administration of MAPKs inhibitors, SB203580 (p38 inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and U0126 (ERK inhibitor), resulted in a partial reduction in CCD-induced mechanical allodynia. The reduction of allodynia was associated with significant depression in the level of both MAPKs mRNA and protein expression in CCD rats and also associated with the decreased ratios of large size MAPKs positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia. In conclusion, the specific inhibitors of MAPKs contributed to the attenuation of mechanical allodynia in CCD rats and the large size MAPKs positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia were crucial. PMID:27504140

  13. Role of Medio-Dorsal Frontal and Posterior Parietal Neurons during Auditory Detection Performance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Wiest, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    To further characterize the role of frontal and parietal cortices in rat cognition, we recorded action potentials simultaneously from multiple sites in the medio-dorsal frontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex of rats while they performed a two-choice auditory detection task. We quantified neural correlates of task performance, including response movements, perception of a target tone, and the differentiation between stimuli with distinct features (different pitches or durations). A minority of units—15% in frontal cortex, 23% in parietal cortex—significantly distinguished hit trials (successful detections, response movement to the right) from correct rejection trials (correct leftward response to the absence of the target tone). Estimating the contribution of movement-related activity to these responses suggested that more than half of these units were likely signaling correct perception of the auditory target, rather than merely movement direction. In addition, we found a smaller and mostly not overlapping population of units that differentiated stimuli based on task-irrelevant details. The detection-related spiking responses we observed suggest that correlates of perception in the rat are sparsely represented among neurons in the rat's frontal-parietal network, without being concentrated preferentially in frontal or parietal areas. PMID:25479194

  14. Neural correlates for angular head velocity in the rat dorsal tegmental nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassett, J. P.; Taube, J. S.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Many neurons in the rat lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) fire selectively in relation to the animal's head direction (HD) in the horizontal plane independent of the rat's location or behavior. One hypothesis of how this representation is generated and updated is via subcortical projections from the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN). Here we report the type of activity in DTN neurons. The majority of cells (75%) fired as a function of the rat's angular head velocity (AHV). Cells exhibited one of two types of firing patterns: (1) symmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with AHV during head turns in both directions, and (2) asymmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with head turns in one direction and correlated either negatively or not at all in the opposite direction. In addition to modulation by AHV, some of the AHV cells (40.1%) were weakly modulated by the rat's linear velocity, and a smaller number were modulated by HD (11%) or head pitch (15.9%). Autocorrelation analyses indicated that with the head stationary, AHV cells displayed irregular discharge patterns. Because afferents from the DTN are the major source of information projecting to the LMN, these results suggest that AHV information from the DTN plays a significant role in generating the HD signal in LMN. A model is proposed showing how DTN AHV cells can generate and update the LMN HD cell signal.

  15. Increased vitamin D receptor expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Natalija; Ferhatović, Lejla; Marelja, Ivana; Puljak, Livia; Grković, Ivica

    2013-08-01

    The effects of vitamin D on the nervous system have been studied extensively. In spite of accumulating data about the substantial changes in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling system, during different types of neuroinflammatory diseases, its role in diabetic neuropathy has not been investigated in detail. To assess the role of VDR signaling in diabetic neuropathy, we examined expression of VDRs in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus type 1. Diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 was induced with streptozotocin in male Sprague-Dawley rats. After two months, expression of VDRs was analyzed immunohistochemically in the cytoplasm of L4 and L5 DRG neurons of diabetic rats. Semi-quantitative analysis for the determination of staining in nuclei and plasma-membranes of DRG neurons was performed. A significant increase in VDR expression was observed in DRG neurons of diabetic rats. Expression of VDRs was increased in the cytoplasm, nuclei and in cell membranes of neurons. An increase in VDR expression occurred in all neurons, but the greatest increase of fluorescence intensity in cytoplasm was observed in neurons of small diameter. Results of the present study indicate that the VDR signaling system could be a potential therapeutic target for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23684983

  16. Neural correlates for angular head velocity in the rat dorsal tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bassett, J P; Taube, J S

    2001-08-01

    Many neurons in the rat lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) fire selectively in relation to the animal's head direction (HD) in the horizontal plane independent of the rat's location or behavior. One hypothesis of how this representation is generated and updated is via subcortical projections from the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN). Here we report the type of activity in DTN neurons. The majority of cells (75%) fired as a function of the rat's angular head velocity (AHV). Cells exhibited one of two types of firing patterns: (1) symmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with AHV during head turns in both directions, and (2) asymmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with head turns in one direction and correlated either negatively or not at all in the opposite direction. In addition to modulation by AHV, some of the AHV cells (40.1%) were weakly modulated by the rat's linear velocity, and a smaller number were modulated by HD (11%) or head pitch (15.9%). Autocorrelation analyses indicated that with the head stationary, AHV cells displayed irregular discharge patterns. Because afferents from the DTN are the major source of information projecting to the LMN, these results suggest that AHV information from the DTN plays a significant role in generating the HD signal in LMN. A model is proposed showing how DTN AHV cells can generate and update the LMN HD cell signal. PMID:11466446

  17. A comparison of peripheral and central axotomy effects on neurofilament and tubulin gene expression in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.; Oblinger, M.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The expression of major cytoskeletal protein mRNAs was studied in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after crushing either their central or peripheral branch axons. mRNA levels in DRG neurons were examined by quantitative in situ hybridization with radiolabeled cDNA probes specific for the low-molecular-weight neurofilament protein (NF-L) and beta-tubulin. The large-sized (greater than 1000 microns 2) neurons which give rise to myelinated axons in lumbar ganglia (L4 and L5) were studied 1 d through 8 weeks after either dorsal root or sciatic nerve crush. NF-L and beta-tubulin mRNA levels in axotomized DRG neurons were compared to those in contralateral control DRG neurons, as well as to those in normal (completely untreated) DRG cells. In the case of NF-L mRNA, changes were observed after central as well as peripheral branch axotomy and the time course and magnitude of changes were similar after both types of axotomy. NF-L mRNA levels initially decreased (first 2 weeks after crush) and then began to return towards control levels at longer survival times. Similar, but less pronounced, changes in NF-L mRNA levels also occurred in contralateral DRG neurons (which were uninjured); the changes in contralateral neurons were not simply a result of surgical stress since no changes in NF-L mRNA levels were observed in sham-operated DRG neurons. In the case of tubulin mRNA, changes were observed after central as well as peripheral branch axotomy by in situ hybridization, but the time course and magnitude of changes were different after each type of axotomy.

  18. Spino-olivary projections in the rat are anatomically separate from postsynaptic dorsal column projections.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Charlotte R; Cerminara, Nadia L; Apps, Richard; Lumb, Bridget M

    2014-06-15

    The gracile nucleus (GN) and lateral part of rostral dorsal accessory olive (rDAO) are important relays for indirect, postsynaptic dorsal column, and direct ascending pathways, respectively, that terminate as climbing fibers in the "hindlimb-receiving" parts of the C1 and C3 zones in the cerebellar cortex. While the spinal cells of origin of that project to GN and rDAO are from largely separate territories in the spinal cord, previous studies have indicated that there could be an area of overlap between these two populations in the medial dorsal horn. Given the access of these two ascending tracts to sensory (thalamic) versus sensorimotor (precerebellar) pathways, the present study therefore addresses the important question of whether or not individual neurons have the potential to contribute axons to both ascending pathways. A double-fluorescent tracer strategy was used in rats (red Retrobeads and Fluoro-Ruby or green Retrobeads and Fluoro-Emerald) to map the spatial distribution of cells of origin of the two projections in the lumbar spinal cord. The two pathways were found to receive input from almost entirely separate territories within the lumbar cord (levels L3-L5). GN predominantly receives input from lamina IV, while rDAO receives its input from three cell populations: medial laminae V-VI, lateral lamina V, and medial laminae VII-VIII. Cells that had axons that branched to supply both GN and rDAO represented only about 1% of either single-labeled cell population. Overall, the findings therefore suggest functional independence of the two ascending pathways. PMID:24357064

  19. Ethanol consumption in the Sprague-Dawley rat increases sensitivity of the dorsal raphe nucleus to 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Rani K; Hobby, Alexander R; Kirby, Lynn G

    2015-12-15

    Alcoholism afflicts 1 in 13 US adults, and comorbidity with depression is common. Levels of serotonin (5-HT) metabolites in alcoholic or depressed humans and rat strains are lower compared to healthy counterparts. Rats bred for ethanol (EtOH) preference are common in EtOH studies, however out-bred strains better model the range of EtOH consumption in humans. We examined voluntary EtOH consumption in out-bred Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats placed in the 20% EtOH intermittent access drinking paradigm (IA). Acquisition of 20% EtOH consumption (g EtOH/kg/24h) was assessed during the first 6-8 weeks of IA. Rats naturally separated into two groups (Drinkers or Non-drinkers) based on EtOH intake above or below 0.5 g/kg/24h prior to treatment intervention. We examined the effect of central 5-HT depletion on EtOH consumption by infusing 5,7-dihyroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT; i.c.v., 200-300 μg) or vehicle and measured EtOH consumption for 4 weeks post-operatively in IA. Compared to baseline, there was no effect of vehicle or 5,7-DHT on EtOH consumption during the post-operative period. Quantification of 5-HT depletion in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) using tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) immunohistochemistry resulted in a 76% decrease in staining with 5,7-DHT treatment. Interestingly, preservation of the ventromedial (VM) sub-regions was evident in all animals treated with 5,7-DHT, regardless of drinking behavior. In addition, Drinkers treated with 5,7-DHT had significantly more TPH2 depletion in the DRN compared to Non-drinkers. Our findings indicate that out-bred SD rats exhibit a natural EtOH consumption behavior (Drinker or Non-drinker) that is stable across time and independent of 5-HT depletion in the CNS. In addition, rats that regularly consumed >0.5 g EtOH/kg had greater sensitivity to 5,7-DHT in the DRN, indicating an interaction between EtOH and sensitivity of DRN 5-HT cells to neurotoxic substances. This may contribute to the dysfunctionality of the 5-HT system in

  20. Reversal of neurochemical alterations in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia by Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptors in a rat model of spinal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmei; Xue, Yaping; Yan, Yanhua; Lin, Minjie; Yang, Jiajia; Huang, Jianzhong; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-07-01

    The rodent Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptor subtype C has been demonstrated to inhibit pathological pain. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the reversal of pain hypersensitivity by the selective MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22) in a rat model of L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of BAM8-22 (0.1-10nmol) attenuated mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner on day 10 after SNL. The antiallodynia effect of BAM8-22 was abolished by MrgC receptor antibody, but not by naloxone. I.t. BAM8-22 (10nmol) inhibited SNL-induced upregulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthesis (nNOS) and phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the spinal dorsal horn. The BAM8-22 treatment reversed the SNL-induced astrocyte activation, increase of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the spinal cord. BAM8-22 also reversed the upregulation of fractalkine and IL-1β in small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Furthermore, the BAM8-22 exposure suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase of nNOS and IL-1β in the DRG explant cultures and the BAM8-22-induced suppression disappeared in the presence of MrgC receptor antibody. The present study provides evidence that activation of MrgC receptors inhibits nerve injury-induced increase of pronociceptive molecules in DRG neurons, suppressing astrocyte activation, the upregulation of excitatory mediators and phosphorylation of transcription factors in the spinal dorsal horn. As MrgC receptors are unequally expressed in the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, this study suggests that targeting MrgC receptors could be a new therapy for neuropathic pain with limited unwanted effects. PMID:27018398

  1. Protein kinases paralleling late-phase LTP formation in dorsal hippocampus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wan, Jia; Sase, Sunetra; Gröger, Marion; Pollak, Arnold; Korz, Volker; Lubec, Gert

    2014-10-01

    Hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP), representing a cellular model for learning and memory formation, can be dissociated into at least two phases: a protein-synthesis-independent early phase, lasting about 4h and a protein-synthesis-dependent late phase LTP lasting 6h or longer, or even days. A large series of protein kinases have been shown to be involved and herein, a distinct set of protein kinases proposed to be involved in memory retrieval in previous work was tested in dorsal hippocampus of the rat following induction of late-phase LTP. A bipolar stimulation electrode was chronically implanted into the perforant path, while two monopolar recording electrodes were implanted into the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus. The recording electrode was measuring extracellular excitatory postsynaptic potentials, while the other one measured population spikes. Protein kinases were determined by immunoblotting and immunoflourescence on hippocampal areas showed the distribution pattern of protein kinases PKN1 and NEK7. Induction of LTP was proven, elevated levels for protein kinases PKN1, RPS6KB1, STK4, CDC42BPB, PRKG, TLK, BMX and decreased levels for NEK7, MAK14 and PLK1 were observed. A remarkable overlap of protein kinases observed in spatial memory processes with those proposed in LTP formation was demonstrated. The findings may be relevant for design of future studies on protein kinases and for the interpretation of previous work. PMID:24911953

  2. Electrical high frequency stimulation in the dorsal striatum: Effects on response learning and on GABA levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Anett; de Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira; Lecourtier, Lucas; Moser, Andreas; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2011-09-23

    Electrical high frequency stimulation (HFS) has been used to treat various neurological and psychiatric diseases. The striatal area contributes to response learning and procedural memory. Therefore, we investigated the effect of striatal HFS application on procedural/declarative-like memory in rats. All rats were trained in a flooded Double-H maze for three days (4 trials/day) to swim to an escape platform hidden at a constant location. The starting place was the same for all trials. After each training session, HFS of the left dorsal striatum was performed over 4h in alternating 20 min periods (during rest time, 10a.m. to 3p.m.). Nineteen hours after the last HFS and right after a probe trial assessing the rats' strategy (procedural vs. declarative-like memory-based choice), animals were sacrificed and the dorsal striatum was quickly removed. Neurotransmitter levels were measured by HPLC. Stimulated rats did not differ from sham-operated and control rats in acquisition performance, but exhibited altered behavior during the probe trial (procedural memory responses being less frequent than in controls). In stimulated rats, GABA levels were significantly increased in the dorsal striatum on both sides. We suggest that HFS of the dorsal striatum does not alter learning behavior in rats but influences the strategy by which the rats solve the task. Given that the HFS-induced increase of GABA levels was found 19 h after stimulation, it can be assumed that HFS has consequences lasting for several hours and which are functionally significant at a behavioral level, at least under our stimulation (frequency, timing, location, side and strength of stimulation) and testing conditions. PMID:21501632

  3. Music exposure improves spatial cognition by enhancing the BDNF level of dorsal hippocampal subregions in the developing rats.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingshou; Chen, Wenxi; Wang, Yanran; Jing, Wei; Gao, Shan; Guo, Daqing; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-03-01

    Previous research has shown that dorsal hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory process. Music exposure can enhance brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression level in dorsal hippocampus (DH) and thus enhance spatial cognition ability. But whether music experience may affect different subregions of DH in the same degree remains unclear. Here, we studied the effects of exposure to Mozart K.448 on learning behavior in developing rats using the classical Morris water maze task. The results showed that early music exposure could enhance significantly learning performance of the rats in the water maze test. Meanwhile, the BDNF/TrkB level of dorsal hippocampus CA3 (dCA3) and dentate gyrus (dDG) was significantly enhanced in rats exposed to Mozart music as compared to those without music exposure. In contrast, the BDNF/TrkB level of dorsal hippocampus CA1 (dCA1) was not affected. The results suggest that the spatial memory improvement by music exposure in rats may be associated with the enhanced BDNF/TrkB level of dCA3 and dDG. PMID:26802511

  4. Evidence for a haematogenous origin of some of the macrophages appearing in the spinal cord of the rat after dorsal rhizotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, E A

    1979-01-01

    A single dose of colloidal carbon was given intravascularly to young adult rats in order to label circulating monocytes. Two days after injection dorsal rhizotomies were performed on the fifth to eighth cervical nerves on the right side. The rats were killed 1, 3, 4 and 8 days later. Electron microscopic examination of the spinal cord showed wide-spread tissue degeneration on the operated side in the dorsolateral fasciculus, the dorsal horn and the dorsal neuronal white column, the changes in the last named being the most severe. A variety of non-neuronal elements was found in the dorsolateral fasciculus and dorsal horn. These included astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia-like cells, plasma cells, mast cells, polymorphonuclear leucocytes, monocytes and macrophages. Monocytes and macrophages were most common 3 and 4 days after operation. Some of these cells carried intracytoplasmic carbon particles. Carbon-labelled monocytes were observed in blood vessel lumina, perivascularly and in the neuropil. Monocytes crossing blood vessel walls were also encountered, indicating that the neuropil monocytes were derived from circulating cells. Macrophages were characterized by pleomorphic phagosomes which seemed to be composed largely of myelin remnants. The presence of carbon particles in their cytoplasm, and also their general similarity to monocytes, suggested that they originated from the latter. Local microglial cells were considered to be another source of macrophages. Indeed, there were present some microglia-like cells which were regarded as 'activated microglia' as they showed morphological resemblances to microglia on the one hand and to macrophages on the other. In particular their cytoplasm always included phagosomes. It is concluded that the macrophages which appear in the altered spinal cord following rhizotomy are derived both from circulating monocytes and from indigenous microglia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10

  5. Modulation of neuronal activity in dorsal column nuclei by upper cervical spinal cord stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chao; Yang, Xiaoli; Wu, Mingyuan; Farber, Jay P.; Linderoth, Bengt; Foreman, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical human and animal studies show that upper cervical spinal cord stimulation (cSCS) has beneficial effects in treatment of some cerebral disorders, including those due to deficient cerebral circulation. However, the underlying mechanisms and neural pathways activated by cSCS using clinical parameters remain unclear. We have shown that a cSCS-induced increase in cerebral blood flow is mediated via rostral spinal dorsal column fibers implying that the dorsal column nuclei (DCNs) are involved. The aim of this study was to examine how cSCS modulated neuronal activity of DCNs.. A spring-loaded unipolar ball electrode was placed on the left dorsal column at cervical (C2) spinal cord in pentobarbital anesthetized, ventilated and paralyzed male rats. Stimulation with frequencies of 1, 10, 20, 50 Hz (0.2 ms, 10 s) and an intensity of 90% of motor threshold was applied. Extracellular potentials of single neurons in DCNs were recorded and examined for effects of cSCS. In total, 109 neurons in DCNs were isolated and tested for effects of cSCS. Out of these, 56 neurons were recorded from the cuneate nucleus and 53 from the gracile nucleus. Mechanical somatic stimuli altered activity of 87/109 (83.2%) examined neurons. Of the neurons receiving somatic input, 62 were classified as low-threshold and 25 as wide dynamic range. The cSCS at 1 Hz changed the activity of 96/109 (88.1%) of the neurons. Neuronal responses to cSCS exhibited multiple patterns of excitation and/or inhibition: excitation (E, n=21), inhibition (I, n=19), E-I (n=37), I-E (n=8) and E-I-E (n=11). Furthermore, cSCS with high-frequency (50 Hz) altered the activity of 92.7% (51/55) of tested neurons, including 30 E, 24 I, and 2 I-E responses to cSCS. These data suggested that cSCS significantly modulates neuronal activity in dorsal column nuclei. These nuclei might serve as a neural relay for cSCS-induced effects on cerebral dysfunction and diseases. PMID:19665525

  6. Effects of Venous Superdrainage and Arterial Supercharging on Dorsal Perforator Flap in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Xi, Shanshan; Ding, Maochao; Li, Hong; Xu, Wei; Tang, Maolin; Chen, Shixin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To comparatively assess the effects of venous superdrainage and arterial supercharging on dorsal perforator flap survival. Materials and Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (450–550g) were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20), including control group (Control) and experimental groups A (venous superdrainage, Exp. A) and B (arterial supercharging, Exp. B). At postoperative day 7, survival areas of the flaps were evaluated and all animals underwent angiography. Laser Doppler was used to evaluate flap perfusion from 0h to 7days after surgery. Histology with hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to count microvessels. Tissue of “Choke vessels”was excised for quantification of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by western blot assay at 6h and 7days after surgery. Results In the Exp. A group, almost all flaps survived (98.2±1.6%); in the Exp. B and control group, survival areas accounted for 78.8±8.5% and 60.3±7.8%, respectively (P <0.001). In addition, Exp. A animals showed improved anastomosis of choke vessels 2 compared with the Exp. B and Control groups. Furthermore, flap blood flow and partial pressure of oxygen in the Exp. A group were significantly higher compared with values obtained for the Exp. B and Control groups, from 6 hours to 7 days after surgery. More microvessels were found in the Exp. A group (11.65±1.33) than in Exp. B (9.25±0.34) and control (7.25±0.91) animals on POD 7. The relative expression level of HIF-1α and VEGF were significant at 6h and 7days after surgery. Conclusions Venous superdrainage in rat dorsal perforator flap is more effective than arterial supercharging in promoting flap survival, and could effectively alter hemodynamics in the microcirculation and stimulate blood vessel formation. PMID:27513520

  7. Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis in Sensory Neurons of Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Hamid Reza; Soleimani Mehranjani, Malek; Shariatzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Haddadi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) undergo apoptosis after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to investigate sensory neuron death and the mechanism involved in the death of these neurons in cultured DRG. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, L5 DRG from adult mouse were dissected and incubated in culture medium for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Freshly dissected and cultured DRG were then fixed and sectioned using a cryostat. Morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis were investigated using fluorescent staining (Propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342) and the terminal Deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method respectively. To study the role of caspases, general caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD.fmk, 100 μM) and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 were used. Results: After 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours in culture, sensory neurons not only displayed morphological features of apoptosis but also they appeared TUNEL positive. The application of Z-VAD.fmk inhibited apoptosis in these neurons over the same time period. In addition, intense activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found both in the cytoplasm and the nuclei of these neurons after 24 and 48 hours. Conclusion: Results of the present study show caspase-dependent apoptosis in the sensory neurons of cultured DRG from adult mouse. PMID:24027661

  8. Neofunctionalization of embryonic head patterning genes facilitates the positioning of novel traits on the dorsal head of adult beetles.

    PubMed

    Zattara, Eduardo E; Busey, Hannah A; Linz, David M; Tomoyasu, Yoshinori; Moczek, Armin P

    2016-07-13

    The origin and integration of novel traits are fundamental processes during the developmental evolution of complex organisms. Yet how novel traits integrate into pre-existing contexts remains poorly understood. Beetle horns represent a spectacular evolutionary novelty integrated within the context of the adult dorsal head, a highly conserved trait complex present since the origin of insects. We investigated whether otd1/2 and six3, members of a highly conserved gene network that instructs the formation of the anterior end of most bilaterians, also play roles in patterning more recently evolved traits. Using ablation-based fate-mapping, comparative larval RNA interference (RNAi) and transcript sequencing, we found that otd1/2, but not six3, play a fundamental role in the post-embryonic formation of the adult dorsal head and head horns of Onthophagus beetles. By contrast, neither gene appears to pattern the adult head of Tribolium flour beetles even though all are expressed in the dorsal head epidermis of both Onthophagus and Tribolium We propose that, at least in beetles, the roles of otd genes during post-embryonic development are decoupled from their embryonic functions, and that potentially non-functional post-embryonic expression in the dorsal head facilitated their co-option into a novel horn-patterning network during Onthophagus evolution. PMID:27412276

  9. Cannabinoids Inhibit Acid-Sensing Ion Channel Currents in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chun-Yu; Cai, Qi; Zou, Pengcheng; Wu, Heming; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Local acidosis has been found in various pain-generating conditions such as inflammation and tissue injury. Cannabinoids exert a powerful inhibitory control over pain initiation via peripheral cognate receptors. However, the peripheral molecular targets responsible for the antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. WIN55,212-2 dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. WIN55,212-2 shifted the proton concentration–response curve downwards, with an decrease of 48.6±3.7% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the EC50 value. The inhibition of proton-gated current induced by WIN55,212-2 was almost completely blocked by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM 281, but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Pretreatment of forskolin, an AC activator, and the addition of cAMP also reversed the inhibition of WIN55,212-2. Moreover, WIN55,212-2 altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, WIN55,212-2 attenuated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in rats. These results suggest that WIN55,212-2 inhibits the activity of ASICs via CB1 receptor and cAMP dependent pathway in rat primary sensory neurons. Thus, cannabinoids can exert their analgesic action by interaction with ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which was novel analgesic mechanism of cannabinoids. PMID:23029075

  10. Binge ethanol exposure during adolescence leads to a persistent loss of neurogenesis in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus that is associated with impaired adult cognitive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Vetreno, Ryan P.; Crews, Fulton T.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period that coincides with the maturation of adult cognitive faculties. Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can impact brain maturation. Using a rodent model of adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE; 5.0 g/kg, i.g., 20% EtOH w/v; 2 days on/2 days off from postnatal day [P]25 to P55), we discovered that AIE treatment reduced neurogenesis (i.e., doublecortin-immunoreactive [DCX + IR] cells) in both the dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus of late adolescent (P56) male Wistar rats that persisted during abstinence into adulthood (P220). This reduction in neurogenesis was accompanied by a concomitant reduction in proliferating cells (Ki-67) and an increase in cell death (cleaved caspase-3). In the hippocampus, AIE treatment induced a long-term upregulation of neuroimmune genes, including Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its endogenous agonist high-mobility group box 1 as well as several proinflammatory signaling molecules. Administration of lipopolysaccharide, a gram-negative endotoxin agonist at TLR4, to young adult rats (P70) produced a similar reduction of DCX + IR cells that was observed in AIE-treated animals. Behaviorally, AIE treatment impaired object recognition on the novel object recognition task when assessed from P163 to P165. Interestingly, object recognition memory was positively correlated with DCX + IR in both the dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus while latency to enter the center of the apparatus was negatively correlated with DCX + IR in the ventral dentate gyrus. Together, these data reveal that adolescent binge ethanol exposure persistently inhibits neurogenesis throughout the hippocampus, possibly through neuroimmune mechanisms, which might contribute to altered adult cognitive and emotive function. PMID:25729346

  11. Evaluation of Cisplatin Neurotoxicity in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia via Cytosolic Calcium Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Kevser; Yiğitaslan, Semra; Ünel, Çiğdem; Kaygısız, Bilgin; Yıldırım, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Calcium homeostasis is considered to be important in antineoplastic as well as in neurotoxic adverse effects of cisplatin. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the role of Ca2+ in cisplatin neurotoxicity in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Study Design: Cell culture study. Methods: DRG cells prepared from 1-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were used to determine the role of Ca2+ in the cisplatin (10–600 μM) neurotoxicity. The cells were incubated with cisplatin plus nimodipine (1–3 μM), dizocilpine (MK-801) (1–3 μM) or thapsigargin (100–300 nM). Toxicity of cisplatinon DRG cells was determined by the MTT assay. Results: The neurotoxicity of cisplatin was significant when used in high concentrations (100–600 μM). Nimodipine (1 μM) but not MK-801 or thapsigargin prevented the neurotoxic effects of 200 μM of cisplatin. Conclusion: Voltage-dependent calcium channels may play a role in cisplatin neurotoxicity. PMID:27403382

  12. In vivo longitudinal Myelin Water Imaging in rat spinal cord following dorsal column transection injury.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Piotr; Rosicka, Paulina; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew C; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2014-04-01

    Longitudinal Myelin Water Imaging was carried out in vivo to characterize white matter damage following dorsal column transection (DC Tx) injury at the lumbar level L1 of rat spinal cords. A transmit-receive implantable coil system was used to acquire multiple spin-echo (MSE) quantitative T2 data from the lumbar spinal cords of 16 rats at one week pre-injury as well as 3 and 8weeks post-injury (117 microns in-plane resolution and 1.5mm slice thickness). In addition, ex vivo MSE and DTI data were acquired from cords fixed and excised at 3 or 8weeks post injury using a solenoid coil. The MSE data were used to generate Myelin Water Fractions (MWFs) as a surrogate measure of myelin content, while DTI data were acquired to study damage to the axons. Myelin damage was assessed histologically with Eriochrome cyanine (EC) and Myelin Basic Protein in degenerated myelin (dgen-MBP) staining, and axonal damage was assessed by neurofilament-H in combination with neuron specific beta-III-tubulin (NF/Tub) staining. These MRI and histological measures of injury were studied in the dorsal column at 5mm cranial and 5mm caudal to injury epicenter. MWF increased significantly at 3weeks post-injury at both the cranial and caudal sites, relative to baseline. The values on the cranial side of injury returned to baseline at 8weeks post-injury but remained elevated on the caudal side. This trend was found in both in vivo and ex vivo data. This MWF increase was likely due to the presence of myelin debris, which were cleared by 8 weeks on the cranial, but not the caudal, side. Both EC and dgen-MBP stains displayed similar trends. MWF showed significant correlation with EC staining (R=0.63, p=0.005 in vivo and R=0.74, p=0.0001 ex vivo). MWF also correlated strongly with the dgen-MBP stain, but only on the cranial side (R=0.64, p=0.05 in vivo; R=0.63, p=0.038 ex vivo). This study demonstrates that longitudinal MWI in vivo can accurately characterize white matter damage in DC Tx model of injury

  13. The Antinociceptive and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Topical Propofol on Dorsal Horn Neurons in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Takechi, Kenichi; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Klein, Amanda H.; Carstens, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is an IV anesthetic used for general anesthesia. Recent evidence suggests that propofol-anesthetized patients experience less postoperative pain, and that propofol has analgesic properties when applied topically. We presently investigated the antinociceptive effects of topical propofol using behavioral and single-unit electrophysiological methods in rats. Methods In behavioral experiments with rats, we assessed the effect of topical hindpaw application of propofol (1–25%) on heat and mechanically evoked paw withdrawals. In electrophysiology experiments we recorded from lumbar dorsal horn wide dynamic range (WDR)-type neurons in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. We assessed the effect of topical application of propofol to the ipsilateral hindpaw on neuronal responses elicited by noxious heat, cold and mechanical stimuli. We additionally tested if propofol blocks heat sensitization of paw withdrawals and WDR neuronal responses induced by topical application of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC; mustard oil). Results Topical application of propofol (1–25%) significantly increased the mean latency of the thermally evoked hindpaw withdrawal reflex on the treated (but not opposite) side in a concentration-dependent manner, with no effect on mechanically evoked hindpaw withdrawal thresholds. Propofol also prevented shortening of paw withdrawal latency induced by AITC. In electrophysiological experiments, topical application of 10 and 25% propofol, but not 1% propofol or vehicle (10% intralipid), to the ipsilateral hindpaw significantly attenuated the magnitude of responses of WDR neurons to noxious heating of glabrous hindpaw skin with no significant change in thermal thresholds. Maximal suppression of noxious heat-evoked responses was achieved 15-min after application followed by recovery to the pre-propofol baseline by 30 min. Responses to skin cooling or graded mechanical stimuli were not significantly affected by any

  14. Effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvento, G.; Lacombe, P.; Seylaz, J. )

    1989-06-01

    We have studied the effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow (LCBF), as assessed by the quantitative ({sup 14}C)-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus in the alpha-chloralose anesthetized rat caused a significant decrease in LCBF, ranging from -13 to -26% in 24 brain structures out of 33 investigated. The most pronounced decreases (-23 to -26%) were observed in the accumbens, amygdaloid, interpeduncular nuclei and in the median raphe nucleus, limbic system relays. The decreases also concerned cortical regions and the extrapyramidal system. These results indicate that activation of ascending serotonergic system produces a vasoconstriction and that the dorsal raphe nucleus has a widespread modulatory influence on the cerebral circulation.

  15. Role of oxidative stress in rabies virus infection of adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan C; Kammouni, Wafa; Zherebitskaya, Elena; Fernyhough, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Rabies virus infection of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was studied in vitro with cultured adult mouse DRG neurons. Recent in vivo studies of transgenic mice that express the yellow fluorescent protein indicate that neuronal process degeneration, involving both dendrites and axons, occurs in mice infected with the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus by footpad inoculation. Because of the similarities of the morphological changes in experimental rabies and in diabetic neuropathy and other diseases, we hypothesize that neuronal process degeneration occurs as a result of oxidative stress. DRG neurons were cultured from adult ICR mice. Two days after plating, they were infected with CVS. Immunostaining was evaluated with CVS- and mock-infected cultures for neuron specific beta-tubulin, rabies virus antigen, and amino acid adducts of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) (marker of lipid peroxidation and hence oxidative stress). Neuronal viability (by trypan blue exclusion), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, and axonal growth were also assessed with the cultures. CVS infected 33 to 54% of cultured DRG neurons. Levels of neuronal viability and TUNEL staining were similar in CVS- and mock-infected DRG neurons. There were significantly more 4-HNE-labeled puncta at 2 and 3 days postinfection in CVS-infected cultures than in mock-infected cultures, and axonal outgrowth was reduced at these time points in CVS infection. Axonal swellings with 4-HNE-labeled puncta were also associated with aggregations of actively respiring mitochondria. We have found evidence that rabies virus infection in vitro causes axonal injury of DRG neurons through oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be important in vivo in rabies and may explain previous observations of the degeneration of neuronal processes. PMID:20181692

  16. 5-HT potentiation of the GABAA response in the rat sacral dorsal commissural neurones

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tian-Le; Pang, Zhi-Ping; Li, Ji-Shuo; Akaike, Norio

    1998-01-01

    The modulatory effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on the γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) response was investigated in the neurones freshly dissociated from the rat sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) using the nystatin perforated patch recording configuration under the voltage-clamp conditions.5-HT potentiated GABA-induced Cl− current (IGABA) without affecting the reversal potential of IGABA and the apparent affinity of GABA to its receptor.α-Methyl-5-HT mimicked the potentiation effect of 5-HT on IGABA while ketanserine blocked it. 1-Oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol (OAG) potentiated IGABA, and the effect of 5-HT on IGABA was occluded by OAG pretreatment. In the presence of chelerythrine, 5-HT failed to potentiate IGABA, suggesting that protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the pathway through which the activation of the 5-HT2 receptor potentiates the IGABA.The facilitatory effect of 5-HT on IGABA remained in the presence of BAPTA-AM. LiCl also had no effect on 5-HT-induced potentiation of IGABA.H-89, genistein, okadaic acid and pervanadate all had no effects on 5-HT potentiation of IGABA. Pertussis toxin treatment for 6–8 h did not block the facilitatory effect of 5-HT on IGABA.The present results show that GABAA receptor in the rat SDCN could be modulated in situ by 5-HT, one of the major transmitters involved in the supraspinal control of nociception, and that the phosphorylation of GABAA receptor by PKC may be sufficient to support such modulation. The results also strongly support the hypothesis that the cotransmission by 5-HT and GABA has an important role in the spinal cord. PMID:9690871

  17. Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus of the Rat: Representation of Complex Sounds in Ears Damaged by Acoustic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Ropp, Tessa-Jonne F; May, Bradford J; Young, Eric D

    2015-08-01

    Acoustic trauma damages the cochlea but secondarily modifies circuits of the central auditory system. Changes include decreases in inhibitory neurotransmitter systems, degeneration and rewiring of synaptic circuits, and changes in neural activity. Little is known about the consequences of these changes for the representation of complex sounds. Here, we show data from the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) of rats with a moderate high-frequency hearing loss following acoustic trauma. Single-neuron recording was used to estimate the organization of neurons' receptive fields, the balance of inhibition and excitation, and the representation of the spectra of complex broadband stimuli. The complex stimuli had random spectral shapes (RSSs), and the responses were fit with a model that allows the quality of the representation and its degree of linearity to be estimated. Tone response maps of DCN neurons in rat are like those in other species investigated previously, suggesting the same general organization of this nucleus. Following acoustic trauma, abnormal response types appeared. These can be interpreted as reflecting degraded tuning in auditory nerve fibers plus loss of inhibitory inputs in DCN. Abnormal types are somewhat more prevalent at later times (103-376 days) following the exposure, but not significantly so. Inhibition became weaker in post-trauma neurons that retained inhibitory responses but also disappeared in many neurons. The quality of the representation of spectral shape, measured by sensitivity to the spectral shapes of RSS stimuli, was decreased following trauma; in fact, neurons with abnormal response types responded mainly to overall stimulus level, and not spectral shape. PMID:25967754

  18. Glucose effects on gastric motility and tone evoked from the rat dorsal vagal complex.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M; Browning, K N; Sahibzada, N; Verbalis, J G; Gillis, R A; Travagli, R A

    2001-10-01

    1. To examine the effects of glucose on the central components of the vago-vagal reflex control of gastric function, we performed both in vivo and in vitro experiments on neurones in the medial nucleus of the tractus solitarius (mNTS) and in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). 2. In the in vivo anaesthetized rat preparation, unilateral microinjection of D-glucose (10 or 50 mM (60 nl)(-1)) in mNTS produced inhibition of gastric motility and an increase in intragastric pressure. D-glucose had no effect in the DMV. 3. In the in vitro rat brainstem slice preparation, whole-cell recordings of DMV neurones showed that increasing the glucose concentration of the perfusion solution from 5 mM to 15 or 30 mM produced outward currents of 35 +/- 5 pA (n = 7) and 51 +/- 10 pA (n = 11), respectively. These were blocked by tetrodotoxin and picrotoxin, indicating that glucose was acting indirectly to cause the release of GABA. Decreasing the glucose concentration of the perfusing solution by one-half produced an inward current of 36 +/- 5 pA (n = 7). 4. Stimulation of the NTS evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in DMV neurones. The amplitude of the evoked IPSCs was positively correlated with glucose concentration. Perfusion with the ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel opener diazoxide mimicked the effect of reduced glucose, while perfusion with the K(ATP) channel blocker glibenclamide mimicked the effects of increased glucose. 5. Our data indicate that glucose had no direct excitatory effect on DMV neurones, but DMV neurones appear to be affected by an action of glucose on cell bodies of mNTS neurones via effects on an ATP-sensitive potassium channel. PMID:11579164

  19. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators. PMID:26671526

  20. Inflammatory mediators release calcitonin gene-related peptide from dorsal root ganglion neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, B; Izydorczyk, I; Kress, M

    2000-01-01

    The interactions between the inflammatory mediators bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2) and acid pH were studied in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. For this purpose, the cultures were stimulated by inflammatory mediators (bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2), 10(-5)M each) or acid solution (pH 6.1) for 5 min and the content of calcitonin gene-related peptide was determined in the supernatant before, during and after stimulation, using an enzyme immunoassay. Acid solution resulted in a threefold increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was entirely dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. The release could not be blocked by the addition of the capsaicin antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M). Bradykinin (10(-5)M) caused a 50% increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was again dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium, whereas serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) were each ineffective at 10(-5)M concentration. The combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) led to a fivefold increase of the calcitonin gene-related peptide release which could not be further enhanced by acidification. The competitive capsaicin receptor antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M) significantly reduced the release induced by the combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2). It is suggested that the inflammatory mediators co-operate and together may act as endogenous agonists at the capsaicin receptor to cause calcium influx and consecutive neuropeptide release. PMID:10858619

  1. Dorsal striatal dopamine depletion impairs both allocentric and egocentric navigation in rats.

    PubMed

    Braun, Amanda A; Graham, Devon L; Schaefer, Tori L; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Successful navigation requires interactions among multiple but overlapping neural pathways mediating distinct capabilities, including egocentric (self-oriented, route-based) and allocentric (spatial, map-based) learning. Route-based navigation has been shown to be impaired following acute exposure to the dopaminergic (DA) drugs (+)-methamphetamine and (+)-amphetamine, but not the serotoninergic (5-HT) drugs (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or (±)-fenfluramine. The dopaminergic-rich neostriatum is involved in both allocentric and egocentric navigation. This experiment tested whether dorsal striatal DA loss using bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injections impaired one or both types of navigation. Two weeks following 6-OHDA injections, rats began testing in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) followed by the Morris water maze (MWM) for route-based and spatial navigation, respectively. 6-OHDA treatment significantly increased latency and errors in the CWM and path length, latency, and cumulative distance in the MWM with no difference on cued MWM trials. Neostriatal DA levels were reduced by 80% at 2 and 7 weeks post-treatment. In addition, 6-OHDA increased DA turnover and decreased norepinephrine (NE) levels. 6-OHDA injections did not alter monoamine levels in the prefrontal cortex. The data support that neostriatal DA modulates both types of navigation. PMID:22465436

  2. Tonic GABAA Receptor-Mediated Inhibition in the Rat Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors expressed in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus (DMV) critically regulate the activity of vagal motor neurons and, by inference, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Two types of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition have been identified in the brain, represented by phasic (Iphasic) and tonic (Itonic) inhibitory currents. The hypothesis that Itonic regulates neuron activity was tested in the DMV using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in transverse brain stem slices from rats. An Itonic was present in a subset of DMV neurons, which was determined to be mediated by different receptors than those mediating fast, synaptic currents. Preapplication of tetrodotoxin significantly decreased the resting Itonic amplitude in DMV neurons, suggesting that most of the current was due to action potential (AP)–dependent GABA release. Blocking GABA transport enhanced Itonic and multiple GABA transporters cooperated to regulate Itonic. The Itonic was composed of both a gabazine-insensitive component that was nearly saturated under basal conditions and a gabazine-sensitive component that was activated when extracellular GABA concentration was elevated. Perfusion of THIP (10 μM) significantly increased Itonic amplitude without increasing Iphasic amplitude. The Itonic played a major role in determining the overall excitability of DMV neurons by contributing to resting membrane potential and AP frequency. Our results indicate that Itonic contributes to DMV neuron membrane potential and activity and is thus an important regulator of vagally mediated GI function. PMID:20018836

  3. Global analysis of transcriptome in dorsal root ganglia following peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Leilei; Wu, Jiancheng; Zhou, Songlin; Wang, Yaxian; Qin, Jing; Yu, Bin; Gu, Xiaosong; Yao, Chun

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nervous system has intrinsic regeneration ability after injury, accompanied with the coordination of numerous cells, molecules and signaling pathways. These post-injury biological changes are complex with insufficient understanding. Thus, to obtain a global perspective of changes following nerve injury and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying nerve regeneration are of great importance. By RNA sequencing, we detected transcriptional changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons at 0 h, 3 h, 9 h, 1 d, 4 d and 7 d following sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. Differentially expressed genes were then selected and classified into major clusters according to their expression patterns. Cluster 2 (with genes high expressed before 9 h and then down expressed) and cluster 6 (combination of cluster 4 and 5 with genes low expressed before 1 d and then up expressed) were underwent GO annotation and KEGG pathway analysis. Gene act networks were then constructed for these two clusters and the expression of pivotal genes was validated by quantitative real-time PCR. This study provided valuable information regarding the transcriptome changes in DRG neurons following nerve injury, identified potential genes that could be used for improving axon regeneration after nerve injury, and facilitated to elucidate the biological process and molecular mechanisms underlying peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27450809

  4. The post-natal development of cutaneous afferent fibre input and receptive field organization in the rat dorsal horn.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M

    1985-01-01

    The responses evoked in lumbar dorsal horn cells by both natural and electrical hind-limb skin stimulation were recorded in the spinal cord of rat pups aged 0-15 days under urethane anaesthesia. The input volley was recorded on the L4 dorsal root and consisted of two separate waves from birth. Latency and threshold measurements were consistent with these two waves being immature A (myelinated fibre) waves and C (non-myelinated fibre) waves. On the first 3 days of life background activity of cells in the dorsal horn was low and evoked discharges were sluggish. On electrical stimulation of the skin, neonatal dorsal horn cells frequently responded with only 1 or 2 impulses per input volley with long central delays of up to 20 ms. Synaptic linkage appeared weak and many cells failed to follow stimulation rates of 5 Hz. Natural skin stimulation showed that the majority of cells at days 0-3 responded to pinching the skin only. The development of responses evoked by C fibres in the dorsal horn was delayed compared to that of responses evoked by A fibres. Short and long latency responses corresponding to the early A and late C afferent input volleys could be recorded in the superficial laminae (I, II and III) of the dorsal horn from day 0, but in the deeper laminae only early short latency A responses were evoked until the age of day 7-8. After this time, a long latency C response also appeared and increased in strength with age. Convergence of low and high threshold inputs onto dorsal horn cells was rare at birth but increased gradually over the following two weeks. Receptive field areas, mapped by natural mechanical stimulation of skin, were large at birth and decreased in size with age. At birth the mean receptive field area was 14.2% of the total hind-limb area whereas at day 15 it was 3.6%. This fall in size was particularly marked in cells of the deep dorsal horn. Pinching or brushing the receptive field of many neonatal dorsal horn cells resulted in long

  5. Coexistence of choline acetyltransferase and GABA in axon terminals in the dorsal cap of the rat inferior olive.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Hawkins, R K; De Zeeuw, C I

    1996-06-10

    The dorsal cap of Kooy of the inferior olive (DC) is involved in compensatory eye movements. The rat DC receives a prominent input from the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (NPH); part of these axon terminals are immunoreactive for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and part of them are GABAergic. In the present study we investigated the fine distribution of cholinergic terminals in the rat DC, and the possible coexistence of ChAT and GABA. ChAT-positive terminals were observed throughout the entire neuropil of the rat DC contacting both extraglomerular and intraglomerular dendrites. Twenty nine percent of these terminals also contained GABA. The ChAT/GABA double-labelled terminals showed the same morphological characteristics as terminals traced from the NPH. The present data demonstrate colocalization of ChAT and GABA in axon terminals of the rat DC and strongly suggest that neurons in the NPH are the source of these profiles. PMID:8816268

  6. Responses of spinal neurones to cutaneous and dorsal root stimuli in rats with mechanical allodynia after contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Drew, G M; Siddall, P J; Duggan, A W

    2001-03-01

    The firing of neurones in spinal segments adjacent to a contusive T13 spinal cord injury was characterised in anaesthetised rats. Three groups of rats were examined: (1) allodynic spinally injured, (2) non-allodynic spinally injured and (3) normal, uninjured. Spinal cord field potentials evoked by electrical dorsal root stimulation and the responses of 207 dorsal horn neurones to mechanical stimuli applied to the skin were studied. Within the lesioned spinal segment few active neurones were encountered and field potentials were absent. Depolarising field potentials recorded rostral to the lesion were reduced in both allodynic and non-allodynic animals compared to uninjured controls, while those recorded in caudal segments were enhanced in allodynic animals. Neuronal recordings revealed that allodynia was associated with exaggerated responses, including afterdischarges, to innocuous and noxious mechanical stimuli in a proportion of wide dynamic range, but not low threshold, neurones. These changes were observed both rostral and caudal to the site of injury. The results suggest that an increased responsiveness of some dorsal horn neurones in segments neighbouring a contusive spinal cord injury may contribute to the expression of mechanical allodynia. It is proposed that a relative lack of inhibition underlies altered cell responses. PMID:11222993

  7. Functional differences between neurochemically defined populations of inhibitory interneurons in the rat spinal dorsal horn☆

    PubMed Central

    Polgár, Erika; Sardella, Thomas C.P.; Tiong, Sheena Y.X.; Locke, Samantha; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand how nociceptive information is processed in the spinal dorsal horn we need to unravel the complex synaptic circuits involving interneurons, which constitute the vast majority of the neurons in laminae I–III. The main limitation has been the difficulty in defining functional populations among these cells. We have recently identified 4 non-overlapping classes of inhibitory interneuron, defined by expression of galanin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and parvalbumin, in the rat spinal cord. In this study we demonstrate that these form distinct functional populations that differ in terms of sst2A receptor expression and in their responses to painful stimulation. The sst2A receptor was expressed by nearly all of the nNOS- and galanin-containing inhibitory interneurons but by few of those with NPY and none of the parvalbumin cells. Many galanin- and NPY-containing cells exhibited phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pERK) after mechanical, thermal or chemical noxious stimuli, but very few nNOS-containing cells expressed pERK after any of these stimuli. However, many nNOS-positive inhibitory interneurons up-regulated Fos after noxious thermal stimulation or injection of formalin, but not after capsaicin injection. Parvalbumin cells did not express either activity-dependent marker following any of these stimuli. These results suggest that interneurons belonging to the NPY, nNOS and galanin populations are involved in attenuating pain, and for NPY and nNOS cells this is likely to result from direct inhibition of nociceptive projection neurons. They also suggest that the nociceptive inputs to the nNOS cells differ from those to the galanin and NPY populations. PMID:23707280

  8. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals. PMID:25231613

  9. Propofol differentially inhibits the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid and glycine in the spinal dorsal horn of rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yong, Zheng; Mi, Weidong; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Propofol (2, 6-diisopropylphenol) is an intravenous anesthetic that is commonly used for the general anesthesia. It is well known that the spinal cord is one of the working targets of general anesthesia including propofol. However, there is a lack of investigation of the effects of propofol on spinal dorsal horn which is important for the sensory transmission of nociceptive signals. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing dosage of propofol on the release of glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine (Gly) in the spinal dorsal horn. Materials and Methods: The efflux of Glu, GABA or Gly in the spinal dorsal horn of rats was detected using transverse spinal microdialysis under an awake condition and various depths of propofol anesthesia. The infusion rates of propofol were, in order, 400 µg/(kg·min), 600 µg/(kg·min) and 800 µg/(kg·min), with a 20 min infusion period being maintained at each infusion rate. Results: Propofol decreased the glutamate efflux within spinal dorsal horn in a dose-dependent manner, and the maximum decrease was 56.8 ± 6.0% at high-dose propofol infusion producing immobility. The inhibitory GABA and Gly efflux was also decreased about 15–20% at low-dose propofol infusion only producing sedation, but did not continue to drop with higher doses of propofol. Conclusion: Propofol decreased both excitatory and inhibitory amino acids efflux in spinal dorsal horn, and the preferential suppression of the excitatory amino acid might be associated with the analgesic effect of propofol. PMID:26557972

  10. Periaqueductal grey cyclooxygenase-dependent facilitation of C-nociceptive drive and encoding in dorsal horn neurons in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Leith, J Lianne; Wilson, Alex W; You, Hao-Jun; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The experience of pain is strongly affected by descending control systems originating in the brainstem ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (VL-PAG), which control the spinal processing of nociceptive information. A- and C-fibre nociceptors detect noxious stimulation, and have distinct and independent contributions to both the perception of pain quality (fast and slow pain, respectively) and the development of chronic pain. Evidence suggests a separation in the central processing of information arising from A- vs. C-nociceptors; for example, inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)–prostaglandin system within the VL-PAG alters spinal nociceptive reflexes evoked by C-nociceptor input in vivo via descending pathways, leaving A-nociceptor-evoked reflexes largely unaffected. As the spinal neuronal mechanisms underlying these different responses remain unknown, we determined the effect of inhibition of VL-PAG COX-1 on dorsal horn wide dynamic-range neurons evoked by C- vs. A-nociceptor activation. Inhibition of VL-PAG COX-1 in anaesthetised rats increased firing thresholds of lamina IV–V wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons in response to both A- and C-nociceptor stimulation. Importantly, wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons continued to faithfully encode A-nociceptive information, even after VL-PAG COX-1 inhibition, whereas the encoding of C-nociceptor information by wide dynamic-range spinal neurons was significantly disrupted. Dorsal horn neurons with stronger C-nociceptor input were affected by COX-1 inhibition to a greater extent than those with weak C-fibre input. These data show that the gain and contrast of C-nociceptive information processed in individual wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons is modulated by prostanergic descending control mechanisms in the VL-PAG. PMID:25239460

  11. Childhood emotional maltreatment severity is associated with dorsal medial prefrontal cortex responsivity to social exclusion in young adults.

    PubMed

    van Harmelen, Anne-Laura; Hauber, Kirsten; Gunther Moor, Bregtje; Spinhoven, Philip; Boon, Albert E; Crone, Eveline A; Elzinga, Bernet M

    2014-01-01

    Children who have experienced chronic parental rejection and exclusion during childhood, as is the case in childhood emotional maltreatment, may become especially sensitive to social exclusion. This study investigated the neural and emotional responses to social exclusion (with the Cyberball task) in young adults reporting childhood emotional maltreatment. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated brain responses and self-reported distress to social exclusion in 46 young adult patients and healthy controls (mean age = 19.2±2.16) reporting low to extreme childhood emotional maltreatment. Consistent with prior studies, social exclusion was associated with activity in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex. In addition, severity of childhood emotional maltreatment was positively associated with increased dorsal medial prefrontal cortex responsivity to social exclusion. The dorsal medial prefrontal cortex plays a crucial role in self-and other-referential processing, suggesting that the more individuals have been rejected and maltreated in childhood, the more self- and other- processing is elicited by social exclusion in adulthood. Negative self-referential thinking, in itself, enhances cognitive vulnerability for the development of psychiatric disorders. Therefore, our findings may underlie the emotional and behavioural difficulties that have been reported in adults reporting childhood emotional maltreatment. PMID:24416347

  12. Objects, Numbers, Fingers, Space: Clustering of Ventral and Dorsal Functions in Young Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinello, Alessandro; Cattani, Veronica; Bonfiglioli, Claudia; Dehaene, Stanislas; Piazza, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    In the primate brain, sensory information is processed along two partially segregated cortical streams: the ventral stream, mainly coding for objects' shape and identity, and the dorsal stream, mainly coding for objects' quantitative information (including size, number, and spatial position). Neurophysiological measures indicate that…

  13. Development and taxonomic value of dorsal tertiary fringe scales of the adult mosquito wing (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The condition of dorsal tertiary fringe scales on the wings of females and males for numerous species of tribe Aedini and representative species of other culicid tribes is noted. With few exceptions the presence or absence of these scales appears to be consistent for species included in well-define...

  14. Dorsal-ventral differences in the glia limitans of the spinal cord: an ultrastructural study in developing normal and irradiated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, T.J.; Gilmore, S.A.; Waxman, S.G.; Klinge, E.

    1985-07-01

    The dorsal and ventral surfaces of the lumbosacral spinal cord were examined in normal and irradiated postnatal rats. In normal rats between three and 13 days postnatal (DP), the glia limitans (GL) of the ventral surface was a more complex structure than the dorsal GL. This greater degree of complexity was manifested in a greater number of subpial astrocytes, a greater number of radial glial processes and a more advanced state in differentiation of its constituents. In rats irradiated at three DP and examined at 13 DP, the ventral GL remained intact and relatively unaffected by the radiation. In contrast, the dorsal GL was disrupted, and Schwann cells were seen within the dorsal funiculus. The ventral GL of the rat lumbosacral spinal cord is a more substantial structure than the dorsal GL during normal development. This factor alone may account for the integrity of the barrier properties of the ventral GL following radiation. However, these observations suggest that subpial astrocytes of the dorsal GL are more susceptible to radiation damage at three DP than the subpial astrocytes and radial glia of the ventral GL.

  15. Selective vulnerability of dorsal root ganglia neurons in experimental rabies after peripheral inoculation of CVS-11 in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, John P; Hsu, Lena; Jackson, Alan C

    2009-08-01

    The involvement of dorsal root ganglia was studied in an in vivo model of experimental rabies virus infection using the challenge virus standard (CVS-11) strain. Dorsal root ganglia neurons infected with CVS in vitro show prolonged survival and few morphological changes, and are commonly used to study the infection. It has been established that after peripheral inoculation of mice with CVS the brain and spinal cord show relatively few neurodegenerative changes, but detailed studies of pathological changes in dorsal root ganglia have not previously been performed in this in vivo experimental model. In this study, adult ICR mice were inoculated in the right hindlimb footpad with CVS. Spinal cords and dorsal root ganglia were evaluated at serial time points for histopathological and ultrastructural changes and for biochemical markers of cell death. Light microscopy showed multifocal mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrates in the sensory ganglia and a spectrum of degenerative neuronal changes. Ultrastructural changes in gangliocytes included features characteristic of the axotomy response, the appearance of numerous autophagic compartments, and aggregation of intermediate filaments, while the neurons retained relatively intact mitochondria and plasma membranes. Later in the process, there were more extensive degenerative neuronal changes without typical features of either apoptosis or necrosis. The degree of degenerative neuronal changes in gangliocytes contrasts with observations in CNS neurons in experimental rabies. Hence, gangliocytes exhibit selective vulnerability in this animal model. This contrasts markedly with the fact that they are, unlike CNS neurons, highly permissive to CVS infection in vitro. Further study is needed to determine mechanisms for this selective vulnerability, which will give us a better understanding of the pathogenesis of rabies. PMID:19252919

  16. Impacts of anti-nerve growth factor antibody on pain-related behaviors and expressions of opioid receptor in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia of rats with cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zhibin; Ma, Jiaming; Hong, Tao; Zhu, Yongqiang; Li, Hongxi; Pan, Shinong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impacts of anti-nerve growth factor antibody on pain-related behaviors and expressions of μ-opioid receptor in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia of rats with cancer-induced bone pain. Methods The rats were randomly grouped and then injected with 10 μl of phosphate buffer saline or Walker256 tumor cells into the upper segment of left tibia. Thirteen days after the injection, the intrathecal catheterization was performed, followed by the injection of saline, anti-nerve growth factor, nerve growth factor, and naloxone twice a day. The pain ethological changes were measured at the set time points; the expression changes of μ-opioid receptor protein and mRNA in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia were detected on the 18th day. Results After the tumor cells were injected into the tibia, hyperalgesia appeared and the expression of μ-opioid receptor protein and mRNA in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia was increased, compared with the sham group; after intrathecally injected anti-nerve growth factor, the significant antinociceptive effects appeared, and the μ-opioid receptor expression was increased, compared with the cancer pain group; the μ-opioid receptor expressions in the other groups showed no statistical significance. The naloxone pretreatment could mostly inverse the antinociception effects of anti-nerve growth factor. Conclusions Anti-nerve growth factor could reduce hyperalgesia in the cancer-induced bone pain rats, and the antinociceptive effects were related with the upregulation of μ-opioid receptor. PMID:27118770

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Donors Increase the Responsiveness of Dorsal Horn Neurons and Induce Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Inhyung; Chun, Sang Woo; Kim, Hee Kee

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers have analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through spinal mechanisms in the rat. The studies suggest that superoxide in spinal cord is one of important mediators of persistent pain. To test the hypothesis that increase of superoxide-derived intermediates leads to central sensitization and pain, the effects of an intrathecal injection of chemical ROS donors releasing either OH∙, OCl−, or H2O2 were examined on pain behaviors. Following treatment with t-BOOH (OH∙ donor), dorsal horn neuron responses to mechanical stimuli in normal rats and the changes of neuronal excitability were explored on substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons using whole-cell patch clamping recordings. Intrathecal administration of t-BOOH or NaOCl (OCl− donor), but not H2O2, significantly decreased mechanical thresholds of hind paws. The responses of wide dynamic range neurons to mechanical stimuli increased after a local application of t-BOOH. The t-BOOH increased the frequency and the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials, depolarized membrane potential in SG neurons, and increased the frequency of action potentials evoked by depolarizing current pulses. These results suggest that elevated ROS, especially OH∙, in the spinal cord sensitized dorsal horn neurons and produced hyperalgesia in normal rats. PMID:26457204

  18. Basic properties of somatosensory-evoked responses in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Bellistri, Elisa; Aguilar, Juan; Brotons-Mas, Jorge R; Foffani, Guglielmo; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2013-05-15

    The hippocampus is a pivotal structure for episodic memory function. This ability relies on the possibility of integrating different features of sensory stimuli with the spatio-temporal context in which they occur. While recent studies now suggest that somatosensory information is already processed by the hippocampus, the basic mechanisms still remain unexplored. Here, we used electrical stimulation of the paws, the whisker pad or the medial lemniscus to probe the somatosensory pathway to the hippocampus in the anaesthetized rat, and multisite electrodes, in combination with tetrode and intracellular recordings, to look at the properties of somatosensory hippocampal responses. We found that peripheral and lemniscal stimulation elicited small local field potential responses in the dorsal hippocampus about 35-40 ms post-stimulus. Current source density analysis established the local nature of these responses, revealing associated synaptic sinks that were consistently confined to the molecular layer (ML) of the dentate gyrus (DG), with less regular activation of the CA1 stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM). A delayed (40-45 ms), potentially active, current source that outlasted the SLM sink was present in about 50% cases around the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Somatosensory stimulation resulted in multi-unit firing increases in the majority of DG responses (79%), whereas multi-unit firing suppression was observed in the majority of CA1 responses (62%). Tetrode and intracellular recordings of individual cells confirmed different firing modulation in the DG and the CA1 region, and verified the active nature of both the early ML sink and delayed somatic CA1 source. Hippocampal responses to somatosensory stimuli were dependent on fluctuations in the strength and composition of synaptic inputs due to changes of the ongoing local (hippocampal) and distant (cortical) state. We conclude that somatosensory signals reach the hippocampus mainly from layer II entorhinal cortex to

  19. Prolonged noxious mechanical stimulation of the rat's tail: responses and encoding properties of dorsal horn neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Cervero, F; Handwerker, H O; Laird, J M

    1988-01-01

    1. Single-unit electrical activity has been recorded from dorsal horn neurones in the sacral (S1-S2) segments of the spinal cord of barbiturate-anaesthetized rats. Fifty-two neurones responding to a manually applied pinch of their receptive fields in the tail were selected. They were subsequently tested for their responses to four successive 2 min pinches at noxious intensities delivered by a feed-back-controlled mechanical device. 2. Neurones were tested with both innocuous (i.e. brushing and stroking) and noxious (i.e. pinching, pin-prick, and in some cases heating about 45 degrees C) stimulation of their cutaneous receptive fields. Three of the tested cells were driven exclusively by innocuous skin stimulation (mechanoreceptive or class 1), thirty-six were driven by both innocuous and noxious skin stimulation (multireceptive or class 2) and thirteen were driven exclusively by noxious skin stimulation (nocireceptive or class 3). 3. All of the multireceptive and nocireceptive neurones responded to the 2 min noxious pinch with an initial phasic discharge followed by sustained firing that showed little evidence of adaptation throughout the stimulus period. The three mechanoreceptive neurones responded to the 2 min noxious pinch with a short discharge at the stimulus onset, but were silent for the remainder of the stimulus period. 4. Thirty-one cells were tested with successive 2 min pinches of 4, 6 and 8 N (and in some cases, a further 4 N pinch) applied at 10 min intervals. Different encoding properties were observed during the sustained part of the neuronal response according to: (i) the afferent fibre input characteristics of the cell; (ii) whether or not the tail had received a test series of pinches earlier in the same experiment. 5. None of the multireceptive cells with only an A-fibre afferent input encoded the stimulus strength. However, the multireceptive cells with both an A- and a C-fibre afferent input and all nocireceptive cells did encode the stimulus

  20. Modulators of Calcium Influx Regulate Membrane Excitability in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lirk, Philipp; Poroli, Mark; Rigaud, Marcel; Fuchs, Andreas; Fillip, Patrick; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Ljubkovic, Marko; Sapunar, Damir; Hogan, Quinn

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic neuropathic pain resulting from neuronal damage remains difficult to treat, in part due to incomplete understanding of underlying cellular mechanisms. We have previously shown that inward Ca2+ flux (ICa) across the sensory neuron plasmalemma is decreased in a rodent model of chronic neuropathic pain, but the direct consequence of this loss of ICa on function of the sensory neuron has not been defined. We therefore examined the extent to which altered membrane properties after nerve injury, especially increased excitability that may contribute to chronic pain, are attributable to diminished Ca2+ entry. Methods Intracellular microelectrode measurements were obtained from A-type neurons of dorsal root ganglia excised from control rats and those with neuropathic pain behavior following spinal nerve ligation. Recording conditions were varied to suppress or promote ICa while biophysical parameters and excitability were determined. Results Both lowered external bath Ca2+ concentration and blockade of ICa with bath cadmium diminished the duration and area of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP), accompanied by decreased current threshold for action potential (AP) initiation and increased repetitive firing during sustained depolarization. Reciprocally, elevated bath Ca2+ increased the AHP and suppressed repetitive firing. Voltage sag during neuronal hyperpolarization, indicative of the cation-nonselective H-current, diminished with lowered bath Ca2+, cadmium application, or chelation of intracellular Ca2+. Additional recordings with selective blockers of ICa subtypes showed that N-, P/Q, L-, and R-type currents each contribute to generation of the AHP, and that blockade of any of these as well as the T-type current slows the AP upstroke, prolongs the AP duration, and (except for L-type current) decreases the current threshold for AP initiation. Conclusions Taken together, our findings show that suppression of ICa decreases the AHP, reduces the

  1. Inflammation alters trafficking of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in tonically firing lamina II neurons of the rat spinal dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    Kopach, Olga; Kao, Sheng-Chin; Petralia, Ronald S.; Belan, Pavel; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Voitenko, Nana

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation alters AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunit trafficking and increases AMPAR Ca2+ permeability at synapses of spinal dorsal horn neurons. However, it is unclear whether AMPAR trafficking at extrasynaptic sites of these neurons also changes under persistent inflammatory pain conditions. Using patch-clamp recording combined with Ca2+ imaging and cobalt staining, we found that, under normal conditions, an extrasynaptic pool of AMPARs in rat substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of spinal dorsal horn predominantly consists of GluR2-containing Ca2+-impermeable receptors. Maintenance of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation was associated with a marked enhancement of AMPA-induced currents and [Ca2+]i transients in SG neurons, while, as we previously showed, the amplitude of synaptically evoked AMPAR-mediated currents was not changed 24 h after CFA. These findings indicate that extrasynaptic AMPARs are upregulated and their Ca2+ permeability increases dramatically. This increase occurred in SG neurons characterized by intrinsic tonic firing properties, but not in those exhibited strong adaptation. This increase was also accompanied by an inward rectification of AMPA-induced currents and enhancement of sensitivity to a highly selective Ca2+-permeable AMPAR blocker, IEM-1460. Electron microcopy and biochemical assays additionally showed an increase in the amount of GluR1 at extrasynaptic membranes in dorsal horn neurons 24 h post-CFA. Taken together, our findings suggest that CFA-induced inflammation increases functional expression and proportion of extrasynaptic GluR1-containing Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in tonically firing excitatory dorsal horn neurons. We suggest that the altered extrasynaptic AMPAR trafficking might participate in the maintenance of persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:21282008

  2. Inflammation alters trafficking of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in tonically firing lamina II neurons of the rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Kopach, Olga; Kao, Sheng-Chin; Petralia, Ronald S; Belan, Pavel; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Voitenko, Nana

    2011-04-01

    Peripheral inflammation alters AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunit trafficking and increases AMPAR Ca(2+) permeability at synapses of spinal dorsal horn neurons. However, it is unclear whether AMPAR trafficking at extrasynaptic sites of these neurons also changes under persistent inflammatory pain conditions. Using patch-clamp recording combined with Ca(2+) imaging and cobalt staining, we found that, under normal conditions, an extrasynaptic pool of AMPARs in rat substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of spinal dorsal horn predominantly consists of GluR2-containing Ca(2+)-impermeable receptors. Maintenance of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation was associated with a marked enhancement of AMPA-induced currents and [Ca(2+)](i) transients in SG neurons, while, as we previously showed, the amplitude of synaptically evoked AMPAR-mediated currents was not changed 24 h after CFA. These findings indicate that extrasynaptic AMPARs are upregulated and their Ca(2+) permeability increases dramatically. This increase occurred in SG neurons characterized by intrinsic tonic firing properties, but not in those exhibited strong adaptation. This increase was also accompanied by an inward rectification of AMPA-induced currents and enhancement of sensitivity to a highly selective Ca(2+)-permeable AMPAR blocker, IEM-1460. Electron microcopy and biochemical assays additionally showed an increase in the amount of GluR1 at extrasynaptic membranes in dorsal horn neurons 24h post-CFA. Taken together, our findings indicate that CFA-induced inflammation increases functional expression and proportion of extrasynaptic GluR1-containing Ca(2+)-permeable AMPARs in tonically firing excitatory dorsal horn neurons, suggesting that the altered extrasynaptic AMPAR trafficking might participate in the maintenance of persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:21282008

  3. Disinhibition by propranolol and chlordiazepoxide of nonrewarded lever-pressing in the rat is unaffected by dorsal noradrenergic bundle lesion.

    PubMed

    Salmon, P; Tsaltas, E; Gray, J A

    1989-03-01

    Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats received 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle and 10 others underwent control operations. The lesion depleted levels of noradrenaline in the hippocampus to 2% of those in the controls. All rats were then trained for 16 sessions to lever-press in a Skinner box on a variable interval 18 sec schedule of food-reinforcement, then for 42 days on a successive discrimination between periods of variable interval (VI 18 sec) food-reinforcement and periods of extinction. This report describes the effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDP; 5 mg/kg) and propranolol (5 and 10 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally in both groups on modified ABBA designs after this training. Both drugs increased the response rates in extinction periods. The effect of propranolol was similar at each dose and smaller than that of CDP. Although CDP and propranolol (5 mg/kg) increased variable interval response rates also, this could not account for the effect on extinction response rates. Responding did not differ between the lesioned and control animals and the effects of drugs were similar in each group. It is unlikely that CDP or propranolol release nonrewarded responding by disrupting transmission in the dorsal noradrenergic bundle. PMID:2725847

  4. Localization of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase in rat dorsal root ganglion cells and its regulation after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lever, Isobel J; Robinson, Michelle; Cibelli, Mario; Paule, Cleoper; Santha, Peter; Yee, Louis; Hunt, Stephen P; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Elphick, Maurice R; Nagy, Istvan; Rice, Andrew S C

    2009-03-25

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a degradative enzyme for a group of endogenous signaling lipids that includes anandamide (AEA). AEA acts as an endocannabinoid and an endovanilloid by activating cannabinoid and vanilloid type 1 transient receptor potential (TRPV1) receptors, respectively, on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. Inhibition of FAAH activity increases AEA concentrations in nervous tissue and reduces sensory hypersensitivity in animal pain models. Using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate the location of the FAAH in adult rat DRG, sciatic nerve, and spinal cord. In naive rats, FAAH immunoreactivity localized to the soma of 32.7 +/- 0.8% of neurons in L4 and L5 DRG. These were small-sized (mean soma area, 395.96 +/- 5.6 mum(2)) and predominantly colabeled with peripherin and isolectin B4 markers of unmyelinated C-fiber neurons; 68% colabeled with antibodies to TRPV1 (marker of nociceptive DRG neurons), and <2% colabeled with NF200 (marker of large myelinated neurons). FAAH-IR was also present in small, NF200-negative cultured rat DRG neurons. Incubation of these cultures with the FAAH inhibitor URB597 increased AEA-evoked cobalt uptake in a capsazepine-sensitive manner. After sciatic nerve axotomy, there was a rightward shift in the cell-size distribution of FAAH-immunoreactive (IR) DRG neurons ipsilateral to injury: FAAH immunoreactivity was detected in larger-sized cells that colabeled with NF200. An ipsilateral versus contralateral increase in both the size and proportion of FAAH-IR DRG occurred after spinal nerve transection injury but not after chronic inflammation of the rat hindpaw 2 d after injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. This study reveals the location of FAAH in neural tissue involved in peripheral nociceptive transmission. PMID:19321773

  5. High Oestradiol Replacement Reverses Response Memory Bias in Ovariectomised Female Rats Regardless of Dopamine Levels in the Dorsal Striatum.

    PubMed

    Hussain, D; Cossette, M-P; Brake, W G

    2016-05-01

    Oestrogens influence memory system bias in female rats such that high levels of oestrogen are associated with place (or spatial) memory use, and low oestrogen levels with response (or habitual) memory use. Moreover, striatal-dependent response memory is sensitive to dopamine transmission in the dorsal striatum, and oestrogens have been shown to affect dopamine release in that brain area. In the present study, the effects of oestrogens and dopamine transmission on multiple memory system bias were explored in ovariectomised rats receiving low or high 17β-oestradiol replacement under saline, autoreceptor-activating doses of the dopamine D2 receptor agonist, apomorphine (50 and 80 μg/kg), or amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg) administration. Furthermore, dorsal striatal dopamine release was measured after administration of the same drug conditions using in vivo microdialysis. As expected, high oestradiol rats predominantly used place memory, whereas the opposite pattern was observed in low oestradiol rats. However, the high apomorphine dose statistically significantly altered memory bias in high oestradiol rats from predominant place to predominant response memory, with a similar trend in the low apomorphine dose and the amphetamine group. There was no effect of drugs on memory bias in low oestradiol rats. Rats with high oestradiol replacement receiving amphetamine exhibited greater dorsal striatal dopamine release than low oestradiol replacement rats, and this difference was amplified in the right hemisphere. Furthermore, a logistic regression analysis revealed that oestradiol, but not dorsal striatal dopamine levels, significantly predicted response memory bias. These findings provide further evidence that oestradiol modulates memory system bias, and also that memory bias is changed by systemic apomorphine administration. However, although oestradiol affects dopamine transmission in the dorsal striatum in a lateralised manner, this does not predict memory system bias. PMID

  6. Serotonin₆ receptors in the dorsal hippocampus regulate depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Cheng; Li, Jun-Yi; Tan, Hui-Hui; Du, Cheng-Xue; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Ma, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate both activation and blockade of serotonin6 (5-HT6) receptors may produce antidepressant-like effects. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT6 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) involve in the regulation of PD-associated depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. In sham-operated rats, intra-DH injection of 5HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 or antagonist SB258585 increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility time, indicating the induction of antidepressant effects. In the lesioned rats, WAY208466 also produced antidepressant effects, whereas SB258585 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Neurochemical results showed that WAY208466 did not change dopamine (DA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), DH and habenula, and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the DH and habenula in sham-operated rats, and SB258585 increased DA and NA levels in these structures. Further, WAY208466 increased DA levels in the mPFC, DH and habenula, and NA level in the habenula in the lesioned rats, and SB258585 decreased DA levels in the mPFC and habenula. Additionally, the lesion did not change the density of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/5-HT6 receptor co-expressing neurons in the DH. Compared to sham-operated rats, these findings suggest that the effects of 5-HT6 receptors in PD-associated depression may be mediated through different neurochemical mechanisms, and the DH is an important site involved in these effects. PMID:25863121

  7. Kinetic analysis of two types of Na+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, N; Tatebayashi, H

    1993-01-01

    1. The gating properties of two types of Na+ channels were studied in neurones isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia using the whole cell variation of the patch electrode voltage-clamp technique. 2. Two types of Na+ currents (INa) were identified on the basis of their sensitivity to tetrodotoxin (TTX). One type was insensitive to TTX (up to 0.1 mM), while the other type was blocked by 1 nM of TTX. Whereas they were both insensitive to 50 microM Cd2+, a high concentration (2 mM) of Co2+ selectively inhibited the TTX-insensitive type. 3. The activation thresholds were about -60 and -40 mV for the TTX-sensitive and the TTX-insensitive INa, respectively. Activation of the TTX-sensitive INa developed with a sigmoidal time course which was described by m3 kinetics, whereas the activation of the TTX-insensitive INa was described by a single exponential function. A deactivation process, as measured by the tail current upon repolarization, followed an exponential decay in either type of INa. 4. The rate constant of activation indicated that under comparable membrane potential conditions, the TTX-insensitive channels open 4-5 times slower than the TTX-sensitive ones upon depolarization. Likewise, the rate constant of inactivation indicated that the TTX-insensitive channels inactivate 3-7 times more slowly than the TTX-sensitive ones upon repolarization. 5. The steady-state activation curve for the TTX-insensitive INa was shifted about 20 mV in the positive direction from that for the TTX-sensitive INa. 6. The steady-state inactivation curve for the TTX-insensitive INa as obtained with a 0.5 s prepulse was shifted about 26 mV in the positive direction from that for the TTX-sensitive INa, indicating a greater availability for the TTX-insensitive INa in depolarized membrane. However, on increasing the duration of prepulse, the inactivation curve for the TTX-insensitive INa, but not for the TTX-sensitive INa, shifted in the negative direction due to an extremely slow

  8. Postnatal manganese exposure does not alter dopamine autoreceptor sensitivity in adult and adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Sanders A; Mohd-Yusof, Alena; Kaplan, Graham J; Abdulla, Zuhair I; Lee, Ryan J; Crawford, Cynthia A

    2013-04-15

    Administering manganese chloride (Mn) to rats on postnatal day (PD) 1-21 causes long-term reductions in dopamine transporter levels in the dorsal striatum, as well as a persistent increase in D1 and D2 receptor concentrations. Whether dopamine autoreceptors change in number or sensitivity is uncertain, although D2S receptors, which may be presynaptic in origin, are elevated in Mn-exposed rats. The purpose of this study was to determine if early Mn exposure causes long-term changes in dopamine autoreceptor sensitivity that persist into adolescence and adulthood. To this end, male rats were exposed to Mn on PD 1-21 and autoreceptor functioning was tested 7 or 70 days later by measuring (a) dopamine synthesis (i.e., DOPA accumulation) in the dorsal striatum after quinpirole or haloperidol treatment and (b) behavioral responsiveness after low-dose apomorphine treatment. Results showed that low doses (i.e., "autoreceptor" doses) of apomorphine (0.06 and 0.12 mg/kg) decreased the locomotor activity of adolescent and adult rats, while higher doses increased locomotion. The dopamine synthesis experiment also produced classic autoreceptor effects, because quinpirole decreased dorsal striatal DOPA accumulation; whereas, haloperidol increased DOPA levels in control rats, but not in rats given the nerve impulse inhibitor γ-butyrolactone. Importantly, early Mn exposure did not alter autoreceptor sensitivity when assessed in early adolescence or adulthood. The lack of Mn-induced effects was evident in both the dopamine synthesis and behavioral experiments. When considered together with past studies, it is clear that early Mn exposure alters the functioning of various dopaminergic presynaptic mechanisms, while dopamine autoreceptors remain unimpaired. PMID:23458069

  9. Postnatal manganese exposure does not alter dopamine autoreceptor sensitivity in adult and adolescent male rats

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Sanders A.; Mohd-Yusof, Alena; Kaplan, Graham J.; Abdulla, Zuhair I.; Lee, Ryan J.; Crawford, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Administering manganese chloride (Mn) to rats on postnatal day (PD) 1–21 causes long-term reductions in dopamine transporter levels in the dorsal striatum, as well as persistent increases in D1 and D2 receptor concentrations. Whether dopamine autoreceptors change in number or sensitivity is uncertain, although D2S receptors, which may be presynaptic in origin, are elevated in Mn-exposed rats. The purpose of this study was to determine if early Mn exposure causes long-term changes in dopamine autoreceptor sensitivity that persist into adolescence and adulthood. To this end, male rats were exposed to Mn on PD 1–21 and autoreceptor functioning was tested 7 or 70 days later by measuring (a) dopamine synthesis (i.e., DOPA accumulation) in the dorsal striatum after quinpirole or haloperidol treatment and (b) behavioral responsiveness after low-dose apomorphine treatment. Results showed that low doses (i.e., “autoreceptor” doses) of apomorphine (0.06 and 0.12 mg/kg) decreased the locomotor activity of adolescent and adult rats, while higher doses increased locomotion. The dopamine synthesis experiment also produced classic autoreceptor effects, because quinpirole decreased dorsal striatal DOPA accumulation; whereas, haloperidol increased DOPA levels in control rats, but not in rats given the nerve impulse inhibitor γ-butyrolactone. Importantly, early Mn exposure did not alter autoreceptor sensitivity when assessed in early adolescence or adulthood. The lack of Mn-induced effects was evident in both the dopamine synthesis and behavioral experiments. When considered together with past studies, it is clear that early Mn exposure alters the functioning of various dopaminergic presynaptic mechanisms, while dopamine autoreceptors remain unimpaired. PMID:23458069

  10. Activation of the trigeminal medullary dorsal horn during voluntary diving in rats.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Paul F

    2005-07-27

    Fos immunohistochemistry was used to indicate whether activation of trigeminal neurons occurs in voluntarily diving rats. In rats trained to dive underwater, significant increases in Fos labeling were found within the ventral superficial MDH and paratrigeminal nucleus, 100-150 microm caudal to the obex compared to control rats. The conclusion is that the ventral superficial MDH is the initial brainstem afferent relay of diving response in voluntarily diving rats. PMID:15978555

  11. Overexpression of GRK6 attenuates neuropathic pain via suppression of CXCR2 in rat dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Li, Rong-Ji; Li, Meng; Liu, Xuelian; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Ju, Zhong; Miao, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled kinase (GRK) 6 is a member of the GRK family that mediates agonist-induced desensitization and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), thus involving in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. Recent studies have indicated that chemokines play an important role in chronic pain via increased expression of respective GPCRs. This study was designed to investigate the role of GRK6 and its interaction with substrate chemokine receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Following induction of CCI, GRK6 expression was significantly downregulated in rat DRGs at L4-L6 segments. Overexpression of GRK6 using lentiviral-mediated production strategy via sciatic nerve injection markedly attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Overexpression of GRK6 also drastically reversed the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons innervating the hind paw and suppressed the enhanced expression of CXCR2 in DRGs of CCI rats. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and correlation analysis supported the interaction between GRK6 and CXCR2. These results suggest that GRK6 might be a key molecular involved in peripheral mechanism of neuropathic pain and that overexpression of GRK6 might be a potential strategy for treatment for neuropathic pain through inhibition of CXCR2 signal pathway. PMID:27145805

  12. Overexpression of GRK6 attenuates neuropathic pain via suppression of CXCR2 in rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Li, Rong-Ji; Li, Meng; Liu, Xuelian; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Ju, Zhong; Miao, Xiuhua; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled kinase (GRK) 6 is a member of the GRK family that mediates agonist-induced desensitization and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), thus involving in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. Recent studies have indicated that chemokines play an important role in chronic pain via increased expression of respective GPCRs. This study was designed to investigate the role of GRK6 and its interaction with substrate chemokine receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Following induction of CCI, GRK6 expression was significantly downregulated in rat DRGs at L4-L6 segments. Overexpression of GRK6 using lentiviral-mediated production strategy via sciatic nerve injection markedly attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Overexpression of GRK6 also drastically reversed the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons innervating the hind paw and suppressed the enhanced expression of CXCR2 in DRGs of CCI rats. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and correlation analysis supported the interaction between GRK6 and CXCR2. These results suggest that GRK6 might be a key molecular involved in peripheral mechanism of neuropathic pain and that overexpression of GRK6 might be a potential strategy for treatment for neuropathic pain through inhibition of CXCR2 signal pathway. PMID:27145805

  13. Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor relieves pain symptoms of diabetic rats by reducing excitability of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yu, Ting; Yu, Liling; Li, Haijun; Liu, Yongjuan; Wang, Dongqin

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes lacking of effective treatments. Enhanced excitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron plays a crucial role in the progression of diabetic neuropathic hyperalgesia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known as a neuromodulator of nociception, but whether and how BDNF modulates the excitability of DRG neurons in the development of DPN remain to be clarified. This study investigated the role of exogenous BDNF and its high-affinity tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain. The results showed that continued intrathecal administration of BDNF to diabetic rats dramatically alleviated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, as well as inhibited hyperexcitability of DRG neurons. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with TrkB Fc (a synthetic fusion protein consisting of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the TrkB receptor). The expression of BDNF and TrkB was upregulated in the DRG of diabetic rats. Intrathecal administration of BDNF did not affect this upregulation. These data provide novel information that exogenous BDNF relieved pain symptoms of diabetic rats by reducing hyperexcitability of DRG neurons and might be the potential treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26441011

  14. Phosphorylation of CaMKII in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus plays an important role in sleep-wake regulation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Su-Ying; Li, Sheng-Jie; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Xue-Qiong; Yu, Bin; Sheng, Zhao-Fu; Huang, Yuan-Li; Cao, Qing; Xu, Ya-Ping; Lin, Zhi-Ge; Yang, Guang; Song, Jin-Zhi; Ding, Hui; Wang, Zi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-He

    2016-02-01

    The Ca(2+) modulation in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) plays an important role in sleep-wake regulation. Calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) is an important signal-transducing molecule that is activated by Ca(2+) . This study investigated the effects of intracellular Ca(2+) /CaMKII signaling in the DRN on sleep-wake states in rats. Maximum and minimum CaMKII phosphorylation was detected at Zeitgeber time 21 (ZT 21; wakefulness state) and ZT 3 (sleep state), respectively, across the light-dark rhythm in the DRN in rats. Six-hour sleep deprivation significantly reduced CaMKII phosphorylation in the DRN. Microinjection of the CAMKII activation inhibitor KN-93 (5 or 10 nmol) into the DRN suppressed wakefulness and enhanced rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and non-REM sleep (NREMS). Application of a high dose of KN-93 (10 nmol) increased slow-wave sleep (SWS) time, SWS bouts, the mean duration of SWS, the percentage of SWS relative to total sleep, and delta power density during NREMS. Microinjection of CaCl2 (50 nmol) in the DRN increased CaMKII phosphorylation and decreased NREMS, SWS, and REMS. KN-93 abolished the inhibitory effects of CaCl2 on NREMS, SWS, and REMS. These data indicate a novel wake-promoting and sleep-suppressing role for the Ca(2+) /CaMKII signaling pathway in DRN neurons. We propose that the intracellular Ca(2+) /CaMKII signaling in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) plays wake-promoting and sleep-suppressing role in rats. Intra-DRN application of KN-93 (CaMKII activation inhibitor) suppressed wakefulness and enhanced rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS). Intra-DRN application of CaCl2 attenuated REMS and NREMS. We think these findings should provide a novel cellular and molecular mechanism of sleep-wake regulation. PMID:26558357

  15. Proteomic analysis of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus of rats maintained on a high fat and refined sugar diet.

    PubMed

    Francis, Heather M; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Pardey, Margery C; Haynes, Paul A; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The typical Western diet, rich in high saturated fat and refined sugar (HFS), has been shown to increase cognitive decline with aging and Alzheimer's disease, and to affect cognitive functions that are dependent on the hippocampus, including memory processes and reversal learning. To investigate neurophysiological changes underlying these impairments, we employed a proteomic approach to identify differentially expressed proteins in the rat dorsal and ventral hippocampus following maintenance on an HFS diet. Rats maintained on the HFS diet for 8 weeks were impaired on a novel object recognition task that assesses memory and on a Morris Water Maze task assessing reversal learning. Quantitative label-free shotgun proteomic analysis was conducted on biological triplicates for each group. For the dorsal hippocampus, 59 proteins were upregulated and 36 downregulated in the HFS group compared to controls. Pathway ana-lysis revealed changes to proteins involved in molecular transport and cellular and molecular signaling, and changes to signaling pathways including calcium signaling, citrate cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. For the ventral hippocampus, 25 proteins were upregulated and 27 downregulated in HFS fed rats. Differentially expressed proteins were involved in cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, and cellular and molecular function. Changes to signaling pathways included protein ubiquitination, ubiquinone biosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. This is the first shotgun proteomics study to examine protein changes in the hippocampus following long-term consumption of a HFS diet, identifying changes to a large number of proteins including those involved in synaptic plasticity and energy metabolism. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000028. PMID:23963966

  16. Glial nitric oxide-mediated long-term presynaptic facilitation revealed by optical imaging in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2004-11-01

    We investigated a presynaptic form of long-term potentiation (LTP) in horizontal slices of the rat spinal cord by visualizing presynaptic and postsynaptic excitation with a voltage-sensitive dye. To record presynaptic excitation, we stained primary afferent fibers anterogradely from the dorsal root. A single-pulse test stimulation of C fiber-activating strength to the dorsal root elicited action potential (AP)-like or compound AP-like optical signals throughout the superficial dorsal horn. After conditioning (240 pulses at 2 Hz for 2 min), the presynaptic excitation was augmented. Furthermore, new excitation was elicited in the areas that were silent before conditioning. For postsynaptic recording, projection neurons in spinal lamina I were stained retrogradely from the periaqueductal gray in the brain stem. The test stimulation elicited AP-like or EPSP-like optical signals in the stained neurons. After conditioning, the EPSP-like responses were augmented, and previously silent neurons were converted to active ones. Results obtained with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, NO synthase inhibitors, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist and mGluR1 antagonist, and a glial metabolism inhibitor suggest that after conditioning, presynaptic excitation is facilitated by NO released from glial cells via the activation of mGluR1. The results also indicate the possible presence of additional presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanism(s) for the LTP induction. Activity-dependent LTP of nociceptive afferent synaptic transmission in the spinal cord is believed to underlie central sensitization after inflammation or nerve injury. This glial NO-mediated control of presynaptic excitation may contribute to the induction at least in part. PMID:15525773

  17. 5-HT1B receptors inhibit glutamate release from primary afferent terminals in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Choi, I-S; Cho, J-H; An, C-H; Jung, J-K; Hur, Y-K; Choi, J-K; Jang, I-S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although 5-HT1B receptors are expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons, it is still not known whether these receptors can modulate nociceptive transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices using a conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique under a voltage-clamp condition. KEY RESULTS CP93129, a selective 5-HT1B receptor agonist, reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, CP93129 reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by GR55562, a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, but not LY310762, a 5-HT1D receptor antagonist. Sumatriptan, an anti-migraine drug, also decreased EPSC amplitude, and this effect was partially blocked by either GR55562 or LY310762. On the other hand, primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were mediated by the Ca2+ influx passing through both presynaptic N-type and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by ω-conotoxin GVIA, an N-type Ca2+ channel blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results suggest that the activation of presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors reduces glutamate release from primary afferent terminals onto medullary dorsal horn neurons, and that 5-HT1B receptors could be, at the very least, a potential target for the treatment of pain from orofacial tissues. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Connor, pp. 353–355 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.01963.x PMID:22462474

  18. Characteristics of the electrical oscillations evoked by 4-aminopyridine on dorsal root fibers and their relation to fictive locomotor patterns in the rat spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taccola, G; Nistri, A

    2005-01-01

    4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) is suggested to improve symptomatology of spinal injury patients because it may facilitate neuromuscular transmission, spinal impulse flow and the operation of the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG). Since 4-AP can also induce repetitive discharges from dorsal root afferents, this phenomenon might interfere with sensory signals necessary to modulate CPG activity. Using electrophysiological recording from dorsal and ventral roots of the rat isolated spinal cord, we investigated 4-AP-evoked discharges and their relation with fictive locomotor patterns. On dorsal roots 4-AP (5-10 microM) induced sustained synchronous oscillations (3.3+/-0.8 s period) smaller than electrically evoked synaptic potentials, persistent after sectioning off the ventral region and preserved in an isolated dorsal quadrant, indicating their dorsal horn origin. 4-AP oscillations were blocked by tetrodotoxin, or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione and d-amino-phosphonovalerate, or strychnine and bicuculline, suggesting they were network mediated via glutamatergic, glycinergic and GABAergic transmission. Isolated ventral horn areas could not generated 4-AP oscillations, although their intrinsic disinhibited bursting was accelerated by 4-AP. Thus, ventral horn areas contained 4-AP sensitive sites, yet lacked the network for 4-AP induced oscillations. Activation of fictive locomotion by either application of N-methyl-D-aspartate and serotonin or stimulus trains to a single dorsal root reversibly suppressed dorsal root oscillations induced by 4-AP. This suppression was due to depression of dorsal network activity rather than simple block of root discharges. Since dorsal root oscillations evoked by 4-AP were turned off when the fictive locomotor program was initiated, these discharges are unlikely to interfere with proprioceptive signals during locomotor training in spinal patients. PMID:15857720

  19. Comparative structural and functional analysis of the larval and adult dorsal vessel and its role in hemolymph circulation in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    League, Garrett P.; Onuh, Ogechukwu C.; Hillyer, Julián F.

    2015-01-01

    Hemolymph circulation in insects is driven primarily by the contractile action of a dorsal vessel, which is divided into an abdominal heart and a thoracic aorta. As holometabolous insects, mosquitoes undergo striking morphological and physiological changes during metamorphosis. This study presents a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the larval and adult dorsal vessel in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Using intravital video imaging we show that, unlike the adult heart, the larval heart contracts exclusively in the anterograde direction and does not undergo heartbeat directional reversals. The larval heart contracts 24% slower than the adult heart, and hemolymph travels across the larval dorsal vessel at a velocity that is 68% slower than what is seen in adults. By fluorescently labeling muscle tissue we show that although the general structure of the heart and its ostia are similar across life stages, the heart-associated alary muscles are significantly less robust in larvae. Furthermore, unlike the adult ostia, which are the entry points for hemolymph into the heart, the larval ostia are almost entirely lacking in incurrent function. Instead, hemolymph enters the larval heart through incurrent openings located at the posterior terminus of the heart. These posterior openings are structurally similar across life stages, but in adults have an opposite, excurrent function. Finally, the larval aorta and heart differ significantly in the arrangement of their cardiomyocytes. In summary, this study provides an in-depth developmental comparison of the circulatory system of larval and adult mosquitoes. PMID:25524976

  20. A physiological study of the prenatal development of cutaneous sensory inputs to dorsal horn cells in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The response of fetal dorsal horn cells to natural and electrical stimulation of the skin of the hindpaw was recorded in vivo from the lumbar spinal cord of anaesthetized rat fetuses still in contact with their mother via the maternal circulation. 2. Responses to electrical stimulation were obtained from embryonic day 17 (E17) but spikes were not evoked by natural skin stimulation until embryonic day 19 (E19). 3. At E19 responses were evoked by pressure or pinching the skin, but responses to low intensity brush and touch were not clear until E20. 4. Receptive fields were small and response amplitudes and frequencies initially very low. However, by E20 bursts of up to fifty spikes were recorded to a single pinch and some cells displayed responses that outlasted the stimulus by 10-15 s. 5. The development of dorsal horn cutaneous evoked spike activity and consequently the ability to transmit cutaneous sensory information to the brain therefore occurs some 2 days after the development of peripheral afferent receptive fields. It is concluded that this represents the maturation time for central synaptic connections. PMID:1886065

  1. An experimental model for chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion produced by intervertebral foramen stenosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hu, S J; Xing, J L

    1998-07-01

    Under anesthesia and sterile surgery, a small stainless steel rod (4 mm in length and 0.5-0.8 mm in diameter) was inserted into the L5 intervertebral foramen in the rat, developing intervertebral foramen stenosis and hence producing a chronic steady compression of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The hind paw on the injured side exhibited a significant reduction in the latency of foot withdrawal to noxious heat and manifested a persistent heat hyperalgesia 5-35 days after surgery. Injection of 1% carrageenan into the intervertebral foramen, presumably causing inflammation of the DRG, also produced hyperalgesia to heat on the hind paw of the injured side 5-21 days after surgery. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings from myelinated dorsal root fibers were performed in vivo. Spontaneous activity was present in 21.5% of the fibers recorded from DRG neurons injured with chronic compression in contrast to 1.98% from uninjured DRG neurons. The pattern of spontaneous activity was periodic and bursting in 75.3% of the spontaneously active fibers. These neurons had a greatly enhanced sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the injured DRG and a prolonged after discharge. In response to TEA, topically applied to the DRG, excitatory responses were evoked in the injured, but not the uninjured, DRG neurons. Application of this experimental model may further our understanding of the neural mechanisms by which chronic compression of DRG induces low back pain and sciatica. PMID:9755014

  2. Stimulation of the ventral tegmental area increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased spinal dorsal horn neuronal activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Ling; Sibi, Jiny E; Yang, Xiaofei; Chiao, Jung-Chih; Peng, Yuan Bo

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been found to be effective in relieving intractable pain. The ventral tegmental area (VTA) plays a role not only in the reward process, but also in the modulation of nociception. Lesions of VTA result in increased pain thresholds and exacerbate pain in several pain models. It is hypothesized that direct activation of VTA will reduce pain experience. In this study, we investigated the effect of direct electrical stimulation of the VTA on mechanical, thermal and carrageenan-induced chemical nociceptive thresholds in Sprague-Dawley rats using our custom-designed wireless stimulator. We found that: (1) VTA stimulation itself did not show any change in mechanical or thermal threshold; and (2) the decreased mechanical and thermal thresholds induced by carrageenan injection in the hind paw contralateral to the stimulation site were significantly reversed by VTA stimulation. To further explore the underlying mechanism of VTA stimulation-induced analgesia, spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal responses to graded mechanical stimuli were recorded. VTA stimulation significantly inhibited dorsal horn neuronal activity in response to pressure and pinch from the paw, but not brush. This indicated that VTA stimulation may have exerted its analgesic effect via descending modulatory pain pathways, possibly through its connections with brain stem structures and cerebral cortex areas. PMID:26821313

  3. Glucose Injections into the Dorsal Hippocampus or Dorsolateral Striatum of Rats Prior to T-Maze Training: Modulation of Learning Rates and Strategy Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of injecting glucose into the dorsal hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum on learning rates and on strategy selection in rats trained on a T-maze that can be solved by using either a hippocampus-sensitive place or striatum-sensitive response strategy. Percentage strategy selection on a probe trial…

  4. Nesfatin-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration by protein kinase C activation in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Gok, Zeynep Betul; Kacar, Emine; Serhatlioglu, Ihsan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2016-04-21

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently identified anorexigenic hypothalamic polypeptide derived from the posttranslational processing of nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2). Several studies have indicated that this neuropeptide may be participated in somatosensory and visceral transmission including pain signals in addition to energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of nesfatin-1 in the transmission of peripheral neural signals by investigating the effects of nesfatin-1 on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i in DRG neurons were investigated by using an in vitro calcium imaging system. DRG neurons were grown in primary culture following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 1-or 2-day-old neonatal Wistar rats. Using the fura-2-based calcium imaging technique, the effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i and role of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway in nesfatin-1 effect were assessed. Nesfatin-1 elevated [Ca(2+)]i in cultured DRG neurons. The response was prevented by pretreating the cells with pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed nesfatin-1-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. The result shows that nesfatin-1 interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor, leading to an increase of [Ca(2+)]i, which is linked to protein kinase C activation in cultured rat DRG neurons. PMID:26975784

  5. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels by levo-tetrahydropalmatine in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Qiu, Fang; Ren, Cuixia; Gan, Xiong; Peng, Fang; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-02-01

    Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP), a main bioactive Chinese herbal constituent from the genera Stephania and Corydalis, has been in use in clinical practice for years in China as a traditional analgesic agent. However, the mechanism underlying the analgesic action of l-THP is poorly understood. This study shows that l-THP can exert an inhibitory effect on the functional activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which are believed to mediate pain caused by extracellular acidification. l-THP dose dependently decreased the amplitude of proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. l-THP shifted the proton concentration-response curve downward, with a decrease of 40.93% ± 8.45% in the maximum current response to protons, with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Moreover, l-THP can alter the membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons to acid stimuli. It significantly decreased the number of action potentials and the amplitude of the depolarization induced by an extracellular pH drop. Finally, peripherally administered l-THP inhibited the nociceptive response to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. These results indicate that l-THP can inhibit the functional activity of ASICs in dissociated primary sensory neurons and relieve acidosis-evoked pain in vivo, which for the first time provides a novel peripheral mechanism underlying the analgesic action of l-THP. PMID:25395088

  6. Shp-1 dephosphorylates TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons and alleviates CFA-induced inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Xu, Ling-Chi; Yue, Lu-Peng; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Kong, Jin-Ge; Xing, Guo-Gang; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2015-04-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are expressed in nociceptive neurons of rat dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) and mediate inflammatory pain. Nonspecific inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of TRPV1 and sensitizes TRPV1. However, less is known about tyrosine phosphorylation's implication in inflammatory pain, compared with that of serine/threonine phosphorylation. Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (Shp-1) is a key phosphatase dephosphorylating TRPV1. In this study, we reported that Shp-1 colocalized with and bound to TRPV1 in nociceptive DRG neurons. Shp-1 inhibitors, including sodium stibogluconate and PTP inhibitor III, sensitized TRPV1 in cultured DRG neurons. In naive rats, intrathecal injection of Shp-1 inhibitors increased both TRPV1 and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1 in DRGs and induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was abolished by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine, BCTC, or AMG9810. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain in rats significantly increased the expression of Shp-1, TRPV1, and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1, as well as the colocalization of Shp-1 and TRPV1 in DRGs. Intrathecal injection of sodium stibogluconate aggravated CFA-induced inflammatory pain, whereas Shp-1 overexpression in DRG neurons alleviated it. These results suggested that Shp-1 dephosphorylated and inhibited TRPV1 in DRG neurons, contributing to maintain thermal nociceptive thresholds in normal rats, and as a compensatory mechanism, Shp-1 increased in DRGs of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, which was involved in protecting against excessive thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:25790452

  7. In a rat model of panic, corticotropin responses to dorsal periaqueductal gray stimulation depend on physical exertion.

    PubMed

    de Souza Armini, Rubia; Bernabé, Cristian Setúbal; Rosa, Caroline Azevedo; Siller, Carlos Antônio; Schimitel, Fagna Giacomin; Tufik, Sérgio; Klein, Donald Franklin; Schenberg, Luiz Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Panic disorder patients are exquisitely and specifically sensitive to hypercapnia. The demonstration that carbon dioxide provokes panic in fear-unresponsive amygdala-calcified Urbach-Wiethe patients emphasizes that panic is not fear nor does it require the activation of the amygdala. This is consonant with increasing evidence suggesting that panic is mediated caudally at midbrain's dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG). Another startling feature of the apparently spontaneous clinical panic is the counterintuitive lack of increments in corticotropin, cortisol and prolactin, generally considered 'stress hormones'. Here we show that the stress hormones are not changed during DPAG-evoked panic when escape is prevented by stimulating the rat in a small compartment. Neither did the corticotropin increase when physical exertion was statistically adjusted to the same degree as non-stimulated controls, as measured by lactate plasma levels. Conversely, neuroendocrine responses to foot-shocks were independent from muscular effort. Data are consonant with DPAG mediation of panic attacks. PMID:25618592

  8. Long-term potentiation of neuronal excitation by neuron-glia interactions in the rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2007-03-01

    By imaging neuronal excitation in rat spinal cord slices with a voltage-sensitive dye, we examined the role of glial cells in the P2X receptor agonist alphabeta-methylene ATP (alphabetameATP)-triggered long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dorsal horn. Bath application of alphabetameATP potentiated neuronal excitation in the superficial dorsal horn. The potentiation was inhibited in the presence of the P2X receptor antagonists TNP-ATP, PPADS and A-317491, and was not induced in slices taken from rats neonatally treated with capsaicin. These results suggest that alphabetameATP acts on P2X receptors, possibly P2X(3) and/or P2X(2/3), in capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent terminals. Furthermore, the potentiation was inhibited by treatment with the glial metabolism inhibitor monofluoroacetic acid. Results obtained with the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) inhibitor SB203580, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-6, and antibodies to TNF-alpha and IL-6, as well as by double immunolabelling of activated p38 MAPK with markers of astrocytes and microglia, demonstrated that alphabetameATP activated p38 MAPK in astrocytes, and that the presence of proinflammatory cytokines and p38 MAPK activation were necessary for the induction of alphabetameATP-triggered LTP. These findings indicate that glial cells contribute to the alphabetameATP-induced LTP, which might be part of a cellular mechanism for the induction of persistent pain. PMID:17425556

  9. Galanin subtype 1 and subtype 2 receptors mediate opposite anxiety-like effects in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Morais, J S; Souza, M M; Campanha, T M N; Muller, C J T; Bittencourt, A S; Bortoli, V C; Schenberg, L C; Beijamini, V

    2016-11-01

    About 40% of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neurons co-express serotonin (5-HT) and galanin. Serotonergic pathways from the DRN to the amygdala facilitate learned anxiety, while those from the DRN to the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (DPAG) impair innate anxiety. Previously, we showed that galanin infusion in the DRN of rats induces anxiolytic effect by impairing inhibitory avoidance without changing escape behaviour in the elevated T-maze (ETM). Here, we evaluated: (1) which galanin receptors would be involved in the anxiolytic effect of galanin in the DRN of rats tested in the ETM; (2) the effects of galanin intra-DRN on panic-like behaviours evoked by electrical stimulation of the DPAG. The activation of DRN GAL1 receptors by M617 (1.0 and 3.0nmol) facilitated inhibitory avoidance, whereas the activation of GAL2 receptors by AR-M1896 (3.0nmol) impaired the inhibitory avoidance in the ETM, suggesting an anxiogenic and an anxiolytic-like effect respectively. Both agonists did not change escape behaviour in the ETM or locomotor activity in the open field. The anxiolytic effect of AR-M1896 was attenuated by the prior administration of WAY100635 (0.18nmol), a 5-HT1A antagonist. Galanin (0.3nmol) administered in the DRN increased discreetly flight behaviours induced by electrical stimulation of the DPAG, suggesting a panicolytic effect. Together, our results showed that galanin mediates opposite anxiety responses in the DRN by activation of GAL1 and GAL2 receptors. The anxiolytic effect induced by activation of Gal2 receptors may depend on serotonergic tone. Finally, the role of galanin in panic related behaviours remains uncertain. PMID:27498247

  10. Inactivation of the Dorsal Raphé Nucleus Reduces the Anxiogenic Response of Rats Running an Alley for Intravenous Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Ettenberg, Aaron; Ofer, Oren A.; Mueller, Carl L.; Waldroup, Stephanie; Cohen, Ami; Ben-Shahar, Osnat

    2010-01-01

    Rats traversing a straight alley once a day for delivery of a single i.v. injection of cocaine develop over trials an ambivalence about entering the goal box. This ambivalence is characterized by the increasing occurrence of “retreat behaviors” where animals leave the start box and run quickly to the goal box, but then stop at the entry point and “retreat” back toward the start box. This unique pattern of retreat behavior has been shown to reflect a form of “approach-avoidance conflict” that stems from the animals’ concurrent positive (cocaine reward) and negative (cocaine-induced anxiety) associations with the goal box. Cocaine blocks reuptake of the serotonergic (5-HT) transporter and serotonin has been implicated in the modulation of anxiety. It was therefore of interest to determine whether inactivation of the serotonergic cell bodies residing in the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) and projecting to brain areas critical for the modulation of anxiety, would alter the anxiogenic state exhibited by rats running an alley for single daily i.v. injections of 1.0 mg/kg cocaine. Reversible inactivation of the DRN was accomplished by intracranial application of a mixed solution of the GABA agonists baclofen and muscimol. While DRN inactivation had no impact on the subjects’ motivation to initiate responding (i.e., latencies to leave the start box were unaffected) it reliably reduced the frequency of approach-avoidance retreat behaviors (conflict behavior). These data suggest that inactivation of the dorsal raphé reduces the conflict/anxiety otherwise present in experienced cocaine-seeking animals. PMID:21108959

  11. Assessment of the Optimal Stimulus Pattern to Achieve Rapid Dorsal Hippocampal Kindling in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Fatemeh; Sayyah, Mohammad; Gholami Pourbadie, Hamid; Babapour, Vahab

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Although hippocampus is the most famous brain area involved in temporal lobe epilepsy, hippocampal kindling (HK) develops very slowly. Hence, rapid kindling is usually preferred to the traditional kindling and it is widely used. In this article we aimed at finding the optimal stimulus pattern, which yields the fastest HK rate. Methods: Stimulus patterns with different duration (2, 3, 5 and 10 s) and inter-train interval (ITI) (5, 10 and 30 min) as well as number of trains in 24 h (8 and 12) were exerted to rats’ dorsal hippocampus. The stimuli were continued until appearance of 3 consecutive generalized seizures or maximum 7 days stimulations. Results: While the protocol with train duration of 10 s and ITI of 30 min caused the fastest kindling rate and the most growth of afterdischarges, the protocol with train duration of 5 s and ITI of 5 min was the most time-consuming protocol among protocols tested. Discussion: Rapid HK develops with a time course of days compared to weeks in traditional kindling. Train duration and inter-train interval are key factors for rapid HK. Among the patterns, 12 trains/24h of 50Hz monophasic square wave with 10 s duration and 30 min interval between trains, is the best stimulus pattern for eliciting rapid dorsal HK. PMID:27307955

  12. Organization of Multisynaptic Inputs to the Dorsal and Ventral Dentate Gyrus: Retrograde Trans-Synaptic Tracing with Rabies Virus Vector in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Shinya; Sato, Sho; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Witter, Menno P.; Iijima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral, anatomical, and gene expression studies have shown functional dissociations between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus with regard to their involvement in spatial cognition, emotion, and stress. In this study we examined the difference of the multisynaptic inputs to the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus (DG) in the rat by using retrograde trans-synaptic tracing of recombinant rabies virus vectors. Three days after the vectors were injected into the dorsal or ventral DG, monosynaptic neuronal labeling was present in the entorhinal cortex, medial septum, diagonal band, and supramammillary nucleus, each of which is known to project to the DG directly. As in previous tracing studies, topographical patterns related to the dorsal and ventral DG were seen in these regions. Five days after infection, more of the neurons in these regions were labeled and labeled neurons were also seen in cortical and subcortical regions, including the piriform and medial prefrontal cortices, the endopiriform nucleus, the claustrum, the cortical amygdala, the medial raphe nucleus, the medial habenular nucleus, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the lateral septum. As in the monosynaptically labeled regions, a topographical distribution of labeled neurons was evident in most of these disynaptically labeled regions. These data indicate that the cortical and subcortical inputs to the dorsal and ventral DG are conveyed through parallel disynaptic pathways. This second-order input difference in the dorsal and ventral DG is likely to contribute to the functional differentiation of the hippocampus along the dorsoventral axis. PMID:24223172

  13. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on MBP and GDNF Expression and Morphology in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Ren, Ning-Tao; Zhou, Fang-Qiang; Li, Jie; Lei, Wei; Liu, Ning; Bi, Long; Wu, Zi-Xiang; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Cui, Geng

    2016-09-01

    With the development of technology and space exploration, studies on long-duration space flights have shown that microgravity induces damage to multiple organs, including the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, very little is known about the effects of long-term microgravity on DRG neurons. This study investigated the effects of microgravity on lumbar 5 (L5) DRG neurons in rats using the hindlimb unweighting (HU) model. Male (M) and female (F) Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into M- and F-control (CON) groups and M- and F-HU groups, respectively (n = 10). At the end of HU treatment for 4 weeks, morphological changes were detected. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and degenerated myelin basic protein (dgen-MBP) expressions were analyzed by immunofluorescence and western blot assays. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protein and mRNA expressions were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analysis, respectively. Compared with the corresponding CON groups, the HU groups exhibited slightly loose junctions between DRG neurons, some separated ganglion cells and satellite cells, and lightly stained Nissl bodies that were of smaller size and had a scattered distribution. High levels of dgen-MBP and low MBP expressions were appeared and GDNF expressions were significantly decreased in both HU groups. Changes were more pronounced in the F-HU group than in the M-HU group. In conclusion, HU treatment induced damage of L5 DRG neurons, which was correlated with decreased total MBP protein expression, increased dgen-MBP expression, and reduced GDNF protein and mRNA expression. Importantly, these changes were more severe in F-HU rats compared with M-HU rats. PMID:27230884

  14. Glutamate receptors in the dorsal hippocampus mediate the acquisition, but not the expression, of conditioned place aversion induced by acute morphine withdrawal in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Yao; Kang, Shuo; Yu, Chuan; Chi, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Jing-gen

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of glutamate receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) in the motivational component of morphine withdrawal. Methods: NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (5 μg/0.5 μL per side) or AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (2 μg/0.5 μL per side) was microinjected into DH of rats. Conditioned place aversion (CPA) induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal were assessed. Results: Preconditioning microinjection of D-AP5 or NBQX into the DH impaired the acquisition of CPA in acute morphine-dependent rats. However, intra-DH microinjection of D-AP5 or NBQX after conditioning but before the testing session had no effect on the expression of CPA. Conclusion: Our results suggest that NMDA and AMPA receptors in the dorsal hippocampus are involved in the acquisition, but not in the expression, of the negative motivational components of acute morphine withdrawal in rats. PMID:19767765

  15. Control of action potential propagation by intracellular Ca2+ in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, C; Lipp, P; Lüscher, H R; Niggli, E

    1996-01-01

    1. To assess the role of intracellular Ca2+ in action potential (AP) propagation, whole-cell recordings of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells were carried out while Ca2+ was simultaneously measured with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. 2. Flash photolytic liberation of a Ca2+ buffer during trains of APs which partly failed to invade the DRG cell body immediately lowered intracellular Ca2+ and restored safe AP propagation. Furthermore, the speed of the propagated AP was reduced considerably when intracellular Ca2+ was increased by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+. 3. Both results suggest that intracellular Ca2+ regulates the safety factor for AP propagation and may thus provide a control mechanism for synaptic integration, which acts pre- as well as postsynaptically. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8821131

  16. Direct communication of the spinal subarachnoid space with the rat dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joukal, Marek; Klusáková, Ilona; Dubový, Petr

    2016-05-01

    The anatomical position of the subarachnoid space (SAS) in relation to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and penetration of tracer from the SAS into DRG were investigated. We used intrathecal injection of methylene blue to visualize the anatomical position of the SAS in relation to DRG and immunostaining of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) for detecting arachnoid limiting the SAS. Intrathecal administration of fluorescent-conjugated dextran (fluoro-emerald; FE) was used to demonstrate direct communication between the SAS and DRG. Intrathecal injection of methylene blue and DPP-IV immunostaining revealed that SAS delimited by the arachnoid was extended up to the capsule of DRG in a fold-like recess that may reach approximately half of the DRG length. The arachnoid was found in direct contact to the neuronal body-rich area in the angle between dorsal root and DRG as well as between spinal nerve roots at DRG. Particles of FE were found in the cells of DRG capsule, satellite glial cells, interstitial space, as well as in small and medium-sized neurons after intrathecal injection. Penetration of FE from the SAS into the DRG induced an immune reaction expressed by colocalization of FE and immunofluorescence indicating antigen-presenting cells (MHC-II+), activated (ED1+) and resident (ED2+) macrophages, and activation of satellite glial cells (GFAP+). Penetration of lumbar-injected FE into the cervical DRG was greater than that into the lumbar DRG after intrathecal injection of FE into the cisterna magna. Our results demonstrate direct communication between DRG and cerebrospinal fluid in the SAS that can create another pathway for possible propagation of inflammatory and signaling molecules from DRG primary affected by peripheral nerve injury into DRG of remote spinal segments. PMID:26844624

  17. Reorganization of central terminals of myelinated primary afferents in the rat dorsal horn following peripheral axotomy.

    PubMed

    Woolf, C J; Shortland, P; Reynolds, M; Ridings, J; Doubell, T; Coggeshall, R E

    1995-09-11

    We have investigated the time course and extent to which peripheral nerve lesions cause a morphological reorganization of the central terminals of choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP)-labelled primary afferent fibers in the mammalian dorsal horn. Choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase is retrogradely transported by myelinated (A) sensory axons to laminae I, III, IV and V of the normal dorsal horn of the spinal cord, leaving lamina II unlabelled. We previously showed that peripheral axotomy results in the sprouting of numerous B-HRP-labelled large myelinated sensory axons into lamina II. We show here that this spread of B-HRP-labelled axons into lamina II is detectable at 1 week, maximal by 2 weeks and persists for over 6 months postlesion. By 9 months, however, B-HRP fibers no longer appear in lamina II. The sprouting into lamina II occurs whether regeneration is allowed (crush) or prevented (section with ligation), and does not reverse at times when peripheral fibers reinnervate the periphery. We also show that 15 times more synaptic terminals in lamina II are labelled by B-HRP 2 weeks after axotomy than in the normal. We interpret this as indicating that the sprouting fibers are making synaptic contacts with postsynaptic targets. This implies that A-fiber terminal reorganization is a prominent and long-lasting but not permanent feature of peripheral axotomy. We also provide evidence that this sprouting is the consequence of a combination of an atrophic loss of central synaptic terminals and the conditioning of the sensory neurons by peripheral axotomy. The sprouting of large sensory fibers into the spinal territory where postsynaptic targets usually receive only small afferent fiber input may bear on the intractable touch-evoked pain that can follow nerve injury. PMID:7499558

  18. Anisatin modulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-channel in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Tomoko; Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Okuyama, Emi; Nagata, Keiichi; Honda, Hiroshi; Shono, Toshio; Narahashi, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Anisatin, a toxic, insecticidally active component of Sikimi plant, is known to act on the GABA system. In order to elucidate the mechanism of anisatin interaction with the GABA system, whole-cell and single-channel patch clamp experiments were performed with rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in primary culture.Repeated co-applications of GABA and anisatin suppressed GABA-induced whole-cell currents with an EC50 of 1.10 μM. No recovery of currents was observed after washout with anisatin-free solution.However, pre-application of anisatin through the bath had no effect on GABA-induced currents. The decay phase of currents was accelerated by anisatin. These results indicate that anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents requires opening of the channels and is use-dependent.Anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents was not voltage dependent.Picrotoxinin attenuated anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents. [3H]-EBOB binding to rat brain membranes was competitively inhibited by anisatin. These data indicated that anisatin bound to the picrotoxinin site.At the single-channel level, anisatin did not alter the open time but prolonged the closed time. The burst duration was reduced and channel openings per burst were decreased indicating that anisatin decreased the probability of openings. PMID:10455311

  19. Modulation of Spinal GABAergic Inhibition and Mechanical Hypersensitivity following Chronic Compression of Dorsal Root Ganglion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Chul; Nam, Taick Sang; Jung, Se Jung; Gwak, Young S.; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD) results in neuropathic pain. We investigated the role of spinal GABA in CCD-induced pain using rats with unilateral CCD. A stereological analysis revealed that the proportion of GABA-immunoreactive neurons to total neurons at L4/5 laminae I–III on the injured side decreased in the early phase of CCD (post-CCD week 1) and then returned to the sham-control level in the late phase (post-CCD week 18). In the early phase, the rats showed an increase in both mechanical sensitivity of the hind paw and spinal WDR neuronal excitability on the injured side, and such increase was suppressed by spinally applied muscimol (GABA-A agonist, 5 nmol) and baclofen (GABA-B agonist, 25 nmol), indicating the reduced spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In the late phase, the CCD-induced increase in mechanical sensitivity and neuronal excitability returned to pre-CCD levels, and such recovered responses were enhanced by spinally applied bicuculline (GABA-A antagonist, 15 nmol) and CGP52432 (GABA-B antagonist, 15 nmol), indicating the regained spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In conclusion, the alteration of spinal GABAergic inhibition following CCD and leading to a gradual reduction over time of CCD-induced mechanical hypersensitivity is most likely due to changes in GABA content in spinal GABA neurons. PMID:26451259

  20. Ca(2+) in the dorsal raphe nucleus promotes wakefulness via endogenous sleep-wake regulating pathway in the rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Su-Ying; Li, Sheng-Jie; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Xue-Qiong; Yu, Bin; Huang, Yuan-Li; Cao, Qing; Xu, Ya-Ping; Yang, Guang; Ding, Hui; Song, Jin-Zhi; Ye, Hui; Sheng, Zhao-Fu; Wang, Zi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-He

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are involved in the control of sleep-wake states. Our previous studies have indicated that calcium (Ca(2+)) modulation in the DRN plays an important role in rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) regulation during pentobarbital hypnosis. The present study investigated the effects of Ca(2+) in the DRN on sleep-wake regulation and the related neuronal mechanism in freely moving rats. Our results showed that microinjection of CaCl2 (25 or 50 nmol) in the DRN promoted wakefulness and suppressed NREMS including slow wave sleep and REMS in freely moving rats. Application of CaCl2 (25 or 50 nmol) in the DRN significantly increased serotonin in the DRN and hypothalamus, and noradrenaline in the locus coeruleus and hypothalamus. Immunohistochemistry study indicated that application of CaCl2 (25 or 50 nmol) in the DRN significantly increased c-Fos expression ratio in wake-promoting neurons including serotonergic neurons in the DRN, noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus, and orxinergic neurons in the perifornical nucleus, but decreased c-Fos expression ratio of GABAergic sleep-promoting neurons in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus. These results suggest that Ca(2+) in the DRN exert arousal effects via up-regulating serotonergic functions in the endogenous sleep-wake regulating pathways. PMID:27456222

  1. Ethanol withdrawal induces anxiety-like effects: Role of nitric oxide synthase in the dorsal raphe nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Natália Almeida; Batistela, Melissa Resende; Padovan, Diego; de Martinis, Bruno Spinosa; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato; Padovan, Cláudia Maria

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediated transmission in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) has been shown to be involved in the modulation of anxiety-like behaviors. We investigated whether inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the DRN would prevent anxiety-like behavior induced by ethanol withdrawal. Male Wistar rats were treated with ethanol 2-6% (v/v) for a period of 21 days. Ethanol withdrawal was induced by abrupt discontinuation of the treatment. Experiments were performed 48 h after ethanol discontinuation. Rats with a guide cannula aimed at the DRN received intra-DRN injections of the non-selective NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), selective neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitor N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine (NPLA), or selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS) N-([3-(aminomethyl)phenyl] methyl) ethanimidamidedihydrochloride (1400W). Five minutes later, the animals were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Plasma ethanol levels were determined by gas chromatography. There was a reduction in plasma ethanol levels 48 h after ethanol withdrawal. Rats from the ethanol withdrawal group showed decreased exploration of the open arms of the EPM with no change in the exploration of enclosed arms. Intra-DRN treatment with l-NAME (100 nmoles/0.2 μL) and 1400W (1 nmol/0.2 μL), but not NPLA (10 nmoles/0.2 μL) in the DRN attenuated the decrease in the exploration of the open arms of the EPM induced by ethanol withdrawal. The major new finding of the present study is that iNOS in the DRN plays a role in the anxiety-like behavior induced by ethanol withdrawal. PMID:27139232

  2. Comparison of dorsal root ganglion gene expression in rat models of traumatic and HIV-associated neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Maratou, Klio; Wallace, Victoria C.J.; Hasnie, Fauzia S.; Okuse, Kenji; Hosseini, Ramine; Jina, Nipurna; Blackbeard, Julie; Pheby, Timothy; Orengo, Christine; Dickenson, Anthony H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuropathic pain in the context of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy, we measured gene expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rats subjected to systemic treatment with the anti-retroviral agent, ddC (Zalcitabine) and concomitant delivery of HIV-gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve. L4 and L5 DRGs were collected at day 14 (time of peak behavioural change) and changes in gene expression were measured using Affymetrix whole genome rat arrays. Conventional analysis of this data set and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was performed to discover biological processes altered in this model. Transcripts associated with G protein coupled receptor signalling and cell adhesion were enriched in the treated animals, while ribosomal proteins and proteasome pathways were associated with gene down-regulation. To identify genes that are directly relevant to neuropathic mechanical hypersensitivity, as opposed to epiphenomena associated with other aspects of the response to a sciatic nerve lesion, we compared the gp120 + ddC-evoked gene expression with that observed in a model of traumatic neuropathic pain (L5 spinal nerve transection), where hypersensitivity to a static mechanical stimulus is also observed. We identified 39 genes/expressed sequence tags that are differentially expressed in the same direction in both models. Most of these have not previously been implicated in mechanical hypersensitivity and may represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. As an external control, the RNA expression of three genes was examined by RT-PCR, while the protein levels of two were studied using western blot analysis. PMID:18606552

  3. Stress-Hyperresponsive WKY Rats Demonstrate Depressed Dorsal Raphe Neuronal Excitability and Dysregulated CRF-Mediated Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Julia C; Zhang, Guojun; Walsh, Teresa; Kirby, Lynn G; Akanwa, Adaure; Brooks-Kayal, Amy; Beck, Sheryl G

    2011-01-01

    Major depression is a debilitating psychiatric disease that may be precipitated by a dysregulation of stress neurocircuitry caused by chronic or severe stress exposure. Moreover, hyperresponsivity to stressors correlates with depressed mood and may contribute to the etiology of major depression. The serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is an important site in the neurocircuitry underlying behavioral responses to stressors, and is tightly regulated, in part, by a combination of intrinsic cell properties, autoinhibition, and GABAergic synaptic transmission. The stress-related neurotransmitter corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) modulates DRN neuronal excitability and subsequent 5-HT release in the forebrain. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats exhibit exaggerated behavioral responses to stressors, that is, stress hyperresponsivity, and are considered an animal model of depression. To better understand the neurobiological basis of the stress hyperresponsivity, we used a combination of mRNA analysis and whole-cell electrophysiological techniques to measure differences in intrinsic activity and receptor response, in 5-HT- and non-5-HT-containing neurons of the DRN in WKY rats compared with Sprague-Dawley controls. In the WKY rat, there was a decrease in the neuronal excitability of 5-HT neurons coupled with decreased TPH2 production. Additionally, we found that CRF did not increase GABAergic activity in 5-HT neurons as is normally seen in 5-HT neurons of Sprague-Dawley controls. The CRF modulation of 5-HT DRN neurotransmission at the single-cell level is selectively disrupted in the WKY animal model of depression and may be one of the cellular correlates underlying depression. PMID:21160465

  4. Effect of mid-dorsal caudate nucleus on conditioning for pain stimulus in rats.

    PubMed

    Mulgaonker, V K; Mascarenhas, J F

    1991-01-01

    Male rats were subjected to conditioning, with light source as conditioned stimulus, followed by a noxious stimulus applied to the tail as unconditioned stimulus. There was development of conditioned response after a few days, which was inhibited later on. PMID:1917015

  5. Interactions between respiratory oscillators in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Huckstepp, Robert TR; Henderson, Lauren E; Cardoza, Kathryn P; Feldman, Jack L

    2016-01-01

    Breathing in mammals is hypothesized to result from the interaction of two distinct oscillators: the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) driving inspiration and the lateral parafacial region (pFL) driving active expiration. To understand the interactions between these oscillators, we independently altered their excitability in spontaneously breathing vagotomized urethane-anesthetized adult rats. Hyperpolarizing preBötC neurons decreased inspiratory activity and initiated active expiration, ultimately progressing to apnea, i.e., cessation of both inspiration and active expiration. Depolarizing pFL neurons produced active expiration at rest, but not when inspiratory activity was suppressed by hyperpolarizing preBötC neurons. We conclude that in anesthetized adult rats active expiration is driven by the pFL but requires an additional form of network excitation, i.e., ongoing rhythmic preBötC activity sufficient to drive inspiratory motor output or increased chemosensory drive. The organization of this coupled oscillator system, which is essential for life, may have implications for other neural networks that contain multiple rhythm/pattern generators. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14203.001 PMID:27300271

  6. Interactions between respiratory oscillators in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Huckstepp, Robert Tr; Henderson, Lauren E; Cardoza, Kathryn P; Feldman, Jack L

    2016-01-01

    Breathing in mammals is hypothesized to result from the interaction of two distinct oscillators: the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) driving inspiration and the lateral parafacial region (pFL) driving active expiration. To understand the interactions between these oscillators, we independently altered their excitability in spontaneously breathing vagotomized urethane-anesthetized adult rats. Hyperpolarizing preBötC neurons decreased inspiratory activity and initiated active expiration, ultimately progressing to apnea, i.e., cessation of both inspiration and active expiration. Depolarizing pFL neurons produced active expiration at rest, but not when inspiratory activity was suppressed by hyperpolarizing preBötC neurons. We conclude that in anesthetized adult rats active expiration is driven by the pFL but requires an additional form of network excitation, i.e., ongoing rhythmic preBötC activity sufficient to drive inspiratory motor output or increased chemosensory drive. The organization of this coupled oscillator system, which is essential for life, may have implications for other neural networks that contain multiple rhythm/pattern generators. PMID:27300271

  7. Dorsal hippocampus inactivation impairs spontaneous recovery of Pavlovian magazine approach responding in rats.

    PubMed

    Campese, Vincent D; Delamater, Andrew R

    2014-08-01

    Destruction or inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) has been shown to eliminate the renewal of extinguished fear [1-4]. However, it has recently been reported that the contextual control of responding to extinguished appetitive stimuli is not disrupted when the DH is destroyed or inactivated prior to tests for renewal of Pavlovian conditioned magazine approach [5]. In the present study we extend the analysis of DH control of appetitive extinction learning to the spontaneous recovery of Pavlovian conditioned magazine approach responding. Subjects were trained to associate two separate stimuli with the delivery of food and had muscimol or vehicle infused into the DH prior to a single test-session for spontaneous recovery occurring immediately following extinction of one of these stimuli, but one week following extinction of the other. While vehicle treated subjects showed more recovery to the distally extinguished stimulus than the proximal one, muscimol treated subjects failed to show spontaneous recovery to either stimulus. This result suggests that, while the DH is not involved in the control of extinction by physical contexts [5], it may be involved when time is the gating factor controlling recovery of extinguished responding. PMID:24742862

  8. Anatomical organization of MCH connections with the pallidum and dorsal striatum in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Chometton, Sandrine; Cvetkovic-Lopes, Vesna; Houdayer, Christophe; Franchi, Gabrielle; Mariot, Amandine; Poncet, Fabrice; Fellmann, Dominique; Risold, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Neurons producing the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) are distributed in the posterior hypothalamus, but project massively throughout the forebrain. Many aspects regarding the anatomical organization of these projections are still obscure. The present study has two goals: first to characterize the topographical organization of neurons projecting into the cholinergic basal forebrain (globus pallidus, medial septal complex), and second to verify if MCH neurons may indirectly influence the dorsal striatum (caudoputamen) by innervating afferent sources to this structure. In the first series of experiments, the retrograde tracer fluorogold was injected into multiple sites in the pallidal and medial septal regions and the distribution of retrogradely labeled neurons were analyzed in the posterior lateral hypothalamus. In the second series of experiments, fluorogold was injected into the caudoputamen, and the innervation by MCH axons of retrogradely labeled cells was analyzed. Our results revealed that the MCH system is able to interact with the basal nuclei in several different ways. First, MCH neurons provide topographic inputs to the globus pallidus, medial septal complex, and substantia innominata. Second, striatal projecting neurons in the cortex, thalamus, and substantia nigra presumably receive only sparse inputs from MCH neurons. Third, the subthalamic nucleus is heavily innervated by MCH projections, thus, presumably serves as one important intermediate station to mediate MCH influence on other parts of the basal nuclei. PMID:25324738

  9. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  10. Connections from the rat dorsal column nuclei (DCN) to the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG).

    PubMed

    Barbaresi, Paolo; Mensà, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal columns (DCs; spinal cord stimulation; SCS) has been proposed to treat chronic neuropathic pain. SCS may activate a dual mechanism that would affect both the spinal cord and supraspinal levels. Stimulation of DCs or DC nuclei (DCN) in animals where neuropathic pain has been induced causes activation of brainstem centers including the periaqueductal gray (PAG), which is involved in the endogenous pain suppression system. Biotinylated dextran-amine (BDA) was iontophoretically injected into the DCN to analyze the ascending projection directed to the PAG. Separate injections into the gracile nucleus (GrN) and the cuneate nucleus (CunN) showed BDA-positive fibers terminating in different regions of the contralateral PAG. GrN-PAG afferents terminated in the caudal and middle portions of PAG-l, whereas CunN-PAG fibers terminated in the middle and rostral portions of PAG-l. Based on the DCN somatotopic map, the GrN sends information to the PAG from the contralateral hindlimb and the tail and the CunN from the contralateral forelimb, shoulder, neck and ear. This somatotopic organization is consistent with earlier electrophysiological and PAG stimulation studies. These fibers could form part of the DCs-brainstem-spinal cord loop, which may be involved in the inhibitory effects of SCS on neuropathic pain. PMID:26902642

  11. Downregulation of Cdh1 signalling in spinal dorsal horn contributes to the maintenance of mechanical allodynia after nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Li, Li; Li, Dajia; Tan, Wei; Wan, Li; Zhu, Chang; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Chuanhan

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and its co-activator Cdh1 are important ubiquitin-ligases in proliferating cells and terminally differentiated neurons. In recent years, APC/C-Cdh1 has been reported as an important complex contributing to synaptic development and transmission. Interestingly, cortical APC/C-Cdh1 is found to play a critical role in the maintenance of neuropathic pain, but it is not clear whether APC/C-Cdh1 in spinal dorsal cord is involved in molecular mechanisms of neuropathic pain conditions. Results Immunostaining showed that Cdh1 was mainly distributed in dorsal horn neurons of the spinal cord in rats. Its expression was downregulated in the ipsilateral dorsal horn at 14 days after spared nerve injury. Rescued expression of Cdh1 in spinal cord by intrathecal administration of recombinant lentivirus encoding Cdh1 (Lenti-Cdh1-GFP) significantly attenuated spared nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, rescued expression of spinal Cdh1 significantly reduced surface membrane expression of GluR1, but increased the expression of GluR1-related erythropoietin-producing human hepatocellular receptor A4 and its ligand EphrinA1 in dorsal horn of spared nerve injury-treated animals. Conclusions This study indicates that a downregulation of Cdh1 expression in spinal dorsal horn is involved in molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of neuropathic pain. Upregulation of spinal Cdh1 may be a promising approach to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:27184142

  12. Increased responsiveness of rat dorsal horn neurons in vivo following prolonged intrathecal exposure to interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Vikman, K S; Siddall, P J; Duggan, A W

    2005-01-01

    Prolonged increases in the level of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma occur in the CNS during some disease states associated with persistent pain. Administration of interferon-gamma to both humans and rodents has produced pain or pain-related behavior but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. The present study examined the effects of repeated intrathecal administration of interferon-gamma on dorsal horn neuronal responses under in vivo conditions. In addition, behavioral effects of interferon-gamma treatment were studied. Intrathecal cannulae were implanted into anesthetized rats. Animals then received either 1000 U of recombinant rat interferon-gamma in 10 microl buffer intrathecally, repeated four times over 8 days, or similarly administered buffer (controls). Interferon-gamma-treated animals showed a significant reduction in paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation of the hind paw. Electrophysiological experiments were performed under halothane anesthesia. Extracellular recordings of spontaneous and evoked responses were obtained from dorsal horn neurons (n=64) in the lumbar spinal cord. There was a significantly higher proportion of spontaneously active neurons in the interferon-gamma-treated animals (50%) when compared with controls (19%). A significantly increased proportion of neurons from interferon-gamma-treated animals displayed afterdischarges following both innocuous and noxious mechanical stimulation of the receptive field (brush: 21% in interferon-gamma-treated, 3% in controls; pinch: 97% in interferon-gamma-treated, 50% in controls). Neurons from interferon-gamma-treated animals also showed significantly increased wind-up of action potentials in response to repeated electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at C-fiber strength at both 0.5 and 1 Hz. Paired-pulse inhibition, evoked through electrical stimulation of the cutaneous receptive field, was significantly decreased in neurons from interferon-gamma-treated animals at 50

  13. Pharmacological properties of P2X3-receptors present in neurones of the rat dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Rae, M G; Rowan, E G; Kennedy, C

    1998-01-01

    The electrophysiological actions of several agonists which may differentiate between P2X1- and P2X3-receptors were studied under concentration and voltage-clamp conditions in dissociated neurones of 1–4 day old rat dorsal root ganglia.β,γ-Methylene-D-ATP (β,γ-me-D-ATP) (1–300 μM), diadenosine 5′,5′′′-P1,P5-pentaphosphate (AP5A) (100 nM–300 μM), diadenosine 5′,5′′′-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (AP4A) (300 nM–300 μM) and uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) (1 μM–1 mM) all activated concentration-dependent inward currents with a latency to onset of a few ms.The concentration-response curves for β,γ-me-D-ATP and AP5A and ATP had similar maximum values, while that for AP4A had a lower maximum. The concentration-response curve to UTP was shallow and did not reach a maximum. β,γ-Methylene-L-ATP was virtually inactive. The rank order of agonist potency was ATP>AP5A≈amp;AP4A>β,γ-me-D-ATP>UTP>>β,γ-methylene-L-ATP.The inward currents were inhibited by the P2-receptor antagonists suramin (100 μM) and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS) (10 μM). PPADS also inhibited responses to ATP (800 nM) and α,β-methylene ATP (2 μM) in a concentration-dependent manner.This study shows that β,γ-me-D-ATP, AP5A, AP4A and UTP all act via a suramin- and PPADS-sensitive P2X-receptor to evoke rapid, transient inward currents in dissociated neurones of rat dorsal root ganglia. The very low activity of β,γ-methylene-L-ATP suggests that the agonists were acting at the P2X3-subtype to produce these effects. PMID:9630357

  14. Perinatal undernutrition facilitates morphine sensitization and cross-sensitization to cocaine in adult rats: a behavioral and neurochemical study.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, E E; Valdomero, A; Orsingher, O A; Cuadra, G R

    2010-01-20

    The development of sensitization to the locomotor effects of morphine and cross-sensitization between morphine and cocaine were evaluated in adult rats submitted to a protein malnutrition schedule from the 14th day of gestation up to 30 days of age (D-rats), and compared with well-nourished animals (C-rats). Dose-response curves to morphine-induced locomotor activity (5, 7.5, 10 or 15 mg/kg, i.p., every other day for 5 days) revealed a shift to the left in D-rats compared to C-rats. This implies that D-rats showed behavioral sensitization to the lower dose of morphine used (5 mg/kg), which was ineffective in C-rats. Furthermore, when a cocaine challenge (10 mg/kg, i.p) was given 48 h after the last morphine administration, only D-rats exhibited cross-sensitization in morphine-pretreated animals (7.5 and 10 mg/kg). In order to correlate the differential response observed with the functioning of the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were measured in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell) and the dorsal caudate-putamen. A challenge with cocaine in morphine pre-exposed animals produced an increase in DA release, but only in the nucleus accumbens "core" of D-rats. Similar DA levels were found in the nucleus accumbens "shell" and in the dorsal caudate-putamen of both groups. Finally, these results demonstrate that D-rats had a lower threshold for developing both a progressive behavioral sensitization to morphine and a cross-sensitization to cocaine. In accordance with these behavioral findings, a higher responsiveness of the nucleus accumbens core, expressed by increased DA levels, both basal and after cocaine challenge, was observed in D-rats. PMID:19892003

  15. Intracellular calcium regulation among subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shao-Gang; Zhang, Xiulin; Gold, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    Primary afferent neurons are functionally heterogeneous. To determine whether this functional heterogeneity reflects, in part, heterogeneity in the regulation of the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), the magnitude and decay of evoked Ca2+ transients were assessed in subpopulations of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with voltage clamp and fura-2 ratiometric imaging. To determine whether differences in evoked Ca2+ transients among subpopulations of DRG neurons reflected differences in the contribution of Ca2+ regulatory mechanisms, pharmacological techniques were employed to assess the contribution of influx, efflux, release and uptake pathways. Subpopulations of DRG neurons were defined by cell body size, binding of the plant lectin IB4 and responsiveness to the algogenic compound capsaicin (CAP). Ca2+ transients were evoked with 30 mm K+ or voltage steps to 0 mV. There were marked differences between subpopulations of neurons with respect to both the magnitude and decay of the Ca2+ transient, with the largest and most slowly decaying Ca2+ transients in small-diameter, IB4-positive, CAP-responsive neurons. The smallest and most rapidly decaying transients were in large-diameter, IB4-negative and CAP-unresponsive DRG neurons. These differences were not due to a differential distribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents. However, these differences did appear to reflect a differential contribution of other influx, efflux, release and uptake mechanisms between subpopulations of neurons. These results suggest that electrical activity in subpopulations of DRG neurons will have a differential influence on Ca2+-regulated phenomena such as spike adaptation, transmitter release and gene transcription. Significantly more activity should be required in large-diameter non-nociceptive afferents than in small-diameter nociceptive afferents to have a comparable influence on these processes. PMID:16945973

  16. Adrenomedullin mediates tumor necrosis factor-α-induced responses in dorsal root ganglia in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yajuan; Zhang, Yan; Huo, Yuanhui; Wang, Dongmei; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a member of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, has been demonstrated to be a pain peptide. This study investigated the possible involvement of AM in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced responses contributing to neuronal plasticity in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Exposure of the DRG explant cultures to TNF-α (5nM) for 48h upregulated the expression of AM mRNA. The treatment with TNF-α also increased the level of CGRP, CCL-2 and MMP-9 mRNA in the cultured DRG. This increase was attenuated by the co-treatment with the selective AM receptor antagonist AM22-52 (2μM). The blockade of AM receptors inhibited TNF-α-induced increase of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) and nuclear factor kappa B (pNF-κB) proteins. On the other hand, the treatment with the AM receptor agonist AM1-50 (10nM) for 96h induced an increase in the level of GFAP, IL-1β, pCREB and pNF-κB proteins. The inhibition of AM activity did not change TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (pERK) while the treatment with AM1-50 still increased the level of pERK in the cultured DRG. Immunofluorescence assay showed the colocalization of AM-like immunoreactivity (IR) with TNF-α-IR in DRG neurons. The present study suggests that the increased AM receptor signaling mediated the many, but not all, TNF-α-induced activities, contributing to peripheral sensitization in neuropathic pain. PMID:27184601

  17. Selective depression of nociceptive responses of dorsal horn neurones by SNC 80 in a perfused hindquarter preparation of adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Cao, C Q; Hong, Y G; Dray, A; Perkins, M N

    2001-01-01

    -nociceptive dorsal horn neurones were not inhibited by SNC 80 at a dose of up to 10 microM (n=5). These data demonstrate that delta-opioid receptor modulate nociceptive, but not non-nociceptive, transmission in spinal dorsal horn neurones of the adult mouse. The potentiation of neuronal activity by HS 378 may reflect an autoregulatory role of the endogenous delta-opioid in nociceptive transmission in mouse. PMID:11731107

  18. Marked Increase in Nitric Oxide Synthase mRNA in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia after Peripheral Axotomy: In situ Hybridization and Functional Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verge, Valerie M. K.; Xu, Zhang; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Hokfelt, Tomas

    1992-12-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we studied nitric oxide (NO) synthase (EC 1.14.23.-) mRNA in lumbar dorsal root ganglia after peripheral transection of the sciatic nerve in rats. The effect of the NO synthase inhibitor N^ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester on the nociceptive flexor reflex was also studied in axotomized rats. Nerve section induced a dramatic increase in number of NO synthase mRNA-positive cells in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia. In some of these cells the peptides galanin and/or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and/or neuropeptide Y were also strongly up-regulated. Intravenous administration of nitro-L-arginine methyl ester blocked spinal hyperexcitability at much lower dosages in axotomized than in normal animals. The results suggest involvement of NO in the function of lumbar sensory neurons, especially after axotomy, perhaps preferentially at peripheral sites.

  19. Wheel running alters patterns of uncontrollable stress-induced cfos mRNA expression in rat dorsal striatum direct and indirect pathways: a possible role for plasticity in adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Ghasem, Parsa R.; Mika, Agnieszka; Day, Heidi E.; Herrera, Jonathan J.; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Fleshner, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that adenosine is a major regulator of striatum activity, in part, through the antagonistic modulation of dopaminergic function. Exercise can influence adenosine and dopamine activity, which may subsequently promote plasticity in striatum adenosine and dopamine systems. Such changes could alter activity of medium spiny neurons and impact striatum function. The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first was to characterize the effect of long-term wheel running on adenosine 1 (A1R), adenosine 2A (A2AR), dopamine 1 (D1R), and dopamine 2 (D2R) receptor mRNA expression in adult rat dorsal and ventral striatum structures using in situ hybridization. The second was to determine if changes to adenosine and dopamine receptor mRNA from running are associated with altered cfos mRNA induction in dynorphin- (direct pathway) and enkephalin- (indirect pathway) expressing neurons of the dorsal striatum following stress exposure. We report that chronic running, as well as acute uncontrollable stress, reduced A1R and A2AR mRNA levels in the dorsal and ventral striatum. Running also modestly elevated D2R mRNA levels in striatum regions. Finally, stress-induced cfos was potentiated in dynorphin and attenuated in enkephalin expressing neurons of running rats. These data suggest striatum adenosine and dopamine systems are targets for neuroplasticity from exercise, which may contribute to changes in direct and indirect pathway activity. These findings may have implications for striatum mediated motor and cognitive processes, as well as exercise facilitated stress-resistance. PMID:25017571

  20. Effects of Silk Sericin on Incision Wound Healing in a Dorsal Skin Flap Wound Healing Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ersel, Murat; Uyanikgil, Yigit; Akarca, Funda Karbek; Ozcete, Enver; Altunci, Yusuf Ali; Karabey, Fatih; Cavusoglu, Turker; Meral, Ayfer; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Cetin, Emel Oyku

    2016-01-01

    Background The wound healing process is complex and still poorly understood. Sericin is a silk protein synthesized by silk worms (Bombyx mori). The objective of this study was to evaluate in vivo wound healing effects of a sericin-containing gel formulation in an incision wound model in rats. Material/Methods Twenty-eight Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 4 groups (n=7). No intervention or treatment was applied to the Intact control group. For other groups, a dorsal skin flap (9×3 cm) was drawn and pulled up with sharp dissection. The Sham operated group received no treatment. The Placebo group received placebo gel without sericin applied to the incision area once a day from day 0 to day 9. The Sericin Group 3 received 1% sericin gel applied to the incision area once a day from day 0 to day 9. Hematoxylin and eosin stain was applied for histological analysis and Mallory-Azan staining was applied for histoimmunochemical analysis of antibodies and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase), and desmin was applied to paraffin sections of skin wound specimens. Parameters of oxidative stress were measured in the wound area. Results Epidermal thickness and vascularization were increased, and hair root degeneration, edema, cellular infiltration, collagen discoloration, and necrosis were decreased in Sericin group in comparison to the Placebo group and the Sham operated group. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) levels were decreased, but superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were increased in the sericin group. Conclusions We found that sericin had significant positive effects on wound healing and antioxidant activity. Sericin-based formulations can improve healing of incision wounds. PMID:27032876

  1. Serotonin in the dorsal periaqueductal gray inhibits panic-like defensive behaviors in rats exposed to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Spiacci, A; Sergio, T de Oliveira; da Silva, G S F; Glass, M L; Schenberg, L C; Garcia-Cairasco, N; Zangrossi, H

    2015-10-29

    It has been proposed that spontaneous panic attacks are the outcome of the misfiring of an evolved suffocation alarm system. Evidence gathered in the last years is suggestive that the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) in the midbrain harbors a hypoxia-sensitive suffocation alarm system. We here investigated whether facilitation of 5-HT-mediated neurotransmission within the dPAG changes panic-like defensive reactions expressed by male Wistar rats submitted to a hypoxia challenge (7% O2), as observed in other animal models of panic. Intra-dPAG injection of 5-HT (20 nmol), (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) (8 nmol), a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, or (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo amphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) (16 nmol), a preferential 5-HT2A agonist, reduced the number of upward jumps directed to the border of the experimental chamber during hypoxia, interpreted as escape attempts, without affecting the rats' locomotion. These effects were similar to those caused by chronic, but not acute, intraperitoneal administration of the antidepressant fluoxetine (5-15 mg/kg), or acute systemic administration of the benzodiazepine receptor agonist alprazolam (1-4 mg/kg), both drugs clinically used in the treatment of panic disorder. Our findings strengthen the view that the dPAG is a key encephalic area involved in the defensive behaviors triggered by activation of the suffocation alarm system. They also support the use of hypoxia-evoked escape as a model of respiratory-type panic attacks. PMID:26319117

  2. Effects of Silk Sericin on Incision Wound Healing in a Dorsal Skin Flap Wound Healing Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Ersel, Murat; Uyanikgil, Yigit; Karbek Akarca, Funda; Ozcete, Enver; Altunci, Yusuf Ali; Karabey, Fatih; Cavucoglu, Turker; Meral, Ayfer; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Oyku Cetin, Emel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The wound healing process is complex and still poorly understood. Sericin is a silk protein synthesized by silk worms (Bombyx mori). The objective of this study was to evaluate in vivo wound healing effects of a sericin-containing gel formulation in an incision wound model in rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-eight Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 4 groups (n=7). No intervention or treatment was applied to the Intact control group. For other groups, a dorsal skin flap (9×3 cm) was drawn and pulled up with sharp dissection. The Sham operated group received no treatment. The Placebo group received placebo gel without sericin applied to the incision area once a day from day 0 to day 9. The Sericin Group 3 received 1% sericin gel applied to the incision area once a day from day 0 to day 9. Hematoxylin and eosin stain was applied for histological analysis and Mallory-Azan staining was applied for histoimmunochemical analysis of antibodies and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase), and desmin was applied to paraffin sections of skin wound specimens. Parameters of oxidative stress were measured in the wound area. RESULTS Epidermal thickness and vascularization were increased, and hair root degeneration, edema, cellular infiltration, collagen discoloration, and necrosis were decreased in Sericin group in comparison to the Placebo group and the Sham operated group. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) levels were decreased, but superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were increased in the sericin group. CONCLUSIONS We found that sericin had significant positive effects on wound healing and antioxidant activity. Sericin-based formulations can improve healing of incision wounds. PMID:27032876

  3. P2X₇ receptor of rat dorsal root ganglia is involved in the effect of moxibustion on visceral hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuangmei; Shi, Qingming; Zhu, Qicheng; Zou, Ting; Li, Guilin; Huang, An; Wu, Bing; Peng, Lichao; Song, Miaomiao; Wu, Qin; Xie, Qiuyu; Lin, Weijian; Xie, Wei; Wen, Shiyao; Zhang, Zhedong; Lv, Qiulan; Zou, Lifang; Zhang, Xi; Ying, Mofeng; Li, Guodong; Liang, Shangdong

    2015-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease often display visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral nociceptors after inflammatory stimulation generate afferent nerve impulses through dorsal root ganglia (DRG) transmitting to the central nervous system. ATP and its activated-purinergic 2X7 (P2X7) receptor play an important role in the transmission of nociceptive signal. Purinergic signaling is involved in the sensory transmission of visceral pain. Moxibustion is a therapy applying ignited mugwort directly or indirectly at acupuncture points or other specific parts of the body to treat diseases. Heat-sensitive acupoints are the corresponding points extremely sensitive to moxa heat in disease conditions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the analgesic effect of moxibustion on a heat-sensitive acupoint "Dachangshu" and the expression levels of P2X7 receptor in rat DRG after chronic inflammatory stimulation of colorectal distension. Heat-sensitive moxibustion at Dachangshu acupoint inhibited the nociceptive signal transmission by decreasing the upregulated expression levels of P2X7 mRNA and protein in DRG induced by visceral pain, and reversed the abnormal expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of satellite glial cells) in DRG. Consequently, abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score in a visceral pain model was reduced, and the pain threshold was elevated. Therefore, heat-sensitive moxibustion at Dachangshu acupoint can produce a therapeutic effect on IBS via inhibiting the nociceptive transmission mediated by upregulated P2X7 receptor. PMID:25527178

  4. An improved method for patch clamp recording and calcium imaging of neurons in the intact dorsal root ganglion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hayar, Abdallah; Gu, Chunping; Al-Chaer, Elie D.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been mostly investigated in culture of dissociated cells, and it is uncertain whether these cells maintain the electrophysiological properties of the intact DRG neurons. Few attempts have been made to record from DRG neurons in the intact ganglion using the patch clamp technique. In this study, rat DRGs were dissected and incubated for at least 1 hour at 37°C in collagenase (10 mg/ml). We used oblique epi-illumination to visualize DRG neurons and perform patch clamp recordings. All DRG neurons exhibited strong delayed rectifier potassium current and a high threshold for spike generation (−15 mV) that rendered the cells very weakly excitable, generating only one action potential upon strong current injection (>300 pA). It is therefore possible that cultured DRG neurons, commonly used in studies of pain processing, may be hyperexcitable because they acquired "neuropathic" properties due to the injury induced by their dissociation. Electrical stimulation of the attached root produced an antidromic spike in the soma that could be blocked by intracellular hyperpolarization or high frequency stimulation. Imaging intracellular calcium concentration with Oregon Green BAPTA-1 indicates that antidromic stimulation caused a long-lasting increase in intracellular calcium concentration mostly near the cell membrane. This study describes a simple approach to examine the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties and intracellular calcium signaling in DRG neurons in the intact ganglion where the effects of somatic spike invasion can be studied as well. PMID:18588915

  5. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47) in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Sun, Yanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gao, Yandong; Tian, Li; Liu, Yang; Pu, Yanan; Gou, Xingchun; Chen, Yanke; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:26697232

  6. Expression profile of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, SLC17A9) in subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kentaro; Nomura, Yuka; Kawamori, Kanako; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2014-09-01

    ATP plays an important role in the signal transduction between sensory neurons and satellite cells in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). In primary cultured DRG neurons, ATP is known to be stored in lysosomes via a vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), and to be released into the intercellular space through exocytosis. DRGs consist of large-, medium- and small-sized neurons, which play different roles in sensory transmission, but there is no information on the expression profiles of VNUT in DRG subpopulations. Here, we obtained detailed expression profiles of VNUT in isolated rat DRG tissues. On immunohistochemical analysis, VNUT was found in DRG neurons, and was predominantly expressed by the small- and medium-sized DRG ones, as judged upon visual inspection, and this was compatible with the finding that the number of VNUT-positive DRG neurons in IB4-positive cells was greater than that in NF200-positive ones. These results suggest that VNUT play a role in ATP accumulation in DRG neurons, especially in small- and medium-sized ones, and might be involved in ATP-mediated nociceptive signaling in DRGs. PMID:25043192

  7. Repeated cocaine administration increases B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 phosphorylation in the rat dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Min; Jang, Dong Hye; Choe, Eun Sang

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation caused by drug administration is a critical step in the regulation of behavioral alterations. This study was conducted to determine how repeated exposure to cocaine phosphorylates B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), which may be responsible for the regulation of behavioral alterations in the rat dorsal striatum. The results revealed that repeated systemic injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once a day for 7 consecutive days increased the phosphorylation of Bcl2 at serine 70 (Bcl2-S70). However, this increase was reduced by the blockade of dopamine D1 receptors, group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In addition, elevation of behavioral locomotor activity after repeated exposure to cocaine was partially reduced by the inhibition of Bcl2. These data suggest that stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors, group I mGluRs, and NMDA receptors following repeated cocaine administration is necessary for the induction of Bcl2-S70 phosphorylation, which contributes to the expression of behavioral sensitization. PMID:19879923

  8. Differences in Neural-Immune Gene Expression Response in Rat Spinal Dorsal Horn Correlates with Variations in Electroacupuncture Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xiaohui; He, Fei; Lin, Libo; Ping, Xingjie; Yu, Lei; Han, Jisheng; Zhao, Guoping; Zhang, Qinghua; Cui, Cailian

    2012-01-01

    Background Electroacupuncture (EA) has been widely used to alleviate diverse pains. Accumulated clinical experiences and experimental observations indicated that significant differences exist in sensitivity to EA analgesia for individuals of patients and model animals. However, the molecular mechanism accounting for this difference remains obscure. Methodology/Principal Findings We classified model male rats into high-responder (HR; TFL changes >150) and non-responder (NR; TFL changes ≤0) groups based on changes of their pain threshold detected by tail-flick latency (TFL) before and after 2 Hz or 100 Hz EA treatment. Gene expression analysis of spinal dorsal horn (DH) revealed divergent expression in HR and NR after 2 Hz/100 Hz EA. The expression of the neurotransmitter system related genes was significantly highly regulated in the HR animals while the proinflammation cytokines related genes were up-regulated more significantly in NR than that in HR after 2 Hz and 100 Hz EA stimulation, especially in the case of 2 Hz stimulation. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggested that differential regulation and coordination of neural-immune related genes might play an important role for individual variations in analgesic effects responding to EA in DH. It also provided new candidate genes related to EA responsiveness for future investigation. PMID:22879942

  9. Acrylamide Retards the Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilaments in Rat Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons and the Corresponding Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    An, Lihong; Li, Guozhen; Si, Jiliang; Zhang, Cuili; Han, Xiaoying; Wang, Shuo; Jiang, Lulu; Xie, Keqin

    2016-05-01

    Chronic acrylamide (ACR) exposure induces peripheral-central axonopathy in occupational workers and laboratory animals, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we first investigated the effects of ACR on slow axonal transport of neurofilaments in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons through live-cell imaging approach. Then for the underlying mechanisms exploration, the protein level of neurofilament subunits, motor proteins kinesin and dynein, and dynamitin subunit of dynactin in DRG neurons were assessed by western blotting and the concentrations of ATP was detected using ATP Assay Kit. The results showed that ACR treatment results in a dose-dependent decrease of slow axonal transport of neurofilaments. Furthermore, ACR intoxication significantly increases the protein levels of the three neurofilament subunits (NF-L, NF-M, NF-H), kinesin, dynein, and dynamitin subunit of dynactin in DRG neurons. In addition, ATP level decreased significantly in ACR-treated DRG neurons. Our findings indicate that ACR exposure retards slow axonal transport of NF-M, and suggest that the increase of neurofilament cargoes, motor proteins, dynamitin of dynactin, and the inadequate ATP supply contribute to the ACR-induced retardation of slow axonal transport. PMID:26721510

  10. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Chiaki; Watanabe, Shimpei; Nakamura, Motokazu; Norimoto, Hisayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine) is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH), a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF) in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control), a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in "itch-scratch" animal models is under investigation. PMID:26287150

  11. Proteomics Analysis of Dorsal Striatum Reveals Changes in Synaptosomal Proteins following Methamphetamine Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Peter J.; Peng, Lifeng; Kivell, Bronwyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a widely abused, highly addictive drug. Regulation of synaptic proteins within the brain’s reward pathway modulates addiction behaviours, the progression of drug addiction and long-term changes in brain structure and function that result from drug use. Therefore, using large scale proteomics studies we aim to identify global protein expression changes within the dorsal striatum, a key brain region involved in the modulation of addiction. We performed LC-MS/MS analyses on rat striatal synaptosomes following 30 days of methamphetamine self-administration (2 hours/day) and 14 days abstinence. We identified a total of 84 differentially-expressed proteins with known roles in neuroprotection, neuroplasticity, cell cytoskeleton, energy regulation and synaptic vesicles. We identify significant expression changes in stress-induced phosphoprotein and tubulin polymerisation-promoting protein, which have not previously been associated with addiction. In addition, we confirm the role of amphiphysin and phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein in addiction. This approach has provided new insight into the effects of methamphetamine self-administration on synaptic protein expression in a key brain region associated with addiction, showing a large set of differentially-expressed proteins that persist into abstinence. The mass spectrometry proteomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001443. PMID:26484527

  12. Glutamate receptor binding in the frontal cortex and dorsal striatum of aged rats with impaired attentional set-shifting.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Michelle M; Baxter, Mark G

    2003-12-01

    Aged Long-Evans rats exhibit deficits in attentional set shifting, an aspect of executive function, relative to adult rats. Impairments in set shifting and spatial learning are uncorrelated in aged rats, indicating a possible dissociation of the effects of ageing in prefrontal versus hippocampal systems. Ionotropic glutamate receptor binding was assessed using an in vitro autoradiography method in young and aged rats. The rats had been tested on a set-shifting task that measured attentional set shifts and reversal learning, as well as in a spatial learning task in the Morris water maze. [3H]Kainate, [3H]AMPA and NMDA-displaceable [3H]glutamate receptor binding were quantified in orbital cortex, cingulate cortex, medial frontal cortex, dorsolateral and dorsomedial striatum. Age-related decreases in [3H]kainate binding were apparent in all regions measured. Similarly, NMDA-displaceable [3H]glutamate binding was decreased in the aged rats in all the regions measured except for the medial frontal area where no age effects were observed. [3H]AMPA receptor binding was preserved with age in all the regions measured. Lower levels of [3H]kainate binding in the cingulate cortex were significantly correlated with poorer set-shifting performance, whereas higher levels of NMDA binding in the dorsomedial striatum were correlated with poorer set-shifting performance. There were no significant correlations between the levels of ionotropic glutamate receptors and performance in the reversal task or spatial learning in the Morris water maze. These results indicate that age-related behavioural deficits in attentional set shifting are selectively associated with neurobiological alterations in the cingulate cortex and dorsomedial striatum. PMID:14686906

  13. Primary afferents with TRPM8 and TRPA1 profiles target distinct subpopulations of rat superficial dorsal horn neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wrigley, Paul J; Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, transient receptor potential melastatin-1 (TRPM8) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), are expressed in subpopulations of sensory neurones and have been proposed to mediate innocuous and noxious cold sensation respectively. The aim of this study was to compare TRPM8 and TRPA1 modulation of glutamatergic afferent transmission within the spinal dorsal horn. Experimental approach: Whole cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat spinal cord slices in vitro to examine the effect of TRP agonists and temperature on glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Key results: Icilin (3 or 100 µmol·L−1), menthol (200 µmol·L−1) and capsaicin (1 µmol·L−1) reduced the amplitude of primary afferent evoked EPSCs in subpopulations of lamina I and II neurones. In a subpopulation of superficial neurones, innocuous cold (threshold 29°C), 3 µmol·L−1 icilin (EC50 1.5 µmol·L−1) and menthol (EC50 263 µmol·L−1) increased the rate of spontaneous miniature EPSCs. In the majority of lamina I and II neurones, 100 µmol·L−1 icilin (EC50 79 µmol·L−1), allyl isothiocyanate (EC50 226 µmol·L−1), cinnamaldehyde (EC50 38 µmol·L−1) and capsaicin (1 µmol·L−1) increased miniature EPSC rate. The response to 100 µmol·L−1, but not 3 µmol·L−1 icilin, was abolished by ruthenium red, while neither was affected by iodoresiniferatoxin. Responsiveness to 3 µmol·L−1, but not to 100 µmol·L−1 icilin, was highly predictive of innocuous cold responsiveness. Neurones responding to 3 µmol·L−1 icilin and innocuous cold were located more superficially than those responding to 100 µmol·L−1 icilin. Conclusions and implications: Activation of TRPM8 and TRPA1 presynaptically modulated glutamatergic transmission onto partially overlapping but distinct populations of superficial dorsal horn neurones. Spinal TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels may therefore provide

  14. 5-HT1A autoreceptor modulation of locomotor activity induced by nitric oxide in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gualda, L B; Martins, G G; Müller, B; Guimarães, F S; Oliveira, R M W

    2011-04-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the origin of ascending serotonergic projections and is considered to be an important component of the brain circuit that mediates anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. A large fraction of DRN serotonin-positive neurons contain nitric oxide (NO). Disruption of NO-mediated neurotransmission in the DRN by NO synthase inhibitors produces anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in rats and also induces nonspecific interference with locomotor activity. We investigated the involvement of the 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor in the locomotor effects induced by NO in the DRN of male Wistar rats (280-310 g, N = 9-10 per group). The NO donor 3-morpholinosylnomine hydrochloride (SIN-1, 150, and 300 nmol) and the NO scavenger S-3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycine (carboxy-PTIO, 0.1-3.0 nmol) were injected into the DRN of rats immediately before they were exposed to the open field for 10 min. To evaluate the involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor in the locomotor effects of NO, animals were pretreated with the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 8 nmol), the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-(2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl)-N-2-pyridinyl-cyclohexanecarboxamide maleate (WAY-100635, 0.37 nmol), and the NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7, 1 nmol), followed by microinjection of SIN-1 into the DRN. SIN-1 increased the distance traveled (mean ± SEM) in the open-field test (4431 ± 306.1 cm; F(7,63) = 2.44, P = 0.028) and this effect was blocked by previous 8-OH-DPAT (2885 ± 490.4 cm) or AP7 (3335 ± 283.5 cm) administration (P < 0.05, Duncan test). These results indicate that 5-HT(1A) receptor activation and/or facilitation of glutamate neurotransmission can modulate the locomotor effects induced by NO in the DRN. PMID:21445531

  15. Angular velocity and head direction signals recorded from the dorsal tegmental nucleus of gudden in the rat: implications for path integration in the head direction cell circuit.

    PubMed

    Sharp, P E; Tinkelman, A; Cho, J

    2001-06-01

    When a rat navigates through space, head direction (HD) cells provide an ongoing signal of the rat's directional heading. It is thought that these cells rely, in part, on angular path integration of the rat's head movements. This integration requires that the HD cell system receive information about angular head movements and that this information be combined with the current directional signal, to generate the next "predicted" direction. Recent data suggest that the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN) may play a critical role in helping to generate the HD cell signal. To test this, recordings were made from cells in the DTN in freely moving rats. The following cell types were found: (a) "classic" HD cells, (b) angular velocity cells, and (c) cells that fired as a function of both head direction and angular velocity. Thus, DTN cells exhibit firing characteristics that are critical to the neural circuit hypothesized for generation of the HD cell signal. PMID:11439447

  16. Cortical and subcortical plasticity in the brains of humans, primates, and rats after damage to sensory afferents in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaas, Jon H.; Qi, Hui-Xin; Burish, Mark; Gharbawie, Omar; Onifer, Stephen M.; Massey, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The failure of injured axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury deprives brain neurons of their normal sources of activation. These injuries also result in the reorganization of affected areas of the central nervous system that is thought to drive both the ensuing recovery of function and the formation of maladaptive neuronal circuitry. Better understanding of the physiological consequences of novel synaptic connections produced by injury and the mechanisms that control their formation are important to the development of new successful strategies for the treatment of patients with spinal cord injuries. Here we discuss the anatomical, physiological and behavioral changes that take place in response to injury-induced plasticity after damage to the dorsal column pathway in rats and monkeys. Complete section of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord at a high cervical level in monkeys and rats interrupts the ascending axon branches of low threshold mechanoreceptor afferents subserving the forelimb and the rest of the lower body. Such lesions render the corresponding part of the somatotopic representation of primary somatosensory cortex totally unresponsive to tactile stimuli. There are also behavioral consequences of the sensory loss, including an impaired use of the hand/forelimb in manipulating small objects. In monkeys, if some of the afferents from the hand remain intact after dorsal column lesions, these remaining afferents extensively reactivate portions of somatosensory cortex formerly representing the hand. This functional reorganization develops over a postoperative period of one month, during which hand use rapidly improves. These recoveries appear to be mediated, at least in part, by the sprouting of preserved afferents within the cuneate nucleus of the dorsal column-trigeminal complex. In rats, such functional collateral sprouting has been promoted by the post-lesion digestion of the perineuronal net in the cuneate nucleus. Thus, this and other

  17. Arginine Vasopressin Injected into the Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus Inhibits Gastric Motility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianping; Chang, Lanlan; Xie, Jinlu; Ai, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Until now, the effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) in the DMV on gastric motility and the possible modulating pathway between the DMV and the gastrointestinal system remain poorly understood. Objectives. We aimed to explore the role of AVP in the DMV in regulating gastric motility and the possible central and peripheral pathways. Material and Methods. Firstly, we microinjected different doses of AVP into the DMV and investigated its effects on gastric motility in rats. Then, the possible central and peripheral pathways that regulate gastric motility were also discussed by microinjecting SR49059 (a specific AVP receptor antagonist) into the DMV and intravenous injection of hexamethonium (a specific neuronal nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist) before AVP microinjection. Results. Following microinjection of AVP (180 pmol and 18 pmol) into the DMV, the gastric motility (including total amplitude, total duration, and motility index of gastric contraction) was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05). Moreover, the inhibitory effect of AVP (180 pmol) on gastric motility could be blocked completely by both SR49059 (320 pmol) and hexamethonium (8 μmol). Conclusions. It is concluded that AVP inhibits the gastric motility by acting on the specific AVP receptor in the DMV, with the potential involvement of the parasympathetic preganglionic cholinergic fibers. PMID:26843857

  18. Signalling of a step-like intensity change of noxious mechanical stimuli by dorsal horn neurones in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Laird, J M; Cervero, F

    1991-01-01

    1. Single-unit extracellular recordings were made from thirty-one dorsal horn neurones in the sacral spinal cord of barbiturate-anaesthetized rats. Each neurone was tested with four noxious mechanical pinches applied to its receptive field on the tail. Each pinch lasted 120 s, with a step-like change in intensity after 60 s. In two pinches the step increased the intensity, from 4 to 6 N or from 6 to 8 N, and in two the step decreased the intensity, from 8 to 6 N or from 6 to 4 N. 2. The ability of the neurones to signal these step changes in intensity was examined. Five neurones with an exclusively low-threshold afferent input (class 1) were tested, and found to fire only briefly at the start of the 120 s stimulus. Neurones with a high-threshold input (nociceptive neurones), either exclusively (class 3; n = 10) or in addition to a low-threshold input (class 2: n = 16), responded throughout the 120 s stimuli. 3. Nociceptive dorsal horn neurones have been divided into two groups of 'good' and 'poor' encoders on the basis of their response to the step changes in intensity. 4. 'Good' encoders (n = 13) were neurones signalling both a step increase and a step decrease in intensity, of which seven were class 2 and six class 3, five recorded in the superficial dorsal horn and eight in the deep dorsal horn. 5. 'Poor' encoders (n = 13) were neurones which failed to signal one or both of the step changes in intensity, of which nine were class 2 and four class 3, three recorded in the superficial dorsal horn and ten in the deep dorsal horn. 6. These results demonstrate that neurones with similar input properties and location are not necessarily a homogeneous group in terms of their processing of nociceptive stimuli. Moreover, they suggest that subgroups of both class 2 and class 3 and of superficial and deep dorsal horn neurones contribute to the different components of a nociceptive response. 7. We propose that the output and projection target of a particular dorsal horn

  19. Peripheral inflammation facilitates Abeta fiber-mediated synaptic input to the substantia gelatinosa of the adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Baba, H; Doubell, T P; Woolf, C J

    1999-01-15

    Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in thick adult rat transverse spinal cord slices with attached dorsal roots to study changes in fast synaptic transmission induced by peripheral inflammation. In slices from naive rats, primary afferent stimulation at Abeta fiber intensity elicited polysynaptic EPSCs in only 14 of 57 (25%) SG neurons. In contrast, Abeta fiber stimulation evoked polysynaptic EPSCs in 39 of 62 (63%) SG neurons recorded in slices from rats inflamed by an intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) 48 hr earlier (p < 0.001). Although the peripheral inflammation had no significant effect on the threshold and conduction velocities of Abeta, Adelta, and C fibers recorded in dorsal roots, the mean threshold intensity for eliciting EPSCs was significantly lower in cells recorded from rats with inflammation (naive: 33.2 +/- 15.1 microA, n = 57; inflamed: 22.8 +/- 11.3 microA, n = 62, p < 0.001), and the mean latency of EPSCs elicited by Abeta fiber stimulation in CFA-treated rats was significantly shorter than that recorded from naive rats (3.3 +/- 1.8 msec, n = 36 vs 6.0 +/- 3.5 msec, n = 12; p = 0.010). Abeta fiber stimulation evoked polysynaptic IPSCs in 4 of 25 (16%) cells recorded from naive rat preparations and 14 of 26 (54%) SG neurons from CFA-treated rats (p < 0.001). The mean threshold intensity for IPSCs was also significantly lower in CFA-treated rats (naive: 32.5 +/- 15.7 microA, n = 25; inflamed: 21. 9 +/- 9.9 microA, n = 26, p = 0.013). The facilitation of Abeta fiber-mediated input into the substantia gelatinosa after peripheral inflammation may contribute to altered sensory processing. PMID:9880605

  20. Minocycline enhances inhibitory transmission to substantia gelatinosa neurons of the rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Peng, H-Z; Ma, L-X; Lv, M-H; Hu, T; Liu, T

    2016-04-01

    Minocycline, a second-generation tetracycline, is well known for its antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, and antinociceptive effects. Modulation of synaptic transmission is one of the analgesic mechanisms of minocycline. Although it has been reported that minocycline may suppress excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission, it remains unclear whether it could affect inhibitory synaptic transmission, which also plays a key role in modulating pain signaling. To examine the effect of minocycline on synaptic transmission in rat spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons, we recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) using whole-cell patch-clamp recording at a holding potential of 0 mV. Bath application of minocycline significantly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of sIPSCs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 85. The enhancement of inhibitory synaptic transmission produced by minocycline was not affected by the glutamate receptor antagonists CNQX and D-APV or by the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX). Moreover, the potency of minocycline for facilitating sIPSC frequency was the same in both glycinergic and GABAergic sIPSCs without changing their decay phases. However, the facilitatory effect of minocycline on sIPSCs was eliminated in a Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution or by co-administration with calcium channel blockers. In summary, our data demonstrate that baseline inhibitory synaptic transmission in SG neurons is markedly enhanced by minocycline. This may function to decrease the excitability of SG neurons, thus leading to a modulation of nociceptive transmission. PMID:26826332

  1. Connectivity of Pacemaker Neurons in the Neonatal Rat Superficial Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Neil C.; Arbabi, Shahriar; Baccei, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Pacemaker neurons with an intrinsic ability to generate rhythmic burst-firing have been characterized in lamina I of the neonatal spinal cord, where they are innervated by high-threshold sensory afferents. However, little is known about the output of these pacemakers, as the neuronal populations which are targeted by pacemaker axons have yet to be identified. The present study combines patch clamp recordings in the intact neonatal rat spinal cord with tract-tracing to demonstrate that lamina I pacemaker neurons contact multiple spinal motor pathways during early life. Retrograde labeling of premotor interneurons with the trans-synaptic virus PRV-152 revealed the presence of burst-firing in PRV-infected lamina I neurons, thereby confirming that pacemakers are synaptically coupled to motor networks in the spinal ventral horn. Notably, two classes of pacemakers could be distinguished in lamina I based on cell size and the pattern of their axonal projections. While small pacemaker neurons possessed ramified axons which contacted ipsilateral motor circuits, large pacemaker neurons had unbranched axons which crossed the midline and ascended rostrally in the contralateral white matter. Recordings from identified spino-parabrachial and spino-PAG neurons indicated the presence of pacemaker activity within neonatal lamina I projection neurons. Overall, these results show that lamina I pacemakers are positioned to regulate both the level of activity in developing motor circuits as well as the ascending flow of nociceptive information to the brain, thus highlighting a potential role for pacemaker activity in the maturation of pain and sensorimotor networks in the CNS. PMID:25380417

  2. Opioid Peptides Inhibit Excitatory But Not Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in the Rat Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Kirsteen N.; Kalyuzhny, Alexander E.; Travagli, R. Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Opioid peptides produce gastrointestinal inhibition and increase feeding when applied to the brainstem. The present studies were designed to determine the actions of opioid peptides on synaptic transmission within the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) and the localization of μ-opioid receptors. Whole-cell recordings were made from identified gastrointestinal-projecting DMV neurons in thin brainstem slices of the rat. Electrical stimulation of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius evoked EPSCs and IPSCs. In all neurons tested, methionine (Met)-enkephalin (0.003–30 μm) inhibited the peak amplitude of the EPSCs. The effect was prevented by naloxone (1 μm) as well as by naloxonazine (0.2 μm). An increase in the ratio of the evoked paired pulses indicated that the inhibition was attributable to actions at presynaptic receptors. This presynaptic inhibitory action was mimicked by [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (0.1 μm) and the analgesic dipeptide kyotorphin (10 μm) but not by cyclic[d-Pen2, d-Pen5]-enkephalin (1 μm) and trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (1 μm). In contrast, the amplitude of evoked IPSCs was not altered either by Met-enkephalin or by any of the opioid receptor-selective agonists. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that nerve terminals apposing DMV neurons showed immunoreactivity to μ-opioid receptors colocalized with glutamate immunoreactivity but not glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactivity. These results suggest that within the DMV, μ-opioid receptors are present on the nerve terminals of excitatory but not inhibitory inputs to GI motoneurons. Such specificity may imply that the central inhibitory action of opioid peptides on gastrointestinal function targets selected pathways. PMID:11943802

  3. Differential expression patterns of K(+) /Cl(-) cotransporter 2 in neurons within the superficial spinal dorsal horn of rats.

    PubMed

    Javdani, Fariba; Holló, Krisztina; Hegedűs, Krisztina; Kis, Gréta; Hegyi, Zoltán; Dócs, Klaudia; Kasugai, Yu; Fukazawa, Yugo; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Antal, Miklós

    2015-09-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and glycine-mediated hyperpolarizing inhibition is associated with a chloride influx that depends on the inwardly directed chloride electrochemical gradient. In neurons, the extrusion of chloride from the cytosol primarily depends on the expression of an isoform of potassium-chloride cotransporters (KCC2s). KCC2 is crucial in the regulation of the inhibitory tone of neural circuits, including pain processing neural assemblies. Thus we investigated the cellular distribution of KCC2 in neurons underlying pain processing in the superficial spinal dorsal horn of rats by using high-resolution immunocytochemical methods. We demonstrated that perikarya and dendrites widely expressed KCC2, but axon terminals proved to be negative for KCC2. In single ultrathin sections, silver deposits labeling KCC2 molecules showed different densities on the surface of dendritic profiles, some of which were negative for KCC2. In freeze fracture replicas and tissue sections double stained for the β3-subunit of GABAA receptors and KCC2, GABAA receptors were revealed on dendritic segments with high and also with low KCC2 densities. By measuring the distances between spots immunoreactive for gephyrin (a scaffolding protein of GABAA and glycine receptors) and KCC2 on the surface of neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-immunoreactive dendrites, we found that gephyrin-immunoreactive spots were located at various distances from KCC2 cotransporters; 5.7 % of them were recovered in the middle of 4-10-µm-long dendritic segments that were free of KCC2 immunostaining. The variable local densities of KCC2 may result in variable postsynaptic potentials evoked by the activation of GABAA and glycine receptors along the dendrites of spinal neurons. PMID:25764511

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation. PMID:26510475

  5. Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus Modulate Autonomic Responses but Not Behavioral Consequences Associated to Acute Restraint Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Scopinho, América A.; Lisboa, Sabrina F. S.; Guimarães, Francisco S.; Corrêa, Fernando M. A.; Resstel, Leonardo B. M.; Joca, Sâmia R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the dorsal (DH) and the ventral (VH) poles of the hippocampus are structurally, molecularly and functionally different regions. While the DH is preferentially involved in the modulation of spatial learning and memory, the VH modulates defensive behaviors related to anxiety. Acute restraint is an unavoidable stress situation that evokes marked and sustained autonomic changes, which are characterized by elevated blood pressure (BP), intense heart rate (HR) increases, skeletal muscle vasodilatation and cutaneous vasoconstriction, which are accompanied by a rapid skin temperature drop followed by body temperature increases. In addition to those autonomic responses, animals submitted to restraint also present behavioral changes, such as reduced exploration of the open arms of an elevated plus-maze (EPM), an anxiogenic-like effect. In the present work, we report a comparison between the effects of pharmacological inhibition of DH and VH neurotransmission on autonomic and behavioral responses evoked by acute restraint stress in rats. Bilateral microinjection of the unspecific synaptic blocker cobalt chloride (CoCl2, 1mM) into the DH or VH attenuated BP and HR responses, as well as the decrease in the skin temperature, elicited by restraint stress exposure. Moreover, DH or VH inhibition before restraint did not change the delayed increased anxiety behavior observed 24 h later in the EPM. The present results demonstrate for the first time that both DH and VH mediate stress-induced autonomic responses to restraint but they are not involved in the modulation of the delayed emotional consequences elicited by such stress. PMID:24147071

  6. The effects of quinolones and NSAIDs upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from rat dorsal root ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Davey, P G; Lambert, J J

    1991-02-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated a proconvulsant effect of certain quinolone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combinations. Radioligand binding experiments have indicated that these actions may be mediated by antagonism of the GABAA receptor. The present study has further investigated this hypothesis in a functional assay by examining the effects of the quinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin alone and in combination with either fenbufen or biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA) upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from voltage-clamped rat dorsal root ganglion neurones (DRG) maintained in cell culture. GABA-evoked whole cell currents were weakly but dose-dependently (30 microM-1 mM) reduced in the presence of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. The IC50 for ciprofloxacin was 100 microM but greater than 1 mM for ofloxacin. Application of either fenbufen (100 microM) or BPAA (100 microM) alone produced little effect on the GABA-evoked currents. However, the inhibitory action of ciprofloxacin was enhanced in the presence of 100 microM fenbufen by approximately five-fold whereas the antagonism of GABA responses by ofloxacin was unaffected. In contrast, BPAA (100 microM) had a dramatic effect on the inhibitory actions of both antibiotics such that the IC50 for ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was reduced to 0.03 and 0.3 microM respectively. The present results support earlier binding studies and extend them by demonstrating electrophysiologically a potent quinolone/NSAID drug interaction at the GABAA receptor. The mechanism(s) of this novel interaction remains to be determined. These results are commensurate with clinical observations of an increased risk of fits in patients prescribed certain quinolones together with certain NSAIDs. PMID:1647389

  7. Activation of presynaptic glycine receptors facilitates glycine release from presynaptic terminals synapsing onto rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Jang, Il-Sung; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Akaike, Norio

    2003-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Here we report the novel finding that presynaptic glycine autoreceptors modulate release from terminals synapsing onto rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) neurons. In mechanically dissociated SDCN neurons, in which functional presynaptic nerve terminals remain adherent to the isolated neurons, exogenously applied glycine (3 μM) increased the frequency of glycinergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) without affecting their amplitudes or decay times. This suggests that glycine acts presynaptically to increase glycine release probability. Picrotoxin, at a concentration that had little direct effect on sIPSC frequency and amplitude (30 μM), significantly attenuated glycine-induced presynaptic sIPSC facilitation. The glycine-induced sIPSC frequency facilitation was completely abolished either in a Ca2+-free external solution or in the presence of 100 μM Cd2+, suggesting the involvement of extracellular Ca2+ influx into the nerve terminals. The glycine action was also completely occluded in the presence of 300 nM tetrodotoxin. In recordings from SDCN neurons in spinal cord slices, glycine (10 μM) increased evoked IPSC (eIPSC) amplitude and decreased the extent of paired-pulse facilitation. In response to brief high frequency stimulus trains the eIPSCs displayed a profound frequency-dependent facilitation that was greatly reduced by picrotoxin (30 μM). These results indicate that glycine acts at presynaptic autoreceptors, causing depolarization of the glycinergic nerve terminals, the subsequent activation of voltage-dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels, and facilitation of glycine release. Furthermore, this presynaptic facilitation was observed under more physiological conditions, suggesting that these glycinergic autoreceptors may contribute to the integration of local inhibitory inputs to SDCN neurons. PMID:12754315

  8. Prostaglandin D2 modulates calcium signals induced by prostaglandin E2 in neurons of rat dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Ott, Daniela; Simm, Björn; Pollatzek, Eric; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Rummel, Christoph; Roth, Joachim

    2015-06-15

    Fever in response to a localized subcutaneous stimulation with a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can be attenuated by co-administration of a local anesthetic or the non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor diclofenac at doses, which do not exert systemic effects when injected at sites remote from the area of inflammatory stimulation. These results suggest a participation of neuronal afferent signals mediated by COX-products in the manifestation of fever under these conditions. We therefore, measured intracellular Ca(2+)-concentrations in cultured neurons from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) stimulated with the pyrogenic mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic mediator PGD2, mixtures of both PGs, and menthol using the fura-2 ratio imaging technique. Neurons could be grouped according to their size with diameters of about 15μm (small), 35μm (medium sized), or 55μm (large). 96 out of 264 neurons responded to PGE2 with pronounced Ca(2+)-signals, 53 of them being also responsive to menthol, indicative of their function as cold-sensors. 80% of these neurons belonged to the medium sized group. In a next experiment, we tested whether Ca(2+)-signals of PGE2 responsive neurons were modulated by PGD2. In 60% of all neurons investigated (n=57), the strength of the PGE2-induced Ca(2+)-signals was reduced by co-administration of PGD2. This effect was also observed in those neurons that were responsive to PGE2 and menthol (n=23; p<0.001). This observation indicates antagonistic effects of PGE2 and PGD2 on a neuronal pathway that involves cold sensors and is activated during a localized subcutaneous inflammation. This finding might provide an explanation for the reported antipyretic and anti-inflammatory capacities of PGD2. PMID:25912777

  9. Distinct neurochemical and functional properties of GAD67-containing 5-HT neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Shikanai, Hiroki; Yoshida, Takayuki; Konno, Kohtarou; Yamasaki, Miwako; Izumi, Takeshi; Ohmura, Yu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2012-10-10

    The serotonergic (5-HTergic) system arising from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in various physiological and behavioral processes, including stress responses. The DRN is comprised of several subnuclei, serving specific functions with distinct afferent and efferent connections. Furthermore, subsets of 5-HTergic neurons are known to coexpress other transmitters, including GABA, glutamate, or neuropeptides, thereby generating further heterogeneity. However, despite the growing evidence for functional variations among DRN subnuclei, relatively little is known about how they map onto neurochemical diversity of 5-HTergic neurons. In the present study, we characterized functional properties of GAD67-expressing 5-HTergic neurons (5-HT/GAD67 neurons) in the rat DRN, and compared with those of neurons expressing 5-HTergic molecules (5-HT neurons) or GAD67 alone. While 5-HT/GAD67 neurons were absent in the dorsomedial (DRD) or ventromedial (DRV) parts of the DRN, they were selectively distributed in the lateral wing of the DRN (DRL), constituting 12% of the total DRL neurons. They expressed plasmalemmal GABA transporter 1, but lacked vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter. By using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, we found that 5-HT/GAD67 neurons had lower input resistance and firing frequency than 5-HT neurons. As revealed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry, neurons in the DRL, particularly 5-HT/GAD67 neurons, showed higher responsiveness to exposure to an open field arena than those in the DRD and DRV. By contrast, exposure to contextual fear conditioning stress showed no such regional differences. These findings indicate that 5-HT/GAD67 neurons constitute a unique neuronal population with distinctive neurochemical and electrophysiological properties and high responsiveness to innocuous stressor. PMID:23055511

  10. Morphological and electrophysiological features of motor neurons and putative interneurons in the dorsal vagal complex of rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong; Glatzer, Nicholas R.; Williams, Kevin W.; Derbenev, Andrei V.; Liu, Dan; Smith, Bret N.

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) contains preganglionic motor neurons that control viscera along the subdiaphragmatic digestive tract, but may also contain neurons that do not project to the viscera. Neurons that expressed EGFP 60-72 h subsequent to PRV-152 inoculation of vagal terminals in the stomach wall were targeted for whole-cell patch-clamp recording and biocytin filling in transverse brainstem slices from rats and their quantitative morphological and electrophysiological characteristics were compared with uninfected cells. Over 90% of PRV-152 labeled neurons were also labeled subsequent to intraperitoneal injection of FluoroGold, indicating most were preganglionic motor neurons. In reconstructed neurons with an identifiable axon trajectory, two cellular subtypes were distinguished. The axon projected ventrolaterally from the DMV in 44 of 49 cells and these were likely to be vagal motor neurons. Axons of other neurons ramified within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) or DMV. These cells were smaller and otherwise morphologically distinct from putative motor neurons. Transgenic mice with GFP-expressing inhibitory neurons (i.e., GIN mice) were used to identify a GABAergic subset vagal neurons. These neurons had locally-ramifying axons and formed a morphologically distinct subset of DMV cells, which were similar in size and axon trajectory to GABAergic neurons in the NTS. Most neurons in the DMV therefore possess morphological features of motor neurons, but locally projecting cells and inhibitory neurons with distinct morphological features are also found within the DMV. These cells likely contribute to regulation of vagal function. PMID:19619517

  11. 5-HT7 receptor modulates GABAergic transmission in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus and controls cortical release of serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Kusek, Magdalena; Sowa, Joanna; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Tokarski, Krzysztof; Hess, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the several serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes that are expressed in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Some earlier findings suggested that 5-HT7 receptors in the DRN were localized on GABAergic interneurons modulating the activity of 5-HT projection neurons. The aim of the present study was to find out how the 5-HT7 receptor modulates the GABAergic synaptic input to putative 5-HT DRN neurons, and whether blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor would affect the release of 5-HT in the target structure. Male Wistar rats with microdialysis probes implanted in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) received injections of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride (SB 269970), which induced an increase in the levels of 5-HT and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the PFC. In another set of experiments whole-cell recordings from presumed projection neurons were carried out using DRN slices. SB 269970 application resulted in depolarization and in an increase in the firing frequency of the cells. In order to activate 5-HT7 receptors, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) was applied in the presence of N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635). Hyperpolarization of cells and a decrease in the firing frequency were observed after activation of the 5-HT7 receptor. Blockade of 5-HT7 receptors caused a decrease in the mean frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs), while its activation induced an increase. The mechanism of these effects appears to involve tonically-active 5-HT7 receptors modulating firing and/or GABA release from inhibitory interneurons which regulate the activity of DRN serotonergic projection neurons. PMID:26347612

  12. Involvement of dorsal hippocampus glutamatergic and nitrergic neurotransmission in autonomic responses evoked by acute restraint stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Neto, T B; Scopinho, A A; Biojone, C; Corrêa, F M A; Resstel, L B M

    2014-01-31

    The dorsal hippocampus (DH) is a structure of the limbic system that is involved in emotional, learning and memory processes. There is evidence indicating that the DH modulates cardiovascular correlates of behavioral responses to stressful stimuli. Acute restraint stress (RS) is an unavoidable stress situation that evokes marked and sustained autonomic changes, which are characterized by elevated blood pressure (BP), intense heart rate (HR) increase and a decrease in cutaneous temperature. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor/nitric oxide (NO) pathway of the DH in the modulation of autonomic (arterial BP, HR and tail skin temperature) responses evoked by RS in rats. Bilateral microinjection of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-7 (10 nmol/500 nL) into the DH attenuated RS-evoked autonomic responses. Moreover, RS evoked an increase in the content of NO₂/NO₃ in the DH, which are products of the spontaneous oxidation of NO under physiological conditions that can provide an indirect measurement of NO production. Bilateral microinjection of N-propyl-L-arginine (0.1 nmol/500 nL; N-propyl, a neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) inhibitor) or carboxy-PTIO (2 nmol/500 nL; c-PTIO, an NO scavenger) into the DH also attenuated autonomic responses evoked by RS. Therefore, our findings suggest that a glutamatergic system present in the DH is involved in the autonomic modulation during RS, acting via NMDA receptors and nNOS activation. Furthermore, the present results suggest that NMDA receptor/nNO activation has a facilitatory influence on RS-evoked autonomic responses. PMID:24269610

  13. Pharmacological Characterization of 5-HT1A Autoreceptor-Coupled GIRK Channels in Rat Dorsal Raphe 5-HT Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    G protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in 5-HT neurons are assumed to be principal effectors of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, but their pharmacology, subunit composition and the role in regulation of 5-HT neuron activity have not been fully elucidated. We sought for a pharmacological tool for assessing the functional role of GIRK channels in 5-HT neurons by characterizing the effects of drugs known to block GIRK channels in the submicromolar range of concentrations. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in brainstem slices were used to determine concentration-response relationships for the selected GIRK channel blockers on 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated inwardly rectifying K+ conductance in rat dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons. 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated GIRK conductance was completely blocked by the nonselective inwardly rectifying potassium channels blocker Ba2+ (EC50 = 9.4 μM, full block with 100 μM) and by SCH23390 (EC50 = 1.95 μM, full block with 30 μM). GIRK-specific blocker tertiapin-Q blocked 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated GIRK conductance with high potency (EC50 = 33.6 nM), but incompletely, i.e. ~16% of total conductance resulted to be tertiapin-Q-resistant. U73343 and SCH28080, reported to block GIRK channels with submicromolar EC50s, were essentially ineffective in 5-HT neurons. Our data show that inwardly rectifying K+ channels coupled to 5-HT1A autoreceptors display pharmacological properties generally expected for neuronal GIRK channels, but different from GIRK1-GIRK2 heteromers, the predominant form of brain GIRK channels. Distinct pharmacological properties of GIRK channels in 5-HT neurons should be explored for the development of new therapeutic agents for mood disorders. PMID:26460748

  14. NSAIDs modulate GABA-activated currents via Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LEI; LI, LI; MA, KE-TAO; WANG, YANG; LI, JING; SHI, WEN-YAN; ZHU, HE; ZHANG, ZHONG-SHUANG; SI, JUN-QIANG

    2016-01-01

    The ability of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to modulate γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-activated currents via Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG), was examined in the present study. During the preparation of DRG neurons harvested from Sprague-Dawley rats, the whole-cell recording technique was used to record the effect of NSAIDs on GABA-activated inward currents, and the expression levels of the TMEM16A and TMEM16B subunits were revealed. In the event that DRG neurons were pre-incubated for 20 sec with niflumic acid (NFA) and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) prior to the administration of GABA, the GABA-induced inward currents were diminished markedly in the majority of neurons examined (96.3%). The inward currents induced by 100 µmol/l GABA were attenuated by (0±0.09%; neurons = 4), (5.32±3.51%; neurons = 6), (21.3±4.00%; neurons = 5), (33.8±5.20%; neurons = 17), (52.2±5.10%; neurons = 4) and (61.1±4.12%; neurons = 12) by 0.1, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 µmol/l NFA, respectively. The inward currents induced by 100 µmol/l GABA were attenuated by (13.8±6%; neurons = 6), (23.2±14.7%; neurons = 6) and (29.7±9.1%; neurons = 9) by 3, 10 and 30 µmol/l NPPB, respectively. NFA and NPPB dose-dependently inhibited GABA-activated currents with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 6.7 and 11 µmol/l, respectively. The inhibitory effect of 100 µmol/l NFA on the GABA-evoked inward current were also strongly inhibited by nitrendipine (NTDP; an L-type calcium channel blocker), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (a highly selective calcium chelating reagent), caffeine (a widely available Ca2+ consuming drug) and calcium-free extracellular fluid, in a concentration-dependent manner. Immunofluorescent staining indicated that TMEM16A and TMEM16B expression was widely distributed in DRG neurons. The results suggest that NSAIDs may be able to regulate Ca2

  15. Mechanical allodynia following contusion injury of the rat spinal cord is associated with loss of GABAergic inhibition in the dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Drew, Geoffrey M; Siddall, Philip J; Duggan, Arthur W

    2004-06-01

    The present study investigated whether mechanical allodynia following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) of the thoracic segments 12 and 13 of the rat was associated with a reduction in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic inhibition adjacent to the site of injury. Five to 7 days following SCI, extracellular recordings were obtained from dorsal horn neurones located 1-2 segments caudal to the injury, in non-allodynic and allodynic halothane anaesthetised rats and from comparable neurones in normal rats. To assess spinal GABAergic inhibition in the three groups of animals, spontaneous and evoked cell firing rates were recorded before, during and after microiontophoretic application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. Administration of bicuculline to normal animals resulted in significant and reversible increases in the receptive field size, spontaneous firing rate, response to brushing and pinching the skin and afterdischarge activity of dorsal horn neurones, as well as decreasing paired-pulse depression of responses evoked by transcutaneous electrical stimulation. In non-allodynic SCI animals, bicuculline ejection led to significant changes in receptive field size, paired-pulse depression and responses to brush and pinch stimulation that were comparable to those observed in normal animals. By contrast, in allodynic SCI animals, bicuculline ejection had little or no effect on dorsal horn neurone responses to mechanical skin stimuli and paired-pulse depression despite reliably blocking the inhibition of cell firing produced by similarly applied GABA. The demonstration of reduced GABAergic inhibition predominantly in the allodynic SCI rats suggests that such a deficiency contributed to this pain-related behaviour acutely following SCI. PMID:15157699

  16. Supraspinal morphine and descending inhibitions acting on the dorsal horn of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, A H; Le Bars, D

    1987-01-01

    1. Recordings were made from thirty-nine convergent neurones in the lumbar enlargement of the rat spinal cord. These neurones were activated by both innocuous and noxious stimuli applied to their excitatory receptive fields located on the extremity of the ipsilateral hind paw. Transcutaneous application of suprathreshold 2 ms square-wave pulses to the centre of the receptive field resulted in responses to A- and C-fibre activation being observed; a mean of 18.8 +/- 1.8 C-fibre latency spikes was evoked per stimulus. This type of response was inhibited by applying noxious conditioning stimuli to heterotopic body areas; immersing the tail in a 52 degrees C water-bath caused a mean 54.5 +/- 2.3% inhibition of the C-fibre-evoked response; such inhibitory processes have been termed diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (d.n.i.c.). 2. The effects of microinjections of morphine (5 micrograms; 0.2 microliter) on both the unconditioned C-fibre-evoked response and inhibitory processes triggered from the tail were investigated in an attempt to answer two questions: (a) does morphine increase tonic descending inhibitory processes and (b) what are the effects of morphine on descending inhibitory processes triggered by noxious stimuli? 3. The predominant effect of periaqueductal grey matter (p.a.g.) morphine on the C-fibre-evoked responses was a facilitation: 51% of cells had their C-fibre-evoked responses increased by morphine (by roughly 50%); 31% of cells were not influenced while the remaining 18% of units were depressed; however the cells classified as depressed were only marginally so. No clear relationships were found either between the microinjection sites in the p.a.g. and their corresponding effects or between the number of C-fibre-spikes evoked in the control sequences and the subsequent effect of morphine. 4. While d.n.i.c. was not altered by morphine in 56% of cases, it was clearly reduced in the remaining cells. The effects were immediate but peaked at 40 min

  17. ACUTE BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY OF CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR IN ADULT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Motor activity and neuromotor function were examined in adult CD rats exposed to either carbaryl or propoxur, and behavioral effects were compared with the time course of cholinesterase inhibition. Rats received an IP injection of either 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 mg/kg propoxur or 0, 4, 8,...

  18. Expression and transport of Angiotensin II AT1 receptors in spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Pavel, Jaroslav; Tang, Hui; Brimijoin, Stephen; Moughamian, Armen; Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Benicky, Julius; Saavedra, Juan M

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the role of Angiotensin II in the regulation of peripheral sensory and motor systems, we initiated a study of the expression, localization and transport of Angiotensin II receptor types in the rat sciatic nerve pathway, including L4–L5 spinal cord segments, the corresponding dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and the sciatic nerve. We used quantitative autoradiography for AT1 and AT2 receptors, and in situ hybridization to detect AT1A, AT1B and AT2 mRNAs. We found substantial expression and discrete localization of Angiotensin II AT1 receptors, with much higher numbers in the grey than in the white matter. A very high AT1 receptor expression was detected in the superficial dorsal horns and in neuronal clusters of the DRGs. Expression of AT1A mRNA was significantly higher than that of AT1B. AT1 receptor binding and AT1A and AT1B mRNAs were especially prominent in ventral horn motor neurons, and in the DRG neuronal cells. Unilateral dorsal rhizotomy significantly reduced AT1 receptor binding in the ipsilateral side of the superficial dorsal horn, indicating that a substantial number of dorsal horn AT1 receptors have their origin in the DRGs. After ligation of the sciatic nerve, there was a high accumulation of AT1 receptors proximal to the ligature, a demonstration of anterograde receptor transport. We found inconsistent levels of AT2 receptor binding and mRNA. Our results suggest multiple roles of Angiotensin II AT1 receptors in the regulation of sensory and motor functions. PMID:18976642

  19. Preweaning cocaine exposure alters brain glucose metabolic rates following repeated amphetamine administration in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Susan M; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Dow-Edwards, Diana L

    2004-10-15

    Developmental cocaine exposure produces long-term alterations in function of many neuronal circuits. This study examined glucose metabolic rates following repeated amphetamine administration in adult male and female rats pretreated with cocaine during postnatal days (PND) 11-20. PND11-20 cocaine increased the response to amphetamine in many components of the motor system and the dorsal caudate-putamen, in particular, and decreased the metabolic response in the hypothalamus. While amphetamine alone produced widespread increases in metabolism, there were no cocaine-related effects in the mesolimbic, limbic or sensory structures. These data suggest that a brief cocaine exposure during development can alter ontogeny and result in abnormal neuronal responses to repeated psychostimulant administration in adulthood. PMID:15464226

  20. TRIMETHYLTIN DISRUPTS ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONDING IN ADULT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trimethyltin (TMT) is a limbic-system toxicant which also produces sensory dysfunction in adult animals. In the present experiment, the authors examined the effects of TMT on the acoustic startle response. Adult male, Long-Evans rats (N=12/dose) received a single i.p. injection o...

  1. Presynaptic inhibitory effects of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on nociceptive excitatory synaptic transmission in spinal superficial dorsal horn neurons of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tomoyose, Orie; Kodama, Daisuke; Ono, Hideki; Tanabe, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, has been shown to exert analgesic effects in humans and laboratory animals. However, its effects on spinal nociceptive synaptic transmission have not been fully characterized. Here, whole-cell recordings were made from dorsal horn neurons in spinal slices with attached dorsal roots from adult mice, and the effects of fluvoxamine on monosynaptic A-fiber- and C-fiber-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked in response to electrical stimulation of a dorsal root were studied. Fluvoxamine (10 - 100 μM) concentration-dependently suppressed both monosynaptic A-fiber- and C-fiber-mediated EPSCs, which were attenuated by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. In the presence of the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron, fluvoxamine hardly suppressed A-fiber-mediated EPSCs, whereas its inhibitory effect on C-fiber-mediated EPSCs was not affected. Although fluvoxamine increased the paired-pulse ratio of A-fiber-mediated EPSCs, it increased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs (sEPSCs and mEPSCs). Since sEPSCs and mEPSCs appeared to arise largely from spinal interneurons, we then recorded strontium-evoked asynchronous events occurring after A-fiber stimulation, whose frequency was reduced by fluvoxamine. These results suggest that fluvoxamine reduces excitatory synaptic transmission from primary afferent fibers via presynaptic mechanisms involving 5-HT1A and/or 5-HT3 receptors, which may contribute to its analgesic effects. PMID:25252797

  2. Effect of TRPV4-p38 MAPK Pathway on Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yu-Juan; Zhang, Xiao; Fan, Zhen-Zhen; Huai, Juan; Teng, Yong-Bo; Zhang, Yang; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships among TRPV4, p38, and neuropathic pain in a rat model of chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. Mechanical allodynia appeared after CCD surgery, enhanced via the intrathecal injection of 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD, an agonist of TRPV4) and anisomycin (an agonist of p38), but was suppressed by Ruthenium Red (RR, an inhibitor of TRPV4) and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38). The protein expressions of p38 and P-p38 were upregulated by 4α-PDD and anisomycin injection but reduced by RR and SB203580. Moreover, TRPV4 was upregulated by 4α-PDD and SB203580 and downregulated by RR and anisomycin. In DRG tissues, the numbers of TRPV4- or p38-positive small neurons were significantly changed in CCD rats, increased by the agonists, and decreased by the inhibitors. The amplitudes of ectopic discharges were increased by 4α-PDD and anisomycin but decreased by RR and SB203580. Collectively, these results support the link between TRPV4 and p38 and their intermediary role for neuropathic pain in rats with chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. PMID:27366753

  3. Expression of the vesicular glutamate transporters-1 and -2 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord and their regulation by nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Brumovsky, P; Watanabe, M; Hökfelt, T

    2007-06-29

    The expression of two vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, was studied with immunohistochemistry in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), the lumbar spinal cord and the skin of the adult mouse. About 12% and 65% of the total number of DRG neuron profiles (NPs) expressed VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, respectively. VGLUT1-immunoreactive (IR) NPs were usually medium- to large-sized, in contrast to a majority of small- or medium-sized VGLUT2-IR NPs. Most VGLUT1-IR NPs did not coexpress calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or bound isolectin B4 (IB4). In contrast, approximately 31% and approximately 42% of the VGLUT2-IR DRG NPs were also CGRP-IR or bound IB4, respectively. Conversely, virtually all CGRP-IR and IB4-binding NPs coexpressed VGLUT2. Moderate colocalization between VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 was also observed. Sciatic nerve transection induced a decrease in the overall number of VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-IR NPs (both ipsi- and contralaterally) and, in addition, a parallel, unilateral increase of VGLUT2-like immunoreactivity (LI) in a subpopulation of mostly small NPs. In the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, strong VGLUT1-LI was detected, particularly in deep dorsal horn layers and in the ventral horns. VGLUT2-LI was abundant throughout the gray spinal matter, 'radiating' into/from the white matter. A unilateral dorsal rhizotomy reduced VGLUT1-LI, while apparently leaving unaffected the VGLUT2-LI. Transport through axons for both VGLUTs was confirmed by their accumulation after compression of the sciatic nerve or dorsal roots. In the hind paw skin, abundant VGLUT2-IR nerve fibers were observed, sometimes associated with Merkel cells. Lower numbers of VGLUT1-IR fibers were also detected in the skin. Some VGLUT1-IR and VGLUT2-IR fibers were associated with hair follicles. Based on these data and those by Morris et al. [Morris JL, Konig P, Shimizu T, Jobling P, Gibbins IL (2005) Most peptide-containing sensory neurons lack proteins for exocytotic release and

  4. L5 spinal nerve axotomy induces sensitization of cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons in the rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Djouhri, Laiche

    2016-06-15

    Partial nerve injury often leads to peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP), a major health problem that lacks effective drug treatment. PNP is characterized by ongoing/spontaneous pain, and hypersensitivity to noxious (hyperalgesia) and innocuous (allodynia) stimuli. Preclinical studies using the L5 spinal nerve ligation/axotomy (SNL/SNA) model of PNP suggest that this type of chronic pain results partly from sensitization of ipsilateral L4C-and Aδ-fiber nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, but whether L4 β-nociceptors, which constitute a substantial group of DRG neurons, also become sensitized remains unanswered. To address this issue, intracellular recordings from somata of cutaneous Aβ-nociceptors (classified according to their dorsal root conduction velocities (>6.5m/s), and physiologically based on their responses to noxious (but not innocuous) mechanical stimuli) were made from L4-DRGs in normal (control) rats and in rats seven days after L5 SNA in vivo. Compared with control, cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptive DRG neurons in SNA rats (that developed mechanical hypersensitivity) exhibited sensitization indicated by: a) decreased mean mechanical threshold (from 57.8±7.1 to 10.3±1.7mN), b) decreased mean dorsal root electrical threshold (from 11.4±0.7 to 4.3±0.4V), c) increased mean response to a suprathreshold mechanical stimulus (from 18.5±1.8 to 34±3.7spikes/sec) and d) an obvious, but non-significant, increase in the incidence of ongoing/spontaneous activity (from 3% to 18%). These findings suggest that cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptors also become sensitized after L5 SNA, and that sensitization of this subclass of A-fiber nociceptors may contribute both directly and indirectly to nerve injury-induced PNP. PMID:27173166

  5. Auditory behaviour and brainstem histochemistry in adult rats with characterized ear damage after neonatal ossicle ablation or cochlear disruption.

    PubMed

    Paterson, J A; Hosea, E W

    1993-02-26

    Binaural and monaural ossicle ablation in neonate rats before the time of onset of auditory input resulted in hearing deficits as detected by behavioural responses to sound stimuli in these rats as young adults. Cochlear disruption at the same neonatal age similarly resulted in the absence of startle reflexes in many of the rats. When the middle and inner ears of the rats were analysed postmortem in serial sections, it was observed that most ears after neonatal ossicle ablation contained only small remnants of the malleus-incus unit, separated from the stapes; in other ears an apparent continuity of ossicles had been restored. The rats with blind-ending ear canals and ossicle atrophy were those that had shown little response to sound stimuli. In the cochlear-disrupted rats, those with modiolar damage and loss of most spiral ganglion cells had shown substantial impairment of sound perception, even in some rats with only monaural modiolar loss. The chronic conduction deficit caused by neonatal ossicle removal did not result in detectable differences in relative cytochrome oxidase activity in the dorsal cochlear nuclei and central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. For monaurally ossicle-ablated rats, quantitation of the average intensity of enzyme reaction product in sections of dorsal or ventral cochlear nuclei, or central nucleus, did not reveal a difference between operated and non-operated sides. However, in binaurally ossicle-ablated rats, the relative enzyme activity in the anteroventral cochlear nuclei was reduced in comparison to this nucleus in control rats. The volume of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus in rats that had had neonatal binaural cochlear disruption was reduced relative to the volume in control rats or in rats that had had binaural ossicle ablation (P < 0.001); the latter procedure did not result in a statistically significant difference from controls in AVCN volume. In cochlear-operated rats with monaural modiolar damage, the AVCN

  6. Efficient central nervous system AAVrh10-mediated intrathecal gene transfer in adult and neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Hordeaux, J; Dubreil, L; Deniaud, J; Iacobelli, F; Moreau, S; Ledevin, M; Le Guiner, C; Blouin, V; Le Duff, J; Mendes-Madeira, A; Rolling, F; Cherel, Y; Moullier, P; Colle, M-A

    2015-04-01

    Intracerebral administration of recombinant adeno-associated vector (AAV) has been performed in several clinical trials. However, delivery into the brain requires multiple injections and is not efficient to target the spinal cord, thus limiting its applications. To assess widespread and less invasive strategies, we tested intravenous (IV) or intrathecal (that is, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) delivery of a rAAVrh10-egfp vector in adult and neonate rats and studied the effect of the age at injection on neurotropism. IV delivery is more efficient in neonates and targets predominantly Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and sensory neurons of the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. A single intra-CSF administration of AAVrh10, single strand or oversized self-complementary, is efficient for the targeting of neurons in the cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression is more widespread in neonates when compared with adults. More than 50% of motor neurons express GFP in the three segments of the spinal cord in neonates and in the cervical and thoracic regions in adults. Neurons are almost exclusively transduced in neonates, whereas neurons, astrocytes and rare oligodendrocytes are targeted in adults. These results expand the possible routes of delivery of AAVrh10, a serotype that has shown efficacy and safety in clinical trials concerning neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25588740

  7. The Influence of Carcinogenic Dosage and of Sex on the Induction of Epitheliomas and Sarcomas in the Dorsal Skin of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Cora P.; Glucksmann, A.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of varying the numbers (4, 5, 10, 20 and 40) of weekly applications of DMBA to the dorsal skin of intact and castrate male and female rats on the induction of basal and squamous celled epitheliomas and of sarcomas has been investigated. Basal celled tumours originate mainly in hair follicles and squamous celled neoplasms in the interfollicular regions of the epidermis and differ in their progression to malignancy. Penetration of the panniculus carnosus is neither a sufficient nor necessary criterion of malignancy since growing hair follicles pass through the muscle layer and carcinomas and sarcomas which are still confined to the dermis, spread along the perineural lymphatics and metastasise to the lungs. Sex and castration do not affect carcinogenesis of epitheliomas in the dorsal skin at any dose level. Significantly more sarcomas result from 20 weekly paintings in male than in female or castrate rats. The induction period for all tumour types is shortened in sensitive individuals only by an increase from 5 to 10 weekly applications. For less sensitive animals the rate of oncogenesis is accelerated with number of administrations up to 20, but slowed down from this level by 40 paintings. The optimal dose for speed of induction of all tumour types, for maximal yield of basal celled epitheliomas and for that of sarcomas in male rats is 20 weekly applications. The progression to malignancy varies with tumour type: it is fast for sarcomas and slow for basal celled neoplasms. Of the 336 rats at risk only 1% have fibromas or other precursor lesions, while 40% have sarcomas; animals with squamous celled papillomas account for 12%, but those with carcinomas for 66%; there are, however, 64% of rats with basal celled papillomas and only 9% with carcinomas. The optimal dose phenomenon in carcinogenesis is discussed. ImagesFigs. 4-6Figs. 1-3 PMID:5144527

  8. Moderate and severe perinatal asphyxia induces differential effects on cocaine sensitization in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Galeano, Pablo; Romero, Juan Ignacio; Luque-Rojas, María Jesús; Suárez, Juan; Holubiec, Mariana Inés; Bisagno, Verónica; Santín, Luis Javier; De Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Capani, Francisco; Blanco, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) increases the likelihood of suffering from dopamine-related disorders, such as ADHD and schizophrenia. Since dopaminergic transmission plays a major role in cocaine sensitization, the purpose of this study was to determine whether PA could be associated with altered behavioral sensitization to cocaine. To this end, adult rats born vaginally (CTL), by caesarean section (C+), or by C+ with 15 min (PA15, moderate PA) or 19 min (PA19, severe PA) of global anoxia were repeatedly administered with cocaine (i.p., 15 mg/kg) and then challenged with cocaine (i.p., 15 mg/kg) after a 5-day withdrawal period. In addition, c-Fos, FosB/ΔFosB, DAT, and TH expression were assessed in dorsal (CPu) and ventral (NAcc) striatum. Results indicated that PA15 rats exhibited an increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine, while PA19 rats displayed an abnormal acquisition of locomotor sensitization and did not express a sensitized response to cocaine. c-Fos expression in NAcc, but not in CPu, was associated with these alterations in cocaine sensitization. FosB/ΔFosB expression was increased in all groups and regions after repeated cocaine administration, although it reached lower expression levels in PA19 rats. In CTL, C+, and PA15, but not in PA19 rats, the expression of TH in NAcc was reduced in groups repeatedly treated with cocaine, independently of the challenge test. Furthermore, this reduction was more pronounced in PA15 rats. DAT expression remained unaltered in all groups and regions studied. These results suggest that moderate PA may increase the vulnerability to drug abuse and in particular to cocaine addiction. PMID:23447367

  9. A Transgenic Rat for Specifically Inhibiting Adult Neurogenesis123

    PubMed Central

    Grigereit, Laura; Pickel, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The growth of research on adult neurogenesis and the development of new models and tools have greatly advanced our understanding of the function of newborn neurons in recent years. However, there are still significant limitations in the ability to identify the functions of adult neurogenesis in available models. Here we report a transgenic rat (TK rat) that expresses herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase in GFAP+ cells. Upon treating TK rats with the antiviral drug valganciclovir, granule cell neurogenesis can be completely inhibited in adulthood, in both the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. Interestingly, neurogenesis in the glomerular and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb was only partially inhibited, suggesting that some adult-born neurons in these regions derive from a distinct precursor population that does not express GFAP. Within the hippocampus, blockade of neurogenesis was rapid and nearly complete within 1 week of starting treatment. Preliminary behavioral analyses indicate that general anxiety levels and patterns of exploration are generally unaffected in neurogenesis-deficient rats. However, neurogenesis-deficient TK rats showed reduced sucrose preference, suggesting deficits in reward-related behaviors. We expect that TK rats will facilitate structural, physiological, and behavioral studies that complement those possible in existing models, broadly enhancing understanding of the function of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27257630

  10. Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin-induced sympathectomy in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picklo, M. J.; Wiley, R. G.; Lonce, S.; Lappi, D. A.; Robertson, D.

    1995-01-01

    Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin (DHIT) is an antibody-targeted noradrenergic lesioning tool comprised of a monoclonal antibody against the noradrenergic enzyme, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, conjugated to saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein. Noradrenergic-neuron specificity and completeness and functionality of sympathectomy were assessed. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 28.5, 85.7, 142 or 285 micrograms/kg DHIT i.v. Three days after injection, a 6% to 73% decrease in the neurons was found in the superior cervical ganglia of the animals. No loss of sensory, nodose and dorsal root ganglia, neurons was observed at the highest dose of DHIT. In contrast, the immunotoxin, 192-saporin (142 micrograms/kg), lesioned all three ganglia. To assess the sympathectomy, 2 wk after treatment (285 micrograms/kg), rats were anesthetized with urethane (1 g/kg) and cannulated in the femoral artery and vein. DHIT-treated animals' basal systolic blood pressure and heart rate were significantly lower than controls. Basal plasma norepinephrine levels were 41% lower in DHIT-treated animals than controls. Tyramine-stimulated release of norepinephrine in DHIT-treated rats was 27% of controls. Plasma epinephrine levels of DHIT animals were not reduced. DHIT-treated animals exhibited a 2-fold hypersensitivity to the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. We conclude that DHIT selectively delivered saporin to noradrenergic neurons resulting in destruction of these neurons. Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin administration produces a rapid, irreversible sympathectomy.

  11. Spatial and temporal pattern of changes in the number of GAD65-immunoreactive inhibitory terminals in the rat superficial dorsal horn following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Louis-Etienne; Magnussen, Claire; Bailey, Andrea L; St Louis, Manon; De Koninck, Yves; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are an important component of dorsal horn circuitry where they serve to modulate spinal nociception. There is now considerable evidence indicating that reduced inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn contributes to neuropathic pain. A loss of these inhibitory neurons after nerve injury is one of the mechanisms being proposed to account for reduced inhibition; however, this remains controversial. This is in part because previous studies have focused on global measurements of inhibitory neurons without assessing the number of inhibitory synapses. To address this, we conducted a quantitative analysis of the spatial and temporal changes in the number of inhibitory terminals, as detected by glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) immunoreactivity, in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Isolectin B4 (IB4) labelling was used to define the location within the dorsal horn directly affected by the injury to the peripheral nerve. The density of GAD65 inhibitory terminals was reduced in lamina I (LI) and lamina II (LII) of the spinal cord after injury. The loss of GAD65 terminals was greatest in LII with the highest drop occurring around 3-4 weeks and a partial recovery by 56 days. The time course of changes in the number of GAD65 terminals correlated well with both the loss of IB4 labeling and with the altered thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli. Our detailed analysis of GAD65+ inhibitory terminals clearly revealed that nerve injury induced a transient loss of GAD65 immunoreactive terminals and suggests a potential involvement for these alterations in the development and amelioration of pain behaviour. PMID:25189404

  12. Neuropathological and neuroprotective features of vitamin B12 on the dorsal spinal ganglion of rats after the experimental crush of sciatic nerve: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal motoneuron neuroprotection by vitaminB12 was previously reported; the present study was carried out to evaluate neuroprotectivity in the dorsal root ganglion sensory neuron. Methods In present study thirty-six Wister-Albino rats (aged 8–9 weeks and weighing 200–250 g) were tested. The animals were randomly divided into 6 groups which every group contained 6 rats. Group A: received normal saline (for 42 days); Group B: vitamin B12 was administered (0.5 mg/kg/day for 21 days); Group C: received vitamin B12 (1 mg/kg/day for 21days); Group D: received vitamin B12 (0.5 mg/kg/day for 42 days); Group E; received vitamin B12 (1 mg/kg/day for 42 days); Group F; received no treatment. The L5 Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons count compared to the number of left and right neurons .Furthermore, DRG sensory neurons for regeneration were evaluated 21 or 42 days after injury (each group was analyzed by One-Way ANOVA test). Results (1): The comparison of left crushed neurons (LCN) number with right non-crushed neurons in all experimental groups (B, C, D and C), indicating a significant decline in their neurons enumeration (p<0/05). (2): The comparison of test group’s LCN with the control group’s LCN revealed a significant rise in the number of experimental group neurons (p<0/05). (3): Moreover, comparing the number of right neurons in experimental groups with the number of neurons in crushed neurons indicated that the average number of right neurons showed a significant increase in experimental groups (p<0/05). Conclusion Consequently, the probability of nerve regeneration will be increased by the increment of the administered drug dosage and duration. On the other hand, the regeneration and healing in Dorsal Spinal Ganglion will be improved by increase of administration time and vitamin B12 dose, indicating that such vitamin was able to progress recovery process of peripheral nerves damage in experimental rats. Finally, our results have important

  13. Effect of eletroacupuncture on DU-14 (Dazhui), DU-2 (Yaoshu), and Liv-13 (Zhangmen) on the survival of Wistar rats' dorsal skin flaps.

    PubMed

    Uema, Deise; Orlandi, Denise; Freitas, Raphael R; Rodgério, Tatiane; Yamamura, Ysao; Tabosa, Angela F

    2008-01-01

    The survival of skin flaps has great interest in many areas of Medicine. In practice, one of the most important complications in the use of skin flaps is the tissue ischemia, which frequently results in widespread necrosis and failure of the proposed treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible benefits of eletroacupuncture stimulation of the points DU-14 (Dazhui), DU-2 (Yaoshu), and Liv-13 (Zhangmen) over the skin flap survival of Wistar rats after 8 days of treatment. Forty male Wistar rats were allocated into four groups with 10 animals each. They were submitted to a surgical procedure in which a dorsal skin flap measuring 10 x 4 cm was elevated and then sutured back with a plastic barrier between the flap and the donor site. During the following 8 days, one group received electro stimulation in two "nonaccupoints" whereas the other one had the accupoints DU-14 (Dazhui), DU-2 (Yaoshu), and Liv-13 (Zhangmen) stimulated. After this period, the rats were killed and flaps were appraised qualitative and quantitatively. Data were evaluated with analysis of variance and to establish significance Fisher's PLSD test was used when analysis of variance showed P < .05. It was observed that electroacupuncture group presented a skin flap survival index remarkably larger than the others. It has also shown a better evolution during the 8 days PO, confirmed by the lowest rate of necrosis and absent area. In this experimental model, eletroacupuncture was an efficient method to preserve vitality and decrease dorsal skin flap necrosis on Wistar rats. PMID:18354293

  14. The effects of huwentoxin-I on the voltage-gated sodium channels of rat hippocampal and cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meichi; Rong, Mingqiang; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping

    2012-03-01

    Huwentoxin-I (HWTX-I) is a 33-residue peptide isolated from the venom of Ornithoctonus huwena and could inhibit TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels and N-type calcium channels in mammalian dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. However, the effects of HWTX-I on mammalian central neuronal and insect sodium channel subtypes remain unknown. In this study, we found that HWTX-I potently inhibited sodium channels in rat hippocampal and cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons with the IC(50) values of 66.1±5.2 and 4.80±0.58nM, respectively. Taken together with our previous work on DRG neurons (IC(50)≈55nM), the order of sodium channel sensitivity to HWTX-I inhibition was insect central DUM≫mammalian peripheral>mammalian central neurons. HWTX-I exhibited no effect on the steady-state activation and inactivation of sodium channels in rat hippocampal and cockroach DUM neurons. PMID:22094230

  15. Virus-Mediated Knockdown of Nav1.3 in Dorsal Root Ganglia of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Alleviates Tactile Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain affects a substantial number of people and represents a major public health problem. Available clinical treatments for diabetic neuropathic pain remain only partially effective and many of these treatments carry the burden of side effects or the risk of dependence. The misexpression of sodium channels within nociceptive neurons contributes to abnormal electrical activity associated with neuropathic pain. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.3 produces tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents with rapid repriming kinetics and has been shown to contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability and ectopic firing in injured neurons. Suppression of Nav1.3 activity can attenuate neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury. Previous studies have shown that expression of Nav1.3 is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of diabetic rats that exhibit neuropathic pain. Here, we hypothesized that viral-mediated knockdown of Nav1.3 in painful diabetic neuropathy would reduce neuropathic pain. We used a validated recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-shRNA-Nav1.3 vector to knockdown expression of Nav1.3, via a clinically applicable intrathecal injection method. Three weeks following vector administration, we observed a significant rate of transduction in DRGs of diabetic rats that concomitantly reduced neuronal excitability of dorsal horn neurons and reduced behavioral evidence of tactile allodynia. Taken together, these findings offer a novel gene therapy approach for addressing chronic diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:26101954

  16. Virus-Mediated Knockdown of Nav1.3 in Dorsal Root Ganglia of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Alleviates Tactile Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain affects a substantial number of people and represents a major public health problem. Available clinical treatments for diabetic neuropathic pain remain only partially effective and many of these treatments carry the burden of side effects or the risk of dependence. The misexpression of sodium channels within nociceptive neurons contributes to abnormal electrical activity associated with neuropathic pain. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.3 produces tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents with rapid repriming kinetics and has been shown to contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability and ectopic firing in injured neurons. Suppression of Nav1.3 activity can attenuate neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury. Previous studies have shown that expression of Nav1.3 is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of diabetic rats that exhibit neuropathic pain. Here, we hypothesized that viral-mediated knockdown of Nav1.3 in painful diabetic neuropathy would reduce neuropathic pain. We used a validated recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-shRNA-Nav1.3 vector to knockdown expression of Nav1.3, via a clinically applicable intrathecal injection method. Three weeks following vector administration, we observed a significant rate of transduction in DRGs of diabetic rats that concomitantly reduced neuronal excitability of dorsal horn neurons and reduced behavioral evidence of tactile allodynia. Taken together, these findings offer a novel gene therapy approach for addressing chronic diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:26101954

  17. Evaluation of Five Tests for Sensitivity to Functional Deficits following Cervical or Thoracic Dorsal Column Transection in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Fagoe, Nitish D; Attwell, Callan L; Eggers, Ruben; Tuinenbreijer, Lizz; Kouwenhoven, Dorette; Verhaagen, Joost; Mason, Matthew R J

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal column lesion model of spinal cord injury targets sensory fibres which originate from the dorsal root ganglia and ascend in the dorsal funiculus. It has the advantages that fibres can be specifically traced from the sciatic nerve, verifiably complete lesions can be performed of the labelled fibres, and it can be used to study sprouting in the central nervous system from the conditioning lesion effect. However, functional deficits from this type of lesion are mild, making assessment of experimental treatment-induced functional recovery difficult. Here, five functional tests were compared for their sensitivity to functional deficits, and hence their suitability to reliably measure recovery of function after dorsal column injury. We assessed the tape removal test, the rope crossing test, CatWalk gait analysis, and the horizontal ladder, and introduce a new test, the inclined rolling ladder. Animals with dorsal column injuries at C4 or T7 level were compared to sham-operated animals for a duration of eight weeks. As well as comparing groups at individual timepoints we also compared the longitudinal data over the whole time course with linear mixed models (LMMs), and for tests where steps are scored as success/error, using generalized LMMs for binomial data. Although, generally, function recovered to sham levels within 2-6 weeks, in most tests we were able to detect significant deficits with whole time-course comparisons. On the horizontal ladder deficits were detected until 5-6 weeks. With the new inclined rolling ladder functional deficits were somewhat more consistent over the testing period and appeared to last for 6-7 weeks. Of the CatWalk parameters base of support was sensitive to cervical and thoracic lesions while hind-paw print-width was affected by cervical lesion only. The inclined rolling ladder test in combination with the horizontal ladder and the CatWalk may prove useful to monitor functional recovery after experimental treatment in this

  18. Evaluation of Five Tests for Sensitivity to Functional Deficits following Cervical or Thoracic Dorsal Column Transection in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Ruben; Tuinenbreijer, Lizz; Kouwenhoven, Dorette; Verhaagen, Joost; Mason, Matthew R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal column lesion model of spinal cord injury targets sensory fibres which originate from the dorsal root ganglia and ascend in the dorsal funiculus. It has the advantages that fibres can be specifically traced from the sciatic nerve, verifiably complete lesions can be performed of the labelled fibres, and it can be used to study sprouting in the central nervous system from the conditioning lesion effect. However, functional deficits from this type of lesion are mild, making assessment of experimental treatment-induced functional recovery difficult. Here, five functional tests were compared for their sensitivity to functional deficits, and hence their suitability to reliably measure recovery of function after dorsal column injury. We assessed the tape removal test, the rope crossing test, CatWalk gait analysis, and the horizontal ladder, and introduce a new test, the inclined rolling ladder. Animals with dorsal column injuries at C4 or T7 level were compared to sham-operated animals for a duration of eight weeks. As well as comparing groups at individual timepoints we also compared the longitudinal data over the whole time course with linear mixed models (LMMs), and for tests where steps are scored as success/error, using generalized LMMs for binomial data. Although, generally, function recovered to sham levels within 2–6 weeks, in most tests we were able to detect significant deficits with whole time-course comparisons. On the horizontal ladder deficits were detected until 5–6 weeks. With the new inclined rolling ladder functional deficits were somewhat more consistent over the testing period and appeared to last for 6–7 weeks. Of the CatWalk parameters base of support was sensitive to cervical and thoracic lesions while hind-paw print-width was affected by cervical lesion only. The inclined rolling ladder test in combination with the horizontal ladder and the CatWalk may prove useful to monitor functional recovery after experimental treatment in this

  19. Acute stress and hippocampal output: exploring dorsal CA1 and subicular synaptic plasticity simultaneously in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Matthew J; Howland, John G

    2013-01-01

    The Cornu Ammonis-1 (CA1) subfield and subiculum (SUB) serve as major output structures of the hippocampal formation. Exploring forms of synaptic plasticity simultaneously within these two output regions may improve understanding of the dynamics of hippocampal circuitry and information transfer between hippocampal and cortical brain regions. Using a novel dual-channel electrophysiological preparation in urethane-anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in vivo, we examined the effects of acute restraint stress (30 min) on short- and long-term forms of synaptic plasticity in both CA1 and SUB by stimulating the CA3 region. Paired-pulse facilitation was disrupted in SUB but not CA1 in the dual-channel experiments following exposure to acute stress. Disruptions in CA1 PPF were evident in subsequent single-channel experiments with a more anterior recording site. Acute stress disrupted long-term potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation (10 bursts of 20 pulses at 200 Hz) in both CA1 and SUB. Low-frequency stimulation (900 pulses at 1 Hz) did not alter CA1 plasticity while a late-developing potentiation was evident in SUB that was disrupted following exposure to acute stress. These findings highlight differences in the sensitivity to acute stress for distinct forms of synaptic plasticity within synapses in hippocampal output regions. The findings are discussed in relation to normal and aberrant forms of hippocampal-cortical information processing. PMID:24303119

  20. Physiological responses during whole body suspension of adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize responses of adult rats to one and two weeks of whole body suspension. Body weights and food and water intakes were initially reduced during suspension, but, while intake of food and water returned to presuspension levels, body weight remained depressed. Diuresis was evident, but only during week two. Hindlimb muscle responses were differential, with the soleus exhibiting the greatest atrophy and the EDL a relative hypertrophy. These findings suggest that adult rats respond qualitatively in a manner similar to juveniles during suspension.

  1. Early life stress induces renal dysfunction in adult male rats but not female rats

    PubMed Central

    Loria, Analia S.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Pollock, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal separation (MatSep) is a model of behavioral stress during early life. We reported that MatSep exacerbates ANG II-induced hypertension in adult male rats. The aims of this study were to determine whether exposure to MatSep in female rats sensitizes blood pressure to ANG II infusion similar to male MatSep rats and to elucidate renal mechanisms involved in the response in MatSep rats. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) pups were exposed to MatSep 3 h/day from days 2 to 14, while control rats remained with their mothers. ANG II-induced mean arterial pressure (MAP; telemetry) was enhanced in female MatSep rats compared with control female rats but delayed compared with male MatSep rats. Creatinine clearance (Ccr) was reduced in male MatSep rats compared with control rats at baseline and after ANG II infusion. ANG II infusion significantly increased T cells in the renal cortex and greater histological damage in the interstitial arteries of male MatSep rats compared with control male rats. Plasma testosterone was greater and estradiol was lower in male MatSep rats compared with control rats with ANG II infusion. ANG II infusion failed to increase blood pressure in orchidectomized male MatSep and control rats. Female MatSep and control rats had similar Ccr, histological renal analysis, and sex hormones at baseline and after ANG II infusion. These data indicate that during ANG II-induced hypertension, MatSep sensitizes the renal phenotype in male but not female rats. PMID:23174859

  2. Estradiol and GPER Activation Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation but Not GPER Expression in the Hippocampus of Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Lieblich, Stephanie E.; Chow, Carmen; Galea, Liisa A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the female rodent but it is not known whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), a membrane receptor, is involved in this process, nor whether there are regional differences in estradiol’s effects on cell proliferation. Thus, we investigated whether estradiol exerts its effects on cell proliferation in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus through GPER, using the GPER agonist, G1, and antagonist, G15. Ovariectomized adult female rats received a single injection of either: 17β-estradiol (10 μg), G1 (0.1, 5, 10 μg), G15 (40 μg), G15 and estradiol, or vehicle (oil, DMSO, or oil+DMSO). After 30 min, animals received an injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and were perfused 24 h later. Acute treatment with estradiol increased, while the GPER agonist G1 (5 μg) decreased, the number of BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus relative to controls. The GPER antagonist, G15 increased the number of BrdU+ cells relative to control in the dorsal region and decreased the number of BrdU+ cells in the ventral region. However, G15 treatment in conjunction with estradiol partially eliminated the estradiol-induced increase in cell proliferation in the dorsal dentate gyrus. Furthermore, G1 decreased the expression of GPER in the dentate gyrus but not the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In summary, we found that activation of GPER decreased cell proliferation and GPER expression in the dentate gyrus of young female rats, presenting a potential and novel estrogen-independent role for this receptor in the adult hippocampus. PMID:26075609

  3. Study on the Mechanism Underlying the Regulation of the NMDA Receptor Pathway in Spinal Dorsal Horns of Visceral Hypersensitivity Rats by Moxibustion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L. D.; Zhao, J. M.; Huang, R. J.; Tan, L. Y.; Hu, Z. H.; Weng, Z. J.; Wang, K.; Wu, H. G.; Liu, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is enhanced in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Treatment of IBS visceral pain by moxibustion methods has a long history and rich clinical experience. In the clinic, moxibustion on the Tianshu (ST25) and Shangjuxu (ST37) acupoints can effectively treat bowel disease with visceral pain and diarrhea symptoms. To investigate the regulatory function of moxibustion on the Tianshu (ST25) and Shangjuxu (ST37) acupoints on spinal cord NR1, NR2B, and PKCε protein and mRNA expression in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) visceral hypersensitivity rats, we did some research. In the study, we found that moxibustion effectively relieved the IBS visceral hyperalgesia status of rats. Analgesic effect of moxibustion was similar to intrathecal injection of Ro 25-6981. The expression of NR1, NR2B, and PKCε in the spinal dorsal horns of IBS visceral hyperalgesia rats increased. Moxibustion on the Tianshu and Shangjuxu acupoints might inhibit the visceral hypersensitivity, simultaneously decreasing the expression of NR1, NR2B, and PKCε in spinal cord of IBS visceral hyperalgesia rats. Based on the above experimental results, we hypothesized NR1, NR2B, and PKCε of spinal cord could play an important role in moxibustion inhibiting the process of central sensitization and visceral hyperalgesia state. PMID:27200098

  4. Rat exposure in mice with neuropathic pain induces fear and antinociception that is not reversed by 5-HT2C receptor activation in the dorsal periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Furuya-da-Cunha, Elke Mayumi; Souza, Rimenez Rodrigues de; Canto-de-Souza, Azair

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that serotonin 5-HT2C receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) mediate both anxiety and antinociception in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze. The present study examined the effects of intra-dPAG infusion of the serotonin 5-HT2C receptor agonist (MK-212) in the defensive reactions and antinociception in mice with neurophatic pain confronted by a predator. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, and predator confrontation was performed using the rat exposure test (RET). Our results demonstrated that both sham-operated and CCI mice exhibited intense defensive reactions when confronted by rats. However, rat-exposed CCI mice showed reduced pain reactivity in comparison to CCI mice exposed to a toy rat. Intra-dPAG infusion of MK-212 prior to predator exposure did not significantly alter defensive or antinociceptive responses. To our knowledge, our results represent the first evidence of RET-induced antinociception in mice. Moreover, the results of the present study suggest that 5-HT2C receptor activation in the dPAG is not critically involved in the control of predator-evoked fearful or antinociceptive responses. PMID:27059332

  5. DISC1-mediated dysregulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heekyung; Kang, Eunchai; GoodSmith, Douglas; Yoon, Do Yeon; Song, Hongjun; Knierim, James J; Ming, Guo-Li; Christian, Kimberly M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the constitutive generation of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the mature brain, is a robust model of neural development and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Previous studies in mice have shown that altered expression of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (Disc1), the mouse homolog of a risk gene for major psychiatric disorders, results in several distinct morphological phenotypes during neuronal development. Although there are advantages to using rats over mice for neurophysiological studies, genetic manipulations have not been widely utilized in rat models. Here, we used a retroviral-mediated approach to knockdown DISC1 expression in dividing cells in the rat dentate gyrus and characterized the morphological development of adult-born granule neurons. Consistent with earlier findings in mice, we show that DISC1 knockdown in adult-born dentate granule cells in rats resulted in accelerated dendritic growth, soma hypertrophy, ectopic dendrites, and mispositioning of new granule cells due to overextended migration. Our study thus demonstrates that the Disc1 genetic manipulation approach used in prior mouse studies is feasible in rats and that there is a conserved biological function of this gene across species. Extending gene-based studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis from mice to rats will allow for the development of additional models that may be more amenable to behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological investigations. These models, in turn, can generate additional insight into the systems-level mechanisms of how risk genes for complex psychiatric disorders may impact adult neurogenesis and hippocampal function. PMID:26161071

  6. DISC1-mediated dysregulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heekyung; Kang, Eunchai; GoodSmith, Douglas; Yoon, Do Yeon; Song, Hongjun; Knierim, James J.; Ming, Guo-li; Christian, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the constitutive generation of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the mature brain, is a robust model of neural development and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Previous studies in mice have shown that altered expression of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (Disc1), the mouse homolog of a risk gene for major psychiatric disorders, results in several distinct morphological phenotypes during neuronal development. Although there are advantages to using rats over mice for neurophysiological studies, genetic manipulations have not been widely utilized in rat models. Here, we used a retroviral-mediated approach to knockdown DISC1 expression in dividing cells in the rat dentate gyrus and characterized the morphological development of adult-born granule neurons. Consistent with earlier findings in mice, we show that DISC1 knockdown in adult-born dentate granule cells in rats resulted in accelerated dendritic growth, soma hypertrophy, ectopic dendrites, and mispositioning of new granule cells due to overextended migration. Our study thus demonstrates that the Disc1 genetic manipulation approach used in prior mouse studies is feasible in rats and that there is a conserved biological function of this gene across species. Extending gene-based studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis from mice to rats will allow for the development of additional models that may be more amenable to behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological investigations. These models, in turn, can generate additional insight into the systems-level mechanisms of how risk genes for complex psychiatric disorders may impact adult neurogenesis and hippocampal function. PMID:26161071

  7. Neurite growth acceleration of adult Dorsal Root Ganglion neurons illuminated by low-level Light Emitting Diode light at 645 nm.

    PubMed

    Burland, Marion; Paris, Lambert; Quintana, Patrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Diouloufet, Lucie; Sar, Chamroeun; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Charlot, Benoit; Braga Silva, Jefferson; Chammas, Michel; Sieso, Victor; Valmier, Jean; Bardin, Fabrice

    2015-06-01

    The effect of a 645 nm Light Emitting Diode (LED) light irradiation on the neurite growth velocity of adult Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons with peripheral axon injury 4-10 days before plating and without previous injury was investigated. The real amount of light reaching the neurons was calculated by taking into account the optical characteristics of the light source and of media in the light path. The knowledge of these parameters is essential to be able to compare results of the literature and a way to reduce inconsistencies. We found that 4 min irradiation of a mean irradiance of 11.3 mW/cm(2) (corresponding to an actual irradiance reaching the neurons of 83 mW/cm(2)) induced a 1.6-fold neurite growth acceleration on non-injured neurons and on axotomized neurons. Although the axotomized neurons were naturally already in a rapid regeneration process, an enhancement was found to occur while irradiating with the LED light, which may be promising for therapy applications. Dorsal Root Ganglion neurons (A) without previous injury and (B) subjected to a conditioning injury. PMID:25077453

  8. Glucose injections into the dorsal hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum of rats prior to T-maze training: Modulation of learning rates and strategy selection

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Clinton E.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of injecting glucose into the dorsal hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum on learning rates and on strategy selection in rats trained on a T-maze that can be solved by using either a hippocampus-sensitive place or striatum-sensitive response strategy. Percentage strategy selection on a probe trial (Pcrit) administered after rats achieved criterion (nine of 10 correct choices) varied by group. All groups predominately exhibited a response strategy on a probe trial administered after overtraining, i.e., after 90 trials. In experiment 1, rats that received intrahippocampal glucose injections showed enhanced acquisition of the T-maze and showed increased use of response solutions at Pcrit compared with that of unimplanted and artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF)-treated groups. These findings suggest that glucose enhanced hippocampal functions to accelerate the rate of learning and the early adoption of a response strategy. In experiment 2, rats that received intrastriatal glucose injections exhibited place solutions early in training and reached criterion more slowly than did aCSF controls, with learning rates comparable to those of unoperated and operated-uninjected controls. Relative to unoperated, operated-uninjected and glucose-injected rats, rats that received intrastriatal aCSF injections showed enhanced acquisition of the T-maze and increased use of response solutions at Pcrit. The unexpected enhanced acquisition seen after striatal aCSF injections suggests at least two possible interpretations: (1) aCSF impaired striatal function, thereby releasing competition with the hippocampus and ceding control over learning to the hippocampus during early training trials; and (2) aCSF enhanced striatal functioning to facilitate striatal-sensitive learning. With either interpretation, the results indicate that intrastriatal glucose injections compensated for the aCSF-induced effect. Finally, enhanced acquisition regardless

  9. Percutaneous fixation with Kirschner wires versus volar locking plate fixation in adults with dorsally displaced fracture of distal radius: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nick R; Rangan, Amar; Griffin, Damian; Tubeuf, Sandy; Lamb, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the clinical effectiveness of Kirschner wire fixation with locking plate fixation for patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius. Design A multicentre two arm parallel group assessor blind randomised controlled trial with 1:1 treatment allocation. Setting 18 trauma centres in the United Kingdom. Participants 461 adults with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius within 3 cm of the radiocarpal joint that required surgical fixation. Patients were excluded if the surgeon thought that the surface of the wrist joint was so badly displaced it required open reduction. Interventions Kirschner wire fixation: wires are passed through the skin over the dorsal aspect of the distal radius and into the bone to hold the fracture in the correct anatomical position. Locking plate fixation: a locking plate is applied through an incision over the volar (palm) aspect of the wrist and secured to the bone with fixed angle locking screws. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure: validated patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE). This rates wrist function in two (equally weighted) sections concerning the patient’s experience of pain and disability to give a score out of 100. Secondary outcomes: disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, the EuroQol (EQ-5D), and complications related to the surgery. Results The baseline characteristics of the two groups were well balanced, and over 90% of patients completed follow-up. The wrist function of both groups of patients improved by 12 months. There was no clinically relevant difference in the patient rated wrist score at three, six, or 12 months (difference in favour of the plate group was −1.3, 95% confidence interval −4.5 to 1.8; P=0.40). Nor was there a clinically relevant difference in health related quality of life or the number of complications in each group. Conclusions Contrary to the existing literature, and against the rapidly increasing use of locking plate

  10. Structural and molecular alterations of primary afferent fibres in the spinal dorsal horn in vincristine-induced neuropathy in rat.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Rivals, Isabelle; M'Dahoma, Saïd; Dubacq, Sophie; Pezet, Sophie; Calvino, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    Vincristine is one of the most common anti-cancer drug therapies administered for the treatment of many types of cancer. Its dose-limiting side effect is the emergence of peripheral neuropathy, resulting in chronic neuropathic pain in many patients. This study sought to understand the mechanisms underlying the development of neuropathic pain by vincristine-induced neurotoxicity. We focused on signs of functional changes and revealed that deep layers of the spinal cord (III-IV) experience increased neuronal activity both in the absence of peripheral stimulation and, as a result of tactile mechanical stimulations. These laminae and superficial laminae I-II were also subject to structural changes as evidenced by an increase in immunoreactivity of Piccolo, a marker of active presynaptic elements. Further investigations performed, using DNA microarray technology, describe a large number of genes differentially expressed in dorsal root ganglions and in the spinal dorsal horn after vincristine treatment. Our study describes an important list of genes differentially regulated by vincristine treatment that will be useful for future studies and brings forward evidence for molecular and anatomical modifications of large diameter sensory neurons terminating in deep dorsal horn laminae, which could participate in the development of tactile allodynia. PMID:23975629

  11. ACUTE TOXICITY OF PESTICIDES IN ADULT AND WEANLING RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    LD sub 50 values were determined for 57 pesticides administered by the oral or dermal route to adult male and female Sherman rats. Nine pesticides tested by the oral route (bufencarb, cacodylic acid, dialifor, deltamethrin, dicamba, diquat, quintozene, phoxim, pyrazon) and 4 test...

  12. Activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors inhibits basal and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release in rat dorsal striatum: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Mao, L; Lau, Y S; Wang, J Q

    2000-09-22

    Group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase and are distributed pre-synaptically in the striatum. A behavioral study previously conducted in this laboratory shows that activation of this group of mGlu receptors attenuates acute amphetamine-stimulated motor activity. By administering a group III selective agonist or antagonist via the dialysis probe, the present study employed in vivo microdialysis to evaluate the capacity of the group III selective agents to alter extracellular levels of dopamine in the dorsal striatum of normal and amphetamine-treated rats. It was found that the group III agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) dose-dependently (1, 10 and 100 microM) reduced basal levels of extracellular dopamine. In contrast, the group III antagonist alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) dose-dependently (10, 50 and 250 microM) elevated the basal release of extracellular dopamine. This elevation was antagonized by co-perfusion of L-AP4. Perfusion of 5-microM amphetamine through the dialysis probe increased extracellular dopamine in the dorsal striatum. Co-perfusion of L-AP4 (100 microM) significantly reduced amphetamine-stimulated dopamine levels, whereas co-perfusion of L-AP4 (100 microM) and MPPG (100 microM) did not alter the capacity of amphetamine to elicit dopamine release. The data obtained from this study demonstrate the presence of a tonically active glutamatergic tone on group III mGlu receptors in the dorsal striatum to pre-synaptically regulate basal dopamine release in an inhibitory fashion. Moreover, activation of L-AP4-sensitive group III mGlu receptors can suppress the phasic release of dopamine induced by a dopamine stimulant amphetamine. PMID:10996594

  13. Neuronal and glial expression of inward rectifier potassium channel subunits Kir2.x in rat dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yuzo; Yasaka, Toshiharu; Takano, Makoto; Ishihara, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Inward rectifier K(+) channels of the Kir2.x subfamily play important roles in controlling the neuronal excitability. Although their cellular localization in the brain has been extensively studied, only a few studies have examined their expression in the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. In this study, immunohistochemical analyses of Kir2.1, Kir2.2, and Kir2.3 expression were performed in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord using bright-field and confocal microscopy. In DRG, most ganglionic neurons expressed Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3, whereas satellite glial cells chiefly expressed Kir2.3. In the spinal cord, Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3 were all expressed highly in the gray matter of dorsal and ventral horns and moderately in the white matter also. Within the gray matter, the expression was especially high in the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). Confocal images obtained using markers for neuronal cells, NeuN, and astrocytes, Sox9, showed expression of all three Kir2 subunits in both neuronal somata and astrocytes in lamina I-III of the dorsal horn and the lateral spinal nucleus of the dorsolateral funiculus. Immunoreactive signals other than those in neuronal and glial somata were abundant in lamina I and II, which probably located mainly in nerve fibers or nerve terminals. Colocalization of Kir2.1 and 2.3 and that of Kir2.2 and 2.3 were present in neuronal and glial somata. In the ventral horn, motor neurons and interneurons were also immunoreactive with the three Kir2 subunits. Our study suggests that Kir2 channels composed of Kir2.1-2.3 subunits are expressed in neuronal and glial cells in the DRG and spinal cord, contributing to sensory transduction and motor control. PMID:26854211

  14. High Glucose Accelerates Autophagy in Adult Rat Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Kim, Man Soo; Park, Eun-Young

    2014-01-01

    Study Design In vitro cell culture. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high glucose on autophagy in adult rat intervertebral disc cells. Overview of Literature Diabetes mellitus is considered to be an important etiologic factor for intervertebral disc degeneration, resulting in degenerative disc diseases. A glucose-mediated increase of autophagy is a major causative factor for the development of diseases associated with diabetes mellitus. However, no information is available for the effect of high glucose on autophagy in adult intervertebral disc cells. Methods Nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from 24-week-old adult rats, cultured and placed in either 10% fetal bovine serum (normal control) or 10% fetal bovine serum plus two different high glucose concentrations (0.1 M and 0.2 M) (experimental conditions) for one and three days, respectively. The expressions of autophagy markers, such as beclin-1, light chain 3-I (LC3-I) and LC3-II, autophagy-related gene (Atg) 3, 5, 7 and 12, were identified and quantified. Results Two high glucoses significantly increased the expressions of beclin-1, LC3-II, Atg3, 5, 7, and 12 in adult rat nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I expression was also increased in a dose-respectively time-dependent manner. Conclusions The results suggest that autophagy of adult nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells might be a potential mechanism for the intervertebral disc degeneration in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. Thus, the prevention of autophagy in adult intervertebral disc cells might be considered as a novel therapeutic target to prevent or to delay the intervertebral disc degeneration in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:25346805

  15. Radiotherapy Suppresses Bone Cancer Pain through Inhibiting Activation of cAMP Signaling in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiqin; Dong, Yanbin; He, Xueming; Zhao, Ping; Yang, Aixing; Zhou, Rubing; Ma, Jianhua; Xie, Zhong; Song, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major clinical approaches for treatment of bone cancer pain. Activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway plays important roles in bone cancer pain. Here, we examined the effects of radiotherapy on bone cancer pain and accompanying abnormal activation of cAMP-PKA signaling. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and received tumor cell implantation (TCI) in rat tibia (TCI cancer pain model). Some of the rats that previously received TCI treatment were treated with X-ray radiation (radiotherapy). Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured and used for evaluating level of pain caused by TCI treatment. PKA mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was detected by RT-PCR. Concentrations of cAMP, IL-1β, and TNF-α as well as PKA activity in DRG and the spinal cord were measured by ELISA. The results showed that radiotherapy significantly suppressed TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The level of PKA mRNA in DRG, cAMP concentration and PKA activity in DRG and in the spinal cord, and concentrations of IL-1β and TNF-α in the spinal cord were significantly reduced by radiotherapy. In addition, radiotherapy also reduced TCI-induced bone loss. These findings suggest that radiotherapy may suppress bone cancer pain through inhibition of activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in DRG and the spinal cord. PMID:26989332

  16. Effects of 14 days of spaceflight and nine days of recovery on cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cross-sectional areas and succinate dehydrogenase activities of L5 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after nine days of recovery. The mean and distribution of the cross-sectional areas were similar to age-matched, ground-based controls for both the spaceflight and for the spaceflight plus recovery groups. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in spaceflight compared to aged-matched control rats, whereas the mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was similar in age-matched control and spaceflight plus recovery rats. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity of neurons with cross-sectional areas between 1000 and 2000 microns2 was lower (between 7 and 10%) in both the spaceflight and the spaceflight plus recovery groups compared to the appropriate control groups. The reduction in the oxidative capacity of a subpopulation of sensory neurons having relatively large cross-sectional areas immediately following spaceflight and the sustained depression for nine days after returning to 1 g suggest that the 0 g environment induced significant alterations in proprioceptive function.

  17. Acute pancreatitis decreases the sensitivity of pancreas-projecting dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus neurones to group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists in rats

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Tanja; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that pancreatic exocrine secretions (PES) are modulated by dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones, whose activity is finely tuned by GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) decrease synaptic transmission to pancreas-projecting DMV neurones and increase PES. In the present study, we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches aimed at characterising the effects of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) on the vagal neurocircuitry modulating pancreatic functions. In control rats, microinjection of bicuculline into the DMV increased PES, whereas microinjections of kynurenic acid had no effect. Conversely, in AP rats, microinjection of bicuculline had no effect, whereas kynurenic acid decreased PES. DMV microinjections of the group II mGluR agonist APDC and whole cell recordings of excitatory currents in identified pancreas-projecting DMV neurones showed a reduced functional response in AP rats compared to controls. Moreover, these changes persisted up to 3 weeks following the induction of AP. These data demonstrate that AP increases the excitatory input to pancreas-projecting DMV neurones by decreasing the response of excitatory synaptic terminals to group II mGluR agonist. PMID:24445314

  18. Dorsal root ganglion-derived Schwann cells combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Qu, Wei; Wu, Yuxuan; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Huajun

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells, nerve regeneration promoters in peripheral nerve tissue engineering, can be used to repair both the peripheral and central nervous systems. However, isolation and purification of Schwann cells are complicated by contamination with fibroblasts. Current reported measures are mainly limited by either high cost or complicated procedures with low cell yields or purity. In this study, we collected dorsal root ganglia from neonatal rats from which we obtained highly purified Schwann cells using serum-free melanocyte culture medium. The purity of Schwann cells (> 95%) using our method was higher than that using standard medium containing fetal bovine serum. The obtained Schwann cells were implanted into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Results showed that axonal diameter and area were significantly increased and motor functions were obviously improved in the rat sciatic nerve tissue. Experimental findings suggest that serum-free melanocyte culture medium is conducive to purify Schwann cells and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan nerve conduits combined with Schwann cells contribute to restore sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25598778

  19. Learning history and cholinergic modulation in the dorsal hippocampus are necessary for rats to infer the status of a hidden event.

    PubMed

    Fast, Cynthia D; Flesher, M Melissa; Nocera, Nathanial A; Fanselow, Michael S; Blaisdell, Aaron P

    2016-06-01

    Identifying statistical patterns between environmental stimuli enables organisms to respond adaptively when cues are later observed. However, stimuli are often obscured from detection, necessitating behavior under conditions of ambiguity. Considerable evidence indicates decisions under ambiguity rely on inference processes that draw on past experiences to generate predictions under novel conditions. Despite the high demand for this process and the observation that it deteriorates disproportionately with age, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We developed a rodent model of decision-making during ambiguity to examine features of experience that contribute to inference. Rats learned either a simple (positive patterning) or complex (negative patterning) instrumental discrimination between the illumination of one or two lights. During test, only one light was lit while the other relevant light was blocked from physical detection (covered by an opaque shield, rendering its status ambiguous). We found experience with the complex negative patterning discrimination was necessary for rats to behave sensitively to the ambiguous test situation. These rats behaved as if they inferred the presence of the hidden light, responding differently than when the light was explicitly absent (uncovered and unlit). Differential expression profiles of the immediate early gene cFos indicated hippocampal involvement in the inference process while localized microinfusions of the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine, into the dorsal hippocampus caused rats to behave as if only one light was present. That is, blocking cholinergic modulation prevented the rat from inferring the presence of the hidden light. Collectively, these results suggest cholinergic modulation mediates recruitment of hippocampal processes related to past experiences and transfer of these processes to make decisions during ambiguous situations. Our results correspond with correlations observed between human brain

  20. Protective effects of chronic treatment with a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba L. in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelo L; Moreira, Luciana M; Arçari, Demetrius P; Dos Santos, Letícia França; Marques, Antônio Cezar; Pedrazzoli, José; Cerutti, Suzete M

    2016-10-15

    This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba L. (EGb) on short-term and long-term memory as well as on anxiety-like and locomotor activity using the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PM-DAT). Additionally, we evaluated the antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of EGb on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) of middle-aged rats using the comet assay. Twelve-month-old male Wistar rats were administered vehicle or EGb (0.5mgkg(-1) or 1.0gkg(-1)) for 30days. Behavioural data showed that EGb treatment improved short-term memory. Neither an anti-anxiety effect nor a change in locomotor activity was observed. Twenty-four hours after the behavioural tests, the rats were decapitated, and the PFC and DH were quickly dissected out and prepared for the comet assay. The levels of DNA damage in the PFC were significantly lower in rats that were treated with 1.0gkg(-1) EGb. Both doses of EGb decreased H2O2-induced DNA breakage in cortical cells, whereas the levels of DNA damage in the EGb-treated animals were significantly lower than those in the control animals. No significant differences in the level of DNA damage in hippocampal cells were observed among the experimental groups. EGb treatment was not able to reduce H2O2-induced DNA damage in hippocampal cells. Altogether, our data provide the first demonstration that chronic EGb treatment improved the short-term memory of middle-aged rats, an effect that could be associated with a reduction in free radical production in the PFC. These data suggest that EGb treatment might increase the survival of cortical neurons and corroborate and extend the view that EGb has protective and therapeutic properties. PMID:27424157

  1. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  2. Functional mu opioid receptors are expressed in cholinergic interneurons of the rat dorsal striatum: territorial specificity and diurnal variation.

    PubMed

    Jabourian, Maritza; Venance, Laurent; Bourgoin, Sylvie; Ozon, Sylvie; Pérez, Sylvie; Godeheu, Gérard; Glowinski, Jacques; Kemel, Marie-Louise

    2005-06-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons play a crucial role in the control of movement as well as in motivational and learning aspects of behaviour. Neuropeptides regulate striatal cholinergic transmission and particularly activation of mu opioid receptor (MOR) inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release in the dorsal striatum. In the present study we investigated whether this cholinergic transmission could be modulated by an enkephalin/MOR direct process. We show that mRNA and protein of MORs are expressed by cholinergic interneurons in the limbic/prefrontal territory but not by those in the sensorimotor territory of the dorsal striatum. These MORs are functional because potassium-evoked release of ACh from striatal synaptosomes was dose-dependently reduced by a selective MOR agonist, this effect being suppressed by a MOR antagonist. The MOR regulation of cholinergic interneurons presented a diurnal variation. (i) The percentage of cholinergic interneurons containing MORs that was 32% at the beginning of the light period (morning) increased to 80% in the afternoon. (ii) The MOR-mediated inhibition of synaptosomal ACh release was higher in the afternoon than in the morning. (iii) While preproenkephalin mRNA levels remained stable, enkephalin tissue content was the lowest (-32%) in the afternoon when the spontaneous (+35%) and the N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked (+140%) releases of enkephalin (from microsuperfused slices) were the highest. Therefore, by acting on MORs present on cholinergic interneurons, endogenously released enkephalin reduces ACh release. This direct enkephalin/MOR regulation of cholinergic transmission that operates only in the limbic/prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum might contribute to information processing in fronto-cortico-basal ganglia circuits. PMID:16026468

  3. Upregulation of Chemokine CXCL12 in the Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord Contributes to the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain Following Spared Nerve Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Wang, Xinru; Li, Zhisong; Kong, Cunlong; Zhao, Yonghui; Qian, Jun-Liang; Kan, Quancheng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling is involved in chronic pain. However, few studies have systemically assessed its role in direct nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the underlying mechanism. Here, we determined that spared nerve injury (SNI) increased the expression of CXCL12 and its cognate receptor CXCR4 in lumbar 5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and satellite glial cells. SNI also induced long-lasting upregulation of CXCL12 and CXCR4 in the ipsilateral L4-5 spinal cord dorsal horn, characterized by CXCL12 expression in neurons and microglia, and CXCR4 expression in neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, SNI-induced a sustained increase in TNF-α expression in the DRG and spinal cord. Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of the TNF-α synthesis inhibitor thalidomide reduced the SNI-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and inhibited the expression of CXCL12 in the DRG and spinal cord. Intrathecal injection (i.t.) of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, both 30 min before and 7 days after SNI, reduced the behavioral signs of allodynia. Rats given an i.t. or i.p. bolus of AMD3100 on day 8 of SNI exhibited attenuated abnormal pain behaviors. The neuropathic pain established following SNI was also impaired by i.t. administration of a CXCL12-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, repetitive i.t. AMD3100 administration prevented the activation of ERK in the spinal cord. The mechanical hypersensitivity induced in naïve rats by i.t. CXCL12 was alleviated by pretreatment with the MEK inhibitor PD98059. Collectively, our results revealed that TNF-α might mediate the upregulation of CXCL12 in the DRG and spinal cord following SNI, and that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling via ERK activation contributes to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. PMID:26781879

  4. Risk-assessment and risk-taking behavior predict potassium- and amphetamine-induced dopamine response in the dorsal striatum of rats

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Sara; Momeni, Shima; Lundberg, Stina; Nylander, Ingrid; Roman, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Certain personality types and behavioral traits display high correlations to drug use and an increased level of dopamine in the reward system is a common denominator of all drugs of abuse. Dopamine response to drugs has been suggested to correlate with some of these personality types and to be a key factor influencing the predisposition to addiction. This study investigated if behavioral traits can be related to potassium- and amphetamine-induced dopamine response in the dorsal striatum, an area hypothesized to be involved in the shift from drug use to addiction. The open field and multivariate concentric square field™ tests were used to assess individual behavior in male Wistar rats. Chronoamperometric recordings were then made to study the potassium- and amphetamine-induced dopamine response in vivo. A classification based on risk-taking behavior in the open field was used for further comparisons. Risk-taking behavior was correlated between the behavioral tests and high risk takers displayed a more pronounced response to the dopamine uptake blocking effects of amphetamine. Behavioral parameters from both tests could also predict potassium- and amphetamine-induced dopamine responses showing a correlation between neurochemistry and behavior in risk-assessment and risk-taking parameters. In conclusion, the high risk-taking rats showed a more pronounced reduction of dopamine uptake in the dorsal striatum after amphetamine indicating that this area may contribute to the sensitivity of these animals to psychostimulants and proneness to addiction. Further, inherent dopamine activity was related to risk-assessment behavior, which may be of importance for decision-making and inhibitory control, key components in addiction. PMID:25076877

  5. Pharmacological modulations of adrenergic phenotype in medullary C2 and C3 cell groups of adult rat.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C; Denoroy, L; Le Cavorsin, M; Pujol, J F; Weissmann, D

    1996-08-01

    The adrenergic phenotype was analysed in the rat's rostral dorsomedial medulla under normal conditions and 3 days after a single intraperitoneal injection of an eburnamine derivative, RU 24722, which increases tyrosine hydroxylase protein expression in the rostral portion of the nucleus tractus solitarius. This approach was investigated by a double immunofluorescence labelling of tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase proteins. Under normal conditions, most adrenergic cell bodies are anatomically distributed in the dorsal and rostral medulla oblongata between the rostral part of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Adrenergic neurons detected in this medullar region were distributed between both cell groups. Three days after the pharmacological RU 24722 treatment, an upregulation in tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase protein expression was detected in both cell groups characterized by a highly increased number of tyrosine hydroxylase- and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase-containing cell bodies. The number of TH-mRNA containing neurons was also increased, indicating the transcriptional level of this regulation. These results demonstrated a particular neuronal plasticity of adrenergic phenotype in the medullary cell groups of adult rat. PMID:8877600

  6. Effects of neonatal capsaicin treatment on descending modulation of spinal nociception from the rostral, medial medulla in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, M; Gebhart, G F

    1994-05-01

    Stimulation-produced modulation from the rostral, medial medulla (RMM) on the spinal nociceptive tail-flick (TF) reflex and on lumbar spinal dorsal horn neuron responses to noxious cutaneous stimuli was studied in adult rats treated as neonates with capsaicin or vehicle. In vehicle-treated rats (n = 7), both descending facilitatory and inhibitory influences on the TF reflex were produced from the RMM. At 11/23 sites in the RMM, electrical stimulation produced biphasic modulatory effects. Electrical stimulation facilitated the spinal nociceptive TF reflex at low intensities (5-25 microA) and inhibited the TF reflex at greater intensities (50-200 microA). The mean threshold intensity of stimulation to inhibit the TF reflex (cut-off time = 7.0 s) was 66 microA (n = 11). At 11 of 23 sites, electrical stimulation only inhibited the TF reflex; the mean threshold intensity of stimulation to inhibit the TF reflex was 50 microA (n = 11). At one stimulation site, electrical stimulation only facilitated the TF reflex at the intensities tested (5-100 microA). In capsaicin-treated rats (n = 6), the proportion of sites from which electrical stimulation only inhibited the TF reflex was significantly less (3/27 sites = 11%) than in vehicle-treated rats (11/23 = 48%). The threshold intensity of stimulation to inhibit the TF reflex from these three sites was 50 microA. The number of sites in RMM from which electrical stimulation only facilitated the TF reflex was significantly greater in capsaicin-treated rats (15/27 = 56%) than in vehicle-treated rats (1/23 = 4%). Neither the number of sites in RMM from which electrical stimulation produced biphasic modulatory effects on the TF reflex (48% and 33%, respectively) nor the intensities of stimulation or magnitudes of facilitation or inhibition of the TF reflex significantly differed between vehicle- and capsaicin-treated rats. In electrophysiological experiments, all units studied responded to non-noxious and noxious intensities of

  7. Developmentally Regulated Expression of HDNF/NT-3 mRNA in Rat Spinal Cord Motoneurons and Expression of BDNF mRNA in Embryonic Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Ernfors, Patrik; Persson, Håkan

    1991-01-01

    Northern blot analysis was used to demonstrate high levels of hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin-3 (HDNF/NT-3) mRNA in the embryonic day (E) 13 - 14 and 15 - 16 spinal cord. The level decreased at E18 - 19 and remained the same until postnatal day (P) 1, after which it decreased further to a level below the detection limit in the adult. In situ hybridization revealed that the NT-3 mRNA detected in the developing spinal cord was derived from motoneurons and the decrease seen at E18 - 19 was caused by a reduction in the number of motoneurons expressing NT-3 mRNA. The distribution of NT-3 mRNA-expressing cells in the E15 spinal cord was very similar to the distribution of cells expressing choline acetyltransferase or nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) mRNA. Moreover, a striking similarity between the developmentally regulated expression of NT-3 and NGFR mRNA was noted in spinal cord motoneurons. A subpopulation of all neurons in the dorsal root ganglia expressed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA from E13, the earliest time examined, to adulthood. These results are consistent with a trophic role of NT-3 for proprioceptive sensory neurons innervating the ventral horn, and imply a local action of BDNF for developing sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia. PMID:12106253

  8. Opiate receptor agonists regulate phosphorylation of synapsin I in cocultures of rat spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Nah, S Y; Saya, D; Barg, J; Vogel, Z

    1993-01-01

    Kappa opiate receptor agonists applied to cocultures of spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion neurons have been previously shown to inhibit voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx and adenylate cyclase activity. Here we describe the effect of kappa opiate receptor agonists on phosphorylation of synapsin I, a synaptic-vesicle-associated protein whose phosphorylation was shown to be regulated by cAMP and Ca2+ concentrations. Depolarization of spinal cord-dorsal root ganglion cocultured cells (by high K+ or veratridine) and the addition of forskolin (which activates adenylate cyclase) led to increased phosphorylation of synapsin I. Addition of kappa opiate agonists attenuated both the depolarization- and the forskolin-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I. This attenuation was blocked by the opiate antagonist naloxone. mu and delta opiate receptor agonists had much weaker effects on the depolarization-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I. Similarly, kappa opiate agonists decreased (by 40-60%) the high-K+- or veratridine-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I in spinal cord synaptosomes. These results show that opiate ligands modulate synapsin I phosphorylation. Moreover, the data could explain the reduction in synaptic efficacy observed after opiate treatment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8097883

  9. Peripubertal ovariectomy influences thymic adrenergic network plasticity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Kosec, Duško; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-08-15

    The study investigated the influence of peripubertal ovariectomy on the thymic noradrenaline (NA) concentration, and the thymocyte NA content and β2- and α1-adrenoceptor (AR) expression in adult 2- and 11-month-old rats. In control rats, the thymic NA concentration increased with age. This increase reflected rise in the density of catecholamine (CA)-containing fluorescent nerve fibers and cells and their CA content. Additionally, the average β2- and α1-AR thymocyte surface density changed in the opposite direction with age; the density of β2-AR decreased, whereas that of α1-AR increased. Ovariectomy diminished the thymic NA concentration in 2-month-old rats. This reflected the decrease in the density of fluorescent nerve fibers, and CA content in fluorescent nerve fibers and non-lymphoid cells, since the thymocyte NA content was increased in ovariectomized (Ox) rats. Estrogen supplementation prevented the ovariectomy-induced changes. In Ox rats, the density of CA-synthesizing nerve fibers and non-lymphoid cells diminished with age. To the contrary, NA content in thymocytes increased with age, but it did not exceed that in 11-month-old controls. Additionally, ovariectomy diminished the average thymocyte surface density of β2-ARs, but it increased that of α1-ARs in 2-month-old-rats (due to estrogen, and estrogen and progesterone deficiency, respectively). These changes, despite of the rise in circulating estrogen level post-ovariectomy, remained stable with age. This most likely reflected a decreased sensitivity to estrogen action, as a consequence of the hormone misprinting in peripubertal age. The analysis of thymocyte proliferation in culture suggested that age- and ovariectomy-induced alterations in thymocyte NA synthesis and AR expression altered NA autocrine/paracrine action on thymocytes. In conclusion, the study indicates that the ovarian hormone deficiency in peripubertal age affects ovarian steroid-dependent remodeling of thymic adrenergic

  10. BMP3 expression in the adult rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kanna; Mikawa, Sumiko; Sato, Kohji

    2016-07-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein-3 (BMP3) is a very unique member of the TGF-β superfamily, because it functions as an antagonist to both the canonical BMP and activin pathways and plays important roles in multiple biological events. Although BMP3 expression has been described in the early development of the kidney, intestine and bone, little information is available for BMP3 expression in the central nervous system (CNS). We, thus, investigated BMP3 expression in the adult rat CNS using immunohistochemistry. BMP3 was intensely expressed in most neurons and their axons. Furthermore, we found that astrocytes and ependymal cells also express BMP3 protein. These data indicate that BMP3 is widely expressed throughout the adult CNS, and its abundant expression in the adult brain strongly supports the idea that BMP3 plays important roles in the adult brain. PMID:27130896