Science.gov

Sample records for adult stroke patients

  1. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke. PMID:26610894

  2. Correlations between the sequelae of stroke and physical activity in Korean adult stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Chun, In-Ae

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated a wide range of stroke patients living in South Korea using the Korean Community Health Survey raw data to determine the correlation between stroke and physical activity. [Subjects and Methods] This study used raw data from the 2012 Korean Community Health Survey. The total number of participants was 228,921; of the 4,475 stroke patients who had been diagnosed by a medical doctor or an oriental medical doctor, the data for 4,460 patients, excluding 15 whose amount of physical activity was unclear, were used in the analysis. [Results] The amount of physical activity performed by patients who had sequelae was significantly lower than that performed by patients who no longer had sequelae. Similarly, for the type of sequelae, palsy in the arms and legs, facial palsy, communication disability, swallowing or eating disability, and visual disability were associated with lower physical activity. Furthermore, as the number of sequelae increased, patients performed significantly less physical activity. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that when decisions on national policies and budgets are made, methods for increasing the physical activity of patients with a history of stroke should be considered. PMID:27390446

  3. Correlations between the sequelae of stroke and physical activity in Korean adult stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Chun, In-Ae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated a wide range of stroke patients living in South Korea using the Korean Community Health Survey raw data to determine the correlation between stroke and physical activity. [Subjects and Methods] This study used raw data from the 2012 Korean Community Health Survey. The total number of participants was 228,921; of the 4,475 stroke patients who had been diagnosed by a medical doctor or an oriental medical doctor, the data for 4,460 patients, excluding 15 whose amount of physical activity was unclear, were used in the analysis. [Results] The amount of physical activity performed by patients who had sequelae was significantly lower than that performed by patients who no longer had sequelae. Similarly, for the type of sequelae, palsy in the arms and legs, facial palsy, communication disability, swallowing or eating disability, and visual disability were associated with lower physical activity. Furthermore, as the number of sequelae increased, patients performed significantly less physical activity. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that when decisions on national policies and budgets are made, methods for increasing the physical activity of patients with a history of stroke should be considered. PMID:27390446

  4. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden. PMID:25750539

  5. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%-15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden. PMID:25750539

  6. Stroke prevention by direct revascularization for patients with adult-onset moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tackeun; Oh, Chang Wan; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyojun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Cho, Won-Sang; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a progressive disease that can cause recurrent stroke. The authors undertook this retrospective case-control study with a large sample size in an attempt to assess the efficacy of direct or combined revascularization surgery for ischemia in adults with MMD. METHODS The authors investigated cases involving patients with moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia who visited Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital between 2000 and 2014. Among 441 eligible patients, 301 underwent revascularization surgery and 140 were treated conservatively. Variables evaluated included age at diagnosis, sex, surgical record, Suzuki stage, and occurrence of stroke. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on whether or not they had undergone revascularization surgery. Actuarial 1-, 5-, and 10-year stroke rates were calculated using the life table method. Risk factor analysis for 5-year stroke occurrence was conducted with multivariate regression. RESULTS Of the 441 patients, 301 had been surgically treated (revascularization group) and 140 had not (control group). The mean follow-up durations were 45 and 77 months, respectively. The actuarial 10-year cumulative incidence rate for any kind of stroke was significantly lower in the revascularization group (9.4%) than in the control group (19.6%) (p = 0.041); the relative risk reduction (RRR) was also superior (52.0%) in the revascularization group, and the number needed to treat was 10. The 10-year rate of ischemic stroke was greater (13.3%) in the control group than in the revascularization group (3.9%) (p = 0.019). The RRR for ischemic stroke in the revascularization group was 70.7%, and the number needed to treat was 11. However, the actuarial 1- and 5-year rates of ischemic stroke did not significantly differently between the groups. Overall, revascularization surgery was shown to be an independent protective factor, as revealed by multivariate analysis

  7. Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic diplegia secondary to stroke in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Melissa Ann; Berman, Casey Melissa; Mazzola, Catherine Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is often recommended for children with spastic paraparesis and cerebral palsy. SDR reduces spasticity in the lower extremities for these children with spastic paraplegia. However, SDR is infrequently recommended for adults with spasticity. Spastic diplegia in adult patients can be due to stroke, brain or spinal cord injury from trauma, infection, toxic-metabolic disorders, and other causes. Although rarely considered, SDR is an option for adult patients with spastic diplegia as well. Case Description: The authors describe a patient who underwent a SDR with a successful postoperative outcome. This man suffered a hypertensive and hemorrhagic stroke secondary to intravenous drug abuse at age 46. A SDR was performed after two failed intrathecal baclofen pump placements due to recurrent infections, likely resulting from his immunocompromised status. The patient underwent lumbar laminectomies and dorsal rhizotomies at levels L1-S1 bilaterally. Postoperatively, the patient's spasticity was significantly reduced. His Ashworth spasticity score decreased from 4/5 to 1/5, and the reduction in tone has been durable over 3 years. Conclusion: SDR in older patients with spastic paraparesis may be considered as a treatment option. PMID:26167363

  8. Does the rectus femoris nerve block improve knee recurvatum in adult stroke patients? A kinematic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Delporte, L; Arsenault, L; Revol, P; Lefevre, M; Clevenot, D; Boisson, D; Mertens, P; Rossetti, Y; Luauté, J

    2014-02-01

    Knee recurvatum (KR) during gait is common in hemiplegic patients. Quadriceps spasticity has been postulated as a cause of KR in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the role of rectus femoris spasticity in KR by using selective motor nerve blocks of the rectus femoris nerve in hemiparetic stroke patients. The data from six adult, post-stroke hemiplegic patients who underwent a rectus femoris nerve block for a stiff-knee gait were retrospectively analyzed. An extensive clinical and functional evaluation was performed and gait was assessed by motion analysis (kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic parameters) before and during the block realized using 2% lidocaine injected under a neurostimulation and ultrasonographic targeting procedure. The main outcome measures were the peak knee extension in stance and peak knee extensor moment obtained during gait analysis. No serious adverse effect of the nerve block was observed. The block allowed a reduction of rectus femoris overactivity in all patients. Peak knee extension and extensor moment in stance did not improve in any patient, but peak knee flexion during the swing phase was significantly higher after block (mean: 31.2° post, 26.4 pre, p < 0.05). Our results provide arguments against the hypothesis that the spasticity of the rectus femoris contributes to KR. PMID:24286615

  9. Dysphagia in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S; Hamdy, S

    2006-01-01

    Swallowing musculature is asymmetrically represented in both motor cortices. Stroke affecting the hemisphere with the dominant swallowing projection results in dysphagia and clinical recovery has been correlated with compensatory changes in the previously non‐dominant, unaffected hemisphere. This asymmetric bilaterality may explain why up to half of stroke patients are dysphagic and why many will regain a safe swallow over a comparatively short period. Despite this propensity for recovery, dysphagia carries a sevenfold increased risk of aspiration pneumonia and is an independent predictor of mortality. The identification, clinical course, pathophysiology, and treatment of dysphagia after stroke are discussed in this review. PMID:16754707

  10. The reliability of repeated TMS measures in older adults and in patients with subacute and chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schambra, Heidi M.; Ogden, R. Todd; Martínez-Hernández, Isis E.; Lin, Xuejing; Chang, Y. Brenda; Rahman, Asif; Edwards, Dylan J.; Krakauer, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures in healthy older adults and stroke patients has been insufficiently characterized. We determined whether common TMS measures could reliably evaluate change in individuals and in groups using the smallest detectable change (SDC), or could tell subjects apart using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We used a single-rater test-retest design in older healthy, subacute stroke, and chronic stroke subjects. At twice daily sessions on two consecutive days, we recorded resting motor threshold, test stimulus intensity, recruitment curves, short-interval intracortical inhibition, and facilitation, and long-interval intracortical inhibition. Using variances estimated from a random effects model, we calculated the SDC and ICC for each TMS measure. For all TMS measures in all groups, SDCs for single subjects were large; only with modest group sizes did the SDCs become low. Thus, while these TMS measures cannot be reliably used as a biomarker to detect individual change, they can reliably detect change exceeding measurement noise in moderate-sized groups. For several of the TMS measures, ICCs were universally high, suggesting that they can reliably discriminate between subjects. TMS measures should be used based on their reliability in particular contexts. More work establishing their validity, responsiveness, and clinical relevance is still needed. PMID:26388729

  11. Trends in Outcome and Hospitalization Cost among Adult Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Hussam A.; Al-Qudah, Zaid A.; Khan, Hafiz M. R.; Farhad, Khosro; Ji, Andrew Bo-Hua; Souayah, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction New treatments for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have been introduced and are expected to improve patients’ overall outcomes. We assessed the impact of new therapeutic strategies on outcome and cost of hospitalization among adult patients with AIS in the United States. Methods Patients with AIS admitted in the United States in 1993–1994 and 2006–2007 were listed using the Nationwide Inpatient Survey database. We determined the rates of occurrence, hospitalization outcomes, and mean hospital charges for all patients. We further analyzed these variables in the ventilated and nonventilated patients. Results We identified 386,043 patients with AIS admitted in the United States in 1993–1994 and 749,766 patients in 2006–2007. The length of hospitalization was significantly higher in 1993–1994 compared with 2006–2007: 6.9 ± 4.2 days versus 4.66 ± 3 days, respectively. In-hospital mortality rate was 8.9% in 1993–1994 and 5.6% in 2006–2007 (P < 0.0001). There was a significant increase in mean hospital charges in 2006–2007 compared with 1993–1994 ($21,916 ± $14,117 versus $9,646 ± $5,727). The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in 2006–2007 in nonventilated patients. There was a significant increase in mean hospital charges in 2006–2007 compared with 1993–1994 in both ventilated ($81,528 ± $64,526 versus $25,143 ± $17,172, P<0.0001) and nonventilated patients ($21,085 ± $13,042 versus $10,000 ± $6,300, P<0.0001). The mortality rate was significantly lower in 2006–2007 in both subgroups: 46.5% versus 59.8% in ventilated patients and 4.2% versus 8.2% in nonventilated patients (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Our study suggests that new therapeutic strategies have improved outcomes and increased cost of hospitalization among adult patients with AIS in the United States over a period of 13 years. The hospitalization cost was significantly higher in the ventilated and nonventilated patients in 2006–2007, which may

  12. Comparison of the Amplitudes of the H-reflex of Post-stroke Hemiplegia Patients and Normal Adults during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare H-reflex characteristics during gait of hemiplegic stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-five patients and age-matched twenty-five volunteers in good health were studied. All the subjects could walk independently. [Methods] An MP150 (BIOPAC Systems, Inc., Goleta, CA, USA) was used to record the electromyography (EMG) data collected with Ag-Ag/Cl measurement electrodes (BIOPAC, diameter of 2 cm). [Results] The comparison showed significant differences of Hmax/Mmax ratio (%) in all gait cycles between the stroke group and the control group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study furnished basic reference data for gait strategies and functional training programs for hemiplegic stroke patients. PMID:24259840

  13. Effects of mental practice embedded in daily therapy compared to therapy as usual in adult stroke patients in Dutch nursing homes: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Susy M; Beurskens, Anna J; van Kroonenburgh, Susanne M; Demarteau, Jeroen; Schols, Jos M; Wade, Derick T

    2007-01-01

    Background Mental practice as an additional cognitive therapy is getting increased attention in stroke rehabilitation. A systematic review shows some evidence that several techniques in which movements are rehearsed mentally might be effective but not enough to be certain. This trial investigates whether mental practice can contribute to a quicker and/or better recovery of stroke in two Dutch nursing homes. The objective is to investigate the therapeutic potential of mental practice embedded in daily therapy to improve individually chosen daily activities of adult stroke patients compared to therapy as usual. In addition, we will investigate prognostic variables and feasibility (process evaluation). Methods A randomised, controlled, observer masked prospective trial will be conducted with adult stroke patients in the (sub)acute phase of stroke recovery. Over a six weeks intervention period the control group will receive multi professional therapy as usual. Patients in the experimental group will be instructed how to perform mental practice, and will receive care as usual in which mental practice is embedded in physical, occupation and speech therapy sessions. Outcome will be assessed at six weeks and six months. The primary outcome measure is the patient-perceived effect on performance of daily activities as assessed by an 11-point Likert Scale. Secondary outcomes are: Motricity Index, Nine Hole Peg Test, Barthel Index, Timed up and Go, 10 metres walking test, Rivermead Mobility Index. A sample size of the patients group and all therapists will be interviewed on their opinion of the experimental program to assess feasibility. All patients are asked to keep a log to determine unguided training intensity. Discussion Advantages and disadvantages of several aspects of the chosen design are discussed. Trial registration ISRCTN27582267 PMID:17937798

  14. [Drug rehabilitation in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Skoromets, A A; Koval'chuk, V V

    2007-01-01

    An influence of different drugs on functional rehabilitation in post-stroke patients has been studied. We tested for efficacy medications with nootropic, metabolic and antioxidative activity as well as pathogenetic and symptomatic remedies for differential therapy of ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke (IS, HS). We analyzed 1920 stroke patients, including 1520 with IS and 400 with HS. The functional rehabilitation depending on different drugs was followed up 1 year after stroke using Barthel, Lindmark and Scandinavian scales for stroke. Moreover, we suggested a coefficient for calculating of drug efficacy. The results of the study revealed that the use of some traditional drugs was not well founded. The most efficient medications in the treatment of IS proved to be actovegin, instenon, berlition, rheopolyglucin and gliatilin. The beneficial effect on rehabilitation of patients with HS was found only for actovegin. PMID:18379517

  15. Characteristics of stroke in young adults in Tuzla Canton, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dzevdet; Salihović, Denisa; Ibrahimagić, Omer C; Sinanović, Osman

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze stroke in young adults in Tuzla Canton, Bosnia and Herzegovina. From January 2001 to December 2005, 3864 patients with first-ever stroke were admitted at the Department of Neurology Tuzla. A retrospective analysis of risk factors, stroke types, severity and one month outcome in all young adults (18-45 years of age) with first-ever stroke was carried out. Out of total, there were 154 (4%) young adults with stroke. Mean age was 38.8 +/- 5.7 years and 47% were women. The leading risk factors were smoking (56%) and hypertension (45%). Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was more frequent in young adults compared with older patients (> 45 years of age) (22% vs. 3.5%, p < 0.0001), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) was similar in both groups (16.9% vs. 15.8%, p = 0.7), but ischemic stroke (IS) was predominant stroke type in the older group (61% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004). Young adults had more frequent lacunar stroke (26.6% vs. 16.1%, p = 0.01) and stroke due to other etiology (8.5% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.0004) than stroke patients over 45 years of age. Stroke severity at admission was lower in young adults than in older patients (p < 0.0001), as well as mortality at one month (11% vs. 30%, p < 0.0001). Favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale < or = 2) had 71% of young adults compared with only 53% of patients in the older group (p = 0.0003). Stroke in young adults in Tuzla Canton is rare. Risk factors profile, stroke types, severity and outcome at one month in young adults are different from those in older patients. PMID:23940998

  16. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  17. Protein consumptions in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudi, Zahra; Ghiasvand, Reza; Askari, Gholamreza; Darvishi, Leila; Ghasemi, Shekoofe; Hariri, Mitra; Hajishafiei, Maryam; khorvash, Fariborz; Iraj, Bijan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stroke is one of the most common causes of disabilities and death all over the world. The mortality rate of stroke is predicted to be doubled by 2030 in the Middle East countries. Nutrition is an effective strategy in prevention and management of stroke. This study assessed the relationship between various protein types and stroke risk. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based case-control study was performed in a University hospital. The data regarding consumption of usual food intake of 69 cases (46 men and 23 women) and 60 controls (30 men and 30 women) was collected with a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The mean consumption of red and white meat and vegetable and processed proteins consumption were compared between two groups. Results: The percent of total of daily protein intake were lower in patients with stroke in both sexes (25.92% vs 30.55% in men and 30.7% vs 31.14% in women). Conclusion: Lower protein consumption may be observed in patients with stroke patients in both sex. PMID:23961286

  18. HIV, antiretroviral treatment, hypertension, and stroke in Malawian adults

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Connor, Myles D.; Mzinganjira, Henry; Kampondeni, Sam; Choko, Augustine; Hopkins, Mark; Emsley, Hedley C.A.; Bryer, Alan; Faragher, Brian; Heyderman, Robert S.; Allain, Theresa J.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate HIV, its treatment, and hypertension as stroke risk factors in Malawian adults. Methods: We performed a case-control study of 222 adults with acute stroke, confirmed by MRI in 86%, and 503 population controls, frequency-matched for age, sex, and place of residence, using Global Positioning System for random selection. Multivariate logistic regression models were used for case-control comparisons. Results: HIV infection (population attributable fraction [PAF] 15%) and hypertension (PAF 46%) were strongly linked to stroke. HIV was the predominant risk factor for young stroke (≤45 years), with a prevalence of 67% and an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) (95% confidence interval) of 5.57 (2.43–12.8) (PAF 42%). There was an increased risk of a stroke in patients with untreated HIV infection (aOR 4.48 [2.44–8.24], p < 0.001), but the highest risk was in the first 6 months after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) (aOR 15.6 [4.21–46.6], p < 0.001); this group had a lower median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (92 vs 375 cells/mm3, p = 0.004). In older participants (HIV prevalence 17%), HIV was associated with stroke, but with a lower PAF than hypertension (5% vs 68%). There was no interaction between HIV and hypertension on stroke risk. Conclusions: In a population with high HIV prevalence, where stroke incidence is increasing, we have shown that HIV is an important risk factor. Early ART use in immunosuppressed patients poses an additional and potentially treatable stroke risk. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome may be contributing to the disease mechanisms. PMID:26683649

  19. Genetics of ischaemic stroke in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Terni, Eva; Giannini, Nicola; Brondi, Marco; Montano, Vincenzo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke may be a clinical expression of several inherited disorders in humans. Recognition of the underlined genetic disorders causing stroke is important for a correct diagnosis, for genetic counselling and, even if rarely, for a correct therapeutic management. Moreover, the genetics of complex diseases such the stroke, in which multiple genes interact with environmental risk factors to increase risk, has been revolutionized by the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) approach. Scope of review Here we review the single-gene causes of ischemic stroke, bringing the reader from the candidate gene method toward the exciting new horizons of genetic technology. Major conclusions The aetiological diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young adults is more complex than in the elderly. The identification of a genetic cause is important to provide appropriate counseling and to start a correct therapy, when available. The advent of GWAS technology, such as for other complex pathological conditions, has contributed enormously to the understanding of many of these genetic bases. For success large, well phenotyped case cohorts are required, and international collaborations are essential. General significance This review focuses on the main causes of genetically-based ischemic stroke in young adults, often classified as indeterminate, investigating also the recent findings of the GWAS, in order to improve diagnostic and therapeutic management. PMID:26672892

  20. The growing problem of stroke among young adults.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Sally; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2013-12-01

    Although overall stroke incidence has been declining in developed countries, there is evidence that stroke in the young is increasing. Increasing incidence may be particularly pronounced among minorities in whom historically a higher burden of stroke has been reported. Compared with older adults, time spent with disability is longer for those affected at younger ages, and new data suggests that among 30-day young adult stroke survivors, increased mortality persists for as long as 20 years. Stroke in young adults is often missed by less experienced clinicians due to its unexpectedness, leading to lost opportunities for intervention. The causes and risk factors for stroke in the young are often rare or undetermined, but young adults with stroke also have a high burden of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and substance abuse. Disseminating awareness and promoting research on young adult stroke are steps towards reducing the burden of stroke. PMID:24105640

  1. [Nutritional support in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Segurola Gurrutxaga, Hegoi; Bretón Lesmes, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a public health problem of the first order. In developed countries is one of the leading causes of death, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition, stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in adulthood. Many of the patients who survive do so with significant sequelae that limit them in their activities of daily living. Most strokes (80-85%) are due to ischemia, while the rest are hemorrhagic. We have identified many modifiable risk factors, some with an important relationship with dietary factors or comorbidities in wich the diet has a significant impact. The incidence of malnutrition in stroke patients is not well known, but most likely impacts on patient prognosis. Furthermore, the nutritional status of patients admitted for stroke often deteriorates during hospitalization. It is necessary to perform a nutritional assessment of the patient in the early hours of admission, to determine both the nutritional status and the presence of dysphagia. Dysphagia, through alteration of the safety and efficacy of swallowing, is a complication that has an implication for nutritional support, and must be treated to prevent aspiration pneumonia, which is the leading cause of mortality in the stroke patient. Nutritional support should begin in the early hours. In patients with no or mild dysphagia that can be controlled by modifying the texture of the diet, they will start oral diet and oral nutritional supplementation will be used if the patient does not meet their nutritional requirements. There is no evidence to support the use of nutritional supplements routinely. Patients with severe dysphagia, or decreased level of consciousness will require enteral nutrition. Current evidence indicates that early nutrition should be initiated through a nasogastric tube, with any advantages of early feeding gastrostomy. Gastrostomy will be planned when the enteral nutrition support will be expected for long-term (4 weeks). Much evidence points to the

  2. Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Dawn; Gillen, Glen; Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Evidence Connection articles provide a clinical application of systematic reviews developed in conjunction with the American Occupational Therapy Association's (AOTA's) Evidence-Based Practice project. The clinical condition discussed in this inaugural Evidence Connection article is adults with stroke. Findings from the systematic reviews on this topic were published in the January/February 2015 issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and in AOTA's Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Adults With Stroke (Wolf & Nilsen, 2015). Each article in this series will summarize the evidence from the published reviews on a given topic and presents an application of the evidence to a related clinical case. Evidence Connection articles illustrate how the research evidence from the reviews can be used to inform and guide clinical decision making. PMID:26356668

  3. Stroke in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mankovsky, Boris N; Ziegler, Dan

    2004-01-01

    The article's objective is to review the key advances in the scientific literature related to the association of stroke with diabetes mellitus and to summarize the current approaches to stroke prevention in diabetic patients. The key findings from the literature regarding stroke incidence in patients with diabetes, specific and nonspecific risk factors of stroke in the diabetic population, such as arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, diabetes duration, diabetic complications, insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, course and outcome of stroke in subjects with diabetes and/or hyperglycemia, and the peculiarities of type, site and size of stroke in diabetic patients are discussed. The results of recent clinical trials aimed at correcting hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, to prevent stroke in people with diabetes, are reviewed. The medical database Medline along with original articles from peer-reviewed journals were used for analysis. There is convincing evidence suggesting that diabetes mellitus represents a strong independent risk factor of stroke. The contribution of hyperglycemia to increased stroke risk is not proven. Data suggest an association of the full cluster of the insulin resistance syndrome and stroke. Diabetes is a risk factor mainly for ischemic stroke, while its association with hemorrhagic stroke remains controversial. Hyperglycemia is common in stroke patients, but it is not known whether it independently influences the course and outcome of stroke or merely reflects stroke severity and location. Aggressive control of arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia allows to decrease the risk of stroke in diabetic patients substantially, while the importance of glucose control for stroke prevention remains unproven. PMID:15250030

  4. Examining Factors Associated with Pre-Admission to Discharge of Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Shao-Ping; Chen, Chiu-Mei; Liao, Hung-Chang; Chou, Ming-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and a major cause of adult disability in Taiwan. This research established correlations between pre-admission and discharge data in stroke patients to promote education of the general public, prevention, treatment and high standards of chronic care. A total of 790 stroke patients at Chung Shan Medical…

  5. Practical Assessment of Dysphagia in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Moo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a quantitative and organ-specific practical test for the diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia based on assessment of stroke patients. Methods An initial test composed of 24 items was designed to evaluate the function of the organs involved in swallowing. The grading system of the initial test was based on the analysis of 50 normal adults. The initial test was performed in 52 stroke patients with clinical symptoms of dysphagia. Aspiration was measured via a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS). The odds ratio was obtained to evaluate the correlation between each item in the initial test and the VFSS. A polychotomous linear logistic model was used to select the final test items. Results Eighteen of 24 initial items were selected as significant for the final tests. These 18 showed high initial validity and reliability. The Spearman correlation coefficient for the total score of the test and functional dysphagia scale was 0.96 (p<0.001), indicating a statistically significant positive correlation. Conclusion This study was carried out to design a quantitative and organ-specific test that assesses the causes of dysphagia in stroke patients; therefore, this test is considered very useful and highly applicable to the diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia. PMID:26798618

  6. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  7. Patient's Guide to Antithrombotic Therapy in Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... have had ischemic strokes. 5. How important is aspirin for a new stroke? ! Aspirin is a drug that “thins” the blood by ... cases, it is recommended that patients start taking aspirin within 48 hours of an ischemic stroke. While ...

  8. Risk factors, aetiology and outcome of ischaemic stroke in young adults: the Swiss Young Stroke Study (SYSS).

    PubMed

    Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Mono, Marie-Luise; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Michel, Patrik; Odier, Celine; Sztajzel, Roman; Lyrer, Philippe; Engelter, Stefan T; Bonati, Leo; Gensicke, Henrik; Traenka, Christopher; Tettenborn, Barbara; Weder, Bruno; Fischer, Urs; Galimanis, Aekaterini; Jung, Simon; Luedi, Rudolf; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Weck, Anja; Cereda, Carlo W; Baumgartner, Ralf; Bassetti, Claudio L; Mattle, Heinrich P; Nedeltchev, Krassen; Arnold, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    Ischaemic stroke (IS) in young adults has been increasingly recognized as a serious health condition. Stroke aetiology is different in young adults than in the older population. This study aimed to investigate aetiology and risk factors, and to search for predictors of outcome and recurrence in young IS patients. We conducted a prospective multicentre study of consecutive IS patients aged 16-55 years. Baseline demographic data, risk factors, stroke aetiology including systematic genetic screening for Fabry disease and severity were assessed and related to functional neurological outcome (modified Rankin Scale, mRS), case fatality, employment status, place of residence, and recurrent cerebrovascular events at 3 months. In 624 IS patients (60% men), median age was 46 (IQR 39-51) years and median NIHSS on admission 3 (IQR 1-8). Modifiable vascular risk factors were found in 73%. Stroke aetiology was mostly cardioembolism (32%) and of other defined origin (24%), including cervicocerebral artery dissection (17%). Fabry disease was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.3%). Aetiology remained unknown in 20%. Outcome at 3 months was favourable (mRS 0-1) in 61% and fatal in 2.9%. Stroke severity (p < 0.001) and diabetes mellitus (p = 0.023) predicted unfavourable outcome. Stroke recurrence rate at 3 months was 2.7%. Previous stroke or TIA predicted recurrent cerebrovascular events (p = 0.012). In conclusion, most young adults with IS had modifiable vascular risk factors, emphasizing the importance of prevention strategies. Outcome was unfavourable in more than a third of patients and was associated with initial stroke severity and diabetes mellitus. Previous cerebrovascular events predicted recurrent ones. PMID:26067218

  9. Psychosocial Distress and Stroke Risk in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kimberly M.; Clark, Cari J.; Lewis, Tené T.; Aggarwal, Neelum T.; Beck, Todd; Guo, Hongfei; Lunos, Scott; Brearley, Ann; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Evans, Denis A.; Everson-Rose, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association of psychosocial distress with risk of stroke mortality and incident stroke in older adults. Methods Data were from the Chicago Health and Aging Project, a longitudinal population-based study conducted in three contiguous neighborhoods on the south side of Chicago, Illinois. Participants were community-dwelling black and non-Hispanic white adults, age 65 and older (N=4,120 for stroke mortality; N=2,649 for incident stroke). Psychosocial distress was an analytically-derived composite measure of depressive symptoms, perceived stress, neuroticism, and life dissatisfaction. Cox proportional hazards models examined the association of distress with stroke mortality and incident stroke over 6 years of follow-up. Results 151 stroke deaths and 452 incident strokes were identified. Adjusting for age, race, and sex, the hazard ratio (HR) for each 1-SD increase in distress was 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.28–1.70) for stroke mortality and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.07–1.30) for incident stroke. Associations were reduced following adjustment for stroke risk factors and remained significant for stroke mortality (HR=1.29; 95% CI=1.10–1.52) but not for incident stroke (HR=1.09; 95% CI=0.98–1.21). Secondary analyses of stroke subtypes showed that distress was strongly related to incident hemorrhagic strokes (HR=1.70; 95% CI=1.28–2.25) but not ischemic strokes (HR=1.02; 95% CI=0.91–1.15) in fully adjusted models. Conclusions Increasing levels of psychosocial distress are related to excess risk of both fatal and nonfatal stroke in older black and white adults. Additional research is needed to examine pathways linking psychosocial distress to cerebrovascular disease risk. PMID:23238864

  10. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  11. Symmetric bilateral caudate, hippocampal, cerebellar, and subcortical white matter MRI abnormalities in an adult patient with heat stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schucany, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Heat stroke is the end result of excess heat stress and results in multiorgan dysfunction with a propensity for central nervous system (CNS) injury. Damage to the CNS appears to be the result of multiple mechanisms, including direct heat damage and the initiation of a sepsis-type syndrome. Only a few scattered case reports exist in the literature that document CNS damage via imaging. We present a case with symmetric bilateral magnetic resonance findings in the caudate nuclei, subcortical white matter, hippocampi, and cerebellum. To our knowledge, this is the first case to report symmetric bilateral caudate abnormality and bilateral hippocampal enhancement. PMID:18982090

  12. Role of echocardiography in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koki; Homma, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of potential embolic source is an important diagnostic step in treating patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Cardiogenic embolism has been estimated to be the causative factor in 15-30% of all cases of ischemic stroke. Cardioembolic strokes are generally severe and recurrence and mortality rate high. Various cardiac disorders including atrial fibrillation, ventricular thrombus, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and structural heart defects can cause cardioembolic stroke. Although the aortic arch is not a cardiac structure, it is usually considered under source of cardiac embolism (cardioaortic source) and is reviewed in this article. Echocardiography (both transthoracic and transesophageal) is a widely used and versatile technique that can provide comprehensive information of thromboembolic risk in patients with stroke. This article reviews potential cardiac sources of stroke and discusses the role of echocardiography in clinical practice. PMID:27256218

  13. Meningovascular neurosyphilis: a report of stroke in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Vaitkus, Antanas; Krasauskaite, Egle; Urbonaviciūte, Inga

    2010-01-01

    A young adult patient with meningovascular neurosyphilis in the form of acute ischemic stroke with right hemiparesis and speech disturbance is reported. CT scan showed features of ischemic infarct and extensive laboratory studies were made before the diagnosis ultimately was revealed. Such cases could result in confusion for the clinician, and high index of clinical suspicion of this condition is required since syphilis is not routinely tested, as routine screening is seen to be of low diagnostic yield. As clinical practice indicates, it remains a difficult problem approaching diagnosis of neurosyphilis, and this is achieved through exclusion of neurosyphilis as a clinical possibility. PMID:20571297

  14. Management of depression in elderly stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lökk, Johan; Delbari, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) in elderly patients has been considered the most common neuropsychiatric consequence of stroke up to 6–24 months after stroke onset. When depression appears within days after stroke onset, it is likely to remit, whereas depression at 3 months is likely to be sustained for 1 year. One of the major problems posed by elderly stroke patients is how to identify and optimally manage PSD. This review provides insight to identification and management of depression in elderly stroke patients. Depression following stroke is less likely to include dysphoria and more likely characterized by vegetative signs and symptoms compared with other forms of late-life depression, and clinicians should rely more on nonsomatic symptoms rather than somatic symptoms. Evaluation and diagnosis of depression among elderly stroke patients are more complex due to vague symptoms of depression, overlapping signs and symptoms of stroke and depression, lack of properly trained health care personnel, and insufficient assessment tools for proper diagnosis. Major goals of treatment are to reduce depressive symptoms, improve mood and quality of life, and reduce the risk of medical complications including relapse. Antidepressants (ADs) are generally not indicated in mild forms because the balance of benefit and risk is not satisfactory in elderly stroke patients. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first choice of PSD treatment in elderly patients due to their lower potential for drug interaction and side effects, which are more common with tricyclic ADs. Recently, stimulant medications have emerged as promising new therapeutic interventions for PSD and are now the subject of rigorous clinical trials. Cognitive behavioral therapy can also be useful, and electroconvulsive therapy is available for patients with severe refractory PSD. PMID:20856917

  15. Dimethylarginine levels in cerebrospinal fluid of hyperacute ischemic stroke patients are associated with stroke severity.

    PubMed

    Brouns, Raf; Marescau, Bart; Possemiers, Ilse; Sheorajpanday, Rishi; De Deyn, Peter P

    2009-09-01

    We hypothesise that asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, SDMA) are released in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to ischemia-induced proteolysis and that CSF dimethylarginines are related to stroke severity. ADMA and SDMA were measured in CSF of 88 patients with ischemic stroke or TIA within 24 h after stroke onset (mean 8.6 h) and in 24 controls. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission. Outcome was evaluated by institutionalization due to stroke and the modified Rankin scale. Dimethylarginine levels were higher in patients with stroke than in TIA patients, who had higher levels than controls and correlated with the NIHSS. Logistic regression analysis confirmed that dimethylarginines were independently associated with stroke severity. The SDMA/ADMA ratio did not differ significantly between controls and stroke patients. CSF dimethylarginine levels are increased in hyperacute ischemic stroke and are associated with stroke severity. PMID:19296217

  16. Early carotid endarterectomy in selected stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kahn, M B; Patterson, H K; Seltzer, J; Fitzpatrick, M; Smullens, S; Bell, R; DiMuzio, P; Carabasi, R A

    1999-09-01

    Although there are several reports suggesting the safety of performing carotid endarterectomy (CE) within 4 weeks (early) of a nondisabling stroke, at many institutions it is not standard practice. Benefits of early surgery may include reduction in the number of strokes or carotid occlusions during the time between stroke and surgery, as well as a reduction in the cost of medical care due to the elimination of interval anticoagulation and close follow-up. This review examines the outcomes of early CE in selected patients after a nondisabling stroke. A total of 1065 CEs were performed between November 1991 and April 1998. Seventy-five patients were identified by computerized hospital record and office chart review as having CE after a nondisabling stroke. Criteria for early surgery included 1) nondisabling stroke ipsilateral to a carotid stenosis >50%, 2) neurological stability, and 3) no evidence of hemorrhagic stroke or significant cerebral edema by CT/MRI evaluation. This review suggests that early CE can be performed in selected patients with an acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:10466988

  17. Skipping Meds Greatly Ups Heart Patients' Risk of Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skipping Meds Greatly Ups Heart Patients' Risk of Stroke: Study Fatal strokes seven times more likely if drugs to control ... are much more likely to die from a stroke if they don't take cholesterol-lowering statin ...

  18. Stroke Incidence Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jennifer S.; Liu, Xinggang; Smith, Gordon S.; Baumgarten, Mona; Rattinger, Gail B.; Gambert, Steven R.; Langenberg, Patricia; Zuckerman, Ilene H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), older adults are at increased risk of hemorrhagic and thromboembolic events, but it is unclear whether the increased risk continues after hospital discharge. We estimated incidence rates of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke following hospital discharge for TBI among adults ≥65 and compared them with pre-TBI rates. Participants 16,936 Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 with a diagnosis of TBI in any position on an inpatient claim between 6/1/2006 and 12/31/2009 who survived to hospital discharge. Design Retrospective analysis of a random 5% sample of Medicare claims data Main Measures Hemorrhagic stroke was defined as ICD-9 codes 430.xx-432.xx. Ischemic stroke was defined as ICD-9 codes 433.xx-435.xx, 437.0x, and 437.1x. Results There was a six-fold increase in the rate of hemorrhagic stroke following TBI compared to the pre-TBI period (adjusted Rate Ratio (RR) 6.5; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 5.3, 7.8), controlling for age and sex. A smaller increase in the rate of ischemic stroke was observed (adjusted RR 1.3; 95% CI 1.2, 1.4). Conclusion Future studies should investigate causes of increased stroke risk post-TBI as well as effective treatments to reduce stroke risk and improve outcomes post-TBI among older adults. PMID:24816156

  19. Hurdles in stroke thrombolysis: Experience from 100 consecutive ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Badachi, Sagar; Mathew, Thomas; Prabhu, Arvind; Nadig, Raghunandan; Sarma, Gosala R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute management of ischemic stroke involves thrombolysis within 4.5 h. For a successful outcome, early recognition of stroke, transportation to the hospital emergency department immediately after stroke, timely imaging, proper diagnosis, and thrombolysis within 4.5 h is of paramount importance. Aim: To analyze the obstacles for thrombolysis in acute stroke patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. A total of hundred consecutive patients of acute ischemic stroke who were not thrombolysed, but otherwise fulfilled the criteria for thrombolysis were evaluated prospectively for various factors that prevented thrombolysis. The constraints to thrombolysis were categorized into: i) Failure of patient to recognize stroke symptoms, ii) patient's awareness of thrombolysis as a treatment modality for stroke, iii) failure of patient's relative to recognize stroke, iv) failure of primary care physician to recognize stroke, v) transport delays, vi) lack of neuroimaging and thrombolysis facility, and vii) nonaffordability. Results: The biggest hurdle for early hospital presentation is failure of patients to recognize stroke (73%), followed by lack of neuroimaging facility (58%), nonaffordability (56%), failure of patient's relative to recognize stroke (38%), failure of the primary care physician to recognize stroke (21%), and transport problems (13%). Awareness of thrombolysis as a treatment modality for stroke was seen only in 2%. Conclusion: Considering the urgency of therapeutic measures in acute stroke, there is necessity and room for improvement to overcome various hurdles that prevent thrombolysis. PMID:26713013

  20. Physiologic imaging in acute stroke: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Clinton D; Stephens, Marcus; Zuckerman, Scott L; Waitara, Magarya S; Morone, Peter J; Dewan, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is changing, as endovascular intervention becomes an important adjunct to tissue plasminogen activator. An increasing number of sophisticated physiologic imaging techniques have unique advantages and applications in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment-decision making of acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we first highlight the strengths, weaknesses, and possible indications for various stroke imaging techniques. How acute imaging findings in each modality have been used to predict functional outcome is discussed. Furthermore, there is an increasing emphasis on using these state-of-the-art imaging modalities to offer maximal patient benefit through IV therapy, endovascular thrombolytics, and clot retrieval. We review the burgeoning literature in the determination of stroke treatment based on acute, physiologic imaging findings. PMID:26063695

  1. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2) migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3) the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4) migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions. PMID:21197470

  2. Two young stroke patients associated with regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yumiko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Deguchi, Kentaro; Sato, Kota; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Takao, Yoshiki; Morio, Tomohiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-02-15

    We recently experienced 2 young adult patients who developed ischemic stroke after regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy for agammaglobulinemia with diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in their childhood. Patient 1 was 26-year-old woman, who developed Wallenberg's syndrome 6 days after the last IVIg therapy, but had no further stroke recurrence with cilostazol later. Patient 2 was 37-year-old man, who developed recurrent cerebral infarction in the territory of bilateral lenticulostriate branches like branch atheromatous disease (BAD) several days after the IVIg therapy. However, he had no further stroke recurrence after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) therapy for his lymphoproliferative disorder. It was suggested that IVIg therapy was associated to these different types of ischemic stroke in our 2 young adult patients with minimal vascular risk factors. Although IVIg therapy is widely used as a relatively safe medication for immunodeficiency disorders or autoimmune diseases, we need to pay more attention to stroke occurrence with regular IVIg therapy. PMID:26810508

  3. Stroke and the "stroke belt" in dialysis: contribution of patient characteristics to ischemic stroke rate and its geographic variation.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, James B; Ellerbeck, Edward F; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Phadnis, Milind A; Rigler, Sally K; Spertus, John A; Zhou, Xinhua; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I

    2013-12-01

    Geographic variation in stroke rates is well established in the general population, with higher rates in the South than in other areas of the United States. ESRD is a potent risk factor for stroke, but whether regional variations in stroke risk exist among dialysis patients is unknown. Medicare claims from 2000 to 2005 were used to ascertain ischemic stroke events in a large cohort of 265,685 incident dialysis patients. A Poisson generalized linear mixed model was generated to determine factors associated with stroke and to ascertain state-by-state geographic variability in stroke rates by generating observed-to-expected (O/E) adjusted rate ratios for stroke. Older age, female sex, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity, unemployed status, diabetes, hypertension, history of stroke, and permanent atrial fibrillation were positively associated with ischemic stroke, whereas body mass index >30 kg/m(2) was inversely associated with stroke (P<0.001 for each). After full multivariable adjustment, the three states with O/E rate ratios >1.0 were all in the South: North Carolina, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. Regional efforts to increase primary prevention in the "stroke belt" or to better educate dialysis patients on the signs of stroke so that they may promptly seek care may improve stroke care and outcomes in dialysis patients. PMID:23990675

  4. Ischemic stroke following abuse of Marijuana in a Nigerian adult male.

    PubMed

    Oyinloye, Olalekan; Nzeh, Donald; Yusuf, Ayodeji; Sanya, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug among adolescents and young adults. Despite its widespread use, only a few reports exist on the association of cannabis use and stroke. A 26-year-old Nigerian male, developed right-sided ischemic stroke few hours after smoking three wraps of cannabis. He had smoked cannabis consistently for the past 4 years prior to the development of the stroke. Known stroke etiology and abuse of other illicit drugs were ruled out from history and investigations. Neuroimaging studies of the brain revealed infarcts in basal ganglia secondary to occlusion of blood flow in the left anterior and middle cerebral arteries. The mechanism of stroke in this patient was thought to be a cannabis-induced vasculopathy. Many cases of stroke in the young are increasingly being seen in hospitals in resource scarce countries. There seems to be a predilection for the basal ganglia in ischemic stroke following cannabis abuse. Therefore, cannabis abuse should be considered in young adults with basal ganglia infarcts, after excluding other known etiologies. PMID:25288854

  5. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  6. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  7. Patient Eye Examinations - Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examinations, Adults Patient Eye Examinations, Children Refractive Errors Scientists in the Laboratory Visual Acuity Testing Patient Eye Examinations, Adults × Warning message Automatic fallback to the cURL connection method kicked in to handle the request. Result code ...

  8. Activated Protein C Resistance Does Not Increase Risk for Recurrent Stroke or Death in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christoph; Sonntag, Natalie; Schleef, Michael; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Poppert, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated protein C (APC) resistance is the most common inherited prothrombotic disorder. The role of APC resistance in ischemic stroke is controversially discussed. Objectives The aim of this single center follow up study was to investigate the effect of APC resistance on stroke recurrence and survival in stroke patients. Patients/Methods We retrospectively identified 966 patients who had had an ischemic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (TIA) and in whom laboratory tests for APC resistance had been conducted. These patients were contacted to determine the primary outcomes of recurrent ischemic stroke or death. Results A total of 858 patients with an average follow up time of 8.48 years were included. APC resistance did not influence cumulative incidence functions for stroke free and total survival. In multivariate analyses, crude and adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent stroke as well as for death where not significantly increased in patients with APC resistance. This also applies to the subgroups of young patients, patients with cryptogenic stroke and patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion APC-resistance is not a risk factor for subsequent stroke or death in patients with a first ischemic stroke or TIA. Testing for APC-resistance in stroke patients therefore cannot be routinely recommended. PMID:27508300

  9. Development of sensors to monitor stroke patients

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, S.A.; Glass, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    In the United States, approximately 550,000 new cases of stroke are reported annually, resulting in 150,000 deaths and leaving 300,000 survivors disabled. Thromboembolic strokes account for an estimated 300,000-400,000 of the 550,000 reported new cases of stroke each year. These thromboembolic strokes may be treatable by thrombolytic therapy which involves injecting a thrombolytic agent directly into the thrombus. As the clot dissolves, it breaks into fragments. One particular diagnostic fragment is the D dimer fragment which has antigenic properties. At LLNL, the authors are developing various catheter-based microtools to treat stroke. As part of the package, fiber optic pH sensors and D dimer biosensors are being developed for novel applications, in that they will be coaxially threaded through a catheter to the damaged area of the brain. The pH sensor would allow local measurements of tissue viability, providing an assessment on the patient`s status and indicating the optimal treatment plan. The D dimer biosensor would allow local measurements of the products of thrombolysis, i.e., D dimer, assisting in the identification of clot type and providing feedback on the dosage and infusion rate of the thrombocytic agent.

  10. Reduced Resting Metabolic Rate in Adults with Hemiparetic Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Monica C; Hafer-Macko, Charlene E; Ryan, Alice S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Resting metabolic rate (RMR) is the component of energy expenditure that explains the largest proportion of total daily energy requirements. Since RMR is determined largely by fat-free mass and a low RMR predicts weight gain in healthy adults, identifying the role of muscle atrophy following stroke on RMR may help identify ways to mitigate the development of obesity post-stroke. Methods Thirty-nine stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis (mean ± SEM: age: 61 ± 1 years, latency from stroke: 107 ± 40 months, BMI: 31 ± 3 kg/m2) underwent DXA scans for measurement of body composition, including total, paretic, and non-paretic leg lean mass and fasted, 30-min indirect calorimetry for measurement of RMR. Result Predicted RMR was calculated by the Mifflin-St Jeor equation, which considers weight, height, and age for both men and women. RMR was 14% lower than predicted (1438 ± 45 vs. 1669 ± 38 kcals/24 hrs; P<0.01). Total (r=0.73, P<0.01), paretic (r=0.72, P<0.01) and non-paretic (r=0.67, P<0.01) leg lean mass predicted RMR. Conclusion These data indicate that muscle atrophy post stroke may lead to a reduced RMR. This substantiates the need to attenuate the loss of lean mass after a stroke to prevent declines in RMR and possible weight gain common post-stroke. PMID:26973796

  11. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Connected Home » Stroke Heath and Aging Stroke What Is a Stroke? Stroke Is an Emergency. ... IGNORE THE SIGNS OF STROKE! What Is a Stroke? A stroke happens when something changes how blood ...

  12. Comparison of provision of stroke care in younger and older patients: findings from the South london stroke register.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Siobhan L; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony G; McKevitt, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Background. Evidence-based stroke care should be available to all patients. However, evidence exists of inequalities according to age. This study compared access to care for younger adults to that for over 65s. Methods. Using population-based data from 4229 patients with first-ever stroke between 1995 and 2010, associations between age and 21 care indicators were investigated using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Age was not associated with stroke unit admission for ischaemic stroke (P = 0.666). Younger PICH patients were least likely to be admitted to stroke units (P = 0.001), instead treated on neurosurgical or ICU wards. Younger age was also associated with admission to neurosurgery or ICU after SAH (P = 0.006), increased occupational or physiotherapy at 1 year (P = 0.043), and contact with a GP 3 months after stroke (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Younger patients have equal or greater access to evidence-based care. However, there is a need to ensure that services meet the needs of this group. PMID:22593833

  13. Importance and Repercussions of Renal and Cardiovascular Pathology on Stroke in Young Adults: An Anatomopathologic Study of 52 Clinical Necropsies

    PubMed Central

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Fernández-Abreu, Mary; Cardozo-Duran, José; Vilchez-Barrios, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stroke in young adults has seldom been studied in a necropsy series. The objective of the present clinical necropsy-based investigation was to analyze stroke and its relationship with cardiovascular and renal pathology in young adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS The protocols of 52 clinical necropsies with diagnoses of stroke in patients aged 18 – 49 years, performed between the years 1990–2006, were reviewed. RESULTS Hemorrhagic stroke was diagnosed in 36 patients (69.3%), whereas the remaining 16 (30.7%) had ischemic stroke. Hypertensive cardiopathy was evident in 88.4% of the cases. Chronic renal pathology, directly or indirectly related to hypertension, was observed in 55.7% of the patients. Ischemic stroke as a result of occlusive atherosclerotic disease was seen in 50% of cases. Cardiogenic emboli were found in 25% of the cadavers. Hemorrhagic stroke was associated with hypertension in 43% of the cases, with ruptured vascular malformations in 29%, and coagulopathies in 17% of the cases. Hypertensive cardiopathy was present in patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (81.2% and 91.6%, respectively). The most frequently observed renal ailments were chronic pyelonephritis (23%) and nephrosclerosis (21.1%). These were associated with ischemic stroke in 43.7%, and 12.5% of the cases, respectively, and with 13.8% and 25% of the hemorrhagic stroke cases. DISCUSSION Hypertensive cardiopathy, occlusive atherosclerotic disease, chronic pyelonephritis and nephrosclerosis are among the pathophysiologycal mechanisms that apparently and eventually interact to induce a significant number of cases of stroke in young adults. A chronic systemic inflammatory state appears to be an important related condition because it possibly constitutes an accelerant of the pathophysiologycal process. PMID:18297202

  14. Ipsilateral hippocampal atrophy is associated with long-term memory dysfunction after ischemic stroke in young adults.

    PubMed

    Schaapsmeerders, Pauline; van Uden, Inge W M; Tuladhar, Anil M; Maaijwee, Noortje A M; van Dijk, Ewoud J; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Arntz, Renate M; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Kessels, Roy P C

    2015-07-01

    Memory impairment after stroke in young adults is poorly understood. In elderly stroke survivors memory impairments and the concomitant loss of hippocampal volume are usually explained by coexisting neurodegenerative disease (e.g., amyloid pathology) in interaction with stroke. However, neurodegenerative disease, such as amyloid pathology, is generally absent at young age. Accumulating evidence suggests that infarction itself may cause secondary neurodegeneration in remote areas. Therefore, we investigated the relation between long-term memory performance and hippocampal volume in young patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. We studied all consecutive first-ever ischemic stroke patients, aged 18-50 years, admitted to our academic hospital center between 1980 and 2010. Episodic memory of 173 patients was assessed using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and the Rey Complex Figure and compared with 87 stroke-free controls. Hippocampal volume was determined using FSL-FIRST, with manual correction. On average 10 years after stroke, patients had smaller ipsilateral hippocampal volumes compared with controls after left-hemispheric stroke (5.4%) and right-hemispheric stroke (7.7%), with most apparent memory dysfunctioning after left-hemispheric stroke. A larger hemispheric stroke was associated with a smaller ipsilateral hippocampal volume (b=-0.003, P<0.0001). Longer follow-up duration was associated with smaller ipsilateral hippocampal volume after left-hemispheric stroke (b=-0.028 ml, P=0.002) and right-hemispheric stroke (b=-0.015 ml, P=0.03). Our results suggest that infarction is associated with remote injury to the hippocampus, which may lower or expedite the threshold for cognitive impairment or even dementia later in life. PMID:25757914

  15. Assessing the Impact of Health Literacy on Education Retention of Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schnepel, Loretta; Smotherman, Carmen; Livingood, William; Dodani, Sunita; Antonios, Nader; Lukens-Bull, Katryne; Balls-Berry, Joyce; Johnson, Yvonne; Miller, Terri; Hodges, Wayne; Falk, Diane; Wood, David; Silliman, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate health literacy is a pervasive problem with major implications for reduced health status and health disparities. Despite the role of focused education in both primary and secondary prevention of stroke, the effect of health literacy on stroke education retention has not been reported. We examined the relationship of health literacy to the retention of knowledge after recommended stroke education. Methods This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at an urban safety-net hospital. Study subjects were patients older than 18 admitted to the hospital stroke unit with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke who were able to provide informed consent to participate (N = 100). Health literacy levels were measured by using the short form of Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Patient education was provided to patients at an inpatient stroke unit by using standardized protocols, in compliance with Joint Commission specifications. The education outcomes for poststroke care education, knowledge retention, was assessed for each subject. The effect of health literacy on the Stroke Patient Education Retention scores was assessed by using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Of the 100 participating patients, 59% had inadequate to marginal health literacy. Stroke patients who had marginal health literacy (mean score, 7.45; standard deviation [SD], 1.9) or adequate health literacy (mean score, 7.31; SD, 1.76) had statistically higher education outcome scores than those identified as having inadequate health literacy (mean score, 5.58; SD, 2.06). Results from multivariate analysis indicated that adequate health literacy was most predictive of education outcome retention. Conclusions This study demonstrated a clear relationship between health literacy and stroke education outcomes. Studies are needed to better understand the relationship of health literacy to key educational outcomes for primary or secondary prevention of stroke and to

  16. Recognition and Management of Perioperative Stroke in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Vlisides, Phillip E; Mashour, George A; Didier, Thomas J; Shanks, Amy M; Weightman, Adam; Gelb, Adrian W; Moore, Laurel E

    2016-08-01

    We sought to characterize stroke management and outcomes in a postoperative population. By using the electronic medical records, we identified 39 patients suffering perioperative stroke after noncardiac and nonneurosurgical procedures for whom documentation of management and outcomes was available. Thirty-three strokes occurred during admission, whereas 6 occurred after discharge and were recognized upon return to the hospital. Perioperative stroke was associated with delayed recognition, infrequent intervention, and significant rates of morbidity and mortality, suggesting the need for improved screening and more rapid treatment. There may be disparities in care and outcomes between in-hospital and out-of hospital stroke patients, though further study is warranted. PMID:27490452

  17. New pooled cohort risk equations: Application to a recent stroke patient population

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, Pooled Cohort Risk (PCR) equations, which incorporates new sex- and race-specific estimates of the 10-year risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) including stroke, for ASCVD-free adults was introduced. Given the importance of secondary stroke prevention and benefit of a potential tool to readily identify stroke patients at high intermediate-term vascular risk for appropriate treatment, we evaluated the prediction and discrimination of the PCR and Framingham Cardiovascular Risk (FCR) equations after a recent stroke. Method We conducted an analysis of Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention dataset of 3555 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. ≥ Subjects were categorized as having low-PCR/low-FCR (<%), high-PCR/high-FCR (≥), and known-ASCVD. Independent associations of high-PCR/high-FCR with recurrent stroke (primary outcome) and stroke/coronary heart disease (CHD)/vascular death (secondary outcomes) were assessed. Results Both PCR and FCR were independently related to both outcomes: compared with low-PCR, high-PCR was associated with stroke (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.25–2.57) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (2.05; 1.55–2.70). Compared with low-FCR, high-FCR was associated with stroke (2.06; 1.34–3.16) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (1.57; 1.12–2.20). The c-statistic of PCR/FCR as a continuous variable for stroke was 0.56 (95% CI, 0.54–0.58) and 0.56 (0.54–0.57), respectively and for stroke/CHD/vascular death was 0.62 (0.60–0.63) and 0.61 (0.59–0.63), respectively. Conclusions Both PCR and FCR are significant predictors of recurrent vascular events among patients after a recent non-cardioembolic stroke, but neither one of them is an optimal model for discriminating intermediate-term ASCVD prediction among stroke patients already receiving secondary stroke prevention. PMID:25510378

  18. Diffuse Cerebral Vasculopathy in a HIV-Positive Patient with Recurrent Strokes.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Lo, Chung-Ping; Juan, Chun-Jung; Chang, Wei-Chou; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2008-02-18

    The causes of ischemic stroke in the young adult are diverse. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection-related vasculopathy is usually not included in the list of differential diagnoses. HIV-positive patients may present with acute neurologic dysfunction of different causes, among which cerebral infarction is an uncommon one. Herein, we report a HIV-infected young man who suffered from recurrent ischemic strokes with evidence of cerebral vasculopathy on serial magnetic resonance images. PMID:24256749

  19. Audiological findings in aphasic patients after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Solange Satie; Ortiz, Karin Zazo; Minett, Thaís Soares Cianciarullo; Borges, Alda Christina Lopes de Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To outline the audiological findings of aphasic patients after cerebrovascular accidents. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed between March 2011 and August 2012 in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Pathology Department of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo. A total of 43 aphasic subjects (27 men) were referred for audiological evaluation after stroke, with mean age of 54.48 years. Basic audiological evaluation tests were performed, including pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry (speech recognition threshold and word recognition score), immittance measures (tympanometry and contralateral acoustic reflex), and transient otoacoustic emissions. Results Sensorineural hearing loss was prevalent (78.6%). Speech recognition threshold and word recognition score were not obtained in some patients because they were unable to perform the task. Hearing loss was a common finding in this population. Conclusion Comprehension and/or oral emission disruptions in aphasic patients after stroke compromised conventional speech audiometry, resulting in the need for changes in the evaluation procedures for these patients. PMID:25628193

  20. Increased Risk of Stroke in Patients With Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuropsychiatric diseases might enhance stroke development, possibly through inflammation and atherosclerosis. Approximately 25% to 40% of patients with stroke, largely younger patients, are not associated with any conventional stroke risk factors. In this research, we explored whether fibromyalgia (FM), a neuropsychosomatic disorder, increases stroke risk. From a claims dataset with one million enrollees sourced of the Taiwan National Health Insurance database, we selected 47,279 patients with FM and randomly selected 189,112 age- and sex-matched controls within a 3-year period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. Stroke risk was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Comorbidities associated with increased stroke risk, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis, were more prevalent in patients with FM and high stroke risk than in the controls. The overall stroke risk was 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–1.30) higher in the FM group than in the non-FM group. Even without comorbidities, stroke risk was higher in patients with FM than in the controls (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.35–1.53, P < 0.001). The relative risk of stroke was 2.26-fold between FM and non-FM groups in younger patients (age <35 years, 95% CI: 1.86–2.75). This is the first investigation associating FM with an increased risk of stroke development. The outcomes imply that FM is a significant risk factor for stroke and that patients with FM, particularly younger patients, require close attention and rigorous measures for preventing stroke. PMID:26937918

  1. Neurorickettsioses: a rare presentation with stroke in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Kumar S, Praveen; K, Pramod

    2014-10-01

    Acute stroke-like presentations due to rickettsial infections have been sparsely reported in literature. We report a young patient who presented with high grade fever and acute encephalopathy with right hemiplegia. CT head showed left cerebral, bilateral thalamic and midbrain infarcts. The stroke in young work-up for conventional and non-conventional risk factors including few infections known to cause cerebral vasculitis was negative. He did not respond to empirical antimalarials and antibiotics. With a high index of suspicion of his 'febrile cerebrovasculitis' like presentation, serological test for rickettsia was done and found to be positive. He responded to doxycycline. This case expands the spectrum of presentation of neurorickettsioses and highlights the importance of considering rickettsial vasculitis as one of the potentially treatable causes of infections causing stroke. PMID:25478386

  2. High-quality Health Information Provision for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hong-Sheng; Ma, Jing-Jian; Li, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: High-quality information provision can allow stroke patients to effectively participate in healthcare decision-making, better manage the stroke, and make a good recovery. In this study, we reviewed information needs of stroke patients, methods for providing information to patients, and considerations needed by the information providers. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including information provision for patients with stroke in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on information provision for stroke patients in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide. High-quality and effective health information provision plays an essential role in helping patients to actively take part in decision-making and healthcare, and empowering them to effectively self-manage their long-standing chronic conditions. Different methods for providing information to patients have their relative merits and suitability, and as a result, the effective strategies taken by health professionals may include providing high-quality information, meeting patients’ individual needs, using suitable methods in providing information, and maintaining active involvement of patients. Conclusions: It is suggested that to enable stroke patients to access high-quality health information, greater efforts need to be made to ensure patients to receive accurate and current evidence-based information which meets their individual needs. Health professionals should use suitable information delivery methods, and actively involve stroke patients in information provision. PMID:27569241

  3. Acupuncture treatment for ischaemic stroke in young adults: protocol for a randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Jin, Xiaoming; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Gao, Hong; Fang, Zhen; Chen, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stroke in young adults is not uncommon. Although the overall incidence of stroke has been recently declining, the incidence of stroke in young adults is increasing. Traditional vascular risk factors are the main cause of young ischaemic stroke. Acupuncture has been shown to benefit stroke rehabilitation and ameliorate the risk factors for stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether acupuncture treatment will be effective in improving the activities of daily living (ADL), motor function and quality of life (QOL) in patients of young ischaemic stroke, and in preventing stroke recurrence by controlling blood pressure, lipids and body weight. Methods and analysis In this randomised, sham-controlled, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial, 120 patients between 18 and 45 years of age with a recent (within 1 month) ischaemic stroke will be randomised for an 8-week acupuncture or sham acupuncture treatment. The primary outcome will be the Barthel Index for ADL. The secondary outcomes will include the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) for QOL; and risk factors that are measured by ambulatory blood pressure, the fasting serum lipid, body mass index and waist circumference. Incidence of adverse events and long-term mortality and recurrence rate during a 10-year and 30-year follow-up will also be investigated. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Protocol V.3 was approved in June 2013. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone during follow-up calls enquiring on the patient's post-study health status. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC- 13003317; Pre-results. PMID:26739742

  4. Atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke in dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, James B.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Phadnis, Milind; Rigler, Sally K.; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Spertus, John A.; Zhou, Xinhua; Hou, Qingjiang; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Both stroke and chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) are common in dialysis patients, but uncertainty exists in the incidence of new strokes and the risk conferred by chronic AF. Methods A cohort of dually-eligible (Medicare & Medicaid) incident dialysis patients was constructed. Medicare claims were used to determine the onset of chronic AF, which was specifically treated as a time-dependent covariate. Cox proportional hazards models were used to model time to stroke. Results Of 56,734 patients studied, 5629 (9.9%) developed chronic AF. There were 22.8 ischemic and 5.0 hemorrhagic strokes per 1000 patient-years, a ratio of approximately 4.5:1. Chronic AF was independently associated with time to ischemic (HR 1.26, 99% CI’s 1.06 – 1.49, P = 0.0005), but not hemorrhagic, stroke. Race was strongly associated with hemorrhagic stroke: African-Americans (HR 1.46, 99% CI’s 1.08 – 1.96), Hispanics (HR 1.64, 99% CI’s 1.16 – 2.31), and others (HR 1.76, 99% CI’s 1.16 – 2.78) had higher rates than did Caucasians (P < 0.001 for all). Conclusions Chronic AF has a significant, but modest, association with ischemic stroke. Race/ethnicity is strongly associated with hemorrhagic strokes. The proportion of strokes due to hemorrhage is much higher than in the general population. PMID:23332588

  5. Relationship between Stroke and Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Milind A.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Shireman, Theresa I.; Rigler, Sally K.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Stroke is common in patients undergoing long-term dialysis, but the implications for mortality after stroke in these patients are not fully understood. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A large cohort of dually-eligible (Medicare and Medicaid) patients initiating dialysis from 2000 to 2005 and surviving the first 90 days was constructed. Medicare claims were used to ascertain ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes occurring after 90-day survival. A semi-Markov model with additive hazard extension was generated to estimate the association between stroke and mortality, to calculate years of life lost after a stroke, and to determine whether race was associated with differential survival after stroke. Results The cohort consisted of 69,371 individuals representing >112,000 person-years of follow-up. Mean age±SD was 60.8±15.5 years. There were 21.1 (99% confidence interval [99% CI], 20.0 to 22.3) ischemic strokes and 4.7 (99% CI, 4.2 to 5.3) hemorrhagic strokes after cohort entry per 1000 patient-years. At 30 days, mortality was 17.9% for ischemic stroke and 53.4% for hemorrhagic stroke. The adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) depended on time since entry into the cohort; for patients who experienced a stroke at 1 year after cohort entry, for example, the AHR of hemorrhagic stroke for mortality was 25.4 (99% CI, 22.4 to 28.4) at 1 week, 9.9 (99% CI, 8.4 to 11.6) at 3 months, 5.9 (99% CI, 5.0 to 7.0) at 6 months, and 1.8 (99% CI, 1.5 to 2.1) at 24 months. The corresponding AHRs for ischemic stroke were 11.7 (99% CI, 10.2 to 13.1) at 1 week, 6.6 (99% CI, 6.4 to 6.7) at 3 months, and 4.7 (99% CI, 4.5 to 4.9) at 6 months, remaining significantly >1.0 even at 48 months. Median months of life lost were 40.7 for hemorrhagic stroke and 34.6 for ischemic stroke. For both stroke types, mortality did not differ by race. Conclusions Dialysis recipients have high mortality after a stroke with corresponding decrements in remaining years of life. Poststroke

  6. Differences Between US and UK Adults in Stroke Preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Gary A.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; White, Martin; Sniehotta, Falko F.; Mackintosh, Joan E.; Gellert, Paul; Skolarus, Lesli E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Although time-dependent treatment is available, most people delay contacting emergency medical services for stroke. Given differences in the healthcare system and public health campaigns, exploring between-country differences in stroke preparedness may identify novel ways to increase acute stroke treatment. Methods— A survey was mailed to population-based samples in Ingham County, Michigan, US (n=2500), and Newcastle upon Tyne, UK (n=2500). Surveys included stroke perceptions and stroke/nonstroke scenarios to assess recognition and response to stroke. Between-country differences and associations with stroke preparedness were examined using t tests and linear mixed models. Results— Overall response rate was 27.4%. The mean age of participants was 55 years, and 58% were female. US participants were better in recognizing stroke (70% versus 63%, d=0.27) and were more likely to call emergency medical services (55% versus 52%, d=0.11). After controlling for demographics and comorbidities, US participants remained more likely to recognize stroke but were not more likely to respond appropriately. A greater belief that medical treatment can help with stroke and understanding of stroke was associated with improved stroke recognition and response. Conclusions— Overall, stroke recognition and response were moderate. US participants were modestly better at recognizing stroke, although there was little difference in response to stroke. Future stroke awareness interventions could focus more on stroke outcome expectations and developing a greater understanding of stroke among the public. PMID:26419968

  7. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  8. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  9. Assessing the Cognitive Regulation of Emotion in Depressed Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Margaret A.; Andrewes, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of a simple scale for measuring positive interpersonal attitudes of depressed stroke patients, with regard to their cognitive limitations. Two versions of the Attitudes Towards Relationships Scale were developed and administered to depressed stroke (n = 48) and control rheumatic/orthopaedic (n = 45)…

  10. Association of glycerol to dexamethasone in treatment of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Albizzati, M G; Candelise, L; Capitani, E; Colombo, A; Spinnler, H

    1979-08-01

    A prospective study of 93 acute stroke patients randomly selected by type of antiedema treatment given (hypertonic glicerol infusion plus dexamethasone versus dexamethasone alone) failed to elicit any statistically significant difference between the two treatments on survival rates and quality of survival 7 and 30 days after the stroke. PMID:495045

  11. Determinants of Length of Stay in Stroke Patients: A Geriatric Rehabilitation Unit Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to identify the predictors of length of stay--the impact of age, comorbidity, and stroke subtype--on the outcome of geriatric stroke patients. One hundred and seventy stroke patients (129 first-ever ischemic, 25 hemorrhagic, and 16 ischemic second strokes) were included in the study. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project…

  12. Stroke symptoms with absence of recognized stroke are associated with cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms in older adults with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Passler, Jesse S.; Clay, Olivio J.; Wadley, Virginia G.; Ovalle, Fernando; Crowe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Self-reported stroke symptoms may represent unrecognized cerebrovascular events leading to poorer cognitive and mental health. We examined relationships between stroke symptoms, cognitive impairment, and depressive symptoms in a high-risk sample: 247 adults age ≥65 with diabetes. Stroke symptoms were assessed using the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke-free Status, cognitive impairment was measured with the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status, and depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. In 206 participants without history of stroke/TIA, 27.7% reported stroke symptoms, with sudden loss of comprehension most frequently reported (11.7%). Having >1 vs. 0 stroke symptoms was associated with greater odds of cognitive impairment (OR=3.04, 95% CI, 1.15–8.05) and more depressive symptoms (b =2.60, p<.001) while controlling for age, race, gender, education, diabetes duration, diabetes severity, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Better recognition and treatment of cerebrovascular problems in older adults with diabetes may lead to improved cognition and mental health. PMID:26801916

  13. Stroke Symptoms With Absence of Recognized Stroke Are Associated With Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Passler, Jesse S; Clay, Olivio J; Wadley, Virginia G; Ovalle, Fernando; Crowe, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Self-reported stroke symptoms may represent unrecognized cerebrovascular events leading to poorer cognitive and mental health. We examined relationships between stroke symptoms, cognitive impairment, and depressive symptoms in a high-risk sample: 247 adults aged ≥65 with diabetes. Stroke symptoms were assessed using the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke-free Status, cognitive impairment was measured with the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status, and depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. In 206 participants without history of stroke/transient ischemic attack, 27.7% reported stroke symptoms, with sudden loss of comprehension most frequently reported (11.7%). Having >1 versus 0 stroke symptoms was associated with greater odds of cognitive impairment (odds ratio = 3.04, 95% confidence interval 1.15-8.05) and more depressive symptoms (b= 2.60,P< .001) while controlling for age, race, gender, education, diabetes duration, diabetes severity, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Better recognition and treatment of cerebrovascular problems in older adults with diabetes may lead to improved cognition and mental health. PMID:26801916

  14. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blockages that lead to ischemic strokes. A hemorrhagic stroke occurs if an artery in the brain leaks ... risms) are examples of conditions that can cause hemorrhagic strokes. (Aneurysms are balloon-like bulges in an artery ...

  15. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is ... rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment ...

  16. Risk of Stroke in Patients With Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Yeh, Diana Yu-Wung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The association between spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) and stroke has not been reported, and this study aimed to explore this association. We used the National Health Insurance Research Database for conducting a nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort study of patients newly hospitalized for SP from 2000 to 2010. A total of 2541 patients with newly diagnosed SP were included and compared with patients without SP. We observed that patients with SP were at higher risk for developing stroke, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.56. In addition, these patients had a significantly higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR = 2.22) than of ischemic stroke (adjusted HR = 1.48). The risk of stroke was the highest in the initial 4 months after hospitalization for SP (adjusted HR = 3.41, 95% confidence interval = 1.98–5.87). In conclusion, our study revealed a correlation between stroke and a history of SP, and the risk of stroke after SP was time sensitive. PMID:27100423

  17. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  18. Stroke and the “Stroke Belt” in Dialysis: Contribution of Patient Characteristics to Ischemic Stroke Rate and Its Geographic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Phadnis, Milind A.; Rigler, Sally K.; Spertus, John A.; Zhou, Xinhua; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2013-01-01

    Geographic variation in stroke rates is well established in the general population, with higher rates in the South than in other areas of the United States. ESRD is a potent risk factor for stroke, but whether regional variations in stroke risk exist among dialysis patients is unknown. Medicare claims from 2000 to 2005 were used to ascertain ischemic stroke events in a large cohort of 265,685 incident dialysis patients. A Poisson generalized linear mixed model was generated to determine factors associated with stroke and to ascertain state-by-state geographic variability in stroke rates by generating observed-to-expected (O/E) adjusted rate ratios for stroke. Older age, female sex, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity, unemployed status, diabetes, hypertension, history of stroke, and permanent atrial fibrillation were positively associated with ischemic stroke, whereas body mass index >30 kg/m2 was inversely associated with stroke (P<0.001 for each). After full multivariable adjustment, the three states with O/E rate ratios >1.0 were all in the South: North Carolina, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. Regional efforts to increase primary prevention in the “stroke belt” or to better educate dialysis patients on the signs of stroke so that they may promptly seek care may improve stroke care and outcomes in dialysis patients. PMID:23990675

  19. Neuroimaging Findings in Cryptogenic Stroke Patients with and without PFO

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, David E.; Ruthazer, Robin; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Donovan, Jennifer S.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Griffith, John; Homma, Shunichi; Jaigobin, Cheryl; Mas, Jean-Louis; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Michel, Patrik; Mono, Marie-Luise; Nedeltchev, Krassen; Papetti, Federica; Serena, Joaquín; Weimar, Christian; Kent, David M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patent foramen ovale (PFO) and cryptogenic stroke (CS) are commonly associated but some PFOs are incidental. Specific radiological findings associated with PFO may be more likely to indicate a PFO-related etiology. We examined whether specific radiological findings are associated with PFO among subjects with CS and known PFO status. METHODS We analyzed the Risk of Paradoxical Embolism (RoPE) database of subjects with CS and known PFO status, for associations between PFO and: 1) index stroke seen on imaging, 2) index stroke size, 3) index stroke location, 4) multiple index strokes, and 5) prior stroke on baseline imaging. We also compared imaging with purported “high risk” echocardiographic features. RESULTS Subjects (n=2680) were significantly more likely to have a PFO if their index stroke was large (OR 1.36, p=0.0025), seen on index imaging (OR 1.53, p=0.003), and superficially located (OR 1.54, p<0.0001). A prior stroke on baseline imaging was associated with not having a PFO (OR 0.66, p<0.0001). Finding multiple index strokes was unrelated to PFO status (OR 1.21, p=0.161). No echocardiographic variables were related to PFO status. CONCLUSIONS This is the largest study to report the radiological characteristics of patients with CS and known PFO status. Strokes that were large, radiologically apparent, superficially located, or unassociated with prior radiological infarcts were more likely to be PFO associated than were unapparent, smaller, or deep strokes, and those accompanied by chronic infarcts. There was no association between PFO and multiple acute strokes nor between specific echocardiographic PFO features with neuroimaging findings. PMID:23339957

  20. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-08-16

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into "a training package", based on the patient's functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  1. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-09-01

    Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84-0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38-0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43-0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35-0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  2. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E.; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y.; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84–0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38–0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43–0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35–0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  3. Strategies to improve recovery in acute ischemic stroke patients: Iberoamerican Stroke Group Consensus.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Gutiérrez-Fernández, M; Romano, M; Cantú-Brito, C; Arauz, A; Olmos, L E; Ameriso, S F; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2014-06-01

    Stroke is not only a leading cause of death worldwide but also a main cause of disability. In developing countries, its burden is increasing as a consequence of a higher life expectancy. Whereas stroke mortality has decreased in developed countries, in Latin America, stroke mortality rates continue to rise as well as its socioeconomic dramatic consequences. Therefore, it is necessary to implement stroke care and surveillance programs to better describe the epidemiology of stroke in these countries in order to improve therapeutic strategies. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenic processes of brain ischemia have resulted in development of effective therapies during the acute phase. These include reperfusion therapies (both intravenous thrombolysis and interventional endovascular approaches) and treatment in stroke units that, through application of management protocols directed to maintain homeostasis and avoid complications, helps to exert effective brain protection that decreases further cerebral damage. Some drugs may enhance protection, and besides, there is increasing knowledge about brain plasticity and repair mechanisms that take place for longer periods beyond the acute phase. These mechanisms are responsible for recovery in certain patients and are the focus of basic and clinical research at present. This paper discusses recovery strategies that have demonstrated clinical effect, or that are promising and need further study. This rapidly evolving field needs to be carefully and critically evaluated so that investment in patient care is grounded on well-proven strategies. PMID:23802573

  4. Locomotor Trajectories of Stroke Patients during Oriented Gait and Turning

    PubMed Central

    Van Hamme, Angele; Bensmail, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    Background The Timed Up and Go (TUG) test is widely used to assess locomotion in patients with stroke and is considered to predict the risk of falls. The analysis of locomotor trajectories during the TUG appears pertinent in stroke patients. The aims of this study were i) to analyze locomotor trajectories in patients with stroke during the walking and turning sub-tasks of the TUG, and to compare them with healthy subjects, ii) to determine whether trajectory parameters provide additional information to that provided by the conventional measure (performance time), iii) to compare the trajectory parameters of fallers and non-fallers with stroke and of patients with right and left hemisphere stroke, and iv) to evaluate correlations between trajectory parameters and Berg Balance Scale scores. Methods 29 patients with stroke (mean age 54.2±12.2 years, 18 men, 8 fallers) and 25 healthy subjects (mean age 51.6±8.7 years, 11 men) underwent three-dimensional analysis of the TUG. The trajectory of the center of mass was analyzed by calculation of the global trajectory length, Hausdorff distance and Dynamic Time Warping. The parameters were compared with a reference trajectory during the total task and each sub-task (Go, Turn, Return) of the TUG. Results Values of trajectory parameters were significantly higher for the stroke group during the total TUG and the Go and Turn sub-tasks (p<0.05). Moreover, logistic regression indicated that these parameters better discriminated stroke patients and healthy subjects than the conventional timed performance during the Go sub-task. In addition, fallers were distinguished by higher Dynamic Time Warping during the Go (p<0.05). There were no differences between patients with right and left hemisphere stroke. Discussion and Conclusion The trajectories of the stroke patients were longer and more deviated during the turn and the preceding phase. Trajectory parameters provided additional information to timed performance of this locomotor

  5. Subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dahmardeh, Maryam; Dabiri, Soroosh

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is the first cause of morbidity all around the world. Entrapment neuropathies are a known complication of stroke. The objective of this study is to assess the frequency of subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in the healthy and paretic hands of stroke patients. Methods The authors performed nerve conduction study in the first three days after admission in 39 stroke patients without subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome and 30 days after admission. Electrophysiological studies were done in both paretic and non-paretic hands. Both ulnar and median nerves were studied. Results After one month we found subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in 16 paretic hands and 13 healthy hands. We did not find any difference in the frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome in two sides. Conclusion The authors suggest that simultaneous different mechanisms may act in inducing carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands of hemiparetic patients. PMID:24250872

  6. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into “a training package”, based on the patient’s functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  7. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. Method Data was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0. Eleven logistic regression models were created to explore associations between having health services needs met in each problem area respectively (dependent variable) and the independent variables. In all models the independent variables were: age, sex, SIS domain corresponding to the dependent variable, or stroke severity in cases when no corresponding SIS domain was identified, and involvement in decisions on care and treatment. Results The 63 participants who returned the questionnaires had a mean age of 72 years, 33 were male and 30 were female. Eighty percent had suffered a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading. Conclusions The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health

  8. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  9. Comparing language outcomes in monolingual and bilingual stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Parker Jones, ‘Ōiwi; Grogan, Alice; Crinion, Jenny; Rae, Johanna; Ruffle, Louise; Leff, Alex P.; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Price, Cathy J.; Green, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke prognoses are usually inductive, generalizing trends learned from one group of patients, whose outcomes are known, to make predictions for new patients. Research into the recovery of language function is almost exclusively focused on monolingual stroke patients, but bilingualism is the norm in many parts of the world. If bilingual language recruits qualitatively different networks in the brain, prognostic models developed for monolinguals might not generalize well to bilingual stroke patients. Here, we sought to establish how applicable post-stroke prognostic models, trained with monolingual patient data, are to bilingual stroke patients who had been ordinarily resident in the UK for many years. We used an algorithm to extract binary lesion images for each stroke patient, and assessed their language with a standard tool. We used feature selection and cross-validation to find ‘good’ prognostic models for each of 22 different language skills, using monolingual data only (174 patients; 112 males and 62 females; age at stroke: mean = 53.0 years, standard deviation = 12.2 years, range = 17.2–80.1 years; time post-stroke: mean = 55.6 months, standard deviation = 62.6 months, range = 3.1–431.9 months), then made predictions for both monolinguals and bilinguals (33 patients; 18 males and 15 females; age at stroke: mean = 49.0 years, standard deviation = 13.2 years, range = 23.1–77.0 years; time post-stroke: mean = 49.2 months, standard deviation = 55.8 months, range = 3.9–219.9 months) separately, after training with monolingual data only. We measured group differences by comparing prediction error distributions, and used a Bayesian test to search for group differences in terms of lesion-deficit associations in the brain. Our models distinguish better outcomes from worse outcomes equally well within each group, but tended to be over-optimistic when predicting bilingual language outcomes: our bilingual patients tended to have poorer language skills

  10. Post-stroke bacteriuria among stroke patients attending a physiotherapy clinic in Ghana: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Donkor, Eric S; Akumwena, Amos; Amoo, Philip K; Owolabi, Mayowa O; Aspelund, Thor; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections are known to be a major complication of stroke patients. In this study, we evaluated the risk of community-acquired bacteriuria among stroke patients, the associated factors, and the causative organisms. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 stroke patients and 83 age- and sex-matched, apparently healthy controls. Urine specimens were collected from all the study subjects and were analyzed by standard microbiological methods. Demographic and clinical information was also collected from the study subjects. For stroke patients, the information collected also included stroke parameters, such as stroke duration, frequency, and subtype. Results Bacteriuria was significantly higher among stroke patients (24.3%, n=17) than among the control group (7.2%, n=6), with a relative risk of 3.36 (confidence interval [CI], 1.40–8.01, P=0.006). Among the control group, all six bacteriuria cases were asymptomatic, whereas the 17 stroke bacteriuria cases comprised 15 cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria and two cases of symptomatic bacteriuria. Female sex (OR, 3.40; CI, 1.12–10.30; P=0.03) and presence of stroke (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.08–0.70; P=0.009) were significantly associated with bacteriuria. The etiology of bacteriuria was similar in both study groups, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were the most predominant organisms isolated from both stroke patients (12.9%) and the control group (2.4%). Conclusion Stroke patients in the study region have a significantly higher risk of community-acquired bacteriuria, which in most cases is asymptomatic. Community-acquired bacteriuria in stroke patients appears to have little or no relationship with clinical parameters of stroke such as stroke subtype, duration and frequency. PMID:27051289

  11. Cortical changes underlying balance recovery in patients with hemiplegic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Mihara, Masahito; Hattori, Noriaki; Hatakenaka, Megumi; Kawano, Teiji; Yagura, Hajime; Miyai, Ichiro; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2014-01-15

    Balance problems are a major sequelae of stroke and are implicated in poor recovery of activities of daily living. In a cross-sectional study, using 50-channel event-related functional near-infrared spectroscopy we previously reported a significant correlation between individual balance ability after stroke and postural perturbation-related cortical activation in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and the prefrontal cortex. However, the neural mechanisms underlying balance recovery after stroke remain unclear. Herein, we examined the cortical involvement in balance recovery after stroke by determining longitudinal regional cortical activation changes in patients with hemiplegic stroke. Twenty patients with subcortical stroke admitted to our hospital for post-acute inpatient rehabilitation participated in this study. Before and after intensive inpatient physical and occupational therapy rehabilitation, we evaluated cortical activation associated with external postural perturbations induced by combined brisk forward and backward movement on a platform. Postural perturbation-related cortical activation in the SMA of the affected and unaffected hemispheres was significantly increased after intensive rehabilitation. The increment of the postural-perturbation-related oxygenated hemoglobin signals in the SMA of the unaffected hemisphere was significantly correlated with the gain in balance function measured by the Berg Balance Scale. These findings support the conclusion that the SMA plays an important role in postural balance control, and suggest that the SMA is a crucial area for balance recovery after hemiplegic stroke. PMID:23684871

  12. Difference in Motor Fatigue between Patients with Stroke and Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sehle, Aida; Vieten, Manfred; Mündermann, Annegret; Dettmers, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is often reported in stroke patients. However, it is still unclear if fatigue in stroke patients is more prominent, more frequent or more “typical” than in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if the pathophysiology differs between these two populations. The purpose of this study was to compare motor fatigue and fatigue-induced changes in kinematic gait parameters between stroke patients, MS patients, and healthy persons. Gait parameters at the beginning and end of a treadmill walking test were assessed in 10 stroke patients, 40 MS patients, and 20 healthy subjects. The recently developed Fatigue index Kliniken Schmieder (FKS) based on change of the movement’s attractor and its variability was used to measure motor fatigue. Six stroke patients had a pathological FKS. The FKS (indicating the level of motor fatigue) in stroke patients was similar compared to MS patients. Stroke patients had smaller step length, step height and greater step width, circumduction with the right and left leg, and greater sway compared to the other groups at the beginning and at the end of test. A severe walking impairment in stroke patients does not necessarily cause a pathological FKS indicating motor fatigue. Moreover, the FKS can be used as a measure of motor fatigue in stroke and MS and may also be applicable to other diseases. PMID:25566183

  13. Parkinsonian patients reduce their stroke size with increased processing demands.

    PubMed

    Van Gemmert, A W; Teulings, H L; Stelmach, G E

    2001-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often show reductions in writing size (micrographia) as the length of the text they produce increases. The cause for these reductions in stroke size are not well understood. Reductions in stroke size could be associated with either concurrent processing demands that result from the coordination and control of fingers, wrist, and arm during writing and the processing of future words or increased extension of the wrist joint as the execution of the writing progresses to the right across the page, resulting in increased stiffness in the pen-limb system. Parkinson's patients and elderly controls wrote phrases of different lengths with target patterns in various serial positions. When the number of words to be written increased, PD patients reduced their stroke size of the initial target pattern, while the elderly controls did not reduce their stroke size. There was no systematic change in stroke size of the second pattern as function of serial position. This result suggests that PD patients reduce the size of their handwriting strokes when concurrent processing load increases. PMID:11748904

  14. The impact of patient's weight on post-stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid; Alperovitch-Najenson, Deborah; Treger, Iuly

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of patient's weight on rehabilitation outcomes in first-event stroke patients. Design Retrospective, observational comparative study. 102 first-time stroke male and female patients admitted to the 52-bed neurology rehabilitation department in a rehabilitation hospital were included in the study. Body mass index (BMI), Functional Independence Measure (FIM) on admission and at discharge, as well as the delta-FIM (FIM on admission - FIM at discharge) were evaluated. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the FIM and the NIHSS scores between BMI groups (normal, overweight, moderate and severe obesity). Results A statistically significant negative correlation (rho = -0.20, p = 0.049) was found between FIM change and BMI, that remained significant after adjustments for age, sex and hospitalisation days. No difference was found between groups in FIM or NIHSS change between BMI groups. Conclusions In sub-acute post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehabilitation hospital, BMI was negatively associated with the improvement of functional parameters. Patients' BMI should be taken into consideration when predicting rehabilitation outcome for stroke patients. Further investigations are needed to identify the functional parameters affected by the patients' BMI. Implications for Rehabilitation In sub-acute post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehabilitation hospital, BMI was negatively associated with the improvement of functional parameters. Patients' BMI should be taken into consideration when predicting rehabilitation outcome for stroke patients. New rehabilitation strategies should be designed to improve the functional outcomes of rehabilitation of obese patients. PMID:27248186

  15. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  16. Gender differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Alberti, Andrea; Lanari, Alessia; Micheli, Sara; Bertolani, Luca; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Billeci, Antonia M R; Comi, Giancarlo; Previdi, Paolo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women than men owing to the fact that women have more stroke events and are less likely to recover. Age-specific stroke rates are higher in men; however, because of women's longer life expectancy and the much higher incidence of stroke at older ages, women have more stroke events than men overall. The aims of this prospective study in consecutive patients were to assess whether there are gender differences in stroke risk factors, treatment or outcome. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were included in this prospective study at four study centers. Disability was assessed using a modified Rankin Scale score (>or=3 indicating disabling stroke) in both genders at 90 days. Outcomes and risk factors in both genders were compared using the chi(2) test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify any independent predictors of outcome. A total of 1136 patients were included in this study; of these, 494 (46%) were female. Women were statistically older compared with men: 76.02 (+/- 12.93) and 72.68 (+/- 13.27) median years of age, respectively. At admission, females had higher NIH Stroke Scale scores compared with males (9.4 [+/- 6.94] vs 7.6 [+/- 6.28] for men; p = 0.0018). Furthermore, females tended to have more cardioembolic strokes (153 [30%] vs 147 [23%] for men; p = 0.004). Males had lacunar and atherosclerotic strokes more often (146 [29%] vs 249 [39%] for men; p = 0.002, and 68 [13%] vs 123 [19%] for men; p = 0.01, respectively). The mean modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months was also significantly different between genders, at 2.5 (+/- 2.05) for women and 2.1 (+/- 2.02) for men (p = 0.003). However, at multivariate analysis, female gender was not an indicator for negative outcome. It was concluded that female gender was not an independent factor for negative outcome. In addition, both genders demonstrated different stroke pathophysiologies. These findings should be taken into account when diagnostic workup and

  17. Shunt volume dynamics in stroke patients with patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Reichenberger, F; Kaps, M; Seeger, W; Tanislav, C

    2013-09-01

    A variation in right atrial and pulmonary arterial pressure might result in a shunt dynamic across a patent foramen ovale (PFO). In the present study we tested if peak exercise facilitates a restoration of right to left shunt (RLS) in stroke patients who demonstrated a functional PFO closure (no evidence of RLS across an initially demonstrated PFO). In stroke patients with PFO demonstrating a functional closure, the RLS was reassessed on peak exercise using contrast-enhanced transcranial Doppler sonography. The exercise procedure consisted of a cardiopulmonary exercise test with supplementary stress echocardiography for assessment of pulmonary circulation. Four stroke patients with initially PFO curtain pattern and a subsequent functional PFO closure (no evidence for RLS) underwent the procedure. In all four patients a RLS could be resurrected during peak physical exercise after a Valsalva strain. While in two patients peak exercise led to an RLS in a countable range of microembolic signals, in two patients a curtain pattern was obtained. One patient showed evidence for reoccurrence of RLS on peak exercise without a Valsalva strain. The patients with curtain pattern had a better peak exercise performance. Although the systolic pulmonary arterial pressure increased during exercise in all patients, there was no direct correlation with the detected RLS. After a functional PFO closure peak exercise combined with a Valsalva strain facilitates the reoccurrence of RLS in stroke patients. PMID:23743402

  18. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  19. [Comparative characterization of hemostatic parameters in patients with cerebral stroke].

    PubMed

    Chinybaeva, L A

    2004-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty-nine patients with cerebral stroke (CS), including 184 patients with ischemic stroke and 85 with hemorrhagic stroke (HS), were examined. A control group consisted of 56 healthy individuals matched by sex and age. The status of different links of the hemostatic system was assessed in patients with CS, by using "Tekhnologiya-Standart" (Technology Standard) kits (Barnaul). The findings suggest the higher platelet aggregability with the universal aggregation inductor (ADP) and ristomycin, as well as suppressed fibrinolytic activity, elevated levels of soluble fibrin-monomeric complexes, and decreased concentrations of angiotensin III. The lupus anticoagulant causing a poor outcome of the disease was much more frequently detected in patients with HS. PMID:15449775

  20. Community stroke rehabilitation helps patients return to work.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John; O'Connor, Rory J

    2013-09-01

    Around 150,000 people experience a stroke every year in the UK. Nearly one million people in England are living with the effects of a stroke; one third of whom are moderately to severely disabled. A quarter of stroke survivors are under the age of 65 meaning that many are in work and/or have responsibility for caring for children or elderly parents. With a comprehensive rehabilitation team, patients with more complex or severe disability can be rehabilitated in the community providing that the home environment can be suitably adapted. All patients will require regular review by their own doctor and some of these reviews will focus on standardised assessments of risk factors for stroke and implementation of appropriate secondary prevention. The GP has a role in identifying the emotional impact of stroke on the patient and the impact that the stroke has on relatives and carers. The core components of the community-based programme can be broadly defined as improving emotional wellbeing, communication, cognitive function and physical independence and supporting return to work. Antidepressants are effective in reducing emotional lability. Cognitive functions such as memory, attention, perception and planning are often affected by stroke. Assessment and treatment by the occupational therapy team and clinical psychologist can reduce the impact of these impairments. Speech and language therapy is instrumental in facilitating recovery as is training carers in supportive communication and providing aphasia-friendly information. NICE recommends that patients receive 45 minutes of each relevant therapy five times a week. Each therapy needs to be provided at an intensity that will produce a functional change. Most patients will be able to drive again if there is no significant visual field loss or uncontrolled epilepsy. Graded return to work programmes are more successful as people are gradually accustomed to the workplace. PMID:24383153

  1. Effects of Physical Exercise on Working Memory and Prefrontal Cortex Function in Post-Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Moriya, M; Aoki, C; Sakatani, K

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise enhances prefrontal cortex activity and improves working memory performance in healthy older adults, but it is not clear whether this remains the case in post-stroke patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effect of physical exercise on prefrontal cortex activity in post-stroke patients using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We studied 11 post-stroke patients. The patients performed Sternberg-type working memory tasks before and after moderate intensity aerobic exercise (40 % of maximal oxygen uptake) with a cycling ergometer for 15 min. We measured the NIRS response at the prefrontal cortex during the working memory task. We evaluated behavioral performance (response time and accuracy) of the working memory task. It was found that physical exercise improved behavioral performance of the working memory task compared with the control condition (p < 0.01). In addition, NIRS analysis indicated that physical exercise enhanced prefrontal cortex activation, particularly in the right prefrontal cortex (p < 0.05), during the working memory task compared with the control condition. These findings suggest that the moderate-intensity aerobic exercise enhances prefrontal cortex activity and improves working memory performance in post-stroke patients. PMID:27526144

  2. Pediatric Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  3. Recovery of slow-5 oscillations in a longitudinal study of ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    La, C; Nair, V A; Mossahebi, P; Stamm, J; Birn, R; Meyerand, M E; Prabhakaran, V

    2016-01-01

    Functional networks in resting-state fMRI are identified by characteristics of their intrinsic low-frequency oscillations, more specifically in terms of their synchronicity. With advanced aging and in clinical populations, this synchronicity among functionally linked regions is known to decrease and become disrupted, which may be associated with observed cognitive and behavioral changes. Previous work from our group has revealed that oscillations within the slow-5 frequency range (0.01-0.027 Hz) are particularly susceptible to disruptions in aging and following a stroke. In this study, we characterized longitudinally the changes in the slow-5 oscillations in stroke patients across two different time-points. We followed a group of ischemic stroke patients (n = 20) and another group of healthy older adults (n = 14) over two visits separated by a minimum of three months (average of 9 months). For the stroke patients, one visit occurred in their subacute window (10 days to 6 months after stroke onset), the other took place in their chronic window (> 6 months after stroke). Using a mid-order group ICA method on 10-minutes eyes-closed resting-state fMRI data, we assessed the frequency distributions of a component's representative time-courses for differences in regards to slow-5 spectral power. First, our stroke patients, in their subacute stage, exhibited lower amplitude slow-5 oscillations in comparison to their healthy counterparts. Second, over time in their chronic stage, those same patients showed a recovery of those oscillations, reaching near equivalence to the healthy older adult group. Our results indicate the possibility of an eventual recovery of those initially disrupted network oscillations to a near-normal level, providing potentially a biomarker for stroke recovery of the cortical system. This finding opens new avenues in infra-slow oscillation research and could serve as a useful biomarker in future treatments aimed at recovery. PMID:27077023

  4. Recovery of slow-5 oscillations in a longitudinal study of ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    La, C.; Nair, V.A.; Mossahebi, P.; Stamm, J.; Birn, R.; Meyerand, M.E.; Prabhakaran, V.

    2016-01-01

    Functional networks in resting-state fMRI are identified by characteristics of their intrinsic low-frequency oscillations, more specifically in terms of their synchronicity. With advanced aging and in clinical populations, this synchronicity among functionally linked regions is known to decrease and become disrupted, which may be associated with observed cognitive and behavioral changes. Previous work from our group has revealed that oscillations within the slow-5 frequency range (0.01–0.027 Hz) are particularly susceptible to disruptions in aging and following a stroke. In this study, we characterized longitudinally the changes in the slow-5 oscillations in stroke patients across two different time-points. We followed a group of ischemic stroke patients (n = 20) and another group of healthy older adults (n = 14) over two visits separated by a minimum of three months (average of 9 months). For the stroke patients, one visit occurred in their subacute window (10 days to 6 months after stroke onset), the other took place in their chronic window (> 6 months after stroke). Using a mid-order group ICA method on 10-minutes eyes-closed resting-state fMRI data, we assessed the frequency distributions of a component's representative time-courses for differences in regards to slow-5 spectral power. First, our stroke patients, in their subacute stage, exhibited lower amplitude slow-5 oscillations in comparison to their healthy counterparts. Second, over time in their chronic stage, those same patients showed a recovery of those oscillations, reaching near equivalence to the healthy older adult group. Our results indicate the possibility of an eventual recovery of those initially disrupted network oscillations to a near-normal level, providing potentially a biomarker for stroke recovery of the cortical system. This finding opens new avenues in infra-slow oscillation research and could serve as a useful biomarker in future treatments aimed at recovery. PMID:27077023

  5. Factors Related to Gait Function in Post-stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ki Hun; Lee, Joo Young; Lee, Kun Jae; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Gait function after a stroke is an important factor for determining a patient’s ability to independently perform activities of daily living (ADL). The objective of this study was to elucidate the factors associated with gait function in post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty-nine stroke patients (16 females and 23 males; average age 67.82 ± 10.96 years; post-onset duration: 200.18 ± 27.14 days) participated in this study. [Methods] Their gait function, motor function (Manual Muscle Test [MMT] and Brünnstrom stage), level of cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination score [MMSE], and the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment for the Geriatric Population [LOTCA-G]), and ADL (Korean modified Barthel index [K-MBI]) were assessed. [Results] The degree of gait function showed significant positive correlations with the following variables: MMT of the elbow, knee, ankle and wrist; Brünnstrom stage; MMSE; LOTCA-G subscores except motor praxis; K-MBI. Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed the Brünnstrom stage was the only explanatory variable closely associated with gait level. [Conclusion] Gait function of post-stroke patients was related to motor function, cognition, and ADL. In particular, there is a significant association between gait level and the Brünnstrom stages, reflecting the importance of monitoring the motor recovery of gait function in post-stroke patients. PMID:25540503

  6. Stroke Epidemiology in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a major health burden in Thailand. It is the leading cause of death and long term disability in both men and women. Despite the improvement of healthcare system, the mortality rate of stroke is still increasing during the past 5 years. The incidence of stroke in Thailand is now being studied in a large population based cohort. The prevalence of stroke is estimated to be 1.88% among adults 45 years and older. Stroke is more prevalent in men than in women and the mean age of stroke onset is 65 years. Hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and atrial fibrillation are major risk factors of stroke in the Thai population. Evolution from predominantly rural to urbanized industrial communities result in the increasing prevalence of these risk factors. Similar to other parts of the world, ischemic stroke is the most common stroke type but the proportion of hemorrhagic stroke is higher when compared to Caucasian populations. Among patients with ischemic stroke, lacunar stroke is most common, accounting for almost half followed by atherosclerotic disease. Intracranial atherosclerosis is also prevalent in Thai population. For acute treatment, intravenous thrombolysis has been used in Thailand for over 20 years. Its cost is reimbursed by the national health care system but its use is still limited. With the introduction of the stroke fast track system, prompt stroke treatment across the country is warranted. Stroke unit is now the standard of care in large regional and provincial hospitals. PMID:24741559

  7. Visual impairment in stroke patients--a review.

    PubMed

    Sand, K M; Midelfart, A; Thomassen, L; Melms, A; Wilhelm, H; Hoff, J M

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of all stroke patients suffer from post-stroke visual impairment. Hemianopia is the most common symptom, but also neglect, diplopia, reduced visual acuity, ptosis, anisocoria, and nystagmus are frequent. Partial or complete recovery of visual disorders can occur, but many patients suffer permanent disability. This disability is often less evident than impairment of motor and speech functions, but is negatively correlated with rehabilitation outcome and can lead to a significant reduction in day-to-day functioning. To be visually impaired after stroke reduces quality of life and causes social isolation because of difficulties in navigating/orientating in the surroundings. A thorough diagnosis including targeted examination and later follow-up with eye examination and perimetry is essential in order to establish the extent of the visual impairment and to select the best rehabilitation strategy. Patients seem to profit from visual rehabilitation focused on coping strategies. PMID:23190292

  8. Disability Assessment for Patients with Stroke.

    PubMed

    Jette, A M

    1997-01-01

    This review focuses on six prominent disability instruments designed and used in stroke research. The strengths and limitations of each are reviewed against four criteria which should be considered in selecting among existing instruments: the conceptual scope; the scaling method; its psychometric properties; and the instrument's feasibility. Outcomes measurement is an active area of investigation and the clinical researcher should follow the rehabilitation literature closely to keep abreast of the latest developments. PMID:27620373

  9. Biomarkers Associated with Ischemic Stroke in Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuisheng; Zhao, Jingfeng; Chen, Yuxiang; Lei, Minxiang

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes is an established risk factor for ischemic stroke, but the associated molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. This study investigated the role of plasma and platelet microRNAs and their targeting proteins in the activation of platelets and their association with the occurrence of ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Results showed that the expressions of platelet and plasma miR-144 and miR-223 were significantly altered in T2DM patients with or without ischemic stroke compared to that in healthy controls, but these changes were more significant in T2DM patients with ischemic stroke. The expressions of P2Y12 and IRS-1 as well as phosphorylation levels of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt in platelets were significantly altered in T2DM patients with or without ischemic stroke. The expression of platelet miR-144 and miR-223 significantly correlated with their plasma levels, P2Y12 and IRS-1 expression, blood glucose concentration, and platelet activation rate. High glucose concentration significantly elevated P-selectin, miR-144 and P2Y12 expression and significantly reduced miR-223 and IRS-1 expression in UT-7 cells. Overexpression of miR-223 and blocking of miR-144 expression significantly normalized the effects of high glucose concentration in UT-7 cells. In conclusion, hyperglycemia may activate platelets through miR-144 and miR-223 to downregulate IRS-1 and upregulate P2Y12 expression in the platelets of T2DM patients through an IRS-1-PI3K-Akt signaling. Low platelet and plasma miR-223 expression in addition to high platelet and plasma miR-144 expression are risk factors for ischemic stroke in T2DM patients. PMID:26175178

  10. Improvement of survival in Polish stroke patients is related to reduced stroke severity and better control of risk factors: the Krakow Stroke Database

    PubMed Central

    Swarowska, Marta; Burkot, Jacek; Janowska, Aleksandra; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Pera, Joanna; Slowik, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the last decade, the stroke mortality rate in Poland significantly decreased. We hypothesised that stroke severity, the major determinant of outcome, is lowered in Polish stroke patients. Material and methods We compared the stroke severity in two cohorts of first-ever ischaemic stroke patients admitted within 24 h after stroke onset to the Department of Neurology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow in the years 1994–2000 and 2008–2012. To assess stroke severity we used the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We defined mild stroke as an NIHSS score ≤ 4. Results We included 816 patients hospitalised in the years 1994–2000 and 569 patients hospitalised in the years 2008–2012. NIHSS score on admission was higher in the former (mean: 12.0 ±7.0 vs. 8.0 ±6.0, p < 0.01), and the frequency of mild stroke was higher in the latter (12.7% vs. 41.8%, p < 0.01). Although the frequency of hypertension (67.3% vs. 81.2%, p < 0.01), diabetes mellitus (20.8% vs. 26.4%, p = 0.02) and atrial fibrillation (20.7% vs. 26.2%, p = 0.02) was higher in patients hospitalised in the years 2008–2012, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure values and the frequency of fasting hyperglycaemia were lower in this cohort. This cohort also less frequently suffered from hypercholesterolaemia (25.4% vs. 16.3%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Reduced stroke severity is associated with better recognition and control of risk factors and explains the improvement of survival in Polish stroke patients. PMID:27279847

  11. Effects of Music Therapy on Mood in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Soo; Choi, Jung Hwa; Im, Sang-Hee; Jung, Kang Jae; Cha, Young A; Jung, Chul Oh; Yoon, Yeo Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of music therapy on depressive mood and anxiety in post-stroke patients and evaluate satisfaction levels of patients and caregivers. Materials and Methods Eighteen post-stroke patients, within six months of onset and mini mental status examination score of over 20, participated in this study. Patients were divided into music and control groups. The experimental group participated in the music therapy program for four weeks. Psychological status was evaluated with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) before and after music therapy. Satisfaction with music therapy was evaluated by a questionnaire. Results BAI and BDI scores showed a greater decrease in the music group than the control group after music therapy, but only the decrease of BDI scores were statistically significant (p=0.048). Music therapy satisfaction in patients and caregivers was affirmative. Conclusion Music therapy has a positive effect on mood in post-stroke patients and may be beneficial for mood improvement with stroke. These results are encouraging, but further studies are needed in this field. PMID:22028163

  12. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  13. Strategies of Daily Living Rehabilitative Activities for Post Stroke Patients at Minia University Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaky, Hend Elham Mohamed; EL-Lateef Mohammad, Zienab Abd; EL-Labban, Abdou Saad Taha; Ahmed, Gahen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Rehabilitation aims to hasten and maximize recovery from stroke by treating the disabilities caused by the stroke. Therefore, the aim of this study determine the post stroke patients' knowledge and practices in relation to disease and activities of daily living before the implementation of…

  14. Predictors of Functional Outcome Among Stroke Patients in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Abanto, Carlos; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Tirschwell, David L.; Montano, Silvia; Quispe, Yrma; Gonzales, Isidro; Valencia, Ana; Calle, Pilar; Garate, Arturo; Zunt, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the aging population in low- and middle-income countries, cerebrovascular disease is expected to remain a leading cause of death. Little has been published about stroke in Peru. Aims We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized stroke patients at a referral center hospital in Lima, Peru to explore factors associated with functional outcome among stroke patients. Methods We identified 579 patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage stroke at the National Institute of Neurologic Sciences in Lima, Peru in 2008 and 2009. A favorable outcome was defined as a modified Rankin score of ≤2 at discharge. Results The mean age was 63.3 years; 75.6% had ischemic stroke; the average length of stay was 17.3 days. At hospital discharge, 231 (39.9%) had a favorable outcome. The overall mortality rate was 5.2%. In multivariate models, the likelihood of having a favorable outcome decreased linearly with increasing age (p=0.02) and increasing NIHSS (p=0.02). Favorable outcome was also associated with male gender (relative risk [RR]=1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0, 1.5) and divorced status (RR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7). Patients on Salud Integral de Salud (public assistance-type insurance, SIS) (RR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5,1.0) were also less likely to have a favorable outcome. Conclusions Favorable outcome after stroke was independently associated with younger age, lower NIHSS score, male gender, being divorced, and not being on SIS insurance. These findings suggest further study of worse functional outcomes in patients with SIS insurance and confirm the importance of risk adjustment for age, stroke severity (NIHSS) and other socioeconomic factors in outcomes studies. Future studies should preferentially assess outcome at 30-days and 6-months to provide more reliable comparisons and allow additional study of Peruvian end-of-life decision-making and care. PMID:23352681

  15. Preliminary Investigation of Economics Issues in Hospitalized Patients with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tolou-Ghamari, Zahra; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Khorvash, Fariborz

    2013-01-01

    Background: The study of economics is important in Iranian stroke patients, because it is one of the costly diseases that could be linked to disability, mortality, and morbidity. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate total treatment costs of hospitalized patients with stroke. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 24 patients conducted to Isfahan Neurosciences Research Centre was carried out between April 1, 2012 and September 31, 2012. Demographic (sex, age) and economic variables (Raise tariffs, accumulated surplus, the total amount, of patients’, patients’ paid, and home insurance contribution) were extracted from the patients’ profiles. All information recorded and processed using Excel. Results: The mean age of patients was 71 years (ranged; 40-93 years old). Preliminary analysis of available costs issues could be described as: Raise tariffs (mean: 3500256 Rial, ranged: 504460-9775455 Rial), accumulated surplus (mean: 565578 Rial, ranged: 56700-2343664 Rial), the total amount (mean: 4045556 Rial, ranged: 715460-12219119 Rial), of patients’ (mean: 756037 Rial, ranged: 0-8365447 Rial), patients’ paid (mean: 1307762 Rial, ranged: 45300-9193000 Rial), and home insurance contribution (mean: 3070713 Rial, ranged 0-8887907 Rial). Conclusions: The cost disparity within this study after stroke could be mainly connected to variations in duration of hospital stay. Inspecting agenda towards this direction could reduce the economic cost of stroke significantly. Therefore, further assessment correlated to attain strategies in order to reduce costs associated to patients’ paid and home insurance contribution could be much more advantageous. PMID:23776748

  16. The Recovery of Walking in Stroke Patients: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on walking recovery of stroke patients as it relates to the following subjects: epidemiology of walking dysfunction, recovery course of walking, and recovery mechanism of walking (neural control of normal walking, the evaluation methods for leg motor function, and motor recovery mechanism of leg). The recovery of walking…

  17. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  18. Cardiovascular diseases in patients 65 years and younger with non-cardiogenic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gąsior, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 10–15% of patients with stroke are under 65 years of age. The aim of the study was to determine types of stroke In people below 65. We analysed the incidence and types of associated cardiovascular diseases in patients with non-cardiogenic stroke. Material and methods In this prospective study patients (aged ≤ 65) with stroke underwent physical examination, computed tomography of the head, blood tests, electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and transcranial and carotid artery ultrasound. Classification of stroke was performed according to the ASCOD scale. Analysis considered the incidence of heart diseases in patients with non-cardiogenic stroke and the incidence of heart diseases recognised as a cause of cerebral embolism in patients with cardiogenic stroke. Results The study included 611 patients with stroke at the age of 27–65 (mean: 57.2 ±6.7; M/F 380/231). Stroke of heterogeneous aetiology was observed in 321 patients, cardiogenic stroke in 78, and stroke caused by small vessel and carotid artery disease in 73 and 72 patients, respectively. The most common heart diseases in non-cardiogenic stroke patients included persistent foramen ovale, coronary heart disease and past myocardial infarction. The most common causes of cardiogenic embolism were cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation and interatrial septal defect. Conclusions Aetiologically heterogeneous stroke and cardiogenic stroke are the most commonly observed among young stroke patients. Cardiomyopathy and atrial fibrillation are the most common sources of cerebral embolism in young patients with cardiogenic stroke. Nearly 1/5 of patients with a non-cardiogenic stroke have congenital or acquired structural changes in the heart. PMID:27279848

  19. Carotid interventions (CEA and CAS) in acute stroke patients: which procedure on which patient.

    PubMed

    Darling, Ralph C; Warner, Courtney; Yeh, Chin C; Shah, Melissa D; Hnath, Jeffrey C; Shah, Dhiraj M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of carotid bifurcation disease in patients presenting with acute stroke has been a controversial issue over the past four decades. Classically, patients were asked to wait four to six weeks before intervention was entertained in order for the brain to stabilize and the risks of intervention to be minimized. Unfortunately, up to 20% of patients will have a secondary event after their index event and the window of opportunity to save potentially salvageable ischemic tissue will be missed. Early reports had demonstrated poor results with intervention. However, more recently, institutions such as ours have demonstrated excellent results with early intervention in patients who present with stable mild to moderate stroke with an NIH stroke scale less than 15 and preferably less than 10, present with stroke and ipsilateral carotid artery lesion of 50% or greater. Also more recently, we have been aggressively treating patients with larger ulcerative plaques even if the stenosis approaches 50%. In our and others experiences, patients who are treated at institutions that have comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) where they have a multidisciplinary system that consists of vascular surgeons, neuro interventionalists, stroke neurologists, specifically trained stroke nursing staff and a neuro intensive ICU have had optimal results. Early assessment, diagnosis of stroke with recognition of cause of embolization is mandatory but patient selection is extremely important; finding those patients who will benefit the most from urgent intervention. Most studies have demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy in these patients. More recent studies have demonstrated acceptable results with carotid stenting, especially in smaller lesions, those less than 1.2 centimeters. Early intervention should be avoided in most patients who are obtunded or with an NIH stroke scale greater than 15 or who do not have any "brain at risk" to salvage. These patients may be better served by

  20. Cardiovascular Response During Submaximal Underwater Treadmill Exercise in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeehyun; Lim, Kil-Byung; Lee, Hong-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiovascular response during head-out water immersion, underwater treadmill gait, and land treadmill gait in stroke patients. Methods Ten stroke patients were recruited for underwater and land treadmill gait sessions. Each session was 40 minutes long; 5 minutes for standing rest on land, 5 minutes for standing rest in water or on treadmill, 20 minutes for treadmill walking in water or on land, 5 minutes for standing rest in water or on treadmill, and 5 minutes for standing rest on land. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured during each session. In order to estimate the cardiovascular workload and myocardial oxygen demand, the rate pressure product (RPP) value was calculated by multiplying systolic BP (SBP) by HR. Results SBP, DBP, mean BP (mBP), and RPP decreased significantly after water immersion, but HR was unchanged. During underwater and land treadmill gait, SBP, mBP, DBP, RPP, and HR increased. However, the mean maximum increases in BP, HR and RPP of underwater treadmill walking were significantly lower than that of land treadmill walking. Conclusion Stroke patients showed different cardiovascular responses during water immersion and underwater gait as opposed to standing and treadmill-walking on land. Water immersion and aquatic treadmill gait may reduce the workload of the cardiovascular system. This study suggested that underwater treadmill may be a safe and useful option for cardiovascular fitness and early ambulation in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:25379492

  1. Predictors of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Handerson Nunes; Magedanz, Ellen Hettwer; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; dos Santos, Natalia Nunes; Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral; Goldani, Marco Antonio; Petracco, João Batista; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors related to the development of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods A historical cohort study. We included 4626 patients aged > 18 years who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, heart valve replacement surgery alone or heart valve surgery combined with coronary artery bypass grafting between January 1996 and December 2011. The relationship between risk predictors and stroke was assessed by logistic regression model with a significance level of 0.05. Results The incidence of stroke was 3% in the overall sample. After logistic regression, the following risk predictors for stroke were found: age 50-65 years (OR=2.11 - 95% CI 1.05-4.23 - P=0.036) and age >66 years (OR=3.22 - 95% CI 1.6-6.47 - P=0.001), urgent and emergency surgery (OR=2.03 - 95% CI 1.20-3.45 - P=0.008), aortic valve disease (OR=2.32 - 95% CI 1.18-4.56 - P=0.014), history of atrial fibrillation (OR=1.88 - 95% CI 1.05-3.34 - P=0.032), peripheral artery disease (OR=1.81 - 95% CI 1.13-2.92 - P=0.014), history of cerebrovascular disease (OR=3.42 - 95% CI 2.19-5.35 - P<0.001) and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes (OR=1.71 - 95% CI 1.16-2.53 - P=0.007). Mortality was 31.9% in the stroke group and 8.5% in the control group (OR=5.06 - 95% CI 3.5-7.33 - P<0.001). Conclusion The study identified the following risk predictors for stroke after cardiac surgery: age, urgent and emergency surgery, aortic valve disease, history of atrial fibrillation, peripheral artery disease, history of cerebrovascular disease and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes. PMID:25140462

  2. Prognostic Significance of Uric Acid Levels in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Zhi-Chao; Lu, Tao-Sheng; You, Shou-Jiang; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The importance and function of serum uric acid (UA) levels in patients with cardiovascular disease or stroke are unclear. We sought to evaluate the appropriate UA levels for stroke patients and the association between endogenous UA levels and clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, particularly regarding the possible interaction between gender and UA levels with respect to AIS prognosis. We examined 303 patients who had an onset of ischemic stroke within 48 h. Of those, 101 patients received thrombolytic treatment. Serum UA (μmol/L) levels were measured the second morning after admission. Patient prognosis was evaluated 90 days after clinical onset by modified Rankin Scale. Patients were divided into four groups according to serum UA quartiles. A binary multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess clinical relevance in regard to functional outcome and endogenous UA levels. Analysis of subgroups by gender and normal glomerular filtration rate were also been done. Poor functional outcome was associated with older age, history of atrial fibrillation, or higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with higher UA levels (>380 μmol/L) or lower UA levels (≤250 μmol/L) were 2-3 times more likely to have a poor outcome (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.14-7.61; OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.02-7.58, respectively) compared to the baseline group (UA level 316-380 μmol/L). The same results were observed in thrombolyzed patients. Patients with high and low UA levels were 9-18 times more likely to having poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 316-380 μmol/L; OR 18.50, 95% CI: 2.041-167.67; OR 9.66, 95% CI 1.42-65.88, respectively). In men, patients with high UA levels were 6 times more likely to have poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 279-334 μmol/L; OR 6.10, 95% CI 1.62-22.93). However, female patients with UA level 271-337 μmol/L were seven times more

  3. Treating the acute stroke patient as an emergency: current practices and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S; Lees, K; Donnan, G

    2006-01-01

    Summary Developments in acute stroke therapy have followed advances in the understanding of the evolving pathophysiology in both ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). In ischaemic stroke, rapid reperfusion of the ischaemic penumbra with thrombolysis within 3 h of symptom onset is of proven benefit, but few patients currently receive therapy, mainly due to the short-time window and lack of stroke expertise. In ICH, a recent study indicated that a haemostatic agent can limit ongoing bleeding and improve outcomes when administered within 4 h of stroke onset. These advances in acute stroke therapy underlie the concept that ‘time is brain’ and that urgent intervention can limit cerebral damage. Neuroprotective therapy could offer the prospect of a greater proportion of stroke patients receiving treatment, potentially before imaging and even in the ambulance setting. Virtually all stroke patients would benefit from receiving multidisciplinary care in acute stroke units. PMID:16620351

  4. Stroke Patients with a Past History of Cancer Are at Increased Risk of Recurrent Stroke and Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kui-Kai; Wong, Yuen-Kwun; Teo, Kay-Cheong; Chang, Richard Shek-Kwan; Hon, Sonny Fong-Kwong; Chan, Koon-Ho; Cheung, Raymond Tak-Fai; Li, Leonard Sheung-Wai; Tse, Hung-Fat; Ho, Shu-Leong; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cancer patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. It is unclear whether cancer confers any additional risk for recurrent stroke or cardiovascular mortality after stroke. Methods This was a single center, observational study of 1,105 consecutive Chinese ischemic stroke patients recruited from a large stroke rehabilitation unit based in Hong Kong. We sought to determine whether patients with cancer are at higher risk of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular mortality. Results Amongst 1,105 patients, 58 patients (5.2%) had cancer, of whom 74% were in remission. After a mean follow-up of 76±18 months, 241 patients developed a recurrent stroke: 22 in patients with cancer (38%, annual incidence 13.94%/year), substantially more than those without cancer (21%, 4.65%/year) (p<0.01). In a Cox regression model, cancer, age and atrial fibrillation were the 3 independent predictors of recurrent stroke with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.42 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.54–3.80), 1.01 (1.00–1.03) and 1.35 (1.01–1.82) respectively. Likewise, patients with cancer had a higher cardiovascular mortality compared with those without cancer (4.30%/year vs. 2.35%/year, p = 0.08). In Cox regression analysis, cancer (HR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.08–4.02), age (HR: 1.04, 95% CI 1.02–1.06), heart failure (HR: 3.06, 95% CI 1.72–5.47) and significant carotid atherosclerosis (HR: 1.55, 95% CI 1.02–2.36) were independent predictors for cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions Stroke patients with a past history of cancer are at increased risk of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:24523883

  5. Bringing the Hospital to the Patient: First Treatment of Stroke Patients at the Emergency Site

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Silke; Kostpopoulos, Panagiotis; Haass, Anton; Helwig, Stefan; Keller, Isabel; Licina, Tamara; Schlechtriemen, Thomas; Roth, Christian; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Anna; Vierra, Julio; Körner, Heiko; Schmidt, Kathrin; Romann, Marie-Sophie; Alexandrou, Maria; Yilmaz, Umut; Grunwald, Iris; Kubulus, Darius; Lesmeister, Martin; Ziegeler, Stephan; Pattar, Alexander; Golinski, Martin; Liu, Yang; Volk, Thomas; Bertsch, Thomas; Reith, Wolfgang; Fassbender, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Background Early treatment with rt-PA is critical for favorable outcome of acute stroke. However, only a very small proportion of stroke patients receive this treatment, as most arrive at hospital too late to be eligible for rt-PA therapy. Methods and Findings We developed a “Mobile Stroke Unit”, consisting of an ambulance equipped with computed tomography, a point-of-care laboratory system for complete stroke laboratory work-up, and telemedicine capabilities for contact with hospital experts, to achieve delivery of etiology-specific and guideline-adherent stroke treatment at the site of the emergency, well before arrival at the hospital. In a departure from current practice, stroke patients could be differentially treated according to their ischemic or hemorrhagic etiology even in the prehospital phase of stroke management. Immediate diagnosis of cerebral ischemia and exclusion of thrombolysis contraindications enabled us to perform prehospital rt-PA thrombolysis as bridging to later intra-arterial recanalization in one patient. In a complementary patient with cerebral hemorrhage, prehospital diagnosis allowed immediate initiation of hemorrhage-specific blood pressure management and telemedicine consultation regarding surgery. Call-to-therapy-decision times were 35 minutes. Conclusion This preliminary study proves the feasibility of guideline-adherent, etiology-specific and causal treatment of acute stroke directly at the emergency site. PMID:21060800

  6. Rehabilitation needs for older adults with stroke living at home: perceptions of four populations

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Claude; Deaudelin, Isabelle; Robichaud, Line; Rousseau, Jacqueline; Viscogliosi, Chantal; Talbot, Lise R; Desrosiers, Johanne

    2007-01-01

    Background Many people who have suffered a stroke require rehabilitation to help them resume their previous activities and roles in their own environment, but only some of them receive inpatient or even outpatient rehabilitation services. Partial and unmet rehabilitation needs may ultimately lead to a loss of functional autonomy, which increases utilization of health services, number of hospitalizations and early institutionalization, leading to a significant psychological and financial burden on the patients, their families and the health care system. The aim of this study was to explore partially met and unmet rehabilitation needs of older adults who had suffered a stroke and who live in the community. The emphasis was put on needs that act as obstacles to social participation in terms of personal factors, environmental factors and life habits, from the point of view of four target populations. Methods Using the focus group technique, we met four types of experts living in three geographic areas of the province of Québec (Canada): older people with stroke, caregivers, health professionals and health care managers, for a total of 12 groups and 72 participants. The audio recordings of the meetings were transcribed and NVivo software was used to manage the data. The process of reducing, categorizing and analyzing the data was conducted using themes from the Disability Creation Process model. Results Rehabilitation needs persist for nine capabilities (e.g. related to behaviour or motor activities), nine factors related to the environment (e.g. type of teaching, adaptation and rehabilitation) and 11 life habits (e.g. nutrition, interpersonal relationships). The caregivers and health professionals identified more unmet needs and insisted on an individualized rehabilitation. Older people with stroke and the health care managers had a more global view of rehabilitation needs and emphasized the availability of resources. Conclusion Better knowledge of partially met or

  7. Effect of IQoro® training on impaired postural control and oropharyngeal motor function in patients with dysphagia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired postural control in patients with stroke-related dysphagia and if IQS training has any effect on impaired postural control in parallel with effect on OPMD. Method A prospective clinical study was carried out with 26 adult patients with stroke-related dysphagia. The training effect was compared between patients consecutively investigated at two different time periods, the first period with 15 patients included in the study more than half a year after stroke, the second period with 11 patients included within 1 month after stroke. Postural control tests and different oropharyngeal motor tests were performed before and after 3 months of oropharyngeal sensorimotor training with an IQS, and at a late follow-up (median 59 weeks after end of training). Result All patients had impaired postural control at baseline. Significant improvement in postural control and OPMD was observed after the completion of IQS training in both intervention groups. The improvements were still present at the late follow-up. PMID:26924256

  8. Declining patient functioning and caregiver burden/health: The Minnesota Stroke Survey-Quality of Life after Stroke Study

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Melissa M.; Smith, Maureen A.; Martinson, Brian C.; Kind, Amy; Luepker, Russell V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Caregivers of stroke patients may adapt to changes in patient functioning over time. If adaptation occurs, caregiver burden and health may be influenced more by worsening in patient functioning than static levels of functioning. This study examines the relationship between patients' baseline and changes in functioning and caregivers' subjective and objective burden as well as their health. Design and Methods: Only stroke patients who had caregivers were included in this analysis (N=356). Stroke patients (N=281) or their proxies (N=75) were interviewed within 4 months of hospital discharge and patients' medical records were abstracted. The primary caregiver also was interviewed at approximately the same time as the patient/proxy interview (N=356). In all but one of the 75 proxy cases, the proxy was the patient's caregiver. Binomial and ordinal logistic regression models were used. Results: Declining patient neurological functioning predicted greater objective burden and subjective burden relating to consequences for caregivers' personal lives, but did not predict caregiver health. Implications: The impact a patient's stroke has on a caregiver's personal life and the number of hours spent caring for the patient appear to be a function of the changes of the patient's status over time rather than a function of a “snapshot” of their functioning at baseline. If these results are confirmed, interventions to protect caregivers may be indicated for stroke patients who continue to decline after hospital discharge. PMID:18981274

  9. Validation of a simple method for atrial fibrillation screening in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Gandolfo, C; Balestrino, M; Bruno, C; Finocchi, C; Reale, N

    2015-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in adult and old people and represents a risk factor for stroke. Correct AF individuation bears strong relevance in primary and secondary stroke prevention. Our goal was to evaluate the reliability of a low-cost, non-invasive technology in detecting AF in acute stroke patients. AFib model BP3MQ1-2D (Microlife USA, Dunedin, FL) showed good accuracy in diagnosing AF in a general cardiologic outpatient population. We carried out an observational study in patients with recent stroke. We studied 207 subjects, 103 men, 104 women, mean age (±SD) 77.7 ± 11.34 years, who underwent a test by AFib device with indication of AF or lack of it. The golden standard was a 12-lead EKG done immediately and evaluated by a certified cardiologist. We computed estimates of Sensitivity and Specificity and their 95 % confidence intervals (CI). AF was present in 38 subjects from the sample of 207 (18.4 %). AFib correctly demonstrated AF in 34 and failed diagnosing AF in 4 cases; on the other hand, AFib correctly excluded AF in 167 and caused an erroneous diagnosis of AF in 2 cases. The Sensitivity was 0.895 (95 % CI 0.7597-0.958) and the Specificity was 0.988 (95 % CI 0.958-0.997). The AFib device global accuracy was 0.971 (95 % CI 0.938-0.987). This device was able to detect AF with high specificity and a good sensitivity. This device may be considered as an accurate tool in detecting AF in stroke patients. PMID:25926072

  10. End of Life Care for Patients Dying of Stroke: A Comparative Registry Study of Stroke and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Heléne; Milberg, Anna; Hjelm, Katarina; Friedrichsen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Although stroke is a significant public health challenge and the need for palliative care has been emphasized for these patients, there is limited data on end-of-life care for patients dying from stroke. Objective To study the end-of-life care during the last week of life for patients who had died of stroke in terms of registered symptom, symptom management, and communication, in comparison with patients who had died of cancer. Design This study is a retrospective, comparative registry study. Methods A retrospective comparative registry study was performed using data from a Swedish national quality register for end-of-life care based on WHO`s definition of Palliative care. Data from 1626 patients who had died of stroke were compared with data from 1626 patients who had died of cancer. Binary logistic analyses were used to calculate odds ratios, with 95% CI. Results Compared to patients who was dying of cancer, the patients who was dying of stroke had a significantly higher prevalence of having death rattles registered, but a significantly lower prevalence of, nausea, confusion, dyspnea, anxiety, and pain. In addition, the stroke group had significantly lower odds ratios for health care staff not to know whether all these six symptoms were present or not. Patients who was dying of stroke had significantly lower odds ratio of having informative communication from a physician about the transition to end-of-life care and of their family members being offered bereavement follow-up. Conclusions The results indicate on differences in end-of-life care between patients dying of stroke and those dying from cancer. To improve the end-of-life care in clinical practice and ensure it has consistent quality, irrespective of diagnosis, education and implementation of palliative care principles are necessary. PMID:26845149

  11. A Survey of Caregivers' Knowledge About Caring for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Jong Hwa; Lee, Sook Joung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate how much formal caregivers know about caring for stroke patients, and whether they adequately provide it. Methods Formal caregivers, who worked for stroke patients at 8 hospitals (including 4 university hospitals, 2 rehabilitation hospitals, and 2 convalescent hospitals) participated in this study. The survey was based on a self-report questionnaire, with 6 categories containing a total of 48 questions about the specific care of stroke patients: the demographic characteristics of the caregivers, bed positioning, the provision of meals, position changes and transfers, the range of motion exercises, and caregiver training. Results A total of 217 caregivers were surveyed, and they were distributed as follows: 41% came from the university hospitals, 35% came from the rehabilitation hospitals, and 24% came from the convalescent hospitals. The percentages of correct answers were distributed as follows: 64.3% for bed positioning, 74.3% for providing meals, and 62.4% for position change and transfer. The total and subscale scores of the caregivers working at convalescent hospitals were significantly lower than those of the caregivers working at the other types of hospitals (p<0.05). Only 7.8% of the total participants received training on a regular basis. The caregivers obtained most of the information from caregiver associations (58.1%), and the majority of the caregivers (65.4%) were willing to receive training. Conclusion About one third (33.8%) of caregivers did not have adequate knowledge of how to properly care for stroke patients; in fact, a significant number of caregivers demonstrated inappropriate and insufficient knowledge in several areas. It is assumed that the provision of regular training, by rehabilitation experts, will improve the professionalism and knowledge of the caregivers, and positively affect patient outcomes. PMID:26605179

  12. Cardioembolic stroke: practical considerations for patient risk management and secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hardik; Nowak, Richard J; Schindler, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    Cardioembolic (CE) stroke constitutes approximately 20% of all occurrence of ischemic stroke in patients. Atrial fibrillation remains the most common and most studied mechanism underlying CE stroke events. Cardioembolic strokes carry high morbidity and are associated with early recurrence in patients. Our understanding of other patient mechanisms associated with CE stroke, including valvular disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and patent foramen ovale, continues to grow. Our review summarizes the diagnosis and management of patients who have sustained CE stroke as a result of the aforementioned cardiac mechanisms. Advances in primary and secondary risk management for prevention of CE stroke are also highlighted in our article-specifically, emerging data regarding monitoring of patients with atrial fibrillation, new anticoagulation therapy, and management of patients with decreased ejection fraction. PMID:24393752

  13. Family History and Functional Outcome in Korean Stroke Patients: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jung; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of family history of stroke with functional outcomes in stroke patients in Korea. Methods A case-control study was conducted. A total of 170 patients who were admitted to a rehabilitation unit were included. Risk factors for stroke such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, smoking, high blood cholesterol and homocysteine level, obesity, and family history of stroke were taken into account. Stroke subtypes were the following: large vessel infarct, small vessel infarct, embolic infarct, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracranial hemorrhage. Stroke severity as assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), functional outcomes using the Korean version of the Modified Barthel index (K-MBI), Functional Independence Measurement (FIM), and cognitive function using the Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) were assessed at admission and discharge. Results Subjects with a family history of stroke were more likely to have an ischemic stroke (90.7%) than were those without a family history (70.9%). The K-MBI, FIM, NIHSS, and K-MMSE scores did not show significant differences between patients with or without family history. Conclusion Family history of stroke was significantly associated with ischemic stroke, but not with functional outcomes. Other prognostic factors of stroke were not distributed differently between patients included in this study with or without a family history of stroke. PMID:26798613

  14. Resident Physicians Choices of Anticoagulation for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Oqab, Zardasht; McIntyre, William F; Quinn, Kieran L; Lamb, Tyler; Quadros, Kenneth; Yazdan-Ashoori, Payam; van Oosten, Erik; Chu, Karen; Lamba, Jasmine; Barake, Walid; Mohajer, Kiarash; Marr, Jeffrey N; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to identify practice patterns of Canadian resident physicians pertaining to stroke prevention in nonvalvular AF according to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines. A Web-based survey consisting of 16 multiple-choice questions was distributed to 11 academic centres. Questions involved identification of risks of stroke, bleeding, and selection of appropriate therapy in clinical scenarios that involve a patient with AF with a Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age, Diabetes, Stroke/Transient Ischemic Attack (CHADS2) score of 3 and no absolute contraindications to anticoagulation. There were 1014 total respondents, of whom 570 were internal, 247 family, 137 emergency medicine, and 60 adult cardiology residents. For a patient with a new diagnosis of AF, warfarin was chosen by 80.3%, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) by 60.3%, and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) by 7.2% of residents. To a patient with a history of gastrointestinal bleed during ASA treatment, warfarin was recommended by 75.1%, NOACs by 36.1%, ASA by 12.1%, and 4% were unsure. For a patient with a history of an intracranial bleed, warfarin was recommended by 38.8%, NOACs by 23%, ASA by 24.8%, and 18.2% were unsure. For a patient taking warfarin who had a labile international normalized ratio, 89% would switch to a NOAC and 29.5% would continue warfarin. This study revealed that, across a wide sampling of disciplines and centres, resident physician choices of anticoagulation in nonvalvular AF differ significantly from contemporary Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines. PMID:26652126

  15. Declining Patient Functioning and Caregiver Burden/Health: The Minnesota Stroke Survey-Quality of Life after Stroke Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Melissa M.; Smith, Maureen A.; Martinson, Brian C.; Kind, Amy; Luepker, Russell V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Caregivers of stroke patients may adapt to changes in patient functioning over time. If adaptation occurs, then caregiver burden and health may be influenced more by worsening in patient functioning than by static levels of functioning. This study examines the relationship between patients' baseline and changes in functioning and…

  16. Critical Care for Patients with Massive Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Younsuck; Choi, H. Alex; Lee, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Malignant cerebral edema following ischemic stroke is life threatening, as it can cause inadequate blood flow and perfusion leading to irreversible tissue hypoxia and metabolic crisis. Increased intracranial pressure and brain shift can cause herniation syndrome and finally brain death. Multiple randomized clinical trials have shown that preemptive decompressive hemicraniectomy effectively reduces mortality and morbidity in patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction. Another life-saving decompressive surgery is suboccipital craniectomy for patients with brainstem compression by edematous cerebellar infarction. In addition to decompressive surgery, cerebrospinal fluid drainage by ventriculostomy should be considered for patients with acute hydrocephalus following stroke. Medical treatment begins with sedation, analgesia, and general measures including ventilatory support, head elevation, maintaining a neutral neck position, and avoiding conditions associated with intracranial hypertension. Optimization of cerebral perfusion pressure and reduction of intracranial pressure should always be pursued simultaneously. Osmotherapy with mannitol is the standard treatment for intracranial hypertension, but hypertonic saline is also an effective alternative. Therapeutic hypothermia may also be considered for treatment of brain edema and intracranial hypertension, but its neuroprotective effects have not been demonstrated in stroke. Barbiturate coma therapy has been used to reduce metabolic demand, but has become less popular because of its systemic adverse effects. Furthermore, general medical care is critical because of the complex interactions between the brain and other organ systems. Some challenging aspects of critical care, including ventilator support, sedation and analgesia, and performing neurological examinations in the setting of a minimal stimulation protocol, are addressed in this review. PMID:25328873

  17. Robotic Technologies and Rehabilitation: New Tools for Stroke Patients' Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Patrizia; Morone, Giovanni; Rosati, Giulio; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The role of robotics in poststroke patients' rehabilitation has been investigated intensively. This paper presents the state-of-the-art and the possible future role of robotics in poststroke rehabilitation, for both upper and lower limbs. Materials and Methods. We performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, Cochrane, and PeDRO databases using as keywords “robot AND stroke AND rehabilitation.” Results and Discussion. In upper limb robotic rehabilitation, training seems to improve arm function in activities of daily living. In addition, electromechanical gait training after stroke seems to be effective. It is still unclear whether robot-assisted arm training may improve muscle strength, and which electromechanical gait-training device may be the most effective for walking training implementation. Conclusions. In the field of robotic technologies for stroke patients' rehabilitation we identified currently relevant growing points and areas timely for developing research. Among the growing points there is the development of new easily transportable, wearable devices that could improve rehabilitation also after discharge, in an outpatient or home-based setting. For developing research, efforts are being made to establish the ideal type of treatment, the length and amount of training protocol, and the patient's characteristics to be successfully enrolled to this treatment. PMID:24350244

  18. Application of ultrasonography in assessing oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Yen; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Chang, Hui-Ya; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2012-09-01

    This study applied submental ultrasonography (SUS) to measure changes in dysphagic stroke patients' tongue thickness and hyoid bone displacement when swallowing 5 mL of water and correlated the results with the severity of clinical dysphagia. We included 60 stroke patients (30 tube-feeding-dependent and 30 on regular oral intake) and 30 healthy controls. An additional 10 healthy people were recruited to assess the reliability of SUS. Measurements of hyoid bone displacement using videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and SUS were compared for 12 stroke patients to assess the correlation between the two methods. Changes in tongue thickness and hyoid bone displacement were significantly less in the tube-feeding group. Those with a tongue thickness change of less than 1.0 cm and hyoid bone displacement of less than 1.5 cm were likely to be tube-feeding. SUS showed good intra-rater/inter-rater reliability and correlated well with VFSS measurement. SUS can be an adjunct assessment tool of swallowing. PMID:22698507

  19. Categorization of Ischemic Stroke Patients Compared with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale

    PubMed Central

    Marendic, Mario; Bulicic, Ana Repic; Borovina, Tonka; Mise, Nikolina Ivica; Romac, Rinaldo; Suljic, Enra; Titlic, Marina; Milosevic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Scientific guidelines recommend the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) for ischemic stroke (IS) assessment. In Clinical Department of Neurology of Split University Hospital Center nurses use the categorization of patients (COP) according to individual needs for health care. Aim: The aim of this study was to demonstrate that there is a positive correlation between the COP and the NIHSS in IS patients. Methods: We analyzed NIHSS scores and COP findings in 325 participants (median age 77 years, min-max: 37-95 years) with acute ISs. Results: There is a statistically significant correlation between the NIHSS score at admission and COP at admission (ρ=0.717; P<0.001). There is a statistically significant correlation between the NIHSS score at discharge and COP at discharge (ρ=0.762; P<0.001). Median of NIHSS scores at admission is higher in females than in males for 2 (Z=4.45, P<0.001) and at discharge is higher for 2 (Z = 4.1, P<0.001). Median of COP at admission is higher in females than in males for 1 (Z=4.7, P<0.001) and at discharge is the same (Z=4.7, P<0.001). Conclusion: There is a significant association of NIHSS scores and COP in IS patients. This association exists at admission and at discharge from the hospital. PMID:27147786

  20. Involvement of calpains in adult neurogenesis: implications for stroke.

    PubMed

    Machado, Vanessa M; Morte, Maria I; Carreira, Bruno P; Azevedo, Maria M; Takano, Jiro; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C; Asmussen, Hannelore; Horwitz, Alan R; Carvalho, Caetana M; Araújo, Inês M

    2015-01-01

    Calpains are ubiquitous proteases involved in cell proliferation, adhesion and motility. In the brain, calpains have been associated with neuronal damage in both acute and neurodegenerative disorders, but their physiological function in the nervous system remains elusive. During brain ischemia, there is a large increase in the levels of intracellular calcium, leading to the activation of calpains. Inhibition of these proteases has been shown to reduce neuronal death in a variety of stroke models. On the other hand, after stroke, neural stem cells (NSC) increase their proliferation and newly formed neuroblasts migrate towards the site of injury. However, the process of forming new neurons after injury is not efficient and finding ways to improve it may help with recovery after lesion. Understanding the role of calpains in the process of neurogenesis may therefore open a new window for the treatment of stroke. We investigated the involvement of calpains in NSC proliferation and neuroblast migration in two highly neurogenic regions in the mouse brain, the dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). We used mice that lack calpastatin, the endogenous calpain inhibitor, and calpains were also modulated directly, using calpeptin, a pharmacological calpain inhibitor. Calpastatin deletion impaired both NSC proliferation and neuroblast migration. Calpain inhibition increased NSC proliferation, migration speed and migration distance in cells from the SVZ. Overall, our work suggests that calpains are important for neurogenesis and encourages further research on their neurogenic role. Prospective therapies targeting calpain activity may improve the formation of new neurons following stroke, in addition to affording neuroprotection. PMID:25698931

  1. Involvement of calpains in adult neurogenesis: implications for stroke

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Vanessa M.; Morte, Maria I.; Carreira, Bruno P.; Azevedo, Maria M.; Takano, Jiro; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C.; Asmussen, Hannelore; Horwitz, Alan R.; Carvalho, Caetana M.; Araújo, Inês M.

    2015-01-01

    Calpains are ubiquitous proteases involved in cell proliferation, adhesion and motility. In the brain, calpains have been associated with neuronal damage in both acute and neurodegenerative disorders, but their physiological function in the nervous system remains elusive. During brain ischemia, there is a large increase in the levels of intracellular calcium, leading to the activation of calpains. Inhibition of these proteases has been shown to reduce neuronal death in a variety of stroke models. On the other hand, after stroke, neural stem cells (NSC) increase their proliferation and newly formed neuroblasts migrate towards the site of injury. However, the process of forming new neurons after injury is not efficient and finding ways to improve it may help with recovery after lesion. Understanding the role of calpains in the process of neurogenesis may therefore open a new window for the treatment of stroke. We investigated the involvement of calpains in NSC proliferation and neuroblast migration in two highly neurogenic regions in the mouse brain, the dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). We used mice that lack calpastatin, the endogenous calpain inhibitor, and calpains were also modulated directly, using calpeptin, a pharmacological calpain inhibitor. Calpastatin deletion impaired both NSC proliferation and neuroblast migration. Calpain inhibition increased NSC proliferation, migration speed and migration distance in cells from the SVZ. Overall, our work suggests that calpains are important for neurogenesis and encourages further research on their neurogenic role. Prospective therapies targeting calpain activity may improve the formation of new neurons following stroke, in addition to affording neuroprotection. PMID:25698931

  2. Independent and Joint Effect of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Blood Pressure Control on Incident Stroke in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun; Xu, Benjamin; Xu, Richard; Tung, Renee; Frank, Eric; Tromble, Wayne; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Weiyi; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Chunyan; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianping; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Chen, Yundai; Yang, Tianlun; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Zhao, Lianyou; Hou, Fan Fan; Ge, Junbo; Dong, Qiang; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to influence the effects of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Data are limited on whether PWV is an independent predictor of stroke above and beyond hypertension control. This longitudinal analysis examined the independent and joint effect of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) with hypertension control on the risk of first stroke. This report included 3310 hypertensive adults, a subset of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT) with baseline measurements for baPWV. During a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 111 participants developed first stroke. The risk of stroke was higher among participants with baPWV in the highest quartile than among those in the lower quartiles (6.3% versus 2.4%; hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.60). Similarly, the participants with inadequate hypertension control had a higher risk of stroke than those with adequate control (5.1% versus 1.8%; hazard ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.61). When baPWV and hypertension control were examined jointly, participants in the highest baPWV quartile and with inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with their counterparts (7.5% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 3.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-6.77). There was a significant and independent effect of high baPWV on stroke as shown among participants with adequate hypertension control (4.2% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 2.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.81). In summary, among hypertensive patients, baPWV and hypertension control were found to independently and jointly affect the risk of first stroke. Participants with high baPWV and inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with other groups. PMID:27217412

  3. A framework of counseling for patients with stroke in nursing: a narrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Oikarinen, Anne; Kääriäinen, Maria; Kyngäs, Helvi

    2014-10-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death in developed countries. Its prevalence and disability burden are expected to increase in the future because of an aging population. The consequences of stroke are specific to the individual. Whereas some patients experience long-term functional and cognitive deficits, others may recover completely and be discharged quickly. Counseling is needed to help patients and their families cope with the effects of stroke after discharge. This is a systematic literature review with a narrative analysis. The purpose was to describe the content and characteristics of stroke patients' counseling. A review of studies published between January 2000 and February 2013 describing stroke patients' counseling was conducted by CINAHL and Medline databases. Studies were selected based on inclusion criteria, and the quality of the included studies was assessed. The final data (n = 33) were extracted and synthesized. Seven prominent themes were identified in the literature relating to (a) information about the disease and concerns regarding stroke, (b) the aims of counseling, (c) counseling methods, (d) interaction as a method for counseling, (e) the stroke nurse as a counselor, (f) emotional support, and (g) decision making in patients' care. The results of the review show that stroke patients' counseling is a multifaceted phenomenon with distinctive characteristics. The findings of the review can be used to develop counseling for patients with stroke and their families. In addition, the review can be used when educating stroke nurses for stroke units. PMID:25188689

  4. Nurses 'must' control of the nutritional needs of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Mould, Jacqui

    The aim of this observational study was to review nutritional practice within an acute stroke unit (ASU) and compare practice against National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance, National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) guidelines, and the National Stroke Agenda. 'Observations of Care', a well recognized approach and part of the Royal College of Nursing clinical leadership programme, was undertaken along with a traditional audit to review nutritional care in the ASU. Usually undertaken by persons outside of the team to prevent bias, in this situation the bias was minimized as the auditor was new to the team. Current practice was evaluated and it was important for the team to have ownership of the assessment process. This article also reviews the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitals and the importance of nutritional assessment, the use of screening tools and types of diet that best maintain optimum outcomes. Patients who have experienced a stroke can face a range of problems that influence dietary intake. On admission, 16-31% are already malnourished. PMID:20081700

  5. Crossed linguo-buccal reflex in post-stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Nagumo, K; Hirayama, K; Nakajima, Y; Takahashi, M

    2000-12-15

    A pathological crossed orofacial reflex, called crossed linguo-buccal reflex in the present study, was observed in approximately 1/3 of post-stroke patients with central facial palsy. Stroking with pressure two or three times with a split wooden tongue-blade to the tongue or palate contralateral to the central facial palsy elicited a reflex movement consisting of retraction of the angle of mouth and medio-posterior withdrawal of the buccal mucosa on the paretic side. Seventy-seven patients with central hemifacial palsy caused by a unilateral cerebral lesion were examined clinically, electromyographically and by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, three men with bilateral cerebral lesions and bilateral crossed linguo-buccal reflexes were electromyographically examined. Twenty-two patients with unilateral cerebral lesions had this reflex. It was found that this reflex was most frequently observed in patients with a capsulo-caudate lesion involving the head of the caudate nucleus, the anterior limb and genu of the internal capsule. The electromyogram of the reflex showed increased activity in the orbicularis oris, depressor anguli oris, risorius, zygomaticus major and buccinator muscles on the paretic side with a long latency (254-856 ms), and a prolonged after-discharge after the stimulation. Reciprocal inhibition was observed in patients with bilateral positive reflexes. These findings suggest that liberation of the polysynaptic brainstem reflex in the medulla oblongata and pons from the indirect corticobulbar inhibition may underlie the occurrence of the crossed linguo-buccal reflex in post-stroke patients. PMID:11102639

  6. An intelligent rollator for mobility impaired persons, especially stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Thomas; Lindahl, Olof; Bäcklund, Tomas; Karlsson, Marcus; Hohnloser, Peter; Bråndal, Anna; Hu, Xiaolei; Wester, Per

    2016-07-01

    An intelligent rollator (IRO) was developed that aims at obstacle detection and guidance to avoid collisions and accidental falls. The IRO is a retrofit four-wheeled rollator with an embedded computer, two solenoid brakes, rotation sensors on the wheels and IR-distance sensors. The value reported by each distance sensor was compared in the computer to a nominal distance. Deviations indicated a present obstacle and caused activation of one of the brakes in order to influence the direction of motion to avoid the obstacle. The IRO was tested by seven healthy subjects with simulated restricted and blurred sight and five stroke subjects on a standardised indoor track with obstacles. All tested subjects walked faster with intelligence deactivated. Three out of five stroke patients experienced more detected obstacles with intelligence activated. This suggests enhanced safety during walking with IRO. Further studies are required to explore the full value of the IRO. PMID:27078084

  7. Intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical embolectomy, and intracranial stenting for hyperacute ischemic stroke in a patient with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Argetsinger, Debora S; Miller, Jeffrey W; Fletcher, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese translation of moyamoya means "puff of smoke" and refers to the angiographic appearance of dilated collateral vessels seen during chronic progressive narrowing of the intracranial supraclinoid portions of the internal carotid arteries. Despite cerebral ischemia being the most common presenting symptom, 20% to 40% of adults suffer a hemorrhagic stroke. Due to the lack of evidence and histopathologic findings, intravenous and endovascular reperfusion therapy is typically avoided. This case study presents a patient with moyamoya disease in the hyperacute phase of ischemic stroke. The patient received full dose (0.9mg/kg) tissue plasminogen activator and subsequently underwent a mechanical clot extraction and Wingspan stent (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) placement. The use of these options in the setting of moyamoya disease is novel. This demonstrates that moyamoya disease may not be an absolute contraindication to revascularization in hyperacute ischemic stroke and underscores that many perceived contraindications to thrombolytic and mechanical revascularization therapies are relative. PMID:26896911

  8. Anosognosia for obvious visual field defects in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Baier, Bernhard; Geber, Christian; Müller-Forell, Wiebke; Müller, Notger; Dieterich, Marianne; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Patients with anosognosia for visual field defect (AVFD) fail to recognize consciously their visual field defect. There is still unclarity whether specific neural correlates are associated with AVFD. We studied AVFD in 54 patients with acute stroke and a visual field defect. Nineteen percent of this unselected sample showed AVFD. By using modern voxelwise lesion-behaviour mapping techniques we found an association between AVFD and parts of the lingual gyrus, the cuneus as well as the posterior cingulate and corpus callosum. Damage to these regions appears to induce unawareness of visual field defects and thus may play a significant role for conscious visual perception. PMID:24652382

  9. Stem Cells May Offer New Hope to Stroke Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159163.html Stem Cells May Offer New Hope to Stroke Survivors Experimental ... HealthDay News) -- Preliminary research suggests that injecting adult stems cells directly into the brain may give stroke patients ...

  10. The Relation Between GABA and L-Arginine Levels With Some Stroke Risk Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hosinian, Mohsen; Qujeq, Durdi; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in extra and intracellular neurotransmitter amino acids concentration in the early stage of acute cerebral ischemia have been reported. In this the study, serum level of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-Arginine in acute ischemic stroke patients was assessed. 60 patients with acute ischemic stroke and sixthy healthy volunteers as a control group were assessed. Serum GABA was measured with modified enzymatic method and serum L- Arginine was measured by modified Sakaguchi method. Serum GABA level in stroke cases was lower than that of the control group. There was no relationship between GABA level and age or gender. Also, no significant correlation was observed between GABA levels with ischemic stroke risk factors such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Serum L- Arginine level in patients was slightly increased in comparison with control group. There was a positive relationship between serum L- Arginine level and acute ischemic stroke risk factors. Serum GABA level was reduced in patients and had no correlation with acute ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:27478806

  11. The Relation Between GABA and L-Arginine Levels With Some Stroke Risk Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Hosinian, Mohsen; Qujeq, Durdi; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in extra and intracellular neurotransmitter amino acids concentration in the early stage of acute cerebral ischemia have been reported. In this the study, serum level of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-Arginine in acute ischemic stroke patients was assessed. 60 patients with acute ischemic stroke and sixthy healthy volunteers as a control group were assessed. Serum GABA was measured with modified enzymatic method and serum L- Arginine was measured by modified Sakaguchi method. Serum GABA level in stroke cases was lower than that of the control group. There was no relationship between GABA level and age or gender. Also, no significant correlation was observed between GABA levels with ischemic stroke risk factors such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Serum L- Arginine level in patients was slightly increased in comparison with control group. There was a positive relationship between serum L- Arginine level and acute ischemic stroke risk factors. Serum GABA level was reduced in patients and had no correlation with acute ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:27478806

  12. Denial and Self-Image in Stroke, Lung Cancer, and Heart Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jacob; Zigler, Edward

    1975-01-01

    Stroke, lung cancer, and heart disease patients were found to employ denial, as indicated by the relatively small difference between their real and ideal selves before and after the onset of illness. The greatest amount of denial was found for stroke patients. Cancer patients displayed more denial than did heart patients. (Author)

  13. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Telemedicine Service for the Treatment of Acute Stroke Patients: TeleStroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health care service based on telemedicine can reduce both physical and time barriers in stroke treatments. Moreover, this service connects centers specializing in stroke treatment with other centers and practitioners, thereby increasing accessibility to neurological specialist care and fibrinolytic treatment. Objective Development, implementation, and evaluation of a care service for the treatment of acute stroke patients based on telemedicine (TeleStroke) at Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. Methods The evaluation phase, conducted from October 2008 to January 2011, involved patients who presented acute stroke symptoms confirmed by the emergency physician; they were examined using TeleStroke in two hospitals, at a distance of 16 and 110 kilometers from Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. We analyzed the number of interconsultation sheets, the percentage of patients treated with fibrinolysis, and the number of times they were treated. To evaluate medical professionals’ acceptance of the TeleStroke system, we developed a web-based questionnaire using a Technology Acceptance Model. Results A total of 28 patients were evaluated through the interconsultation sheet. Out of 28 patients, 19 (68%) received fibrinolytic treatment. The most common reasons for not treating with fibrinolysis included: clinical criteria in six out of nine patients (66%) and beyond the time window in three out of nine patients (33%). The mean “onset-to-hospital” time was 69 minutes, the mean time from admission to CT image was 33 minutes, the mean “door-to-needle” time was 82 minutes, and the mean “onset-to-needle” time was 150 minutes. Out of 61 medical professionals, 34 (56%) completed a questionnaire to evaluate the acceptability of the TeleStroke system. The mean values for each item were over 6.50, indicating that respondents positively evaluated each item. This survey was assessed using the Cronbach alpha test to determine the reliability of the

  14. Serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 is decreased in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bennion, Douglas M; Rosado, Christian A; Haltigan, Emily A; Regenhardt, Robert W; Sumners, Colin; Waters, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a cardio and neuro-protective carboxypeptidase, are dynamically altered after stroke in preclinical models. We sought to characterize the previously unexplored changes in serum ACE2 activity of stroke patients and the mechanism of these changes. Serum samples were obtained from patients during acute ischemic stroke (n=39), conditions mimicking stroke (stroke-alert, n=23), or from control participants (n=20). Enzyme activity levels were analyzed by fluorometric assay and correlated with clinical variables by regression analyses. Serum ACE2 activity was significantly lower in acute ischemic stroke as compared to both control and stroke-alert patients, followed by an increase to control levels at three days. Serum ACE2 activity significantly correlated with the presence of ischemic stroke after controlling for other factors (P=0.01). Additional associations with ACE2 activity included a positive correlation with systolic blood pressure at presentation in stroke-alert (R(2)=0.24, P=0.03), while stroke levels showed no correlation (R(2)=0.01, P=0.50). ACE2 sheddase activity was unchanged between groups. These dynamic changes in serum ACE2 activity in stroke, which concur with preclinical studies, are not likely to be driven primarily by acute changes in blood pressure or sheddase activity. These findings provide new insight for developing therapies targeting this protective system in ischemic stroke. PMID:27488276

  15. Patient- and Hospital-Level Determinants of Rehabilitation for In-Patient Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Tai; Chen, Chia-Pei; Kuang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Vinchi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During acute stroke care, rehabilitation usage may be influenced by patient- and hospital-related factors. We would like to identify patient- and hospital-level determinants of population-level inpatient rehabilitation usage associated with acute stroke care. From data obtained from the claim information from the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in Taiwan (2009–2011), we enrolled 82,886 stroke patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction from 207 hospitals. A generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) analyses with patient-level factors specified as random effects were conducted (for cross-level interactions). The rate of rehabilitation usage was 51% during acute stroke care. The hospital-related factors accounted for a significant amount of variability (intraclass correlation, 50%). Hospital type was the only significant hospital-level variable and can explain the large amount of variability (58%). Patients treated in smaller hospitals experienced few benefits of rehabilitation services, and those with surgery in a smaller hospital used fewer rehabilitation services. All patient-level variables were significant. With GLMM analyses, we identified the hospital type and its cross-level interaction, and explained a large portion of variability in rehabilitation for stroke patients in Taiwan. PMID:27175671

  16. The Effects of POWER Training in Young and Older Adults after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hunnicutt, Jennifer L; Aaron, Stacey E; Embry, Aaron E; Cence, Brian; Morgan, Patrick; Bowden, Mark G; Gregory, Chris M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approximately 35,000 strokes occur annually in adults below the age of 40, and there is disappointingly little data describing their responses to rehabilitation. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the effects of Poststroke Optimization of Walking using Explosive Resistance (POWER) training in young (<40 years) and older (>60 years) adults and to describe relationships between training-induced improvements in muscular and locomotor function. Methods. Data was analyzed from 16 individuals with chronic stroke who participated in 24 sessions of POWER training. Outcomes included muscle power generation, self-selected walking speed (SSWS), 6-minute walk test, Fugl-Meyer motor assessment, Berg Balance Scale, and Dynamic Gait Index. Results. There were no significant differences between groups at baseline. Within-group comparisons revealed significant improvements in paretic and nonparetic knee extensor muscle power generation in both groups. Additionally, young participants significantly improved SSWS. Improvements in SSWS were more strongly associated with improvements in power generation on both sides in young versus older participants. Conclusions. Younger adults after stroke seem to preferentially benefit from POWER training, particularly when increasing gait speed is a rehabilitation goal. Future research should aim to further understand age-related differences in response to training to provide optimal treatments for all individuals following stroke. PMID:27493828

  17. The Effects of POWER Training in Young and Older Adults after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Stacey E.; Embry, Aaron E.; Cence, Brian; Morgan, Patrick; Gregory, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approximately 35,000 strokes occur annually in adults below the age of 40, and there is disappointingly little data describing their responses to rehabilitation. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the effects of Poststroke Optimization of Walking using Explosive Resistance (POWER) training in young (<40 years) and older (>60 years) adults and to describe relationships between training-induced improvements in muscular and locomotor function. Methods. Data was analyzed from 16 individuals with chronic stroke who participated in 24 sessions of POWER training. Outcomes included muscle power generation, self-selected walking speed (SSWS), 6-minute walk test, Fugl-Meyer motor assessment, Berg Balance Scale, and Dynamic Gait Index. Results. There were no significant differences between groups at baseline. Within-group comparisons revealed significant improvements in paretic and nonparetic knee extensor muscle power generation in both groups. Additionally, young participants significantly improved SSWS. Improvements in SSWS were more strongly associated with improvements in power generation on both sides in young versus older participants. Conclusions. Younger adults after stroke seem to preferentially benefit from POWER training, particularly when increasing gait speed is a rehabilitation goal. Future research should aim to further understand age-related differences in response to training to provide optimal treatments for all individuals following stroke. PMID:27493828

  18. Anthropometric approximation of body weight in unresponsive stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, M W; Graf, M; Henke, C; Hermans, M; Ziemann, U; Sitzer, M; Foerch, C

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose Thrombolysis of acute ischaemic stroke is based strictly on body weight to ensure efficacy and to prevent bleeding complications. Many candidate stroke patients are unable to communicate their body weight, and there is often neither the means nor the time to weigh the patient. Instead, weight is estimated visually by the attending physician, but this is known to be inaccurate. Methods Based on a large general population sample of nearly 7000 subjects, we constructed approximation formulae for estimating body weight from simple anthropometric measurements (body height, and waist and hip circumference). These formulae were validated in a sample of 178 consecutive inpatients admitted to our stroke unit, and their accuracy was compared with the best visual estimation of two experienced physicians. Results The simplest formula gave the most accurate approximation (mean absolute difference 3.1 (2.6) kg), which was considerably better than the best visual estimation (physician 1: 6.5 (5.2) kg; physician 2: 7.4 (5.7) kg). It reduced the proportion of weight approximations mismatched by >10% from 31.5% and 40.4% (physicians 1 and 2, respectively) to 6.2% (anthropometric approximation). Only the patient's own estimation was more accurate (mean absolute difference 2.7 (2.4) kg). Conclusions By using an approximation formula based on simple anthropometric measurements (body height, and waist and hip circumference), it is possible to obtain a quick and accurate approximation of body weight. In situations where the exact weight of unresponsive patients cannot be ascertained quickly, we recommend using this approximation method rather than visual estimation. PMID:17494978

  19. Finger extensor variability in TMS parameters among chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Andrew J; Kahn, Shannon; Wolf, Steven L; Weiss, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Background This study determined the reliability of topographic motor cortical maps and MEP characteristics in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) evoked by single-pulse TMS among patients with chronic stroke. Methods Each of ten patients was studied on three occasions. Measures included location of the EDC hotspot and center of gravity (COG), threshold of activation and average amplitude of the hotspot, number of active sites, map volume, and recruitment curve (RC) slope. Results Consistent intrahemispheric measurements were obtained for the three TMS mapping sessions for all measured variables. No statistically significant difference was observed between hemispheres for the number of active sites, COG distance or the RC slope. The magnitude and range of COG movement between sessions were similar to those reported previously with this muscle in able-bodied individuals. The average COG movement over three sessions in both hemispheres was 0.90 cm. The average COG movement in the affected hemisphere was 1.13 (± 0.08) cm, and 0.68 (± 0.04) cm) for the less affected hemisphere. However, significant interhemispheric variability was seen for the average MEP amplitude, normalized map volume, and resting motor threshold. Conclusion The physiologic variability in some TMS measurements of EDC suggest that interpretation of TMS mapping data derived from hemiparetic patients in the chronic stage following stroke should be undertaken cautiously. Irrespective of the muscle, potential causes of variability should be resolved to accurately assess the impact of pharmacological or physical interventions on cortical organization as measured by TMS among patients with stroke. PMID:15927075

  20. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Andrea; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Caso, Valeria; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Early seizure (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke. Patients and methods A total of 638 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke (543 ischemic, 95 hemorrhagic), admitted to our Stroke Unit, were included in this prospective study. ES were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. Results Thirty-one patients (4.8%) had ES. Seizures were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke. ES was not associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). After multivariate analysis, hemorrhagic transformation resulted as an independent predictive factor for ES (OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 1.95–22.61; p = 0.003). Conclusion ES occur in about 5% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES does not seem to be associated with an adverse outcome at hospital discharge after acute stroke. PMID:18827922

  1. Ancrod causes rapid thrombolysis in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Pollak, V E; Glas-Greenwalt, P; Olinger, C P; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A

    1990-05-01

    Clot lysis is desirable in patients with thrombi in arteries and arterioles by a safe rapidly-acting thrombolytic agent. Ancrod cleaves fibrinogen; the resulting circulating ancrod-fibrin stimulates fibrinolysis. Ancrod action and effect were studied in 20 patients with acute developing stroke in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, and received either normal saline or ancrod 0.5 mu/kg in normal saline administered as a constant-rate intravenous infusion over 6 hours. Subsequent doses of ancrod (or saline placebo) were determined daily thereafter for a total treatment period of 7 days. Neither bleeding nor re-thrombosis occurred within the 90 day follow-up period. That ancrod acted rapidly was shown by a significant decrease in functional plasminogen activator inhibitor (PA-I) within 60 minutes, and by significant elevations of fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer within 3 and 4 hours. The biological effect of fibrinolysis in ancrod infused patients was demonstrated by a greater improvement in stroke score when compared to those infused with saline. PMID:2186630

  2. BCI-FES: could a new rehabilitation device hold fresh promise for stroke patients?

    PubMed

    Young, Brittany M; Williams, Justin; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2014-11-01

    It has been known that stroke constitutes a major source of acquired disability, with nearly 800,000 new strokes each year in the USA alone. While advances in public and preventative health have helped reduce stroke incidence in high-income countries in recent decades, growth of the aging population, increasing stroke rates in low- to middle-income countries and medical advances that have reduced stroke mortality are all contributing to an increase in stroke survivors worldwide. Large numbers of stroke survivors have residual motor deficits. This editorial will provide an introduction to a class of new therapies being investigated with the aim of improving motor outcomes in stroke patients that uses what is known as brain-computer interface technology. PMID:25060658

  3. Changes in motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients should not be ignored

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingli; Li, Peihong; Mao, Zhibang; Qi, Xiang; Zou, Jun; Yu, Zhusheng

    2014-01-01

    Motor function changes in the unaffected hand of stroke patients with hemiplegia. These changes are often ignored by clinicians owing to the extent of motor disability of the affected hand. Finger tapping frequency and Lind-mark hand function score showed that the motor function of unaffected hands in stroke patients was poorer than that of a healthy control hand. After 2 weeks of rehabilitation treatment, motor function of the unaffected hand of stroke patients was obviously improved. Therefore, attention should also be paid to motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients with hemiplegia during rehabilitation. PMID:25221586

  4. How Well Do Stroke Risk Scores Predict Hemorrhage in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gene R; Singer, Daniel E; Chang, Yuchiao; Go, Alan S; Borowsky, Leila H; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-09-01

    The decision to use anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation depends on comparing a patient's estimated risk of stroke to their bleeding risk. Several of the risk factors in the stroke risk schemes overlap with hemorrhage risk. We compared how well 2 stroke risk scores (CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc) and 2 hemorrhage risk scores (the ATRIA bleeding score and the HAS-BLED score) predicted major hemorrhage on and off warfarin in a cohort of 13,559 community-dwelling adults with AF. Over a cumulative 64,741 person-years of follow-up, we identified a total of 777 incident major hemorrhage events. The ATRIA bleeding score had the highest predictive ability of all the scores in patients on warfarin (c-index of 0.74 [0.72 to 0.76] compared with 0.65 [0.62 to 0.67] for CHADS2, 0.65 [0.62 to 0.67] for CHA2DS2-VASc, and 0.64 [0.61 to 0.66] for HAS-BLED) and in those off warfarin (0.77 [0.74 to 0.79] compared with 0.67 [0.64 to 0.71] for CHADS2, 0.67 [0.64 to 0.70] for CHA2DS2-VASc, and 0.68 [0.65 to 0.71] for HAS-BLED). In conclusion, although CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc stroke scores were better at predicting hemorrhage than chance alone, they were inferior to the ATRIA bleeding score. Our study supports the use of dedicated hemorrhage risk stratification tools to predict major hemorrhage in atrial fibrillation. PMID:27394408

  5. Mirror therapy enhances upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Mirela Cristina, Luca; Matei, Daniela; Ignat, Bogdan; Popescu, Cristian Dinu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy program in addition with physical therapy methods on upper limb recovery in patients with subacute ischemic stroke. 15 subjects followed a comprehensive rehabilitative treatment, 8 subjects received only control therapy (CT) and 7 subjects received mirror therapy (MT) for 30 min every day, five times a week, for 6 weeks in addition to the conventional therapy. Brunnstrom stages, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (upper extremity), the Ashworth Scale, and Bhakta Test (finger flexion scale) were used to assess changes in upper limb motor recovery and motor function after intervention. After 6 weeks of treatment, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in the variables measured. Patients who received MT showed greater improvements compared to the CT group. The MT treatment results included: improvement of motor functions, manual skills and activities of daily living. The best results were obtained when the treatment was started soon after the stroke. MT is an easy and low-cost method to improve motor recovery of the upper limb. PMID:25850528

  6. Clopidogrel responsiveness in stroke patients on a chronic aspirin regimen.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Zohara; Ching, Marilou; Sawyer, Robert N; Chichelli, Trevor; Li, Fan; Janicke, David; Radovic, Vladan; Mehta, Bijal; Farooq, Osman; Munschauer, Frederick E

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel (CPG) in patients sustaining acute ischemic stroke who were already receiving chronic outpatient aspirin therapy (81-325 mg/day). Platelet function was measured using 3 different "point-of-care" platelet function analyzers: the Thrombelastograph hemostasis system, the Accumetrics VerifyNow system, and the Chronolog 570VS impedance aggregometer. Platelet function was assessed before administration of a 300-mg CPG loading dose and again at 26 hours and 64 hours after this loading dose along with a 75-mg daily maintenance dose. All 3 instruments detected marked inhibition of platelet function at 26 hours and 64 hours after CPG administration. There were significant variations among the 3 instruments in monitoring antiplatelet responses to aspirin and CPG; however, these variations were eliminated when the platelet function results were corrected for baseline platelet variability. The percentage of patients who were poor responders to CPG after switching from aspirin depended on the measurement instrument used, but was higher at 26 hours after CPG administration than at 64 hours after CPG administration. Our findings indicate that poor response to antiplatelet agents in general, and to CPG in particular, is a function of the measuring instrument. The correction for baseline platelet variability results in similar levels of platelet inhibition measured by the 3 platelet function analyzers. Future studies are warranted to examine the association between ex vivo CPG-induced platelet inhibition and clinical outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:22209644

  7. Incidence of stroke before and after dialysis initiation in older patients.

    PubMed

    Murray, Anne M; Seliger, Stephen; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Herzog, Charles A; Solid, Craig A

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of stroke is substantially higher among hemodialysis patients than among patients with earlier stages of CKD, but to what extent the initiation of dialysis accelerates the risk for stroke is not well understood. In this cohort study, we analyzed data from incident hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients in 2009 who were at least 67 years old and had Medicare as primary payer. We noted whether each of the 20,979 hemodialysis patients initiated dialysis as an outpatient (47%) or inpatient (53%). One year before initiation, the baseline stroke rate was 0.15%-0.20% of patients per month (ppm) for both outpatient and inpatient initiators. Among outpatient initiators, stroke rates began rising approximately 90 days before initiation, reached 0.5% ppm during the 30 days before initiation, and peaked at 0.7% ppm (8.4% per patient-year) during the 30 days after initiation. The pattern was similar among inpatient initiators, but the stroke rate peaked at 1.5% ppm (18% per patient-year). For both hemodialysis groups, stroke rates rapidly declined by 1-2 months after initiation, fluctuated, and stabilized at approximately twice the baseline rate by 1 year. Among the 620 peritoneal dialysis patients, stroke rates were slightly lower and variable, but approximately doubled after initiation. In conclusion, these data suggest that the process of initiating dialysis may cause strokes. Further studies should evaluate methods to mitigate the risk for stroke during this high-risk period. PMID:23620399

  8. Incidence of Stroke Before and After Dialysis Initiation in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Stephen; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Herzog, Charles A.; Solid, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of stroke is substantially higher among hemodialysis patients than among patients with earlier stages of CKD, but to what extent the initiation of dialysis accelerates the risk for stroke is not well understood. In this cohort study, we analyzed data from incident hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients in 2009 who were at least 67 years old and had Medicare as primary payer. We noted whether each of the 20,979 hemodialysis patients initiated dialysis as an outpatient (47%) or inpatient (53%). One year before initiation, the baseline stroke rate was 0.15%–0.20% of patients per month (ppm) for both outpatient and inpatient initiators. Among outpatient initiators, stroke rates began rising approximately 90 days before initiation, reached 0.5% ppm during the 30 days before initiation, and peaked at 0.7% ppm (8.4% per patient-year) during the 30 days after initiation. The pattern was similar among inpatient initiators, but the stroke rate peaked at 1.5% ppm (18% per patient-year). For both hemodialysis groups, stroke rates rapidly declined by 1–2 months after initiation, fluctuated, and stabilized at approximately twice the baseline rate by 1 year. Among the 620 peritoneal dialysis patients, stroke rates were slightly lower and variable, but approximately doubled after initiation. In conclusion, these data suggest that the process of initiating dialysis may cause strokes. Further studies should evaluate methods to mitigate the risk for stroke during this high-risk period. PMID:23620399

  9. Delayed intramuscular human neurotrophin-3 improves recovery in adult and elderly rats after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Duricki, Denise A.; Hutson, Thomas H.; Kathe, Claudia; Soleman, Sara; Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel; Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Shine, H. David; Chen, Qin; Wood, Tobias C.; Bernanos, Michel; Cash, Diana; Williams, Steven C. R.; Gage, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a therapy that reverses disability after stroke when initiated in a time frame suitable for the majority of new victims. We show here that intramuscular delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT3, encoded by NTF3) can induce sensorimotor recovery when treatment is initiated 24 h after stroke. Specifically, in two randomized, blinded preclinical trials, we show improved sensory and locomotor function in adult (6 months) and elderly (18 months) rats treated 24 h following cortical ischaemic stroke with human NT3 delivered using a clinically approved serotype of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV1). Importantly, AAV1-hNT3 was given in a clinically-feasible timeframe using a straightforward, targeted route (injections into disabled forelimb muscles). Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed that recovery was not due to neuroprotection, as expected given the delayed treatment. Rather, treatment caused corticospinal axons from the less affected hemisphere to sprout in the spinal cord. This treatment is the first gene therapy that reverses disability after stroke when administered intramuscularly in an elderly body. Importantly, phase I and II clinical trials by others show that repeated, peripherally administered high doses of recombinant NT3 are safe and well tolerated in humans with other conditions. This paves the way for NT3 as a therapy for stroke. PMID:26614754

  10. Delayed intramuscular human neurotrophin-3 improves recovery in adult and elderly rats after stroke.

    PubMed

    Duricki, Denise A; Hutson, Thomas H; Kathe, Claudia; Soleman, Sara; Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Shine, H David; Chen, Qin; Wood, Tobias C; Bernanos, Michel; Cash, Diana; Williams, Steven C R; Gage, Fred H; Moon, Lawrence D F

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a therapy that reverses disability after stroke when initiated in a time frame suitable for the majority of new victims. We show here that intramuscular delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT3, encoded by NTF3) can induce sensorimotor recovery when treatment is initiated 24 h after stroke. Specifically, in two randomized, blinded preclinical trials, we show improved sensory and locomotor function in adult (6 months) and elderly (18 months) rats treated 24 h following cortical ischaemic stroke with human NT3 delivered using a clinically approved serotype of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV1). Importantly, AAV1-hNT3 was given in a clinically-feasible timeframe using a straightforward, targeted route (injections into disabled forelimb muscles). Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed that recovery was not due to neuroprotection, as expected given the delayed treatment. Rather, treatment caused corticospinal axons from the less affected hemisphere to sprout in the spinal cord. This treatment is the first gene therapy that reverses disability after stroke when administered intramuscularly in an elderly body. Importantly, phase I and II clinical trials by others show that repeated, peripherally administered high doses of recombinant NT3 are safe and well tolerated in humans with other conditions. This paves the way for NT3 as a therapy for stroke. PMID:26614754

  11. The CXCR2 Gene Polymorphism Is Associated with Stroke in Patients with Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Timasheva, Yanina R.; Nasibullin, Timur R.; Mustafina, Olga E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is the major risk factor for stroke, and genetic factors contribute to its development. Inflammation has been hypothesized to be the key link between blood pressure elevation and stroke. We performed an analysis of the association between inflammatory mediator gene polymorphisms and the incidence of stroke in patients with essential hypertension (EH). The study group consisted of 625 individuals (296 patients with noncomplicated EH, 71 hypertensive patients with ischemic stroke, and 258 control subjects). Both patients and controls were ethnic Tatars originating from the Republic of Bashkortostan (Russian Federation). The analysis has shown that the risk of ischemic stroke was associated with the CXCR2 rs1126579 polymorphism. Our results indicate that among patients with EH, the heterozygous genotype carriers had a higher risk of stroke (OR = 1.72, 95% CI 1.01-2.92), whereas the CXCR2*C/C genotype was protective against stroke (OR = 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.83). As shown by the gene-gene interaction analysis, the CXCR2 rs1126579 polymorphism was also present in all genotype/allele combinations associated with the risk of stroke. Genetic patterns associated with stroke also included polymorphisms in the CCL2, CCL18, CX3CR1, CCR5, and CXCL8 (IL8) genes, although no association between these loci and stroke was detected by individual analysis. PMID:26648969

  12. Incremental Value of Left Atrial Global Longitudinal Strain for Prediction of Post Stroke Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Darae; Cho, In Jeong; Kim, Young Dae; Nam, Hyo Suk; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Geu-Ru; Ha, Jong-Won; Heo, Ji Hoe; Chung, Namsik

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a well-established risk factor for stroke. Interestingly, ischemic stroke increases risk of incident AF in patients without prior diagnosed AF. For better risk stratification for post-stroke AF, we studied left atrial (LA) size and mechanical function using two-dimensional (2D) speckle tracking imaging in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 227 patients (132 males, age 67 ± 12) with acute ischemic stroke without a history of AF underwent 2D transthoracic echocardiography and speckle tracking imaging for the assessment of LA volume index and global LA longitudinal strain (LALS). From clinical variables, the CHA2DS2-VASc score and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were calculated in each patient. Post-stroke AF was defined as newly diagnosed AF during the course after ischemic stroke. Results Post-stroke AF occurred in 25 patients (11%). Patients with post-stroke AF were older and showed a higher tendency of CHA2DS2-VASc score, significantly higher log NIHSS, larger LA volume index and lower global LALS than those without. In multivariate analysis, global LALS was an independent predictor for post-stroke AF (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.83.0.97, p < 0.01) after controlling for confounding factors. Furthermore, global LALS provided incremental predictive value for post-stroke AF over the CHA2DS2-VASc score, NIHSS, and LA volume index. The global LALS < 14.5% better distinguished post-stroke AF (area under the curve 0.837, sensitivity 60%, specificity 95%, p < 0.01) than CHA2DS2-VASc score. Conclusion Global LALS as a marker of LA mechanical function has incremental predictive value for post-stroke AF in patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27081440

  13. The coagulopathy of heat stroke: alterations in coagulation and fibrinolysis in heat stroke patients during the pilgrimage (Haj) to Makkah.

    PubMed

    al-Mashhadani, S A; Gader, A G; al Harthi, S S; Kangav, D; Shaheen, F A; Bogus, F

    1994-10-01

    Haemostatic measurements were undertaken in 132 patients diagnosed with heat stroke during the pilgrimage to Makkah, in two successive summers of 1989-90. The control group comprised 49 patients, all pilgrims, with a wide range of clinical conditions, but without hyperpyrexia or deranged haemostasis. Heat stroke patients showed (i) significant prolongation of the prothrombin (PT), activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT) and thrombin times (TT) but normal reptilase time (RT); (ii) significant reduction in plasma levels of antithrombin III (AT-III), factor V, proteins C and S, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) and platelet count; (iii) increase in plasma factor VIII, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and serum FDP; (iv) no significant changes in plasma fibrinogen, plasminogen, alpha 2-antiplasmin and factors VII and X. Heat stroke patients were then grouped into those with and those without bleeding symptoms. Bleeders showed greater prolongation of the PT, aPTT and TT and significant reductions in fibrinogen, AT-III, factors V, VIII and X, plasminogen, alpha 2-antiplasmin and platelet count. Logistic regression and discriminant analysis showed that AT-III was the parameter associated most with heat stroke and reliable enough to predict its occurrence, whether or not bleeding occurred. The results indicate that activation of the haemostatic mechanism, consumptive in nature, regularly accompanies heat stroke and highlights the physiological role of AT-III in checking this activation process. PMID:7865679

  14. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  15. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Pötschke, Christian; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M; Vogelgesang, Antje; Dressel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3(+) Tregs and CD39(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4(+) T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39(+) Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4(+) Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3(+)CD39(+) Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  16. A comparison of driving errors in patients with left or right hemispheric lesions after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung-Ok

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of driving errors among patients with left or right hemispheric lesions due to stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients participated in the study. Driving errors were assessed using a virtual reality driving simulator. [Results] Significant differences were shown in center line crossing frequency, accident rate, brake reaction time, total driving error scores, and overall driving safety between participants with left or right hemispheric lesions. [Conclusion] Driving rehabilitation specialists should consider hemispheric function when teaching driving skills to stroke survivors, because patients with lesions in the left or right hemispheres after stroke show differences in driving skills. PMID:26696720

  17. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  18. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in stroke patients: A 5-year nationwide investigation of 44,460 patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Poststroke sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can hinder communication between patients and healthcare professionals, thereby restricting participation in rehabilitation programs and limiting improvements in physical performance. However, the relationship between stroke and SSNHL remains unclear. This study employed a nationwide population-based dataset to investigate the relationship between stroke and SSNHL.The Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database was used to compile data from 11,115 stroke patients and a comparison cohort of 33,345 matched nonstroke enrollees. Each patient was followed for 5 years to identify new-onset SSNHL. Stratified Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to examine the association of stroke with subsequent SSNHL.Among the 44,460 patients, 66 patients (55,378 person-years) from the stroke cohort and 105 patients (166,586 person-years) from the comparison cohort were diagnosed with SSNHL. The incidence of SSNHL was approximately twice as high among stroke patients than among nonstroke patients (1.19 and 0.63/1000 person-years, respectively). Stroke patients had a 71% increased risk of SSNHL, compared with nonstroke patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-2.36). We also observed a remarkable increase in risk of SSNHL in stroke patients within 1-year of follow-up (adjusted HR 5.65, 95% CI 3.07-10.41) or under steroid therapy during hospitalization (adjusted HR 5.14, 95% CI 2.08-12.75).Patients with stroke had a higher risk of subsequent SSNHL compared with patients without stroke. In particular, stroke patients within 1-year follow-up and those undergoing steroid therapy during hospitalization should be treated with the utmost caution, considering that the risk of SSNHL increases by more than 5-fold. PMID:27603402

  19. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets’ tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight

  20. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  1. Individual and Combined Risk Factors for Incident Atrial Fibrillation and Incident Stroke: An Analysis of 3 Million At-Risk US Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chyou, Janice Y; Hunter, Tina D; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Turakhia, Mintu P; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    Background The incremental effects of risk factor combinations for atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke are incompletely understood. We sought to quantify the risks of incident AF and stroke for combinations of established risk factors in a large US sample. Methods and Results Patients with no evidence of AF or stroke in 2007 were stratified by combinations of the following risk factors: heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, age 65 to 74, age ≥75, coronary artery disease, and chronic kidney disease. Patients with ≥2 of the first 5 or ≥3 of the first 7, classified as “high-risk,” and an age-matched sample of patients with fewer risk factors, classified as “low-risk,” were followed over 2008–2010 for incident AF and stroke. Annualized incidence rates and risks were quantified for each combination of factors by using Cox regression. Annualized incidence rates for AF, stroke, and both were 3.59%, 3.27%, and 0.62% in 1 851 653 high-risk patients and 1.32%, 1.48%, and 0.18% in 1 156 221 low-risk patients, respectively. Among patients with 1 risk factor, those with age ≥75 had the highest hazards of incident AF and stroke (HR 9.2, 6.9). Among patients with 2 risk factors, those with age ≥75 and heart failure had the highest annualized incidence rates of AF and stroke (10.2%, 5.9%). The combination of age ≥75 and hypertension was prevalent and had the highest incidences of AF and stroke. Conclusions Adults with combinations of known risk factors are at increased risk of incident AF and stroke, but combinations of risk factors are not always additive. PMID:26206736

  2. Predictors of diagnostic neuroimaging delays among adults presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute stroke in Ontario: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Kapral, Moira K.; Li, Shudong; Fang, Jiming; Moody, Alan R.; Krahn, Murray; Laupacis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have examined the timeliness of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, but less is known about door-to-imaging time. We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the timing of neuroimaging among patients with suspected acute stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, and to examine factors associated with delays in neuroimaging. Methods: We included all patients 18 years and older with suspected acute stroke seen at hospitals with neuroimaging capacity within the Ontario Stroke Registry between Apr. 1, 2010, and Mar. 31, 2011. We used a hierarchical, multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the association between patient and hospital factors and the likelihood of receiving timely neuroimaging (≤ 25 min) after arrival in the emergency department. Results: A total of 13 250 patients presented to an emergency department with stroke-like symptoms during the study period. Of the 3984 who arrived within 4 hours after symptom onset, 1087 (27.3%) had timely neuroimaging. The factors independently associated with an increased likelihood of timely neuroimaging were less time from symptom onset to presentation, more severe stroke, male sex, no history of stroke or transient ischemic attack, arrival to hospital from a setting other than home and presentation to a designated stroke centre or an urban hospital. Interpretation: A minority of patients with stroke-like symptoms who presented within the 4-hour thrombolytic treatment window received timely neuroimaging. Neuroimaging delays were influenced by various patient and hospital factors, some of which are modifiable. PMID:27398382

  3. Attitudes toward anticoagulant treatment among nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients at high risk of stroke and low risk of bleed

    PubMed Central

    Crivera, Concetta; Nelson, Winnie W; Schein, Jeff R; Witt, Edward A

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of stroke. Anticoagulant (AC) therapies are effective at treating AF, but carry with them an increased risk of bleed. Research suggests that a large proportion of AF patients who have high risk of stroke and low risk of bleeding are not currently receiving AC treatment. The goal of this study was to understand the reasons why these patients do not engage in this potentially life-saving treatment. Method Through a self-report online survey, using validated instruments, 1,184 US adults who self-reported a diagnosis of AF were screened for the risk of stroke and bleed. Of these patients, 230 (19.4%) were at high risk of stroke, low risk of bleed, and not currently using an AC treatment, and were asked follow-up questions to assess their reasons for nontreatment, attitudes toward treatment, and attitudes toward dosing regimens. Results The most common reasons patients stopped AC treatment were concerns regarding bleeding (27.8%) and other medical concerns (26.6%), whereas the most common reason cited for not being prescribed an AC in the first place was the use of antiplatelet therapy as an alternative (57.1%). In both cases, potentially erroneous decisions regarding perceived stoke and/or bleeding risk were also a factor. Finally, the largest factors regarding attitudes toward treatment and dosing regimen were instructions from an authority figure (eg, physician, pharmacist) and ease of use, respectively. Conclusion Results suggest that many AF patients who are at high risk of stroke but at low risk of bleed may not be receiving AC due to potentially inaccurate beliefs about risk. This study also found that AF patients place trust in physicians above other factors such as cost when making treatment decisions. Increased education of patients by physicians on the risks and benefits may be a simple strategy to improve outcomes. PMID:27274206

  4. Development and Comparison of Warfarin Dosing Algorithms in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Yul; Choi, Jong Rak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The genes for cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) have been identified as important genetic determinants of warfarin dosing and have been studied. We developed warfarin algorithm for Korean patients with stroke and compared the accuracy of warfarin dose prediction algorithms based on the pharmacogenetics. Materials and Methods A total of 101 patients on stable maintenance dose of warfarin were enrolled. Warfarin dosing algorithm was developed using multiple linear regression analysis. The performance of all the algorithms was characterized with coefficient of determination, determined by linear regression, and the mean of percent deviation was used to predict doses from the actual dose. In addition, we compared the performance of the algorithms using percentage of predicted dose falling within ±20% of clinically observed doses and dividing the patients into a low-dose group (≤3 mg/day), an intermediate-dose group (3–7 mg/day), and high-dose group (≥7 mg/day). Results A new developed algorithms including the variables of age, body weight, and CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype. Our algorithm accounted for 51% of variation in the warfarin stable dose, and performed best in predicting dose within 20% of actual dose and intermediate-dose group. Conclusion Our warfarin dosing algorithm may be useful for Korean patients with stroke. Further studies to elucidate clinical utility of genotype-guided dosing and find the additional genetic association are necessary. PMID:26996562

  5. Development of clinical practice guidelines for urinary continence care of adult stroke survivors in acute and rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrea R

    2014-01-01

    This study developed evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the urinary continence care of adult stroke survivors in acute and rehabilitation settings. The research team conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on urinary continence interventions and outcomes. The team then developed a set of recommendations outlined in the resulting clinical practice guidelines titled Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for the Urinary Continence Care of Stroke Survivors in Acute and Rehabilitation Settings. The evaluation of the CPGs consisted of a two-part assessment and pilot implementation. An expert panel of 25 local and regional experts in stroke and continence care assessed the proposed CPGs. This assessment consisted of two stages: a) evaluating the guidelines using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Instrument (http://www. agreetrust.org); and, b) conducting focus groups to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of the guidelines using the Ottawa Model of Research Use (OMRU). Results from the expert panel assessments/feedback contributed to the refinement of the CPGs as well as identification and construction of implementation strategies. Two sites conducted a three-month pilot implementation of three recommendations from the CPGs as selected by each site. The two inpatient sites were a rehabilitation setting and a mixed acute and rehabilitation setting. The implementation of the CPGs included the development of learning strategies tailored to the needs of each site and in addition to the creation of an online self-learning portal. This study assessed nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding urinary continence challenges using a survey before and after the pilot. Chart reviews before and after the pilot implementation audited the nurses' urinary continence practices for patients and uptake of the selected guidelines' recommendations. Study findings suggested the implementation of the CPGs

  6. Constraint-induced movement therapy enhanced neurogenesis and behavioral recovery after stroke in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuansheng; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Shanshan; Nie, Yingxue

    2009-08-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has been extensively used for stroke rehabilitation. CIMT encourages use of the impaired limb along with restraint of the ipsilesional limb in daily life, and may promote behavioral recovery and induce structural changes in brain after stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CIMT enhances neurogenesis in rat brain after stroke that was generated by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Adult rats were divided into sham group, ischemia group and ischemia treated with CIMT group. Rats of CIMT group were treated with a plaster cast to restrain the healthy forelimb for 14 days beginning 1 week after ischemia. The proliferation of neuronal cells labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and behavioral recovery were analyzed at day 29 after ischemia. We also measured the tissue level of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) by ELISA. SDF-1 might be involved in the regulation of neurogenesis following stroke. In the subventricular zone of the animals treated with CIMT, there was a significant increase in the number of BrdU-positive cells (135 +/- 18, P < 0.05), compared with ischemia group (87 +/- 12) or sham group (18 +/- 3.6). Likewise, in the dentate gyrus, animals treated with CIMT showed a significant increase in BrdU-positive cells (296 +/- 26, P < 0.05) compared with ischemia group (225 +/- 18) or sham group (162 +/- 11). CIMT treatment after stroke significantly improved behavioral performances and increased the SDF-1 protein levels in the cortex and dentate gyrus. In conclusion, CIMT treatment enhances neurogenesis and functional recovery after stroke. PMID:19638734

  7. Characteristics of Dysphagia in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Comparison With Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kyung; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Woo Hyung; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with those of dysphagic stroke patients. Methods Forty-one patients with TBI were selected from medical records (between December 2004 to March 2013) and matched to patients with stroke (n=41) based on age, sex, and disease duration. Patients' swallowing characteristics were analyzed retrospectively using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and compared between both groups. Following thorough review of medical records, patients who had a history of diseases that could affect swallowing function at the time of the study were excluded. Dysphagia characteristics and severity were evaluated using the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale, and the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale. Results There was a significant difference in radiological lesion location (p=0.024) between the two groups. The most common VFSS finding was aspiration or penetration, followed by decreased laryngeal elevation and reduced epiglottis inversion. Swallowing function, VFSS findings, or quantified dysphagia severity showed no significant differences between the groups. In a subgroup analysis of TBI patients, the incidence of tube feeding was higher in patients with surgical intervention than in those without (p=0.011). Conclusion The swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients after TBI were comparable to those of dysphagic stroke patients. Common VFSS findings comprised aspiration or penetration, decreased laryngeal elevation, and reduced epiglottis inversion. Patients who underwent surgical intervention after TBI were at high risk of tube feeding requirement. PMID:27446779

  8. Stroke during induction of labour in a patient with carotid aneurysm and prior multiple venous thromboses

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sujata; Stern, Jeremy S; Williams, Bode

    2009-01-01

    A case of stroke during induction of labour in a pregnant patient at term anticoagulated for prior venous thrombosis is reported. The cause was a middle cerebral artery embolism, originating from a false dissecting aneurysm of the internal carotid artery. Investigations and causes of stroke in a pregnant patient are briefly outlined.

  9. Optimal Scoring Methods of Hand-Strength Tests in Patients with Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Sheau-Ling; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Lin, Jau-Hong; Chen, Hui-Mei

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scoring methods for measuring strength of the more-affected hand in patients with stroke by examining the effect of reducing measurement errors. Three hand-strength tests of grip, palmar pinch, and lateral pinch were administered at two sessions in 56 patients with stroke. Five scoring methods…

  10. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  11. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  12. Associations and Dissociations of Transitive and Intransitive Gestures in Left and Right Hemisphere Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamenova, Vessela; Roy, Eric A.; Black, Sandra E.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated performance on pantomime and imitation of transitive and intransitive gestures in 80 stroke patients, 42 with left (LHD) and 38 with right (RHD) hemisphere damage. Patients were also categorized in two groups based on the time that has elapsed between their stroke and the apraxia assessment: acute-subacute (n = 42) and…

  13. Acute free-floating carotid artery thrombus causing stroke in a young patient: unique etiology and management using endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ai Peng; Taneja, Manish; Seah, Boon Heng; Leong, Hoe Nam; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease accounts for 20%-30% of strokes in the general population. In young adults, it is an unexpected event and its causes involve diverse pathologies. Herein, we describe a unique case of acute embolic stroke in a young adult patient due to the presence of a large clot in the right common and internal carotid arteries, as a result of an extrinsic cause. Surgical clot retrieval was considered unsafe at that point in time in view of the active inflammatory changes surrounding the affected vessels. This was eventually treated with a novel endovascular technique, a unique alternative to open surgery, with excellent clinical outcome. To our knowledge, the penumbra system has never been used for thrombus removal in a nonacute setting. PMID:25440371

  14. Cognitive Impairment After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gauba, Charu; Chaudhari, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vascular dementia is extremely common and contributes to stroke-associated morbidity and mortality. The study of vascular dementia may help to plan preventive interventions. Aims: To study the frequency of cognitive impairment after stroke in a series of consecutive patients with acute stroke, along with factors which influence it. Methods: Fifty adults with acute infarct or hemorrhage (as seen on computed tomography of the brain) were included in the study. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and Barthel’s Index scores were done. Cognitive testing was done by PGI Battery of Brain Dysfunction (PGI-BBD) and Short Form of the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (SIQCODE). Statistical analysis was by Student’s t-test, Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Mean age of patients was 61.82 years; males and ischemic strokes predominated. Dementia was seen in 30%, cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND) in 42%, and normal cognition in 28% patients. Factors associated with vascular cognitive impairment included old age, male sex, low education, hemorrhages, recurrent or severe stroke, silent infarcts, severe cortical atrophy, and left hemispheric or subcortical involvement. Conclusions: Up to 72% of patients have some form of cognitive impairment after a stroke. Secondary stroke prevention could reduce the incidence of vascular dementia. PMID:26543693

  15. Motor recovery monitoring using acceleration measurements in post acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Its recovery and treatment depends on close clinical monitoring by a clinician especially during the first few hours after the onset of stroke. Patients who do not exhibit early motor recovery post thrombolysis may benefit from more aggressive treatment. Method A novel approach for monitoring stroke during the first few hours after the onset of stroke using a wireless accelerometer based motor activity monitoring system is developed. It monitors the motor activity by measuring the acceleration of the arms in three axes. In the presented proof of concept study, the measured acceleration data is transferred wirelessly using iMote2 platform to the base station that is equipped with an online algorithm capable of calculating an index equivalent to the National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) motor index. The system is developed by collecting data from 15 patients. Results We have successfully demonstrated an end-to-end stroke monitoring system reporting an accuracy of calculating stroke index of more than 80%, highest Cohen’s overall agreement of 0.91 (with excellent κ coefficient of 0.76). Conclusion A wireless accelerometer based ‘hot stroke’ monitoring system is developed to monitor the motor recovery in acute-stroke patients. It has been shown to monitor stroke patients continuously, which has not been possible so far with high reliability. PMID:23590690

  16. Assessment of Serum UCH-L1 and GFAP in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changhong; Kobeissy, Firas; Alawieh, Ali; Li, Na; Li, Ning; Zibara, Kazem; Zoltewicz, Susie; Guingab-Cagmat, Joy; Larner, Stephen F.; Ding, Yuchuan; Hayes, Ronald L.; Ji, Xunming; Mondello, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and reliable diagnostic test to distinguish ischemic from hemorrhagic stroke in patients presenting with stroke-like symptoms is essential to optimize management and triage for thrombolytic therapy. The present study measured serum concentrations of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH-L1) and glial fibrillary astrocytic protein (GFAP) in acute stroke patients and healthy controls and investigated their relation to stroke severity and patient characteristics. We also assessed the diagnostic performance of these markers for the differentiation of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from ischemic stroke (IS). Both UCH-L1 and GFAP concentrations were significantly greater in ICH patients than in controls (p < 0.0001). However, exclusively GFAP differed in ICH compared with IS (p < 0.0001). GFAP yielded an AUC of 0.86 for differentiating between ICH and IS within 4.5hrs of symptom onset with a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 96% using a cut-off of 0.34ng/ml. Higher GFAP levels were associated with stroke severity and history of prior stroke. Our results demonstrate that blood UCH-L1 and GFAP are increased early after stroke and distinct biomarker-specific release profiles are associated with stroke characteristics and type. We also confirmed the potential of GFAP as a tool for early rule-in of ICH, while UCH-L1 was not clinically useful. PMID:27074724

  17. Effect of the a circuit training program using obstacles on the walking and balance abilities of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Tae; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a circuit training program on the walking and balance abilities of stroke patients using an up-to-date walking analysis device. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 12 adults who were diagnosed with stroke. Evaluation was conducted using the Smart Step test for walking ability; (BBS) for balance ability; and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) for functional mobility and movement ability. The 12 stroke patients were randomly recruited and divided into two groups; an experimental group which performed circuit training with obstacles, and a control group which performed flat gait training). [Results] Between-group comparison of the change in the 10-m walking speed found a statistically significant difference between the two groups. Between-group comparison of the changes in BBS and TUG found statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] The circuit training program using obstacles had a positive effect on the gait and balance abilities of the stroke patients. PMID:27190452

  18. Effect of the a circuit training program using obstacles on the walking and balance abilities of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Tae; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a circuit training program on the walking and balance abilities of stroke patients using an up-to-date walking analysis device. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 12 adults who were diagnosed with stroke. Evaluation was conducted using the Smart Step test for walking ability; (BBS) for balance ability; and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) for functional mobility and movement ability. The 12 stroke patients were randomly recruited and divided into two groups; an experimental group which performed circuit training with obstacles, and a control group which performed flat gait training). [Results] Between-group comparison of the change in the 10-m walking speed found a statistically significant difference between the two groups. Between-group comparison of the changes in BBS and TUG found statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] The circuit training program using obstacles had a positive effect on the gait and balance abilities of the stroke patients. PMID:27190452

  19. Patient characteristics affecting stroke identification by emergency medical service providers in Brooklyn, New York.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohit; Helzner, Elizabeth; Sinert, Richard; Levine, Steven Richard; Brandler, Ethan Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Early identification of stroke should begin in the prehospital phase because the benefits of thrombolysis and clot extraction are time dependent. This study aims to identify patient characteristics that affect prehospital identification of stroke by Long Island college hospital (LICH) emergency medical services (EMS). All suspected strokes brought to LICH by LICH ambulances from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2011 were included in the study. We compared prehospital care report-based diagnosis against the get with the guidelines (GWTG) database. Age-adjusted logistic regression models were used to study that the effect of individual patient characteristics have on EMS providers' diagnosis. Included in the study were 10,384 patients with mean age 43.9 years. Of whom, 75 had a GWTG cerebrovascular diagnosis: 53 were ischemic strokes, 7 transient ischemic attacks, 3 subarachnoid hemorrhage, and 12 intercerebral bleeds. LICH EMS correctly identified 44 of 75 GWTG strokes. Fifty-one patients were overcalled as stroke by the EMS. Overall EMS sensitivity was 58.7 % and specificity was 99.5 %. Dispatcher call type of altered mental status, stroke, unconsciousness, and increasing prehospital blood pressure quartile were found to be significantly predictive of a true stroke diagnosis. Patients with a past medical history and EMS providers' impression of seizures were more likely to be overcalled as a stroke in the field. More than a third of actual stroke patients were missed in the field in our study. Our results show that the patients' past medical history, dispatcher collected information and prehospital vital sign measurements are associated with a true diagnosis of stroke. PMID:26553585

  20. CT Angiography and Presentation NIH stroke Scale in Predicting TIA in Patients Presenting with Acute Stroke Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Bedriye; Selph, James; Burdine, Joselyn; Graham, Cole Blease; Sen, Souvik

    2013-11-01

    Patient candidacy for acute stroke intervention, is currently assessed using brain computed tomography angiography (CTA) evidence of significant stenosis/occlusion (SSO) with a high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (>6). This study examined the association between CTA without significant stenosis/occlusion (NSSO) and lower NIHSS (≤ 6) with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and other good clinical outcomes at discharge. Patients presenting <8 hours from stroke symptom onset, had an NIHSS assessment and brain CTA performed at presentation. Good clinical outcomes were defined as: discharge diagnosis of TIA, modified Rankin Score [mRS] ≤ 1, and home as the discharge disposition. Eighty-five patients received both an NIHSS at presentation and a CTA at 4.2 ± 2.2 hours from stroke symptom onset. Patients with NSSO on CTA as well as those with NIHSS≤6 had better outcomes at discharge (p<0.001). NIHSS ≤ 6 were more likely than NSSO (p=0.01) to have a discharge diagnosis of TIA (p<0.001). NSSO on CTA and NIHSS ≤ 6 also correlated with fewer deaths (p<0.001). Multivariable analyses showed NSSO on CTA (Adjusted OR: 5.8 95% CI: 1.2-27.0, p=0.03) independently predicted the discharge diagnosis of TIA. Addition of NIHSS ≤ 6 to NSSO on CTA proved to be a stronger independent predictor of TIA (Adjusted OR 18.7 95% CI: 3.5-98.9, p=0.001). PMID:24851234

  1. CT Angiography and Presentation NIH stroke Scale in Predicting TIA in Patients Presenting with Acute Stroke Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Bedriye; Selph, James; Burdine, Joselyn; Graham, Cole Blease; Sen, Souvik

    2014-01-01

    Patient candidacy for acute stroke intervention, is currently assessed using brain computed tomography angiography (CTA) evidence of significant stenosis/occlusion (SSO) with a high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (>6). This study examined the association between CTA without significant stenosis/occlusion (NSSO) and lower NIHSS (≤ 6) with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and other good clinical outcomes at discharge. Patients presenting <8 hours from stroke symptom onset, had an NIHSS assessment and brain CTA performed at presentation. Good clinical outcomes were defined as: discharge diagnosis of TIA, modified Rankin Score [mRS] ≤ 1, and home as the discharge disposition. Eighty-five patients received both an NIHSS at presentation and a CTA at 4.2 ± 2.2 hours from stroke symptom onset. Patients with NSSO on CTA as well as those with NIHSS≤6 had better outcomes at discharge (p<0.001). NIHSS ≤ 6 were more likely than NSSO (p=0.01) to have a discharge diagnosis of TIA (p<0.001). NSSO on CTA and NIHSS ≤ 6 also correlated with fewer deaths (p<0.001). Multivariable analyses showed NSSO on CTA (Adjusted OR: 5.8 95% CI: 1.2-27.0, p=0.03) independently predicted the discharge diagnosis of TIA. Addition of NIHSS ≤ 6 to NSSO on CTA proved to be a stronger independent predictor of TIA (Adjusted OR 18.7 95% CI: 3.5-98.9, p=0.001). PMID:24851234

  2. The effects of central post-stroke pain on quality of life and depression in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Şahin-Onat, Şule; Ünsal-Delialioğlu, Sibel; Kulaklı, Fazıl; Özel, Sumru

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the effects of central poststroke pain on quality of life, functionality, and depression in stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four patients with stroke having central poststroke pain (a mean age of 60.6±8.5 years; 14 males, 10 females; Group I) and 24 similar age-and gender-matched patients with stroke without central poststroke pain (Group II) were enrolled. Characteristics of pain were recorded in patients with stroke having central poststroke pain. The Visual Analogue Scale and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale were used to evaluate pain. The Functional Independence Measure was used to assess functionality, the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey was used to assess quality of life (QoL), and the Beck Depression Inventory was used to assess depression. [Results] There were no significant differences in Functional Independence Measure and Beck Depression Inventory. Some of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey domains (physical role limitations, pain, and physical scores) in Group II were significantly higher than those in Group I. Additionally, we found that a unit increase in Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs score led to 0.679 decrease in physical score and 0.387 decrease in mental score. [Conclusion] The physical component of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey is negatively affected in patient with central poststroke pain, but the mood and mental components of the scale unaffected. PMID:26957737

  3. The prevalence and risk factors of stroke in patients with chronic schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Huang, Jian; Tian, Jingbin; Cao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guoling; Wang, Chungang; Cao, Ying; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the stroke risk and risk factors in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Patients and methods This study was a large-sample, cross-sectional survey. A total of 363 patients with chronic schizophrenia were selected from the Changping Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Beijing, in August 2014. The patients were divided into either stroke group or control group based on the presence of stroke. Clinical evaluation included positive and negative syndrome scale assessment and a detailed questionnaire to collect the general information and disease-related conditions. Results The prevalence of stroke was 16.5% (60 cases). Stroke and control groups showed a significant difference in age, sex, smoking, combined medication, doses, negative factor score in positive and negative syndrome scale, body mass index, waist circumference, and systolic blood pressure. Multivariate analysis showed that a number of factors are significantly related to stroke, including age, sex, smoking, combined medication, doses, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure. Conclusion The prevalence of stroke is relatively higher in Chinese patients with chronic schizophrenia. Chronic schizophrenia patients are more likely to suffer from stroke; meanwhile, a number of risk factors were identified, including old age, female sex, smoking history, combined medication with a variety of drugs, high doses, obesity, and high blood pressure. PMID:27274246

  4. Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis The full report is titled “Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Early and Late ...

  5. New Electrical Stimulation Therapy Can Help Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed Hand With help of sensor-laden glove, good hand used to regain some ... Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. A sensor-laden glove worn on the patient's good hand ...

  6. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  7. Lateral medullary stroke in patient with granulomatous polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Taraschenko, Olga D; Amory, Colum F; Waldman, Jonathan; Hanspal, Era K; Bernardini, Gary L

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatous polyangiitis (GPA), also known as Wegener granulomatosis, is a systemic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis that infrequently affects the central nervous system. We report a 41-year-old man with lateral medullary infarction who developed rapidly progressive renal failure. He was diagnosed with GPA based on positive serum c-ANCA and antiproteinase 3 antibodies and demonstration of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis on kidney biopsy. He was treated with Coumadin, pulse steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. He had resolution of his neurologic deficits and improvement in renal function. This case report highlights the importance to consider GPA vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of stroke in patients with development of acute kidney injury. PMID:24128976

  8. Upper-Limb Function Assessment Using VBBTs for Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungmin; Kim, Won-Seok; Paik, Nam-Jong; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating and quantifying the upper-limb functions are essential to planning effective patient rehabilitation. The box and block test (BBT) is a conventional, simple, and easy-to-apply assessment tool that is used in hospitals, and previous studies have demonstrated its usefulness in stroke rehabilitation. Using a conventional depth-sensing camera, the authors developed a virtual box and block test (VBBT) system for hand, finger, and grasping assessments based on the BBT used for the grasping ability test in hospitals. Such a virtual upper-limb-function assessment tool that can be implemented in a home setting could be a key component in a home-based virtual rehabilitation system. Comparison results between the real and virtual BBTs show the possibilities for virtualizing conventional and unsupervised assessments. PMID:25585413

  9. The correlation between occupational performance and well-being in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Gang-Seok; Chang, Moonyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to evaluate the occupational performance of stroke patients and their environment by occupational self-assessment and to investigate the relationship between occupational performance and well-being. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled ninety-two stroke patients who were receiving occupational therapy at a general hospital, a rehabilitation hospital, or a community welfare center in the cities of Busan and Gimhae, Republic of Korea. Occupational performance and well-being were investigated with Occupational Self-Assessment Version 2.2 and the Personal Well-being Index-Adult. [Results] Analysis of the correlation between occupational performance as assessed by the “Myself” and “My Environment” sections of Occupational Self-Assessment Version 2.2 and well-being revealed moderate positive correlation for both sections. [Conclusion] The relationship between occupational performance and well-being was identified. Further studies are needed to reveal whether improvement of occupational performance could affect well-being in various dimensions. PMID:27390400

  10. Refusal to eat, capacity, and ethics in stroke patients: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Finestone, Hillel M; Blackmer, Jeff

    2007-11-01

    Patients have the right to make decisions about their health care, including refusing a particular treatment or a life-sustaining activity such as eating. However, patients must be able to understand and appreciate the consequences of their actions. Brain injury caused by a stroke has the potential to affect people's capacity to understand and appreciate their particular medical condition or its consequences. The purpose of this report was to describe the unique medical and ethical challenges presented by 3 rehabilitating stroke patients who refused to eat. Two patients had left-hemisphere strokes, with resultant aphasia. The third patient had a right-brain stroke and was able to state his position verbally but denied many of the consequences of his stroke. The refusal to eat and, therefore, possible impending death forced the attending physiatrist and rehabilitation team members to reevaluate the issue of capacity in the stroke patient. None of the patients died, and oral intake varied from fair to poor. This report elucidates the particular diagnostic, management, legal, and ethical issues surrounding the difficult but likely not uncommon issue of refusal to eat in stroke patients. It highlights the concept of capacity, which guides clinical decision making in such patients, and suggests specific clinical courses of action to take. PMID:17964891

  11. Therapeutic Effects of Mechanical Horseback Riding on Gait and Balance Ability in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun Young; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Chung, Jin Sang; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Lim, Jae Kuk; Lee, Jiwon; Park, Kawn Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effects of mechanical horseback riding for gait and balance parameters in post-stroke patients. Method This study was a non randomized prospective positive-controlled trial over a 12 week period. From May 2011 to October 2011, 37 stroke patients were recruited from our outpatient clinic and divided into two groups. The control group received the conventional physiotherapy while the intervention group received the conventional physiotherapy along with mechanical horseback riding therapy for 12 weeks. Outcome measurements of gait included the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC) and gait part of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (G-POMA) while those of balance included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the balance part of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (B-POMA). These measurements were taken before and after treatment. Results There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics and initial values between the two groups. When comparing baseline and 12 weeks post treatment in each group, the intervention group showed significant improvement on BBS (39.9±5.7 → 45.7±4.8, p=0.001) and B-POMA (10.4±2.6 → 12.6±2.1, p=0.001), but significant improvement on gait parameters. When comparing the groups, the dynamic balance category of BBS in post treatment showed significant difference (p=0.02). Conclusion This study suggests that mechanical horseback riding therapy may be an effective treatment tool for enhancing balance in adults with stroke. PMID:23342307

  12. Stroke Risk among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Zhejiang: A Population-Based Prospective Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Zhong, Jieming; Wu, Haibin; Pan, Jin; Gong, Weiwei; Wang, Meng; Fei, Fangrong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to explore the incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) based on the long-term surveillance data in Zhejiang, China, during 2007 to 2013. Materials and Methods. During January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013, a total of 327,268 T2DM and 307,984 stroke patients were registered on Diabetes and Stroke Surveillance System, respectively. Stroke subtypes were classified according to standard definitions of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes was calculated by standardized incidence ratio (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) compared with general population. Results. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with T2DM was significantly higher than in general population. Stroke risk was found significantly increased with an SIR of 3.87 (95% CI 3.76–3.99) and 3.38 (95% CI 3.27–3.48) in females and males, respectively. The excess risk of stroke was mainly attributable to the significantly higher risk of cerebral infarctions with the risk for T2DM being four times that for general population. Conclusions. The relationship between stroke and T2DM was strong, especially in female. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with T2DM was up to 3-fold higher than in general population in Zhejiang province, especially the subtype of cerebral infarctions. PMID:27403161

  13. Recurrent stroke: what have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, Em

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death, a major cause of disability in adults, and is frequently more disabling than fatal. With a decline in mortality from initial cerebral infarction and an increase in the life expectancy of the population, the number of patients with recurrent stroke and ensuing cardiovascular events will become greater. Thus it is important to find out those patients at high risk of stroke recurrence. This case report illustrates the process of recurrent stroke and the resulting disabilities and morbidities in a 42-year- old man. The role of integrated stroke rehabilitation programme is described. PMID:25606084

  14. Predictors of Depressive Mood in Patients With Isolated Cerebellar Stroke: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify predictive factors of depressive mood in patients with isolated cerebellar stroke. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed in patients who had experienced their first isolated cerebellar stroke during 2002–2014. The patients were classified into two groups by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) (non-depressive group, 0≤GDS≤16; depressive group, 17≤GDS≤30). Data on demographic and socioeconomic factors, comorbidities, functional level, cognitive and linguistic function, and stroke characteristics were collected. Significant variables in univariate analysis were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Fifty-two patients were enrolled, of whom 55.8% had depressive mood, were older (p=0.021), and had higher hypertension rates (p=0.014). Cognitive and linguistic functions did not differ between the two groups. The depressive group had higher ischemic stroke rates (p=0.035) and showed a dominant right posterior cerebellar hemisphere lesion (p=0.028), which was independently associated with depressive mood in the multiple logistic regression analysis (odds ratio, 5.081; 95% confidence interval, 1.261–20.479). Conclusion The risk of depressive mood after cerebellar stroke was increased in patients at old age, with a history of hypertension, ischemic stroke, and lesion of the right posterior cerebellar hemisphere. The most significant determining factor was stroke lesion of the right posterior cerebellar hemisphere. Early detection of risk factors is important to prevent and manage depressive mood after cerebellar stroke. PMID:27446777

  15. Should minor stroke patients be thrombolyzed? A focused review and future directions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Amy Y X; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Up to 80% of ischemic stroke patients may initially present with minor symptoms. Minor stroke and transient ischemic attack patients are typically treated conservatively with antiplatelet agents and general vascular prevention strategies. Yet a high proportion develop recurrent stroke or progression of stroke and up to one in four of these patients are disabled or dead at follow-up. Minor or rapidly improving symptoms are the top reasons for withholding thrombolytic therapy to time-eligible stroke patients as they are believed to be 'too good to treat'. The benefits and risks of treating mild ischemic strokes are still unclear. The increasing use of computed tomography angiography and its ability to identify both proximal and distal intracranial occlusions may change this equation. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis and prognosis of mild strokes, the role of neurovascular imaging in treatment decision making, experience with thrombolysis in this patient population, and propose directions for future studies. PMID:25546628

  16. Mean platelet volume is related with ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Buğra; Arik, Osman Z; Gözükara, Mehmet Y; Şahin, Durmuş Y; Topal, Salih; Uysal, Onur K; Elbasan, Zafer; Epçeliden, Tuncay; Çayli, Murat; Gür, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability worldwide. It is known that atrial fibrillation and left atrial enlargement contribute ischemic stroke, and mean platelet volume (MPV) increases in patients with ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. We aimed to determine whether higher MPV is associated with ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm. We evaluated 74 patients in sinus rhythm and with ischemic stroke (Group 1) and 90 age-matched and sex-matched healthy individuals as control group (Group 2). After physical and echocardiographic examination, 24-48 h Holter monitoring and complete blood counts were studied. There were no statistically significant differences in age, sex rates, and comorbidities between groups. Left atrial diameter was higher in Group 1 than Group 2 (P = 0.001), but both were in normal range. MPV was significantly higher in Group 1 (P < 0.001) and was an independent determinant [odds ratio (OR): 1.840; P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.330-2.545] of ischemic stroke with left atrial (OR: 1.138; P = 0.006; 95% CI 1.037-1.248). In conclusion, higher MPV is associated with acute ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm and without heart failure or left atrial enlargement. MPV and left atrial diameter are independent predictors of ischemic stroke in this patient population. PMID:24686100

  17. Mild Sensory Stimulation Completely Protects the Adult Rodent Cortex from Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite progress in reducing ischemic stroke damage, complete protection remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that, after permanent occlusion of a major cortical artery (middle cerebral artery; MCA), single whisker stimulation can induce complete protection of the adult rat cortex, but only if administered within a critical time window. Animals that receive early treatment are histologically and behaviorally equivalent to healthy controls and have normal neuronal function. Protection of the cortex clearly requires reperfusion to the ischemic area despite permanent occlusion. Using blood flow imaging and other techniques we found evidence of reversed blood flow into MCA branches from an alternate arterial source via collateral vessels (inter-arterial connections), a potential mechanism for reperfusion. These findings suggest that the cortex is capable of extensive blood flow reorganization and more importantly that mild sensory stimulation can provide complete protection from impending stroke given early intervention. Such non-invasive, non-pharmacological intervention has clear translational potential. PMID:20585659

  18. Comparative Effectiveness of Blood Pressure-lowering Drugs in Patients who have Already Suffered From Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ting; You, Li-Kai; Chiang, Chern-En; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Cheng, Hao-Min; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is the most important risk factor for stroke and stroke recurrence. However, the preferred blood pressure (BP)-lowering drug class for patients who have suffered from a stroke has yet to be determined. To investigate the relative effects of BP-lowering therapies [angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), β blockers, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), diuretics, and combinations of these drugs] in patients with a prior stroke history, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis using both traditional frequentist and Bayesian random-effects models and meta-regression of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the outcomes of recurrent stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD), and any major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). Trials were identified from searches of published hypertension guidelines, electronic databases, and previous systematic reviews. Fifteen RCTs composed of 39,329 participants with previous stroke were identified. Compared with the placebo, only ACEI along with diuretics significantly reduced recurrent stroke events [odds ratio (OR) = 0.54, 95% credibility interval (95% CI) 0.33–0.90]. On the basis of the distribution of posterior probabilities, the treatment ranking consistently identified ACEI along with diuretics as the preferred BP-lowering strategy for the reduction of recurrent stroke and CHD (31% and 35%, respectively). For preventing MACCE, diuretics appeared to be the preferred agent for stroke survivors (34%). Moreover, the meta-regression analysis failed to demonstrate a statistical significance between BP reduction and all outcomes (P = 0.1618 for total stroke, 0.4933 for CHD, and 0.2411 for MACCE). Evidence from RCTs supports the use of diuretics-based treatment, especially when combined with ACEI, for the secondary prevention of recurrent stroke and any vascular events in patients who have suffered from stroke. PMID:27082571

  19. [Verbal patient information through nurses--a case of stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Christmann, Elli; Holle, Regina; Schüssler, Dörte; Beier, Jutta; Dassen, Theo

    2004-06-01

    The article represents results of a theoretical work in the field of nursing education, with the topic: Verbal Patient Information through Nurses--A Case of Stroke Patients. The literature review and analysis show that there is a shortage in (stroke) patient information generally and a lack of successful concepts and strategies for the verbal (stroke) patient information through nurses in hospitals. The authors have developed a theoretical basis for health information as a nursing intervention and this represents a model of health information as a "communicational teach-and-learn process", which is of general application to all patients. The health information takes place as a separate nursing intervention within a non-public, face-to-face communication situation and in the steps-model of the nursing process. Health information is seen as a learning process for patients and nurses too. We consider learning as information production (constructivism) and information processing (cognitivism). Both processes are influenced by different factors and the illness-situation of patients, personality information content and the environment. For a successful health information output, it is necessary to take care of these aspects and this can be realized through a constructivational understanding of didactics. There is a need for an evaluation study to prove our concept of health information. PMID:15281356

  20. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Rehabilitation of Arm Dysfunction After Stroke in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis is to determine the effectiveness and cost of CIMT for persons with arm dysfunction after a stroke. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population A stroke is a sudden loss of brain function caused by the interruption of blood flow to the brain (ischemic stroke) or the rupture of blood vessels in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). A stroke can affect any number of areas including the ability to move, see, remember, speak, reason, and read and write. Stroke is the leading cause of adult neurological disability in Canada; 300,000 people or 1% of the population live with its effects. Up to 85% of persons experiencing a complete stroke have residual arm dysfunction which will interfere with their ability to live independently. Rehabilitation interventions are the cornerstone of care and recovery after a stroke. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Constraint-Induced Movement (CIMT) is a behavioural approach to neurorehabilitation based on the principle of ‘learned non-use’. The term is derived from studies in nonhuman primates in which somatosensory deafferentation of a single forelimb was performed and after which the animal then failed to use that limb. This failure to use the limb was deemed ‘learned non-use’. The major components of CIMT include: i) intense repetitive task-oriented training of the impaired limb ii) immobilization of the unimpaired arm, and iii) shaping. With regard to the first component, persons may train the affected arm for several hours a day for up to 10-15 consecutive days. With immobilization, the unaffected arm may be restrained for up to 90% of waking hours. And finally, with shaping, the difficulty of the training tasks is progressively increased as performance improves and encouraging feedback is provided immediately when small gains are achieved. Research Question What is the effectiveness and cost of CIMT compared with physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy

  1. Determinants of Neurological Functional Recovery Potential after Stroke in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haselbach, Daniel; Renggli, Anastasia; Carda, Stefano; Croquelois, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Despite recent progress in stroke prevention and acute treatment, neurorehabilitation remains one of the main methods of treatment in the management of stroke patients. The aim of this study is to point out some important predicting factors of in-hospital neurorehabilitation outcomes. Methods A rehabilitation registry including all patients who had undergone a standardized program of neurorehabilitation at the neurorehabilitation unit of the Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland, was created. Patients aged <65 years and having experienced a first ever nontraumatic stroke from 2005 to 2010 were admitted. Using logistical regression models, predicting factors for each patient were compared to the exit Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score. Results Age >55 years, gender, aphasia, hemilateral spatial neglect, spasticity, complications, length of stay >70 days, entry FIM >100 and relative possible FIM gain/week of >10% were considered to be significant and independent predicting factors of the neurorehabilitation outcome. Discussion/Conclusion Some factors of the in-hospital rehabilitation period have been identified before (spasticity, complications, length of stay, relative possible FIM gain/week) and should be considered for a better management of the neurorehabilitation therapy. In addition, a personalized rehabilitation strategy based on the patient's individual needs should be aimed at. The question of resource allocation can also be addressed with regard to the present findings. PMID:24847344

  2. Pediatric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Goun; Lim, Byung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric stroke is relatively rare but may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Along with the advance of brain imaging technology and clinical awareness, diagnosis of pediatric stroke is increasing wordwide. Pediatric stroke differs from adults in variable risk factor/etiologies, diverse and nonspecific clinical presentation depending on ages. This review will be discussed pediatric stroke focusing on their clinical presentations, diagnosis and etiologies/risk factors. PMID:26180605

  3. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64–2.89) and 3.10 (2.35–4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49–2.20) and 2.04 (1.57–2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06–1.76) and 1.40 (1.07–1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with

  4. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients.

    PubMed

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64-2.89) and 3.10 (2.35-4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49-2.20) and 2.04 (1.57-2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06-1.76) and 1.40 (1.07-1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with diabetes in

  5. Acute stroke revealing Takayasu's arteritis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Gil; Zalmanovich, Anat; Golan, Yitzhak; Jonas Kimchi, Tali; Barenboim, Erez

    2016-08-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian male with Crohn's disease exhibited acute ischaemic stroke as the first manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis. Stroke as the first clinical manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis has been rarely reported. Though rare in Western countries, Takayasu's arteritis should be considered as a possibility in young patients presenting with stroke. Both Takayasu's arteritis and Crohn's disease may increase the risk of ischaemic stroke. Furthermore, their coexistence is much higher than that expected by chance and suggest a pathophysiological link between these diseases. PMID:27075786

  6. Why Is It Difficult to Predict Language Impairment and Outcome in Patients with Aphasia after Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Kasselimis, Dimitrios; Varkanitsa, Maria; Selai, Caroline; Potagas, Constantin; Evdokimidis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    One of the most devastating consequences of stroke is aphasia. Communication problems after stroke can severely impair the patient's quality of life and make even simple everyday tasks challenging. Despite intense research in the field of aphasiology, the type of language impairment has not yet been localized and correlated with brain damage, making it difficult to predict the language outcome for stroke patients with aphasia. Our primary objective is to present the available evidence that highlights the difficulties of predicting language impairment after stroke. The different levels of complexity involved in predicting the lesion site from language impairment and ultimately predicting the long-term outcome in stroke patients with aphasia were explored. Future directions and potential implications for research and clinical practice are highlighted. PMID:24829592

  7. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibrillation: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines ... Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease; Council on Clinical Cardiology. Guidelines for the early management of patients with ...

  8. Comparison of patients' assessments of the quality of stroke care with audit findings

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Esther; Graham, Chris; Hoffman, A; Lowe, D; McKevitt, Christopher; Reeves, Rachel; Rudd, A G

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of correlation between stroke patients' experiences of hospital care with the quality of services assessed in a national audit. Methods Patients' assessments of their care derived from survey data were linked to data obtained in the National Sentinel Stroke Audit 2004 for 670 patients in 51 English NHS trusts. A measure of patients' experience of hospital stroke care was derived by summing responses to 31 survey items and grouping these into three broad concept domains: quality of care; information; and relationships with staff. Audit data were extracted from hospital admissions data and management information to assess the organisation of services, and obtained retrospectively from patient records to evaluate the delivery of care. Patient survey responses were compared with audit measures of organisation of care and compliance with clinical process standards. Results Patient experience scores were positively correlated with clinicians' assessment of the organisational quality of stroke care, but were largely unrelated to clinical process standards. Responses to individual questions regarding communication about diagnosis revealed a discrepancy between clinicians' and patients' reports. Conclusions Better organised stroke care is associated with more positive patient experiences. Examining areas of disparity between patients' and clinicians' reports is important for understanding the complex nature of healthcare and for identifying areas for quality improvement. Future evaluations of the quality of stroke services should include a validated patient experience survey in addition to audit of clinical records. PMID:18055890

  9. Differences in somatosensory and motor improvement during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sens, Elisabeth; Knorr, Christin; Preul, Christoph; Meissner, Winfried; Witte, Otto W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Temporary functional deafferentation is of interest to become an additional tool in neurorehabilitative treatments. Temporary functional deafferentation is known to improve sensory and motor outcomes in chronic stroke patients and healthy subjects. The present study soughts to indicate differences in the efficiency of pharmacologically induced temporary functional deafferentation between chronic stroke patients and matched healthy subjects. 46 chronic stroke patients and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were deafferented on one forearm by an anesthetic cream. Somatosensory performance was assessed using von-Frey Hair testing and Grating orientation task; motor performance was assessed by means of a shape-sorter-drum task. Grating orientation task and shape-sorter-drum task were significantly improved during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Von-Frey Hair testing revealed no improvement of absolute tactile thresholds during temporary functional deafferentation in both groups. Furthermore, the stroke patients showed deficits at baseline measurement in all assessments except the von-Frey Hair test. Temporary functional deafferentation of a forearm by an anesthetic cream results in improvements of motor performance and somatosensory discrimination in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is reasonable to test in a next step whether temporary functional deafferentation might become an additional tool in motor rehabilitation of post stroke patients. PMID:23735321

  10. Mobile stroke units bring treatment to patients, potentially improving long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    At least three U.S. medical centers are evaluating the benefits of deploying specially equipped mobile stroke units to respond to emergency calls for patients with suspected strokes. Most of these units contain CT scanners, lab facilities, and other functionality capable of determining whether a patient would benefit from clot-busting therapy. Such drugs can then be administered to appropriate patients before a patient even arrives in the ED. Early findings from the approach show that care can be accelerated, potentially improving stroke outcomes and reducing longer-term costs. In Houston, a mobile stroke unit dispatches along with EMS when a call involves a potential stroke victim. If the mobile stroke unit team determines that a patient is a candidate for clot-busting therapy, clinicians can administer the therapy, accelerating potentially brain-saving care. In a nine-week period, researchers reported that they treated about two patients per week with clot-busting drugs, 40% of whom received treatment within the first hour of onset. Further, none of the patients who received the drugs experienced intracerebral hemorrhage, and half of them recovered fully from their strokes within 90 days. PMID:26731930

  11. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, Margriet G.A.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; Berg, Gerrit van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Beek, André P. van

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  12. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; eg, warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (eg, those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations. PMID:26089678

  13. Description of Functional Disability among Younger Stroke Patients: Exploration of Activity and Participation and Environmental Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snogren, Maria; Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study is to describe disability among younger stroke patients by analyzing activity and participation and the environmental aspect as well as to compare assessed and self-perceived problems after stroke. International Classification of Functioning and Health (ICF) is a tool that provides a scientific basis for understanding and…

  14. Association between acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and risk of stroke in patients with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Wu, Ping-Hsun; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Yang, Yuan-Han

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dementia are at increased risk of stroke. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have endothelial function protection effects and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the ischemic stroke risk in AChEIs use in dementia patients without stroke history. Using Taiwan National Health Insurance Database from 1999 to 2008, 37,352 dementia patients over 50 years old without stroke history were eligible. The results were analyzed by propensity score–matched Cox proportional hazard models with competing risk adjustment. AChEIs users had lower incidence of ischemic stroke (160.3/10,000 person-years), compared to the propensity score–matched reference (240.8/10,000 person-years). The adjusted hazard ratio for ischemic stroke based on propensity score–matched Cox proportional hazard model was 0.508 (95% confidence interval, 0.434–0.594; P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality between AChEIs users and nonusers. In conclusion, among dementia patients without previous ischemic stroke history, AChEIs treatment was associated with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke but not greater survival. PMID:27377212

  15. Postacute Stroke Rehabilitation Utilization: Are There Differences between Rural-Urban Patients and Taxonomies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Huanguang; Cowper, Diane C.; Tang, Yuhong; Litt, Eric; Wilson, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between Veterans Affairs (VA) stroke patients' poststroke rehabilitation utilization and their residential settings by using 2 common rural-urban taxonomies. Methods: This retrospective study included all VA stroke inpatients in 2001 and 2002. Rehabilitation utilization referred to rehabilitation therapy received…

  16. The Relationship between Mood State, Interpersonal Attitudes and Psychological Distress in Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Margaret A.; Andrewes, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether increasing positive mood improved interpersonal attitudes and relieved depression in depressed stroke patients despite levels of cognitive and emotional dysfunction. Depressed stroke (n = 30) and rheumatic/orthopaedic controls (n = 30) were compared on the effect of verbal and nonverbal positive and neutral mood…

  17. Association between acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and risk of stroke in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Wu, Ping-Hsun; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Yang, Yuan-Han

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dementia are at increased risk of stroke. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have endothelial function protection effects and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the ischemic stroke risk in AChEIs use in dementia patients without stroke history. Using Taiwan National Health Insurance Database from 1999 to 2008, 37,352 dementia patients over 50 years old without stroke history were eligible. The results were analyzed by propensity score-matched Cox proportional hazard models with competing risk adjustment. AChEIs users had lower incidence of ischemic stroke (160.3/10,000 person-years), compared to the propensity score-matched reference (240.8/10,000 person-years). The adjusted hazard ratio for ischemic stroke based on propensity score-matched Cox proportional hazard model was 0.508 (95% confidence interval, 0.434-0.594; P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality between AChEIs users and nonusers. In conclusion, among dementia patients without previous ischemic stroke history, AChEIs treatment was associated with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke but not greater survival. PMID:27377212

  18. Abnormal EEG Complexity and Functional Connectivity of Brain in Patients with Acute Thalamic Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Guo, Jie; Meng, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhijun; Yao, Yang; Yang, Jiajia; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic thalamus stroke has become a serious cardiovascular and cerebral disease in recent years. To date the existing researches mostly concentrated on the power spectral density (PSD) in several frequency bands. In this paper, we investigated the nonlinear features of EEG and brain functional connectivity in patients with acute thalamic ischemic stroke and healthy subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) in resting condition with eyes closed was recorded for 12 stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects as control group. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), Sample Entropy (SampEn), and brain network using partial directed coherence (PDC) were calculated for feature extraction. Results showed that patients had increased mean LZC and SampEn than the controls, which implied the stroke group has higher EEG complexity. For the brain network, the stroke group displayed a trend of weaker cortical connectivity, which suggests a functional impairment of information transmission in cortical connections in stroke patients. These findings suggest that nonlinear analysis and brain network could provide essential information for better understanding the brain dysfunction in the stroke and assisting monitoring or prognostication of stroke evolution. PMID:27403202

  19. Left Atrial Appendage Morphology in Patients with Suspected Cardiogenic Stroke without Known Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Miika; Muuronen, Antti; Arponen, Otso; Mustonen, Pirjo; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Vanninen, Ritva; Taina, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the typical origin for intracardiac thrombus formation. Whether LAA morphology is associated with increased stroke/TIA risk is controversial and, if it does, which morphological type most predisposes to thrombus formation. We assessed LAA morphology in stroke patients with cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology and in age- and gender-matched healthy controls. LAA morphology and volume were analyzed by cardiac computed tomography in 111 patients (74 males; mean age 60 ± 11 years) with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology other than known atrial fibrillation (AF). A subgroup of 40 patients was compared to an age- and gender-matched control group of 40 healthy individuals (21 males in each; mean age 54 ± 9 years). LAA was classified into four morphology types (Cactus, ChickenWing, WindSock, CauliFlower) modified with a quantitative qualifier. The proportions of LAA morphology types in the main stroke group, matched stroke subgroup, and control group were as follows: Cactus (9.0%, 5.0%, 20.0%), ChickenWing (23.4%, 37.5%, 10.0%), WindSock (47.7%, 35.0%, 67.5%), and CauliFlower (19.8%, 22.5%, 2.5%). The distribution of morphology types differed significantly (P<0.001) between the matched stroke subgroup and control group. The proportion of single-lobed LAA was significantly higher (P<0.001) in the matched stroke subgroup (55%) than the control group (6%). LAA volumes were significantly larger (P<0.001) in both stroke study groups compared to controls patients. To conclude, LAA morphology differed significantly between stroke patients and controls, and single-lobed LAAs were overrepresented and LAA volume was larger in patients with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology. PMID:25751618

  20. Left atrial appendage morphology in patients with suspected cardiogenic stroke without known atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Miika; Muuronen, Antti; Arponen, Otso; Mustonen, Pirjo; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Vanninen, Ritva; Taina, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the typical origin for intracardiac thrombus formation. Whether LAA morphology is associated with increased stroke/TIA risk is controversial and, if it does, which morphological type most predisposes to thrombus formation. We assessed LAA morphology in stroke patients with cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology and in age- and gender-matched healthy controls. LAA morphology and volume were analyzed by cardiac computed tomography in 111 patients (74 males; mean age 60 ± 11 years) with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology other than known atrial fibrillation (AF). A subgroup of 40 patients was compared to an age- and gender-matched control group of 40 healthy individuals (21 males in each; mean age 54 ± 9 years). LAA was classified into four morphology types (Cactus, ChickenWing, WindSock, CauliFlower) modified with a quantitative qualifier. The proportions of LAA morphology types in the main stroke group, matched stroke subgroup, and control group were as follows: Cactus (9.0%, 5.0%, 20.0%), ChickenWing (23.4%, 37.5%, 10.0%), WindSock (47.7%, 35.0%, 67.5%), and CauliFlower (19.8%, 22.5%, 2.5%). The distribution of morphology types differed significantly (P<0.001) between the matched stroke subgroup and control group. The proportion of single-lobed LAA was significantly higher (P<0.001) in the matched stroke subgroup (55%) than the control group (6%). LAA volumes were significantly larger (P<0.001) in both stroke study groups compared to controls patients. To conclude, LAA morphology differed significantly between stroke patients and controls, and single-lobed LAAs were overrepresented and LAA volume was larger in patients with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology. PMID:25751618

  1. Suicide in stroke survivors: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Venturini, Paola; Lamis, Dorian A; Giordano, Gloria; Serafini, Gianluca; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a dramatic event and is associated with potentially severe consequences, including disability, mortality, and social costs. Stroke may occur at any age; however, most strokes occur in individuals aged 65 years and older. Previous research has found that stroke increases suicide risk, especially among women and younger patients. The aim of the current review is to investigate the relationship between suicide and stroke in order to determine which stroke patients are at elevated risk for suicide. Moreover, we review the literature in order to provide pharmacological treatment strategies for stroke patients at high risk of suicide. We performed a careful search to identify articles and book chapters focused on this issue, selecting only English-language articles published from 1990 to 2014 that addressed the issue of suicide after stroke and its pharmacological management. We found 12 clinical trials that explored the relationship between stroke and suicidal ideation and/or suicidal plans and 11 investigating suicide as the cause of death after stroke. We identified stroke as a significant risk factor for both suicide and suicidal ideation, especially among younger adult depressed patients in all articles, providing further support for the association between post-stroke and suicidality. Suicide risk is particularly high in the first 5 years following stroke. Depression, previous mood disorder, prior history of stroke, and cognitive impairment were found to be the most important risk factors for suicide. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent the treatment of choice for stroke survivors with suicide risk, and studies in rats have suggested that carbolithium is a promising treatment in these patients. Early identification and treatment of post-stroke depression may significantly reduce suicide risk in stroke patients. PMID:25491561

  2. The Association of Four-Limb Blood Pressure with History of Stroke in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lihang; Chang, Huiying; Gu, Xingbo; Zhang, Haiyu; Sheng, Lijiang; Tian, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the association of ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI), interarm blood pressure (BP) difference and interankle BP difference, obtained by simultaneous four-limb BP measurement, with history of stroke in a Chinese adult population. Methods This cross-sectional study included 1485 participants aged ≥35 years in the framework of the China Hypertension Survey. We performed simultaneous four-limb BP measurement using oscillometric devices with the participants in the supine position and calculated ABI and interarm/interankle BP differences between the 4 limbs. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association of these BP parameters and other factors with a history of stroke. Results In univariate analyses, participants with ABI <0.9, interarm BP difference ≥15 mmHg, and interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg had a higher prevalence of stroke than those without (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0152, p = 0.002, respectively). Multiple logistic regression analyses suggested, ABI <0.9 was independently associated with a history of stroke after adjustment for interarm BP difference ≥15 mmHg, interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg, and traditional risk factors for stroke (p = 0.001). An interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg was associated with prior stroke after the two variables of hypertension and ABI were removed from the logistic regression model (p = 0.0142). Net reclassification improvement analysis showed that inclusion of interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg to the independent risk factors (age, family history of stroke, hypertension, and ABI) improved net reclassification by 11.92%. Conclusion ABI <0.9 is an independent risk factor for stroke prevalence in Chinese adults and it just detected a small propotion of paticipants. The addition of interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg to the independent risk factors for stroke may improve the prediction of stroke. PMID:26452268

  3. Atrial Septal Aneurysm and Patent Foramen Ovale as Risk Factors for Cryptogenic Stroke in Patients Less Than 55 Years of Age: A Study using Transesophageal Echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabanes, L.; Mas, J. L.; Cohen, A.; Amarenco, P.; Cabanes, P. A.; Oubary, P.; Chedru, F.; Guerin, F.; Bousser, M. G.; deRecondo, J.

    1993-01-01

    Background and Purpose: An association between atrial septal aneurysm and embolic events has been suggested. Atrial septal aneurysm has been shown to be associated with patent foramen ovale and,.in some reports, with mitral valve prolapse. These two latter cardiac disorder; have been identified as potential risk factors for ischemic stroke. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the role of atrial septal aneurysm as an independent risk factor for stroke, especially for cryptogenic stroke. Methods: We studied the prevalence of atrial septal aneurysm, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve prolapse in 100 consecutive patients <55 years of age with ischemic stroke who underwent extensive etiological investigations. We compared these results with those in a control group of 50 consecutive patients. The diagnosis of atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale relied on transesophageal echocardiography with a contrast study and that of mitral valve prolapse, on two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Results: Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that atrial septal aneurysm (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 14.6; P=.01) and patent foramen ovale (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 10; P=.003) but not mitral valve prolapse were significantly associated with the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke. The stroke odds of a patient with both atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale were 33.3 times (95% confidence interval, 4.1 to 270) the stroke odds of a patient with neither of these cardiac disorders. For a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of >lo-mm excursion, the stroke odds were approximately 8 times the stroke odds of a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of <10 mm. Conclusions: This study shows that atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale are both significantly associated with cryptogenic stroke and that their association has a marked synergistic effect. Atrial septal aneurysms of >lo-mm excursion are

  4. Sitagliptin After Ischemic Stroke in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Yi; Wang, Szu-Heng; Mao, Chun-Tai; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Su, Feng-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Chuan; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, I-Chang; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cerebrovascular safety and efficacy of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with ischemic stroke remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of sitagliptin in patients with T2DM with recent ischemic stroke. We analyzed data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between March 1, 2009, and December 31, 2011. Ischemic stroke patients were identified from individuals with T2DM. Patients who received sitagliptin were compared with those who did not to evaluate the cardiovascular safety and efficacy of sitagliptin. The primary outcome was a composite of ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death. A total of 5145 type 2 diabetic patients with ischemic stroke met our inclusion criteria and were followed for up to 2.83 years (mean, 1.17 years). Overall, 1715 patients (33.3%) received sitagliptin and 3430 patients (66.7%) did not. The primary composite outcome occurred in 190 patients in the sitagliptin group (11.1%) and in 370 patients in the comparison group (10.8%) (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85–1.21). Patients treated with sitagliptin had a similar risk of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and all-cause mortality with an HR of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.78–1.16, P = 0.612), 1.07 (95% CI, 0.55–2.11, P = 0.834), and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.82–1.22, P = 0.989), respectively, compared with patients not treated with sitagliptin. Treatment with sitagliptin in type 2 diabetic patients with recent ischemic stroke was not associated with increased or decreased risks of adverse cerebrovascular outcomes. PMID:26181549

  5. Effects of temporary functional deafferentation on the brain, sensation, and behavior of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Sens, Elisabeth; Teschner, Ulrike; Meissner, Winfried; Preul, Christoph; Huonker, Ralph; Witte, Otto W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2012-08-22

    Following stroke, many patients suffer from chronic motor impairment and reduced somatosensation in the stroke-affected body parts. Recent experimental studies suggest that temporary functional deafferentation (TFD) of parts of the stroke-affected upper limb or of the less-affected contralateral limb might improve the sensorimotor capacity of the stroke-affected hand. The present study sought evidence of cortical reorganization and related sensory and motor improvements following pharmacologically induced TFD of the stroke-affected forearm. Examination was performed during 2 d of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy. Thirty-six human patients were deafferented on the stroke-affected forearm by an anesthetic cream (containing lidocaine and prilocaine) on one of the 2 d, and a placebo cream was applied on the other. The order of TFD and placebo treatment was counterbalanced across patients. Somatosensory and motor performance were assessed using a Grating orienting task and a Shape-sorter-drum task, and with somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields. Evoked magnetic fields showed significant pre- to postevaluation magnitude increases in response to tactile stimulation of the thumb of the stroke-affected hand during TFD but not following placebo treatment. We also observed a rapid extension of the distance between cortical representations of the stroke-affected thumb and little finger following TFD but not following placebo treatment. Moreover, somatosensory and motor performance of the stroke-affected hand was significantly enhanced during TFD but not during placebo treatment. Thus, pharmacologically induced TFD of a stroke-affected forearm might improve the somatosensory and motor functions of the stroke-affected upper limb, accompanied by cortical plasticity. PMID:22915119

  6. Optimal Combination Treatment and Vascular Outcomes in Recent Ischemic Stroke Patients by Premorbid Risk Level

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background Optimal combination of secondary stroke prevention treatment including antihypertensives, antithrombotic agents, and lipid modifiers is associated with reduced recurrent vascular risk including stroke. It is unclear whether optimal combination treatment has a differential impact on stroke patients based on level of vascular risk. Methods We analyzed a clinical trial dataset comprising 3680 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. Patients were categorized by appropriateness level 0 to III depending on the number of the drugs prescribed divided by the number of drugs potentially indicated for each patient (0=none of the indicated medications prescribed and III=all indicated medications prescribed [optimal combination treatment]). High-risk was defined as having a history of stroke or coronary heart disease (CHD) prior to the index stroke event. Independent associations of medication appropriateness level with a major vascular event (stroke, CHD, or vascular death), ischemic stroke, and all-cause death were analyzed. Results Compared with level 0, for major vascular events, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.20–1.28) and 0.32 (0.14–0.70) in the high-risk group; for stroke, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.54 (0.16–1.77) and 0.25 (0.08–0.85) in the high-risk group; and for all-cause death, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.66 (0.09–5.00) and 0.22 (0.06–0.78) in the high-risk group. Conclusion Optimal combination treatment is related to a significantly lower risk of future vascular events and death among high-risk patients after a recent non-cardioembolic stroke. PMID:26044963

  7. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of stroke prevention treatments in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Amy; Bielecki, Joanna M; Krahn, Murray; Dorian, Paul; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Boon, Heather; Husereau, Don; Pechlivanoglou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background In the last 4 years, four novel oral anticoagulants have been developed as alternatives to warfarin and antiplatelet agents for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The objective of this review was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of all antithrombotic treatments for AF patients. Materials and methods Data sources were Medline Ovid (1946 to October 2015), Embase Ovid (1980 to October 2015), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 9, 2015). Randomized controlled trials of AF patients were selected if they compared at least two of the following: placebo, aspirin, aspirin and clopidogrel combination therapy, adjusted-dose warfarin (target international normalized ratio 2.0–3.0), dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted for outcomes of interest (all stroke, ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, overall mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage). Results Based on 16 randomized controlled trials of 96,826 patients, all oral anticoagulants were more effective than antiplatelet agents at reducing the risk of ischemic stroke and all strokes. Compared to warfarin, dabigatran 150 mg (rate ratio 0.65, 95% credible interval 0.52–0.82) and apixaban (rate ratio 0.82, 95% credible interval 0.69–0.97) reduced the risk of all strokes. Dabigatran 150 mg was also more effective than warfarin at reducing ischemic stroke risk (rate ratio 0.76, 95% credible interval 0.59–0.99). Aspirin, apixaban, dabigatran 110 mg, and edoxaban were associated with less major bleeding than warfarin. Conclusion All oral anticoagulants reduce the risk of stroke in AF patients. Some novel oral anticoagulants are associated with a lower stroke and/or major bleeding risk than warfarin. In addition to the safety and effectiveness of drug therapy, as reported in this study, individual treatment recommendations should also consider the patient’s underlying stroke

  8. A stroke patient with impairment of auditory sensory (echoic) memory.

    PubMed

    Kojima, T; Karino, S; Yumoto, M; Funayama, M

    2014-04-01

    A 42-year-old man suffered damage to the left supra-sylvian areas due to a stroke and presented with verbal short-term memory (STM) deficits. He occasionally could not recall even a single syllable that he had heard one second before. A study of mismatch negativity using magnetoencephalography suggested that the duration of auditory sensory (echoic) memory traces was reduced on the affected side of the brain. His maximum digit span was four with auditory presentation (equivalent to the 1st percentile for normal subjects), whereas it was up to six with visual presentation (almost within the normal range). He simply showed partial recall in the digit span task, and there was no self correction or incorrect reproduction. From these findings, reduced echoic memory was thought to have affected his verbal short-term retention. Thus, the impairment of verbal short-term memory observed in this patient was "pure auditory" unlike previously reported patients with deficits of the phonological short-term store (STS), which is the next higher-order memory system. We report this case to present physiological and behavioral data suggesting impaired short-term storage of verbal information, and to demonstrate the influence of deterioration of echoic memory on verbal STM. PMID:23173635

  9. Patients' Experiences of Disruptions Associated with Post-Stroke Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Sylvia; Barbour, Rosaline S.; Brady, Marian; Clark, Alexander M.; Paton, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysarthria rehabilitation should consider social participation for people with dysarthria, but before this approach can be adopted, an understanding of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria is required. Despite the prevalence of dysarthria as a result of stroke, there is a paucity of research into this communication…

  10. Factors Contributing to Patient Satisfaction with Rehabilitation Following Stroke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M. S.; Smith, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    A study that investigated the satisfaction of 60 Australian stroke survivors with their rehabilitative progress over 12 months found satisfaction with progress improved with time and was influenced by the return to previous lifestyle activities, depression, family functioning, understanding of stroke, and clarity of expectations on admission to…