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Sample records for advanced high-strength steel

  1. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  2. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Frederick, D Alan; Dahl, Michael E

    2009-02-01

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  3. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Automotive Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovicu, Gianfranco; Bottazzi, Mauro; D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Sanctis, Massimo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Santus, Ciro; Valentini, Renzo

    2012-11-01

    Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have a better combination between strength and ductility than conventional HSS, and higher crash resistances are obtained in concomitance with weight reduction of car structural components. These steels have been developed in the last few decades, and their use is rapidly increasing. Notwithstanding, some of their important features have to be still understood and studied in order to completely characterize their service behavior. In particular, the high mechanical resistance of AHSS makes hydrogen-related problems a great concern for this steel grade. This article investigates the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of four AHSS steels. The behavior of one transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), two martensitic with different strength levels, and one hot-stamping steels has been studied using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests on electrochemically hydrogenated notched samples. The embrittlement susceptibility of these AHSS steels has been correlated mainly to their strength level and to their microstructural features. Finally, the hydrogen critical concentrations for HE, established by SSRT tests, have been compared to hydrogen contents absorbed during the painting process of a body in white (BIW) structure, experimentally determined during a real cycle in an industrial plant.

  5. Development of high strength high toughness third generation advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martis, Codrick John

    Third generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS's) are emerging as very important engineering materials for structural applications. These steels have high specific strength and thus will contribute significantly to weight reduction in automotive and other structural component. In this investigation two such low carbon low alloy steels (LCLA) with high silicon content (1.6-2wt %) has been developed. These two steel alloys were subjected to single step and two step austempering in the temperature range of 260-399°C to obtain desired microstructures and mechanical properties. Austempering heat treatment was carried out for 2 hours in a molten salt bath. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and optical metallography. Quantitative analysis was carried out by image analysis technique. The effect of austempering temperature on the mechanical properties of these two alloys was examined. The influence of microstructures on the mechanical properties of alloys was also studied. Austempering heat treatment resulted in fine carbide free bainitic ferrite and high carbon austenite microstructure in the samples austempered above Ms temperature, whereas tempered martensite and austenite microstructure was obtained in samples austempered below Ms temperature. Yield strength, tensile strength and fracture toughness were found to increase as the austempering temperature decreases, whereas ductility increases as the austempering temperature increases. Tensile strength in the range of 1276MPa -1658 MPa and the fracture toughness in the range of 80-141MPa√m were obtained in these two steels. Volume fractions of different phases present and their lath sizes are related to the mechanical properties. Austempered samples consisting of mixed microstructure of bainitic ferrite and tempered martensite phases resulted in the exceptional combination of strength and toughness.

  6. Application technologies for effective utilization of advanced high strength steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suehiro, Masayoshi

    2013-12-01

    Recently, application of high strength steel sheets for automobiles has increased in order to meet a demand of light weighting of automobiles to reduce a carbon footprint while satisfying collision safety. The formability of steel sheets generally decreases with the increase in strength. Fracture and wrinkles tend to occur easily during forming. The springback phenomenon is also one of the issues which we should cope with, because it makes it difficult to obtain the desired shape after forming. Advanced high strength steel sheets with high formability have been developed in order to overcome these issues, and at the same time application technologies have been developed for their effective utilization. These sheets are normally used for cold forming. As a different type of forming, hot forming technique has been developed in order to produce parts with ultra high strength. In this report, technologies developed at NSSMC in this field will be introduced.

  7. Application technologies for effective utilization of advanced high strength steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Suehiro, Masayoshi

    2013-12-16

    Recently, application of high strength steel sheets for automobiles has increased in order to meet a demand of light weighting of automobiles to reduce a carbon footprint while satisfying collision safety. The formability of steel sheets generally decreases with the increase in strength. Fracture and wrinkles tend to occur easily during forming. The springback phenomenon is also one of the issues which we should cope with, because it makes it difficult to obtain the desired shape after forming. Advanced high strength steel sheets with high formability have been developed in order to overcome these issues, and at the same time application technologies have been developed for their effective utilization. These sheets are normally used for cold forming. As a different type of forming, hot forming technique has been developed in order to produce parts with ultra high strength. In this report, technologies developed at NSSMC in this field will be introduced.

  8. Properties of Galvanized and Galvannealed Advanced High Strength Hot Rolled Steels

    SciTech Connect

    V.Y. Guertsman; E. Essadiqi; S. Dionne; O. Dremmailova; R. Bouchard; B. Voyzelle; J. McDermid; R. Fourmentin

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop the coating process information to achieve good quality coatings on 3 advanced high strength hot rolled steels while retaining target mechanical properties, (ii) to obtain precise knowledge of the behavior of these steels in the various forming operations and (iii) to establish accurate user property data in the coated conditions. Three steel substrates (HSLA, DP, TRIP) with compositions providing yield strengths in the range of 400-620 MPa were selected. Only HSLA steel was found to be suitable for galnaizing and galvannealing in the hot rolled condition.

  9. Influence of Manufacturing Processes and Microstructures on the Performance and Manufacturability of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are performance-based steel grades and their global material properties can be achieved with various steel chemistries and manufacturing processes, leading to various microstructures. In this paper, we investigate the influence of supplier variation and resulting microstructure difference on the overall mechanical properties as well as local formability behaviors of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). For this purpose, we first examined the basic material properties and the transformation kinetics of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) 800 steels from three different suppliers under different testing temperatures. The experimental results show that there is a significant supplier (i.e., manufacturing process) dependency of the TRIP 800 steel mechanical and microstructure properties. Next, we examined the local formability of two commercial Dual Phase (DP) 980 steels during stamping process. The two commercial DP 980 steels also exhibit noticeably different formability during stamping process in the sense that one of them shows severe tendency for shear fracture. Microstructure-based finite element analyses are carried out next to simulate the localized deformation process with the two DP 980 microstructures, and the results suggest that the possible reason for the difference in formability lies in the morphology of the hard martensite phase in the DP microstructure.

  10. Strain Rate and Temperature Effects on the Formability and Damage of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, S.; Thompson, A.; Salisbury, C.; Worswick, M.; van Riemsdijk, I.; Mayer, R.

    2008-06-01

    In order to understand the crashworthiness and formability of advance high-strength steels, the effects of strain rate and temperature on the constitutive response of DP 600 and DP 780 steel tubes were investigated and compared with commercial drawing quality (DQ) and high strength low alloy (HSLA) 350 steel tubes. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at quasi-static (QS) (0.003 and 0.1 s-1), intermediate (30 and 100 s-1), and high (500, 1000, and 1500 s-1) strain rates using an Instron, instrumented falling weight impact tester and tensile split Hopkinson bar (TSHB) apparatus, respectively. Elevated temperature tests at 150 °C and 300 °C were also conducted at high strain rates. Following testing, metallography and microscopy techniques were used for material and damage characterization. The results obtained show that the steels studied exhibit a positive strain rate sensitivity. Compared to DQ and HSLA 350, the DP steels were found to have less formability at QS rates but enhanced formability at higher strain rates. A decrease in strength and ductility was measured with increasing temperature for the DP steels, indicating a reduction in energy adsorption due to adiabatic heating during a crash event.

  11. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  12. The Use of Explosive Energy for Joining Advanced High Strength Low Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbánek, Miroslav; Mašek, Bohuslav; Hronek, Pavel; Nesvadba, Petr

    2013-03-01

    This article deals with an alternative method of joining advanced steels for frame structures. These steels cannot be joined by a conventional process due to the impact of temperature on the base material. Therefore, a simple and cost-effective method of forming a high-strength joint, intended for advanced high-strength materials, was designed using explosive forming. One of its key advantages is that it preserves the microstructure of the high-strength material being joined. At the same time, the design of the joint allows it to undergo further plastic deformation if the yield stress is exceeded, thus preventing the step change in load-carrying capacity and the instability of the structure. The alternative joint was intended for materials with yield stress above 1000 MPa and elongation of 10%, under quasi-static conditions. However, the design is also suitable for materials with ultimate tensile strength higher than 2000 MPa. Testing of the load-carrying capacity of the joint in a mechanical testing shop showed that the larger the flow stress of the material, the higher the load-carrying capacity of the joint. The selected joint designs with good load-bearing capacity values were manufactured by forming using products of detonation of the SEMTEX industrial blasting explosive. In a compression test, the demonstration joints showed the axial load-bearing capacity of 200 kN with up to 20-mm displacement to failure.

  13. Nanocrystalline Advanced High Strength Steel Produced by Cold Rolling and Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Daniel M.; Van Aken, David C.

    2016-05-01

    An advanced high strength steel of composition Fe-0.11C-2.46Si-11.5Mn-0.38Al-0.029N (wt pct) was produced with a yield strength of 790 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 1300 MPa, and a total elongation of 28 pct. Conventional processing of hot-band steel by cold rolling and annealing at 873 K (600 °C) was used to produce a nanocrystalline structure with an average grain diameter 112 ± 25 nm (68 pct confidence level). Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were utilized to characterize the nanocrystalline steel, which consisted of γ-austenite, ɛ-martensite, and α-ferrite.

  14. Formability Analysis of Diode-Laser-Welded Tailored Blanks of Advanced High-Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, S. K.; Baltazar Hernandez, V. H.; Kuntz, M. L.; Zhou, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Currently, advances due to tailored blanking can be enhanced by the development of new grades of advanced high-strength steels (HSSs), for the further weight reduction and structural improvement of automotive components. In the present work, diode laser welds of three different grades of advanced high-strength dual-phase (DP) steel sheets (with tensile strengths of 980, 800, and 450 MPa) to high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) material were fabricated by applying the proper welding parameters. Formability in terms of Hecker’s limiting dome height (LDH), the strain distribution on the hemispherical dome surface, the weld line movement during deformation, and the load-bearing capacity during the stretch forming of these different laser-welded blanks were compared. Finite element (FE) analysis of the LDH tests of both the parent metals and laser-welded blanks was done using the commercially available software package LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA); the results compared well with the experimental data. It was also found that the LDH was not affected by the soft zone or weld zone properties; it decreased, however, with an increase in a nondimensional parameter, the “strength ratio” (SR). The weld line movement during stretch forming is an indication of nonuniform deformation resulting in a decrease in the LDH. In all the dissimilar weldments, fracture took place on the HSLA side, but the fracture location shifted to near the weld line (at the pole) in tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) of a higher strength ratio.

  15. Analysis of hot forming of a sheet metal component made of advanced high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkaya, Sinem; Darendeliler, Haluk; Gökler, Mustafa İlhan; Ayhaner, Murat

    2013-05-01

    To provide reduction in weight while maintaining crashworthiness and to decrease the fuel consumption of vehicles, thinner components made of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are being increasingly used in automotive industry. However, AHSS cannot be formed easily at the room temperature (i.e. cold forming). The alternative process involves heating, hot forming and subsequent quenching. A-pillar upper reinforcement of a vehicle is currently being produced by cold forming of DP600 steel sheet with a thickness of 1.8 mm. In this study, the possible decrease in the thickness of this particular part by using 22MnB5 as appropriate AHSS material and applying this alternative process has been studied. The proposed process involves deep drawing, trimming, heating, sizing, cooling and piercing operations. Both the current production process and the proposed process are analyzed by the finite element method. The die geometry, blank holding forces and the design of the cooling channels for the cooling process are determined numerically. It is shown that the particular part made of 22MnB5 steel sheet with a thickness of 1.2 mm can be successfully produced by applying the proposed process sequence and can be used without sacrificing the crashworthiness. With the use of the 22MnB5 steel with a thickness of 1.2 mm instead of DP600 sheet metal with a thickness of 1.8 mm, the weight is reduced by approximately 33%.

  16. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  17. A New Perspective on Fatigue Performance of Advanced High- Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Chiang, Dr. John; Kuo, Dr. Min; Jiang, Cindy; Sang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Weld fatigue performance is a critical aspect for application of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) in automotive body structures. A comparative study has been conducted to evaluate the fatigue life of AHSS welds. The material studied included seven AHSS of various strength levels - DP 600, DP 780, DP 980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron and fully hardened boron steels. Two conventional steels, HSLA 590 and DR 210, were also included for baseline comparison. Lap fillet welds were made on 2-mm nominal thick sheets by the gas metal arc welding process (GMAW). Fatigue test was conducted under a number of stress levels to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. It was found that, unlike in the static and impact loading conditions, the fatigue performance of AHSS is not influenced by the HAZ softening in AHSS. There are appreciable differences in the fatigue lives among different AHSS. Changes in weld parameters can influence the fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of these of higher strength AHSS. A model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. The validity of the model is benchmarked with the experimental results. This model is capable to capture the effects of weld geometry and weld microstructure and strength on the fatigue performance experimentally observed. The theoretical basis and application of the newly developed fatigue modeling methodology will be discussed.

  18. Nanoscale surface analysis on second generation advanced high strength steel after hot dip galvanizing.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Preis, K; Samek, L; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    Second generation advanced high strength steel is one promising material of choice for modern automotive structural parts because of its outstanding maximal elongation and tensile strength. Nonetheless there is still a lack of corrosion protection for this material due to the fact that cost efficient hot dip galvanizing cannot be applied. The reason for the insufficient coatability with zinc is found in the segregation of manganese to the surface during annealing and the formation of manganese oxides prior coating. This work analyses the structure and chemical composition of the surface oxides on so called nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) steel on the nanoscopic scale after hot dip galvanizing in a simulator with employed analytical methods comprising scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and focused ion beam (FIB) for cross section preparation. By the combination of these methods, it was possible to obtain detailed chemical images serving a better understanding which processes exactly occur on the surface of this novel kind of steel and how to promote in the future for this material system galvanic protection. PMID:23404132

  19. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-16

    The “shear fracture” which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of “shear fracture” phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a “shear fracture” in the component.

  20. Advanced high strength steel (AHSS) TWIP: A door to the future in metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Ferrando, R.; Sánchez-Caballero, S.; Reig, M. J.; Pla, R.; Sellés, M. A.; Seguí, V. J.

    2012-04-01

    The last decades have been characterized by a fast evolution of cars. This work shows the evolution of vehicle weight. It shows the response of car manufacturers using new materials and production methods that allow lighter vehicles with lower consumption, cheaper and with lower influence on the greenhouse effect. One of the materials which means a most interesting change is the TWIP steel. This material is characterized by its high strength, his exceptional strain and excellent formability as well as lower energy consumption in their manufacture. TWIP steel are changing towards cheaper compositions and higher performance, and it's going to be great influence in the vehicle weight reduction in the next years.

  1. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  2. Dissimilar Arc Welding of Advanced High-Strength Car-Body Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Spena, P.; D'Aiuto, F.; Matteis, P.; Scavino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A widespread usage of new advanced TWIP steel grades for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with other automotive steel grades. Therefore, the microstructural features and the mechanical response of dissimilar butt weld seams of TWIP and 22MnB5 steel sheets after metal-active-gas arc welding are examined. The microstructural and mechanical characterization of the welded joints was carried out by optical metallography, microhardness and tensile testing, and fractographic examination. The heat-affected zone on the TWIP side was fully austenitic and the only detectable effect was grain coarsening, while on the 22MnB5 side it exhibited newly formed martensite and tempered martensite. The welded tensile specimens exhibited a much larger deformation on the TWIP steel side than on the 22MnB5. The fracture generally occurred at the interface between the fusion zone and the heat-affected zones, with the fractures surfaces being predominantly ductile. The ultimate tensile strength of the butt joints was about 25% lower than that of the TWIP steel.

  3. Springback analysis of ultra high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenma, Kenji; Kina, Futoshi; Suzuki, Wataru

    2013-12-01

    It is an inevitable trend in the automotive industry to apply more and more high strength steels and even ultra-high strength steels. Even though these materials are more difficult to process the development time of forming tools must be reduced. In order to keep the development time under control, simulation tools are used to verify the forming process in advance. At Aoi Machine Industry a project has been executed to accurately simulate springback of ultra-high strength steels in order to reduce the tool tryout time. In the first phase of the project the simulation settings were optimized based on B-Pillar model A made of Dual Phase 980. In the second phase, it was verified with B-Pillar model B whether these simulation settings were usable as general setting. Results showed that with the right settings it is very well possible to accurately simulate springback of ultra-high strength steels. In the third phase the project the stamping of a B-Pillar of Dual Phase 1180 was studied.

  4. Microstructures in laser welded high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, P.; Bellingeri, S.; Massimino, F.; Baldissin, D.; Battezzati, L.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the effect of laser welding on the microstructure was studied for three Advanced High Strength Steels: transformation induced plasticity steel (TRIP), dual phase steel (DP) and martensitic steel. Two sheets of the same steel were laser welded and a microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. For all samples the welded zone was constituted by martensite and the heat affected zone shows a continuous change in microstructure depending on temperatures reached and on the different cooling rates. The change in mechanical properties in the welded area was followed by Vickers micro-hardness measurements. Quasi binary phase diagrams were calculated and, according to position of T0 lines, it was deduced that austenite is the primary phase forming during rapid solidification for all steels.

  5. Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114)

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Girvin; Warren Peterson; Jerry Gould

    2004-09-17

    This program evaluated the effects of common manufacturing variables on spike-tempering effectiveness. The investigation used design-of-experiment (DOE) techniques, and examined both dual-phase and martensitic grades of high-strength steels (HSS). The specific grades chosen for this project were: Dual-phase (DP) 600, galvannealed (GA), 1.55 mm (DP) 600; Dual-phase (DP) 980 (uncoated), 1.55 mm (DP) 980; and Martensitic (M) 1300, 1.55 mm (M) 1300. Common manufacturing conditions of interest included tempering practice (quench and temper time), button size, simulated part fitup (sheet angular misalignment and fitup), and electrode wear (increased electrode face diameter). All of these conditions were evaluated against mechanical performance (static and dynamic tensile shear). Weld hardness data was also used to examine correlations between mechanical performance and the degree of tempering. Mechanical performance data was used to develop empirical models. The models were used to examine the robustness of weld strength and toughness to the selected processing conditions. This was done using standard EWI techniques. Graphical representations of robustness were then coupled with metallographic data to relate mechanical properties to the effectiveness of spike tempering. Mechanical properties for all three materials were relatively robust to variation in tempering. Major deviations in mechanical properties were caused by degradation of the weld itself. This was supported by a lack of correlation between hardness data and mechanical results. Small button sizes and large electrode face diameters (worn electrodes) produced large reductions in both static and dynamic strength levels when compared to standard production setups. Dynamic strength was further degraded by edge-located welds.

  6. Cyclic Deformation of Advanced High-Strength Steels: Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, Timothy B.; Timokhina, Ilana B.; Robertson, Leigh T.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2009-02-01

    The fatigue properties of multiphase steels are an important consideration in the automotive industry. The different microstructural phases present in these steels can influence the strain life and cyclic stabilized strength of the material due to the way in which these phases accommodate the applied cyclic strain. Fully reversed strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests have been used to determine the mechanical fatigue performance of a dual-phase (DP) 590 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) 780 steel, with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) used to examine the deformed microstructures. It is shown that the higher strain life and cyclic stabilized strength of the TRIP steel can be attributed to an increased yield strength. Despite the presence of significant levels of retained austenite in the TRIP steel, both steels exhibited similar cyclic softening behavior at a range of strain amplitudes due to comparable ferrite volume fractions and yielding characteristics. Both steels formed low-energy dislocation structures in the ferrite during cyclic straining.

  7. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Advanced High-Strength Steels Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingdong, Zhang; Qiang, Cao; Xiaofeng, Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is widely used in automotive industry. In order to investigate the mechanical behaviors of AHSS over a wide range of temperatures, quasi-static tensile experiments were conducted at the temperatures from 298 to 1073 K on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-simulation machine. The results show that flow behaviors are affected by testing temperature significantly. In order to describe the flow features of AHSS, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model is employed. By introducing polynomial functions to consider the effects of temperature on hardening behavior, the JC model is modified and used to predict flow behavior of AHSS at different experimental conditions. The accuracy of the modified JC model is verified and the predicted flow stress is in good agreement with experimental results, which confirms that the modified JC model can give an accurate and precise estimate over a wide range of temperatures.

  8. High-strength, low-alloy steels.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M S

    1980-05-23

    High-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steels have nearly the same composition as plain carbon steels. However, they are up to twice as strong and their greater load-bearing capacity allows engineering use in lighter sections. Their high strength is derived from a combination of grain refinement; precipitation strengthening due to minor additions of vanadium, niobium, or titanium; and modifications of manufacturing processes, such as controlled rolling and controlled cooling of otherwise essentially plain carbon steel. HSLA steels are less formable than lower strength steels, but dualphase steels, which evolved from HSLA steels, have ferrite-martensite microstructures and better formability than HSLA steels of similar strength. This improved formability has substantially increased the utilization potential of high-strength steels in the manufacture of complex components. This article reviews the development of HSLA and dual-phase steels and discusses the effects of variations in microstructure and chemistry on their mechanical properties. PMID:17772810

  9. Development of Advanced High Strength Steel for Improved Vehicle Safety, Fuel Efficiency and CO2 Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Singhai, Mrigandra; Desai, Rahul; Sam, Srimanta; Patra, Pradip Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Global warming and green house gas emissions are the major issues worldwide and their impacts are clearly visible as a record high temperatures, rising sea, and severe `flooding and droughts'. Motor vehicles considered as a major contributor on global warming due to its green house gas emissions. Hence, the automobile industries are under tremendous pressure from government and society to reduce green house gas emission to maximum possible extent. In present work, Dual Phase steel with boron as microalloying is manufactured using thermo-mechanical treatment during hot rolling. Dual phase steel with boron microalloying improved strength by near about 200 MPa than dual phase steel without boron. The boron added dual phase steel can be used for manufacturing stronger and a lighter vehicle which is expected to perform positively on green house gas emissions. The corrosion resistance behavior is also improved with boron addition which would further increase the life cycle of the vehicle even under corrosive atmosphere.

  10. Effect of microstructure on the fracture response of advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark David

    The effect of constituent hardness on formability performance for higher-strength dual phase (DP) steels was evaluated. A commercially-produced DP steel with 1080 MPa ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was processed to create eight additional constituent hardness conditions by tempering and cold-rolling, processes that primarily affected constituent hardness properties. Using nanoindentation, ferrite and martensite hardness values for the nine conditions of the DP steel (as-received, four as-tempered, four temper cold-rolled) provided a range of hardness values to evaluate formability performance. Formability performance for the nine steel conditions was evaluated using tensile and hole expansion testing. A decrease in martensite/ferrite hardness ratio corresponded to an increase in hole expansion ratio (HER), and an increase in yield strength (YS). A lower hardness ratio (increased similarity of ferrite and martensite hardness) was interpreted to increase strain-sharing between ferrite and martensite, which suppressed plastic strain localization to higher stresses for the case of YS, and to higher formability limits for the case of HER. A lower hardness ratio corresponded to a decrease in work-hardening, and was interpreted to be caused by the suppression of strain localization in ferrite. Multiple studies from literature correlated HER to tensile properties, and the nine steel conditions produced consistent trends with the data reported in each study, confirming the experimental HER and tensile properties obtained in the current study are consistent with literature. The microstructural response to plastic deformation was evaluated using two DP steels with equivalent UTS and different hardness ratios. Nanoindentation analyses on tensile specimens deformed to the UTS revealed a greater increase in ferrite hardness for the higher hardness ratio steel, interpreted to be caused by the greater amount of work hardening. EBSD crystallographic orientation maps for the two DP

  11. Analysis of failure of resistance spot welding for advanced high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Wooram; Koh, Youngwoo; Chung, Kwansoo; Yang, Xin

    2013-12-01

    For the evaluation of the failure performance of the similar spot welded joints under static loading conditions, characterization procedure was proposed utilizing numerically inverse calibration method. TRIP (Transformation induced plasticity steel) 980 and DP (Dual Phase steel) 980 sheets were considered as base materials. In order to characterize the mechanical properties, for the spot weld joints were performed simple tension tests based on the newly developed miniature simple tension test method, while for the base sheets were performed those following standard methods. Considering the hardening behaviors and failure properties of the base sheets and weld nuggets, numerical simulations for the lap-shear tension test were performed and compared with experiments.

  12. Two-surface plasticity Model and Its Application to Spring-back Simulation of Automotive Advanced High Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taejoon; Seok, Dong-Yoon; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Noma, Nobuyasu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2011-08-01

    A two-surface isotropic-kinematic hardening law was developed based on a two-surface plasticity model previously proposed by Lee et al., (2007, Int. J. Plast. 23, 1189-1212). In order to properly represent the Bauschinger and transient behaviors as well as permanent softening during reverse loading with various pre-strains, both the inner yield surface and the outer bounding surface expand (isotropic hardening) and translate (kinematic hardening) in this two-surface model. As for the permanent softening, both the isotropic hardening and the kinematic hardening evolution of the outer bounding surface were modified by introducing softening parameters. The numerical formulation was also developed based on the incremental plasticity theory and the developed constitutive law was implemented into the commercial finite element program, ABAQUS/Explicit and ABAQUS/Standard using the user-defined material subroutines. In this work, a dual phase (DP) steel was considered as an advanced high strength steel sheet and uni-axial tension tests and uni-axial tension-compression-tension tests were performed for the characterization of the material property. For a validation purpose, the developed two-surface plasticity model was applied to the 2-D draw bending test proposed as a benchmark problem of the NUMISHEET 2011 conference and successfully validated with experiments.

  13. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  14. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  15. Effect of microstructure on the fracture response of advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    coalescence) is a rapid event that occurs at failure displacements greater than 95%. Hardness values obtained from nanoindentation were determined to accurately incorporate all strengthening effects present in the constituents. Due to the presence of 5% austenite, TRIP780 and DP980H exhibited different yielding behavior, different tensile stress-strain behavior than the other six DP steels, and had the highest total elongation in their respective strength groups. Austenite appeared to offer increased ductility without sacrificing any other material properties of interest.

  16. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, M.; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11-14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge® software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within 4%, and the position of the joint interface to within 10%, of the experimental results.

  17. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, M.; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11-14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge® software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within 4%, and the position of the joint interface to within 10%, of the experimental results.

  18. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Michael; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11–14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge* software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within percent, and the position of the joint interface to within 10 percent, of the experimental results.

  19. Formability Characterization of a New Generation High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram Sadagopan; Dennis Urban; Chris Wong; Mai Huang; Benda Yan

    2003-05-16

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are being progressively explored by the automotive industry all around the world for cost-effective solutions to accomplish vehicle lightweighting, improve fuel economy, and consequently reduce greenhouse emissions. Because of their inherent high strength, attractive crash energy management properties, and good formability, the effective use of AHSS such as Duel Phase and TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels, will significantly contribute to vehicle lightweighting and fuel economy. To further the application of these steels in automotive body and structural parts, a good knowledge and experience base must be developed regarding the press formability of these materials. This project provides data on relevant intrinsic mechanical behavior, splitting limits, and springback behavior of several lots of mild steel, conventional high strength steel (HSS), advanced high strength steel (AHSS) and ultra-high strength steel (UHSS), supplied by the member companies of the Automotive Applications Committee (AAC) of the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). Two lots of TRIP600, which were supplied by ThyssenKrupp Stahl, were also included in the study. Since sheet metal forming encompasses a very diverse range of forming processes and deformation modes, a number of simulative tests were used to characterize the forming behavior of these steel grades. In general, it was found that formability, as determined by the different tests, decreased with increased tensile strength. Consistant with previous findings, the formability of TRIP600 was found to be exceptionally good for its tensile strength.

  20. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  1. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  2. Welding High Strength Modern Line Pipe Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodall, Graeme Robertson

    The effect of modern mechanized girth welding on high strength line pipe has been investigated. The single cycle grain coarsened heat affected zone in three grade 690 line pipe steels and a grade 550 steel has been simulated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator. The continuous cooling transformation diagrams applicable to the grain coarsened heat affected zone resulting from a range of heat inputs applicable to modern mechanized welding have been established by dilatometry and metallography. The coarse grained heat affected zone was found to transform to lath martensite, bainite, and granular bainite depending on the cooling rate. The impact toughness of the steels was measured using Charpy impact toughness and compared to the toughness of the grain coarsened heat affected zone corresponding to a welding thermal cycle. The ductile to brittle transition temperature was found to be lowest for the steel with the highest hardenability. The toughness resulting from three different thermal cycles including a novel interrupted intercritically reheated grain coarsened (NTR ICR GC HAZ) that can result from dual torch welding at fast travel speed and close torch spacing have been investigated. All of the thermally HAZ regions showed reduced toughness that was attributed to bainitic microstructure and large effective grain sizes. Continuous cooling transformation diagrams for five weld metal chemistries applicable to mechanized pulsed gas metal arc welding of modern high strength pipe steel (SMYS>550 MPa) have been constructed. Welds at heat inputs of 1.5 kJmm-1 and 0.5 kJmm-1 have been created for simulation and analysis. Dilatometric analysis was performed on weld metal specimens cut from single pass 1.5 kJmm-1 as deposited beads. The resulting microstructures were found to range from martensite to polygonal ferrite. There is excellent agreement between the simulated and as deposited weld metal regions. Toughness testing indicates improved energy absorption at -20

  3. Hydrogen trapping in high-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, B.G.

    1998-10-09

    Hydrogen trapping in three high-strength steels -- AerMet 100 and AISI 4340 and H11 -- was studied using a potentiostatic pulse technique. Irreversible trapping constants (k) and hydrogen entry fluxes were determined for these alloys in 1 mol/1 acetic acid/1 mol/1 sodium acetate. The order of the k values for the three steels and two 18Ni maraging steels previously studies inversely parallels their threshold stress intensities for stress corrosion cracking (K{sub 1SCC}). Irreversible trapping in AerMet 100 varies with aging temperature and appears to depend on the type of carbide (Fe{sub 3}C or M{sub 2}C) present. For 4340 steel, k can be correlated with K{sub 1SCC} over a range of yield strengths. The change in k is consistent with a change in the principal type of irreversible trap from matrix boundaries to incoherent Fe{sub 3}C. The principal irreversible traps in H11 at high yield strengths are thought to be similar to those in 4340 steel.

  4. Micromechanics of plastic deformation and phase transformation in a three-phase TRIP-assisted advanced high strength steel: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ankit; Ghassemi-Armaki, Hassan; Sung, Hyokyung; Chen, Peng; Kumar, Sharvan; Bower, Allan F.

    2015-05-01

    The micromechanics of plastic deformation and phase transformation in a three-phase advanced high strength steel are analyzed both experimentally and by microstructure-based simulations. The steel examined is a three-phase (ferrite, martensite and retained austenite) quenched and partitioned sheet steel with a tensile strength of ~980 MPa. The macroscopic flow behavior and the volume fraction of martensite resulting from the austenite-martensite transformation during deformation were measured. In addition, micropillar compression specimens were extracted from the individual ferrite grains and the martensite particles, and using a flat-punch nanoindenter, stress-strain curves were obtained. Finite element simulations idealize the microstructure as a composite that contains ferrite, martensite and retained austenite. All three phases are discretely modeled using appropriate crystal plasticity based constitutive relations. Material parameters for ferrite and martensite are determined by fitting numerical predictions to the micropillar data. The constitutive relation for retained austenite takes into account contributions to the strain rate from the austenite-martensite transformation, as well as slip in both the untransformed austenite and product martensite. Parameters for the retained austenite are then determined by fitting the predicted flow stress and transformed austenite volume fraction in a 3D microstructure to experimental measurements. Simulations are used to probe the role of the retained austenite in controlling the strain hardening behavior as well as internal stress and strain distributions in the microstructure.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  6. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation deals in detail with the three recognized stages of plastic fracture in high strength steels, namely, void initiation, void growth, and void coalescence. The particular steels under investigation include plates from both commercial purity and high purity heats of AISI 4340 and 18 Ni, 200 grade maraging steels. A scanning electron microscope equipped with an X-ray energy dispersive analyzer, together with observations made using light microscopy, revealed methods of improving the resistance of high strength steels to plastic fracture.

  7. Effect of Boron on the Hot Ductility Behavior of a Low Carbon Advanced Ultra-High Strength Steel (A-UHSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, Ignacio; Altamirano, Gerardo; Bedolla-Jacuinde, Arnoldo; Cabrera, José María

    2013-11-01

    This research work studied the effect of boron additions (14, 33, 82, 126, and 214 ppm) on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced ultra-high strength steel. For this purpose, specimens were subjected to a hot tensile test at different temperatures [923 K, 973 K, 1023 K, 1073 K, 1173 K, and 1273 K (650 °C, 700 °C, 750 °C, 800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C)] under a constant true strain rate of 10-3 s-1. The reduction of area (RA) of the tested samples until fracture was taken as a measure of the hot ductility. In general, results revealed a marked improvement in hot ductility from 82 ppm B when the stoichiometric composition for BN (0.8:1) was exceeded. By comparing the ductility curve of the steel with the highest boron content (B5, 214 ppm B) and the curve for the steel without boron (B0), the increase of hot ductility in terms of RA is over 100 pct. In contrast, the typical recovery of hot ductility at temperatures below the Ar3, where large amounts of normal transformation ferrite usually form in the structure, was not observed in these steels. On the other hand, the fracture surfaces indicated that the fracture mode tends to be more ductile as the boron content increases. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism, which in turn causes hot ductility loss. In general, results are discussed in terms of boron segregation and precipitation on austenitic grain boundaries during cooling from the austenitic range and subsequent plastic deformation.

  8. Numerical Modeling for Springback Predictions by Considering the Variations of Elastic Modulus in Stamping Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting springback by considering the variations of elastic modulus on springback in stamping AHSS. Various stamping tests and finite-element method (FEM) simulation codes were used in this study. The cyclic loading-unloading tensile tests were conducted to determine the variations of elastic modulus for dual-phase (DP) 780 sheet steel. The biaxial bulge test was used to obtain plastic flow stress data. The non-linear reduction of elastic modulus for increasing the plastic strain was formulated by using the Yoshida model that was implemented in FEM simulations for springback. To understand the effects of material properties on springback, experiments were conducted with a simple geometry such as U-shape bending and the more complex geometry such as the curved flanging and S-rail stamping. Different measurement methods were used to confirm the final part geometry. Two different commercial FEM codes, LS-DYNA and DEFORM, were used to compare the experiments. The variable elastic modulus improved springback predictions in U-shape bending and curved flanging tests compared to FEM with the constant elastic modulus. However, in S-rail stamping tests, both FEM models with the isotropic hardening model showed limitations in predicting the sidewall curl of the S-rail part after springback. To consider the kinematic hardening and Bauschinger effects that result from material bending-unbending in S-rail stamping, the Yoshida model was used for FEM simulation of S-rail stamping and springback. The FEM predictions showed good improvement in correlating with experiments.

  9. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  10. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as

  11. Retention of ductility in high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. R.; Zackay, V. F.

    1969-01-01

    To produce high strength alloy steel with retention of ductility, include tempering, cooling and subsequent tempering. Five parameters for optimum results are pretempering temperature, amount of strain, strain rate, temperature during strain, and retempering temperature.

  12. TRP 9904 - Constitutive Behavior of High Strength Multiphase Sheel Steel Under High Strain Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    David Matlock; John Speer

    2005-03-31

    The focus of the research project was to systematically assess the strain rate dependence of strengthening mechanisms in new advanced high strength sheet steels. Data were obtained on specially designed and produced Duel Phase and TRIP steels and compared to the properties of automotive steels currently in use.

  13. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  14. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  15. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the plastic fracture process to improve tensile strength in high strength steels is presented. Two generic types of steels are considered: a quenched and tempered grade and a maraging grade, in order to compare two different matrix microstructures. Each type of steel was studied in commercial grade purity and in special melted high purity form, low in residual and impurity elements. The specific alloys dealt with include AISI 4340 and 18 Ni, 200 grade maraging steel, both heat treated to the same yield strength level of approximately 200 ksi.

  16. Method of making high strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel, particularly suitable for the mining industry, is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other subsitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  17. Reduced hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in platinum implanted high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, J. G.; Lowder, L. J.; Culbertson, R. J.; Kosik, W. E.; Brown, R.

    1991-07-01

    High strength steels suffer from a high susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement in a corrosive atmosphere, a factor which limits their usefulness. A good catalyst, such as platinum, present on the surface of the steel may lead to a low value of hydrogen overvoltage, thereby reducing the accumulation and subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the metal. In the present study, platinum was implanted into high strength electroslag remelted (ESR) 4340 steel specimens to a dose of 10 16 atoms/cm 2. Both Pt-implanted and unimplanted specimens were rate charged with hydrogen. The relative concentration of diffusible hydrogen was determined using an electrochemical measurement device known as a Barnacle Electrode. The specimens implanted with platinum exhibited less diffusible hydrogen than the unimplanted steel. Slow strain rate notched-tensile tests, in an aqueous solution of 3.5 wt.% NaCI, were performed in order to evaluate the effect of hydrogen on strength and ductility. The Pt-implanted specimens were able to sustain significantly higher loads before fracture than their unimplanted counterparts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) verified the presence of brittle cracking typical of hydrogen embrittlement type failures. Degradation of mechanical properties due to hydrogen embrittlement was thus significantly reduced. This suggested that both the electrochemical and catalytic properties of the Pt-implanted surface were responsible for the improvement in properties.

  18. Production of high strength TMCP steel plate for offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuzuru; Tamehiro, Hiroshi; Chijiiwa, Rikio; Funato, Kazuo; Doi, Naoki; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Kibe, Masaomi

    1993-12-31

    Titanium-oxide bearing steel (Ti-O steel), which has improved toughness in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) by utilizing intragranular ferrite (IGF), has been developed, and successfully put into commercial production. This was also the first application of yield strength (YS) 420 N/mm{sup 2} class TMCP steel plates to offshore structures. In the Ti-O steel, IGF grows radially from Ti-oxides finely dispersed in the steel as nuclei when HAZ transforms from austenite to ferrite after welding, and thus the microstructure of the HAZ is remarkably refined. As Ti-oxide particles are chemically stable even in the region near the fusion line which was reheated to a high-temperature above 1,350 C, control of the microstructure is possible in the entire HAZ and excellent crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) properties can be obtained. By applying Ti-O steel, Nippon Steel has succeeded in the mass production (approximately 9,000 tons) of YS 420 N/mm{sup 2} class TMCP steel plate for offshore structures in the North Sea. In addition to high strength and strict CTOD properties, various other properties including low carbon equivalent, narrow YS range, etc., were required for this plate. In order to satisfy these requirements, it was necessary to take comprehensive measured in the entire production process including steel making, continuous casting and plate rolling. The Ti-O steel with low carbon equivalent satisfies the required strength and low-temperature toughness of the base material and exhibits excellent toughness in the CTOD and Charpy tests of the welded joints, and offers good field weldability. Furthermore, the YS was controlled within a narrow range of less than 100 N/mm{sup 2} by strictly controlling the range of chemical composition and the TMCP condition.

  19. High Strength Stainless Steel Properties that Affect Resistance Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R.

    2001-08-01

    This report discusses results of a study on selected high strength stainless steel alloy properties that affect resistance welding. The austenitic alloys A-286, JBK-75 (Modified A-286), 21-6-9, 22-13-5, 316 and 304L were investigated and compared. The former two are age hardenable, and the latter four obtain their strength through work hardening. Properties investigated include corrosion and its relationship to chemical cleaning, the effects of heat treatment on strength and surface condition, and the effect of mechanical properties on strength and weldability.

  20. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Hydrogen in High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Hirakami, D.; Tarui, T.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal desorption analyses (TDA) were conducted in high strength martensitic steels containing carbon from 0.33 to 1.0 mass pct, which were charged with hydrogen at 1223 K (950 °C) under hydrogen of one atmospheric pressure and quenched to room temperature. In 0.33C steel, which had the highest M s temperature, only one desorption peak was observed around 373 K (100 °C), whereas two peaks, one at a similar temperature and the other around and above 573 K (300 °C), were observed in the other steels, the height of the second peak increasing with carbon content. In 0.82C steel, both peaks disappeared during exposure at room temperature in 1 week, whereas the peak heights decreased gradually over 2 weeks in specimens electrolytically charged with hydrogen and aged for varying times at room temperature. From computer simulation, by means of the McNabb-Foster theory coupled with theories of carbon segregation, these peaks are likely to be due to trapping of hydrogen in the strain fields and cores of dislocations, and presumably to a lesser extent in prior austenite grain boundaries. The results also indicate that carbon atoms prevent and even expel hydrogen from trapping sites during quenching and aging in these steels.

  1. Grain refinement of high strength steels to improve cryogenic toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Grain-refining techniques using multistep heat treatments to reduce the grain size of five commercial high-strength steels were investigated. The goal of this investigation was to improve the low-temperature toughness as measured by Charpy V-notch impact test without a significant loss in tensile strength. The grain size of four of five alloys investigated was successfully reduced up to 1/10 of original size or smaller with increases in Charpy impact energy of 50 to 180 percent at -320 F. Tensile properties were reduced from 0 to 25 percent for the various alloys tested. An unexpected but highly beneficial side effect from grain refining was improved machinability.

  2. Corrosion and embrittlement of high-strength steel bridge wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaas, Garry Wayne

    Suspension bridge cable inspections have revealed severely corroded and broken wires in some main cables. Accelerated cyclic corrosion studies were conducted to assess the relative effect of corrosion on high-strength steel bridge wire. Galvanized and ungalvanized wire samples were corroded under various levels of sustained loads in a cabinet that cyclically applied an acidic salt spray, dry conditions, and 100% relative humidity at elevated temperature. Mass loss, hydrogen concentration, ultimate load, and elongation at failure were measured for corroded and uncorroded samples. Elongation measurements indicated a significant embrittlement of the wires that could not be explained only by the presence of absorbed hydrogen (hydrogen embrittlement). The main cause of reduction of wire elongation was found to be the surface irregularities induced by the corrosion process. The corrosion process in a high-strength steel wire was modeled and analyzed using finite element methods. Forty-one separate FEM tests were run and this data was compared to the experimental data. In addition, for the purpose of comparison, a previously developed hydrogen embrittlement model was analyzed and its validity was discussed in detail. SEM photographs of the fracture surfaces were taken and possible causes and mechanisms of fracture were suggested by observations of the fracture morphology. It was shown through this experimental and numerical research work that the geometry of the wire, determined by the amount of corrosion, pitting, and surface irregularities, controls the ultimate elongation of the wire sample, as also confirmed by the SEM analysis of the fracture surfaces. It was also shown that, using a generally accepted hydrogen embrittlement model, there is no evidence that hydrogen embrittlement is occurring, or at least that hydrogen evolution is not the controlling factor in the loss of wire's ductility.

  3. Effect of formation and state of interface on joint strength in friction stir spot welding for advanced high strength steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Koichi; Matsushita, Muneo; Ikeda, Rinsei; Oi, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    The tensile shear strength and cross tension strength of friction stir spot welded joints were evaluated in the cases of lap joints of 270 N/mm2 grade and 980 N/mm2 grade cold rolled steel sheets with respect to the stir zone area, hardness distribution, and interface condition between the sheets. The results suggested that both the tensile shear strength and cross tension strength were based on the stir zone area and its hardness in both grades of steel. The "hook" shape of the interface also affected the joint strength. However, the joining that occurred across the interfaces had a significant influence on the value of the joint strength in the case of the 270 N/mm2 grade steel.

  4. Anomolous Fatigue Crack Growth Phenomena in High-Strength Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Johnston, William M., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of a fatigue crack through a material is the result of a complex interaction between the applied loading, component geometry, three-dimensional constraint, load history, environment, material microstructure and several other factors. Previous studies have developed experimental and computational methods to relate the fatigue crack growth rate to many of the above conditions, with the intent of discovering some fundamental material response, i.e. crack growth rate as a function of something. Currently, the technical community uses the stress intensity factor solution as a simplistic means to relate fatigue crack growth rate to loading, geometry and all other variables. The stress intensity factor solution is a very simple linear-elastic representation of the continuum mechanics portion of crack growth. In this paper, the authors present fatigue crack growth rate data for two different high strength steel alloys generated using standard methods. The steels exhibit behaviour that appears unexplainable, compared to an aluminium alloy presented as a baseline for comparison, using the stress intensity factor solution.

  5. Fatigue crack retardation of high strength steel in saltwater

    SciTech Connect

    Tokaji, K.; Ando, Z.; Imai, T.; Kojima, T.

    1983-04-01

    A high strength steel was studied in 3 percent saltwater to investigate the effects of a corrosive environment and sheer thickness on fatigue crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload. Experiments were carried out under sinusoidally varying loads at a load ratio of 0 and frequency of 10 H /SUB z/ . A single tensile overload was found to cause delayed retardation, and the crack propagation rate at first increased, followed by fairly rapid decrease to a minimum value and then increased gradually to its steady-state value, just as it did in air. The overload affected zone size and the retardation cycles increased with decreasing sheet thickness, just as they did in air. However, the zone size and the cycles were larger in 3 percent saltwater than in air. Since the crack propagation rates through the overload affected zone were not affected by the test environment, the longer retardation cycles in 3 percent saltwater were attributed to an enlargement of the overload affected zone size. The crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was well explained by the crack closure concept.

  6. Strength analysis of laser welded lap joint for ultra high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Young Cheol; Kim, Cheol Hee; Cho, Young Tae; Jung, Yoon Gyo

    2013-12-01

    Several industries including the automotive industry have recently applied the process of welding high strength steel. High strength steel is steel that is harder than normal high strength steel, making it much stronger and stiffer. HSS can be formed in pieces that can be up to 10 to 15 percent thinner than normal steel without sacrificing strength, which enables weight reduction and improved fuel economy. Furthermore, HSS can be formed into complex shapes that can be welded into structural areas. This study is based on previous experiments and is aimed at establishing the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel. Research on the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel is conducted by using Solid Works, a program that analyzes the stress of a virtual model. In conclusion, we found that the stress distribution is changed depending on the shape of welded lap joint. In addition, the Influence of the stress distribution on welded high strength steel can be used to standard for high energy welding of high strength steel, and we can also predict the region in welded high strength steel that may cracked.

  7. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  8. Advanced characterization techniques in understanding the roles of nickel in enhancing strength and toughness of submerged arc welding high strength low alloy steel multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Kin-Ling

    Striving for higher strength along with higher toughness is a constant goal in material properties. Even though nickel is known as an effective alloying element in improving the resistance of a steel to impact fracture, it is not fully understood how nickel enhances toughness. It was the goal of this work to assist and further the understanding of how nickel enhanced toughness and maintained strength in particular for high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel submerged arc welding multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition. Using advanced analytical techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermodynamic modeling software, the effect of nickel was studied with nickel varying from one to five wt. pct. in increments of one wt. pct. in a specific HSLA steel submerged arc welding multiple pass weldment. The test matrix of five different nickel compositions in the as-welded and stress-relieved condition was to meet the targeted mechanical properties with a yield strength greater than or equal to 85 ksi, a ultimate tensile strength greater than or equal to 105 ksi, and a nil ductility temperature less than or equal to -140 degrees F. Mechanical testing demonstrated that nickel content of three wt. pct and greater in the as-welded condition fulfilled the targeted mechanical properties. Therefore, one, three, and five wt. pct. nickel in the as-welded condition was further studied to determine the effect of nickel on primary solidification mode, nickel solute segregation, dendrite thickness, phase transformation temperatures, effective ferrite grain size, dislocation density and strain, grain misorientation distribution, and precipitates. From one to five wt. pct nickel content in the as-welded condition, the primary solidification was shown to change from primary delta-ferrite to primary austenite. The nickel partitioning coefficient increased and dendrite/cellular thickness was

  9. Cup-Drawing Behavior of High-Strength Steel Sheets Containing Different Volume Fractions of Martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Wan; Yang, Hoe-Seok; Han, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2010-06-15

    Planar anisotropy and cup-drawing behavior were investigated for high-strength steel sheets containing different volume fractions of martensite. Macrotexture analysis using XRD was conducted to capture the effect of crystallographic orientation on the planar anisotropy of high-strength steel sheets. A phenomenological yield function, Yld96, which accounts for the anisotropy of yield stress and r-values, was implemented into ABAQUS using the user subroutine UMAT. Cup drawing of high-strength steel sheets was simulated using the FEM code. The profiles of earing and thickness strain were compared with the experimentally measured results.

  10. Cup-Drawing Behavior of High-Strength Steel Sheets Containing Different Volume Fractions of Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Wan; Yang, Hoe-Seok; Han, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2010-06-01

    Planar anisotropy and cup-drawing behavior were investigated for high-strength steel sheets containing different volume fractions of martensite. Macrotexture analysis using XRD was conducted to capture the effect of crystallographic orientation on the planar anisotropy of high-strength steel sheets. A phenomenological yield function, Yld96, which accounts for the anisotropy of yield stress and r-values, was implemented into ABAQUS using the user subroutine UMAT. Cup drawing of high-strength steel sheets was simulated using the FEM code. The profiles of earing and thickness strain were compared with the experimentally measured results.

  11. Corrosion Behavior of High-Strength Bainitic Rail Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, A. P.; Sangal, S.; Layek, S.; Giribaskar, S.; Mondal, Kallol

    2015-04-01

    The present work discusses corrosion behavior of newly developed bainitic steels made by isothermal heat treatment of a new steel composition (0.71 pct C, 1.15 pct Mn, 0.20 pct Ni, 0.59 pct Cr, 0.40 pct Cu, 0.35 pct Si, 0.026 pct S, 0.027 pct P, and rest Fe (weight percent)). Corrosion behavior of the pearlitic steel made by normalization is also studied. Electrochemical polarization and salt fog tests are carried out in 0.6 M NaCl. Steel rusts after salt fog tests are analyzed. Modified composition, finer microstructures, and compact rust morphology attribute to better corrosion resistance of the bainitic steels. Corrosion mechanisms for the pearlitic and bainitic steels are discussed.

  12. Toughening mechanisms of a high-strength acicular ferrite steel heavy plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhi-Qiang; Bao, Yan-Ping; Xia, Zheng-Hai; Luo, Deng; Guo, Ai-Min; Wu, Kai-Ming

    2010-10-01

    An ultra-low carbon acicular ferrite steel heavy plate was obtained with an advanced thermo-mechanical control process-relaxed precipitation controlled transformation (TMCP-RPC) at Xiangtan Steel, Valin Group. The heavy plate has a tensile strength of approximately 600 MPa with a lower yield ratio. The impact toughness of the heavy plate achieves 280 J at -40°C. The fine-grained mixed microstructures of the heavy plate mainly consist of acicular ferrite, granular bainite, and polygonal ferrite. The high strength and excellent toughness of the heavy plate are attributed to the formation of acicular ferrite microstructure. The prevention of blocks of martensite/retained austenite (M/A) and the higher cleanness are also responsible for the superior toughness.

  13. Proceedings: 1986 Workshop on Advanced High-Strength Materials

    SciTech Connect

    1989-05-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has contributed to many in-service failures of high-strength LWR components. In 25 workshop presentations, this report addresses the effects of metallurgical factors, manufacturing processes, design improvements, and installation practices on the resistance of high-strength alloys to SCC.

  14. Martensitic transformations in high-strength steels at aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskaya, V. V.; Bannykh, O. A.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of heat treatment and elastic stresses on the texture of maraging NiTi-steels is studied. The interruption of the decomposition of martensite at the early stages is shown to be accompanied by the γ → α transformation, which proceeds upon cooling from the aging temperature and under elastic (σ < σ0.2) tensile stresses. The martensite has a crystallographic texture, which is caused by the evolution of hot-deformation texture as a result of quenching and decomposition of a supersaturated α solid solution.

  15. Fatigue failure of hydrogen embrittled high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Aleszka, J.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation are presented concerning the fracture behavior of cathodically charged, quenched and tempered martensitic steels under cyclic load conditions. Introduction of H2 by cathodic charging reduced fatigue life by as much as 60%. It is proposed that subsurface transverse fatigue cracks nucleate simultaneously at multiple sites, such as at microcracks, voids, or inclusions. Fatigue crack growth then occurs on planes perpendicular to the major applied stress axis in the presence of the critical combination of applied external stress and hydrogen.

  16. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

    2003-04-21

    A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

  17. Cleavage fracture properties of high strength steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.K.; Ritter, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The qualification of consumables and welding of steels in critical naval applications, including submarine construction, is dependent upon the achievement of high levels of toughness at low temperature. The principal technique employed is the Charpy impact test at temperatures down to {minus}115 C ({minus}175 F). In the investigation described here, low temperature toughness properties were investigated by breaking notched specimens in slow four point bending and measuring the critical tensile stress for cleavage initiation. Multi-pass Flux Cored Arc (FCA) welds joining 690 MPa (100 ksi) yield strength, quenched and tempered steel were tested to identify cleavage fracture micromechanisms and to investigate the role of microstructural features in the cleavage fracture process. Cleavage fracture stress values in the range 2,018 to 2,381 MPa were recorded in weld metal when testing at sub-zero temperatures. Detailed examination of fracture surfaces by scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that weld metal inclusions play a critical role in acting as cleavage initiation sites. Changing welding position from downhand to vertical-up resulted in a small number of widely spaced inclusions approaching or exceeding 10 {micro}m in diameter but these were not observed to act as cleavage initiation sites. The cleavage fracture resistance of multi-pass Manual Metal Arc (MMA) welds which are currently under investigation is compared with FCA weldments.

  18. Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Hoelzer, David T; Busby, Jeremy T; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Klueh, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F-M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F-M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N&T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N&T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

  19. Improvement of formability of high strength steel sheets in shrink flanging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedon, Z.; Abe, Y.; Mori, K.

    2016-02-01

    In the shrinkage flanging, the wrinkling tends to occur due to compressive stress. The wrinkling will cause a difficulty in assembling parts, and severe wrinkling may leads to rupture of parts. The shrinkage flange of the ultra-high strength steel sheets not only defects the product by the occurrence of the wrinkling but also causes seizure and wear of the dies and shortens the life of dies. In the present study, a shape of a punch having gradual contact was optimized in order to prevent the wrinkling in shrinkage flanging of ultra-high strength steel sheets. The sheet was gradually bent from the corner of the sheet to reduce the compressive stress. The wrinkling in the shrink flanging of the ultra-high strength steel sheets was prevented by the punch having gradual contact. It was found that the punch having gradual contact is effective in preventing the occurrence of wrinkling in the shrinkage flanging.

  20. Design of a low-alloy high-strength and high-toughness martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan-jun; Ren, Xue-ping; Yang, Wen-chao; Zang, Yue

    2013-08-01

    To develop a high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel with high strength and high toughness, a series of martensitic steels were studied through alloying with various elements and thermodynamic simulation. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the designed steel were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing and Charpy impact test. The results show that cementite exists between 500°C and 700°C, M7C3 exits below 720°C, and they are much lower than the austenitizing temperature of the designed steel. Furthermore, the Ti(C,N) precipitate exists until 1280°C, which refines the microstructure and increases the strength and toughness. The optimal alloying components are 0.19% C, 1.19% Si, 2.83% Mn, 1.24% Ni, and 0.049% Ti; the tensile strength and the V notch impact toughness of the designed steel are more than 1500 MPa and 100 J, respectively.

  1. A Study on Forming Characteristics of Roll Forming Process with High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, ByeongDon; Lee, HyunJong; Kim, DongKyu; Moon, YoungHoon

    2011-08-01

    Roll forming is a kind of sheet metal forming process used to manufacture long sheet metal products with constant cross section. Recently, roll forming technology draws attentions of automotive industries due to its various advantages, such as high production speed, reduced tooling cost and improved quality. In automotive industries, roll formed automotive parts used as structural components in vehicle body frame or sub frame and high strength steel becomes more common to improve safety and fuel efficiency. However, when roll forming process is performed with high strength steel, rolling forming defects, such as spring back, buckling and scratch should be considered more carefully. In this study, efforts to avoid roll forming defects and to optimize forming parameters were performed. FE analysis was performed with high strength steels using commercially available simulation software, COPRA-RF™ and SHAPE-RF™. Forming characteristics were analyzed and roll flower model and proper roll-pass sequences were suggested by analyzing longitudinal strain and deformation behavior. This study provided considerable experience about roll forming process design that using high strength steel.

  2. Kic size effect study on two high-strength steels using notched bend specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonesifer, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    Five methods are used to calculate plane strain fracture toughness (K sub Q) values for bend-specimens of various sizes from two high-strength steels. None of the methods appeared to satisfactorily predict valid stress intensity factor (K sub IC) values from specimens of sizes well below that required by E399 standard tests.

  3. An investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Three generally recognized stages of plastic fracture in high strength steels are considered in detail. These stages consist of void initiation, void growth, and void coalescence. A brief review of the existing literature on plastic fracture is included along with an outline of the experimental approach used in the investigation.

  4. Springback analysis for the stamping of an automotive part with high strength steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Tzu-Hao; Tsai, Heng-Kuang; Chang, Chih-Kai; Hsu, Yu-Hung; Chen, Fuh-Kuo; Chung, Kuo-Hsin

    2013-05-01

    The study of springback analysis of 440MPa high strength steel is investigated in this paper. Because of the springback phenomenon is related to the material properties and the deformation mechanism during the forming process, the material properties of 440MPa high strength steel are studied at first. The material properties of 440MPa high strength steel are obtained by conducting cyclic uniaxial tension-compression tests with different strain ranges. In order to apply the material properties obtained from the experiments to the finite element analysis, the material constants required in the Yoshida-Uemori model (Y-U model) with the Bauschinger effect considered are established. For realizing the springback characteristics of 440MPa high strength steel, the U-hat draw-bending and V-shape bending are examined by the finite element analysis. From the simulation results, it finds that the side wall curl phenomenon occurs in the U-hat drawbending and the springback phenomenon appears in the V-shape bending. Moreover, it also shows that the side wall curl phenomenon and springback phenomenon are more obvious in the finite element simulations with the Bauschinger effect considered. Finally, the validation of springback prediction is performed by stamping an engine hood reinforcement with 440MPa high strength steel sheet. From the stamping results, it shows that the simulation results of springback prediction are in a well agreement to the production part data. It also finds that the springback predictions are more accurate by the finite element simulations with the use of the Y-U model. It is also found that for a stamping part which is subjected to a reversed tension-compression deformation in the forming process, the occurrence of the Bauschinger effect is obvious. It is also concluded that the accuracy of springback prediction can be much improved by the use of material model with the Bauschinger effect considered.

  5. Sulfide stress cracking characteristics of high strength steels from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, H.; Ueno, M.

    1994-12-31

    Sulfide stress cracking (SSC) evaluation of high strength OCTG (oil country tubular goods) from the view point of environmental factors has been studied to some extent, but little research has been conducted from the view point of fracture mechanics. In the present study, SSC resistance was evaluated using threshold stress and K{sub 1ssc}. The same ranking of SSC resistance is obtained from both methods. However, SSC resistant steels show higher K{sub 1ssc} than conventional steels even if their respective threshold stresses are the same. For steel products bearing cracks and dents, SSC evaluation using both the threshold stress and the K{sub 1ssc} is suggested.

  6. High strength, low carbon, dual phase steel rods and wires and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Nakagawa, Alvin H.

    1986-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility, low carbon, dual phase steel wire, bar or rod and process for making the same is provided. The steel wire, bar or rod is produced by cold drawing to the desired diameter in a single multipass operation a low carbon steel composition characterized by a duplex microstructure consisting essentially of a strong second phase dispersed in a soft ferrite matrix with a microstructure and morphology having sufficient cold formability to allow reductions in cross-sectional area of up to about 99.9%. Tensile strengths of at least 120 ksi to over 400 ksi may be obtained.

  7. The role of cyclic plastic zone size on fatigue crack growth behavior in high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korda, Akhmad A.; Miyashita, Y.; Mutoh, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The role of cyclic plastic zone in front of the crack tip was studied in high strength steels. Estimated plastic zone size would be compared with actual observation. Strain controlled fatigue tests of the steels were carried out to obtain cyclic stress-strain curves for plastic zone estimation. Observations of plastic zone were carried out using in situ SEM fatigue crack growth tests under a constant-ΔK. Hard microstructures in structural steels showed to inhibit the extent of plastic deformation around the crack tip. The rate of crack growth can be correlated with the size of plastic zone. The smaller the plastic zone size, the slower the fatigue crack growth.

  8. High-strength economically alloyed corrosion-resistant steels with the structure of nitrogen martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O.; Blinov, V.; Lukin, E.

    2016-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as the main alloying element allowing one both to increase the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of steels and to improve their processability is a new trend in physical metallurgy of high-strength corrosion resistant steels. The principles of alloying, which are developed for high-nitrogen steel in IMET RAS, ensure the formation of the structure, which contains predetermined amounts of martensite (70-80%) and austenite (20-30%) and is free from δ-ferrite, σ-phase, and Cr23C6 carbide. These principles were used as the base for the creation of new high-strength corrosion-resistant weldable and deformable 0Kh16AN5B, 06Kh16AN4FD, 08Kh14AN4MDB, 09Kh16AN3MF, 27Kh15AN3MD2, 40Kh13AN3M2, and 19Kh14AMB steels, which are operative at temperatures ranging from - 70 to 400°C. The developed nitrogen-containing steels compared with similar carbon steels are characterized by a higher resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion and are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. The new steels successfully passed trial tests as heavy duty articles.

  9. A study of microstructure, quasi-static response, fatigue, deformation and fracture behavior of high strength alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Manigandan

    The history of steel dates back to the 17th century and has been instrumental in the betterment of every aspect of our lives ever since, from the pin that holds the paper together to the Automobile that takes us to our destination steel touches everyone every day. Path breaking improvements in manufacturing techniques, access to advanced machinery and understanding of factors like heat treatment, corrosion resistance have aided in the advancement in the properties of steel in the last few years. In this dissertation document, the results of a study aimed at the influence of alloy chemistry, processing and influence of the quasi static and fatigue behavior of seven alloy steels is discussed. The microstructure of the as-received steel was examined and characterized for the nature and morphology of the grains and the presence of other intrinsic features in the microstructure. The tensile, cyclic fatigue and bending fatigue tests were done on a fully automated closed-loop servo-hydraulic test machine at room temperature. The failed samples of high strength steels were examined in a scanning electron microscope for understanding the fracture behavior, especially the nature of loading be it quasi static, cyclic fatigue or bending fatigue . The quasi static and cyclic fatigue fracture behavior of the steels examined coupled with various factors contributing to failure are briefly discussed in light of the conjoint and mutually interactive influences of intrinsic microstructural effects, nature of loading, and stress (load)-deformation-microstructural interactions.

  10. Advanced Gear Alloys for Ultra High Strength Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Tony; Krantz, Timothy; Sebastian, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Single tooth bending fatigue (STBF) test data of UHS Ferrium C61 and C64 alloys are presented in comparison with historical test data of conventional gear steels (9310 and Pyrowear 53) with comparable statistical analysis methods. Pitting and scoring tests of C61 and C64 are works in progress. Boeing statistical analysis of STBF test data for the four gear steels (C61, C64, 9310 and Pyrowear 53) indicates that the UHS grades exhibit increases in fatigue strength in the low cycle fatigue (LCF) regime. In the high cycle fatigue (HCF) regime, the UHS steels exhibit better mean fatigue strength endurance limit behavior (particularly as compared to Pyrowear 53). However, due to considerable scatter in the UHS test data, the anticipated overall benefits of the UHS grades in bending fatigue have not been fully demonstrated. Based on all the test data and on Boeing s analysis, C61 has been selected by Boeing as the gear steel for the final ERDS demonstrator test gearboxes. In terms of potential follow-up work, detailed physics-based, micromechanical analysis and modeling of the fatigue data would allow for a better understanding of the causes of the experimental scatter, and of the transition from high-stress LCF (surface-dominated) to low-stress HCF (subsurface-dominated) fatigue failure. Additional STBF test data and failure analysis work, particularly in the HCF regime and around the endurance limit stress, could allow for better statistical confidence and could reduce the observed effects of experimental test scatter. Finally, the need for further optimization of the residual compressive stress profiles of the UHS steels (resulting from carburization and peening) is noted, particularly for the case of the higher hardness C64 material.

  11. Grain-refining heat treatments to improve cryogenic toughness of high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    The development of two high Reynolds number wind tunnels at NASA Langley Research Center which operate at cryogenic temperatures with high dynamic pressures has imposed severe requirements on materials for model construction. Existing commercial high strength steels lack sufficient toughness to permit their safe use at temperatures approaching that of liquid nitrogen (-320 F). Therefore, a program to improve the cryogenic toughness of commercial high strength steels was conducted. Significant improvement in the cryogenic toughness of commercial high strength martensitic and maraging steels was demonstrated through the use of grain refining heat treatments. Charpy impact strength at -320 F was increased by 50 to 180 percent for the various alloys without significant loss in tensile strength. The grain sizes of the 9 percent Ni-Co alloys and 200 grade maraging steels were reduced to 1/10 of the original size or smaller, with the added benefit of improved machinability. This grain refining technique should permit these alloys with ultimate strengths of 220 to 270 ksi to receive consideration for cryogenic service.

  12. Springback Simulation of High Strength Steel Sheet using Local Interpolation for Tool Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Takuda, Hirohiko; Teodosiu, Cristian; Makinouchi, Akitake

    2007-05-17

    This paper presents the effect of tool modelling accuracy on the simulation accuracy of springback in high strength steels. Simulations of a two-dimensional draw-bending process are carried out by using a polyhedral tool model whose surface is approximated by a polyhedron, and a model whose surface is smoothed by quadratic parametric surfaces proposed by Nagata [Nagata, Comput. Aided Geom. D, 22(2005), 55-59] (Nagata patch model). It is found that not only the shape accuracy but also the normal vector accuracy of tool models are of importance for accurate springback predictions. The use of the Nagata patch model is an efficient approach not only to improve the simulation accuracy but also to make the simulation be hardly influenced by the tool mesh, even for simulations of a high strength steel in which large amount of springback is involved.

  13. Progress in press forming computer aided analysis for high strength steel sheet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramoto, Jiro; Urabe, Masaki; Ishiwatari, Akinobu; Urabe, Toshiaki

    2013-12-01

    The development of press-forming analysis technologies is important to expand the application of high strength steel sheets to automotive body structures. In general, there are various problems in the forming process of high strength steel sheets. In this study the improvements in the prediction accuracy of stretch-flange-fracture and springback were especially focused. In terms of the prediction accuracy of stretch-flange-fracture, a new stretch-flange-fracture prediction technology was developed based on a maximum principal strain gradient. It enables the accurate prediction of stretch- flange-fracture in press-forming of practical parts. On the other hand, springback prediction technologies were developed to solve springback problems. It is very important to clarify the root cause of springback in order to control. Therefore, a new method of springback factor analysis was developed, which can extract the areas and residual stresses which have major impacts on springback at press-forming.

  14. Analysis of local warm forming of high strength steel using near infrared ray energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. H.; Lee, K.; Lee, E. H.; Yang, D. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The automotive industry has been pressed to satisfy more rigorous fuel efficiency requirements to promote energy conservation, safety features and cost containment. To satisfy this need, high strength steel has been developed and used for many different vehicle parts. The use of high strength steels, however, requires careful analysis and creativity in order to accommodate its relatively high springback behavior. An innovative method, called local warm forming with near infrared ray, has been developed to help promote the use of high strength steels in sheet metal forming. For this method, local regions of the work piece are heated using infrared ray energy, thereby promoting the reduction of springback behavior. In this research, a V-bend test is conducted with DP980. After springback, the bend angles for specimens without local heating are compared to those with local heating. Numerical analysis has been performed using the commercial program, DEFORM-2D. This analysis is carried out with the purpose of understanding how changes to the local stress distribution will affect the springback during the unloading process. The results between experimental and computational approaches are evaluated to assure the accuracy of the simulation. Subsequent numerical simulation studies are performed to explore best practices with respect to thermal boundary conditions, timing, and applicability to the production environment.

  15. Analysis of local warm forming of high strength steel using near infrared ray energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W. H.; Lee, K.; Lee, E. H. E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr; Yang, D. Y. E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr

    2013-12-16

    The automotive industry has been pressed to satisfy more rigorous fuel efficiency requirements to promote energy conservation, safety features and cost containment. To satisfy this need, high strength steel has been developed and used for many different vehicle parts. The use of high strength steels, however, requires careful analysis and creativity in order to accommodate its relatively high springback behavior. An innovative method, called local warm forming with near infrared ray, has been developed to help promote the use of high strength steels in sheet metal forming. For this method, local regions of the work piece are heated using infrared ray energy, thereby promoting the reduction of springback behavior. In this research, a V-bend test is conducted with DP980. After springback, the bend angles for specimens without local heating are compared to those with local heating. Numerical analysis has been performed using the commercial program, DEFORM-2D. This analysis is carried out with the purpose of understanding how changes to the local stress distribution will affect the springback during the unloading process. The results between experimental and computational approaches are evaluated to assure the accuracy of the simulation. Subsequent numerical simulation studies are performed to explore best practices with respect to thermal boundary conditions, timing, and applicability to the production environment.

  16. Influence of banded structure on the mechanical properties of a high-strength maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Salam, I.; Hashmi, F.H.; Khan, A.Q.

    1997-04-01

    Chemical inhomogeneity results in the formation of banded structure in high-strength maraging steels. Segregation of titanium and molybdenum was found to be the primary cause of banded structure formation. When the concentrations of these elements increased beyond certain critical levels, bands comprising different grain sizes formed. The inclusions existed preferentially along the interface of the bands. A high-temperature homogenization treatment substantially reduced or eliminated the banded structure. The large grain size resulting from the homogenization treatment was subsequently reduced by a grain refinement treatment. The mechanical properties of the steel substantially improved following homogenization and grain refinement.

  17. Optimization of the heat treatment of ingots of high-strength vessel steel modified by rare-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyuts, V. G.; Tsukanov, V. V.; Efimov, S. V.; Pavlova, A. G.; Golubtsov, V. A.; Levagin, E. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A process is developed for the production of high-strength vessel steel. It includes the application of a microcrystalline REM-containing modifier and an improved regime of preliminary heat treatment of ingots. This process ensures high hot deformability of ingots and a substantial decrease in the time of production of high-strength vessel steel. The quality of the produced steel meets the requirements of the existing technical forms and records.

  18. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  19. Modeling and FE Simulation of Quenchable High Strength Steels Sheet Metal Hot Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongsheng; Bao, Jun; Xing, Zhongwen; Zhang, Dejin; Song, Baoyu; Lei, Chengxi

    2011-08-01

    High strength steel (HSS) sheet metal hot forming process is investigated by means of numerical simulations. With regard to a reliable numerical process design, the knowledge of the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties is essential. In this article, tensile tests are performed to examine the flow stress of the material HSS 22MnB5 at different strains, strain rates, and temperatures. Constitutive model based on phenomenological approach is developed to describe the thermo-mechanical properties of the material 22MnB5 by fitting the experimental data. A 2D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element (FE) model is developed to simulate the HSS sheet metal hot forming process for U-channel part. The ABAQUS/explicit model is used conduct the hot forming stage simulations, and ABAQUS/implicit model is used for accurately predicting the springback which happens at the end of hot forming stage. Material modeling and FE numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the processing parameters on the hot forming process. The processing parameters have significant influence on the microstructure of U-channel part. The springback after hot forming stage is the main factor impairing the shape precision of hot-formed part. The mechanism of springback is advanced and verified through numerical simulations and tensile loading-unloading tests. Creep strain is found in the tensile loading-unloading test under isothermal condition and has a distinct effect on springback. According to the numerical and experimental results, it can be concluded that springback is mainly caused by different cooling rats and the nonhomogengeous shrink of material during hot forming process, the creep strain is the main factor influencing the amount of the springback.

  20. Recent Observation of Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Jr, C J; Liu, Xinyu; Kameda, Jun; Morgan, Michael J

    2008-09-14

    The present progress report shows that the ultra-high-strength 4340-type steel, even if ideally pure, cannot safely be used for service in a hydrogen environment. Some of the strength must be given up in favor of more toughness, which can be achieved by reducing the carbon content and increasing the nickel content. The 5%NiCrMoV steel with about 0.1% carbon shows promise in this regard, especially in an aqueous environment and in hydrogen at around atmospheric pressure. However, we have not yet achieved a purity level high enough to establish the baseline behavior of an ideally pure version of this steel in high-pressure hydrogen.

  1. Microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of a high strength dual-phase steel under monotonic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, E.V.; Bouvier, S.; Bacroix, B.

    2015-02-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructures of a high-strength dual-phase steel DP800 have been examined after moderate plastic deformations in simple shear and uniaxial tension. Special attention has been paid to the effect of the intergranular hard phase (martensite) on the microstructure evolution in the near-grain boundary regions. Quantitative parameters of dislocation patterning have been determined and compared with the similar characteristics of previously examined single-phase steels. The dislocation patterning in the interiors of the ferrite grains in DP800 steel is found to be similar to that already observed in the single-phase IF (Interstitial Free) steel whereas the martensite-affected zones present a delay in patterning and display very high gradients of continuous (gradual) disorientations associated with local internal stresses. The above stresses are shown to control the work-hardening of dual-phase materials at moderate strains for monotonic loading and are assumed to influence their microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior under strain-path changes. - Highlights: • The microstructure evolution has been studied by TEM in a DP800 steel. • It is influenced by both martensite and dislocations in the initial state. • The DP800 steel presents a high work-hardening rate due to internal stresses.

  2. Influence of Cyclic Straining on Fatigue, Deformation, and Fracture Behavior of High-Strength Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.; Vasudevan, V. K.; Tammana, D.; Poorganji, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the results of a study on microstructural influences on mechanical behavior of the high-strength alloy steel Tenax™ 310 are presented and discussed. Under the influence of fully reversed strain cycling, the stress response of this alloy steel revealed softening from the onset of deformation. Cyclic strain resistance exhibited a linear trend for the variation of both elastic strain amplitude with reversals-to-failure, and plastic strain amplitude with reversals-to-failure. Fracture morphology was essentially the same at the macroscopic level over the entire range of cyclic strain amplitudes examined. However, at the fine microscopic level, this high-strength alloy steel revealed fracture to be mixed-mode with features reminiscent of "locally" ductile and brittle mechanisms. The macroscopic mechanisms governing stress response at the fine microscopic level, resultant fatigue life, and final fracture behavior are presented and discussed in light of the mutually interactive influences of intrinsic microstructural effects, deformation characteristics of the microstructural constituents during fully reversed strain cycling, cyclic strain amplitude, and resultant response stress.

  3. Development of multi-pass weld condition for high strength steel using Taguchi method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.

    1995-12-01

    The mechanical tests (tensile strength, impact toughness) are performed to develop a weld conditions for high strength steel. The effects of heat input, weld geometry (root face, root gap, groove angle), electrode type, plate thickness are experimentally analyzed using Taguchi method with an orthogonal L18(2{sup 1} {times} 3{sup 7}) array. From the experiments and the ANOVA analysis, effects of the main factors as well as the interactions between any two factors are quantitatively analyzed and the equations for the mechanical properties as functions of the weld conditions are derived.

  4. Microstructural effects on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of medium and high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, R.; Solana, F.; Bernstein, I. M.; Thompson, A. W.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of variations in microstructure and strength level on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of three medium to high strength steels, H13, 300M, and HY-130, in 3.5 pct NaCl have been systematically studied. Superimposed on the expected inverse dependence of KISCC on yield strength was more than an order of magnitude reduction in crack growth rate, with no strength penalty. These results have been analyzed in terms of the possible relative roles of different microstructural features, in particular retained austenite, whose detailed behavior is the subject of a companion paper.

  5. Microstructural effects on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of medium and high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, R.; Solana, F.; Bernstein, I. M.; Thompson, A. W.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of variations in microstructure and strength level on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of three medium to high strength steels, H13, 300M, and HY-130, in 3.5 pct NaCl have been systematically studied. Superimposed on the expected inverse dependence of KISCC on yield strength was more than an order of magnitude reduction in crack growth rate, with no strength penalty. These results have been analyzed in terms of the possible relative roles of different microstructural features, in particular retained austenite, whose detailed behavior is the subject of a companion paper.

  6. Fabrication of High Strength and Ductile Stainless Steel Fiber Felts by Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Z.; Tang, H. P.; Qian, M.; Li, A. J.; Ma, J.; Xu, Z. G.; Li, C. L.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Stainless steel fiber felts are important porous stainless steel products for a variety of industry applications. A systematic study of the sintering of 28- µm stainless steel fibers has been conducted for the first time, assisted with synchrotron radiation experiments to understand the evolution of the sintered joints. The critical sintering conditions for the formation of bamboo-like grain structures in the fiber ligaments were identified. The evolution of the number density of the sintered joints and the average sintered neck radius during sintering was assessed based on synchrotron radiation experiments. The optimum sintering condition for the fabrication of high strength and ductile 28- µm-diameter stainless steel fiber felts was determined to be sintering at 1000°C for 900 s. Sintering under this optimum condition increased the tensile strength of the as-sintered stainless steel fiber felts by 50% compared to conventional sintering (1200°C for 7200 s), in addition to much reduced sintering cycle and energy consumption.

  7. Microstructural model for hot strip rolling of high-strength low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Militzer, M.; Hawbolt, E.B.; Meadowcroft, T.R.

    2000-04-01

    The microstructural evolution during hot-strip rolling has been investigated in four commercial high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels and compared to that of a plain, low-carbon steel. The recrystallization rates decrease as the Nb microalloying content increases, leading to an increased potential to accumulate retained strain during the final rolling passes. The final microstructure and properties of the hot band primarily depend on the austenite decomposition and precipitation during run-out table cooling and coiling. A combined transformation-ferrite-grain-size model, which was developed for plain, low-carbon steels, can be applied to HSLA steels with some minor modifications. The effect of rolling under no-recrystallization conditions (controlled rolling) on the transformation kinetics and ferrite grain refinement has been evaluated for the Nb-containing steels. Precipitation of carbides, nitrides, and/or carbonitrides takes place primarily during coiling, and particle coarsening controls the associated strengthening effect. The microstructural model has been verified by comparison to structures produced in industrial coil samples.

  8. Effect of shot peening on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-feng; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Ming-ming; Song, Xiao-long

    2016-06-01

    The effect of shot peening (SP) on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel was investigated by electrochemical hydrogen charging, slow strain rate tensile tests, and hydrogen permeation tests. Microstructure observation, microhardness, and X-ray diffraction residual stress studies were also conducted on the steel. The results show that the shot peening specimens exhibit a higher resistance to hydrogen embrittlement in comparison with the no shot peening (NSP) specimens under the same hydrogen-charging current density. In addition, SP treatment sharply decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and increases the subsurface hydrogen concentration. These findings are attributed to the changes in microstructure and compressive residual stress in the surface layer by SP. Scanning electron microscope fractographs reveal that the fracture surface of the NSP specimen exhibits the intergranular and quasi-cleavage mixed fracture modes, whereas the SP specimen shows only the quasi-cleavage fractures under the same hydrogen charging conditions, implying that the SP treatment delays the onset of intergranular fracture.

  9. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  10. Constitutive Modeling of Hot Deformation Behavior of High-Strength Armor Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Madhu, Vemuri

    2016-05-01

    The hot isothermal compression tests of high-strength armor steel under a wide range of deformation temperatures (1100-1250 °C) and strain rates of (0.001-1/s) were performed. Based on the experimental data, constitutive models were established using the original Johnson-Cook (JC) model, modified JC model, and strain-compensated Arrhenius model, respectively. The modified JC model considers the coupled effects of strain hardening, strain rate hardening, and thermal softening. Moreover, the prediction accuracy of these developed models was determined by estimating the correlation coefficient ( R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The results demonstrate that the flow behavior of high-strength armor steel is considerably influenced by the strain rate and temperature. The original JC model is inadequate to provide good description on the flow stress at evaluated temperatures. The modified JC model and strain-compensated Arrhenius model significantly enhance the predictability. It is also observed from the microstructure study that at low strain rates (0.001-0.01/s) and high temperatures (1200-1250 °C), a typical dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs.

  11. An Investigation into Hot Deformation Characteristics and Processing Maps of High-Strength Armor Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Madhu, V.

    2015-12-01

    The isothermal hot compression tests of high-strength armor steel over wide ranges of strain rates (0.01-10 /s) and deformation temperatures (950-1100 °C) are carried out using Gleeble thermo-simulation machine. The true stress-strain data obtained from the experiments are employed to establish the constitutive equations based on the strain-compensated Arrhenius model. With strain-compensated Arrhenius model, good agreement between the experimental and predicted values is achieved, which represents the highest accuracy in comparison with the other models. The hot deformation activation energy is estimated to be 512 kJ/mol. By employing dynamic material model, the processing maps of high-strength armor steel at various strains are established. A maximum efficiency of about 45% of power dissipation is obtained at high temperature and low strain rate. Due to the high power dissipation efficiency and excellent processing ability in dynamic recrystallization zone for metal material, the optimum processing conditions are selected such that the temperature range is between 1050 and 1100°C and the strain rate range is between 0.01 and 0.1/s. Transmission electron microscopy observations show that the dislocation density is directly associated with the value of processing efficiency.

  12. Constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of high strength ferritic steels for static and dynamic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abed, Farid H.

    2010-11-01

    A constitutive relation is presented in this paper to describe the plastic behavior of ferritic steel over a broad range of temperatures and strain rates. The thermo-mechanical behavior of high strength low alloy (HSLA-65) and DH-63 naval structural steels is considered in this study at strains over 40%. The temperatures and strain rates are considered in the range where dynamic strain aging is not effective. The concept of thermal activation analysis as well as the dislocation interaction mechanism is used in developing the flow model for both the isothermal and adiabatic viscoplastic deformation. The flow stresses of the two steels are very sensitive to temperature and strain rate, the yield stresses increase with decreasing temperatures and increasing strain rates. That is, the thermal flow stress is mainly captured by the yield stresses while the hardening stresses are totally pertained to the athermal component of the flow stress. The proposed constitutive model predicts results that compare very well with the measured ones at initial temperature range of 77 K to 1000 K and strain rates between 0.001 s-1 and 8500 s-1 for both steels.

  13. Low-Temperature Toughening Mechanism in Thermomechanically Processed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2011-03-01

    High-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels were fabricated by varying thermomechanical processing conditions such as rolling and cooling conditions in the intercritical region, and the low-temperature toughening mechanism was investigated in terms of microstructure and the associated grain boundary characteristics. The steels acceleratedly cooled to relatively higher temperature had lower tensile strength than those acceleratedly cooled to room temperature due to the increased volume fraction of granular bainite or polygonal ferrite (PF) irrespective of rolling in the intercritical region, while the yield strength was dependent on intercritical rolling, and start and finish cooling temperatures, which affected the formation of PF and low-temperature transformation phases. The steel rolled in the intercritical region and cooled to 673 K (400 °C) provided the best combination of high yield strength and excellent low-temperature toughness because of the presence of fine PF and appropriate mixture of various low-temperature transformation phases such as granular bainite, degenerate upper bainite (DUB), lower bainite (LB), and lath martensite (LM). Despite the high yield strength, the improvement of low-temperature toughness could be explained by the reduction of overall effective grain size based on the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis data, leading to the decrease in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  14. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  15. Seismic performance of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete composite frame joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Changwang; Jia, Jinqing

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of a composite frame comprised of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete (SRUHSC) columns and steel reinforced concrete (SRC) beams, six interior frame joint specimens were designed and tested under low cyclically lateral load. The effects of the axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio were studied on the characteristics of the frame joint performance including crack pattern, failure mode, ductility, energy dissipation capacity, strength degradation and rigidity degradation. It was found that all joint specimens behaved in a ductile manner with flexural-shear failure in the joint core region while plastic hinges appeared at the beam ends. The ductility and energy absorption capacity of joints increased as the axial load ratio decreased and the volumetric stirrup ratio increased. The displacement ductility coefficient and equivalent damping coefficient of the joints fell between the corresponding coefficients of the steel reinforced concrete (SRC) frame joint and RC frame joint. The axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio have less influence on the strength degradation and more influence on the stiffness degradation. The stiffness of the joint degrades more significantly for a low volumetric stirrup ratio and high axial load ratio. The characteristics obtained from the SRUHSC composite frame joint specimens with better seismic performance may be a useful reference in future engineering applications.

  16. Hydroformability of 980MPa and 1180MPa ultra-high strength ERW steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuji; Katsumura, Tatsuro; Aratani, Masatoshi; Sonobe, Osamu; Kato, Yasushi

    2013-12-01

    High strength steel tubes have attracted attention as materials for reducing auto body weight. However, there have been few reports on hydroforming using materials with nominal tensile strengths exceeding 980MPa. Therefore, free bulge forming tests and rectangular section bulge forming tests were carried out with electric resistance welded (ERW) tubes having nominal tensile strengths of 980MPa and 1180MPa. These steels are dual-phase steels consisting of martensite and ferrite. In the free bulge forming tests, the limiting bulging ratio (LBR) under axial feeding was 17% for the 980MPa material and 5% for the 1180MPa material. In the rectangular section bulge tests with a bulging ratio of 4%, it was possible to avoid rupture of the 1180MPa material at the heat-affected zone (HAZ) by applying axial feed loading or selecting the proper welded seam position. Under the same rectangular section bulging test conditions, forming of the 980MPa material without defects was possible regardless of the axial feeding condition and selection of the welded seam position.

  17. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Jian; Wang, Y. Morris

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility,more » leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.« less

  18. The development of high strength corrosion resistant precipitation hardening cast steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Rachel A.

    Precipitation Hardened Cast Stainless Steels (PHCSS) are a corrosion resistant class of materials which derive their properties from secondary aging after a normalizing heat treatment step. While PHCSS materials are available in austenitic and semi-austenitic forms, the martensitic PHCSS are most widely used due to a combination of high strength, good toughness, and corrosion resistance. If higher strength levels can be achieved in these alloys, these materials can be used as a lower-cost alternative to titanium for high specific strength applications where corrosion resistance is a factor. Although wrought precipitation hardened materials have been in use and specified for more than half a century, the specification and use of PHCSS has only been recent. The effects of composition and processing on performance have received little attention in the cast steel literature. The work presented in these investigations is concerned with the experimental study and modeling of microstructural development in cast martensitic precipitation hardened steels at high strength levels. Particular attention is focused on improving the performance of the high strength CB7Cu alloy by control of detrimental secondary phases, notably delta ferrite and retained austenite, which is detrimental to strength, but potentially beneficial in terms of fracture and impact toughness. The relationship between age processing and mechanical properties is also investigated, and a new age hardening model based on simultaneous precipitation hardening and tempering has been modified for use with these steels. Because the CB7Cu system has limited strength even with improved processing, a higher strength prototype Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-Ti system has been designed and adapted for use in casting. This prototype is expected to develop high strengths matching or exceed that of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Traditional multicomponent constitution phase diagrams widely used for phase estimation in conventional stainless steels

  19. Metallurgical considerations of the high yield to ultimate ratio in high strength steels for use in offshore engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, J.; Billingham, J.

    1995-12-31

    High strength steels are increasingly being specified for offshore applications primarily on topsides, but also more recently in jackets themselves. Compared with conventional structural steels, modem high strength steels possess higher yield ratios (YR). This has caused some concern and debate on their work hardening capacity and moreover, current material specification and design codes severely penalize their use by placing limits on YR and on allowable design stress. Many changes have occurred in steel processing and alloying methods over the past 15 years or so, to produce higher strength steels with increased toughness yet utilizing leaner chemistries to enhance weldability. High strength steels in the range 355--550MPa are likely to be increasingly used in future offshore applications and the current paper, although concerned with studies aimed specifically to assess the importance of variations in YR, also presents an overview of typical mechanical properties possessed by such steels. In general, the actual yield strength of steel plates exceeds the SMYS by a significant margin, sometimes by as much as 100MPa, which has important implications for material selection, design procedures and welding considerations. In general, as the yield strength increases, so also does the YR. However, despite possessing high YR values, modem steels maintain high levels of combined toughness, ductility and weldability. Variability in mechanical properties can be correlated with parameters such as particular steel manufacturer and production route, composition, and plate thickness. It has been demonstrated that some manufacturers can exert closer control on variability in properties, thereby consistently satisfying current offshore requirements.

  20. Nickel coating on high strength low alloy steel by pulse current deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, S.; Patel, S. K.; Mahapatra, S. S.; Sharma, N.; Ghosh, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal mostly used to enhance the value, utility, and lifespan of industrial equipment and components by protecting them from corrosion. Nickel is commonly used in the chemical and food processing industries to prevent iron from contamination. Since the properties of nickel can be controlled and varied over broad ranges, nickel plating finds numerous applications in industries. In the present investigation, pulse current electro-deposition technique has been used to deposit nickel on a high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel substrate.Coating of nickel is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and EDAX analysis. Optical microscopy and SEM is used to assess the coating characteristics. Electrochemical polarization study has been carried out to study the corrosion behaviour of nickel coating and the polarisation curves have revealed that current density used during pulse electro-deposition plays a vital role on characteristics of nickel coating.

  1. Sliding wear, toughness and microstructural relationships in high strength Fe/Cr/C experimental steels

    SciTech Connect

    Salesky, W.J.

    1980-06-01

    Hardness has been believed to be the major parameter influencing wear resistance of materials. Recently, it was suggested that combinations of high strength and toughness may lead to optimum wear resistance. It is known that the martensite transformation can be exploited to provide a variety of strength-toughness combinations. Small additions of Mn or Ni to the Fe/4Cr/.3C martensitic alloys have been shown to increase toughness while maintaining strength via increasing the volume fraction of retained austenite. An investigation of the relationships between microstructure, toughness, and sliding wear resistance for these experimental alloys is reported. Comparative studies were performed on several industrial alloys to provide a practical basis for comparison of these medium carbon experimental steels.

  2. Toughening by the addition of phosphorus to a high-strength steel with ultrafine elongated grain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Meysam; Kimura, Yuuji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2013-02-01

    Phosphorus-doped high-strength steels are typically brittle at room temperature. In contrast to the non-hardening embrittlement of body-centred cubic (bcc) steels which decreases toughness without increasing strength, we observed an increase in toughness of about 20% by adding a large amount (0.053 wt%) of phosphorus (P) to a high-strength bcc steel with an ultrafine elongated ferrite grain structure processed by warm calibre rolling at 500 °C which produced a 91% reduction in area. The enhanced toughness is attributed to P segregation, which causes grain boundaries to become feasible crack propagation paths, thereby enhancing delamination toughening. The 0.053% P steel showed a microstructure and tensile properties similar to those of 0.001% P steel (reference steel).

  3. Effect of microstructure on static and dynamic mechanical properties of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinbo

    The high speed deformation behavior of a commercially available dual phase (DP) steel was studied by means of split Hopkinson bar apparatus in shear punch (25m/s) and tension (1000s-1) modes with an emphasis on the influence of microstructure. The cold rolled sheet material was subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to produce several different microstructures, namely ferrite plus pearlite, ferrite plus bainite and/or acicular ferrite, ferrite plus bainite and martensite, and ferrite plus different fractions of martensite. Static properties (0.01mm/s for shear punch and 0.001s -1 for tension) of all the microstructures were also measured by an MTS hydraulic machine and compared to the dynamic properties. The effects of low temperature tempering and bake hardening were investigated for some ferrite plus martensite microstructures. In addition, two other materials, composition designed as high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, were heat treated and tested to study the effect of alloy chemistry on the microstructure and property relationship. A strong effect of microstructure on both static and dynamic properties and on the relationship between static and dynamic properties was observed. According to the variation of dynamic factor with static strength, three groups of microstructures with three distinct behaviors were identified, i.e. classic dual phase (ferrite plus less than 50% martensite), martensite-matrix dual phase (ferrite plus more than 50% martensite), and non-dual phase (ferrite plus non-martensite). Under the same static strength level, the dual phase microstructure was found to absorb more dynamic energy than other microstructures. It was also observed that the general dependence of microstructure on static and dynamic property relationship was not strongly influenced by chemical composition, except the ferrite plus martensite microstructures generated by the TRIP chemistry, which exhibited

  4. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  5. Mechanical and Electrochemical Behavior of a High Strength Low Alloy Steel of Different Grain Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, K. S.; Mondal, D. K.

    2013-08-01

    Various heat treatments applied to a fine-grained high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel resulted in producing different grain sizes. Optical and scanning electron microstructures of the different alloy states exhibited varying ferrite grains which have increased with the increase of annealing time and decrease of cooling rates. TEM structures of the as-received HSLA steel displayed characteristics microstructural features, distribution, and morphology of microalloy precipitates. Hardness and tensile strength values have decreased with the increase of grain sizes. Potentiodynamic electrochemical polarization of the different alloy states in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution showed typical active metal/alloy behavior. Tensile specimens of the as-received and heat-treated alloy cathodically charged with hydrogen, followed by tensile testing, did not indicate any noticeable loss of ductility. FESEM fractographs of hydrogen-charged samples showed a few chain of voids in the presence of cup and cone ductile fracture features in tensile-tested samples without hydrogen charging as well.

  6. An analytical electron microscopy study of paraequilibrium cementite precipitation in ultra-high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.; Olson, G. B.; Campbell, C. E.

    1999-03-01

    To support quantitative design of ultra-high-strength (UHS) secondary-hardening steels, the precipitation of cementite prior to the precipitation of the M2C phase is investigated using a model alloy. The microstructure of cementite is investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Consistent with earlier studies on tempering of Fe-C martensite, lattice imaging of cementite suggests microsyntactic intergrowth of M5C2 (Hägg carbide). The concentration of substitutional alloying elements in cementite are quantified by high-resolution analytical electron microscopy (AEM) using extraction replica specimens. Quantification of the substitutional elements in cementite confirms its paraequilibrium (PE) state with ferrite at the very early stage of tempering. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the thermodynamic driving force for nucleation of the primary-strengthening, coherent M2C carbide phase. The ferrite-cementite PE condition reduces the carbon concentration in the ferrite matrix with a significant reduction of M2C driving force. The kinetics of dissolution of PE cementite and its transition to other intermediate states will also influence the kinetics of secondary hardening behavior in UHS steels.

  7. Studies of Evaluation of Hydrogen Embrittlement Property of High-Strength Steels with Consideration of the Effect of Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Eiji; Wang, Maoqiu; Li, Songjie; Zhang, Zuogui; Kimura, Yuuji; Uno, Nobuyoshi; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength steels was investigated by using slow strain rate test (SSRT) of circumferentially notched round bar specimens after hydrogen precharging. On top of that, cyclic corrosion tests (CCT) and outdoor exposure tests were conducted prior to SSRT to take into account the effect of hydrogen uptake under atmospheric corrosion for the evaluation of the susceptibility of high-strength steels. Our studies of hydrogen embrittle properties of high-strength steels with 1100 to 1500 MPa of tensile strength and a prototype ultrahigh-strength steel with 1760 MPa containing hydrogen traps using those methods are reviewed in this article. A power law relationship between notch tensile strength of hydrogen-precharged specimens and diffusible hydrogen content has been found. It has also been found that the local stress and the local hydrogen concentration are controlling factors of fracture. The results obtained by using SSRT after CCT and outdoor exposure test were in good agreement with the hydrogen embrittlement fracture property obtained by means of long-term exposure tests of bolts made of the high-strength steels.

  8. Detection of stress corrosion cracking of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, S.; Gaillet, L.; Tessier, C.; Idrissi, H.

    2008-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures was studied by acoustic emission technique (AE). A simulated concrete pore (SCP) solution at high-alkaline (pH ≈ 12) contaminated by sulphate, chloride, and thiocyanate ions was used. The evolution of the acoustic activity recorded during the tests shows the presence of several stages related respectively to cracks initiation due to the local corrosion imposed by corrosives species, cracks propagation and steel failure. Microscopic examinations pointed out that the wires exhibited a brittle fracture mode. The cracking was found to propagate in the transgranular mode. The role of corrosives species and hydrogen in the rupture mechanism of high-strength steel was also investigated. This study shows promising results for an potential use in situ of AE for real-time health monitoring of eutectoid steel cables used in prestressed concrete structures.

  9. Influence of original microstructure on the transformation behavior and mechanical properties of ultra-high-strength TRIP-aided steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hong-xiang; Zhao, Ai-min; Zhao, Zheng-zhi; Li, Xiao; Li, Shuang-jiao; Hu, Han-jiang; Xia, Wei-guang

    2015-03-01

    The transformation behavior and tensile properties of an ultra-high-strength transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel (0.2C-2.0Si-1.8Mn) were investigated by different heat treatments for automobile applications. The results show that F-TRIP steel, a traditional TRIP steel containing as-cold-rolled ferrite and pearlite as the original microstructure, consists of equiaxed grains of intercritical ferrite surrounded by discrete particles of M/RA and B. In contrast, M-TRIP steel, a modified TRIP-aided steel with martensite as the original microstructure, containing full martensite as the original microstructure is comprised of lath-shaped grains of ferrite separated by lath-shaped martensite/retained austenite and bainite. Most of the austenite in F-TRIP steel is granular, while the austenite in M-TRIP steel is lath-shaped. The volume fraction of the retained austenite as well as its carbon content is lower in F-TRIP steel than in M-TRIP steel, and austenite grains in M-TRIP steel are much finer than those in F-TRIP steel. Therefore, M-TRIP steel was concluded to have a higher austenite stability, resulting in a lower transformation rate and consequently contributing to a higher elongation compared to F-TRIP steel. Work hardening behavior is also discussed for both types of steel.

  10. Microstructure and oxidation behavior of high strength steel AISI 410 implanted with nitrogen ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandriyana, Ismoyo, Agus Hadi; Sujitno, Tjipto; Dimyati, A.

    2016-04-01

    Surface treatment by implantation with nitrogen-ion was performed on the commercial feritic high strength steel AISI 410 which is termed for high temperature applications. The aim of this research was focused on the surface modification to improve its high temperature oxidation property in the early stages. Ion implantation was carried out at acceleration energy of 100 KeV and ion current 10 mA for 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The samples were subjected to the high temperature oxidation test by means of thermogravimetry in a magnetic suspension balance (MSB) at 500 °C for 5 hours. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD) and Vickers Hardness measurement were used for sample characterization. The formation of ferro-nitride phase after implantation did not occur, however a thin layer considered to contain nitrogen interstitials was detected. The oxidation of both samples before and after implantation followed parabolic kinetics indicating inward growth of oxide scale characteristically due to diffusion of oxygen anions towards matrix surface. After oxidation test relativelly stable oxide scales were observed. Oxidation rates decreased proportionally with the increasing of implantation time due to the formation of oxide layer which is considered to be effectiv inhibitor for the oxygen diffusion.

  11. The formation mechanisms of interlocked microstructures in low-carbon high-strength steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X.L.; Wang, H.H.; Cheng, L.; Wu, K.M.

    2012-05-15

    Microstructural features and the formation mechanisms of interlocked microstructures of acicular ferrite in a low-carbon high-strength steel weld metal were investigated by means of computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction technique and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. Multiple nucleation on inclusions, sympathetic nucleation or repeated nucleation, hard impingement, mutual intersection, and fixed orientation relationships of acicular ferrite grains were observed. They were all responsible for the formation of interlocked microstructures in the weld metal. During the process of isothermal transformation, the pre-formed acicular ferrite laths or plates partitioned austenite grains into many small and separate regions, and the growth of later formed acicular ferrite grains was confined in these small regions. Thus, the crystallographic grain size became smaller with the increasing holding time. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acicular ferrite is formed by multiple nucleation and sympathetic nucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hard impingement and intersection of ferrite grains occur at later stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pre-formed ferrite laths partition austenite grains into smaller regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The growth of later formed ferrite grains is confined in the smaller regions.

  12. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel

    PubMed Central

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure. PMID:27222751

  13. Effect of initial microstructure on austenite formation kinetics in high-strength experimental microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Martínez, Edgar; Vázquez-Gómez, Octavio; Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier; Campillo, Bernardo

    2015-12-01

    Austenite formation kinetics in two high-strength experimental microalloyed steels with different initial microstructures comprising bainite-martensite and ferrite-martensite/austenite microconstituents was studied during continuous heating by dilatometric analysis. Austenite formation occurred in two steps: (1) carbide dissolution and precipitation and (2) transformation of residual ferrite to austenite. Dilatometric analysis was used to determine the critical temperatures of austenite formation and continuous heating transformation diagrams for heating rates ranging from 0.03°C•s-1 to 0.67°C•s-1. The austenite volume fraction was fitted using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation to determine the kinetic parameters k and n as functions of the heating rate. Both n and k parameters increased with increasing heating rate, which suggests an increase in the nucleation and growth rates of austenite. The activation energy of austenite formation was determined by the Kissinger method. Two activation energies were associated with each of the two austenite formation steps. In the first step, the austenite growth rate was controlled by carbon diffusion from carbide dissolution and precipitation; in the second step, it was controlled by the dissolution of residual ferrite to austenite.

  14. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel.

    PubMed

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure. PMID:27222751

  15. Constant-load delayed fracture test of atmospherically corroded high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Eiji; Matsukado, Katsuhiro; Li, Songjie; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2011-07-01

    Constant load tests of circumferentially notched round bar specimens of high strength steels after cyclic corrosion test and outdoor exposure have been performed to demonstrate that delayed fracture occurs when the hydrogen content from the environment, H E, exceeds the critical hydrogen content for delayed fracture, H C. During the constant load tests the humidity around the specimen was increased in stepwise manner to increase hydrogen entry. After fracture the specimen was kept at the humidity long enough to homogenize hydrogen in the specimen and to obtain more quantitative hydrogen content by thermal desorption analysis. H E of the fractured specimens was higher than H C, and H E of the specimens not fractured was lower than H C. This result confirms that the balance between H C and H E determines the occurrence of delayed fracture and that hydrogen-content-based evaluation of susceptibility to delayed fracture is reasonable. To certify the increase of H E with increase in humidity, electrochemical hydrogen permeation test was carried out. The hydrogen permeation current density was increased especially at 98%RH. Enhancement of hydrogen entry with increase in CCT number was also shown by the test.

  16. On the decomposition of austenite in the heat-affected zone upon welding of high-strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimenko, L. A.; Ramus', A. A.; Merkulova, A. O.

    2015-05-01

    The kinetics of the decomposition of austenite in the heat-affected zone of welded joints of low-carbon microalloyed high-strength steels has been investigated. A new approach to selecting the parameters of the thermal cycle of welding that ensure the service characteristics of welded joints on a level no lower than the normative requirements is suggested.

  17. FE Simulation Models for Hot Stamping an Automobile Component with Tailor-Welded High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bingtao; Wang, Qiaoling; Wei, Zhaohui; Meng, Xianju; Yuan, Zhengjun

    2016-05-01

    Ultra-high-strength in sheet metal parts can be achieved with hot stamping process. To improve the crash performance and save vehicle weight, it is necessary to produce components with tailored properties. The use of tailor-welded high-strength steel is a relatively new hot stamping process for saving weight and obtaining desired local stiffness and crash performance. The simulation of hot stamping boron steel, especially tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) stamping, is more complex and challenging. Information about thermal/mechanical properties of tools and sheet materials, heat transfer, and friction between the deforming material and the tools is required in detail. In this study, the boron-manganese steel B1500HS and high-strength low-alloy steel B340LA are tailor welded and hot stamped. In order to precisely simulate the hot stamping process, modeling and simulation of hot stamping tailor-welded high-strength steels, including phase transformation modeling, thermal modeling, and thermal-mechanical modeling, is investigated. Meanwhile, the welding zone of tailor-welded blanks should be sufficiently accurate to describe thermal, mechanical, and metallurgical parameters. FE simulation model using TWBs with the thickness combination of 1.6 mm boron steel and 1.2 mm low-alloy steel is established. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the hot stamped automotive component (mini b-pillar), hardness and microstructure at each region are investigated. The comparisons between simulated results and experimental observations show the reliability of thermo-mechanical and metallurgical modeling strategies of TWBs hot stamping process.

  18. Computational design and analysis of high strength austenitic TRIP steels for blast protection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Padmanava

    Recent assessment of material property requirements for blast resistant applications, especially for the naval ship hulls, has defined the need to design steels with high stretch ductility and fragment penetration resistance, along with high strength and adequate toughness. Using a system based computational materials design approach, two series of austenitic (gamma) steels have been designed -- BA120 to exhibit high uniform ductility in tension (>20%) and SA120 to exhibit high tensile (>20%) and shear strains (>50%), with both alloys maintaining high levels of yield strength (120 ksi/827 MPa) at room temperature under Tensile and Shear stress states. BA120 is low chromium (4 wt %) high nickel (23.5 wt %) alloy while the SA120 is a high chromium design (10 wt %), both designed for non-magnetic behavior. The Thermo-Calc computational thermodynamics software in conjunction with a Ni-DATA 7 thermodynamic database has been used to model precipitation strengthening of the alloy, by quantifying the dependence of yield stress of austenitic steels on the mole fraction of the precipitated gamma' (Gamma Prime) Ni3(Ti, Al) phase. The required high strength has been achieved by the precipitation of spheroidal intermetallic gamma' -- phase of optimum diameter (15 nm) in equilibrium with the matrix at the standard aging temperature. Adequate Al and Ti with respect 5 to the Ni in the matrix ensure enough gamma' phase fraction and number density of precipitates to provide the necessary strength. The predicted gamma' precipitation strengthening to 120-130 ksi for both BA120 and SA120 has been validated through both microhardness as well as static and dynamic tensile and shear tests conducted at room temperature. 3-D LEAP analysis of the aged specimens has shown the expected size and distribution of gamma' -- precipitates with good compositional accuracy of predicted values from the thermodynamic models, for both matrix austenite and gamma'. Metastable austenitic steels have been

  19. Laser-Assisted Sheet Metal Working of High Strength Steels in Serial Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus

    Within the sheet metal working industry the demand for thinner sheet materials with very high strength is growing due to the increasing need to save energy and a responsible use of natural resources. The high strength and the low ductility restricts using state of art technology to sheer, bend, emboss or deep draw parts with the needed complexity and quality. The Fraunhofer IPT developed a combination of laser-assisted preheating and conventional punching to a new hybrid technology which allows to shear, bend, emboss and draw high strength materials with a high quality and complexity in a serial production.

  20. Residual Stresses in Inertia-Friction-Welded Dissimilar High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moat, R. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Steuwer, A.; Iqbal, N.; Preuss, M.; Bray, S. E.; Rawson, M.

    2009-09-01

    The welding of dissimilar alloys is seen increasingly as a way forward to improve efficiencies in modern aeroengines, because it allows one to tailor varying material property demands across a component. Dissimilar inertia friction welding (IFW) of two high-strength steels, Aermet 100 and S/CMV, has been identified as a possible joint for rotating gas turbine components and the resulting welds are investigated in this article. In order to understand the impact of the welding process and predict the life expectancy of such structures, a detailed understanding of the residual stress fields present in the welded component is needed. By combining energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction (EDSXRD) and neutron diffraction, it has been possible to map the variations in lattice spacing of the ferritic phase on both sides of two tubular Aermet 100-S/CMV inertia friction welds (as-welded and postweld heat-treated condition) with a wall thickness of 37 mm. Laboratory-based XRD measurements were required to take into account the variation in the strain-free d-spacing across the weld region. It was found that, in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) slightly away from the weld line, residual stress fields showed tensile stresses increasing most dramatically in the hoop direction toward the weld line. Closer to the weld line, in the plastically affected zone, a sharp drop in the residual stresses was observed on both sides, although more dramatically in the S/CMV. In addition to residual stress mapping, synchrotron XRD measurements were carried out to map microstructural changes in thin slices cut from the welds. By studying the diffraction peak asymmetry of the 200- α diffraction peak, it was possible to demonstrate that a martensitic phase transformation in the S/CMV is responsible for the significant stress reduction close to the weld line. The postweld heat treatment (PWHT) chosen to avoid any overaging of the Aermet 100 and to temper the S/CMV martensite resulted in little

  1. Effect of electrode force condition on nugget diameter and residual stress in resistance spot welded high-strength steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyota, M.; Mikami, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Taniguchi, K.; Ikeda, R.; Mochizuki, M.

    2012-08-01

    This study examines the effect of the electrode force condition on the nugget diameter and residual stress in spot welded high-strength steel sheets. Numerical simulations of spot welding were performed to examine the nugget diameter and residual stress. The results indicate that adjusting the force profile changes the current density and stress state at the spot welds. Therefore, choosing an appropriate force profile extends the nugget diameter and reduces the residual stress.

  2. In vivo evaluation of a high-strength, high-ductility stainless steel for use in surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Syrett, B C; Davis, E E

    1979-07-01

    A high-strength, high-ductility, austenitic stainless steel has been evaluated for use in surgical implants by performing in vivo tests in rats, rabbits, dogs, and rhesus monkeys. This stainless steel, a TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steel containing about 4% Mo, was compared with two alloys in current clinical use: Type 316L stainless steel and cast Vitallium. Compared with the other two alloys, cast Vitallium generally had higher resistance to corrosion and superior biocompatibility in all animals. The tests in rats and dogs indicated that the corrosion resistances of the TRIP steel and the Type 316L stainless steel were similar and that the tissue reactions caused by these alloys were also similar. However, in rhesus monkeys, the TRIP steel was shown to be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking and much more susceptible to crevice corrosion than Type 316L stainless steel. Limited tests in rabbits supported the observation that the TRIP steel is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking. These inconsistencies in the in vivo tests underline the need for a reevaluation of the popular test techniques and of the animals commonly chosen for assessing the suitability of candidate implant materials. The "worst case" results from the rhesus monkey tests were entirely consistent with previous results obtained from in vitro studies. However, further work must be performed before the behavior of metals in humans, rhesus monkeys, or any other animal, can be predicted with confidence from an in vitro test program. PMID:110810

  3. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  4. Standard specification for high-strength low-alloy structural steel. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.02 on Structural Steel for Bridges, Buildings, Rolling Stock, and Ships. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1998. Published December 1998.

  5. Local heat treatment of high strength steels with zoom-optics and 10kW-diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Markus; Krause, Volker; Bergweiler, Georg; Flaischerowitz, Martin; Banik, Janko

    2012-03-01

    High strength steels enable new solutions for weight optimized car bodies without sacrificing crash safety. However, cold forming of these steels is limited due to the need of high press capacity, increased tool wear, and limitations in possible geometries. One can compensate for these drawbacks by local heat treatment of the blanks. In high-deformation areas the strength of the material is reduced and the plasticity is increased by diode laser irradiation. Local heat treatment with diode laser radiation could also yield key benefits for the applicability of press hardened parts. High strength is not desired all over the part. Joint areas or deformation zones for requested crash properties require locally reduced strength. In the research project "LOKWAB" funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), heat treatment of high strength steels was investigated in cooperation with Audi, BMW, Daimler, ThyssenKrupp, Fraunhofer- ILT, -IWU and others. A diode laser with an output power of 10 kW was set up to achieve acceptable process speed. Furthermore a homogenizing zoom-optics was developed, providing a rectangular focus with homogeneous power density. The spot size in x- and y-direction can be changed independently during operation. With pyrometer controlled laser power the surface temperature is kept constant, thus the laser treated zone can be flexibly adapted to the needs. Deep-drawing experiments show significant improvement in formability. With this technique, parts can be manufactured, which can conventionally only be made of steel with lower strength. Locally reduced strength of press hardened serial parts was demonstrated.

  6. Effect of Multistage Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingdong; Wen, Haiming; Zhang, Han; Gu, Jianfeng; Li, Chuanwei; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of Cu-rich precipitates (CRPs) and reverted austenite (RA) on the strength and impact toughness of a Cu-containing 3.5 wt pct Ni high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel after various heat treatments involving quenching (Q), lamellarization (L), and tempering (T) is studied using electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography. The QT sample exhibits high strength but low impact toughness, whereas the QL samples mostly possess improved impact toughness but moderate strength, but the QLT samples again have degraded impact toughness due to additional tempering. The dispersion of nanoscale CRPs, which are formed during tempering, is responsible for the enhanced strength but simultaneously leads to the degraded impact toughness. The RA formed during lamellarization contributes to the improved impact toughness. Based on the present study, new heat treatment schedules are proposed to balance strength and impact toughness by optimizing the precipitation of CRPs and RA.

  7. Standard specification for high-strength low-alloy columbium-vanadium structural steel. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    DoD adopted. This guide is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.02 on Structural Steel for Bridges, Buildings, Rolling Stock, and Ships. Current edition approved Dec. 10, 1997. Published May 1998. Originally published as A 572-66. Last previous edition A 572/A 572M-97b.

  8. Performance optimization and computational design of ultra-high strength gear steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemens, Benjamin Lee

    Rising power density requirements in transmission gear applications are swiftly outpacing gear redesign alone and will ultimately depend on better materials. Ni-Co secondary hardening steels show great promise for these applications due to their optimized combination of strength and toughness. The commercially available secondary hardening alloys GearMet RTM C61 and C67 have already demonstrated promising contact fatigue resistance, however bending fatigue is anticipated to be the primary failure mode limiting high power density gear applications. Single tooth bending fatigue testing was therefore completed on C61 and C67 spur gears to both assess the optimized performance of these alloys as well as identify defect populations currently limiting further advances. The resultant best-practice C61 spur gears in a shot peened and isotropic superfinished condition outperformed the top-ranking premium gear steel, demonstrating an approximate 15% improvement in bending fatigue endurance limit. Fatigue failures limiting further bending fatigue performance were identified to primarily initiate at three defect classes: shot peening-induced surface damage, subsurface inter-granular cleavage facets and Al2O3 and La2O2S inclusions. C67 spur gears did not show increased performance despite elevated surface hardness levels due to the inability of current shot peening practices to achieve maximum compressive stress in ultra-high hardness materials. In an effort to reduce the material cost of these alloys through minimization/elimination of cobalt alloying additions, BCC Cu precipitation was incorporated to offset ensuing losses in temper resistance by providing additional heterogeneous nucleation sites for the M2C strengthening dispersion. Fifty-pound experimental heats were made of four designed compositions. Peak hardness levels achieved during tempering fell on average 200 VHN short of the 900 VHN designed surface hardness. 3-dimensional local electrode atom probe (LEAP

  9. Graded High-Strength Spring-Steels by a Special Inductive Heat T reatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tump, A.; Brandt, R.

    2016-03-01

    A method for effective lightweight design is the use of materials with high specific strength. As materials e.g. titanium are very expensive, steel is still the most important material for manufacturing automotive components. Steel is cost efficient, easy to recycle and its tensile strength easily exceeds 2,000 MPa by means of modern QT-technology (Quenched and Tempered). Therefore, lightweight design is still feasible in spite of the high density of steel. However, a further increase of tensile strength is limited, especially due to an increasing notch sensitivity and exposure to a corrosive environment. One solution is a special QT-process for steel, which creates a hardness gradient from the surface to the core of the material. This type of tailored material possesses a softer layer, which improves material properties such as fracture toughness and notch sensitivity. This leads to a better resistance to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. Due to this optimization, a weight reduction is feasible without the use of expensive alloying elements. To understand the damage mechanism a comprehensive testing procedure was performed on homogeneous and gradient steels. Some results regarding the fracture mechanic behavior of such steels will be discussed.

  10. Numerical and experimental evaluation of laser forming process for the shape correction in ultra high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Kim, E. Z.; Lee, N. K.; Lee, G. A.; Park, S. J.; Chu, A.

    2013-12-16

    In this paper, laser forming characteristics in ultra high strength steel with ultimate strength of 1200MPa are investigated numerically and experimentally. FE simulation is conducted to identify the response related to deformation and characterize the effect of laser power, beam diameter and scanning speed with respect to the bending angle for a square sheet part. The thermo-mechanical behaviors during the straight-line heating process are presented in terms of temperature, stress and strain. An experimental setup including a fiber laser with maximum mean power of 3.0 KW is used in the experiments. From the results in this work, it would be easily adjustment the laser power and the scanning speed by controlling the line energy for a bending operation of CP1180 steel sheets.

  11. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  12. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-16

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  14. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of TiC/Ti(CN)/TiN multilayer CVD coatings on high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Xue, Qi; Li, Songxia

    2013-09-01

    Titanium carbide/titanium carbonitride/titanium nitride (TiC/Ti(CN)/TiN) multilayer coatings are prepared on the surface of three high-strength steels (35CrMo, 42CrMo, and 40CrNiMo) by chemical vapor deposition method. The fracture morphology, elemental distribution, phase composition, micro-hardness, and adhesion of the multilayer film are analyzed. The hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion resistance of the coating is evaluated by the National Association of Corrosion Engineers saturated hydrogen sulfide solution immersion test. A test simulating the environment of the natural gas wells with high temperature and pressure in Luojiazhai in Sichuan is also performed. The results show that the multilayer coatings have dense structures, ∼11 μm thickness, 24.5 ± 2.0 GPa nano-hardness, and ∼70 N adhesion. The corrosion sample also shows no brittle failure induced by stress corrosion after treatment with the coating. Gravimetric analysis shows that the deposition of TiC/Ti(CN)/TiN multilayer coatings results in a corrosion rate reduction of at least 50 times compared with the high-strength steel substrate. A preliminary analysis on this phenomenon is conducted.

  15. A High-Strength High-Ductility Ti- and Mo-Bearing Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao; Zhao, Aimin; Wang, Xiaopei; Wang, Xuming; Yang, Jingbo; Han, Junke; Yang, Fengli

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development of a Ti- and Mo-bearing ferritic steel precipitation-strengthened by nanometer-sized carbides. The steel showed an ultimate tensile strength of 995 MPa, a tensile elongation of 20 pct, and a hole-expanding ratio of 44 pct. The precipitation of nanometer-sized carbides in this steel during isothermal transformation at 873 K, 898 K, and 973 K (600 °C, 625 °C, and 700 °C) for 60 minutes was investigated in detail. The contributions of various strengthening mechanisms were analyzed, and the maximum contribution from the nanometer-sized carbide precipitates was estimated to be about 430 MPa.

  16. The question of increasing the contact life of high-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zarotskii, G.I.; Katsov, K.B.; Khrunik, R.A.; Kokotailo, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    Comparative investigations were made of the contact life of 00N18KM5T and 00N14Kh5M3T maraging steels and 38KhN3MFA dispersion-hardened steel with different variations of melting and heat and chemicothermal treatment. The contact life investigations were made in the 450-2000-MPa range of stresses with a degree of slippage of 5%. It was established that regardless of the chemical composition and heat treatment, nitriding by ionized nitrogen in the plasma of a glow discharge provides the greatest increase in specimen contact life (210-245%).

  17. On the impact bending test technique for high-strength pipe steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenkin, A. M.; Odesskii, P. D.; Shabalov, I. P.; Likhachev, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    It is shown that the impact toughness (KCV-40 = 250 J/cm2) accepted for pipe steels of strength class K65 (σy ≥ 550 MPa) intended for large-diameter gas line pipes is ineffective to classify steels in fracture strength. The results obtained upon testing of specimens with a fatigue crack and additional sharp lateral grooves seem to be more effective. In energy consumption, a macrorelief with splits is found to be intermediate between ductile fracture and crystalline brittle fracture. A split formation mechanism is considered and a scheme is proposed for split formation.

  18. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  19. High-Strength Low-Carbon Ferritic Steel Containing Cu-Fe-Ni-Al-Mn Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaynman, Semyon; Isheim, Dieter; Prakash Kolli, R.; Bhat, Shrikant P.; Seidman, David N.; Fine, Morris E.

    2008-02-01

    An investigation of a low-carbon, Fe-Cu-based steel, for Naval ship hull applications, with a yield strength of 965 MPa, Charpy V-notch absorbed impact-energy values as high as 74 J at -40 °C, and an elongation-to-failure greater than 15 pct, is presented. The increase in strength is derived from a large number density (approximately 1023 to 1024 m-3) of copper-iron-nickel-aluminum-manganese precipitates. The effect on the mechanical properties of varying the thermal treatment was studied. The nanostructure of the precipitates found within the steel was characterized by atom-probe tomography. Additionally, initial welding studies show that a brittle heat-affected zone is not formed adjacent to the welds.

  20. Investigation of Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Quenchable High-Strength Steels in Hot Stamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorriño, Anton; Angulo, Carlos; Muro, Maider; Izaga, Julian

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) is determined in the industrial range of contact pressure applied during the hot stamping process of boron steel sheets, under similar conditions to those used in industrial practice. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the parts are also examined. Moreover, the influence of the stamping pressure on the IHTC is investigated in detail via mechanical property and microstructural characterization.

  1. Formation Energies and Electronic Properties of Vanadium Carbides Found in High Strength Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, Krista; Medvedeva, Julia

    2013-03-01

    Carbide formation and stabilization in steels is of great interest owing to its effect on the microstructure and properties of the Fe-based alloys. The appearance of carbides with different metal/C ratios strongly depends on the carbon concentration, alloy composition as well as the heat treatment. Strong carbide-forming elements such as Ti, V, and Nb have been used in microalloyed steels; with VC showing an increased solubility in the iron matrix as compared with TiC and NbC. This allows for dissolution of the VC into the steel during heating and fine precipitation during cooling. In addition to VC, the primary vanadium carbide with cubic structure, a wide range of non-stoichiometric compositions VCy with y varying from 0.72 to 0.88, has been observed. This range includes two ordered compounds, V8C7 and V6C5. In this study, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is employed to examine the stability of the binary carbides by calculating their formation energies. We compare the local structures (atomic coordination, bond distances and angles) and the density of states in optimized geometries of the carbides. Further, the effect of alloying additions, such as niobium and titanium, on the carbide stabilization is investigated. We determine the energetically preferable substitutional atom location in each carbide and study the impurity distribution as well as its role in the carbide formation energy and electronic structure.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  3. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowcliffe, A. F.; Zinkle, S. J.; Stubbins, J. F.; Edwards, D. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop Al25), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop Al25 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface.

  4. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-03-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  5. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  6. Ultrasonic Spot Welding of Aluminum to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel: Microstructure, Tensile and Fatigue Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, V. K.; Bhole, S. D.; Chen, D. L.

    2014-04-01

    The structural applications of lightweight aluminum alloys inevitably involve dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change, lap shear tensile load, and fatigue resistance of dissimilar ultrasonic spot-welded joints of aluminum-to-galvanized high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. Two non-uniform layers were identified in between Al and HSLA steel via SEM/EDS and XRD. One was an Al-Zn eutectic layer and the other was a thin (<2 μm) layer of intermetallic compound (IMC) of Al and Fe in the nugget zone. The lap shear tensile testing gave a maximum load of 3.7 kN and the sample failed initially in between the Al-Zn eutectic film and Al-Fe IMC, and afterward from the region containing Al on both matching fracture surfaces. The fatigue test results showed a fatigue limit of about 0.5 kN (at 1 × 107 cycles). The maximum cyclic stress at which transition of the fatigue fracture from transverse through-thickness crack growth mode to the interfacial failure mode occurs increases with increasing energy input.

  7. Modelling and simulation of the influence of forming processes on the structural behavior of high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gelin, J.C.; Thibaud, S.; Boudeau, N.

    2005-08-05

    The paper first describes experiments and modeling concerning the identification of material behavior for high strength steels with phase transformations associated to plastic deformation. The experiments consist of tensile and bulging tests carried out on 316L stainless steels and TRIP 700 steels used in automotive industry. These experiments have permitted to determine the hardening curves of such materials vs. the martensite volume fraction associated to plastic deformation. It has been demonstrated that the stress triaxiality has a major role in the martenstic transformation and a model is proposed to define the flow stress vs. effective strain accounting planar anisotropy and variation of martenstic volume fraction. Then a plasticity model has been proposed in an anisotropic form and the related flow rules have been defined. The resulting model has been implemented in different finite elements software, and applied in numerical simulations of stamping and hydroforming of typical components to prove the effects of forming processes on the resulting properties of the components. Finally, the structural behavior of the resulting components is investigated and the effects of forming processes on the resulting structural behaviour are analyzed. Two cases are presented, one concerns the deep drawing of a cylindrical cup and the other concerns the stamping of a closed U channel used as a structural part for crash frames. Is has been clearly proved that the variation of martensite volume fraction arising during processing has a strong influence on the resulting behaviour of the parts considering springback and crash resistance.

  8. Development of Bimodal Grain Structures in Nb-Containing High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels during Slab Reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Debalay; Davis, Claire; Strangwood, Martin

    2008-08-01

    Bimodal (mixed coarse and fine) grain structures, which have been observed in some Nb-containing thermomechanically-controlled rolled steel plates, adversely affect their mechanical properties by causing scatter in cleavage fracture stress values. It is known that bimodal grain structures can develop during reheating prior to rolling; however, no quantitative predictions of the level of bimodality or the critical reheat temperatures for formation have been reported. In this article, three high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel slabs with varying microalloying additions (Ti, Nb, and V) have been characterized in the as-continuously cast and reheated (to various temperatures in the range 1050 °C to 1225 °C) conditions to determine the link between their grain size distribution (and any bimodality observed) and the microalloy precipitate type, size, and distribution. The as-cast slabs showed inhomogeneous microalloying precipitate distributions with the separation between precipitate-rich and precipitate-poor regions being consistent with interdendritic segregation and hence, the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). The susceptibility of the slabs to the formation of bimodality, based on the steel chemical compositions and critical reheat temperature ranges has been identified, both experimentally and theoretically using ThermoCalc (Thermo-Calc Software, Stockholm, Sweden) modeling of precipitate stability in the solute-rich and the solute-depleted regions formed during casting.

  9. Cyclic Strain Resistance, Stress Response, Fatigue Life, and Fracture Behavior of High Strength Low Alloy Steel 300 M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.; Tammana, Deepthi; Poorgangi, Behrang; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2014-05-01

    The focus of this technical manuscript is a record of the specific role of microstructure and test specimen orientation on cyclic stress response, cyclic strain resistance, and cyclic stress versus strain response, deformation and fracture behavior of alloy steel 300 M. The cyclic strain amplitude-controlled fatigue properties of this ultra-high strength alloy steel revealed a linear trend for the variation of log elastic strain amplitude with log reversals-to-failure, and log plastic strain amplitude with log reversals-to-failure for both longitudinal and transverse orientations. Test specimens of the longitudinal orientation showed only a marginal improvement over the transverse orientation at equivalent values of plastic strain amplitude. Cyclic stress response revealed a combination of initial hardening for the first few cycles followed by gradual softening for a large portion of fatigue life before culminating in rapid softening prior to catastrophic failure by fracture. Fracture characteristics of test specimens of this alloy steel were different at both the macroscopic and fine microscopic levels over the entire range of cyclic strain amplitudes examined. Both macroscopic and fine microscopic observations revealed fracture to be a combination of both brittle and ductile mechanisms. The underlying mechanisms governing stress response, deformation characteristics, fatigue life, and final fracture behavior are presented and discussed in light of the competing and mutually interactive influences of test specimen orientation, intrinsic microstructural effects, deformation characteristics of the microstructural constituents, cyclic strain amplitude, and response stress.

  10. Self-affine parameters of fracture surfaces of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Moisés; Schaeffer, Elisa; Guzmán, Yoshua; Aldaco, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    We report the experimental study of crack nucleation and propagation on AISI 4340 and Premomet steels, submitted to different thermal treatments that resulted in different properties and microstructures. Crack initiation and propagation under fatigue, tension and impact conditions were analyzed at different lengthscales. The SEM fractographic study allowed the correlation of the observed mechanisms with the patterns observed on the fracture surfaces. The scaling properties were explored and correlated to the observed mechanisms. Using the topographic data of 3D reconstructed surfaces obtained by laser scanning, we calculated both global and local roughness exponents using different variable-bandwidth methods, obtaining the statistical distributions as a function of the orientation. Although the results tend to the same average global value (close to 0.8) for both steels regardless of the heat-treating condition, their statistical distributions are sensitive to the anisotropy of the microstructure, we also found a correlation of the local roughness exponents with the local orientation of the microstructure and the dimples observed on the fracture surfaces.

  11. Modification of the Stress-Strain Curve for High-Strength Line Pipe Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents work performed to improve the work hardening behaviour of an X80 microalloyed steel through various Interrupted Thermal Treatments (ITT). The aim of this work was to determine the relationships between thermal history, microstructure and mechanical properties through both qualitative and quantitative measures. Prior to the ITT experiments, a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram was constructed under no-strain conditions to identify the transformation temperatures and products that are achievable in X80 steel. The thermal treatments were applied using a Gleeble thermal-mechanical simulator to generate a variety of microstructures in various fractions and morphologies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate and quantify the microstructures in terms of phase fraction and grain size. The ITT experiments successfully generated microstructures comprised of ferrite, bainitic ferrite, martensite and martensite-austenite (M-A) without the addition of strain. The effect of cooling rates, interrupt temperature, re-heat temperature and hold times were investigated and the mechanical performance was correlated with the quantified microstructures. Although the ITT experiments did not improve the strength relative to a continuously cooled sample, the work hardening coefficient was increased as a result of the interrupted thermal treatments.

  12. Structure and ductility of the heat-affected zone of welded joints of a high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatchikova, T. I.; Nosov, A. D.; Goncharov, S. N.; Gudnev, N. Z.; Delgado Reina, S. Yu.; Yakovleva, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    Methods of optical microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy have been used to study the structure of welded joints of a high-strength structural steel with different types of the weld metal. The impact toughness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has been determined at temperatures of +20 and -40°C. Based on the fractograph investigations of the character of the fracture of the welded joints after tests for impact bending, the regions that are the most dangerous for crack initiation have been determined. Structural factors that affect the brittleness of the near-weld zone of welded joints with the austenite metal of the weld are indicated, including the existence of an austenite-bainite structure and coarse carbides, as well as the specific distribution of hydrogen.

  13. Hydrogen-induced cold cracking in heat-affected zone of low-carbon high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Hu, Zhiyong; Qiu, Chunlin

    2014-12-01

    The Y-groove cracking test by submerged arc welding was employed to study the susceptibility of a low-carbon high-strength steel to hydrogen-induced cold cracking (HICC). The morphology of hydrogen cracks was observed using an electron probe microscope. The results showed that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has a higher susceptibility to HICC than the weld metal and that increasing heat input can improve the HICC resistance of the weldment. The intergranular microcracking is the main HICC mode at the lowest heat input condition, accompanied with some transgranular microcracks attached to complex inclusions. In combination with phase transformation behaviour in sub-zones, the effect of the phase transformation sequence is proposed to try to illustrate the fact that the fine-grained HAZ has higher probability of hydrogen cracking than the coarse-grained HAZ owing to the occurrence of hydrogen enrichment in the fine-grained HAZ after the transformation.

  14. Expanded Lever Rule for Phase Volume Fraction Calculation of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel in Thermal Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuanwei; Huang, Jihua; Chen, Shuhai; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-06-01

    The principle of the lever rule on the dilatation curve and its application to the corresponding differential dilatation curve were introduced in a nonoverlapped two-phase continuous cooling process. The lever rule was further expanded in the case of an overlapped two-phase process. The application of the expanded lever rule was based on the approximate symmetry treatment on the differential dilatation curve, which shows reasonably both on the theoretical calculation and in the experimental results. High-strength low-alloy steels were thermal simulated with Gleeble 3500. The transformed phase volume fractions in different cooling processes were calculated by the expanded lever rule and metallography analysis. The results showed the expanded lever rule could calculate reliable phase volume fractions as metallography analysis.

  15. Material Selection for an Ultra High Strength Steel Component Based on the Failure Criteria of CrachFEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, L.; Beier, Th.; Werner, H.; Horstkott, D.; Dell, H.; Gese, H.

    2005-08-05

    An increasing use of combining more than one process step is noticed for coupling crash simulations with the results of forming operations -- mostly by inheriting the forming history like plastic strain and material hardening. Introducing a continuous failure model allows a further benefit of these coupling processes; it sometimes can even be the most attractive result of such a work. In this paper the algorithm CrachFEM for fracture prediction has been used to generate more benefit of the successive forming and crash simulations -- especially for ultra high strength steels. The choice and selection of the material grade in combination with the component design can therefore be done far before the prototyping might show an unsuccessful crash result; and in an industrial applicable manner.

  16. Precipitation of aluminum nitride in a high strength maraging steel with low nitrogen content

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmaire, G.; Dehmas, M.; Redjaïmia, A.; Puech, S.; Fribourg, G.

    2014-12-15

    In the present work, aluminum nitride (AlN) precipitation was investigated in a X23NiCoCrMoAl13-6-3 maraging steel with low nitrogen content (wt.% N = 5.5 ppm). A reliable and robust automatic method by scanning electron microscopy observations coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was developed for the quantification of AlN precipitates. The first stage was to identify the solvus temperature and to develop a heat treatment able to dissolve the AlN precipitates. The experimental determination of equilibrium conditions and solvus temperature show good agreement with ThermoCalc® simulation. Then, from this AlN-free state, the cooling rate, isothermal holding time and temperature were the subject of an intensive investigation in the austenite region of this maraging steel. In spite of the high temperatures used during heat treatments, the growth kinetic of the largest AlN precipitates (> 1 μm) is slow. The cooling rate has a major effect on the size and the number density of AlN due to a higher driving force for nucleation at low temperatures. At last, quenching prior to isothermal annealing at high temperatures leads to fine and dense AlN precipitation, resulting from the martensite to austenite transformation. Experimental results will be discussed and compared with kinetic data obtained with the mobility database MobFe2 implemented in Dictra® software. - Highlights: • Slow dissolution kinetic of AlN precipitates due to both their large size and small chemical driving force • Significant effects of cooling rate prior isothermal heat treatment, holding time and temperature on AlN precipitation • Size of AlN precipitates can be reduced by quenching prior isothermal holding. • Fine precipitation of AlN related to the α → γ transformation.

  17. An Atom Probe Tomographic Investigation of High-Strength, High-Toughness Precipitation Strengthened Steels for Naval Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Allen H.

    Novel high-strength high-toughness alloys strengthened by precipitation are investigated for use in naval applications. The mechanical properties of an experimental steel alloy, NUCu-140, are evaluated and are not suitable for the naval requirements due to poor impact toughness at -40°C. An investigation is conducted to determine optimum processing conditions to restore toughness. A detailed aging study is conducted at 450, 500, and 550°C to determine the evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties. A combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Local electrode atom probe (LEAP) tomography are used to measure the evolution of the Cu precipitates, austenite, NbC, and cementite phases during aging. The evolution of the Cu precipitates significantly affects the yield strength of the steel, but low temperature toughness is controlled by the cementite precipitates. Extended aging is effective at improving the impact toughness but the yield strength is also decreased due to coarsening of the Cu precipitates. To provide a foundation for successful welding of NUCu-140 steel, an investigation of the effects of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are performed. The microstructures in the base metal (BM), heat affected zone (HAZ), and fusion zone (FZ) of a GMAW sample are analyzed to determine the effects of the welding thermal cycle. Weld simulation samples with known thermal histories are prepared and analyzed by XRD and LEAP tomography. A significant loss in microhardness is observed as a result of dissolution of the Cu precipitates after the weld thermal cycle. The cooling time is too rapid to allow significant precipitation of Cu. In addition to the NUCu-140 alloy, a production HSLA-115 steel alloy is investigated using TEM, XRD, and LEAP tomography. The strength of the HSLA-115 is found to be derived primarily from Cu precipitates. The volume fractions of cementite, austenite, and NbC are measured by XRD

  18. Oxidation behavior of nickel-base superalloys and High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talekar, Anjali S.

    Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022) and High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels are candidate materials for use in outer layer of waste storage packages and as rock bolts in the underground roof supports at Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository respectively. Oxidation kinetics of three Ni-base Superalloys and two HSLA Steels, Split Set Friction Rock Stabilizers (SS-46) and Swellex Mn-24, have been determined by isothermal high temperature continuous measurement thermogravimetry at temperatures ranging between 600°C to 1100°C in pure oxygen atmosphere for predetermined periods of exposures (48 hours for the Superalloys and 100 hours for HSLA steels). The two other Ni-base Superalloys selected were Alloy-263 (UNS N07263) and Alloy-282. These are similar in their Cr composition to Alloy C-22 and have variations in the contents of other alloying elements namely Co and Mo. The alloys were selected for comparison of their oxidation resistance with C-22 as a baseline material. All three Superalloys are known chromia formers. All the superalloys were evaluated for determining their kinetic parameters and the activation energies for the superalloys were also calculated. The activation energy for the parabolic regime of Alloy-282 is found to be 232 kJ/mol. The slope of the curves on a plot of kp as a function of (1/T) show Alloy-282 to have better oxidation resistance up to 980°C and thereafter the rate constants are similar for all three alloys, but when activation energies over the whole temperature range are calculated, Alloy-263 shows the best average oxidation resistance. Surface characterization by means of microscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the nature of oxides formed. Based on the kinetics and the characterization, proposed mechanisms for oxidation of these alloys at high temperatures are put forth. Temperature modulated thermogravimetry was used for studies on HSLA steels. The imposed sinusoidal temperature modulations on the isothermal temperature

  19. Prediction of diffusion assisted hydrogen embrittlement failure in high strength martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Zikry, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A stress assisted hydrogen diffusion transport model, a dislocation-density-based multiple-slip crystalline plasticity formulation, and an overlapping fracture method were used to investigate hydrogen diffusion and embrittlement in lath martensitic steels with distributions of M23C6 carbide precipitates. The formulation accounts for variant morphologies based on orientation relationships (ORs) that are uniquely inherent to lath martensitic microstructures. The interrelated effects of martensitic block and packet boundaries and carbide precipitates on hydrogen diffusion, hydrogen assisted crack nucleation and growth, are analyzed to characterize the competition between cleavage fracture and hydrogen diffusion assisted fracture along preferential microstructural fracture planes. Stresses along the three cleavage planes and the six hydrogen embrittlement fracture planes are monitored, such that crack nucleation and growth can nucleate along energetically favorable planes. High pressure gradients result in the accumulation of hydrogen, which embrittles martensite, and results in crack nucleation and growth along {110} planes. Cleavage fracture occurs along {100} planes when there is no significant hydrogen diffusion. The predictions indicate that hydrogen diffusion can suppress the emission and accumulation of dislocation density, and lead to fracture with low plastic strains.

  20. Development of high strength ferritic steel for interconnect application in SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froitzheim, J.; Meier, G. H.; Niewolak, L.; Ennis, P. J.; Hattendorf, H.; Singheiser, L.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    High-Cr ferritic model steels containing various additions of the refractory elements Nb and/or W were studied with respect to oxidation behaviour (hot) tensile properties, creep behaviour and high-temperature electrical conductivity of the surface oxide scales. Whereas W additions of around 2 wt.% had hardly any effect on the oxidation rates at 800 and 900 °C, Nb additions of 1% led to a substantially enhanced growth rate of the protective surface oxide scale. It was found that this adverse effect can be alleviated by suitable Si additions. This is related to the incorporation of Si and Nb into Laves phase precipitates which also contribute to increased creep and hot tensile strength. The dispersion of Laves phase precipitates was greatly refined by combined additions of Nb and W. The high-temperature electrical conductivity of the surface oxide scales was similar to that of the Nb/W-free alloys. Thus the combined additions of Nb, W and Si resulted in an alloy with oxidation resistance, ASR contribution and thermal expansion comparable to the commercial alloy Crofer 22 APU, but with creep strength far greater than that of Crofer 22 APU.

  1. Austenite stabilization and high strength-elongation product of a low silicon aluminum-free hot-rolled directly quenched and dynamically partitioned steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Yun-Bo; Yang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Zhi-Ping; Peng, Fei; Ju, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Di

    2015-06-15

    Microstructures composed of lath martensite and retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol.% and 12.0 vol.% were obtained in a low-C low-Si Al-free steel through hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning (HDQ&DP) processes. The austenite stabilization mechanism in the low-C low-Si Al-free steel under the special dynamical partitioning processes is investigated by analyzing the carbon partition behavior from martensite to austenite and the carbide precipitation-coarsening behavior in martensite laths combining with the possible hot rolling deformation inheritance. Results show that the satisfying retained austenite amount in currently studied low-Si Al-free HDQ&DP steel is caused by the high-efficiency carbon enrichment in the 30–80 nm thick regions of austenite near the interfaces in the hot-rolled ultra-fast cooled structure and the avoidance of serious carbides coarsening during the continuous cooling procedures. The excellent strength-elongation product reaching up to 26,000 MPa% shows that the involved HDQ&DP process is a promising method to develop a new generation of advanced high strength steel. - Highlights: • HDQ&DP processes were applied to a low-C low-Si Al-free steel. • Effective partitioning time during the continuous cooling processes is 1–220 s. • Retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol. % and 12.0 vol. % has been obtained. • The special austenite stabilization mechanism has been expounded.

  2. A Study of the Influence of Thermomechanical Controlled Processing on the Microstructure of Bainite in High Strength Plate Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaojun; DeArdo, Anthony J.

    2014-10-01

    Steels with compositions that are hot rolled and cooled to exhibit high strength and good toughness often require a bainitic microstructure. This is especially true for plate steels for linepipe applications where strengths in excess of 690 MPa (100 ksi) are needed in thicknesses between approximately 6 and 30 mm. To ensure adequate strength and toughness, the steels should have adequate hardenability (C. E. >0.50 and Pcm >0.20), and are thermomechanically controlled processed, i.e., controlled rolled, followed by interrupted direct quenching to below the Bs temperature of the pancaked austenite. Bainite formed in this way can be defined as a polyphase mixture comprised a matrix phase of bainitic ferrite plus a higher carbon second phase or micro-constituent which can be martensite, retained austenite, or cementite, depending on circumstances. This second feature is predominately martensite in IDQ steels. Unlike pearlite, where the ferrite and cementite form cooperatively at the same moving interface, the bainitic ferrite and MA form in sequence with falling temperature below the Bs temperature or with increasing isothermal holding time. Several studies have found that the mechanical properties may vary strongly for different types of bainite, i.e., different forms of bainitic ferrite and/or MA. Thermomechanical controlled processing (TMCP) has been shown to be an important way to control the microstructure and mechanical properties in low carbon, high strength steel. This is especially true in the case of bainite formation, where the complexity of the austenite-bainite transformation makes its control through disciplined processing especially important. In this study, a low carbon, high manganese steel containing niobium was investigated to better understand the effects of austenite conditioning and cooling rates on the bainitic phase transformation, i.e., the formation of bainitic ferrite plus MA. Specimens were compared after transformation from recrystallized

  3. Gigacycle Fatigue Properties of High-Strength Steels According to Inclusion and ODA Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Y.; Hirukawa, H.; Kimura, T.; Hayaishi, M.

    2007-08-01

    Gigacycle fatigue tests were conducted for several versions of JIS-SCM440 low-alloy and JIS-SUJ2 bearing steels using 20-kHz ultrasonic fatigue testing to elucidate the relationship of the inclusion size and type to fish-eye fracture properties. The total number of tested specimens was over 200. Most of the specimens revealed Al2O3 or (Cr, Fe)3C inclusion-originating types of fish-eye fractures, while TiN inclusions and the matrix also caused fish-eye fractures in some specimens. Based on these fatigue test results, 109-cycle fatigue limits were estimated according to inclusion size by resorting the obtained data points according to their inclusion sizes at the fish-eye fracture origin. The estimated fatigue limits revealed saturation when the inclusion sizes were smaller than 15 μm, while those fatigue limits depended on the inclusion sizes to the -1/6th power in the case of inclusions above 15 μm in size. The saturation of the 109-cycle fatigue limits was considered to be caused by the effects of the optically dark areas (ODAs). Moreover, the fatigue limits also depended on inclusion type. In comparing the Al2O3 and (Cr, Fe)3C inclusions, the key features causing the difference in the fatigue limits were likely to be bonding between the inclusion and the matrix, i.e., the (Cr, Fe)3C inclusions were tightly bonded to the matrix, unlike the Al2O3 inclusions, although both inclusions were of the hard type.

  4. Application of carbon extraction replicas in grain-size measurements of high-strength steels using TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Poorhaydari, Kioumars . E-mail: kioumars@ualberta.ca; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2007-06-15

    In this paper, the application of carbon extraction replicas in grain-size measurements is introduced and discussed. Modern high-strength microalloyed steels, used as structural or pipeline materials, have very small grains with substructures. Replicas used in transmission electron microscopes can resolve the grain boundaries and can be used for systematic measurement of grain size in cases where the small size of the grains pushes the resolution of conventional optical microscopes. The grain-size variations obtained from replicas are compared with those obtained from optical and scanning electron microscopy. An emphasis is placed on the importance of using the correct technique for imaging and the optimal magnification. Grain-size measurements are used for estimation of grain-boundary strengthening contribution to yield strength. The variation in grain size is also correlated with hardness in the base metal of several microalloyed steels, as well as the fine-grained heat-affected zone of a weld structure with several heat inputs.

  5. Investigation of Clusters in Medium Carbon Secondary Hardening Ultra-high-strength Steel After Hardening and Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerababu, R.; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Muraleedharan, K.; Srinivas, M.

    2015-06-01

    Clusters, containing between 10 and 1000 atoms, have been investigated in a martensitic secondary hardening ultra-high-strength steel austenitized at 1173 K (900 °C) for 1 hour and tempered at either 768 K or 783 K (495 °C or 510 °C) for 4 or 8 hours using 3D atom probe. The presence of clusters was unambiguously established by comparing the observed spatial distribution of the different alloying elements against the corresponding distribution expected for a random solid solution. Maximum separation envelope method has been used for delineating the clusters from the surrounding "matrix." Statistical analysis was used extensively for size and composition analyses of the clusters. The clusters were found to constitute a significant fraction accounting for between 1.14 and 2.53 vol pct of the microstructure. On the average, the clusters in the 783 K (510 °C) tempered sample were coarser by ~65 pct, with an average diameter of 2.26 nm, relative to the other samples. In all samples, about 85 to 90 pct of the clusters have size less than 2 nm. The percentage frequency histograms for carbon content of the clusters in 768 K and 783 K (495 °C and 510 °C) tempered samples revealed that the distribution shifts toward higher carbon content when the tempering temperature is higher. It is likely that the presence of these clusters exerts considerable influence on the strength and fracture toughness of the steel.

  6. The mechanical properties and microstructures of vanadium bearing high strength dual phase steels processed with continuous galvanizing line simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yu

    For galvanized or galvannealed steels to be commercially successful, they must exhibit several attributes: (i) easy and inexpensive processing in the hot mill, cold mill and on the coating line, (ii) high strength with good formability and spot weldability, and (iii) good corrosion resistance. At the beginning of this thesis, compositions with a common base but containing various additions of V or Nb with or without high N were designed and subjected to Gleeble simulations of different galvanizing(GI), galvannealing(GA) and supercooling processing. The results revealed the phase balance was strongly influenced by the different microalloying additions, while the strengths of each phase were somewhat less affected. Our research revealed that the amount of austenite formed during intercritical annealing can be strongly influenced by the annealing temperature and the pre-annealing conditions of the hot band (coiling temperature) and cold band (% cold reduction). In the late part of this thesis, the base composition was a low carbon steel which would exhibit good spot weldability. To this steel were added two levels of Cr and Mo for strengthening the ferrite and increasing the hardenability of intercritically formed austenite. Also, these steels were produced with and without the addition of vanadium in an effort to further increase the strength. Since earlier studies revealed a relationship between the nature of the starting cold rolled microstructure and the response to CGL processing, the variables of hot band coiling temperature and level of cold reduction prior to annealing were also studied. Finally, in an effort to increase strength and ductility of both the final sheet (general formability) and the sheared edges of cold punched holes (local formability), a new thermal path was developed that replaced the conventional GI ferrite-martensite microstructure with a new ferrite-martensite-tempered martensite and retained austenite microstructure. The new

  7. Welding-Induced Microstructure Evolution of a Cu-Bearing High-Strength Blast-Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Jeremy L.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Lippold, John C.

    2011-12-01

    A new high strength, high toughness steel containing Cu for precipitation strengthening was recently developed for naval, blast-resistant structural applications. This steel, known as BlastAlloy160 (BA-160), is of nominal composition Fe-0.05C-3.65Cu-6.5Ni-1.84Cr-0.6Mo-0.1V (wt pct). The evident solidification substructure of an autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld suggested fcc austenite as the primary solidification phase. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness ranged from a minimum of 353 HV in the coarse-grained HAZ (CGHAZ) to a maximum of 448 HV in the intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ). After postweld heat treatment (PWHT) of the spot weld, hardness increases were observed in the fusion zone (FZ), CGHAZ, and fine-grained HAZ (FGHAZ) regions. Phase transformation and metallographic analyses of simulated single-pass HAZ regions revealed lath martensite to be the only austenitic transformation product in the HAZ. Single-pass HAZ simulations revealed a similar hardness profile for low heat-input (LHI) and high heat-input (HHI) conditions, with higher hardness values being measured for the LHI samples. The measured hardness values were in good agreement with those from the GTA weld. Single-pass HAZ regions exhibited higher Charpy V-notch impact toughness than the BM at both test temperatures of 293 K and 223 K (20 °C and -50 °C). Hardness increases were observed for multipass HAZ simulations employing an initial CGHAZ simulation.

  8. Enhancement of Upper Shelf Energy through Delamination Fracture in 0.05 pct P Doped High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Meysam; Kimura, Yuuji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2012-07-01

    An ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure with strong <110>//rolling direction (RD) fiber deformation texture was produced by warm-caliber rolling at 773 K (500 °C) and final tempering at 823 K (550 °C), namely tempforming in the 1200 MPa-class, medium-carbon, low-alloy steel with phosphorus (P) content of 0.053 wt pct. Charpy impact tests and tensile tests were performed at a temperature range of 77 K (-196 °C) to 623 K (350 °C) on the tempformed (TF) samples along with a conventional quenched and tempered (QT) samples. The QT structure showed a low upper shelf energy of 70 J and a high ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 373 K (100 °C) as a result of P segregation and intergranular fracture. A remarkable increase in the upper shelf energy to 150 J from 70 J and a low DBTT of approximately 103 K (-170 °C) were obtained in the UFEG structure. P segregation embrittlement disappeared completely in the UFEG structure, and ductile fracture on the planes normal to RD along with delamination fracture on the planes along RD were observed at a temperature range of 123 K (-150 °C) to 423 K (150 °C). The enhanced delamination occurred because of the microstructural anisotropy of the UFEG structure, a strong <110>//RD fiber deformation texture, and interfaces ( i.e. ferrite grain boundaries and cementite particles-ferrite matrix interfaces) weakened by P segregation as feasible crack propagation paths. We studied the delamination (crack-arrester-type) fracture in 0.053 pct P doped high-strength steel along with upper shelf energy and DBTT obtained from the UFEG structure.

  9. Kinetics and formation mechanisms of intragranular ferrite in V-N microalloyed 600 MPa high strength rebar steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fu-ming; Li, Chang-rong

    2016-04-01

    To systematically investigate the kinetics and formation mechanisms of intragranular ferrite (IGF), isothermal heat treatment in the temperature range of 450°C to 600°C with holding for 30 s to 300 s, analysis of the corresponding microstructures, and observation of the precipitated particles were conducted in V-N microalloyed 600 MPa high strength rebar steel. The potency of V(C,N) for IGF nucleation was also analyzed statistically. The results show that the dominant microstructure transforms from bainite (B) and acicular ferrite (AF) to grain boundary ferrite (GBF), intragranular polygonal ferrite (IPF), and pearlite (P) as the isothermal temperature increases from 450°C to 600°C. When the holding time at 600°C is extended from 30 s to 60 s, 120 s, and 300 s, the GBF content ranges from 6.0vol% to 6.5vol% and the IPF content increases from 0.5vol% to 2.8vol%, 13.1vol%, and 13.5vol%, respectively, because the ferrite transformation preferentially occurs at the grain boundaries and then occurs at the austenite grains. Notably, V(C,N) particles are the most effective nucleation site for the formation of IPF, accounting for 51% of the said formation.

  10. Microstructure and Toughness of Simulated Heat-Affected Zone of Laser Welded Joint for 960 MPa Grade High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Wei; Li, Zhuguo; Jiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Jian; Wu, Yixiong; Katayama, Seiji

    2014-10-01

    The microstructure and toughness of coarse grain zone (CGZ) and mixed grain zone (MGZ) for laser welded 960 MPa grade high strength steel joints were investigated by thermal simulation with a Gleeble-3500 thermal simulator. The results show that microstructure of the stimulated CGZ mainly consists of uniform interweaved lath martensite, and grain growth is not severe upon increasing the cooling time ( t 8/5). Microstructure of the stimulated MGZ presents strip-like in low peak temperature, and small block martensite is formed on the grain boundary. However, in high peak temperature, the strip-like microstructure disappears and small block martensite presents net-like structure. The lath character for MGZ and CGZ is very obvious under TEM observation, and the average lath thickness of BM, MGZ, and CGZ is 100, 150 and 200 nm, respectively. The impact energy and microhardness of CGZ are higher than MGZ and reduce with increasing the cooling time. The fracture toughness deteriorating drastically for MGZ may be related with the formation of the mixture microstructure, in which the small block martensite is distributed in the shape of a network.

  11. Defect Prediction and Control for Ultra-high-strength Steel Complex Structure in Hot Forming Based on FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xin; Zhou, Jie; Zhuo, Fang; Luo, Yan; Li, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Cracking is the main defect in ultra-high-strength steel (UHSS) forming products. In order to avoid cracking, either adjusting process parameters or changing die's design is usually applied. However, under the condition of forming parts with unreasonable structure design, it makes little difference through the traditional methods of modifying process parameters. In this paper, true stress-strain curves under different strain rates and temperatures are obtained via the hot tensile tests. Then, the material constitutive model of UHSS is introduced into software CAE; this step is used to analyze and predict defects of UHSS hot forming complex structural parts based on FEM. In addition, simulation results of changed structure (open end) are compared with original structure (closed end). The results have shown that both maximum reduction ratio and stress in all directions are sharply reduced, i.e., the forming quality is improved significantly after changing the end structure. Finally, the prediction and control methods of forming defects are verified to be feasible in actual production.

  12. Prediction of Inhomogeneous Distribution of Microalloy Precipitates in Continuous-Cast High-Strength, Low-Alloy Steel Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Suparna; Patra, Sudipta; Neogy, S.; Laik, A.; Choudhary, S. K.; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2012-06-01

    Spatial distribution in size and frequency of microalloy precipitates have been characterized in two continuous-cast high-strength, low-alloy steel slabs, one containing Nb, Ti, and V and the other containing only Ti. Microsegregation during casting resulted in an inhomogeneous distribution of Nb and Ti precipitates in as-cast slabs. A model has been proposed in this study based on the detailed characterization of cast microalloy precipitates for predicting the spatial distribution in size and volume fraction of precipitates. The present model considers different models, which have been proposed earlier. Microsegregation during solidification has been predicted from the model proposed by Clyne and Kurz. Homogenization of alloying elements during cooling of the cast slab has been predicted following the approach suggested by Kurz and Fisher. Thermo-Calc software predicted the thermodynamic stability and volume fraction of microalloy precipitates at interdendritic and dendritic regions. Finally, classical nucleation and growth theory of precipitation have been used to predict the size distribution of microalloy precipitates at the aforementioned regions. The accurate prediction and control over the precipitate size and fractions may help in avoiding the hot-cracking problem during casting and selecting the processing parameters for reheating and rolling of the slabs.

  13. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Verification of Residual Stress in Autogenous Laser Welding of High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Kong, Fanrong; Liu, Shuang; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-03-01

    A three-dimensional finite element (FE) model was developed to numerically calculate the temperature field and residual-stress field in the autogenous laser welding process. The grid independence of the FE model was verified to eliminate the variation of the heat flux between adjacent elements. A cut-off temperature method with combination of the tensile testing was used to consider the effect of high-temperature material properties on the numerical simulation. The effect of the latent heat of fusion and evaporation was also taken into consideration. High compressive initial stress was presented in the selected high-strength steel plates. A subroutine was written to consider the initial stress in the FE mode. Predicted residual stress agreed well with experimental data obtained by an X-ray diffraction technique. Results showed that the transverse and longitudinal residual stresses prevailed in the autogenous laser welding process, and the thermal stress concentration occurred in the molten pool and its adjacent regions. The effect of the welding speed on the distribution of residual stress was also studied. The values of residual stress decreased with an increase in the welding speed.

  14. Effect of notch location on fatigue crack growth behavior of strength-mismatched high-strength low-alloy steel weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Nasser, S. Nemat

    2004-12-01

    Welding of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels involves the use of low-strength, equal-strength, and high-strength filler materials (electrodes) compared with the parent material, depending on the application of the welded structures and the availability of filler material. In the present investigation, the fatigue crack growth behavior of weld metal (WM) and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of undermatched (UM), equally matched (EM), and overmatched (OM) joints has been studied. The base material used in this investigation is HSLA-80 steel of weldable grade. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) has been used to fabricate the butt joints. A center-cracked tension (CCT) specimen has been used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of welded joints, utilizing a servo-hydraulic-controlled fatigue-testing machine at constant amplitude loading (R=0). The effect of notch location on the fatigue crack growth behavior of strength mismatched HSLA steel weldments also has been analyzed.

  15. Formation of Nanostructures in Severely Deformed High-Strength Steel Induced by High-Frequency Ultrasonic Impact Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R. K.; Malet, L.; Gao, H.; Hermans, M. J. M.; Godet, S.; Richardson, I. M.

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification by the generation of a nanostructured surface layer induced via ultrasonic impact treatment was performed at the weld toe of a welded high-strength quenched and tempered structural steel, S690QL1 (Fe-0.16C-0.2Si-0.87Mn-0.33Cr-0.21Mo (wt pct)). Such high-frequency peening techniques are known to improve the fatigue life of welded components. The nanocrystallized structure as a function of depth from the top-treated surface was characterized via a recently developed automated crystal orientation mapping in transmission electron microscopy. Based on the experimental observations, a grain refinement mechanism induced by plastic deformation during the ultrasonic impact treatment is proposed. It involves the formation of low-angle misoriented lamellae displaying a high density of dislocations followed by the subdivision of microbands into blocks and the resulting formation of polygonal submicronic grains. These submicronic grains further breakdown into nano grains. The results show the presence of retained austenite even after severe surface plastic deformation. The average grain size of the retained austenite and martensite is 17 and 35 nm, respectively. The in-grain deformation mechanisms are different in larger and smaller grains. Larger grains show long-range lattice rotations, while smaller grains show plastic deformation through grain rotation. Also the smaller nano grains exhibit the presence of short-range disorder. Surface nanocrystallization also leads to an increased fraction of low angle and low energy coincident site lattice boundaries especially in the smaller grains ( nm).

  16. Effect of different stages of tensile deformation on micromagnetic parameters in high-strength, low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Moorthy, V.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B.

    1999-08-01

    The influence of tensile deformation on the magnetic Barkhausen emissions (MBE) and hysteresis loop has been studied in a high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA) and its weldment. The magnetic measurements were made both in loaded and unloaded conditions for different stress levels. The root-mean-square (RMS) voltage of the MBE has been used for analysis. This study shows that the preyield and postyield deformation can be identified from the change in the MBE profile. The initial elastic deformation showed a linear increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition, and the MBE level remained constant in the unloaded condition. The microplastic yielding, well below the macroyield stress, significantly reduces the MBE, indicating the operation of grain-boundary dislocation sources below the macroyield stress. This is indicated by the slow increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and the decrease in the MBE level in the unloaded condition. The macroyielding resulted in a significant increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and, more clearly, in the unloaded condition. The increase in the MBE level during macroyielding has been attributed to the grain rotation phenomenon, in order to maintain the boundary integrity between adjacent grains, which would preferentially align the magnetic domains along the stress direction. This study shows that MBE during tensile deformation can be classified into four stages: (1) perfectly elastic, (2) microplastic yielding, (3) macroyielding, and (4) progressive plastic deformation. A multimagnetic parameter approach, combining the hysteresis loop and MBE, has been suggested to evaluate the residual stresses.

  17. Effect of pH on Semiconducting Property of Passive Film Formed on Ultra-High-Strength Corrosion-Resistant Steel in Sulfuric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Min; Xiao, Kui; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang; Zhong, Ping

    2013-10-01

    Because Cr9Ni5MoCo14 is a new ultra-high-strength corrosion-resistant steel, it is important to study its corrosion behavior in sulfuric acid solution, which is used to simulate the aggressive environment. The effect of pH on the electrochemical and semiconducting properties of passive films formed on ultra-high-strength corrosion-resistant steel in sulfuric acid solution was investigated by means of the potentiodynamic polarization technique, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Mott-Schottky analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that Cr9Ni5MoCo14 steel showed a passive state in acid solutions. The corrosion behavior of this Cr9Ni5MoCo14 alloy was influenced by the passive film formed on the surface, including thickness, stability, and partitioning of elements of the passive film. The passive current density decreases with increasing pH, and the corrosion resistance was enhanced by the increasing thickness and depletion of the defects within the passive film. Moreover, an enrichment of chromium (primarily the oxides of Cr) and depletion of iron in the passive film led to improved corrosion resistance. These results can provide a theoretical basis for use of this alloy and further development of ultra-high-strength corrosion-resistant steel in today's society.

  18. Effect of second phase morphology on warm stretch-flangeability in high strength TRIP-aided dual-phase steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, A.; Sugimoto, K.; Kobayashi, M.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of second phase morphology on warm stretch-flangeability in 0.2C-(1.0-2.5)Si-(1.0-2.0)Mn (mass%) high strength transformation-induced plasticity TRIP-aided dual-phase (TDP) steel sheets were investigated. Good warm stretch-flangeability in terms of warm hole-punching and the successive warm hole-expanding was achieved in a TDP steel with an isolated fine and acicular second phase. In the acicular type of TDP steel, volume fraction and carbon concentration (stability) of retained austenite increased considerably over a conventional type of TDP steel with a network second phase along ferrite grain boundary. Warm hole-punching suppressed void formation in a surface layer of punched hole, and developed severe flow band which disturbs crack propagation on expanding. On the successive warm hole-expanding it increased local elongation due to TRIP effect of a large amount of untransformed retained austenite. Optimum forming temperatures for punching and for expanding were between 150-200{degrees}C and between 50-200{degrees}C, respectively. These temperatures were related with retained austenite stability. The acicular type of TDP steel also had the best balance of stretch-formability and stretch-flangeability of conventional high strength steels, such as a bainitic steel and a ferrite-bainite steel which have an excellent stretch-flangeability. Also, it was found that the newest TRIP-aided bainitic steel attained the same good balance as the acicular type of TDP steel.

  19. Lightweight, High Strength Metals With Enhanced Radiation Shielding - Technology Advancing Partnerships Challenge Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Maria Clara (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Technology Advancing Partnership (TAP) Challenge will seek to foster innovation throughout the Center by allowing the KSC workforce to identify a specific technology idea that needs improvement and to then work with an external partner to develop that technology. This Challenge will enable competitive partnerships with outside entities that will increase the value by bringing leveraged resources. The selected proposal from the University of Florida will develop new lightweight technologies with radiation mitigation for spacecraft.

  20. Conservation Research and Development/ New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony J. DeArdo; C. Isaac Garcia

    2003-12-15

    Conservation Research and Development/New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance. The experimental work can be divided into four phases. In each phase, the materials were received or designed, processed and tested, to evaluate the BH increment or response, as a function of compositions and processing conditions. Microstructural characterization by various techniques was performed in order to gain insights into the mechanisms of flow stress increment by bake hardening.

  1. Slow strain rate fracture of high-strength steel at controlled electrochemical potentials in ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, and ammonium nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Nichols, D.E. ); Daniels, R.D. . School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1992-08-15

    Slow strain rate testing has been undertaken to determine the effects of individual chemical species on the fracture process of high-strength 4340 steel. Test environments included potassium chloride, ammonium nitrate, and ammonium chloride at concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mole por liter at ambient temperature. Tests were performed at cathodic and anodic controlled potentials, as well as at the open-circuit potential, to delineate the stress corrosion cracking range.

  2. Development of advanced high strength tantalum base alloys. Part 2: Scale-up investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Three experimental tantalum alloy compositions containing 14-16% W, 1% Re, 0.7% Hf, 0.025% C or 0.015% C and 0.015% N were prepared as two inch diameter ingots by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The as-cast ingots were processed by extrusion and swaging to one inch and 0.4 inch diameter rod and evaluated. Excellent high temperature forging behavior was exhibited by all three compositions. Creep strength at 2000 F to 2400 F was enhanced by higher tungsten additions as well as substitution of nitrogen for carbon. Weldability of all three compositions was determined to be adequate. Room temperature ductility was retained in the advanced tantalum alloy compositions as well as a notched/unnotched strength ratio of 1.4 for a notched bar having a K sub t = 2.9.

  3. Some properties of an advanced boron fiber. [high strength, splittable fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An advanced coreless boron fiber exhibits tensile strengths which are more than twice that of the normal CVD B/W fibers. The coreless fiber is made by the chemical removal of the tungsten boride core exposed by splitting the as-grown fiber. The easily splittable fiber is made by the chemical vapor deposition of boron on a larger than usual tungsten substrate. It is expected that the ease of splitting is related to residual stresses in these fibers. Measurements of the axial residual stresses in both the normal and the splittable fibers are presented and the results compared. Differences in these stresses are discussed in connection with the ease of splitting in the splittable fibers.

  4. Texture analysis of tinplate steel and its application in production of double reduced high strength tinplate grades with controlled earing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černík, M.; Gburík, R.; Hrabčáková, L.; Vranec, P.

    2015-04-01

    Several years of texture investigation via X-ray Diffraction and EBSD techniques clearly highlight the effect of steel chemistry and processing on the final texture development in individual tinplate grades produced by U.S. Steel Košice. The influence of chemical composition, degree of deformation, and the annealing process on the texture development in tinplate steel is presented for selected grades processed in production and using the material controlled laboratory experiments. “Non-earing and Ultra-low Earing” tinplate materials provide a good case study where the desired final texture, which contains a strong γ fiber along with other texture component, is achieved with precise control of key processing variables. Development and production of high strength double reduced material with isotropic properties can be achieved by detailed study of crystallographic texture. As-measured Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps and calculated Orientation Distribution Functions (ODFs) were used to characterize the strength of the γ fiber and selected texture components. Calculation of the normal anisotropy index, r, from the acquired texture information, was accomplished for these steels using available crystal plasticity models. Achieved results of detailed texture analysis of tinplate in the manufacture of double reduced high strength tinplate steel grades have been successfully applied.

  5. Corrosion Behavior of E690 High-Strength Steel in Alternating Wet-Dry Marine Environment with Different pH Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Hao, W. K.; Liu, Z. Y.; Li, X. G.; Du, C. W.; Liao, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    The corrosion behavior and mechanism of E690 high-strength steel in marine environment with different pH values were studied through electrochemical technology and long-term alternating wet-dry cycle experiments combined with SEM and XRD. Results showed that the corrosion current density of E690 high-strength steel gradually increased with decreased pH. After long-term tests in alternating wet-dry marine environment with various pH values, uniform corrosion mainly occurred on E690 steel, accompanied by vast corrosion pitting. Weight loss analysis demonstrated that corrosion rate decreased with increased pH. Moreover, corrosion mechanism varied with pH, and hydrogen-evolution reaction greatly increased the E690 steel corrosion rate at low pH. Meanwhile, the compositions of corrosion products slightly differed with pH; these products consisted of Fe3O4, Fe2O3, α-FeOOH, β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and amorphous substances. However, the rust-layer density varied. Cr in the rust layer promoted the densification of rust layer and improved the decay resistance of E690 steel.

  6. Effect of Hardness on the Ballistic Impact Behavior of High-Strength Steels Against 7.62-mm Armor Piercing Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Teyfik; Übeyli, Mustafa; Yıldırım, R. O.

    2009-03-01

    Ballistic performance of engineering materials should be known in selection of the most suitable armor material to protect civilian or military system with the lowest possible weight against various threats. In this study, the ballistic impact characterization of high-strength steels, namely AISI 4340 and DIN 100Cr6, was investigated using 7.62-mm armor piercing (AP) projectiles by considering four hardness levels and five areal densities. The main aim was to examine the effect of hardness and areal density on the ballistic behavior of these steels. Hence, four different heat-treatment schedules were applied to these steels to get different mechanical properties. After ballistic testing, macro and micro examinations of the specimens were carried out to clarify their failure mechanisms. According to the results, the AISI 4340 steel having a hardness of ~50 HRC showed the best ballistic performance among the investigated materials.

  7. Standard specification for pressure vessel plates, carbon steel, high strength, for moderate and lower temperature service. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the responsibility of Subcommittee A01.11 on Steel Plates for Boilers and Pressure Vessels. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1998. Published December 1998. Originally published as A 612-70. Last previous edition A 612/A 612M-90(1996).

  8. Corrosion inhibition in 2.0 M sulfuric acid solutions of high strength maraging steel by aminophenyl tetrazole as a corrosion inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M.

    2014-02-01

    The corrosion of high strength maraging steel after varied immersion times in concentrated solution, 2.0 M, of sulfuric acid has been investigated. The work was also extended to study the effect of 5-(3-aminophenyl)-tetrazole (APTA) on the inhibition of the steel corrosion. The study has been carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscope (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) investigations. EIS spectra showed that the corrosion and polarization resistances decrease with increasing the immersion time of the steel before measurement and increase in the presence of APTA and the increase of its concentration. Polarization data agreed with the EIS measurements and indicated that the increase of immersion time increases the corrosion of steel by increasing its corrosion current and corrosion rate and lowering its polarization resistance. On the other hand, the addition of APTA and the increase of its concentration minimized the corrosion of steel through decreasing the corrosion current and corrosion rate and increasing the polarization resistance at all exposure test periods. SEM and EDX investigations confirmed that the inhibition of the maraging steel in the 2.0 M H2SO4 solutions is achieved via the adsorption of the APTA molecules onto the steel protecting its surface from being dissolved easily.

  9. Effects of B and Cu Addition and Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Low-Carbon, High-Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Shin, Sang Yong; Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Lee, Sunghak

    2012-10-01

    The effects of B and Cu addition and cooling rate on microstructure and mechanical properties of low-carbon, high-strength bainitic steels were investigated in this study. The steel specimens were composed mostly of bainitic ferrite, together with small amounts of acicular ferrite, granular bainite, and martensite. The yield and tensile strengths of all the specimens were higher than 1000 MPa and 1150 MPa, respectively, whereas the upper shelf energy was higher than 160 J and energy transition temperature was lower than 208 K (-65 °C) in most specimens. The slow-cooled specimens tended to have the lower strengths, higher elongation, and lower energy transition temperature than the fast-cooled specimens. The Charpy notch toughness was improved with increasing volume fraction of acicular ferrite because acicular ferrites favorably worked for Charpy notch toughness even when other low-toughness microstructures such as bainitic ferrite and martensite were mixed together. To develop high-strength bainitic steels with an excellent combination of strength and toughness, the formation of bainitic microstructures mixed with acicular ferrite was needed, and the formation of granular bainite was prevented.

  10. Effects of Rolling and Cooling Conditions on Microstructure and Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties of Ultra-Low-Carbon High-Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Shin, Sang Yong; Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak

    2011-07-01

    Six ultra-low-carbon high-strength bainitic steel plates were fabricated by controlling rolling and cooling conditions, and effects of bainitic microstructure on tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated. The microstructural evolution was more critically affected by start cooling temperature and cooling rate than by finish rolling temperature. Bainitic microstructures such as granular bainites (GBs) and bainitic ferrites (BFs) were well developed as the start cooling temperature decreased or the cooling rate increased. When the steels cooled from 973 K or 873 K (700 °C or 600 °C) were compared under the same cooling rate of 10 K/s (10 °C/s), the steels cooled from 973 K (700 °C) consisted mainly of coarse GBs, while the steels cooled from 873 K (600 °C) contained a considerable amount of BFs having high strength, thereby resulting in the higher strength but the lower ductility and upper shelf energy (USE). When the steels cooled from 673 K (400 °C) at a cooling rate of 10 K/s (10 °C/s) or 0.1 K/s (0.1 °C/s) were compared under the same start cooling temperature of 873 K (600 °C), the fast cooled specimens were composed mainly of coarse GBs or BFs, while the slowly cooled specimens were composed mainly of acicular ferrites (AFs). Since AFs had small effective grain size and contained secondary phases finely distributed at grain boundaries, the slowly cooled specimens had a good combination of strength, ductility, and USE, together with very low energy transition temperature (ETT).

  11. Multiple dispersed phases in a high-strength low-carbon steel: An atom-probe tomographic and synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Michael D.; Seidman, David N.

    2009-06-12

    The co-precipitation of Cu, M{sub 2}C (where M is any combination of Cr, Mo or Ti) and austenite (face-centered cubic) is characterized for 5 h isochronal aging times by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and three-dimensional atom-probe tomography for a high-strength low-carbon steel, BlastAlloy 160. High number densities, {approx}10{sup 23} m{sup 03}, of co-located Cu and M{sub 2}C preciptates were observed. Only small austenite volume percentages (<2.1%) were measured after aging at temperatures up to 625 C for 5 h.

  12. The role of phosphorus in cold work embrittlement in Ti and Ti+Nb stabilized high strength ultra-low carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rege, Jayanta Shantaram

    The new generation of ultra low carbon (ULC) steels used in the automotive industry requires both good formability and high strength. Good formability is essential for aerodynamic vehicle bodies while high strength is essential for weight reduction purposes and dent resistance. It is known that the lowering of the interstitial elements, such as C and N, results in higher formability. However, the reduction of the interstitial elements also results in a decrease in their strength. One of the ways of increasing the strength without considerably affecting the formability is by the addition of phosphorus (P) to the ULC steels, which is believed to increase the strength by the solid solution strengthening mechanism. The addition of P increases the strength, but it causes the problem of cold-work embrittlement (CWE) in the steels. Cold-work embrittlement is defined as the susceptibility of the sheet material to intergranular fracture during the secondary working of a deeply drawn part or while in service. Although, the problem of CWE is believed to be due to the segregation of P to the ferrite grain boundaries, it was not clear at what state of processing does the segregation occur. Furthermore, although it has been shown that the Nb-containing ULC steels exhibit better CWE resistance than the Ti-containing ULC steels, the effect of Nb on the segregation behavior of P is not known. The major objective of this study was to understand the segregation behavior of P during the different stages of thermomechanical processing in the high P-containing Ti and Ti+Nb stabilized ULC steels. Two techniques, the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and the atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM), were used in conjunction to study the segregation behavior of P in the steels. These studies revealed that the segregation of P to the ferrite grain boundaries primarily occurred during the coiling process in the Ti stabilized steel. The Ti+Nb stabilized steels showed lower

  13. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  14. Correlation of Fractographic Features with Mechanical Properties in Systematically Varied Microstructures of Cu-Strengthened High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan; Das, Swapan Kumar; Tarafder, Soumitra

    2009-12-01

    Fracture is often the culmination of continued deformation. Therefore, it is probable that a fracture surface may contain an imprint of the deformation processes that were operative. In this study, the deformation behavior of copper-strengthened high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) 100 steel has been investigated. Systematic variation of the microstructure has been introduced in the steel through various aging treatments. Due to aging, the coherency, size, shape, and distribution of the copper precipitates were changed, while those of inclusions, carbides, and carbonitrides were kept unaltered. Two-dimensional dimple morphologies, quantified from tensile fracture surfaces, have been correlated to the nature of the variation of the deformation parameters with aging treatment.

  15. Effect of prestrain on stretch-zone formation during ductile fracture of Cu-strengthened high-strength low-alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprasad, S.; Tarafder, S.; Ranganath, V. R.; Das, S. K.; Ray, K. K.

    2002-12-01

    The effects of prestrain on the ductile fracture behavior of two varieties of Cu-strengthened high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels have been investigated through stretch-zone geometry measurements. It is noted that the ductile fracture-initiation toughness of both the steels remained unaltered up to prestrains of ˜2 pct, beyond which the toughness decreased sharply. A methodology for estimating the stretch-zone dimensions is proposed. Fracture-toughness estimations through stretch-zone width (SZW) and stretch-zone depth (SZD) measurements revealed that the nature of the variation of ductile fracture toughness with prestrain can be better predicted through SZD rather than the SZW measurements. However, for the specimen geometries and prestrain levels that were investigated, none of these methods were found suitable for quantifying the initiation fracture toughness.

  16. A two-parameter model to predict fatigue life of high-strength steels in a very high cycle fatigue regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengqi; Liu, Xiaolong; Hong, Youshi

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic (20 kHz) fatigue tests were performed on specimens of a high-strength steel in very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) regime. Experimental results showed that for most tested specimens failed in a VHCF regime, a fatigue crack originated from the interior of specimen with a fish-eye pattern, which contained a fine granular area (FGA) centered by an inclusion as the crack origin. Then, a two-parameter model is proposed to predict the fatigue life of high-strength steels with fish-eye mode failure in a VHCF regime, which takes into account the inclusion size and the FGA size. The model was verified by the data of present experiments and those in the literature. Furthermore, an analytic formula was obtained for estimating the equivalent crack growth rate within the FGA. The results also indicated that the stress intensity factor range at the front of the FGA varies within a small range, which is irrespective of stress amplitude and fatigue life.

  17. Carbide precipitation and high-temperature strength of hot-rolled high-strength, low-alloy steels containing Nb and Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won-Beom; Hong, Seung-Gab; Park, Chan-Gyung; Park, Sung-Ho

    2002-06-01

    The effects of a Mo addition on both the precipitation kinetics and high-temperature strength of a Nb carbide have been investigated in the hot-rolled high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steels containing both Nb and Mo. These steels were fabricated by four-pass hot rolling and coiling at 650°C, 600°C, and 550°C. Microstructural analysis of the carbides has been performed using field-emission gun transmission electron microscopy (TEM) employing energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The steels containing both Nb and Mo exhibited a higher strength at high temperatures (˜600 °C) in comparison to the steel containing only Nb. The addition of Mo increased the hardenability and led to the refinement of the bainitic microstructure. The proportion of the bainitic phase increased with the increase of Mo content. The TEM observations revealed that the steels containing both Nb and Mo exhibited fine (<10 nm) and uniformly distributed metal carbide (MC)-type carbides, while the carbides were coarse and sparsely distributed in the steels containing Nb only. The EDS analysis also indicated that the fine MC carbides contain both Nb and Mo, and the ratio of Mo/Nb was higher in the finer carbides. In addition, electron diffraction analysis revealed that most of the MC carbides had one variant of the B-N relationship ((100)MC//(100)ferrite, [011]MC//[010]ferrite) with the matrix, suggesting that they were formed in the ferrite region. That is, the addition of Mo increased the nucleation sites of MC carbides in addition to the bainitic transformation, which resulted in finer and denser MC carbides. It is, thus, believed that the enhanced high-temperature strength of the steels containing both Nb and Mo was attributed to both bainitic transformation hardening and the precipitation hardening caused by uniform distribution of fine MC particles.

  18. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sang-Sub; Mun, Jae-Chul; Kim, Tae-Won; Kang, Chung-Gil

    2014-12-01

    In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  19. New developments in actuator materials as reflected in magnetically controlled shape memory alloys and high-strength shape memory steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullakko, Kari; Yakovenko, Peter G.; Gavriljuk, Valentin G.

    1996-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are applied as actuator materials in smart structures and in fastening and pre-stressing devices. Shape memory alloys can be divided into three groups: one-way alloys, two-way alloys and magnetically controlled SMAs. The magnetically controlled SMAs recently suggested by one of the present authors are potential actuator materials for smart structures because they may provide rapid strokes with large amplitudes under precise control. The most extensively applied conventional SMAs are Ni-Ti and Cu- based alloys. Iron-based shape memory alloys, especially Fe-Mn-Si steels, are becoming more and more important in engineering applications due to their low price. The properties of Fe- Mn-Si steels have been improved by alloying, for example, with Cr, Ni and Co. Nitrogen alloying was shown to significantly improve shape memory, mechanical and corrosion properties of Fe-Mn-Si-based steels. Tensile strengths over 1500 MPa, recovery stresses of 300 MPa and recoverable strains of 4% have been attained. In fasteners made from these steels, stresses of 700 MPa were reached. The beneficial effect of nitrogen alloying on shape memory and mechanical properties is based on the decrease of stacking fault energy and increase of the strength of austenite caused by nitrogen atoms. Nitrogen alloyed Fe-Mn-Si- based steels are expected to be employed as actuator materials in pre-stressing and fastening applications in many fields of engineering. Nitrogen alloyed shape memory steels possess good manufacturing properties and weldability, and they are economical to process using conventional industrial methods.

  20. Effect of microstructure variation on the corrosion behavior of high-strength low-alloy steel in 3.5wt% NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu-bing; Li, Chong; Liu, Yong-chang; Yu, Li-ming; Ma, Zong-qing; Liu, Chen-xi; Li, Hui-jun

    2015-06-01

    The effect of microstructure variation on the corrosion behavior of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel was investigated. The protective property of the corrosion product layer was also explored. Experimental results reveal that the type of microstructure has significant effect on the corrosion resistance of HSLA steel. The measurement results of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicate that the steel with acicular ferrite microstructure exhibits the lowest corrosion rate. Martensite exhibits a reduced corrosion resistance compared with polygonal ferrite. It is found that the surface of the acicular ferrite specimen uniformly covered by corrosion products is seemingly denser and more compact than those of the other two microstructures, and can provide some amount of protection to the steel; thus, the charge transfer resistance and modulus values of the acicular ferrite specimen are the largest. However, corrosion products on martensite and polygonal ferrite are generally loose, porous, and defective, and can provide minor protectiveness; thus, the charge transfer resistance values for polygonal ferrite and martensite are lower.

  1. Double Sided Irradiation for Laser-assisted Shearing of Ultra High Strength Steels with Process Integrated Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus; Weinbach, Matthias

    Most small or medium sized parts produced in mass production are made by shearing and forming of sheet metal. This technology is cost effective, but the achievable quality and geometrical complexity are limited when working high and highest strength steel. Based on the requirements for widening the process limits of conventional sheet metal working the Fraunhofer IPT has developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working technology. With this enhancement it is possible to produce parts made of high and highest strength steel with outstanding quality, high complexity and low tool wear. Additionally laser hardening has been implemented to adjust the mechanical properties of metal parts within the process. Currently the process is limited to lower sheet thicknesses (<2 mm) to maintain short cycle times. To enable this process for larger geometries and higher sheet thicknesses the Fraunhofer IPT developed a system for double sided laser-assisted sheet metal working within progressive dies.

  2. High-throughput design of low-activation, high-strength creep-resistant steels for nuclear-reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are prime candidate materials for structural applications in nuclear power reactors. However, their creep strength is much lower than that of creep-resistant steel developed for conventional fossil-fired power plants as alloying elements with a high neutron activation cannot be used. To improve the creep strength and to maintain a low activation, a high-throughput computational alloy design model coupling thermodynamics, precipitate-coarsening kinetics and an optimization genetic algorithm, is developed. Twelve relevant alloying elements with either low or high activation are considered simultaneously. The activity levels at 0-10 year after the end of irradiation are taken as optimization parameter. The creep-strength values (after exposure for 10 years at 650 °C) are estimated on the basis of the solid-solution strengthening and the precipitation hardening (taking into account precipitate coarsening). Potential alloy compositions leading to a high austenite fraction or a high percentage of undesirable second phase particles are rejected automatically in the optimization cycle. The newly identified alloys have a much higher precipitation hardening and solid-solution strengthening at the same activity level as existing reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels.

  3. On the Specific Role of Microstructure in Governing Cyclic Fatigue, Deformation, and Fracture Behavior of a High-Strength Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the results of an experimental study that focused on evaluating the conjoint influence of microstructure and test specimen orientation on fully reversed strain-controlled fatigue behavior of the high alloy steel X2M are presented and discussed. The cyclic stress response of this high-strength alloy steel revealed initial hardening during the first few cycles followed by gradual softening for most of fatigue life. Cyclic strain resistance exhibited a linear trend for the variation of elastic strain amplitude with reversals to failure, and plastic strain amplitude with reversals to failure. Fracture morphology was the same at the macroscopic level over the entire range of cyclic strain amplitudes examined. However, at the fine microscopic level, the alloy steel revealed fracture to be essentially ductile with features reminiscent of predominantly "locally" ductile and isolated brittle mechanisms. The mechanisms governing stress response at the fine microscopic level, fatigue life, and final fracture behavior are presented and discussed in light of the mutually interactive influences of intrinsic microstructural effects, deformation characteristics of the microstructural constituents during fully reversed strain cycling, cyclic strain amplitude, and resultant response stress.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of SA-543 High-Strength Steel in All-Volatile Treatment Boiler Feed Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, R.; Basha, M.; Al-Meshari, A.; Bayramov, A.; van Zyl, G.; Dafalla, H.; Mohamed, A. I.

    2015-10-01

    Susceptibility of SA-543 steel, its welds (with and without stress relief treatment), and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was investigated in de-aerated and aerated boiler feed water subjected to the all-volatile treatment (AVT-BFW), and distilled water at 275 °C using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. The SSRT specimens were tested at three extension rates (3.50 × 10-6, 9.00 × 10-6, and 7.50 × 10-5 mm/s) using a novel SCC testing rig capable of testing at high temperatures and pressures. There are no significant differences in the time-to-failure among the four tested specimens. The elongation of the specimens at the time of failure is in the range of 10-23%. The reduction of the cross-sectional area of the failed specimens is large (45-77%) and the absence of any signs of intergranular propagation in fractured specimens, determined by scanning electron microscopy, indicates that the failure is due to mechanical load and not due to SCC. Dissolved oxygen does not affect the susceptibility of the specimens to SCC, which could be due to the inhibition effect of the test solution. SA-543 steel as the base metal, its welds (with and without stress relief treatment), and the HAZ are suitable for use in hot AVT-BFW and distilled water.

  5. Effect of nano-sized precipitates on the crystallography of ferrite in high-strength strip steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing-jing; Wu, Run; Liang, Wen; Tang, Meng-xia

    2014-05-01

    For strip steel with the thickness of 1.6 mm, the yield and tensile strengths as high as 760 and 850 MPa, respectively, were achieved using the compact strip production technology. Precipitates in the steel were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the strengthening mechanism. In addition, intragranular misorientation, Kernel average misorientation, and stored energy were measured using electron backscatter diffraction for crystallographic analysis of ferrite grains containing precipitates and their neighbors without precipitates. It is found that precipitates in specimens primarily consist of TiC and Ti4C2S2. Ferrite grains containing precipitates exhibit the high Taylor factor as well as the crystallographic orientations with {012}, {011}, {112}, or {221} plane parallel to the rolling plane. Compared with the intragranular orientation of adjoining grains, the intragranular misorientation of grains containing precipitates fluctuates more frequently and more mildly as a function of distance. Moreover, the precipitates can induce ferrite grains to store a relatively large amount of energy. These results suggest that a correlation exists between precipitation in ferrite grains and grain crystallographic properties.

  6. Influence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria on the Corrosion Behavior of High Strength Steel EQ70 under Cathodic Polarization.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fang; Zhai, Xiaofan; Duan, Jizhou; Zhang, Meixia; Hou, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Certain species of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) use cathodes as electron donors for metabolism, and this electron transfer process may influence the proper protection potential choice for structures. The interaction between SRB and polarized electrodes had been the focus of numerous investigations. In this paper, the impact of cathodic protection (CP) on Desulfovibrio caledoniens metabolic activity and its influence on highs trength steel EQ70 were studied by bacterial analyses and electrochemical measurements. The results showed that EQ70 under -0.85 VSCE CP had a higher corrosion rate than that without CP, while EQ70 with -1.05 VSCE had a lower corrosion rate. The enhanced SRB metabolic activity at -0.85 VSCE was most probably caused by the direct electron transfer from the electrode polarized at -0.85 VSCE. This direct electron transfer pathway was unavailable in -1.05 VSCE. In addition, the application of cathodic protection led to the transformation of sulfide rusts into carbonates rusts. These observations have been employed to provide updated recommendations for the optimum CP potential for steel structures in the presence of SRB. PMID:27603928

  7. Effect of Cooling Rate on Phase Transformations in a High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Studied from the Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorin, Thomas; Stanford, Nicole; Taylor, Adam; Hodgson, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The phase transformation and precipitation in a high-strength low-alloy steel have been studied over a large range of cooling rates, and a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram has been produced. These experiments are unique because the measurements were made from samples cooled directly from the melt, rather than in homogenized and re-heated billets. The purpose of this experimental design was to examine conditions pertinent to direct strip casting. At the highest cooling rates which simulate strip casting, the microstructure was fully bainitic with small regions of pearlite. At lower cooling rates, the fraction of polygonal ferrite increased and the pearlite regions became larger. The CCT diagram and the microstructural analysis showed that the precipitation of NbC is suppressed at high cooling rates, and is likely to be incomplete at intermediate cooling rates.

  8. Mechanisms and modeling of cleavage fracture in simulated heat-affected zone microstructures of a high-strength low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert-Perlade, A.; Sturel, T.; Gourgues, A. F.; Besson, J.; Pineau, A.

    2004-03-01

    The effect of the welding cycle on the fracture toughness properties of high-strength low alloy (HSLA) steels is examined by means of thermal simulation of heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructures. Tensile tests on notched bars and fracture toughness tests at various temperatures are performed together with fracture surface observations and cross-sectional analyses. The influence of martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents and of “crystallographic” bainite packets on cleavage fracture micromechanisms is, thus, evidenced as a function of temperature. Three weakest-link probabilistic models (the “Master-curve” (MC) approach, the Beremin model, and a “double-barrier” (DB) model) are applied to account for the ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) fracture toughness curve. Some analogy, but also differences, are found between the MC approach and the Beremin model. The DB model, having nonfitted, physically based scatter parameters, is applied to the martensite-containing HAZ microstructures and gives promising results.

  9. Development of an impact-reduction device by applying ultrasonic vibrations to a high-strength steel plate using a downsized transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Ikeoka, Shota; Tsujino, Jiromaru

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we attempted to downsize an ultrasonic impact-reduction device and studied its use in vehicles because the use of large devices increases the overall vehicle weight and size and reduces fuel economy. We downsized the ultrasonic transducer to 195 mm from 435 mm and measured the vibration, deformation, and impact-reduction characteristics. The resonant frequency changed after a bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducer was connected with the horn, and the motional admittance decreased. Upon application of ultrasonic vibrations to a high-strength steel plate, the deformation magnitude increased, the springback magnitude decreased by up to 25%, and the impact force decreased by 18%. While the downsized impact reduction system was found to be less effective, it still showed an impact reduction effect.

  10. Surface Modification of Micro-Alloyed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel by Controlled TIG Arcing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification of micro-alloyed HSLA steel plate has been carried out by autogenous conventional and pulse current tungsten inert gas arcing (TIGA) processes at different welding parameters while the energy input was kept constant. At a given energy input the influence of pulse parameters on the characteristics of surface modification has been studied in case of employing single and multi-run procedure. The role of pulse parameters has been studied by considering their summarized influence defined by a factor Φ. The variation in Φ and pulse frequency has been found to significantly affect the thermal behavior of fusion and accordingly the width and penetration of the modified region along with its microstructure, hardness and wear characteristics. It is found that pulsed TIGA is relatively more advantageous over the conventional TIGA process, as it leads to higher hardness, improved wear resistance, and a better control over surface characteristics.

  11. Effects of Laser Quenching on Impact Toughness and Fracture Morphologies of 40CrNiMo High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejun, Kong; Lei, Zhang

    2014-10-01

    The surface of 40CrNiMo steel was quenched with a CO2 laser, Charpy impact test was conducted at temperatures of 20, 0, and -20 °C, and the impact absorption energies were measured. The fracture morphologies were observed with SEM, and the influence of microhardness, residual stress, and retained austenite on mechanical behavior of impact fracture after laser quenching was discussed. The results show that the hardened layer depth is more than 1 mm after laser quenching, and hardness is about 480-500 HV. The fracture morphology of the sample is dimple rupture at a temperature of 20 °C; with the lower temperature the fracture dimples become smaller. At a temperature of -20 °C, the fracture morphologies change from ductile to brittle, which is mainly cleavage fracture. The increase in surface hardness, production of compressive residual stress, and existence of retained austenite after laser quenching are the main mechanisms of increasing impact toughness.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of the rule for heat transfer coefficient in hot stamping of high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xianhong; Hao, Xin; Yang, Kun; Zhong, Yaoyao

    2013-12-16

    Heat transfer is a crucial aspect for hot stamping process, the fully austenitized boron steel blank with temperature about 900°C is transferred to the tool, then formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. The desired fully martensitic transformation will happen only if the cooling rate exceeds a critical value approximately 27 K/s. During such process, the heat transfer coefficient (abbreviated as HTC) between the tool and blank plays a decisive role for the variation of the blank temperature. In this work, a theoretical formula based on the joint-roughness model is presented to describe the law of HTC, which relies on the roughness, hardness, and other material parameters of the tool and blank. Moreover, a non-contact temperature measuring system based on the infrared thermal camera is built to catch the temperature change course, and then the HTC value is derived through the inverse analysis. Based on the theoretical and experimental results, the change rule of HTC especially its dependence on the process pressure will be discussed in detail.

  13. Effect of Initial Microstructure on Impact Toughness of 1200 MPa-Class High Strength Steel with Ultrafine Elongated Grain Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Meysam; Garrison, Warren M.; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2014-02-01

    A medium-carbon low-alloy steel was prepared with initial structures of either martensite or bainite. For both initial structures, warm caliber-rolling was conducted at 773 K (500 °C) to obtain ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structures with strong <110>//rolling direction (RD) fiber deformation textures. The UFEG structures consisted of spheroidal cementite particles distributed uniformly in a ferrite matrix of a transverse grain size of about 331 and 311 nm in samples with initial martensite and bainite structures, respectively. For both initial structures, the UFEG materials had similar tensile properties, upper shelf energy (145 J), and ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures 98 K (500 °C). Obtaining the martensitic structure requires more rapid cooling than is needed to obtain the bainitic structure and this more rapid cooling promote cracking. As the UFEG structures obtained from initial martensitic and bainitic structures have almost identical properties, but obtaining the bainitic structure does not require a rapid cooling which promotes cracking suggests the use of a bainitic structure in obtaining UFEG structures should be examined further.

  14. High strength steels, stiffness of vehicle front-end structure, and risk of injury to rear seat occupants.

    PubMed

    Sahraei, Elham; Digges, Kennerly; Marzougui, Dhafer; Roddis, Kim

    2014-05-01

    Previous research has shown that rear seat occupant protection has decreased over model years, and front-end stiffness is a possible factor causing this trend. In this research, the effects of a change in stiffness on protection of rear seat occupants in frontal crashes were investigated. The stiffness was adjusted by using higher strength steels (DP and TRIP), or thicker metal sheets. Finite element simulations were performed, using an LS Dyna vehicle model coupled with a MADYMO dummy. Simulation results showed that an increase in stiffness, to the extent it happened in recent model years, can increase the risk of AIS3+ head injuries from 4.8% in the original model (with a stiffness of 1,000 N/mm) to 24.2% in a modified model (with a stiffness of 2,356 N/mm). The simulations also showed an increased risk of chest injury from 9.1% in the original model to 11.8% in the modified model. Distribution of injuries from real world accident data confirms the findings of the simulations. PMID:24509321

  15. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  16. Ultra-High-Strength Interstitial-Free Steel Processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing at Large Equivalent Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepa; Mukhopadhyay, N. K.; Sastry, G. V. S.; Manna, R.

    2016-04-01

    The billets of interstitial-free (IF) steel are deformed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 298 K (25 °C) adopting the route BC up to an equivalent strain ( ɛ vm) of 24. The evolution of microstructures and their effects on the mechanical properties are examined. The microstructural refinement involves the elongation of grains, the subdivision of grains to the bands with high dislocation density, and the splitting of bands into the cell blocks and then cell blocks into the cells. The widths of the bands and the size of cells decrease with strain. The degree of reduction in the grain size is highest at the low strain level. However, most of the boundaries at this stage are of low-angle boundaries (at ɛ vm = 3). Thereafter, the misorientation angle increases by progressive lattice rotation with strain. The coarse bands transform step by step from the lamellar structure to the ribbon-shaped grains and finally to the near-equiaxed grain structures with the subgrains of a saturated low-angle grain boundary fraction of 0.34 at very large strain >15. The as-received coarse-grained microstructure (grain size of 57.6 ± 21 µm) has been refined to 257 ± 48 nm at an equivalent strain of 24. The strength increases considerably up to ɛ vm = 3 due to grain refinement and high dislocation density. However, the strengthening at later stages is mainly due to the increase in misorientation angle and refinement. Initial yield strength of 227 MPa is increased to a record value of 895 MPa on straining up to ɛ vm = 24 at 298 K (25 °C). Uniform elongation decreases drastically at low equivalent strain but it regains marginally later. The ECAPed sample fails by a ductile fracture at ɛ vm = 0.6 to 6 but by a mixed mode of ductile-brittle fracture at larger strain of 9 to 24.

  17. Technical basis for flawed cylinder test specification to assure adequate fracture resistance of ISO high-strength steel cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.D.; Smith, J.H.; Tribolet, R.O.

    1997-11-01

    High-pressure industrial gases (such as oxygen, nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, etc.) are stored and transported in portable cylinders. ISO TC58 SC3 has developed a draft specification 9809 for design and fabrication of high-pressure cylinders with maximum tensile strength limitation of 1,100 N/mm{sup 2}. In order to extend the ISO 9809 rules for higher than 1,100 N/mm{sup 2} strength level cylinders, a working group WG14 was formed in 1989 to develop new rules to assure adequate fracture resistance. In 1994, WG14 recommended a simple, but unique flawed cylinder test method for design qualification of the cylinder and acceptance criteria to assure adequate fracture resistance. WG14 also recommended Charpy-V-notch impact tests to control the required fracture resistance on production cylinders. This paper presents the technical basis that was employed in developing the flawed cylinder test method and acceptance criteria. The specification was developed for seamless steel cylinders having actual strength in the range of 1,100 to 1,400 N/mm{sup 2} and cylindrical section wall thickness in the range of 3 to 10 mm. Flawed cylinder tests were conducted on several hundred cylinders of varying sizes and strength levels. The specification requires to demonstrate LEAK-BEFORE-BREAK performance of the cylinder having flaw length equal to 1.6 (o.d. {times} t{sub design}){sup 0.5} at failure pressure = (t{sub design}/t{sub actual}) x Design Pressure.

  18. Multicomponent High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Precipitation-Strengthened by Sub-nanometric Cu Precipitates and M2C Carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Hunter, Allen H.; Seidman, David N.

    2016-05-01

    HSLA-115 is a novel high-strength low-alloy structural steel derived from martensitic Cu-bearing HSLA-100. HSLA-100 is typically used in conditions with overaged Cu precipitates, to obtain acceptable impact toughness and ductility. Present work on HSLA-115 demonstrates that incorporating sub-nanometric-sized M2C carbides along with Cu precipitates produces higher strength steels that still meet impact toughness and ductility requirements. Isothermal aging at 823 K (550 °C) precipitates M2C carbides co-located with the Cu precipitates and distributed heterogeneously at lath boundaries and dislocations. 3D atom-probe tomography is used to characterize the evolution of these precipitates at 823 K (550 °C) in terms of mean radii, number densities, and volume fractions. These results are correlated with microhardness, impact toughness, and tensile strength. The optimum combination of mechanical properties, 972 MPa yield strength, 24.8 pct elongation to failure, and 188.0 J impact toughness at 255 K (-18 °C), is attained after 3-hour aging at 823 K (550 °C). Strengthening by M2C precipitates offsets the softening due to overaging of Cu precipitates and tempering of martensitic matrix. It is shown that this extended yield strength plateau can be used as a design principle to optimize strength and toughness at the same time.

  19. Effects of Cooling Conditions on Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Charpy Impact Toughness of Low-Carbon High-Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Shin, Sang Yong; Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Lee, Sunghak

    2013-01-01

    In this study, four low-carbon high-strength bainitic steel specimens were fabricated by varying finish cooling temperatures and cooling rates, and their tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated. All the bainitic steel specimens consisted of acicular ferrite, granular bainite, bainitic ferrite, and martensite-austenite constituents. The specimens fabricated with higher finish cooling temperature had a lower volume fraction of martensite-austenite constituent than the specimens fabricated with lower finish cooling temperature. The fast-cooled specimens had twice the volume fraction of bainitic ferrite and consequently higher yield and tensile strengths than the slow-cooled specimens. The energy transition temperature tended to increase with increasing effective grain size or with increasing volume fraction of granular bainite. The fast-cooled specimen fabricated with high finish cooling temperature and fast cooling rate showed the lowest energy transition temperature among the four specimens because of the lowest content of coarse granular bainite. These findings indicated that Charpy impact properties as well as strength could be improved by suppressing the formation of granular bainite, despite the presence of some hard microstructural constituents such as bainitic ferrite and martensite-austenite.

  20. Multicomponent High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Precipitation-Strengthened by Sub-nanometric Cu Precipitates and M2C Carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Hunter, Allen H.; Seidman, David N.

    2016-08-01

    HSLA-115 is a novel high-strength low-alloy structural steel derived from martensitic Cu-bearing HSLA-100. HSLA-100 is typically used in conditions with overaged Cu precipitates, to obtain acceptable impact toughness and ductility. Present work on HSLA-115 demonstrates that incorporating sub-nanometric-sized M2C carbides along with Cu precipitates produces higher strength steels that still meet impact toughness and ductility requirements. Isothermal aging at 823 K (550 °C) precipitates M2C carbides co-located with the Cu precipitates and distributed heterogeneously at lath boundaries and dislocations. 3D atom-probe tomography is used to characterize the evolution of these precipitates at 823 K (550 °C) in terms of mean radii, number densities, and volume fractions. These results are correlated with microhardness, impact toughness, and tensile strength. The optimum combination of mechanical properties, 972 MPa yield strength, 24.8 pct elongation to failure, and 188.0 J impact toughness at 255 K (-18 °C), is attained after 3-hour aging at 823 K (550 °C). Strengthening by M2C precipitates offsets the softening due to overaging of Cu precipitates and tempering of martensitic matrix. It is shown that this extended yield strength plateau can be used as a design principle to optimize strength and toughness at the same time.

  1. Analysis of a New High-Toughness Ultra-high-Strength Martensitic Steel by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartshorne, Matthew I.; McCormick, Caroline; Schmidt, Michael; Novotny, Paul; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure of a new martensitic high-strength steel (Fe-0.40C-3.81Ni-1.31Cr-1.50Si-0.75Mn-0.52Mo-0.51Cu-0.30V) with high fracture toughness is characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT). MC, M6C, and M23C6 precipitates form inside the martensitic lath matrix. The fracture toughness is insensitive to the dissolution of M23C6 precipitates at austenitizing temperatures above 1164 K (891 °C). APT reveals that solute segregation at the prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGB) is not uniform, with C, Mo, Si, Ni, and/or P enrichment varying at different areas of the PAGB. Si depletion is detected in the same area as the highest C enrichment. Carbon also segregates at lath boundaries. Segregation of C indicates the presence of retained austenite films at both PAGB and lath boundaries. Regions enriched in C up to 10 pct were found within the laths; however, no regions were enriched to the level expected of cementite or ɛ-carbide. The observed C distribution and high fracture toughness indicates that the tempering behavior is significantly different than that observed in 300M steel. The effect of Si, Ni, and Cu on the formation and stabilization of the regions of C enrichment and retained austenite require further study, as it may be key to the increased toughness.

  2. Texture and Formability of One-Step and Two-Step Cold-Rolled and Annealed Interstitial Free High-Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humane, M. M.; Minj, R. K.; Peshwe, D. R.; Paretkar, R. K.

    2011-06-01

    In the current experimental investigation, a comparative study has been carried out to understand the development of texture under different conditions, viz. controlled hot-rolled, one-step cold-rolled (CR) and annealed, and two-step cold-rolled and annealed conditions. Mechanical properties were determined and experimental formability limit diagrams (FLDs) were plotted after both one-step and two-step cold-rolled and annealed conditions. From the tabulated data, it was found that hot band texture of 85 to 90 pct deformation was strong and the main orientations were ( {112} )[ {1bar{1}0} ] and ( {332} )[ {bar{1}bar{1}3} ]. One-step cold rolling developed the strong and uniform α-fiber and γ-fiber at 80 pct cold reduction. The strong and uniform new γ-fiber was obtained at the one-step 80 pct CR annealed condition. In addition, the highest drawability was found at the one-step 80 pct CR annealed condition. In two-step cold rolling, orientation ( {223} )[ {1bar{1}0} ] was the main texture component along with extremely strong γ-fiber. Moreover, batch annealing of two-step cold-rolled steel sheets developed exceptionally strong and uniform γ-fiber, and all mechanical properties were enhanced significantly except yield strength. From FLDs, it is observed that the formability properties of interstitial free (IF) high-strength (HS) steel sheets were excellent at both one-step and two-step cold-rolled and annealed conditions. However, the two-step cold-rolling and annealing process was found to be superior to the one-step process. The data of this investigation may be used at the industrial level to design the entire processing of IF-HS steel sheets.

  3. Crystallographic Reconstruction Study of the Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature on the Variant Selection During Bainite Transformation in C-Mn High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The effect of finish rolling temperature on the austenite-( γ) to-bainite ( α) phase transformation is quantitatively investigated in high-strength C-Mn steels using an alternative crystallographic γ reconstruction procedure, which can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. In particular, the current study aims to clarify the respective contributions of the γ conditioning during the hot rolling and the variant selection during the phase transformation to the inherited texture. The results confirm that the sample finish rolled at the lowest temperature [1102 K (829 °C)] exhibits the sharpest transformation texture. It is shown that this sharp texture is exclusively due to a strong variant selection from parent brass {110}, S {213} and Goss {110}<001> grains, whereas the variant selection from the copper {112} grains is insensitive to the finish rolling temperature. In addition, a statistical variant selection analysis proves that the habit planes of the selected variants do not systematically correspond to the predicted active γ slip planes using the Taylor model. In contrast, a correlation between the Bain group to which the selected variants belong and the finish rolling temperature is clearly revealed, regardless of the parent orientation. These results are discussed in terms of polygranular accommodation mechanisms, especially in view of the observed development in the hot-rolled samples of high-angle grain boundaries with misorientation axes between <111> γ and <110> γ.

  4. Crystallographic Reconstruction Study of the Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature on the Variant Selection During Bainite Transformation in C-Mn High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    The effect of finish rolling temperature on the austenite-(γ) to-bainite (α) phase transformation is quantitatively investigated in high-strength C-Mn steels using an alternative crystallographic γ reconstruction procedure, which can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. In particular, the current study aims to clarify the respective contributions of the γ conditioning during the hot rolling and the variant selection during the phase transformation to the inherited texture. The results confirm that the sample finish rolled at the lowest temperature [1102 K (829 °C)] exhibits the sharpest transformation texture. It is shown that this sharp texture is exclusively due to a strong variant selection from parent brass {110} < {1bar{1}2} > , S {213} < {bar{3}bar{6}4} > and Goss {110}<001> grains, whereas the variant selection from the copper {112} < {bar{1}bar{1}1} > grains is insensitive to the finish rolling temperature. In addition, a statistical variant selection analysis proves that the habit planes of the selected variants do not systematically correspond to the predicted active γ slip planes using the Taylor model. In contrast, a correlation between the Bain group to which the selected variants belong and the finish rolling temperature is clearly revealed, regardless of the parent orientation. These results are discussed in terms of polygranular accommodation mechanisms, especially in view of the observed development in the hot-rolled samples of high-angle grain boundaries with misorientation axes between <111>γ and <110>γ.

  5. Variation in the Chemical Driving Force for Intragranular Nucleation in the Multi-pass Weld Metal of Ti-Containing High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Han, Kyutae; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Changhee

    2015-08-01

    The variation of the Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) around the inclusion during multi-pass welding of Ti-containing high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel was investigated by taking the changes in the impact toughness and microstructure into account. As-deposited weld metal specimens were prepared by single-pass, bead-in-groove welding, and reheated weld metal specimens were obtained by a thermal simulation technique. Two types of chemical compositions were prepared, mainly by controlling the Ti content in order to form two types of phases at inclusion/matrix interface: spinel and ilmenite. When the reheating thermal cycle is applied to the as-deposited weld metal, the MDZ depth varied depending on the inclusion surface phase; this could be explained by the competition of the homogenization effect and the dissolution effect, which occurred near the inclusion/matrix interface. In order to enhance the chemical driving force for intragranular nucleation in both as-deposited weld metal and reheated weld metal, the formation of ilmenite phase is recommended.

  6. Laboratory Study on Oxide Inclusions in High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steel Refined by Slag with Basicity 2-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huixiang; Wang, Xinhua; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Wanjun

    2015-11-01

    Non-metallic inclusions in high-strength low-alloyed steel refined by slag with basicity (B) 2-5 and Al2O3 content 20%-30% (in mass percent) were investigated by slag-metal equilibrium experiments in laboratory and thermodynamic calculations. Most inclusions in equilibrium were quasi-spherical CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system and the sizes were less than 5 µm. The average content ratio, CaO/Al2O3 and CaO/SiO2 of the inclusions, increased with slag basicity increasing when Al2O3 content in slag was around 25%, MgO/Al2O3 and CaO/Al2O3 increased with Al2O3 content in slag decreasing when slag basicity was around 3.3. The MgO/Al2O3 of the inclusions was influenced mainly by Al2O3 content in slag and CaO/Al2O3 was influenced mainly by slag basicity. To make the inclusions out of relative lower melting region (<1,773 K), the values of CaO/Al2O3, MgO/Al2O3 and (CaO+MgO)/Al2O3 of the inclusions should be enhanced by increasing basicity and decreasing Al2O3 content in slag properly.

  7. Interfacial Characterization of Dissimilar Joints Between Al/Mg/Al-Trilayered Clad Sheet to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macwan, A.; Jiang, X. Q.; Chen, D. L.

    2015-07-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are increasingly used in the automotive and aerospace sectors to reduce vehicle weight. Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets are deemed as a promising alternative to improve the corrosion resistance and formability of Mg alloys. The structural application of Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets inevitably involves welding and joining in the multi-material vehicle body manufacturing. This study aimed to characterize the bonding interface microstructure of the Al/Mg/Al-clad sheet to high-strength low-alloy steel with and without Zn coating using ultrasonic spot welding at different levels of welding energy. It was observed that the presence of Zn coating improved the bonding at the interface due to the formation of Al-Zn eutectic structure via enhanced diffusion. At a higher level of welding energy, characteristic flow patterns of Zn into Al-clad layer were observed with an extensive penetration mainly along some high angle grain boundaries. The dissimilar joints without Zn coating made at a high welding energy of 800 J failed partially from the Al/Fe weld interface and partially from the Al/Mg clad interface, while the joints with Zn coating failed from the Al/Mg clad interface due to the presence of brittle Al12Mg17 phase.

  8. Elastic Properties in Tension and Shear of High Strength Nonferrous Metals and Stainless Steel - Effect of Previous Deformation and Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebs, R W; Mcadam, D J

    1947-01-01

    A resume is given of an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation and of annealing temperature on the tensile and shear elastic properties of high strength nonferrous metals and stainless steels in the form of rods and tubes. The data were obtained from earlier technical reports and notes, and from unpublished work in this investigation. There are also included data obtained from published and unpublished work performed on an independent investigation. The rod materials, namely, nickel, monel, inconel, copper, 13:2 Cr-Ni steel, and 18:8 Cr-Ni steel, were tested in tension; 18:8 Cr-Ni steel tubes were tested in shear, and nickel, monel, aluminum-monel, and Inconel tubes were tested in both tension and shear. There are first described experiments on the relationship between hysteresis and creep, as obtained with repeated cyclic stressing of annealed stainless steel specimens over a constant load range. These tests, which preceded the measurements of elastic properties, assisted in devising the loading time schedule used in such measurements. From corrected stress-set curves are derived the five proof stresses used as indices of elastic or yield strength. From corrected stress-strain curves are derived the secant modulus and its variation with stress. The relationship between the forms of the stress-set and stress-strain curves and the values of the properties derived is discussed. Curves of variation of proof stress and modulus with prior extension, as obtained with single rod specimens, consist in wavelike basic curves with superposed oscillations due to differences of rest interval and extension spacing; the effects of these differences are studied. Oscillations of proof stress and modulus are generally opposite in manner. The use of a series of tubular specimens corresponding to different amounts of prior extension of cold reduction gave curves almost devoid of oscillation since the effects of variation of rest interval and extension spacing were

  9. Elemental segregation and subsequent precipitation during solidification of continuous cast Nb–V–Ti high-strength low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Shuguo; Davis, Claire; Strangwood, Martin

    2014-09-15

    In this study, elemental segregation during solidification and subsequent precipitation behaviour in a continuous cast Nb–V–Ti high-strength low-alloy steel was investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and thermodynamic modelling. It is known that for steels with low carbon contents the pearlite that forms on slow cooling does so where the interdendritic liquid was present prior to final solidification. The alloying elements of Nb, Ti, Mn and V segregate into the interdendritic liquid during solidification, while Al preferentially segregates into the solidifying solid phase. The composition analysis on the slab samples verified the predicted element segregation behaviour, with a smaller difference in the concentrations of Mn and V in the pearlite and dendritic ferrite regions being observed compared to the Nb levels. Small (30–100 nm) spherical or irregular shaped Nb-rich precipitates (Nb(C, N) and (Nb, V)(C, N)) were mainly found in the pearlite regions, while angular Al-rich (60–300 nm) precipitates were found in the dendritic ferrite regions, in the form of AlN and complex AlN–V(C, N) precipitates. Small isolated ferrite regions surrounded by pearlite were observed in the microstructure and has two origins: one type is dendritic ferrite that appears as an isolated island due to a sectioning effect when observing the two-dimensional microstructure; the other is a ferrite idiomorph that forms in the interdendritic region due to the low carbon content of the steel. Accordingly, in these isolated ferrite islands two different precipitation behaviours are found; predominantly Al-rich particles in the dendritic regions or predominantly Nb-rich precipitates in the interdendritic ferrite idiomorphs. No Al-rich precipitates were observed in the interdendritic regions (pearlite or isolated ferrite idiomorphs) despite the Thermo-Calc predictions indicating a higher volume fraction of AlN in these

  10. Thermodynamic Evaluation and Optimization of the MnO-B2O3 and MnO-B2O3-SiO2 Systems and Its Application to Oxidation of High-Strength Steels Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Min; Jung, In-Ho

    2015-06-01

    A complete literature review, critical evaluation, and thermodynamic optimization of phase equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of all available oxide phases in the MnO-B2O3 and MnO-B2O3-SiO2 systems at 1 bar pressure are presented. Due to the lack of the experimental data in these systems, the systematic trend of CaO- and MgO-containing systems were taken into account in the optimization. The molten oxide phase is described by the Modified Quasichemical Model. A set of optimized model parameters of all phases is obtained which reproduces all available and reliable thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data. The unexplored binary and ternary phase diagrams of the MnO-B2O3 and MnO-B2O3-SiO2 systems have been predicted for the first time. The thermodynamic calculations relevant to the oxidation of advanced high-strength steels containing boron were performed to find that B can form liquid B2O3-SiO2-rich phase in the annealing furnace under reducing N2-H2 atmosphere, which can significantly influence the wetting behavior of liquid Zn in Zn galvanizing process.