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1

Advanced Space Shuttle simulation model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of atmospheric turbulence in horizontal and near-horizontal flight during the return of the Space Shuttle are important for determining design, control, and pilot-in-the-loop effects. A nonrecursive model (based on vonKarman spectra) for atmospheric turbulence along the flight path of the Shuttle Orbiter has been developed which provides for simulation of instantaneous vertical and horizontal gusts at the vehicle center-of-gravity and also for simulation of instantaneous gust gradients. Based on this model the time series for gusts and gust gradients have been generated and stored on a series of magnetic tapes which are entitled Shuttle Simulation Turbulence Tapes (SSTT). The time series are designed to represent atmospheric turbulence from ground level to an altitude of 120,000 meters. A description of the turbulence generation procedure is provided, the results of validating the simulated turbulence are described, and conclusions and recommendations are presented. Appendices provide tabulated one-dimensional vonKarman spectra, a discussion of the minimum frequency simulated, and the results of spectral and statistical analyses of the SSTT.

Tatom, F. B.; Smith, S. R.

1982-01-01

2

DEVELOPMENT OF THE ADVANCED UTILITY SIMULATION MODEL  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses the development of the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM), developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), to forecast air emissions of pollutants from electric utilities. USM integrates generating unit engineering detail with d...

3

Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern  

ScienceCinema

Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Gertman, Vanessa

2013-05-28

4

Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern  

SciTech Connect

Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Gertman, Vanessa

2010-01-01

5

Advancing Material Models for Automotive Forming Simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simulations in automotive industry need more advanced material models to achieve highly reliable forming and springback predictions. Conventional material models implemented in the FEM-simulation models are not capable to describe the plastic material behaviour during monotonic strain paths with sufficient accuracy. Recently, ESI and Corus co-operate on the implementation of an advanced material model in the FEM-code PAMSTAMP 2G. This applies to the strain hardening model, the influence of strain rate, and the description of the yield locus in these models. A subsequent challenge is the description of the material after a change of strain path. The use of advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry requires a description of plastic material behaviour of multiphase steels. The simplest variant is dual phase steel consisting of a ferritic and a martensitic phase. Multiphase materials also contain a bainitic phase in addition to the ferritic and martensitic phase. More physical descriptions of strain hardening than simple fitted Ludwik/Nadai curves are necessary. Methods to predict plastic behaviour of single-phase materials use a simple dislocation interaction model based on the formed cells structures only. At Corus, a new method is proposed to predict plastic behaviour of multiphase materials have to take hard phases into account, which deform less easily. The resulting deformation gradients create geometrically necessary dislocations. Additional micro-structural information such as morphology and size of hard phase particles or grains is necessary to derive the strain hardening models for this type of materials. Measurements available from the Numisheet benchmarks allow these models to be validated. At Corus, additional measured values are available from cross-die tests. This laboratory test can attain critical deformations by large variations in blank size and processing conditions. The tests are a powerful tool in optimising forming simulations prior to larger scale industrial validation.

Vegter, H.; An, Y.; ten Horn, C. H. L. J.; Atzema, E. H.; Roelofsen, M. E.

2005-08-01

6

Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

2005-01-01

7

Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

2005-09-01

8

ADVANCED UTILITY SIMULATION MODEL DESCRIPTION OF MODIFICATIONS TO THE STATE LEVEL MODEL (VERSION 3.0)  

EPA Science Inventory

The report documents modifications to the state level model portion of the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM), one of four stationary source emission and control cost forecasting models developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The AUSM model...

9

Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.  

SciTech Connect

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr. (,; .); Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

2007-07-01

10

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20

11

Modeling of advanced alkaline electrolyzers: a system simulation approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model for an advanced alkaline electrolyzer has been developed. The model is based on a combination of fundamental thermodynamics, heat transfer theory, and empirical electrochemical relationships. A dynamic thermal model has also been developed. Comparisons between predicted and measured data show that the model can be used to predict the cell voltage, hydrogen production, efficiencies, and operating temperature.

Øystein Ulleberg

2003-01-01

12

Advanced 3D Photocathode Modeling and Simulations Final Report  

SciTech Connect

High brightness electron beams required by the proposed Next Linear Collider demand strong advances in photocathode electron gun performance. Significant improvement in the production of such beams with rf photocathode electron guns is hampered by the lack high-fidelity simulations. The critical missing piece in existing gun codes is a physics-based, detailed treatment of the very complex and highly nonlinear photoemission process.

Dimitre A Dimitrov; David L Bruhwiler

2005-06-06

13

ADVANCED UTILITY SIMULATION MODEL ANALYTICAL DOCUMENTATION STATE LEVEL MODEL (VERSION 1.0)  

EPA Science Inventory

The report is one of 11 in a series describing the initial development of the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM). The AUSM is one of four stationary source emission and control cost forecasting models developed by EPA for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (...

14

ADVANCED UTILITY SIMULATION MODEL, PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION. STATE LEVEL MODEL (VERSION 1.0)  

EPA Science Inventory

The report is one of 11 in a series describing the initial development of the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM). The AUSM is one of four stationary source emission and control cost forecasting models developed by EPA for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (...

15

Numerical simulation of turbomachinery flows with advanced turbulence models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A three dimensional full Navier-Stokes (FNS) code is used to simulate complex turbomachinery flows. The code incorporates an explicit multistep scheme and solves a conservative form of the density averaged continuity, momentum, and energy equations. A compressible low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model, and a q-omega model and an algebraic Reynolds stress model have been incorporated in a fully coupled manner to approximate Reynolds stresses. The code is used to predict the viscous flow field in a backswept transonic centrifugal compressor for which laser two focus data is available. The code is also used to simulate the tip clearance flow in a cascade. The code has been extended to include unsteady Euler solutions for predicting the unsteady flow through a cascade due to incoming wakes, simulating rotor-stator interactions.

Lakshminarayana, B.; Kunz, R.; Luo, J.; Fan, S.

1992-01-01

16

Advancing botnet modeling techniques for military and security simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simulation environments serve many purposes, but they are only as good as their content. One of the most challenging and pressing areas that call for improved content is the simulation of bot armies (botnets) and their effects upon networks and computer systems. Botnets are a new type of malware, a type that is more powerful and potentially dangerous than any other type of malware. A botnet's power derives from several capabilities including the following: 1) the botnet's capability to be controlled and directed throughout all phases of its activity, 2) a command and control structure that grows increasingly sophisticated, and 3) the ability of a bot's software to be updated at any time by the owner of the bot (a person commonly called a bot master or bot herder.) Not only is a bot army powerful and agile in its technical capabilities, a bot army can be extremely large, can be comprised of tens of thousands, if not millions, of compromised computers or it can be as small as a few thousand targeted systems. In all botnets, their members can surreptitiously communicate with each other and their command and control centers. In sum, these capabilities allow a bot army to execute attacks that are technically sophisticated, difficult to trace, tactically agile, massive, and coordinated. To improve our understanding of their operation and potential, we believe that it is necessary to develop computer security simulations that accurately portray bot army activities, with the goal of including bot army simulations within military simulation environments. In this paper, we investigate issues that arise when simulating bot armies and propose a combination of the biologically inspired MSEIR infection spread model coupled with the jump-diffusion infection spread model to portray botnet propagation.

Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

2011-06-01

17

National Advanced Driving Simulator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS) is housed at the University of Iowa and is associated with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Visitors to the NADS Website can see a slideshow overview of the facility, read about the experimental program, and view simulations (QuickTime). Multi-body dynamics, software engineering, tire soil, simulation technology, and electrical engineering are some of the topics discussed at the NADS site. Data on mass, moment of inertia, and center of mass for vehicles ranging from a station wagon to a Hummer can be viewed via the Vehicle Models page (.pdf). This is a cool site for taking a glimpse at the latest in automotive engineering and computer simulation technologies.

18

The Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Capability Roadmap Vision for Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper summarizes a subset of the Advanced Modeling Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap that was developed for NASA in 2005. The AMSA Capability Roadmap Team was chartered to "To identify what is needed to enhance NASA's capabilities to produce leading-edge exploration and science missions by improving engineering system development, operations, and science understanding through broad application of advanced modeling, simulation and analysis techniques." The AMSA roadmap stressed the need for integration, not just within the science, engineering and operations domains themselves, but also across these domains. Here we discuss the roadmap element pertaining to integration within the engineering domain, with a particular focus on implications for future observatory missions. The AMSA products supporting the system engineering function are mission information, bounds on information quality, and system validation guidance. The Engineering roadmap element contains 5 sub-elements: (1) Large-Scale Systems Models, (2) Anomalous Behavior Models, (3) advanced Uncertainty Models, (4) Virtual Testing Models, and (5) space-based Robotics Manufacture and Servicing Models.

Zang, Thomas; Lieber, Mike; Norton, Charles; Fucik, Karen

2006-01-01

19

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-12-01

20

Advanced air quality modeling system for the simulation of photochemical ozone formation over North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

An advanced air quality modeling system is used to simulate the formation of photochemical oxidants, mainly ozone, over North Carolina. The objective of this modeling study is to successfully model the formation processes of ozone in North Carolina to lead to effective ozone control strategy developments for both 1-hour and 8-hour standards and eventually to address the particulate matter issue. The modeling system selected for this ongoing project is the North Carolina Supercomputing Center`s Environmental Decision Support System (EDSS), which evolved from a working prototype of EPA`s Third Generation Modeling System, or Models-3. The EDSS consists of three major modeling components : the Multiscale Air Quality SImulation Platform (MAQSIP) for chemistry/transport modeling, Mesoscale Model Version 5 (MM5) for meteorological modeling, and Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) system for emission modeling. Two inner subdomains at 12-km and 4-km grid resolutions centered over Charlotte are nested inside a coarse domain at a 36-km resolution. Sixteen vertical layers with a denser grid at lower altitude are used to better resolve the mixing layer. The CB-IV chemistry mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry and radical-radical reactions is used to simulate the chemical transformations of reacting species. Preliminary results show that the MAQSIP has reasonably simulated the temporal and spatial distribution of ozone as compared to observations in the first 6-day episode during July 10--15, 1995. Improved ozone predictions are shown in the model using finer grid resolution. Various ozone sensitivity studies on the model inputs such as initial and boundary conditions and the existence of clouds are under testing. An innovative analysis tool for model evaluation and error detection, the Process Analysis method, is also applied to help understand the regulating processes that lead to formation of ozone.

Jang, C.; Wheeler, N.; Dolwick, P.; Olerud, D.; Houyoux, M. [MCNC-North Carolina Supercomputing Center, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Timin, B.; Lawrimore, J.; Holman, S. [North Carolina Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources, Raleigh, NC (United States). Div. of Air Quality; Jeffries, H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

1998-12-31

21

Advanced computers and simulation  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator physicists today have access to computers that are far more powerful than those available just 10 years ago. In the early 1980`s, desktop workstations performed less one million floating point operations per second (Mflops), and the realized performance of vector supercomputers was at best a few hundred Mflops. Today vector processing is available on the desktop, providing researchers with performance approaching 100 Mflops at a price that is measured in thousands of dollars. Furthermore, advances in Massively Parallel Processors (MPP) have made performance of over 10 gigaflops a reality, and around mid-decade MPPs are expected to be capable of teraflops performance. Along with advances in MPP hardware, researchers have also made significant progress in developing algorithms and software for MPPS. These changes have had, and will continue to have, a significant impact on the work of computational accelerator physicists. Now, instead of running particle simulations with just a few thousand particles, we can perform desktop simulations with tens of thousands of simulation particles, and calculations with well over 1 million particles are being performed on MPPs. In the area of computational electromagnetics, simulations that used to be performed only on vector supercomputers now run in several hours on desktop workstations, and researchers are hoping to perform simulations with over one billion mesh points on future MPPs. In this paper we will discuss the latest advances, and what can be expected in the near future, in hardware, software and applications codes for advanced simulation of particle accelerators.

Ryne, R.D.

1993-06-01

22

Advanced computers and simulation  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator physicists today have access to computers that are far more powerful than those available just 10 years ago. In the early 1980's, desktop workstations performed less one million floating point operations per second (Mflops), and the realized performance of vector supercomputers was at best a few hundred Mflops. Today vector processing is available on the desktop, providing researchers with performance approaching 100 Mflops at a price that is measured in thousands of dollars. Furthermore, advances in Massively Parallel Processors (MPP) have made performance of over 10 gigaflops a reality, and around mid-decade MPPs are expected to be capable of teraflops performance. Along with advances in MPP hardware, researchers have also made significant progress in developing algorithms and software for MPPS. These changes have had, and will continue to have, a significant impact on the work of computational accelerator physicists. Now, instead of running particle simulations with just a few thousand particles, we can perform desktop simulations with tens of thousands of simulation particles, and calculations with well over 1 million particles are being performed on MPPs. In the area of computational electromagnetics, simulations that used to be performed only on vector supercomputers now run in several hours on desktop workstations, and researchers are hoping to perform simulations with over one billion mesh points on future MPPs. In this paper we will discuss the latest advances, and what can be expected in the near future, in hardware, software and applications codes for advanced simulation of particle accelerators.

Ryne, R.D.

1993-01-01

23

Recent advances in semi-analytical scattering models for NDT simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For several years, CEA-LIST and partners have been developing ultrasonic simulation tools with the aim of modelling non-destructive evaluation. The existing ultrasonic modules allow us to simulate fully real ultrasonic inspection scenarios in a range of applications which requires the computation of the propagated beam, as well as its interaction with flaws. To fulfil requirements of an intensive use (for parametric studies), the choice has been made to adopt mainly analytical approximate or exact methods to model the scattering of ultrasound by flaws. The applied analytical theories (Kirchhoff and Born approximations, GTD, SOV...) were already described in previous GDR communication. Over the years, this "semi-analytical" approach has been enriched by adaptations and improvements of the existing models or by new models, in order to extend the applicability of the simulation tools. This paper is devoted to the following recent advances performed in the framework of this approach: The SOV method based on the exact analytical model for the scattering from a cylindrical cavity has been extended in 3D to account for field variations along the cylinder. This new 3D model leads to an improvement in simulation of small side-drilled holes. Concerning the geometrical theories of diffraction (GTD), subroutines for calculation of the 2D wedge diffraction coefficients (for bulk or Rayleigh incident waves) have been developed by the Waves and Fields Group and uniform corrections (UAT and UTD) are under investigation. Modelling of the contribution of the head wave and creeping wave to the echoes arising from a wedge. Numerous experimental validations of the developed models are provided. New possibilities offered by these new developments are emphasized.

Darmon, M.; Chatillon, S.; Mahaut, S.; Calmon, P.; Fradkin, L. J.; Zernov, V.

2011-01-01

24

Propulsion Simulations Using Advanced Turbulence Models with the Unstructured Grid CFD Tool, TetrUSS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational investigation has been completed to assess the capability of TetrUSS for exhaust nozzle flows. Three configurations were chosen for this study (1) an axisymmetric supersonic jet, (2) a transonic axisymmetric boattail with solid sting operated at different Reynolds number and Mach number, and (3) an isolated non-axisymmetric nacelle with a supersonic cruise nozzle. These configurations were chosen because existing experimental data provided a means for measuring the ability of TetrUSS for simulating complex nozzle flows. The main objective of this paper is to validate the implementation of advanced two-equation turbulence models in the unstructured-grid CFD code USM3D for propulsion flow cases. USM3D is the flow solver of the TetrUSS system. Three different turbulence models, namely, Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), basic k epsilon, and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) are used in the present study. The results are generally in agreement with other implementations of these models in structured-grid CFD codes. Results indicate that USM3D provides accurate simulations for complex aerodynamic configurations with propulsion integration.

Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.; Deere, Karen A.; Pandya, Mohangna J.

2004-01-01

25

Using Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) to simulate, solve, and fit mathematical models in nutrition.  

PubMed

The ACSL programs (AEgis Technologies, 2000a, b) are fairly easy to use and provide a good combination of canned programming with the flexibility to do more, if one is willing to learn the language (for Fortran and m files). The manuals are fairly easy to understand but are not detailed enough. The manuals are geared toward operating the software. For the Optimize software, the best references are the Simusolv manuals (Steiner et al., 1990). ACSL also provides an interface (Open API or ACSL Server) which can be purchased separately. The interface allows compiled models to be distributed and run as independent programs with Visual Basic or C/C++. For models built with the Graphic Modeler, the interface is shareware. PMID:14995048

Johnson, Heidi A

2003-01-01

26

Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells  

SciTech Connect

Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented.

Durlofsky, Louis J.; Aziz, Khalid

2001-08-23

27

Recent advances in auxiliary-field methods --- simulations in lattice models and real materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed an auxiliary-field (AF) quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method for many-body simulations. The method takes the form of a linear superposition of independent-particle calculations in fluctuating external fields. ``Entanglement'' of the different field configurations leads to random walks in Slater determinant space. We formulate an approximate constraint on the random walk paths to control the sign/phase problem, which has shown to be very accurate even with simple mean-field solutions as the constraining trial wave function. The same method can be applied to both simplified lattice models and real materials. For realistic electronic Hamiltonians, each random walk stream resembles a density-functional theory (DFT) calculation in random local fields. Thus, the AF QMC method can directly import existing technology from standard electronic structure methods into a many-body QMC framework. We have demonstrated this method with calculations in close to 100 systems, including Si solid, first- and second-row molecular systems, molecules of heavier post-d elements, transition-metal systems, and ultra-cold atomic gases. In these we have operated largely in an automated mode, inputting the DFT or Hartree-Fock solutions as trial wave functions. The AF QMC results showed consistently good agreement with near-exact quantum chemistry results and/or experiment. I will also discuss additional algorithmic advances which can further improve the method in strongly correlated systems. Supported by ARO, NSF, ONR, and DOE-cmsn.

Zhang, Shiwei

2007-03-01

28

The Modelica Association Modelica 2006, September 4th Advanced modeling and simulation techniques in MOSILAB  

E-print Network

very different uses MOSILAB. 2 Case studies 2.1 Complex energy system The case study of a solar heating of simulation ex- periments. The considered system model includes a solar energy plant model, a building model). Figure 1: Energy system for solar heating system The solar energy plant model consists of a primary solar

29

Modeling & Simulation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Modeling & Simulation is a journal published by The Society for Modeling and Simulation International. The Society has made its 2004 Modeling and Simulation Resource Guide available free to download. The directory provides descriptions and contact information for the many modeling and simulation software packages currently available, as well as listings for various modeling and simulation organizations worldwide. Two guest articles describe techniques for the application of real-time simulation in simulations that are complex. Previously published articles are also posted in the online archive.

30

Advanced simulation of digital filters  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Advanced Simulation of Digital Filters has been implemented on the IBM 360\\/67 computer utilizing Tektronix hardware and software. The program package is appropriate for use by persons beginning their study of digital signal processing or for filter analysis. The ASDF programs provide the user with an interactive method by which filter pole and zero locations can be manipulated. Graphical

G. S. Doyle

1980-01-01

31

An advanced object-based software framework for complex ecosystem modeling and simulation  

SciTech Connect

Military land managers and decision makers face an ever increasing challenge to balance maximum flexibility for the mission with a diverse set of multiple land use, social, political, and economic goals. In addition, these goals encompass environmental requirements for maintaining ecosystem health and sustainability over the long term. Spatiotemporal modeling and simulation in support of adaptive ecosystem management can be best accomplished through a dynamic, integrated, and flexible approach that incorporates scientific and technological components into a comprehensive ecosystem modeling framework. The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) integrates ecological models and decision support techniques through a geographic information system (GIS)-based backbone. Recently, an object-oriented (OO) architectural framework was developed for IDLAMS (OO-IDLAMS). This OO-IDLAMS Prototype was built upon and leverages from the Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) developed by Argonne National Laboratory. DIAS is an object-based architectural framework that affords a more integrated, dynamic, and flexible approach to comprehensive ecosystem modeling than was possible with the GIS-based integration approach of the original IDLAMS. The flexibility, dynamics, and interoperability demonstrated through this case study of an object-oriented approach have the potential to provide key technology solutions for many of the military's multiple-use goals and needs for integrated natural resource planning and ecosystem management.

Sydelko, P. J.; Dolph, J. E.; Majerus, K. A.; Taxon, T. N.

2000-06-29

32

Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.  

PubMed

Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

2014-08-13

33

Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence  

SciTech Connect

The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical E{times}B rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons.

Waltz, R.E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kerbel, G.D.; Milovich, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hammett, G.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

1994-12-01

34

Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification deweights the contribution of the buoyancy term in the equation for TKE by reducing the ratio of the eddy diffusivity of heat to momentum. This is necessary particularly in the stably stratified free atmosphere where turbulence occurs in thin layers not typically resolvable by the model. The modified MYJ scheme increases the probability and strength of TKE in thermally stable conditions thereby increasing the probability of optical turbulence. Over twelve months of simulations have been generated. Results indicate realistic values of the Fried Coherence Length (ro) are obtained when compared with observations from a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) instrument. Seeing is worse during day than at night with large ros observed just after sunset and just before sunrise. Three dimensional maps indicate that the vast lava fields, which characterize the Big Island, have a large impact on turbulence generation with a large dependence on elevation. Results from this study are being used to make design decisions for adaptive optics systems. Detailed results of this study will be presented at the conference.

Alliss, R.

2014-09-01

35

2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Extension of Takizuka-Abe Binary Collision Model to Weighted Particle  

E-print Network

2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Extension of Takizuka-Abe Binary Collision Model to Weighted Particle Simulation for the Multi-Ion-Species Plasma Including treatment of collisional effects in studies of plasma physics is very difficult due to the complex coupling

Ito, Atsushi

36

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-02-01

37

Advanced concepts flight simulation facility.  

PubMed

The cockpit environment is changing rapidly. New technology allows airborne computerised information, flight automation and data transfer with the ground. By 1995, not only will the pilot's task have changed, but also the tools for doing that task. To provide knowledge and direction for these changes, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Lockheed-Georgia Company have completed three identical Advanced Concepts Flight Simulation Facilities. Many advanced features have been incorporated into the simulators - e g, cathode ray tube (CRT) displays of flight and systems information operated via touch-screen or voice, print-outs of clearances, cockpit traffic displays, current databases containing navigational charts, weather and flight plan information, and fuel-efficient autopilot control from take-off to touchdown. More importantly, this cockpit is a versatile test bed for studying displays, controls, procedures and crew management in a full-mission context. The facility also has an air traffic control simulation, with radio and data communications, and an outside visual scene with variable weather conditions. These provide a veridical flight environment to evaluate accurately advanced concepts in flight stations. PMID:15676591

Chappell, S L; Sexton, G A

1986-12-01

38

Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - integrated multi-scale multi-physics hierarchical modeling and simulation framework Part III: cladding  

SciTech Connect

Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Reactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems to develop predictive tools is critical. Not only are fabrication and performance models needed to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. In this paper we review the current status of the advanced modeling and simulation of nuclear reactor cladding, with emphasis on what is available and what is to be developed in each scale of the project, how we propose to pass information from one scale to the next, and what experimental information is required for benchmarking and advancing the modeling at each scale level.

Tome, Carlos N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, J A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lebensohn, R A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arsenlis, A [LLNL; Marian, J [LLNL; Pasamehmetoglu, K [INL

2010-01-01

39

Leveraging data analytics, patterning simulations and metrology models to enhance CD metrology accuracy for advanced IC nodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integrated Circuit (IC) technology is changing in multiple ways: 193i to EUV exposure, planar to non-planar device architecture, from single exposure lithography to multiple exposure and DSA patterning etc. Critical dimension (CD) control requirement is becoming stringent and more exhaustive: CD and process window are shrinking., three sigma CD control of < 2 nm is required in complex geometries, and metrology uncertainty of < 0.2 nm is required to achieve the target CD control for advanced IC nodes (e.g. 14 nm, 10 nm and 7 nm nodes). There are fundamental capability and accuracy limits in all the metrology techniques that are detrimental to the success of advanced IC nodes. Reference or physical CD metrology is provided by CD-AFM, and TEM while workhorse metrology is provided by CD-SEM, Scatterometry, Model Based Infrared Reflectrometry (MBIR). Precision alone is not sufficient moving forward. No single technique is sufficient to ensure the required accuracy of patterning. The accuracy of CD-AFM is ~1 nm and precision in TEM is poor due to limited statistics. CD-SEM, scatterometry and MBIR need to be calibrated by reference measurements for ensuring the accuracy of patterned CDs and patterning models. There is a dire need of measurement with < 0.5 nm accuracy and the industry currently does not have that capability with inline measurments. Being aware of the capability gaps for various metrology techniques, we have employed data processing techniques and predictive data analytics, along with patterning simulation and metrology models, and data integration techniques to selected applications demonstrating the potential solution and practicality of such an approach to enhance CD metrology accuracy. Data from multiple metrology techniques has been analyzed in multiple ways to extract information with associated uncertainties and integrated to extract the useful and more accurate CD and profile information of the structures. This paper presents the optimization of scatterometry and MBIR model calibration and feasibility to extrapolate not only in design and process space but from one process step to a previous process step. Well calibrated scatterometry model or patterning simulation model can be used to accurately extrapolate and interpolate in the design and process space for lithography patterning where AFM is not capable to accurately measure sub-40 nm trenches. Uncertainty associated with extrapolation can be large and needs to be minimized. We have made use of measurements from CD-SEM and CD-AFM, along with the patterning and scatterometry simulation models to estimate the uncertainty associated with extrapolation and methods to reduce it. First time we have reported the application of machine learning (Artificial Neural Networks) to the resist shrinkage systematic phenomenon to accurately predict the preshrink CD based on supervised learning using the CD-AFM data. The study lays out various basic concepts, approaches and protocols of multiple source data processing and integration for hybrid metrology approach. Impacts of this study include more accurate metrology, patterning models and better process controls for advanced IC nodes.

Rana, Narender; Zhang, Yunlin; Kagalwala, Taher; Hu, Lin; Bailey, Todd

2014-04-01

40

Advanced simulation of digital filters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An Advanced Simulation of Digital Filters has been implemented on the IBM 360/67 computer utilizing Tektronix hardware and software. The program package is appropriate for use by persons beginning their study of digital signal processing or for filter analysis. The ASDF programs provide the user with an interactive method by which filter pole and zero locations can be manipulated. Graphical output on both the Tektronix graphics screen and the Versatec plotter are provided to observe the effects of pole-zero movement.

Doyle, G. S.

1980-09-01

41

Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

2010-09-01

42

ADVANCED URBANIZED METEOROLOGICAL MODELING AND AIR QUALITY SIMULATIONS WITH CMAQ AT NEIGHBORHOOD SCALES  

EPA Science Inventory

We present results from a study testing the new boundary layer parameterization method, the canopy drag approach (DA) which is designed to explicitly simulate the effects of buildings, street and tree canopies on the dynamic, thermodynamic structure and dispersion fields in urban...

43

Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

2010-08-01

44

MATISSE--advanced earth modeling for imaging and scene simulation: first results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we present MATISSE 1.1 a new background scene generator, whose goal is to compute spectral or integrated radiance images of natural background, as well as the transmission of a hot gas signature. The spectral bandwidth for this version of the code is from 750 to 3300 cm-1 (3 to 13 ?m) with a 5 cm-1 resolution. Gaseous absorption is computed by a Correlated K model. The spatial variability of atmospheric quantities (temperatures and mixing ratios, among others) is taken into account, using variable profiles along the line of sight. Natural backgrounds include the atmospheric background, low altitude clouds and the Earth ground. The radiation models used are designed for observation at low spatial resolution of clouds and soils, so a texture model was developed to increase the high spatial resolution rendering in the metric range. Intermediate outputs of the code deliver radiance and transmission restricted to a single line of sight, in which case atmospheric refraction effects are taken into account. Along this line of sight the transmission can also be computed using a line-by-line model, which is useful to propagate the radiation emitted by a hot gas source (fires, aircraft or missile plume). MATISSE 1.1 was released in June 2002, so this paper is devoted to a presentation of the first results obtained with the code and some validation tests.

Simoneau, Pierre; Berton, Roland; Caillault, Karine; Durand, Gerard; Huet, Thierry; Labarre, Luc; Malherbe, Claire; Miesch, Christophe; Roblin, Antoine; Rosier, Bernard

2003-03-01

45

Gastrointestinal Simulation Based on the Advanced Compartmental Absorption and Transit (ACAT) Model  

E-print Network

= concentration in lumen ? GPEN, Kansas, 2006 Gastro Plus? Fa Cp-time profile In vitro enzyme kinetic constants V max (s) and K m (s) Scaling to in vivo clearance Fb + nonlinear kinetics Physical properties - Peff, Sw, pKa Formulation - Dose, dosage form... and Transit Model (ACAT) Brain Adipose Muscle Skin ? GPEN, Kansas, 2006 Example 1 Inputs ? MWt = 350 ? logP = 2.5 ? pKa = acid 5.5 ? Solubility = 0.1 mg/mL @ pH 2 ? Solubility factor = 500 ? Effective permeability = 2E-4 cm/s ? Dose = 100 mg tablet...

Bolger, Michael

2006-10-26

46

14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...121—Advanced Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for...simulator instruction and checks must be conducted under an advanced simulation training program...operator's advanced simulation training program, or changes to it, and to emphasize...

2010-01-01

47

Simulation methods for advanced scientific computing  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to create effective new algorithms for solving N-body problems by computer simulation. The authors concentrated on developing advanced classical and quantum Monte Carlo techniques. For simulations of phase transitions in classical systems, they produced a framework generalizing the famous Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms for Ising and Potts models. For spin-glass-like problems, they demonstrated the effectiveness of an extension of the multicanonical method for the two-dimensional, random bond Ising model. For quantum mechanical systems, they generated a new method to compute the ground-state energy of systems of interacting electrons. They also improved methods to compute excited states when the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method is used and to compute longer time dynamics when the stationary phase quantum Monte Carlo method is used.

Booth, T.E.; Carlson, J.A.; Forster, R.A. [and others

1998-11-01

48

Simulator design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This simulation design task completion report documents the simulation techniques associated with the network models of both the Interim Service ISDN (integrated services digital network) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures. The ISIS network model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communication satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete events simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

Pepin, Gerald R.

1992-01-01

49

Patient-Specific Geometry Modeling and Mesh Generation for Simulating Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Cases by Maxillomandibular Advancement  

PubMed Central

The objective of this paper is the reconstruction of upper airway geometric models as hybrid meshes from clinically used Computed Tomography (CT) data sets in order to understand the dynamics and behaviors of the pre- and postoperative upper airway systems of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) patients by viscous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The selection criteria for OSAS cases studied are discussed because two reasonable pre- and postoperative upper airway models for CFD simulations may not be created for every case without a special protocol for CT scanning. The geometry extraction and manipulation methods are presented with technical barriers that must be overcome so that they can be used along with computational simulation software as a daily clinical evaluation tool. Eight cases are presented in this paper, and each case consists of pre- and postoperative configurations. The results of computational simulations of two cases are included in this paper as demonstration. PMID:21625395

Ito, Yasushi; Cheng, Gary C.; Shih, Alan M.; Koomullil, Roy P.; Soni, Bharat K.; Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Waite, Peter D.

2011-01-01

50

Advancing the LSST Operations Simulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Operations Simulator for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST; http://lsst.org) allows the planning of LSST observations that obey explicit science driven observing specifications, patterns, schema, and priorities, while optimizing against the constraints placed by design-specific opto-mechanical system performance of the telescope facility, site specific conditions (including weather and seeing), as well as additional scheduled and unscheduled downtime. A simulation run records the characteristics of all observations (e.g., epoch, sky position, seeing, sky brightness) in a MySQL database, which can be queried for any desired purpose. Derivative information digests of the observing history database are made with an analysis package called Simulation Survey Tools for Analysis and Reporting (SSTAR). Merit functions and metrics have been designed to examine how suitable a specific simulation run is for several different science applications. This poster reports recent work which has focussed on an architectural restructuring of the code that will allow us to a) use "look-ahead" strategies that avoid cadence sequences that cannot be completed due to observing constraints; and b) examine alternate optimization strategies, so that the most efficient scheduling algorithm(s) can be identified and used: even few-percent efficiency gains will create substantive scientific opportunity. The enhanced simulator will be used to assess the feasibility of desired observing cadences, study the impact of changing science program priorities, and assist with performance margin investigations of the LSST system.

Saha, Abhijit; Ridgway, S. T.; Cook, K. H.; Delgado, F.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Petry, C. E.; Operations Simulator Group

2013-01-01

51

Development of advanced materials for spallation neutron sources and radiation damage simulation based on multi-scale models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report describes the status review of the JSPS Grant Team to develop advanced materials for the spallation neutron sources and modeling of radiation damage. One of the advanced materials is a toughness enhanced, fine-grained tungsten material (W-TiC) having four-times larger fracture toughness than ordinary tungsten and appreciable RT ductility in the recrystallized state. The other is an intergranular crack (IGC)-resistant austenitic stainless steel which was processed by the grain-boundary engineering (GBE). The experimental results are devoted to corrosion in a lead-bismuth eutectic, arrest of corrosion of weld-decay, radiation damage and creep rupture as well as new technique of GBE using a laser and annealing procedure. New technique seems to be applicable to large or complicated-shaped components. A series of the multi-scale models is built up from nuclear reaction between incident particles and medium nuclei to material property change due to radiation damage. Sample calculation is made on 3 mm-thick nickel bombarded by 3 GeV protons.

Kawai, Masayoshi; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Seiichi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Kikuchi, Kenji; Saito, Shigeru; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Iwase, Hiroshi; Ito, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Kaneko, Yoshihisa; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Ishino, Shiori; JSPS Grant Team

2012-12-01

52

Simulation model of the F/A-18 high angle-of-attack research vehicle utilized for the design of advanced control laws  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 'f18harv' six degree-of-freedom nonlinear batch simulation used to support research in advanced control laws and flight dynamics issues as part of NASA's High Alpha Technology Program is described in this report. This simulation models an F/A-18 airplane modified to incorporate a multi-axis thrust-vectoring system for augmented pitch and yaw control power and actuated forebody strakes for enhanced aerodynamic yaw control power. The modified configuration is known as the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The 'f18harv' simulation was an outgrowth of the 'f18bas' simulation which modeled the basic F/A-18 with a preliminary version of a thrust-vectoring system designed for the HARV. The preliminary version consisted of two thrust-vectoring vanes per engine nozzle compared with the three vanes per engine actually employed on the F/A-18 HARV. The modeled flight envelope is extensive in that the aerodynamic database covers an angle-of-attack range of -10 degrees to +90 degrees, sideslip range of -20 degrees to +20 degrees, a Mach Number range between 0.0 and 2.0, and an altitude range between 0 and 60,000 feet.

Strickland, Mark E.; Bundick, W. Thomas; Messina, Michael D.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Carzoo, Susan W.; Yeager, Jessie C.; Beissner, Fred L., Jr.

1996-01-01

53

Two-surface plasticity Model and Its Application to Spring-back Simulation of Automotive Advanced High Strength Steel Sheets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A two-surface isotropic-kinematic hardening law was developed based on a two-surface plasticity model previously proposed by Lee et al., (2007, Int. J. Plast. 23, 1189-1212). In order to properly represent the Bauschinger and transient behaviors as well as permanent softening during reverse loading with various pre-strains, both the inner yield surface and the outer bounding surface expand (isotropic hardening) and translate (kinematic hardening) in this two-surface model. As for the permanent softening, both the isotropic hardening and the kinematic hardening evolution of the outer bounding surface were modified by introducing softening parameters. The numerical formulation was also developed based on the incremental plasticity theory and the developed constitutive law was implemented into the commercial finite element program, ABAQUS/Explicit and ABAQUS/Standard using the user-defined material subroutines. In this work, a dual phase (DP) steel was considered as an advanced high strength steel sheet and uni-axial tension tests and uni-axial tension-compression-tension tests were performed for the characterization of the material property. For a validation purpose, the developed two-surface plasticity model was applied to the 2-D draw bending test proposed as a benchmark problem of the NUMISHEET 2011 conference and successfully validated with experiments.

Park, Taejoon; Seok, Dong-Yoon; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Noma, Nobuyasu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Chung, Kwansoo

2011-08-01

54

A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization,

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

2008-01-01

55

Advanced Turbulence Modeling Concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ZCET program developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is to study hydrogen/air injection concepts for aircraft gas turbine engines that meet conventional gas turbine performance levels and provide low levels of harmful NOx emissions. A CFD study for ZCET program has been successfully carried out. It uses the most recently enhanced National combustion code (NCC) to perform CFD simulations for two configurations of hydrogen fuel injectors (GRC- and Sandia-injector). The results can be used to assist experimental studies to provide quick mixing, low emission and high performance fuel injector designs. The work started with the configuration of the single-hole injector. The computational models were taken from the experimental designs. For example, the GRC single-hole injector consists of one air tube (0.78 inches long and 0.265 inches in diameter) and two hydrogen tubes (0.3 inches long and 0.0226 inches in diameter opposed at 180 degree). The hydrogen tubes are located 0.3 inches upstream from the exit of the air element (the inlet location for the combustor). To do the simulation, the single-hole injector is connected to a combustor model (8.16 inches long and 0.5 inches in diameter). The inlet conditions for air and hydrogen elements are defined according to actual experimental designs. Two crossing jets of hydrogen/air are simulated in detail in the injector. The cold flow, reacting flow, flame temperature, combustor pressure and possible flashback phenomena are studied. Two grid resolutions of the numerical model have been adopted. The first computational grid contains 0.52 million elements, the second one contains over 1.3 million elements. The CFD results have shown only about 5% difference between the two grid resolutions. Therefore, the CFD result obtained from the model of 1.3-million grid resolution can be considered as a grid independent numerical solution. Turbulence models built in NCC are consolidated and well tested. They can handle both coarse and fine grids near the wall. They can model the effect of anisotropy of turbulent stresses and the effect of swirling. The chemical reactions of Magnusson model and ILDM method were both used in this study.

Shih, Tsan-Hsing

2005-01-01

56

Interactive Visualization to Advance Earthquake Simulation LOUISE H. KELLOGG,1  

E-print Network

Interactive Visualization to Advance Earthquake Simulation LOUISE H. KELLOGG,1 GERALD W. BAWDEN,2 the underlying models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization and geophysical data available from field observations. Key words: Interactive visualization, virtual reality

Billen, Magali I.

57

Computational Models of Human Performance: Validation of Memory and Procedural Representation in Advanced Air/Ground Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Man-Machine Interaction Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) under joint U.S. Army and NASA cooperative is intended to assist designers of complex human/automation systems in successfully incorporating human performance capabilities and limitations into decision and action support systems. MIDAS is a computational representation of multiple human operators, selected perceptual, cognitive, and physical functions of those operators, and the physical/functional representation of the equipment with which they operate. MIDAS has been used as an integrated predictive framework for the investigation of human/machine systems, particularly in situations with high demands on the operators. We have extended the human performance models to include representation of both human operators and intelligent aiding systems in flight management, and air traffic service. The focus of this development is to predict human performance in response to aiding system developed to identify aircraft conflict and to assist in the shared authority for resolution. The demands of this application requires representation of many intelligent agents sharing world-models, coordinating action/intention, and cooperative scheduling of goals and action in an somewhat unpredictable world of operations. In recent applications to airborne systems development, MIDAS has demonstrated an ability to predict flight crew decision-making and procedural behavior when interacting with automated flight management systems and Air Traffic Control. In this paper, we describe two enhancements to MIDAS. The first involves the addition of working memory in the form of an articulatory buffer for verbal communication protocols and a visuo-spatial buffer for communications via digital datalink. The second enhancement is a representation of multiple operators working as a team. This enhanced model was used to predict the performance of human flight crews and their level of compliance with commercial aviation communication procedures. We show how the data produced by MIDAS compares with flight crew performance data from full mission simulations. Finally, we discuss the use of these features to study communication issues connected with aircraft-based separation assurance.

Corker, Kevin M.; Labacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

1997-01-01

58

Reactive Potentials for Advanced Atomistic Simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article reviews recent advances in the development of reactive empirical force fields or potentials. In particular, we compare two widely used reactive potentials with variable-charge schemes that are desirable for multicomponent or multifunctional systems: the ReaxFF (reactive force field) and charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potentials. Several applications of these approaches in atomistic simulations that involve metal-based heterogeneous systems are also discussed.

Liang, Tao; Shin, Yun Kyung; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Yilmaz, Dundar E.; Vishnu, Karthik Guda; Verners, Osvalds; Zou, Chenyu; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

2013-07-01

59

Advanced ST Plasma Scenario Simulations for NSTX  

SciTech Connect

Integrated scenario simulations are done for NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] that address four primary milestones for developing advanced ST configurations: high {beta} and high {beta}{sub N} inductive discharges to study all aspects of ST physics in the high-beta regime; non-inductively sustained discharges for flattop times greater than the skin time to study the various current-drive techniques; non-inductively sustained discharges at high {beta} for flattop times much greater than a skin time which provides the integrated advanced ST target for NSTX; and non-solenoidal start-up and plasma current ramp-up. The simulations done here use the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and are based on a discharge 109070. TRANSP analysis of the discharge provided the thermal diffusivities for electrons and ions, the neutral-beam (NB) deposition profile, and other characteristics. CURRAY is used to calculate the High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating depositions and current drive. GENRAY/CQL3D is used to establish the heating and CD [current drive] deposition profiles for electron Bernstein waves (EBW). Analysis of the ideal-MHD stability is done with JSOLVER, BALMSC, and PEST2. The simulations indicate that the integrated advanced ST plasma is reachable, obtaining stable plasmas with {beta} {approx} 40% at {beta}{sub N}'s of 7.7-9, I{sub P} = 1.0 MA, and B{sub T} = 0.35 T. The plasma is 100% non-inductive and has a flattop of 4 skin times. The resulting global energy confinement corresponds to a multiplier of H{sub 98(y,2)} = 1.5. The simulations have demonstrated the importance of HHFW heating and CD, EBW off-axis CD, strong plasma shaping, density control, and early heating/H-mode transition for producing and optimizing these plasma configurations.

C.E. Kessel; E.J. Synakowski; D.A. Gates; R.W. Harvey; S.M. Kaye; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; C.K. Phillips; G. Taylor; R. Wilson; the NSTX Research Team

2004-10-28

60

The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) – A multi-scale nonhydrostatic atmospheric simulation and prediction model. Part I: Model dynamics and verification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  ?A completely new nonhydrostatic model system known as the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) has been developed in\\u000a recent years at the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) at the University of Oklahoma. The ARPS is designed\\u000a from the beginning to serve as an effective tool for basic and applied research and as a system suitable for explicit

M. Xue; K. K. Droegemeier; V. Wong

2000-01-01

61

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20

62

Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of an 840 ft/sec Tip Speed Advanced Ducted Propulsor Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computational Aerodynamic simulations of an 840 ft/sec tip speed, Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, lownoise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15- foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, resulting in quality, detailed aerodynamic and acoustic measurement data. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating conditions simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, excluding a long core duct section downstream of the core inlet guide vane. As a result, only fan rotational speed and system bypass ratio, set by specifying static pressure downstream of the core inlet guide vane row, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. The computed blade row flow fields for all five fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems. A few spanwise comparisons between computational and measurement data in the bypass duct show that they are in good agreement, thus providing a partial validation of the computational results.

Tweedt, Daniel L.

2014-01-01

63

Hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (heavy) simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer program to simulate hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (HEAVY) is described. It is intended for use early in the design process: concept evaluation, alternative comparison, preliminary design, control and management strategy development, component sizing, and sensitivity studies. It allows the designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict the performance of a proposed drive train. The user defines the system to be simulated using a library of predefined component models that may be connected to represent a wide variety of propulsion systems. The development of three models are discussed as examples.

Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

1981-01-01

64

Advanced Civil Transport Simulator Cockpit View  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS) is a futuristic aircraft cockpit simulator designed to provide full-mission capabilities for researching issues that will affect future transport aircraft flight stations and crews. The objective is to heighten the pilots situation awareness through improved information availability and ease of interpretation in order to reduce the possibility of misinterpreted data. The simulators five 13-inch Cathode Ray Tubes are designed to display flight information in a logical easy-to-see format. Two color flat panel Control Display Units with touch sensitive screens provide monitoring and modification of aircraft parameters, flight plans, flight computers, and aircraft position. Three collimated visual display units have been installed to provide out-the-window scenes via the Computer Generated Image system. The major research objectives are to examine needs for transfer of information to and from the flight crew; study the use of advanced controls and displays for all-weather flying; explore ideas for using computers to help the crew in decision making; study visual scanning and reach behavior under different conditions with various levels of automation and flight deck-arrangements.

1992-01-01

65

Onyx-Advanced Aeropropulsion Simulation Framework Created  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a new software environment for analyzing and designing aircraft engines and, eventually, space transportation systems. Its purpose is to dramatically reduce the time, effort, and expense necessary to design and test jet engines by creating sophisticated computer simulations of an aerospace object or system (refs. 1 and 2). Through a university grant as part of that effort, researchers at the University of Toledo have developed Onyx, an extensible Java-based (Sun Micro-systems, Inc.), objectoriented simulation framework, to investigate how advanced software design techniques can be successfully applied to aeropropulsion system simulation (refs. 3 and 4). The design of Onyx's architecture enables users to customize and extend the framework to add new functionality or adapt simulation behavior as required. It exploits object-oriented technologies, such as design patterns, domain frameworks, and software components, to develop a modular system in which users can dynamically replace components with others having different functionality.

Reed, John A.

2001-01-01

66

Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedlovec, G. J.

2014-01-01

67

Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), 32-km North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) interpolated to a 12-km grid, and 13-km Rapid Refresh analyses.

Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

2014-01-01

68

Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

Berndt, Emily B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Elmer, Nicholas J.

2013-01-01

69

The Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Elmer, Nicholas

2013-01-01

70

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

2011-01-01

71

Interactive visualization to advance earthquake simulation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. For example, simulations of earthquake-related processes typically generate complex, time-varying data sets in two or more dimensions. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these data sets, evaluate the underlying models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. Virtual mapping tools allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions. Interactive tools allow us to manipulate shapes in order to construct models of geological features for geodynamic models, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulation or field observations, thereby enabling us to improve our interpretation of the dynamical processes that drive earthquakes. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool, albeit with active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. This approach also takes advantage of the specialized skills of geological scientists who are trained to interpret, the often limited, geological and geophysical data available from field observations. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

Kellogg, L.H.; Bawden, G.W.; Bernardin, T.; Billen, M.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M.; Kreylos, O.; Staadt, O.; Sumner, D.

2008-01-01

72

Component-basedComponent based Modeling and SimulationModeling and Simulation  

E-print Network

­ grid, p2p, cloud computing, etc. Advance simulation models and knowledge sharing on· Advance simulation Meng Teo and Claudia Szabo** Department of Computer Science National University of Singapore email: teoym@comp.nus.edu.sg ** Department of Computer Science** Department of Computer Science University

Teo, Yong-Meng

73

Recent advances in superconducting-mixer simulations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the last few years, considerable progress have been made in the development of techniques for fabricating high-quality superconducting circuits, and this success, together with major advances in the theoretical understanding of quantum detection and mixing at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, has made the development of CAD techniques for superconducting nonlinear circuits an important new enterprise. For example, arrays of quasioptical mixers are now being manufactured, where the antennas, matching networks, filters and superconducting tunnel junctions are all fabricated by depositing niobium and a variety of oxides on a single quartz substrate. There are no adjustable tuning elements on these integrated circuits, and therefore, one must be able to predict their electrical behavior precisely. This requirement, together with a general interest in the generic behavior of devices such as direct detectors and harmonic mixers, has lead us to develop a range of CAD tools for simulating the large-signal, small-signal, and noise behavior of superconducting tunnel junction circuits.

Withington, S.; Kennedy, P. R.

1992-01-01

74

Aviation Safety Simulation Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aviation Safety Simulation Model is a software tool that enables users to configure a terrain, a flight path, and an aircraft and simulate the aircraft's flight along the path. The simulation monitors the aircraft's proximity to terrain obstructions, and reports when the aircraft violates accepted minimum distances from an obstruction. This model design facilitates future enhancements to address other flight safety issues, particularly air and runway traffic scenarios. This report shows the user how to build a simulation scenario and run it. It also explains the model's output.

Houser, Scott; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

75

Supercomputer-based advanced ladar imaging simulator (ALIS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Ladar Imaging Simulator (ALIS) is a comprehensive multi-dimensional laser radar system simulator that models complex atmospheric scenes combined with high-resolution solid object scenes. The primary functions of ALIS are to serve as a laser radar sensor design tool, data product generator for exploitation, and a decision aid for implementing system designs. This paper focuses on the software structure of the simulator and the challenges that it presents. The ambient atmospheric scene generation is augmented with built-in approximate plume models or with external large-scale Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics plume models. The mixed atmosphere and solid object scene is generated via an adaptively meshed, over-sampled voxel representation predicated jointly on the sensor capabilities and scene complexity. To our knowledge, ALIS goes beyond previous ladar simulators with detailed atmospheric turbulence effects and time-dependent plume dispersion models for direct and coherent detection frequency-agile transceivers. ALIS models a wide range of ladar architectures, treating laser coherence properties, receiver electronics noise/transfer functions, and electronics/photon statistical noise. It provides complex amplitude ladar echo "range cubes" (all range reports along a given line-of-sight) for the composite atmosphere-solid scene. The model complexity and its capability to process large (>109) voxel count scenes is accommodated with a portable, scalable software architecture that supports single processors to fine-grained parallel supercomputers.

Smith, Duane D.; Nichols, Terry L.; Gatt, Philip; Lee, Kotik K.; Sicking, Charles; Seida, Steven B.; Coker, Charles F.; Perry, Kimberly M.; Coker, Jason S.

2004-01-01

76

Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

2011-09-01

77

ADVANCED MIXING MODELS  

SciTech Connect

The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide feed of a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (e.g. typically {approx}13 wt% at SRS) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination?

Lee, S.; Dimenna, R.; Tamburello, D.

2011-02-14

78

Aeroheating model advancements featuring electroless metallic plating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discussed are advancements in wind tunnel model construction methods and hypersonic test data demonstrating the methods. The general objective was to develop model fabrication methods for improved heat transfer measuring capability at less model cost. A plated slab model approach was evaluated with cast models containing constantan wires that formed single-wire-to-plate surface thermocouple junctions with a seamless skin of electroless nickel alloy. The surface of a space shuttle orbiter model was selectively plated with scaled tiles to simulate, with high fidelity, the probable misalignments of the heatshield tiles on a flight vehicle. Initial, Mach 8 heating results indicated a minor effect of tile misalignment roughness on boundary layer transition, implying a possible relaxation of heatshield manufacturing tolerances. Some loss of the plated tiles was experienced when the model was tested at high heating rates.

Stalmach, C. J., Jr.; Goodrich, W. D.

1976-01-01

79

Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Our final report on the accomplishments of ITAPS at Stony Brook during period covered by the research award includes component service, interface service and applications. On the component service, we have designed and implemented a robust functionality for the Lagrangian tracking of dynamic interface. We have migrated the hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic solver from stage-wise second order toward global second order schemes. We have implemented high order coupling between interface propagation and interior PDE solvers. On the interface service, we have constructed the FronTier application programer's interface (API) and its manual page using doxygen. We installed the FronTier functional interface to conform with the ITAPS specifications, especially the iMesh and iMeshP interfaces. On applications, we have implemented deposition and dissolution models with flow and implemented the two-reactant model for a more realistic precipitation at the pore level and its coupling with Darcy level model. We have continued our support to the study of fluid mixing problem for problems in inertial comfinement fusion. We have continued our support to the MHD model and its application to plasma liner implosion in fusion confinement. We have simulated a step in the reprocessing and separation of spent fuels from nuclear power plant fuel rods. We have implemented the fluid-structure interaction for 3D windmill and parachute simulations. We have continued our collaboration with PNNL, BNL, LANL, ORNL, and other SciDAC institutions.

Li, Xiaolin [SUNY at Stony Brook] [SUNY at Stony Brook

2013-01-14

80

ADVANCED MIXING MODELS  

SciTech Connect

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and schedule savings. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria associated with the waste processing at SRS and to quantify the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed briefly, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide the DWPF a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (typically {approx}13 wt%) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying to DWPF, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition for DWPF? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination? Grenville and Tilton (1996) investigated the mixing process by giving a pulse of tracer (electrolyte) through the submersible jet nozzle and by monitoring the conductivity at three locations within the cylindrical tank. They proposed that the mixing process was controlled by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the region far away from the jet entrance. They took the energy dissipation rates in the regions remote from the nozzle to be proportional to jet velocity and jet diameter at that location. The reduction in the jet velocity was taken to be proportional to the nozzle velocity and distance from the nozzle. Based on their analysis, a correlation was proposed. The proposed correlation was shown to be valid over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (50,000 to 300,000) with a relative standard deviation of {+-} 11.83%. An improved correlat

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

2008-11-13

81

Simulating the Impact of Oxygen Enrichment in a Cement Rotary Kiln Using Advanced Computational Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work presents the simulation of a rotary kiln used to produce cement clinker. The effort uses an original approach to kiln operation modeling. Thus, the moving cement clinker is accurately simulated, including exothermal reactions into the clicker and advanced heat transfer correlations. The simulation includes the normal operation of a cement kiln, using coal in an air-fired configuration. The

OVIDIU MARIN; OLIVIER CHARON; JACQUES DUGUE; SARAH DUKHAN; WEI ZHOU

2001-01-01

82

The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) - A multi-scale nonhydrostatic atmospheric simulation and prediction tool. Part II: Model physics and applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In Part I of this paper series, the dynamic equations, numerical solution procedures and the parameterizations of subgrid-scale and PBL turbulence of the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) were described. The dynamic and numerical framework of the model was verified using idealized and real mountain flow cases and an idealized density current. In this Part II, we present the

M. Xue; K. K. Droegemeier; V. Wong; A. Shapiro; K. Brewster; F. Carr; D. Weber; Y. Liu; D. Wang

2001-01-01

83

Modeling Advance Life Support Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Activities this summer consisted of two projects that involved computer simulation of bioregenerative life support systems for space habitats. Students in the Space Life Science Training Program (SLSTP) used the simulation, space station, to learn about relationships between humans, fish, plants, and microorganisms in a closed environment. One student complete a six week project to modify the simulation by converting the microbes from anaerobic to aerobic, and then balancing the simulation's life support system. A detailed computer simulation of a closed lunar station using bioregenerative life support was attempted, but there was not enough known about system restraints and constants in plant growth, bioreactor design for space habitats and food preparation to develop an integrated model with any confidence. Instead of a completed detailed model with broad assumptions concerning the unknown system parameters, a framework for an integrated model was outlined and work begun on plant and bioreactor simulations. The NASA sponsors and the summer Fell were satisfied with the progress made during the 10 weeks, and we have planned future cooperative work.

Pitts, Marvin; Sager, John; Loader, Coleen; Drysdale, Alan

1996-01-01

84

Theory Modeling and Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos has a long history in theory, modeling and simulation. We focus on multidisciplinary teams that tackle complex problems. Theory, modeling and simulation are tools to solve problems just like an NMR spectrometer, a gas chromatograph or an electron microscope. Problems should be used to define the theoretical tools needed and not the other way around. Best results occur when theory and experiments are working together in a team.

Shlachter, Jack [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-23

85

Naval threat countermeasure simulator and the IR_CRUISE_missiles models for the generation of infrared (IR) videos of maritime targets and background for input into advanced imaging IR seekers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new hardware-in-the-loop modeling technique was developed at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for the evaluation of IR countermeasures against advanced IR imaging anti-ship cruise missiles. The research efforts involved the creation of tools to generate accurate IR imagery and synthesize video to inject in to real-world threat simulators. A validation study was conducted to verify the accuracy and limitations of the techniques that were developed.

Taczak, Thomas M.; Dries, John W.; Gover, Robert E.; Snapp, Mary Ann; Williams, Elmer F.; Cahill, Colin P.

2002-07-01

86

ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS  

SciTech Connect

The recent Nevada Earthquake (M=6) produced an extraordinary set of crustal guided waves. In this study, we examine the three-component data at all the USArray stations in terms of how well existing models perform in predicting the various phases, Rayleigh waves, Love waves, and Pnl waves. To establish the source parameters, we applied the Cut and Paste Code up to distance of 5° for an average local crustal model which produced a normal mechanism (strike=35°,dip=41°,rake=-85°) at a depth of 9 km and Mw=5.9. Assuming this mechanism, we generated synthetics at all distances for a number of 1D and 3D models. The Pnl observations fit the synthetics for the simple models well both in timing (VPn=7.9km/s) and waveform fits out to a distance of about 5°. Beyond this distance a great deal of complexity can be seen to the northwest apparently caused by shallow subducted slab material. These paths require considerable crustal thinning and higher P-velocities. Small delays and advances outline the various tectonic province to the south, Colorado Plateau, etc. with velocities compatible with that reported on by Song et al.(1996). Five-second Rayleigh waves (Airy Phase) can be observed throughout the whole array and show a great deal of variation ( up to 30s). In general, the Love waves are better behaved than the Rayleigh waves. We are presently adding higher frequency to the source description by including source complexity. Preliminary inversions suggest rupture to northeast with a shallow asperity. We are, also, inverting the aftershocks to extend the frequencies to 2 Hz and beyond following the calibration method outlined in Tan and Helmberger (2007). This will allow accurate directivity measurements for events with magnitude larger than 3.5. Thus, we will address the energy decay with distance as s function of frequency band for the various source types.

Helmberger, Donald V.; Tromp, Jeroen; Rodgers, Arthur J.

2008-04-15

87

New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts  

SciTech Connect

Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

2008-09-10

88

AGRICULTURAL SIMULATION MODEL (AGSIM)  

EPA Science Inventory

AGSIM is a large-scale econometric simulation model of regional crop and national livestock production in the United States. The model was initially developed to analyze the aggregate economic impacts of a wide variety issues facing agriculture, such as technological change, pest...

89

Mixed Virtual/Physical Reality Simulation for Advanced Training  

E-print Network

Mixed Virtual/Physical Reality Simulation for Advanced Training The University of Florida (virtual/ physical) reality simulator system for the use of healthcare, military and other industries virtual transparent reality simulation User interaction is more intuitive, natural and akin to what a user

Slatton, Clint

90

Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

1994-01-01

91

Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) simulator development for advanced satellite designs and experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The simulation development associated with the network models of both the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures is documented. The ISIS Network Model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communications satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete event simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters, and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

Pepin, Gerard R.

1992-01-01

92

Advancements in engineering turbulence modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some new developments in two-equation models and second order closure models are presented. Two-equation models (k-epsilon models) have been widely used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for engineering problems. Most of low-Reynolds number two-equation models contain some wall-distance damping functions to account for the effect of wall on turbulence. However, this often causes the confusion and difficulties in computing flows with complex geometry and also needs an ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. A set of modified two-equation models is proposed to remove the aforementioned shortcomings. The calculations using various two-equation models are compared with direct numerical simulations of channel flow and flat boundary layers. Development of a second order closure model is also discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All the existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the 3-D effect of mean flow on the turbulence (e.g. decrease in the shear stress caused by the cross flow in the boundary layer). The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model is described and is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of 3-D mean flow on the turbulence.

Shih, T.-H.

1991-01-01

93

Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

2014-01-01

94

Advanced radiometric and interferometric milimeter-wave scene simulations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Smart munitions and weapons utilize various imaging sensors (including passive IR, active and passive millimeter-wave, and visible wavebands) to detect/identify targets at short standoff ranges and in varied terrain backgrounds. In order to design and evaluate these sensors under a variety of conditions, a high-fidelity scene simulation capability is necessary. Such a capability for passive millimeter-wave scene simulation exists at TRW. TRW's Advanced Radiometric Millimeter-Wave Scene Simulation (ARMSS) code is a rigorous, benchmarked, end-to-end passive millimeter-wave scene simulation code for interpreting millimeter-wave data, establishing scene signatures and evaluating sensor performance. In passive millimeter-wave imaging, resolution is limited due to wavelength and aperture size. Where high resolution is required, the utility of passive millimeter-wave imaging is confined to short ranges. Recent developments in interferometry have made possible high resolution applications on military platforms. Interferometry or synthetic aperture radiometry allows the creation of a high resolution image with a sparsely filled aperture. Borrowing from research work in radio astronomy, we have developed and tested at TRW scene reconstruction algorithms that allow the recovery of the scene from a relatively small number of spatial frequency components. In this paper, the TRW modeling capability is described and numerical results are presented.

Hauss, B. I.; Moffa, P. J.; Steele, W. G.; Agravante, H.; Davidheiser, R.; Samec, T.; Young, S. K.

1993-01-01

95

PRATHAM: Parallel Thermal Hydraulics Simulations using Advanced Mesoscopic Methods  

SciTech Connect

At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, efforts are under way to develop a 3D, parallel LBM code called PRATHAM (PaRAllel Thermal Hydraulic simulations using Advanced Mesoscopic Methods) to demonstrate the accuracy and scalability of LBM for turbulent flow simulations in nuclear applications. The code has been developed using FORTRAN-90, and parallelized using the message passing interface MPI library. Silo library is used to compact and write the data files, and VisIt visualization software is used to post-process the simulation data in parallel. Both the single relaxation time (SRT) and multi relaxation time (MRT) LBM schemes have been implemented in PRATHAM. To capture turbulence without prohibitively increasing the grid resolution requirements, an LES approach [5] is adopted allowing large scale eddies to be numerically resolved while modeling the smaller (subgrid) eddies. In this work, a Smagorinsky model has been used, which modifies the fluid viscosity by an additional eddy viscosity depending on the magnitude of the rate-of-strain tensor. In LBM, this is achieved by locally varying the relaxation time of the fluid.

Joshi, Abhijit S [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL] [ORNL; Mudrich, Jaime A [ORNL] [ORNL; Popov, Emilian L [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01

96

Advanced wellbore thermal simulator GEOTEMP2 research report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of the GEOTEMP2 wellbore thermal simulator is described. The major technical features include a general purpose air and mist drilling simulator and a two-phase steam flow simulator that can model either injection or production.

Mitchell, R. F.

1982-02-01

97

Advanced power plant training simulator for VVER-440\\/V230 nuclear power plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

An advanced, workstation based, nuclear power plant simulator has been developed for use in training the operational staff of the Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant. This training simulator uses state-of- the-art computer hardware and software and provides the capability to simultaneously include six members of the power plant operating staff in the training sessions. A detailed reactor model has been developed,

W. Shier; R. Kennett; E. Vaclav; A. Gieci

1996-01-01

98

UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example  

SciTech Connect

The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

Schwantes, Jon M.

2009-06-01

99

Advanced Combustion Modeling for Complex Turbulent Flows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The next generation of aircraft engines will need to pass stricter efficiency and emission tests. NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has set an ambitious goal of 70% reduction of NO(x) emissions and a 15% increase in fuel efficiency of aircraft engines. We will demonstrate the state-of-the-art combustion tools developed a t Stanford's Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) as part of this program. In the last decade, CTR has spear-headed a multi-physics-based combustion modeling program. Key technologies have been transferred to the aerospace industry and are currently being used for engine simulations. In this demo, we will showcase the next-generation combustion modeling tools that integrate a very high level of detailed physics into advanced flow simulation codes. Combustor flows involve multi-phase physics with liquid fuel jet breakup, evaporation, and eventual combustion. Individual components of the simulation are verified against complex test cases and show excellent agreement with experimental data.

Ham, Frank Stanford

2005-01-01

100

An Advanced Scattered Moonlight Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the current era of precision astronomy, a complete sky background model is crucial, especially as the telescopes become even larger in the next decade. Such a model is needed for planning observations as well as understanding and correcting the data for the sky background. We have developed a sky model for this purpose, and it is the most complete and universal sky model that we know of to date (Noll et al. 2012). It covers a wide range of wavelengths from 0.3 to 30 microns up to a resolution of 1,000,000 and is instrument independent. Currently it is optimized for the telescopes at Cerro Paranal and the future site Cerro Armazones in Chile. Its original purpose was to improve the ESO (European Southern Observatory) ETC (Exposure Time Calculator) used for predicting exposure times of observations with a given signal to noise ratio for a set of conditions, as part of the Austrian ascension to ESO. Improving the ETC allows for better scheduling and telescope efficiency, and our new sky model has already been implemented by ESO.The brightest natural source of optical light at night is the Moon, and it is the major contributor to the astronomical sky background. We have an improved scattered moonlight model (Jones et al. 2013), where all of the components are computed with physical processes or observational data with less empirical parametrizations. This model is spectroscopic from 0.3 to 2.5 microns and was studied with a FORS1 (Patat et al. 2008) and dedicated X-Shooter data set. To our knowledge, this is the first spectroscopic model extending into the infrared. It includes fully 3-D single and double scattering calculations with extrapolations to higher orders (Noll et al. 2012), a complex treatment for aerosol scattering (Jones et al. 2013), and a lunar fit based on the ROLO survey (Kieffer & Stone 2005). In addition to its original astronomical purpose, since the model is more physical, we can use the scattered moonlight to probe the properties of the atmosphere, such as the distribution of aerosols.We present the current status of the advanced scattered moonlight model as well as its performance in the optical and near-infrared.

Jones, Amy; Noll, Stefan; Kausch, Wolfgang; Kimeswenger, Stefan

2014-06-01

101

Models, Simulations, and Games: A Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Rand evaluation of activity and products of gaming, model-building, and simulation carried out under the auspices of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency aimed not only to assess the usefulness of gaming in military-political policymaking, but also to contribute to the definition of common standards and the refinement of objectives for…

Shubik, Martin; Brewer, Garry D.

102

State of the Art Assessment of Simulation in Advanced Materials Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advances in both the underlying theory and in the practical implementation of molecular modeling techniques have increased their value in the advanced materials development process. The objective is to accelerate the maturation of emerging materials by tightly integrating modeling with the other critical processes: synthesis, processing, and characterization. The aims of this report are to summarize the state of the art of existing modeling tools and to highlight a number of areas in which additional development is required. In an effort to maintain focus and limit length, this survey is restricted to classical simulation techniques including molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations.

Wise, Kristopher E.

2008-01-01

103

Rapid implementation of advanced constitutive models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a methodology based on the NICE integration scheme [1, 2] for simple and rapid numerical implementation of a class of plasticity constitutive models. In this regard, an algorithm is purposely developed for the implementation of newly developed advanced constitutive models into explicit finite element framework. The methodology follows the organization of the problem state variables into an extended form, which allows the constitutive models' equations to be organized in such a way, that the algorithm can be optionally extended with minimal effort to integrate also evolution equations related to a description of other specific phenomena, such as damage, distortional hardening, phase transitions, degradation etc. To confirm simplicity of the program implementation, computational robustness, effectiveness and improved accuracy of the implemented integration algorithm, a deep drawing simulation of the cylindrical cup is considered as the case study, performed in ABAQUS/Explicit. As a fairly complex considered model, the YLD2004-18p model [3, 4] is first implemented via external subroutine VUMAT. Further, to give additional proof of the simplicity of the proposed methodology, a combination of the YLD2004-18p model and Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model (GTN) is considered. As demonstrated, the implementation is really obtained in a very simple way.

Starman, Bojan; Halilovi?, Miroslav; Vrh, Marko; Štok, Boris

2013-12-01

104

Advanced modeling of high intensity accelerators  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goals of this project were three-fold: (1) to develop a new capability, based on high performance (parallel) computers, to perform large scale simulations of high intensity accelerators; (2) to apply this capability to modeling high intensity accelerators under design at LANL; and (3) to use this new capability to improve the understanding of the physics of intense charge particle beams, especially in regard to the issue of beam halo formation. All of these goals were met. In particular, the authors introduced split-operator methods as a powerful and efficient means to simulate intense beams in the presence of rapidly varying accelerating and focusing fields. They then applied these methods to develop scaleable, parallel beam dynamics codes for modeling intense beams in linacs, and in the process they implemented a new three-dimensional space charge algorithm. They also used the codes to study a number of beam dynamics issues related to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, and in the process performed the largest simulations to date for any accelerator design project. Finally, they used the new modeling capability to provide direction and validation to beam physics studies, helping to identify beam mismatch as a major source of halo formation in high intensity accelerators. This LDRD project ultimately benefited not only LANL but also the US accelerator community since, by promoting expertise in high performance computing and advancing the state-of-the-art in accelerator simulation, its accomplishments helped lead to approval of a new DOE Grand Challenge in Computational Accelerator Physics.

Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Wangler, T.P.

1998-11-01

105

Graphical simulation environments for modelling and simulation of integrative physiology.  

PubMed

Guyton's original integrative physiology model was a milestone in integrative physiology, combining significant physiological knowledge with an engineering perspective to develop a computational diagrammatic model. It is still used in research and teaching, with a small number of variants on the model also in circulation. However, though new research has added significantly to the knowledge represented by Guyton's model, and significant advances have been made in computing and simulation software, an accepted common platform to integrate this new knowledge has not emerged. This paper discusses the issues in the selection of a suitable platform, together with a number of current possibilities, and suggests a graphical computing environment for modelling and simulation. By way of example, a validated version of Guyton's 1992 model, implemented in the ubiquitous Simulink environment, is presented which provides a hierarchical representation amenable to extension and suitable for teaching and research uses. It is designed to appeal to the biomedical engineer and physiologist alike. PMID:20576310

Mangourova, Violeta; Ringwood, John; Van Vliet, Bruce

2011-06-01

106

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States) Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

1991-01-01

107

ADVISOR: a systems analysis tool for advanced vehicle modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an overview of Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)—the US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) ADVISOR written in the MATLAB\\/Simulink environment and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ADVISOR provides the vehicle engineering community with an easy-to-use, flexible, yet robust and supported analysis package for advanced vehicle modeling. It is primarily used to quantify the fuel economy, the performance,

T. Markel; A. Brooker; T. Hendricks; V. Johnson; K. Kelly; B. Kramer; M O’Keefe; S. Sprik; K. Wipke

2002-01-01

108

Advances in thermal hydraulic and neutronic simulation for reactor analysis and safety  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes several large-scale computational models developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the simulation and analysis of thermal-hydraulic and neutronic events in nuclear reactors and nuclear power plants. The impact of advanced parallel computing technologies on these computational models is emphasized.

Tentner, A.M.; Blomquist, R.N.; Canfield, T.R.; Ewing, T.F.; Garner, P.L.; Gelbard, E.M.; Gross, K.C.; Minkoff, M.; Valentin, R.A.

1993-03-01

109

Using CONFIG for Simulation of Operation of Water Recovery Subsystems for Advanced Control Software Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool, CONFIG, has been developed to support evaluation of the operability life support systems. CON FIG simulates operations scenarios in which flows and pressures change continuously while system reconfigurations occur as discrete events. In simulations, intelligent control software can interact dynamically with hardware system models. CONFIG simulations have been used to evaluate control software and intelligent agents for automating life support systems operations. A CON FIG model of an advanced biological water recovery system has been developed to interact with intelligent control software that is being used in a water system test at NASA Johnson Space Center

Malin, Jane T.; Flores, Luis; Fleming, Land; Throop, Daiv

2002-01-01

110

Micromechanical modeling of advanced materials  

SciTech Connect

Funded as a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project, the work reported here focuses on the development of a computational methodology to determine the dynamic response of heterogeneous solids on the basis of their composition and microstructural morphology. Using the solid dynamics wavecode CTH, material response is simulated on a scale sufficiently fine to explicitly represent the material`s microstructure. Conducting {open_quotes}numerical experiments{close_quotes} on this scale, the authors explore the influence that the microstructure exerts on the material`s overall response. These results are used in the development of constitutive models that take into account the effects of microstructure without explicit representation of its features. Applying this methodology to a glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) composite, the authors examined the influence of various aspects of the composite`s microstructure on its response in a loading regime typical of impact and penetration. As a prerequisite to the microscale modeling effort, they conducted extensive materials testing on the constituents, S-2 glass and epoxy resin (UF-3283), obtaining the first Hugoniot and spall data for these materials. The results of this work are used in the development of constitutive models for GRP materials in transient-dynamics computer wavecodes.

Silling, S.A.; Taylor, P.A.; Wise, J.L.; Furnish, M.D.

1994-04-01

111

Alignment and Initial Operation of an Advanced Solar Simulator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A solar simulator utilizing nine 30-kW xenon arc lamps was built to provide radiant power for testing a solar dynamic space power system in a thermal vacuum environment. The advanced solar simulator achieved the following values specific to the solar dynamic system: (1) a subtense angle of 1 deg; (2) the ability to vary solar simulator intensity up to 1.7 kW/sq m; (3) a beam diameter of 4.8 m; and (4) uniformity of illumination on the order of +/-10%. The flexibility of the solar simulator design allows for other potential uses of the facility.

Jaworske, Donald A.; Jefferies, Kent S.; Mason, Lee S.

1996-01-01

112

A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

2011-12-01

113

Power resource simulation model  

SciTech Connect

The Power Resource Simulation Model (PRSM) was developed by Black & Veatch for the Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern). Southwestern, one of five power marketing agencies for the US Department of Energy, markets the power and energy generated at 24 US Army Corps of Engineers hydroelectric power plants. PRSM simulates the operation of multipurpose, multireservoir systems and operates the reservoirs to meet user-specified demands (water and electrical) while staying within established operating limits. PRSM is equipped with a graphical user-interface which allows the user to enter and modify input data, initiate the Run program, and view and print simulation results with user-defined tables and graphs. PRSM is operated by specifying demands at each reservoir and for the system as a whole. Once all the individual project demands have been addressed, PRSM operates the reservoirs to meet the system electrical load demands which are input in the form of load duration curves. If the hydropower resources are not capable of meeting the entire system electrical load demand, PRSM will use nonhydro (thermal) resources to meet the remaining system load.

Bultsma, M.L.; Arroyo, J.A. [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Herrold, B.J. [Southwestern Power Administration, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31

114

Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulation  

SciTech Connect

A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter.

Reardon, B.J.

1998-12-01

115

Mathematical modeling of an advanced aircrew breathing system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Advanced Aircrew Oxygen Delivery System (AAODS) program, a computerized mathematical model for dynamically simulating the performance of oxygen delivery systems, is discussed. The program generates estimates of respiratory parameters, the pressure, density, and velocity associated with grid points on a hose, the pressure in a face mask, and the pressure and density maintained by a breathing regulator. The mathematical

Jennifer Coyle Byrne; B. Hartmann; C. J. McIlwain-Axten; Paul Donaher

1993-01-01

116

High-fidelity simulation for advanced cardiac life support training.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. To determine whether a high-fidelity simulation technique compared with lecture would produce greater improvement in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) knowledge, confidence, and overall satisfaction with the training method. DESIGN. This sequential, parallel-group, crossover trial randomized students into 2 groups distinguished by the sequence of teaching technique delivered for ACLS instruction (ie, classroom lecture vs high-fidelity simulation exercise). ASSESSMENT. Test scores on a written examination administered at baseline and after each teaching technique improved significantly from baseline in all groups but were highest when lecture was followed by simulation. Simulation was associated with a greater degree of overall student satisfaction compared with lecture. Participation in a simulation exercise did not improve pharmacy students' knowledge of ACLS more than attending a lecture, but it was associated with improved student confidence in skills and satisfaction with learning and application. CONCLUSIONS. College curricula should incorporate simulation to complement but not replace lecture for ACLS education. PMID:23610477

Davis, Lindsay E; Storjohann, Tara D; Spiegel, Jacqueline J; Beiber, Kellie M; Barletta, Jeffrey F

2013-04-12

117

An advanced physical model of cometary activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the present state of an advanced physical model aimed at the simulation of the environment of active cometary nuclei. The model can handle the complicated shapes of real cometary nuclei, and is ready to handle alternative assumptions concerning the nucleus composition and structure; its present version is based on the simple, but hitherto highly successful, Whipple (1950) paradigm: at small heliocentric distances, strong sublimation theory is used to compute the surface gas production, taking into account the time-dependent heat flow in the nucleus interior; at large distances, different types of gas molecules may be assumed to dominate the gas production. Any size and shape distribution of dust can be assumed. The nucleus spin motion is modelled with allowance for the outgassing and solar tidal torques. The gas outflow is computed by solving quasistationary flow equations (Euler, or Navier-Stokes), hence the extent of the coma which can be modelled is limited either by the breakdown of the fluid approximation, or by that of the steady-state approximation. The dust outflow is computed by solving quasi-stationary "zero-temperature" multifluid Eulerian equations in the gas-dust interaction region, and from a "Keplerian fountain model" beyond it: the extent of the dust distribution which can be modelled is only limited by computer resources limitations. In addition to the detailed gas and dust coma structure, the resulting net nucleus mass loss, net sublimation recoil force, net sublimation torque, and net thermal emission are computed. We mention the past applications of the model to comets P/Halley and C/Hyakutake, and indicate some of the future steps of development of the model.

Rodionov, A. V.; Crifo, J.-F.; Szeg?, K.; Lagerros, J.; Fulle, M.

2002-08-01

118

Advanced Visualization Technology for Terascale Particle Accelerator Simulations  

E-print Network

Advanced Visualization Technology for Terascale Particle Accelerator Simulations Kwan-Liu Ma £ Greg-performance computing, particle accelerators, perception, point-based rendering, scientific visualization, field lines Introduction Particle accelerators have helped enable some of the most remarkable discoveries of the 20th

Ma, Kwan-Liu

119

14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. H Appendix H to Part 121—Advanced Simulation ...instructors and check airmen used in appendix H training and checking are highly qualified...pilot is upgrading; b. Has at least 500 hours of actual flight time while...

2012-01-01

120

14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. H Appendix H to Part 121—Advanced Simulation ...instructors and check airmen used in appendix H training and checking are highly qualified...pilot is upgrading; b. Has at least 500 hours of actual flight time while...

2013-01-01

121

14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. H Appendix H to Part 121—Advanced Simulation ...instructors and check airmen used in appendix H training and checking are highly qualified...pilot is upgrading; b. Has at least 500 hours of actual flight time while...

2011-01-01

122

Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) network model for advanced satellite designs and experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Network Model for Advanced Satellite Designs and Experiments describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top-down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ISDN modeling abstractions are added to permit the determination and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

1991-01-01

123

Modeling and Simulation of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the need for modeling and simulation of electric and hybrid vehicles. Different modeling methods such as physics-based Resistive Companion Form technique and Bond Graph method are presented with powertrain component and system modeling examples. The modeling and simulation capabilities of existing tools such as Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT), ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR (ADVISOR), PSIM, and Virtual Test

David Wenzhong Gao; Chris Mi; Ali Emadi

2007-01-01

124

An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.  

PubMed

In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions. PMID:23418426

Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

2013-01-01

125

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.?

Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

2012-09-28

126

ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS  

SciTech Connect

This quarter, we have focused on several tasks: (1) Building a high-quality catalog of earthquake source parameters for the Middle East and East Asia. In East Asia, we computed source parameters using the CAP method for a set of events studied by Herrman et al., (MRR, 2006) using a complete waveform technique. Results indicated excellent agreement with the moment magnitudes in the range 3.5 -5.5. Below magnitude 3.5 the scatter increases. For events with more than 2-3 observations at different azimuths, we found good agreement of focal mechanisms. Depths were generally consistent, although differences of up to 10 km were found. These results suggest that CAP modeling provides estimates of source parameters at least as reliable as complete waveform modeling techniques. However, East Asia and the Yellow Sea Korean Paraplatform (YSKP) region studied are relatively laterally homogeneous and may not benefit from the CAP method’s flexibility to shift waveform segments to account for path-dependent model errors. A more challenging region to study is the Middle East where strong variations in sedimentary basin, crustal thickness and crustal and mantle seismic velocities greatly impact regional wave propagation. We applied the CAP method to a set of events in and around Iran and found good agreement between estimated focal mechanisms and those reported by the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog. We found a possible bias in the moment magnitudes that may be due to the thick low-velocity crust in the Iranian Plateau. (2) Testing Methods on a Lifetime Regional Data Set. In particular, the recent 2/21/08 Nevada Event and Aftershock Sequence occurred in the middle of USArray, producing over a thousand records per event. The tectonic setting is quite similar to Central Iran and thus provides an excellent testbed for CAP+ at ranges out to 10°, including extensive observations of crustal thinning and thickening and various Pnl complexities. Broadband modeling in 1D, 2D, and 3D will be presented. (3) Shallow Crustal Structure and Sparse Network Source Inversions for Southern California. We conducted a detailed test of a recently developed technique, CAPloc, in recovering source parameters including location and depth based on tomographic maps. We tested two-station solutions against 160 well determined events which worked well except for paths crossing deep basins and along mountain ridges.

Helmberger, Donald V.; Tromp, Jeroen; Rodgers, Arthur J.

2008-10-17

127

Alignment and Initial Operation of an Advanced Solar Simulator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A solar simulator utilizing nine 30 kW xenon arc lamps was built to provide radiant power for testing a solar dynamic space power system in a thermal vacuum environment. The advanced solar simulator meets requirements specific to the solar dynamic system, including: (1) a subtense angle of 1 deg, (2) the ability to vary solar simulator intensity up to 1.7 kW/sq m, (3) a beam diameter of 4.8 m, and (4) uniformity of illumination on the order of +/- 10 percent. The flexibility of the solar simulator design allows for other potential uses of the facility. This paper presents a description of the facility, the alignment procedures used to deliver radiant power to the solar dynamic system, and a summary of the performance of the as-built solar simulator.

Jaworske, Donald A.; Jefferies, Kent S.; Mason, Lee S.

1996-01-01

128

PIXE simulation: Models, methods and technologies  

SciTech Connect

The simulation of PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) is discussed in the context of general-purpose Monte Carlo systems for particle transport. Dedicated PIXE codes are mainly concerned with the application of the technique to elemental analysis, but they lack the capability of dealing with complex experimental configurations. General-purpose Monte Carlo codes provide powerful tools to model the experimental environment in great detail, but so far they have provided limited functionality for PIXE simulation. This paper reviews recent developments that have endowed the Geant4 simulation toolkit with advanced capabilities for PIXE simulation, and related efforts for quantitative validation of cross sections and other physical parameters relevant to PIXE simulation.

Batic, M. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova, Italy and Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Pia, M. G.; Saracco, P. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Weidenspointner, G. [Max-Planck-Institut Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Muenchen (Germany) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Garching 85748 (Germany)

2013-04-19

129

A Versatile and Powerful Simulator for Design, Advanced Control and Expert Systems  

E-print Network

A VERSATILE AND POWERFUL SIMULATOR FOR DESIGN, ADVANCED CONTROL AND EXPERT SYSTEMS H.E. SCHINDLER E.W. LEAVER C. F. SHEWCHUK Section Head, Steady-State Software Director President SACDA INC. SACDA INC. SACDA INC. London, Ontario Canada London..., Ontario Canada London, Ontario Canada ABSnACT The usefulness of models of plant utility systems largely depends on the capabilities of the process system simulator which uses them. SACDA has been engaged in a multi-year development of a versatile...

Schindler, H. E.; Leaver, E. W.; Shewchuk, C. F.

130

MAIZESIM: A SIMULATION MODEL FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF CORN  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A process-based simulation model that predicts potential growth and phenology in corn is presented. This model has been developed based on the design of Object-Oriented crop model. Recent advances in maize and C4 physiology have been incorporated into the present model. In the present model, cano...

131

Advances of Simulation and Expertise Capabilities in CIVA Platform  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulation is more and more widely used by the different actors of industrial NDT. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) launched the development of expertise software for NDT named CIVA which, at its beginning, only contained ultrasonic models from CEA laboratories. CIVA now includes Eddy current simulation tools while present work aims at facilitating integration of algorithms and models from

L. Le Ber; P. Calmon; Th. Sollier; S. Mahaut; Ph. Benoist

2006-01-01

132

DFG IUSS SYMPOSIUM Advances of Molecular Modeling  

E-print Network

between chemistry, physics, and biology in natural environments. There are a number of areas dealing with computational modeling approaches, is rapidly advancing a number of research frontiers in geochemistry

Sparks, Donald L.

133

Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01

134

Modeling and simulation of nanoelectronics devices in cognitive nanoinformatics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the paper, an application of cognitive nanoinformatics to advance modeling and simulation of nanoelectronics devices is discussed. The multi-scale approach to information management for nanoelectronics devices modeling and simulation has been proposed. We illustrate our approach for two case study nanoelectronics devices.

Shakhnov, Vadim A.; Zinchenko, Lyudmila A.; Rezchikova, Elena V.

2014-12-01

135

Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

2005-11-01

136

A future Outlook: Web based Simulation of Hydrodynamic models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite recent advances to present simulation results as 3D graphs or animation contours, the modeling user community still faces some shortcomings when trying to move around and analyze data. Typical problems include the lack of common platforms with standard vocabulary to exchange simulation results from different numerical models, insufficient descriptions about data (metadata), lack of robust search and retrieval tools

A. S. Islam; M. Piasecki

2003-01-01

137

AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model  

SciTech Connect

AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Wilhelm, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)); Goutagny, L. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

1990-09-01

138

Advanced Modeling of Thermal Plasmas for Industrial Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modeling results are presented for different industrial thermal plasma sources using a customized version of the commercial code FLUENT capable of 2D and 3D transient simulation with advanced CFD models that take into account turbulence effects using different approaches (Reynolds Stress Model and Large Eddy Simulation), transport of species and radiation (Discrete Ordinate Model with interaction between radiation and solid surfaces). Simulations results are presented in order to show the capabilities of this modeling tool, which is very useful for the design of a wide range of atmospheric pressure thermal plasmas devices and related assisted processes, such as: ICPTs with injection of powders for spheroidization, DC twin-torch transferred arc plasma systems for waste treatment, DC non-transferred arc torch for plasma spraying and DC transferred arc torch for high quality plasma cutting.

Colombo, Vittorio; Ghedini, Emanuele

2006-10-01

139

Voltage and temperature dynamic simulations for advanced Battery Management Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Successful introduction of Plug-in Electrical Vehicles (PEV) increases the requirements for advanced on-board Battery Management Systems (BMS) significantly. Modern BMS provides the driver for a number of important indications, such as remaining operation time, adaptive State-of-Charge and State-of-Health. The core of an advanced BMS is a mathematical model for the battery (pack). However, the high complexity and the large amount

D. Danilov; A. Lyedovskikh; P. H. L. Notten

2011-01-01

140

Advanced Helmet Mounted Display (AHMD) for simulator applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Helmet Mounted Display (AHMD), augmented reality visual system first presented at last year's Cockpit and Future Displays for Defense and Security conference, has now been evaluated in a number of military simulator applications and by L-3 Link Simulation and Training. This paper presents the preliminary results of these evaluations and describes current and future simulator and training applications for HMD technology. The AHMD blends computer-generated data (symbology, synthetic imagery, enhanced imagery) with the actual and simulated visible environment. The AHMD is designed specifically for highly mobile deployable, minimum resource demanding reconfigurable virtual training systems to satisfy the military's in-theater warrior readiness objective. A description of the innovative AHMD system and future enhancements will be discussed.

Sisodia, Ashok; Riser, Andrew; Bayer, Michael; McGuire, James P.

2006-05-01

141

Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation (GRAIP): Simulation and permutation for advanced intercross population analysis  

SciTech Connect

Background: Advanced intercross lines (AIL) are segregating populations created using a multi-generation breeding protocol for fine mapping complex trait loci (QTL) in mice and other organisms. Applying QTL mapping methods for intercross and backcross populations, often followed by na ve permutation of individuals and phenotypes, does not account for the effect of AIL family structure in which final generations have been expanded and leads to inappropriately low significance thresholds. The critical problem with na ve mapping approaches in AIL populations is that the individual is not an exchangeable unit. Methodology/Principal Findings: The effect of family structure has immediate implications for the optimal AIL creation (many crosses, few animals per cross, and population expansion before the final generation) and we discuss these and the utility of AIL populations for QTL fine mapping. We also describe Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation, (GRAIP) a method for analyzing AIL data that accounts for family structure. GRAIP permutes a more interchangeable unit in the final generation crosses - the parental genome - and simulating regeneration of a permuted AIL population based on exchanged parental identities. GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds and locus-specific Pvalues for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. We contrast GRAIP with na ve permutation using a large densely genotyped mouse AIL population (1333 individuals from 32 crosses). A na ve permutation using coat color as a model phenotype demonstrates high false-positive locus identification and uncertain significance levels, which are corrected using GRAIP. GRAIP also detects an established hippocampus weight locus and a new locus, Hipp9a. Conclusions and Significance: GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds and locus-specific Pvalues for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. The effect of family structure has immediate implications for the optimal AIL creation and we discuss these and the utility of AIL populations.

Pierce, Jeremy [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Broman, Karl [Johns Hopkins University; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Zhou, Guomin [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Airey, David [University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN; Birmingham, Amanda [Dharmacon, Inc.; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

2008-04-01

142

Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

Borreguero Calvo, Jose M [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Stuart I [ORNL] [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL] [ORNL; Doucet, Mathieu [ORNL] [ORNL; Goswami, Monojoy [ORNL] [ORNL; Hagen, Mark E [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL] [ORNL; Proffen, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Ren, Shelly [ORNL] [ORNL; Savici, Andrei T [ORNL] [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01

143

A SIMULATION MODEL FOR POTENTIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT IN CORN  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A process-based simulation model that predicts potential growth and phenology in corn is presented. This model has been developed based on the design of Object-Oriented crop model (Acock and Reddy, 1997). Recent advances in maize and C4 physiology have been incorporated into the present model. In...

144

Introduction Lecture #1 of Advanced Model Checking  

E-print Network

Introduction Lecture #1 of Advanced Model Checking Joost-Pieter Katoen Lehrstuhl 2: Software Chakraborthy, Falak Sher and Haidi Yue · Exam: week xx and (repetition in) week yy · Credits: 6 credits (M.Sc/B checking Principles of Model Checking CHRISTEL BAIER TU Dresden, Germany JOOST-PIETER KATOEN RWTH Aachen

Ábrahám, Erika

145

ADVANCED SCREENING MODEL FOR COMPLEX TERRAIN APPLICATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A methodology has been developed to use the advanced techniques of the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model in situations where on-site meteorological measurements are limited or unavailable. This approach, known as CTSCREEN, uses actual source and terrain characteristics to model pl...

146

Advances in POST2 End-to-End Descent and Landing Simulation for the ALHAT Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) is used as a basis for an end-to-end descent and landing trajectory simulation that is essential in determining design and integration capability and system performance of the lunar descent and landing system and environment models for the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project. The POST2 simulation provides a six degree-of-freedom capability necessary to test, design and operate a descent and landing system for successful lunar landing. This paper presents advances in the development and model-implementation of the POST2 simulation, as well as preliminary system performance analysis, used for the testing and evaluation of ALHAT project system models.

Davis, Jody L.; Striepe, Scott A.; Maddock, Robert W.; Hines, Glenn D.; Paschall, Stephen, II; Cohanim, Babak E.; Fill, Thomas; Johnson, Michael C.; Bishop, Robert H.; DeMars, Kyle J.; Sostaric, Ronald r.; Johnson, Andrew E.

2008-01-01

147

Advanced studies on Simulation Methodologies for very Complicated Fracture Phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although nowadays, computational techniques are well developed, for Extremely Complicated Fracture Phenomena, they are still very difficult to simulate, for general engineers, researchers. To overcome many difficulties in those simulations, we have developed not only Simulation Methodologies but also theoretical basis and concepts. We sometimes observe extremely complicated fracture patterns, especially in dynamic fracture phenomena such as dynamic crack branching, kinking, curving, etc. For examples, although the humankind, from primitive men to modern scientists such as Albert Einstein had watched the post-mortem patterns of dynamic crack branching, the governing condition for the onset of the phenomena had been unsolved until our experimental study. From in these studies, we found the governing condition of dynamic crack bifurcation, as follows. When the total energy flux per unit time into a propagating crack tip reaches the material crack resistance, the crack braches into two cracks [total energy flux criterion]. The crack branches many times whenever the criterion is satisfied. Furthermore, the complexities also arise due to their time-dependence and/or their-deformation dependence. In order to make it possible to simulate such extremely complicated fracture phenomena, we developed many original advanced computational methods and technologies. These are (i)moving finite element method based on Delaunay automatic triangulation (MFEMBOAT), path independent,(ii) equivalent domain integral expression of the dynamic J integral associated with a continuous auxiliary function,(iii) Mixed phase path-prediction mode simulation, (iv) implicit path prediction criterion. In this paper, these advanced computational methods are thoroughly explained together with successful comparison with the experimental results. Since multiple dynamic crack branching phenomena may be most complicated fracture due to complicated fracture paths, and its time dependence (transient), this simulation and numerical results are mainly explained.

Nishioka, Toshihisa

2010-06-01

148

Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova  

SciTech Connect

The three year plan for this project is to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (both Direct Numerical Simulation and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We will model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar interfaces. We will compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we will develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. We will conduct analytic studies of mix, in support of these objectives. Advanced issues, including multiple layers and reshock, will be considered.

Glimm, James

2008-06-24

149

Advanced turbulence models for turbomachinery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development and assessment of the single-time-scale k-epsilon turbulence model with different near-wall treatments and the multi-scale turbulence model for rotating flows are presented. These turbulence models are coded as self contained module decks that can be interfaced with a number of CFD main flow solvers. For each model, a stand-alone module deck with its own formulation, discretization scheme, solver and boundary condition implementations is presented. These satellite decks will take as input (from a main flow solver) the velocity field, grid, boundary condition specifications and will deliver turbulent quantities as output. These modules were tested as separate entities and, although many logical and programming problems were overcome, only wider use and further testing can render the modules sufficiently 'fool proof'.

Hadid, Ali H.; Decroix, Michele E.; Sindir, Munir M.

1993-07-01

150

Advanced turbulence models for turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development and assessment of the single-time-scale k-epsilon turbulence model with different near-wall treatments and the multi-scale turbulence model for rotating flows are presented. These turbulence models are coded as self contained module decks that can be interfaced with a number of CFD main flow solvers. For each model, a stand-alone module deck with its own formulation, discretization scheme, solver and boundary condition implementations is presented. These satellite decks will take as input (from a main flow solver) the velocity field, grid, boundary condition specifications and will deliver turbulent quantities as output. These modules were tested as separate entities and, although many logical and programming problems were overcome, only wider use and further testing can render the modules sufficiently 'fool proof'.

Hadid, Ali H.; Decroix, Michele E.; Sindir, Munir M.

1993-01-01

151

Ballistic limit evaluation of advanced shielding using numerical simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advanced shielding concept employed for the Columbus module of the International Space Station consists of an aluminum bumper and an intermediate shield of Nextel and Kevlar-epoxy. Until recently, the lack of adequate material models for the Nextel cloth and Kevlar-epoxy has precluded the practical usage of hydrocodes in evaluating the response of these shields to hypervelocity impact threats. Recently

Colin J. Hayhurst; Iain H. G. Livingstone; Richard A. Clegg; Roberto Destefanis; Moreno Faraud

2001-01-01

152

Advanced simulation of hydroelectric transient process with Comsol/Simulink  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the study of hydroelectric system, the research of its transient process and the improvement of its simulation accuracy are restricted mainly by the precision mismatch among the hydraulic and power system models. Simulink provides a very rich control and automation model library system, thus electrical and mechanical conditioning control systems can be accurately simulated. However, it can only solve time but spatial integral problem. Due to that cause, the hydraulic system model often needs to be simplified in course of the simulation of hydroelectric transient process. Comsol, a partial differential equation (PDEs)-based multi-physics finite element analysis software, can precisely simulate the hydraulic system model. Being developed in the Matlab environment, it also can seamlessly integrate with Simulink. In this paper, based on the individual component model, an integral hydraulic-mechanical-electric system model is established by implementing Comsol code into the Simulink S-Function. This model helps to study the interaction between the hydraulic system and the electric system, and analyze the transients of a hydro plant. Meanwhile the calculation results are compared and analyzed with the general simulation system only by using Simulink.

Li, L.; Yang, J. D.

2010-08-01

153

Automatic programming of simulation models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of automatic programming is to improve the overall environment for describing the program. This improved environment is realized by a reduction in the amount of detail that the programmer needs to know and is exposed to. Furthermore, this improved environment is achieved by a specification language that is more natural to the user's problem domain and to the user's way of thinking and looking at the problem. The goal of this research is to apply the concepts of automatic programming (AP) to modeling discrete event simulation system. Specific emphasis is on the design and development of simulation tools to assist the modeler define or construct a model of the system and to then automatically write the corresponding simulation code in the target simulation language, GPSS/PC. A related goal is to evaluate the feasibility of various languages for constructing automatic programming simulation tools.

Schroer, Bernard J.; Tseng, Fan T.; Zhang, Shou X.; Dwan, Wen S.

1988-01-01

154

Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next-generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of

Kwan-Liu Ma; Gregory L. Schussman; Brett Wilson; Kwok Ko; Ji Qiang; Robert Ryne

2002-01-01

155

Model Standards Advance the Profession  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Leadership by teachers is essential to serving the needs of students, schools, and the teaching profession. To that end, the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium has developed Teacher Leader Model Standards to codify, promote, and support teacher leadership as a vehicle to transform schools for the needs of the 21st century. The Teacher…

Journal of Staff Development, 2011

2011-01-01

156

Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada); Hanna, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

1997-07-01

157

ADVISOR 2.1: a user-friendly advanced powertrain simulation using a combined backward\\/forward approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

ADVISOR 2.1 is the latest version of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's advanced vehicle simulator. It was first developed in 1994 to support the US Department of Energy hybrid propulsion system program and is designed to be accurate, fast, flexible, easily sharable, and easy to use. This paper presents the model, focusing on its combination of forward- and backward-facing simulation

Keith B. Wipke; Matthew R. Cuddy; Steven D. Burch

1999-01-01

158

Incorporation of RAM techniques into simulation modeling  

SciTech Connect

This work concludes that reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analytical techniques can be incorporated into computer network simulation modeling to yield an important new analytical tool. This paper describes the incorporation of failure and repair information into network simulation to build a stochastic computer model represents the RAM Performance of two vehicles being developed for the US Army: The Advanced Field Artillery System (AFAS) and the Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (FARV). The AFAS is the US Army`s next generation self-propelled cannon artillery system. The FARV is a resupply vehicle for the AFAS. Both vehicles utilize automation technologies to improve the operational performance of the vehicles and reduce manpower. The network simulation model used in this work is task based. The model programmed in this application requirements a typical battle mission and the failures and repairs that occur during that battle. Each task that the FARV performs--upload, travel to the AFAS, refuel, perform tactical/survivability moves, return to logistic resupply, etc.--is modeled. Such a model reproduces a model reproduces operational phenomena (e.g., failures and repairs) that are likely to occur in actual performance. Simulation tasks are modeled as discrete chronological steps; after the completion of each task decisions are programmed that determine the next path to be followed. The result is a complex logic diagram or network. The network simulation model is developed within a hierarchy of vehicle systems, subsystems, and equipment and includes failure management subnetworks. RAM information and other performance measures are collected which have impact on design requirements. Design changes are evaluated through ``what if`` questions, sensitivity studies, and battle scenario changes.

Nelson, S.C. Jr.; Haire, M.J.; Schryver, J.C.

1995-07-01

159

Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation (GRAIP): Simulation and permutation for advanced intercross population analysis  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Background Advanced intercross lines (AIL) are segregating populations created using a multigeneration breeding protocol for fine mapping complex traits in mice and other organisms. Applying quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping methods for intercross and backcross populations, often followed by na ve permutation of individuals and phenotypes, does not account for the effect of family structure in AIL populations in which final generations have been expanded and leads to inappropriately low significance thresholds. The critical problem with a na ve mapping approach in such AIL populations is that the individual is not an exchangeable unit given the family structure. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of family structure has immediate implications for the optimal AIL creation (many crosses, few animals per cross, and population expansion before the final generation) and we discuss these and the utility of AIL populations for QTL fine mapping. We also describe Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation, (GRAIP) a method for analyzing AIL data that accounts for family structure. RAIP permutes a more interchangeable unit in the final generation crosses - the parental genome - and simulating regeneration of a permuted AIL population based on exchanged parental identities. GRAIP determines appropriate genome- ide significance thresholds and locus-specific P-values for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. We contrast GRAIP with na ve permutation using a large densely genotyped mouse AIL population (1333 individuals from 32 crosses). A na ve permutation using coat color as a model phenotype demonstrates high false-positive locus identification and uncertain significance levels in our AIL population, which are corrected by use of GRAIP. We also show that GRAIP detects an established hippocampus weight locus and a new locus, Hipp9a. Conclusions and Significance GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds and locus- specific P-values for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. The effect of family structure has immediate implications for the optimal AIL creation (many crosses, few animals per cross, and population expansion before the final generation) and we discuss these and the utility of AIL populations.

Pierce, Jeremy [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Broman, Karl [Johns Hopkins University; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Zhou, Guomin [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Airey, David [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Birmingham, Amanda [Dharmacon, Inc.; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

2008-01-01

160

Advances of Simulation and Expertise Capabilities in CIVA Platform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simulation is more and more widely used by the different actors of industrial NDT. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) launched the development of expertise software for NDT named CIVA which, at its beginning, only contained ultrasonic models from CEA laboratories. CIVA now includes Eddy current simulation tools while present work aims at facilitating integration of algorithms and models from different laboratories and to include X-ray modeling. This communication gives an overview of existing CIVA capabilities and its evolution towards an integration platform.

Le Ber, L.; Calmon, P.; Sollier, Th.; Mahaut, S.; Benoist, Ph.

2006-03-01

161

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to understand the chemical and physical mechanisms in coal conversion processes and incorporate this knowledge in computer-aided reactor engineering technology for the purposes of development, evaluation, design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology will be important in reducing the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal. This program is merging advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in understanding and modeling coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed and fixed-bed gasifiers. During the past year, work continued on the development, evaluation, and application of an advanced 2-D, entrained-bed model for pulverized coal combustion and gasification and a new 1-D model for fixed-bed coal gasification and combustion. Both models incorporate the Functional Group - Depolymerization, Vaporization, Crosslinking (FG-DVC) submodel for predicting coal devolatilization, particle swelling, and char reactivity. Work on this submodel was also completed during the past year. Extensive user`s manuals describing the theory and operation of the two codes and the submodels were also prepared.

Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); Brewster, B.S.; Radulovic, P.T. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

1993-06-01

162

Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova  

SciTech Connect

The three year plan for this project was to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), Large Eddy Simulations (LES), full two fluid simulations and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar or circular interfaces. We compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. Multiple layers and reshock are considered here.

James Glimm

2009-06-04

163

Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors (u)  

SciTech Connect

Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as {eta} Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

Guzik, Joyce Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01

164

Metamorphic Modelling: Simulating Metamorphic Processes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These activities are aimed at simulating metamorphic rock formation, and explain how increased pressure and heat affect such formation. The first activity, which can also be performed as a teacher demonstration, simulates the idea of contact metamorphism by investigating the effect of heat from a beaker of hot water on egg white. The other two laboratory activities simulate the formation of slate and simulate the distortion of fossils under pressure using plaster of Paris models. The lesson also discusses differences between igneous and metamorphic rocks.

165

Modeling and Simulation at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation is composed of two topics. The first reviews the use of modeling and simulation (M&S) particularly as it relates to the Constellation program and discrete event simulation (DES). DES is defined as a process and system analysis, through time-based and resource constrained probabilistic simulation models, that provide insight into operation system performance. The DES shows that the cycles for a launch from manufacturing and assembly to launch and recovery is about 45 days and that approximately 4 launches per year are practicable. The second topic reviews a NASA Standard for Modeling and Simulation. The Columbia Accident Investigation Board made some recommendations related to models and simulations. Some of the ideas inherent in the new standard are the documentation of M&S activities, an assessment of the credibility, and reporting to decision makers, which should include the analysis of the results, a statement as to the uncertainty in the results,and the credibility of the results. There is also discussion about verification and validation (V&V) of models. There is also discussion about the different types of models and simulation.

Steele, Martin J.

2009-01-01

166

Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

2004-09-15

167

Advances in scientific balloon thermal modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program Office has long acknowledged that the accurate modeling of balloon performance and flight prediction is dependant on how well the balloon is thermally modeled. This ongoing effort is focused on developing accurate balloon thermal models that can be used to quickly predict balloon temperatures and balloon performance. The ability to model parametric changes is also a driver for this effort. This paper will present the most recent advances made in this area. This research effort continues to utilize the ``Thermal Desktop'' addition to AUTO CAD for the modeling. Recent advances have been made by using this analytical tool. A number of analyses have been completed to test the applicability of this tool to the problem with very positive results. Progressively detailed models have been developed to explore the capabilities of the tool as well as to provide guidance in model formulation. A number of parametric studies have been completed. These studies have varied the shape of the structure, material properties, environmental inputs, and model geometry. These studies have concentrated on spherical ``proxy models'' for the initial development stages and then to transition to the natural shaped zero pressure and super pressure balloons. An assessment of required model resolution has also been determined. Model solutions have been cross checked with known solutions via hand calculations. The comparison of these cases will also be presented. One goal is to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed full models. This paper presents the step by step advances made as part of this effort, capabilities, limitations, and the lessons learned. Also presented are the plans for further thermal modeling work.

Bohaboj, T.; Cathey, H.

168

Advances in Scientific Balloon Thermal Modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program office has long acknowledged that the accurate modeling of balloon performance and flight prediction is dependant on how well the balloon is thermally modeled. This ongoing effort is focused on developing accurate balloon thermal models that can be used to quickly predict balloon temperatures and balloon performance. The ability to model parametric changes is also a driver for this effort. This paper will present the most recent advances made in this area. This research effort continues to utilize the "Thrmal Desktop" addition to AUTO CAD for the modeling. Recent advances have been made by using this analytical tool. A number of analyses have been completed to test the applicability of this tool to the problem with very positive results. Progressively detailed models have been developed to explore the capabilities of the tool as well as to provide guidance in model formulation. A number of parametric studies have been completed. These studies have varied the shape of the structure, material properties, environmental inputs, and model geometry. These studies have concentrated on spherical "proxy models" for the initial development stages and then to transition to the natural shaped zero pressure and super pressure balloons. An assessment of required model resolution has also been determined. Model solutions have been cross checked with known solutions via hand calculations. The comparison of these cases will also be presented. One goal is to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed full models. This papa presents the step by step advances made as part of this effort, capabilities, limitations, and the lessons learned. Also presented are the plans for further thermal modeling work.

Bohaboj, T.; Cathey, H. M., Jr.

2004-01-01

169

Advances in Modeling Exploding Bridgewire Initiation  

SciTech Connect

There is great interest in applying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation techniques to the designs of electrical high explosive (HE) initiators, for the purpose of better understanding a design's sensitivities, optimizing its performance, and/or predicting its useful lifetime. Two MHD-capable LLNL codes, CALE and ALE3D, are being used to simulate the process of ohmic heating, vaporization, and plasma formation in exploding bridgewires (EBW). Initiation of the HE is simulated using Ignition & Growth reactive flow models. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D models have been constructed and studied. The models provide some intuitive explanation of the initiation process and are useful for evaluating the potential impact of identified aging mechanisms (such as the growth of intermetallic compounds or powder sintering). The end product of this work is a simulation capability for evaluating margin in proposed, modified or aged initiation system designs.

Hrousis, C A; Christensen, J S

2010-03-10

170

Co-Simulation for Advanced Process Design and Optimization  

SciTech Connect

Meeting the increasing demand for clean, affordable, and secure energy is arguably the most important challenge facing the world today. Fossil fuels can play a central role in a portfolio of carbon-neutral energy options provided CO{sub 2} emissions can be dramatically reduced by capturing CO{sub 2} and storing it safely and effectively. Fossil energy industry faces the challenge of meeting aggressive design goals for next-generation power plants with CCS. Process designs will involve large, highly-integrated, and multipurpose systems with advanced equipment items with complex geometries and multiphysics. APECS is enabling software to facilitate effective integration, solution, and analysis of high-fidelity process/equipment (CFD) co-simulations. APECS helps to optimize fluid flow and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance. APECS offers many advanced capabilities including ROMs, design optimization, parallel execution, stochastic analysis, and virtual plant co-simulations. NETL and its collaborative R&D partners are using APECS to reduce the time, cost, and technical risk of developing high-efficiency, zero-emission power plants with CCS.

Stephen E. Zitney

2009-01-01

171

Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

SciTech Connect

The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

Anand, Krishnasamy [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ra, youngchul [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2011-01-01

172

The Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tropopause folds are identified by warm, dry, high-potential vorticity, ozone-rich air and are one explanation for damaging non-convective wind events. Could improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated tropopause folding improve non-convective wind forecasts and high wind warnings? The goal of this study is to assess the impact of assimilating Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) profiles on forecasting stratospheric air, tropopause folds, and associated non-convective winds: (1) AIRS: Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (2) IASI: Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (3) CrIMSS: Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite

Brendt. Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Elmer, Nicholas

2014-01-01

173

Ornithopter modeling for flight simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the flight simulation of flapping-wing air vehicles (ornithopters) based on a refined flapping-wing aerodynamic model; the modified strip theory (MST). Compared with conventional types of micro air vehicles (MAVs), flapping MAVs show more complicated flight behaviors due to their complex wing motions and aerodynamics. In this paper, a flight dynamic model of an ornithopter is presented to

Jae-Hung Han; Jin-Young Lee; Dae-Kwan Kim

2008-01-01

174

Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability  

SciTech Connect

Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

2013-10-28

175

Software Partitioning Schemes for Advanced Simulation Computer Systems. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conducted to design software partitioning techniques for use by the Air Force to partition a large flight simulator program for optimal execution on alternative configurations, this study resulted in a mathematical model which defines characteristics for an optimal partition, and a manually demonstrated partitioning algorithm design which…

Clymer, S. J.

176

ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES  

SciTech Connect

The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes.

Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

2005-05-05

177

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2009-09-08

178

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kissel, L

2009-04-01

179

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

2008-10-07

180

Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2008-04-30

181

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2007-09-13

182

Advanced coal gasifier designs using large-scale simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Porting of the legacy code MFIX to a high performance computer (HPC) and the use of high resolution simulations for the design of a coal gasifier are described here. MFIX is based on a continuum multiphase flow model that considers gas and solids to form interpenetrating continua. Low resolution simulations of a commercial scale gasifier with a validated MFIX model revealed interesting physical phenomena with implications on the gasifier design, which prompted the study reported here. To be predictive, the simulations need to model the spatiotemporal variations in gas and solids volume fractions, velocities, temperatures with any associated phase change and chemical reactions. These processes occur at various time- and length-scales requiring very high spatial resolution and large number of iterations with small time-steps. We were able to perform perhaps the largest known simulations of gas-solids reacting flows, providing detailed information about the gas-solids flow structure and the pressure, temperature and species distribution in the gasifier. One key finding is the new features of the coal jet trajectory revealed with the high spatial resolution, which provides information on the accuracy of the lower resolution simulations. Methodologies for effectively combining high and low resolution simulations for design studies must be developed. From a computational science perspective, we found that global communication has to be reduced to achieve scalability to 1000s of cores, hybrid parallelization is required to effectively utilize the multicore chips, and the wait time in the batch queue significantly increases the actual time-to-solution. From our experience, development is required in the following areas: efficient solvers for heterogeneous, massively parallel systems; data analysis tools to extract information from large data sets; and programming environments for easily porting legacy codes to HPC.

Syamlal, M.; Guenther, C.; Gel, A.; Pannala, S.

2009-07-01

183

Recovery system simulation - Link modelization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the frame of the preliminary design studies, the dynamic analysis of the recovery system has to be done with a simulator which gives rapidly realistic results. This paper points out the importance of the modelization of the link between the parachute and the load by showing its contribution in the dynamic behavior of this complex system . An eight Degrees of Freedom (DOF) model is presented with its sensitivity to the driving parameters, based on physical considerations. All these considerations are illustrated by results of simulations done in the frame of MARSNET program.

Moulin, J.

184

Modeling Active Galactic Nuclei in Cosmological Simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is generally accepted that black holes play an essential role in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Resolving galaxies and AGN feedback in cosmological simulations allows us to investigate the current understanding of galaxy formation, black hole growth, gas accretion and the origin of AGN. Due to the limited resolution of the simulations, a simplified sub-scale model for AGN feedback is commonly used. Such a model usually depends on various parameters, for which true values are highly uncertain. I present a new advanced model and a more detailed description of AGN feedback, where such nuisance parameters reflect recent observations. The model takes into account the dependency of these parameters on the properties of the black hole and describes a continuous transition between the feedback processes acting in the so called radio-mode and quasar-mode. I will show that with these new implementations, our simulations are now very successful in reproducing observed properties of AGN and their host galaxies, such as the relation between the black hole mass and the stellar mass of the bulge, the stellar mass function and the black hole luminosity function.

Bachmann, L.; Dolag, K.; Hirschmann, M.

2014-07-01

185

JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Particle Simulation AnalysisParticle Simulation Analysis  

E-print Network

JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Particle SimulationEarth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Japan #12;JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Introduction Virtual RealityVirtual Reality #12;JIFT Workshop

Ito, Atsushi

186

Windows Phone 7 Advanced Programming Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this chapter, we cover additional topics related to the programming model. This is the final chapter on Silverlight for\\u000a Windows Phone 7 development, so expect to see a variety of topics, including advanced data binding, encryption services, photo\\u000a manipulation, video playback, and how to achieve deeper integration with Windows Phone for certain scenarios.

Rob Cameron

187

CAPE-OPEN Integration for Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper highlights the use of the CAPE-OPEN (CO) standard interfaces in the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) developed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The APECS system uses the CO unit operation, thermodynamic, and reaction interfaces to provide its plug-and-play co-simulation capabilities, including the integration of process simulation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. APECS also relies heavily on the use of a CO COM/CORBA bridge for running process/CFD co-simulations on multiple operating systems. For process optimization in the face of multiple and some time conflicting objectives, APECS offers stochastic modeling and multi-objective optimization capabilities developed to comply with the CO software standard. At NETL, system analysts are applying APECS to a wide variety of advanced power generation systems, ranging from small fuel cell systems to commercial-scale power plants including the coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant.

Zitney, S.E.

2006-11-01

188

Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) network model for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Full Service Integrated Services Digital Network (FSIS) network model for advanced satellite designs describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ACTS and the Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) perform ISDN protocol analyses and switching decisions in the terrestrial domain, whereas FSIS makes all its analyses and decisions on-board the ISDN satellite.

Pepin, Gerard R.

1992-01-01

189

Automatic programming of simulation models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The concepts of software engineering were used to improve the simulation modeling environment. Emphasis was placed on the application of an element of rapid prototyping, or automatic programming, to assist the modeler define the problem specification. Then, once the problem specification has been defined, an automatic code generator is used to write the simulation code. The following two domains were selected for evaluating the concepts of software engineering for discrete event simulation: manufacturing domain and a spacecraft countdown network sequence. The specific tasks were to: (1) define the software requirements for a graphical user interface to the Automatic Manufacturing Programming System (AMPS) system; (2) develop a graphical user interface for AMPS; and (3) compare the AMPS graphical interface with the AMPS interactive user interface.

Schroer, Bernard J.; Tseng, Fan T.; Zhang, Shou X.; Dwan, Wen S.

1990-01-01

190

Spray Dryers: Modeling and Simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work presents a simulation study of the spray dryer operation using the whole milk suspension as the emulsion to be dried. Two approaches are used to obtain a general description of this operation. The first approach comprises a population balance model, in which drops and particles make up the discrete phase and are distributed into temporal compartments following their

V. S. Birchal; L. Huang; A. S. Mujumdar; M. L. Passos

2006-01-01

191

Recovery system simulation - Link modelization  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the frame of the preliminary design studies, the dynamic analysis of the recovery system has to be done with a simulator which gives rapidly realistic results. This paper points out the importance of the modelization of the link between the parachute and the load by showing its contribution in the dynamic behavior of this complex system . An eight

J. Moulin

1993-01-01

192

A simulation study of crew performance in operating an advanced transport aircraft in an automated terminal area environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simulation study assessing crew performance operating an advanced transport aircraft in an automated terminal area environment is described. The linking together of the Langley Advanced Transport Operating Systems Aft Flight Deck Simulator with the Terminal Area Air Traffic Model Simulation was required. The realism of an air traffic control (ATC) environment with audio controller instructions for the flight crews and the capability of inserting a live aircraft into the terminal area model to interact with computer generated aircraft was provided. Crew performance using the advanced displays and two separate control systems (automatic and manual) in flying area navigation routes in the automated ATC environment was assessed. Although the crews did not perform as well using the manual control system, their performances were within acceptable operational limits with little increase in workload. The crews favored using the manual control system and felt they were more alert and aware of their environment when using it.

Houck, J. A.

1983-01-01

193

A Simulation and Modeling Framework for Space Situational Awareness  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development and initial demonstration of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness enterprise, for quantitatively assessing the benefit of specific sensor systems, technologies and data analysis techniques. The framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient, physics-based simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The details of the modeling and simulation framework are described, including hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, radar cross section calculations, optical brightness calculations, generic radar system models, generic optical system models, specific Space Surveillance Network models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, and visualization tools. The use of this integrated simulation and modeling framework on a specific scenario involving space debris is demonstrated.

Olivier, S S

2008-09-15

194

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specified conversion behavior is ARF's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (1) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (2) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (3) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a workstation'' environment.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)) [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)) [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

1990-01-01

195

Theory, modeling and simulation: Annual report 1993  

SciTech Connect

Developing the knowledge base needed to address the environmental restoration issues of the US Department of Energy requires a fundamental understanding of molecules and their interactions in insolation and in liquids, on surfaces, and at interfaces. To meet these needs, the PNL has established the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and will soon begin construction of a new, collaborative research facility devoted to advancing the understanding of environmental molecular science. Research in the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation program (TMS), which is one of seven research directorates in the EMSL, will play a critical role in understanding molecular processes important in restoring DOE`s research, development and production sites, including understanding the migration and reactions of contaminants in soils and groundwater, the development of separation process for isolation of pollutants, the development of improved materials for waste storage, understanding the enzymatic reactions involved in the biodegradation of contaminants, and understanding the interaction of hazardous chemicals with living organisms. The research objectives of the TMS program are to apply available techniques to study fundamental molecular processes involved in natural and contaminated systems; to extend current techniques to treat molecular systems of future importance and to develop techniques for addressing problems that are computationally intractable at present; to apply molecular modeling techniques to simulate molecular processes occurring in the multispecies, multiphase systems characteristic of natural and polluted environments; and to extend current molecular modeling techniques to treat complex molecular systems and to improve the reliability and accuracy of such simulations. The program contains three research activities: Molecular Theory/Modeling, Solid State Theory, and Biomolecular Modeling/Simulation. Extended abstracts are presented for 89 studies.

Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Garrett, B.C.

1994-07-01

196

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. Toward this goal, work continued on the following projects: coal to char chemistry submodel; fundamental high-pressure reaction rate data; secondary reaction of pyrolysis product and burnout submodels; ash physics and chemistry submodel; large particle submodels; large char particle oxidation at high pressures; SO{sub x}--NO{sub x} submodel development; integration of advanced submodels into entrained-flow code, with evaluation and documentation; comprehensive fixed-bed modeling review, development evaluation and implementation, generalized fuels feedstock submodel; application of generalized pulverized coal comprehensive code; and application of fixed-bed code.

Soloman, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

1990-01-01

197

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

2012-07-31

198

Modeling and Simulation for Safeguards  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this talk is to give an overview of the role of modeling and simulation in Safeguards R&D and introduce you to (some of) the tools used. Some definitions are: (1) Modeling - the representation, often mathematical, of a process, concept, or operation of a system, often implemented by a computer program; (2) Simulation - the representation of the behavior or characteristics of one system through the use of another system, especially a computer program designed for the purpose; and (3) Safeguards - the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. The role of modeling and simulation are: (1) Calculate amounts of material (plant modeling); (2) Calculate signatures of nuclear material etc. (source terms); and (3) Detector performance (radiation transport and detection). Plant modeling software (e.g. FACSIM) gives the flows and amount of material stored at all parts of the process. In safeguards this allow us to calculate the expected uncertainty of the mass and evaluate the expected MUF. We can determine the measurement accuracy required to achieve a certain performance.

Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-26

199

Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Acceleration driven instabilities of fluid mixing layers include the classical cases of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, driven by a steady acceleration and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, driven by an impulsive acceleration. Our program starts with high resolution methods of numerical simulation of two (or more) distinct fluids, continues with analytic analysis of these solutions, and the derivation of averaged equations. A striking achievement has been the systematic agreement we obtained between simulation and experiment by using a high resolution numerical method and improved physical modeling, with surface tension. Our study is accompanies by analysis using stochastic modeling and averaged equations for the multiphase problem. We have quantified the error and uncertainty using statistical modeling methods.

James Glimm; Xiaolin Li

2006-01-10

200

A numerical investigation on the efficiency of range extending systems using Advanced Vehicle Simulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Series plug-in hybrid electric vehicles of varying engine configuration and battery capacity are modeled using Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR). The performance of these vehicles is analyzed on the bases of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions on the tank-to-wheel and well-to-wheel paths. Both city and highway driving conditions are considered during the simulation. When simulated on the well-to-wheel path, it is shown that the range extender with a Wankel rotary engine consumes less energy and emits fewer greenhouse gases compared to the other systems with reciprocating engines during many driving cycles. The rotary engine has a higher power-to-weight ratio and lower noise, vibration and harshness compared to conventional reciprocating engines, although performs less efficiently. The benefits of a Wankel engine make it an attractive option for use as a range extender in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle.

Varnhagen, Scott; Same, Adam; Remillard, Jesse; Park, Jae Wan

2011-03-01

201

Thermochemical modelling of advanced CANDU reactor fuel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With an aging fleet of nuclear generating facilities, the imperative to limit the use of non-renewal fossil fuels and the inevitable need for additional electricity to power Canada's economy, a renaissance in the use of nuclear technology in Canada is at hand. The experience and knowledge of over 40 years of CANDU research, development and operation in Ontario and elsewhere has been applied to a new generation of CANDU, the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR). Improved fuel design allows for an extended burnup, which is a significant improvement, enhancing the safety and the economies of the ACR. The use of a Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) material and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel has created a need to understand better these novel materials and fuel types. This thesis documents a work to advance the scientific and technological knowledge of the ACR fuel design with respect to thermodynamic phase stability and fuel oxidation modelling. For the BNA material, a new (BNA) model is created based on the fundamental first principles of Gibbs energy minimization applied to material phase stability. For LEU fuel, the methodology used for the BNA model is applied to the oxidation of irradiated fuel. The pertinent knowledge base for uranium, oxygen and the major fission products is reviewed, updated and integrated to create a model that is applicable to current and future CANDU fuel designs. As part of this thesis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Coulombic Titration (CT) experiments are compared to the BNA and LEU models, respectively. From the analysis of the CT results, a number of improvements are proposed to enhance the LEU model and provide confidence in its application to ACR fuel. A number of applications for the potential use of these models are proposed and discussed. Keywords: CANDU Fuel, Gibbs Energy Mimimization, Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel, Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) Material, Coulometric Titration, X-Ray Diffraction

Corcoran, Emily Catherine

2009-04-01

202

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01

203

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that work together in unison. In order to support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; Gretchen Matthern; Steven Piet; David Shropshire; Tyler Schweitzer

2010-11-01

204

Advanced Multi-System Simulation Capabilities with AltaRica  

E-print Network

Recently, AIRBUS and ONERA were involved in the ESACS (Enhanced Safety Assessment for Complex Systems) European project. The aim of this project was to investigate new safety assessment techniques based on the use of formal design languages and associated tools. Two case-studies based on AIRBUS aircraft were used to validate the approach. Both a complete hydraulic system and an electric system were modelled. We also built a model depicting the two systems and their interconnections and performed a safety analysis focusing on failure propagation. In this paper, we report how the combination of these two medium sized models was assessed and analysed with the AltaRica language. With respect to analysis, we explain how we used Cecilia OCAS, developed by Dassault Aviation, a French aircraft manufacturer. Simulation was first performed interactively with graphical views of the system that help to understand precisely how failures propagate inside a system as well as between systems. Then we used a model checker that performs symbolically an exhaustive simulation of the system. As a main result, we found out that these tools and the underlying safety approach were very efficient to assess whether qualitative safety requirements are fulfilled by a system design or not.

unknown authors

205

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants  

E-print Network

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 by G. Palmiotti, J. Cahalan, P. Pfeiffer, T;2 ANL-AFCI-168 Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants G

Anitescu, Mihai

206

Simulating spin models on GPU  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last couple of years it has been realized that the vast computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs) could be harvested for purposes other than the video game industry. This power, which at least nominally exceeds that of current CPUs by large factors, results from the relative simplicity of the GPU architectures as compared to CPUs, combined with a large number of parallel processing units on a single chip. To benefit from this setup for general computing purposes, the problems at hand need to be prepared in a way to profit from the inherent parallelism and hierarchical structure of memory accesses. In this contribution I discuss the performance potential for simulating spin models, such as the Ising model, on GPU as compared to conventional simulations on CPU.

Weigel, Martin

2011-09-01

207

Advanced thermal energy management: A thermal test bed and heat pipe simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work initiated on a common-module thermal test simulation was continued, and a second project on heat pipe simulation was begun. The test bed, constructed from surplus Skylab equipment, was modeled and solved for various thermal load and flow conditions. Low thermal load caused the radiator fluid, Coolanol 25, to thicken due to its temperature avoided by using a regenerator-heat-exchanger. Other possible solutions modeled include a radiator heater and shunting heat from the central thermal bus to the radiator. Also, module air temperature can become excessive with high avionics load. A second preoject concerning advanced heat pipe concepts was initiated. A program was written which calculates fluid physical properties, liquid and vapor pressure in the evaporator and condenser, fluid flow rates, and thermal flux. The program is directed to evaluating newer heat pipe wicks and geometries, especially water in an artery surrounded by six vapor channels. Effects of temperature, groove and slot dimensions, and wick properties are reported.

Barile, Ronald G.

1986-01-01

208

OXYGEN UTILIZATION IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE PLANTS: SIMULATION AND MODEL CALIBRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of the research described in the report is to apply recent advances in activated sludge process modeling to the simulation of oxygen utilization rates in full scale activated sludge treatment plants. This is accomplished by calibrating the International Association ...

209

Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D  

SciTech Connect

As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Parkinson, R.D. [Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States). Center for Technology

1993-10-22

210

A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

2012-12-04

211

Mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation in Advanced Life Support Systems.  

PubMed

This paper examines mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation and robotics for Advanced Life Support Systems (ALSS). The focus is on requirements and applications for command and control, control and monitoring, situation assessment and response, diagnosis and recovery, adaptive planning and scheduling, and other automation applications in addition to mechanized equipment and robotics applications to reduce the excessive human labor requirements to operate and maintain an ALSS. Based on principles of systems engineering, an approach is proposed to assess requirements for automation and robotics using mission simulation tools. First, the story of a simulated mission is defined in terms of processes with attendant types of resources needed, including options for use of automation and robotic systems. Next, systems dynamics models are used in simulation to reveal the implications for selected resource allocation schemes in terms of resources required to complete operational tasks. The simulations not only help establish ALSS design criteria, but also may offer guidance to ALSS research efforts by identifying gaps in knowledge about procedures and/or biophysical processes. Simulations of a planned one-year mission with 4 crewmembers in a Human Rated Test Facility are presented as an approach to evaluation of mission feasibility and definition of automation and robotics requirements. PMID:11538963

Erickson, J D; Eckelkamp, R E; Barta, D J; Dragg, J

1996-01-01

212

AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model  

SciTech Connect

This volume describes the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) for topologies, flow regimes, and interfacial areas. The objective of these models is to provide values for the interfacial areas between all components existing in a computational cell. The interfacial areas are then used to evaluate the mass, energy, and momentum transfer between the components. A new approach has been undertaken in the development of a model to convect the interfacial areas of the discontinuous velocity fields in the three-velocity-field environment of AFDM. These interfacial areas are called convectible surface areas. The continuous and discontinuous components are chosen using volume fraction and levitation criteria. This establishes so-called topologies for which the convectible surface areas can be determined. These areas are functions of space and time. Solid particulates that are limited to being discontinuous within the bulk fluid are assumed to have a constant size. The convectible surface areas are subdivided to model contacts between two discontinuous components or discontinuous components and the structure. The models have been written for the flow inside of large pools. Therefore, the structure is tracked only as a boundary to the fluid volume without having a direct influence on velocity or volume fraction distribution by means of flow regimes or boundary layer models. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

Wilhelm, D.

1990-09-01

213

Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

2014-01-01

214

LLNL Scientists Use NERSC to Advance Global Aerosol Simulations  

SciTech Connect

While ''greenhouse gases'' have been the focus of climate change research for a number of years, DOE's ''Aerosol Initiative'' is now examining how aerosols (small particles of approximately micron size) affect the climate on both a global and regional scale. Scientists in the Atmospheric Science Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are using NERSC's IBM supercomputer and LLNL's IMPACT (atmospheric chemistry) model to perform simulations showing the historic effects of sulfur aerosols at a finer spatial resolution than ever done before. Simulations were carried out for five decades, from the 1950s through the 1990s. The results clearly show the effects of the changing global pattern of sulfur emissions. Whereas in 1950 the United States emitted 41 percent of the world's sulfur aerosols, this figure had dropped to 15 percent by 1990, due to conservation and anti-pollution policies. By contrast, the fraction of total sulfur emissions of European origin has only dropped by a factor of 2 and the Asian emission fraction jumped six fold during the same time, from 7 percent in 1950 to 44 percent in 1990. Under a special allocation of computing time provided by the Office of Science INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment) program, Dan Bergmann, working with a team of LLNL scientists including Cathy Chuang, Philip Cameron-Smith, and Bala Govindasamy, was able to carry out a large number of calculations during the past month, making the aerosol project one of the largest users of NERSC resources. The applications ran on 128 and 256 processors. The objective was to assess the effects of anthropogenic (man-made) sulfate aerosols. The IMPACT model calculates the rate at which SO{sub 2} (a gas emitted by industrial activity) is oxidized and forms particles known as sulfate aerosols. These particles have a short lifespan in the atmosphere, often washing out in about a week. This means that their effects on climate tend to be more regional, occurring near the area where the SO{sub 2} is emitted. To accurately study these regional effects, Bergmann needed to run the simulations at a finer horizontal resolution, as the coarser resolution (typically 300km by 300km) of other climate models are insufficient for studying changes on a regional scale. Livermore's use of CAM3, the Community Atmospheric Model which is a high-resolution climate model developed at NCAR (with collaboration from DOE), allows a 100km by 100km grid to be applied. NERSC's terascale computing capability provided the needed computational horsepower to run the application at the finer level.

Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C; Rotman, D

2004-10-13

215

Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.  

PubMed

A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging. PMID:24464989

Uchida, Masafumi

2014-04-01

216

Healthcare Policy Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis: COMPARE  

E-print Network

Healthcare Policy Analysis Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis: COMPARE Challenge Decision and Information Sciences Division Modeling, Simulation, and Visualization Group Healthcare and possible healthcare reform are important issues for the American public, the healthcare industry, policy analysts

217

A Social Diffusion Model with an Application on Election Simulation  

PubMed Central

Issues about opinion diffusion have been studied for decades. It has so far no empirical approach to model the interflow and formation of crowd's opinion in elections due to two reasons. First, unlike the spread of information or flu, individuals have their intrinsic attitudes to election candidates in advance. Second, opinions are generally simply assumed as single values in most diffusion models. However, in this case, an opinion should represent preference toward multiple candidates. Previously done models thus may not intuitively interpret such scenario. This work is to design a diffusion model which is capable of managing the aforementioned scenario. To demonstrate the usefulness of our model, we simulate the diffusion on the network built based on a publicly available bibliography dataset. We compare the proposed model with other well-known models such as independent cascade. It turns out that our model consistently outperforms other models. We additionally investigate electoral issues with our model simulator. PMID:24995351

Wang, Fu-Min; Hung, San-Chuan; Kung, Perng-Hwa; Lin, Shou-De

2014-01-01

218

SEMI Modeling and Simulation Roadmap  

SciTech Connect

With the exponential growth in the power of computing hardware and software, modeling and simulation is becoming a key enabler for the rapid design of reliable Microsystems. One vision of the future microsystem design process would include the following primary software capabilities: (1) The development of 3D part design, through standard CAD packages, with automatic design rule checks that guarantee the manufacturability and performance of the microsystem. (2) Automatic mesh generation, for 3D parts as manufactured, that permits computational simulation of the process steps, and the performance and reliability analysis for the final microsystem. (3) Computer generated 2D layouts for process steps that utilize detailed process models to generate the layout and process parameter recipe required to achieve the desired 3D part. (4) Science-based computational tools that can simulate the process physics, and the coupled thermal, fluid, structural, solid mechanics, electromagnetic and material response governing the performance and reliability of the microsystem. (5) Visualization software that permits the rapid visualization of 3D parts including cross-sectional maps, performance and reliability analysis results, and process simulation results. In addition to these desired software capabilities, a desired computing infrastructure would include massively parallel computers that enable rapid high-fidelity analysis, coupled with networked compute servers that permit computing at a distance. We now discuss the individual computational components that are required to achieve this vision. There are three primary areas of focus: design capabilities, science-based capabilities and computing infrastructure. Within each of these areas, there are several key capability requirements.

Hermina, W.L.

2000-10-02

219

A tutorial view of simulation model development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working from the background of simulation language developments, we develop an understanding of the current status of simulation model development. Factors characterizing the current status include a shift in emphasis from program to model, more commitment to modeling tools, and the lingering impedance of simulation language isolation. Current and future needs are identified. Specific approaches to meeting these needs are

Richard E. Nance

1983-01-01

220

Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction ot the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

Biegel, Bryan A.; Ancona, Mario G.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Yu, Zhiping

2000-01-01

221

Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction to the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion or quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

Biegel, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Ancona, Mario G.; Yu, Zhi-Ping

2000-01-01

222

Detailed simulation of morphodynamics: 1. Hydrodynamic model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a three-dimensional high-resolution hydrodynamic model for unsteady incompressible flow over an evolving bed topography. This is achieved by using a multilevel Cartesian grid technique that allows the grid to be refined in high-gradient regions and in the vicinity of the river bed. The grid can be locally refined and adapted to the bed geometry, managing the Cartesian grid cells and faces using a hierarchical tree data approach. A ghost-cell immersed-boundary technique is applied to cells intersecting the bed topography. The governing equations have been discretized using a finite-volume method on a staggered grid, conserving second-order accuracy in time and space. The solution advances in time using the fractional step approach. Large-eddy simulation is used as turbulence closure. We validate the model against several experiments and other results from literature. Model results for Stokes flow around a cylinder in the vicinity of a moving wall agree well with Wannier's analytical solution. At higher Reynolds numbers, computed trailing bubble length, separation angle, and drag coefficient compare favorably with experimental and previous computational results. Results for the flow over two- and three-dimensional dunes agree well with published data, including a fair reproduction of recirculation zones, horse-shoe structures, and boiling effects. This shows that the model is suitable for being used as a hydrodynamic submodel in the high-resolution modeling of sediment transport and formation and evolution of subaqueous ripples and dunes.

Nabi, M.; de Vriend, H. J.; Mosselman, E.; Sloff, C. J.; Shimizu, Y.

2012-12-01

223

Implementation of Advanced Two Equation Turbulence Models in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver  

Microsoft Academic Search

USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flowsover complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does nothave advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flow. We have implementedtwo modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-# two-equation turbulencemodel and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conductedfor

Qunzhen Wang; Steven J. Massey; Khaled S. Abdol-Hamid

2000-01-01

224

Advances in numerical simulation of turbulent flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME and JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference, 1st, Portland, OR, June 23-27, 1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present conference discusses the modeling of swirling flows with advanced turbulence closures, algebraic expressions for Reynolds stresses, numerical simulation of 3D developing turbulent flows in a square duct with the anisotropic k-epsilon model, the prediction of normal Reynolds stresses with the nonlinear k-epsilon model, combustor flowfield turbulence modeling with the nonlinear k-epsilon model, and the large-eddy simulation of the

I. Celik; T. Kobayashi; K. N. Ghia; J. Kurokawa

1991-01-01

225

Operations planning simulation: Model study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of simulation modeling for the identification of system sensitivities to internal and external forces and variables is discussed. The technique provides a means of exploring alternate system procedures and processes, so that these alternatives may be considered on a mutually comparative basis permitting the selection of a mode or modes of operation which have potential advantages to the system user and the operator. These advantages are measurements is system efficiency are: (1) the ability to meet specific schedules for operations, mission or mission readiness requirements or performance standards and (2) to accomplish the objectives within cost effective limits.

1974-01-01

226

Simulation, Modelling and Visualisation: Toolkits for Building Simulated Worlds.  

E-print Network

planted at the centre of the image is gradually grown by releasing "walker" particles around about it of on-going simulation projects making use of field equation models, micro- scopic entity models to simulate real world textures and patterms that arise from physical processes and systems. The background

Hawick, Ken

227

Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

2011-06-01

228

A modular BLSS simulation model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) for extraterrestrial use will be faced with coordination problems more acute than those in any ecosystem found on Earth. A related problem in BLSS design is providing an interface between the various life support processors, one that will allow for their coordination while still allowing for system expansion. A modular model is presented of a BLSS that interfaces system processors only with the material storage reservoirs, allowing those reservoirs to act as the principal buffers in the system and thus minimizing difficulties with processor coordination. The modular nature of the model allows independent development of the detailed submodels that exist within the model framework. Using this model, BLSS dynamics were investigated under normal conditions and under various failure modes. Partial and complete failures of various components, such as the waste processors or the plants themselves, drive transient responses in the model system, allowing the examination of the effectiveness of the system reservoirs as buffers. The results from simulations help to determine control strategies and BLSS design requirements. An evolved version could be used as an interactive control aid in a future BLSS.

Rummel, John D.; Volk, Tyler

1987-01-01

229

Modeling of advanced fossil fuel power plants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first part of this thesis deals with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil fuel-fired power stations. The GHG emission estimation from fossil fuel power generation industry signifies that emissions from this industry can be significantly reduced by fuel switching and adaption of advanced power generation technologies. In the second part of the thesis, steady-state models of some of the advanced fossil fuel power generation technologies are presented. The impacts of various parameters on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) overpotentials and outputs are investigated. The detail analyses of operation of the hybrid SOFC-gas turbine (GT) cycle when fuelled with methane and syngas demonstrate that the efficiencies of the cycles with and without anode exhaust recirculation are close, but the specific power of the former is much higher. The parametric analysis of the performance of the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle indicates that increasing the system operating pressure and SOFC operating temperature and fuel utilization factor improves cycle efficiency, but the effects of the increasing SOFC current density and turbine inlet temperature are not favourable. The analysis of the operation of the system when fuelled with a wide range of fuel types demonstrates that the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle efficiency can be between 59% and 75%, depending on the inlet fuel type. Then, the system performance is investigated when methane as a reference fuel is replaced with various species that can be found in the fuel, i.e., H2, CO2, CO, and N 2. The results point out that influence of various species can be significant and different for each case. The experimental and numerical analyses of a biodiesel fuelled micro gas turbine indicate that fuel switching from petrodiesel to biodiesel can influence operational parameters of the system. The modeling results of gas turbine-based power plants signify that relatively simple models can predict plant performance with acceptable accuracy. The unique feature of these models is that they are developed based on similar assumptions and run at similar conditions; therefore, their results can be compared. This work demonstrates that, although utilization of fossil fuels for power generation is inevitable, at least in the short- and mid-term future, it is possible and practical to carry out such utilization more efficiently and in an environmentally friendlier manner.

Zabihian, Farshid

230

Advanced electrothermal Spice modelling of large power IGBTs  

E-print Network

Advanced electrothermal Spice modelling of large power IGBTs R. Azar, F. Udrea, W.T. Ng, F. Dawson packages using the Spice language, has generated a great demand for a fully coupled electrothermal IGBT model in Spice. At the present time, the most advanced IGBT models are only incorporated within

Ng, Wai Tung

231

Advanced Method to Estimate Fuel Slosh Simulation Parameters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nutation (wobble) of a spinning spacecraft in the presence of energy dissipation is a well-known problem in dynamics and is of particular concern for space missions. The nutation of a spacecraft spinning about its minor axis typically grows exponentially and the rate of growth is characterized by the Nutation Time Constant (NTC). For launch vehicles using spin-stabilized upper stages, fuel slosh in the spacecraft propellant tanks is usually the primary source of energy dissipation. For analytical prediction of the NTC this fuel slosh is commonly modeled using simple mechanical analogies such as pendulums or rigid rotors coupled to the spacecraft. Identifying model parameter values which adequately represent the sloshing dynamics is the most important step in obtaining an accurate NTC estimate. Analytic determination of the slosh model parameters has met with mixed success and is made even more difficult by the introduction of propellant management devices and elastomeric diaphragms. By subjecting full-sized fuel tanks with actual flight fuel loads to motion similar to that experienced in flight and measuring the forces experienced by the tanks these parameters can be determined experimentally. Currently, the identification of the model parameters is a laborious trial-and-error process in which the equations of motion for the mechanical analog are hand-derived, evaluated, and their results are compared with the experimental results. The proposed research is an effort to automate the process of identifying the parameters of the slosh model using a MATLAB/SimMechanics-based computer simulation of the experimental setup. Different parameter estimation and optimization approaches are evaluated and compared in order to arrive at a reliable and effective parameter identification process. To evaluate each parameter identification approach, a simple one-degree-of-freedom pendulum experiment is constructed and motion is induced using an electric motor. By applying the estimation approach to a simple, accurately modeled system, its effectiveness and accuracy can be evaluated. The same experimental setup can then be used with fluid-filled tanks to further evaluate the effectiveness of the process. Ultimately, the proven process can be applied to the full-sized spinning experimental setup to quickly and accurately determine the slosh model parameters for a particular spacecraft mission. Automating the parameter identification process will save time, allow more changes to be made to proposed designs, and lower the cost in the initial design stages.

Schlee, Keith; Gangadharan, Sathya; Ristow, James; Sudermann, James; Walker, Charles; Hubert, Carl

2005-01-01

232

Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY  

SciTech Connect

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

Veronica J Rutledge

2013-10-01

233

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

1991-12-31

234

Development of CAPE-OPEN unit operations for advanced power systems modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reaction Engineering International (REI) is developing a suite of CORBA CAPE-OPEN compliant unit operations to support the Department of Energy NETL Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power systems. One of these components will provide an interface to the GateCycle software, which is widely used in the power generation industry for process modeling. Additional CAPE-OPEN components will provide

D. Swensen; S. Zitney; M. Bockelie

2007-01-01

235

Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear fuels are critical to understand the burnup, and thus the fuel efficiency.

Lu, Hongbing; Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

2014-01-09

236

Advancement of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Payment  

SciTech Connect

EnergyPlus{sup TM} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOEâ??s Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. The 5-year project was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and was divided into 5 budget period between 2006 and 2011. During the project period, 11 versions of EnergyPlus were released. This report summarizes work performed by an EnergyPlus development team led by the University of Central Floridaâ??s Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC). The team members consist of DHL Consulting, C. O. Pedersen Associates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Oklahoma State University, GARD Analytics, Inc., and WrightSoft Corporation. The project tasks involved new feature development, testing and validation, user support and training, and general EnergyPlus support. The team developed 146 new features during the 5-year period to advance the EnergyPlus capabilities. Annual contributions of new features are 7 in budget period 1, 19 in period 2, 36 in period 3, 41 in period 4, and 43 in period 5, respectively. The testing and validation task focused on running test suite and publishing report, developing new IEA test suite cases, testing and validating new source code, addressing change requests, and creating and testing installation package. The user support and training task provided support for users and interface developers, and organized and taught workshops. The general support task involved upgrading StarTeam (team sharing) software and updating existing utility software. The project met the DOE objectives and completed all tasks successfully. Although the EnergyPlus software was enhanced significantly under this project, more enhancements are needed for further improvement to ensure that EnergyPlus is able to simulate the latest technologies and perform desired HAVC system operations for the development of next generation HVAC systems. Additional development will be performed under a new 5-year project managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Lixing Gu; Don Shirey; Richard Raustad; Bereket Nigusse; Chandan Sharma; Linda Lawrie; Rich Strand; Curt Pedersen; Dan Fisher; Edwin Lee; Mike Witte; Jason Glazer; Chip Barnaby

2011-03-31

237

Simulation model development in information security education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The value of modeling and simulation for education, training, and testing in information security has been documented in several studies. In this paper, we suggest that it is important not only to include the general use of simulation in various courses of the security curriculum, but also to include the theory and development of simulation models. We describe briefly the

Jose M. Garrido; Tridib Bandyopadhyay

2009-01-01

238

Noise Simulation Modeling for Airport Noise Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Noise simulation modeling is now feasible for assessing the noise impacts of airports since computational capabilities have increased. The current aviation noise models use integrated exposure assumptions to calculate the overall noise exposure. However, this assumption greatly restricts the ability to model the effects of terrain, barriers, weather, and aircraft directivity. Noise simulation models, such as NMSim, provide more accurate

J. Micah Downing

239

Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single velocity and pressure, etc.) A unified, multi-scale approach is advocated to extend the necessary foundations and build the capability to simultaneously solve the fluid dynamic interface problems (interface resolution) as well as multiphase mixtures (homogenization).

R. A. Berry

2010-11-01

240

RECENT ADVANCES IN MACROMOLECULAR HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING  

PubMed Central

The modern implementation of the boundary element method (S.R. Aragon, J. Comput. Chem. 25(2004)1191–12055) has ushered unprecedented accuracy and precision for the solution of the Stokes equations of hydrodynamics with stick boundary conditions. This article begins by reviewing computations with the program BEST of smooth surface objects such as ellipsoids, the dumbbell, and cylinders that demonstrate that the numerical solution of the integral equation formulation of hydrodynamics yields very high precision and accuracy. When BEST is used for macromolecular computations, the limiting factor becomes the definition of the molecular hydrodynamic surface and the implied effective solvation of the molecular surface. Studies on 49 different proteins, ranging in molecular weight from 9 to over 400 kDa, have shown that a model using a 1.1 A thick hydration layer describes all protein transport properties very well for the overwhelming majority of them. In addition, this data implies that the crystal structure is an excellent representation of the average solution structure for most of them. In order to investigate the origin of a handful of significant discrepancies in some multimeric proteins (over ?20% observed in the intrinsic viscosity), the technique of Molecular Dynamics simulation (MD) has been incorporated into the research program. A preliminary study of dimeric ?-chymotrypsin using approximate implicit water MD is presented. In addition I describe the successful validation of modern protein force fields, ff03 and ff99SB, for the accurate computation of solution structure in explicit water simulation by comparison of trajectory ensemble average computed transport properties with experimental measurements. This work includes small proteins such as lysozyme, ribonuclease and ubiquitin using trajectories around 10 ns duration. We have also studied a 150 kDa flexible monoclonal IgG antibody, trastuzumab, with multiple independent trajectories encompassing over 320 ns of simulation. The close agreement within experimental error of the computed and measured properties allows us to conclude that MD does produce structures typical of those in solution, and that flexible molecules can be properly described using the method of ensemble averaging over a trajectory. We review similar work on the study of a transfer RNA molecule and DNA oligomers that demonstrate that within 3% a simple uniform hydration model 1.1 A thick provides agreement with experiment for these nucleic acids. In the case of linear oligomers, the precision can be improved close to 1% by a non-uniform hydration model that hydrates mainly in the DNA grooves, in agreement with high resolution x-ray diffraction. We conclude with a vista on planned improvements for the BEST program to decrease its memory requirements and increase its speed without sacrificing accuracy. PMID:21073955

Aragon, Sergio R.

2010-01-01

241

Simulation-based evaluation of Advanced Traveler Information Services (ATIS)  

E-print Network

Drivers using information from an Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS) could potentially make better travel decisions to reduce travel time and increase trip reliability, thereby benefiting both guided drivers as ...

Florian, Daniel George

2004-01-01

242

Propulsion System Modeling and Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory at the School of Aerospace Engineering in Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a core competency that enables propulsion technology managers to make technology investment decisions substantiated by propulsion and airframe technology system studies. This method assists the designer/manager in selecting appropriate technology concepts while accounting for the presence of risk and uncertainty as well as interactions between disciplines. This capability is incorporated into a single design simulation system that is described in this paper. This propulsion system design environment is created with a commercially available software called iSIGHT, which is a generic computational framework, and with analysis programs for engine cycle, engine flowpath, mission, and economic analyses. iSIGHT is used to integrate these analysis tools within a single computer platform and facilitate information transfer amongst the various codes. The resulting modeling and simulation (M&S) environment in conjunction with the response surface method provides the designer/decision-maker an analytical means to examine the entire design space from either a subsystem and/or system perspective. The results of this paper will enable managers to analytically play what-if games to gain insight in to the benefits (and/or degradation) of changing engine cycle design parameters. Furthermore, the propulsion design space will be explored probabilistically to show the feasibility and viability of the propulsion system integrated with a vehicle.

Tai, Jimmy C. M.; McClure, Erin K.; Mavris, Dimitri N.; Burg, Cecile

2002-01-01

243

Direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL)  

SciTech Connect

A direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) is presented which overcomes the traditional disadvantages of simulations executed on a digital computer. The incorporation of parallel processing allows the mapping of simulations into a digital computer to be done in the same inherently parallel manner as they are currently mapped onto an analog computer. The direct-execution format maximizes the efficiency of the executed code since the need for a high level language compiler is eliminated. Resolution is greatly increased over that which is available with an analog computer without the sacrifice in execution speed normally expected with digitial computer simulations. Although this report covers all aspects of the new architecture, key emphasis is placed on the processing element configuration and the microprogramming of the ACLS constructs. The execution times for all ACLS constructs are computed using a model of a processing element based on the AMD 29000 CPU and the AMD 29027 FPU. The increase in execution speed provided by parallel processing is exemplified by comparing the derived execution times of two ACSL programs with the execution times for the same programs executed on a similar sequential architecture.

Carroll, C.C.; Owen, J.E.

1988-05-01

244

On the utility of graphics cards to perform massively parallel simulation of advanced Monte Carlo methods.  

PubMed

We present a case-study on the utility of graphics cards to perform massively parallel simulation of advanced Monte Carlo methods. Graphics cards, containing multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), are self-contained parallel computational devices that can be housed in conventional desktop and laptop computers and can be thought of as prototypes of the next generation of many-core processors. For certain classes of population-based Monte Carlo algorithms they offer massively parallel simulation, with the added advantage over conventional distributed multi-core processors that they are cheap, easily accessible, easy to maintain, easy to code, dedicated local devices with low power consumption. On a canonical set of stochastic simulation examples including population-based Markov chain Monte Carlo methods and Sequential Monte Carlo methods, we nd speedups from 35 to 500 fold over conventional single-threaded computer code. Our findings suggest that GPUs have the potential to facilitate the growth of statistical modelling into complex data rich domains through the availability of cheap and accessible many-core computation. We believe the speedup we observe should motivate wider use of parallelizable simulation methods and greater methodological attention to their design. PMID:22003276

Lee, Anthony; Yau, Christopher; Giles, Michael B; Doucet, Arnaud; Holmes, Christopher C

2010-12-01

245

Iron Resources and Oceanic Nutrients: Advancement of Global Environment Simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of a single factor limiting plankton blooms, is presently giving way to co-limitation by light, and the nutrients N, P, Si and Fe. Primary production, export into the deep sea, and CO2 uptake from the atmosphere together form the 'biological pump' in Ocean Biogeochemical Climate Models (OBCM's). Thus far OBCM's assume just one limiting nutrient (P) and one universal phytoplankton species, for C budgets and CO2 exchange. New realistic OBCM's are being developed for budgeting and exchanges of both CO2 and DMS, implementing (i) co-limitation by 4 nutrients of 5 major taxonomic classes of phytoplankton, (ii) DMS(P) pathways, (iii) global iron cycling, (iv) chemical forms of iron and (v) iron supply into surface waters. The new OBCM's will predict realistic climate scenario's, notably climatic feedbacks on oceanic biogeochemistry. IRONAGES is a European consortium of twelve institutes and is coordinated by Royal NIOZ. Input from below of iron from anoxic sediments of coastal margins has been assessed (March 2002) along a 2-D vertical section from Europe into the centre of the north Atlantic. Input from above of Fe(II) dissolved in rainwater from Sahara dust blown over the central Atlantic will be quantified at sea (October 2002), and related to observed plankton production. Different chemical forms of iron are being assessed and a certification excercise for Fe in seawater also under aegis of SCOR Working Group 109 is being completed (December 2002). For two major DMS-producing algal groups Phaeocystis sp. and Emiliania huxleyi the life cycle, Fe limitation, export production, CO2 uptake and DMS emissions have been synthesized from existing literature and laboratory experiments. This is being fed into ecosystem modeling, as well as into DMS(P) pathway modeling. Also know-how has been synthesized for three other major classes (diatoms, N2-fixing Trichodesmium and nano-pico-plankton) and fed into the ecosystem modeling. Pathways of DMS(P) in blooms are being simulated. An existing plankton ecosystem model already well predicts limitation by four nutrients (N, P, Si, Fe) of two algal groups (diatoms and nanoplankton) including export and CO2 air/sea exchange. This is being expanded with 3 other groups of algae and DMS(P)pathways. Next this extended ecosystem model is being simplified while maintaining reliable output for export and CO2/DMS gas exchange. This unit will then be put into two existing OBCM's. Inputs of Fe from above and below into the oceans have been modeled. Moreover a simple global Fe cycling model has been verified versus field data and insights. Two different OBCM's with same upper ocean ecosystem/DMS unit and Fe cycling will be verified versus pre-industrial and present conditions. Next climate change scenario's, notably changes in Fe inputs, will be run, with special attention to climatic feedbacks (warming) on the oceanic cycles and fluxes.

Debaar, H. J.

2002-12-01

246

Software Platform Evaluation - Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Software Platform Evaluation (SPE) is to document the top-level evaluation of potential software platforms on which to construct a simulation model that satisfies the requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). See the Software Requirements Specification for Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model (INEEL/EXT-05-02643, Rev. 0) for a discussion of the objective and scope of the VISION model. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies. This document will serve as a guide for selecting the most appropriate software platform for VISION. This is a “living document” that will be modified over the course of the execution of this work.

J. J. Jacobson; D. E. Shropshire; W. B. West

2005-11-01

247

RAM simulation model for SPH/RSV systems  

SciTech Connect

The US Army`s Project Manager, Crusader is sponsoring the development of technologies that apply to the Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH), formerly the Advanced Field Artillery System (AFAS), and Resupply Vehicle (RSV), formerly the Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (FARV), weapon system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is currently performing developmental work in support of the SPH/PSV Crusader system. Supportive analyses of reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) aspects were also performed for the SPH/RSV effort. During FY 1994 and FY 1995 OPNL conducted a feasibility study to demonstrate the application of simulation modeling for RAM analysis of the Crusader system. Following completion of the feasibility study, a full-scale RAM simulation model of the Crusader system was developed for both the SPH and PSV. This report provides documentation for the simulation model as well as instructions in the proper execution and utilization of the model for the conduct of RAM analyses.

Schryver, J.C.; Primm, A.H.; Nelson, S.C.

1995-12-31

248

Advanced simulation and analysis of a geopotential research mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer simulations have been performed for an orbital gradiometer mission to assist in the study of high degree and order gravity field recovery. The simulations were conducted for a satellite in near-circular, frozen orbit at a 160-km altitude using a gravitational field complete to degree and order 360. The mission duration is taken to be 32 days. The simulation provides a set of measurements to assist in the evaluation of techniques developed for the determination of the gravity field. Also, the simulation provides an ephemeris to study available tracking systems to satisfy the orbit determination requirements of the mission.

Schutz, B. E.

1988-01-01

249

Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Public Key Infrastructure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Security is an essential part of network communication. The advances in cryptography have provided solutions to many of the network security requirements. Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is the foundation of the cryptography applications. The main objective of this research is to design a model to simulate a reliable, scalable, manageable, and high-performance public key infrastructure. We build a model to simulate the NASA public key infrastructure by using SimProcess and MatLab Software. The simulation is from top level all the way down to the computation needed for encryption, decryption, digital signature, and secure web server. The application of secure web server could be utilized in wireless communications. The results of the simulation are analyzed and confirmed by using queueing theory.

Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Tuey, Richard; Ma, Paul (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

250

Aeroacoustic simulation for phonation modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The phonation process occurs as air expelled from the lungs creates a pressure drop and a subsequent air flow across the larynx. The fluid-structure interaction between the turbulent air flow and oscillating vocal folds, combined with additional resonance in the oral and nasal cavities, creates much of what we hear in the human voice. As many voice-related disorders can be traced to irregular vocal tract shape or motion, it is important to understand in detail the physics involved in the phonation process. To numerically compute the physics of phonation, a solver must be able to accurately model acoustic airflow through a moving domain. The open-source CFD package OpenFOAM is currently being used to evaluate existing solvers against simple acoustic test cases, including an open-ended resonator and an expansion chamber, both of which utilize boundary conditions simulating acoustic sources as well as anechoic termination. Results of these test cases will be presented and compared with theory, and the future development of a three-dimensional vocal tract model and custom-mode acoustic solver will be discussed.

Irwin, Jeffrey; Hanford, Amanda; Craven, Brent; Krane, Michael

2011-11-01

251

Model simulations for Europa's atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Europa's tenuous atmosphere is thought to be produced from sputtering of surface species (predominantly H2O ice ) by heavy ions in the Jovian magnetosphere. Because of its low residence time at Europa's surface temperature, O2, a stable decomposition product of H2O, has been predicted to exist in a significant amount in Europa's atmosphere [Johnson et al. 1982, Eviatar et al. 1985, Johnson 1990]. Recent HST observations have confirmed that and suggested an O2 atmospheric column of 1015 cm-2 on Europa [Hall et al. 1995]. Recent theoretical studies applied to modeling of pure oxygen atmospheres on Europa [Ip et al. 1996, Saur et al. 1998, Shematovich and Johnson 2000] have produced results that are consistent with the above scenerio. In addition to water products, recent observations from Galileo NIMS instruments have suggested the existence of hydrated salt minerals and sulfuric acid on Europa's surface [McCord et al. 1999, Carlson et al. 1999]. Therefore, it is expected that decomposition of these materials by magnetospheric ions can produce volatile species such as H2S, SO2, CO2 and Na in Europa's atmosphere. In fact, Na has been identified in the extended atmosphere of Europa [Brown and Hill, 1996]. In this paper, we will use a kinetic model to study the fate and abundance of these volatile species in addition to simulating the formation of an oxygen atmosphere on Europa.

Wong, M. C.; Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.

2000-10-01

252

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, R.

2013-02-26

253

Harmonic balance optimization of terahertz Schottky diode multipliers using an advanced device model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Substantial proress has been made recently in the advancement of solid state terahertz sources using chains of Schottky diode frequency multipliers. We have developed a harmonic balance simulator and corresponding diode model that incorporates many other factors participating in the diode behavior.

Schlecht, E. T.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Maestrini, A.; Pukala, D.; Gill, J.; Mehdi, I.

2002-01-01

254

Modeling and simulation of plasma processing equipment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently plasma processing technology is utilized in a wide range of applications including advanced Integrated Circuit (IC) fabrication. Traditionally, plasma processing equipments have been empirically designed and optimized at great expense of development time and cost. This research proposes the development of a first principle based, multidimensional plasma process simulator with the aim of enhancing the equipment design procedure. The

Heon Chang Kim

1998-01-01

255

Simulation of personnel control systems with the Insider Safeguards Effectiveness Model (ISEM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear safeguards systems are being designed to prevent theft or sabotage of radioactive material by persons employed in nuclear facilities. As incidents of terrorism have increased, the need for more advanced safeguards systems has been recognized. Dynamic simulation models have been found useful in determining relative safeguards system effectiveness. A simulation model which treats certain aspects of the insider problem

D. D. Boozer; D. Engi

1977-01-01

256

A Computational Methodology for Simulating Thermal Loss Testing of the Advanced Stirling Convertor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two highefficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. In an effort to improve net heat input predictions, numerous tasks have been performed which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs, including the use of multidimensional numerical models. Validation test hardware has also been used to provide a direct comparison of numerical results and validate the multi-dimensional numerical models used to predict convertor net heat input and efficiency. These validation tests were designed to simulate the temperature profile of an operating Stirling convertor and resulted in a measured net heat input of 244.4 W. The methodology was applied to the multi-dimensional numerical model which resulted in a net heat input of 240.3 W. The computational methodology resulted in a value of net heat input that was 1.7 percent less than that measured during laboratory testing. The resulting computational methodology and results are discussed.

Reid, Terry V.; Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.

2012-01-01

257

Recent advances in modeling discontinuities in anisotropic and heterogeneous materials in eddy current NDE  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances are presented to model discontinuities in random anisotropies that arise in certain materials, such as titanium alloys. A numerical model is developed to provide a full anisotropic representation of each crystalline in a gridded region of the material. Several simulated and experimental demonstrations are presented highlighting the effect of grain noise on eddy current measurements. Agreement between VIC-3D(c) model calculations and experimental data in titanium alloy specimens with known flaws is demonstrated.

Aldrin, John C. [Computational Tools, Gurnee, IL 60031 (United States); Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H. [Victor Technologies LLC, Bloomington, IN 47401 (United States)

2011-06-23

258

Modelling and simulation of a heat exchanger  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two models for two different control systems are developed for a parallel heat exchanger. First by spatially lumping a heat exchanger model, a good approximate model which has a high system order is produced. Model reduction techniques are applied to these to obtain low order models that are suitable for dynamic analysis and control design. The simulation method is discussed to ensure a valid simulation result.

Xia, Lei; Deabreu-Garcia, J. Alex; Hartley, Tom T.

1991-01-01

259

Cavity Design and Beam Simulations for the APS RF Gun Advanced Photon Source  

E-print Network

LS-186 Cavity Design and Beam Simulations for the APS RF Gun Advanced Photon Source Michael Borland for the APS RF gun. This note describes the final design, including cavity properties and simulation results expansion for the RF fields in the gun cavity, and stated that the amount of nonlinearity could be gauged

Kemner, Ken

260

Psychometric and Evidentiary Advances, Opportunities, and Challenges for Simulation-Based Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article characterizes the advances, opportunities, and challenges for psychometrics of simulation-based assessments through a lens that views assessment as evidentiary reasoning. Simulation-based tasks offer the prospect for student experiences that differ from traditional assessment. Such tasks may be used to support evidentiary arguments…

Levy, Roy

2013-01-01

261

Resistive companion battery modeling for electric circuit simulations , R. Dougalb  

E-print Network

Resistive companion battery modeling for electric circuit simulations B. Wua , R. Dougalb , R for electric circuit simulations. With a RC numerical solver, simulations of complex electric systems can reserved. Keywords: Battery modeling; Battery simulation; Electric circuit simulation; Resistive companion

262

Monte Carlo Simulations of Model Nonionic Surfactants  

E-print Network

Monte Carlo Simulations of Model Nonionic Surfactants A.P. Chatterjee and A.Z. Panagiotopoulos was studied by histogram reweight- ing grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Two di erent sets of site volume fractions using lattice Monte Carlo simulations performed in the canonical constant NV T ensemble

263

Large blast and thermal simulator advanced concept driver design by computational fluid dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The construction of a large test facility is proposed for simulating the blast and thermal environment resulting from nuclear explosions. This facility would be used to test the survivability and vulnerability of military equipment such as trucks, tanks and helicopters in a simulated thermal and blast environment, and to perform research into nuclear blast phenomenology. The proposed advanced design concepts, heating of driver gas and fast-acting throat valves for wave shaping, are described and the results of CFD studies to advance these new technical concepts for simulating decaying blast waves are reported.

Opalka, Klaus O.

1989-08-01

264

A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

1998-01-01

265

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

2008-01-01

266

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21

267

Advanced adaptive computational methods for Navier-Stokes simulations in rotorcraft aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A phase 2 research and development effort was conducted in area transonic, compressible, inviscid flows with an ultimate goal of numerically modeling complex flows inherent in advanced helicopter blade designs. The algorithms and methodologies therefore are classified as adaptive methods, which are error estimation techniques for approximating the local numerical error, and automatically refine or unrefine the mesh so as to deliver a given level of accuracy. The result is a scheme which attempts to produce the best possible results with the least number of grid points, degrees of freedom, and operations. These types of schemes automatically locate and resolve shocks, shear layers, and other flow details to an accuracy level specified by the user of the code. The phase 1 work involved a feasibility study of h-adaptive methods for steady viscous flows, with emphasis on accurate simulation of vortex initiation, migration, and interaction. Phase 2 effort focused on extending these algorithms and methodologies to a three-dimensional topology.

Stowers, S. T.; Bass, J. M.; Oden, J. T.

1993-01-01

268

Large Eddy Simulations and Turbulence Modeling for Film Cooling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the research is to perform Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) for film cooling process, and to evaluate and improve advanced forms of the two equation turbulence models for turbine blade surface flow analysis. The DNS/LES were used to resolve the large eddies within the flow field near the coolant jet location. The work involved code development and applications of the codes developed to the film cooling problems. Five different codes were developed and utilized to perform this research. This report presented a summary of the development of the codes and their applications to analyze the turbulence properties at locations near coolant injection holes.

Acharya, Sumanta

1999-01-01

269

SSA Modeling and Simulation with DIRSIG  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe and demonstrate a robust, physics-based modeling system to simulate ground and space-based observations of both LEO and GEO objects. With the DIRSIG radiometry engine at its core, our system exploits STK, adaptive optics modeling, and detector effects to produce high fidelity simulated images and radiometry. Key to generating quantitative simulations is our ability to attribute engineering-quality, faceted CAD models with reflective and emissive properties derived from laboratory measurements, including the spatial structure of such difficult materials as MLI. In addition to simulated video imagery, we will demonstrate a computational procedure implementing a position-based dynamics approach to shrink wrap MLI around space components.

Bennett, D.; Allen, D.; Dank, J.; Gartley, M.; Tyler, D.

2014-09-01

270

VHDL simulation with access to transistor models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hardware description languages such as VHDL have evolved to aid in the design of systems with large numbers of elements and a wide range of electronic and logical abstractions. For high performance circuits, behavioral models may not be able to efficiently include enough detail to give designers confidence in a simulation's accuracy. One option is to provide a link between the VHDL environment and a transistor level simulation environment. The coupling of the Vantage Analysis Systems VHDL simulator and the NOVA simulator provides the combination of VHDL modeling and transistor modeling.

Gibson, J.

271

Computational Modeling and Simulation of Infectious Diseases  

E-print Network

Computational Modeling and Simulation of Infectious Diseases May 21­July 27, 2012 Receive a 10-week of Public Health Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS) National Center of Excellence #12;

Sibille, Etienne

272

9/6/2006 Penumadu, Prashant. Geo-Congress 2006 1 Virtual Simulator for AdvancedVirtual Simulator for Advanced  

E-print Network

-on laboratory experience is restricted to systems which are relatively inexpensive and offer no safety problems for Advanced Geotechnical Laboratory TestingGeotechnical Laboratory Testing Dayakar Penumadu: Department support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through grants EEC-0296187 is gratefully acknowledged

Prashant, Amit

273

Monte Carlo Simulation of Interacting Electron Models  

E-print Network

Monte Carlo Simulation of Interacting Electron Models by a New Determinant Approach by Mucheng discusses the calculation of determinants and Monte Carlo simulation of Hub- bard models by a new and a Monte Carlo summation algorithm to evaluate the relevant diagram determinant sums. Index words: Monte

Robinson, Robert W.

274

Scaling strength in human simulation models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Simulating human movement, with multi-body models, enables virtual experiments that are too difficult, costly or dangerous to perform in reality. When simulation models are used for subject specific goals, like planning a rehabilitation intervention, it is important that they are based on subject-specific data. Therefore, accurate strength scaling, accounting for subject specific differences, is required. Unfortunately, current strength scaling

Annegarn J; Rasmussen J; Savelberg HHCM; Verdijk LB; Meijer K

275

Crop Simulation Models and Decision Support Systems  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The first computer simulation models for agricultural systems were developed in the 1970s. These early models simulated potential production for major crops as a function of weather conditions, especially temperature and solar radiation. At a later stage, the water component was added to be able to ...

276

SIMULATION MODELLING OF DEMENTIA PATIENT PATHWAYS  

E-print Network

SIMULATION MODELLING OF DEMENTIA PATIENT PATHWAYS Mohsen Jahangirian, Julie Eatock School of Information Systems, Computing and Mathematics Brunel University, London, UK MalesFemales DEMENTIA `DISEASE-diagnosed patients Disease Progression Disease Onset Community Care DEMENTIA PATHWAY SIMULATION HIGH- LEVEL MODEL

Oakley, Jeremy

277

Submarine landslide flows simulation through centrifuge modelling  

E-print Network

SUBMARINE LANDSLIDE FLOWS SIMULATION THROUGH CENTRIFUGE MODELLING by Chang Shin GUE A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge Churchill College January... “Continuous effort – not strength or intelligence – is the key to unlocking our potential” - Winston Churchill ABSTRACT SUBMARINE LANDSLIDE FLOWS SIMULATION THROUGH CENTRIFUGE MODELLING Chang Shin GUE Landslides occur both onshore...

Gue, Chang Shin

2012-05-08

278

Simulation model of a twin-tail, high performance airplane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mathematical model and associated computer program to simulate a twin-tailed high performance fighter airplane (McDonnell Douglas F/A-18) are described. The simulation program is written in the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language. The simulation math model includes the nonlinear six degree-of-freedom rigid-body equations, an engine model, sensors, and first order actuators with rate and position limiting. A simplified form of the F/A-18 digital control laws (version 8.3.3) are implemented. The simulated control law includes only inner loop augmentation in the up and away flight mode. The aerodynamic forces and moments are calculated from a wind-tunnel-derived database using table look-ups with linear interpolation. The aerodynamic database has an angle-of-attack range of -10 to +90 and a sideslip range of -20 to +20 degrees. The effects of elastic deformation are incorporated in a quasi-static-elastic manner. Elastic degrees of freedom are not actively simulated. In the engine model, the throttle-commanded steady-state thrust level and the dynamic response characteristics of the engine are based on airflow rate as determined from a table look-up. Afterburner dynamics are switched in at a threshold based on the engine airflow and commanded thrust.

Buttrill, Carey S.; Arbuckle, P. Douglas; Hoffler, Keith D.

1992-01-01

279

Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

"NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is pioneering new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit" (NASA 2012). These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach, which is then implemented in a full-scale integrated atmosphere revitalization test. This paper describes the development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations. A companion paper discusses the hardware design and sorbent screening and characterization effort in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program.

Knox, James C.; Kittredge, Kenneth; Xoker, Robert F.; Cummings, Ramona; Gomez, Carlos F.

2012-01-01

280

Statistical simulation of microcrack toughening in advanced ceramics  

Microsoft Academic Search

A statistical distribution of microcracks is simulated as a damage process zone developed around the vicinity of a macro-crack in a brittle ceramic. Uniform distributions of microcrack location and orientation are assumed in a Monte Carlo process to represent isotropic damage. An alternating iteration numerical technique is employed to evaluate the main-crack and the damage zone microcracks interactions, and the

C. K. Chen

2005-01-01

281

Target modelling for SAR image simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper examines target models that might be used in simulations of Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery. We examine the basis for scattering phenomena in SAR, and briefly review the Swerling target model set, before considering extensions to this set discussed in the literature. Methods for simulating and extracting parameters for the extended Swerling models are presented. It is shown that in many cases the more elaborate extended Swerling models can be represented, to a high degree of fidelity, by simpler members of the model set. Further, it is shown that it is quite unlikely that these extended models would be selected when fitting models to typical data samples.

Willis, Chris J.

2014-10-01

282

Predicting Career Advancement with Structural Equation Modelling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the authors' prior findings concerning basic employability skills in order to determine which skills best predict career advancement potential. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing survey responses of human resource managers, the employability skills showing the largest relationships to career…

Heimler, Ronald; Rosenberg, Stuart; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

2012-01-01

283

Modeling and simulation of friction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new models for 'slip-stick' friction are presented. One, called the 'bristle model,' is an approximation designed to capture the physical phenomenon of sticking. This model is relatively inefficient numerically. The other model, called the 'reset integrator model,' does not capture the details for the sticking phenomenon, but is numerically efficient and exhibits behavior similar to the model proposed by

David A. Haessig; Bernard Friedland

1991-01-01

284

Advanced multi-phase flow CFD model development for solid rocket motor flowfield analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle\\/gas reaction and mass transfer,

Paul Liaw; Y. S. Chen; H. M. Shang; Denise Doran

1993-01-01

285

Advanced Maintenance Simulation by Means of Hand-Based Haptic Interfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerospace industry has been involved in virtual simulation for design and testing since the birth of virtual reality. Today this industry is showing a growing interest in the development of haptic-based maintenance training applications, which represent the most advanced way to simulate maintenance and repair tasks within a virtual environment by means of a visual-haptic approach. The goal is to allow the trainee to experiment the service procedures not only as a workflow reproduced at a visual level but also in terms of the kinaesthetic feedback involved with the manipulation of tools and components. This study, conducted in collaboration with aerospace industry specialists, is aimed to the development of an immersive virtual capable of immerging the trainees into a virtual environment where mechanics and technicians can perform maintenance simulation or training tasks by directly manipulating 3D virtual models of aircraft parts while perceiving force feedback through the haptic interface. The proposed system is based on ViRstperson, a virtual reality engine under development at the Italian Center for Aerospace Research (CIRA) to support engineering and technical activities such as design-time maintenance procedure validation, and maintenance training. This engine has been extended to support haptic-based interaction, enabling a more complete level of interaction, also in terms of impedance control, and thus fostering the development of haptic knowledge in the user. The user’s “sense of touch” within the immersive virtual environment is simulated through an Immersion CyberForce® hand-based force-feedback device. Preliminary testing of the proposed system seems encouraging.

Nappi, Michele; Paolino, Luca; Ricciardi, Stefano; Sebillo, Monica; Vitiello, Giuliana

286

The Simulation of a Jumbo Jet Transport Aircraft. Volume 2: Modeling Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The manned simulation of a large transport aircraft is described. Aircraft and systems data necessary to implement the mathematical model described in Volume I and a discussion of how these data are used in model are presented. The results of the real-time computations in the NASA Ames Research Center Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft are shown and compared to flight test data and to the results obtained in a training simulator known to be satisfactory.

Hanke, C. R.; Nordwall, D. R.

1970-01-01

287

Simulating data processing for an Advanced Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

We have designed and implemented a Cray XD-1-based sim- ulation of data capture and signal processing for an ad- vanced Ion Mobility mass spectrometer (Hadamard trans- form Ion Mobility). Our simulation is a hybrid application that uses both an FPGA component and a CPU-based soft- ware component to simulate Ion Mobility mass spectrome- try data processing. The FPGA component includes data capture and accumulation, as well as a more sophisticated deconvolution algorithm based on a PNNL-developed en- hancement to standard Hadamard transform Ion Mobility spectrometry. The software portion is in charge of stream- ing data to the FPGA and collecting results. We expect the computational and memory addressing logic of the FPGA component to be portable to an instrument-attached FPGA board that can be interfaced with a Hadamard transform Ion Mobility mass spectrometer.

Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Clowers, Brian H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Belov, Mikhail E.

2007-11-03

288

Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation describes the capabilities of three-dimensional thermal power model of advanced stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG). The performance of the ASRG is presented for different scenario, such as Venus flyby with or without the auxiliary cooling system.

Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

2014-01-01

289

DETECTION, PROPAGATION MODELING AND DESIGNING OF ADVANCED INTERNET WORMS  

E-print Network

DETECTION, PROPAGATION MODELING AND DESIGNING OF ADVANCED INTERNET WORMS By PARBATI KUMAR MANNA.1 The Computer Worm: A Brief History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.2 Propagation Methods of a Worm-Level Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.3 Recent Trends Among Worms

Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

290

Advancing the Layered Approach to Agent-Based Crowd Simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We adapt a scalable layered intelligence technique from the game industry, for agent-based crowd simulation. We extend this approach for planned movements, pursuance of assignable goals, and avoidance of dynamically introduced obstacles\\/threats, while keeping the system scalable with the number of agents. We exploit parallel processing for expediting the pre-processing step that generates the path-plans offline. We demonstrate the various

Bikramjit Banerjee; Ahmed Abukmail; Landon Kraemer

2008-01-01

291

ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS  

SciTech Connect

A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite {beta}, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius ({rho}{sub *}) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or a globally with physical profile variation. Rohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, plasma pinches and impurity flow, and simulations at fixed flow rather than fixed gradient are illustrated and discussed.

WALTZ RE; CANDY J; HINTON FL; ESTRADA-MILA C; KINSEY JE

2004-10-01

292

Advancing Software Architecture Modeling for Large Scale Heterogeneous Systems  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we describe how incorporating technology-specific modeling at the architecture level can help reduce risks and produce better designs for large, heterogeneous software applications. We draw an analogy with established modeling approaches in scientific domains, using groundwater modeling as an example, to help illustrate gaps in current software architecture modeling approaches. We then describe the advances in modeling, analysis and tooling that are required to bring sophisticated modeling and development methods within reach of software architects.

Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

2010-11-07

293

Thermochemical modeling of actinide alloys related to advanced fuel cycles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Innovative approaches for improved management of transuranium elements are being sought. The use of either metallic or nitride fuels, coupled with pyrochemical reprocessing techniques, are being studied. As our experience with these advanced fuels is limited, their development will be promoted by thermochemical analysis. This paper reviews our thermochemical modeling of technical problems related to advanced fuel cycles and presents models of the actinide alloys and nitrides together with experimental verification of these thermochemical predictions.

Ogawa, T.; Akabori, M.; Kobayashi, F.; Haire, R. G.

1997-08-01

294

Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation  

SciTech Connect

The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

Niels Gronbech Jensen; Mark Asta; Nigel Browning'Vidvuds Ozolins; Axel van de Walle; Christopher Wolverton

2011-12-29

295

Advanced flight deck/crew station simulator functional requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents a study of flight deck/crew system research facility requirements for investigating issues involved with developing systems, and procedures for interfacing transport aircraft with air traffic control systems planned for 1985 to 2000. Crew system needs of NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and industry were investigated and reported. A matrix of these is included, as are recommended functional requirements and design criteria for simulation facilities in which to conduct this research. Methods of exploiting the commonality and similarity in facilities are identified, and plans for exploiting this in order to reduce implementation costs and allow efficient transfer of experiments from one facility to another are presented.

Wall, R. L.; Tate, J. L.; Moss, M. J.

1980-01-01

296

MixSIAR: advanced stable isotope mixing models in R  

EPA Science Inventory

Background/Question/Methods The development of stable isotope mixing models has coincided with modeling products (e.g. IsoSource, MixSIR, SIAR), where methodological advances are published in parity with software packages. However, while mixing model theory has recently been ext...

297

New Advances in Logic-Based Probabilistic Modeling by PRISM  

E-print Network

New Advances in Logic-Based Probabilistic Modeling by PRISM Taisuke Sato and Yoshitaka Kameya Tokyo a logic-based modeling language PRISM and re- port recent developments including belief propagation by the generalized inside-outside algorithm and generative modeling with constraints. The former implies PRISM

Sato, Taisuke

298

High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

2014-04-29

299

ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS  

SciTech Connect

A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite {beta}, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius ({rho}{sub *}) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated.

WALTZ,R.E; CANDY,J; HINTON,F.L; ESTRADA-MILA,C; KINSEY,J.E

2004-10-01

300

Recent advances in the simulation of particle-laden flows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A substantial number of algorithms exists for the simulation of moving particles suspended in fluids. However, finding the best method to address a particular physical problem is often highly non-trivial and depends on the properties of the particles and the involved fluid(s) together. In this report, we provide a short overview on a number of existing simulation methods and provide two state of the art examples in more detail. In both cases, the particles are described using a Discrete Element Method (DEM). The DEM solver is usually coupled to a fluid-solver, which can be classified as grid-based or mesh-free (one example for each is given). Fluid solvers feature different resolutions relative to the particle size and separation. First, a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (mesh-based and with rather fine resolution) is presented to study the behavior of particle stabilized fluid interfaces and second, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics implementation (mesh-free, meso-scale resolution, similar to the particle size) is introduced to highlight a new player in the field, which is expected to be particularly suited for flows including free surfaces.

Harting, J.; Frijters, S.; Ramaioli, M.; Robinson, M.; Wolf, D. E.; Luding, S.

2014-10-01

301

Advanced terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed weapon identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) have developed a terahertz-band imaging system performance model for detection and identification of concealed weaponry. The details of this MATLAB-based model which accounts for the effects of all critical sensor and display components, and for the effects of atmospheric attenuation, concealment material attenuation, and active illumination, were reported on at the 2005 SPIE Europe Security and Defence Symposium. The focus of this paper is to report on recent advances to the base model which have been designed to more realistically account for the dramatic impact that target and background orientation can have on target observability as related to specular and Lambertian reflections captured by an active-illumination-based imaging system. The advanced terahertz-band imaging system performance model now also accounts for target and background thermal emission, and has been recast into a user-friendly, Windows-executable tool. This advanced THz model has been developed in support of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's (DARPA) Terahertz Imaging Focal-Plane Technology (TIFT) program. This paper will describe the advanced THz model and its new radiometric sub-model in detail, and provide modeling and experimental results on target observability as a function of target and background orientation.

Murrill, Steven R.; Redman, Brian; Espinola, Richard L.; Franck, Charmaine C.; Petkie, Douglas T.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Griffin, Steven T.; Halford, Carl E.; Reynolds, Joe

2007-04-01

302

Coupling an Advanced Land Surface Hydrology Model with the Penn State NCAR MM5 Modeling System. Part II: Preliminary Model Validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of short-term numerical experiments conducted by the Penn State-NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5) coupled with an advanced land surface model, alongside the simulations coupled with a simple slab model, are verified with observations. For clear sky day cases, the MM5 model gives reasonable estimates of radiation forcing at the surface with solar radiation being slightly overestimated probably due

Fei Chen; Jimy Dudhia

2001-01-01

303

Dynamic modeling and optimizations of mechanical prosthetic arm by simulation technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulation of a mechanical system incorporating the biological control has drawn the fascination of researchers' interest in the research field of advanced prosthetic control and artificial intelligence. This paper generates the idea of modeling of a mechanical prosthetic arm via some heuristic applications of simulation techniques. The introductory part of the paper shows the clinical study of an upper limb

Biswarup Neogi; Soumya Ghosal; Sinchan Ghosh; Tridib Kumar Bose; Achintya Das

2012-01-01

304

Recent Improvements to an Advanced Atmospheric Transport Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Technologies Group (ATG) has developed an advanced atmospheric modeling capability using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and a stochastic Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) for operational use at the Savannah River Site (SRS). For local simulations concerning releases from the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA), RAMS is run in a nested grid configuration with horizontal grid spacing of 8 and 2 km for each grid, with 6-hr forecasts updated every 3 hours. An interface to allow for easy user access to LPDM had been generated, complete with post-processing results depicting surface concentration, deposition, and a variety of dose quantities. A prior weakness in this approach was that observations from the SRS tower network were only incorporated into the three-dimensional modeling effort during the initialization process. Thus, if the forecasted wind fields were in error, the resulting plume predictions would also be erroneous. To overcome this shortcoming, the procedure for generating RAMS wind fields and reading them into LPDM has been modified such that SRS wind measurements are blended with the predicted three-dimensional wind fields from RAMS using the Barnes technique. In particular, the horizontal components in RAMS are replaced with the observed values at a series of 8 towers that exist within the SRS boundary (covering {approx}300 km{sup 2}). Even though LPDM is currently configured to account only for radioactive releases, it was used in a recent chlorine gas release to generate plume concentrations based on unit releases from the site of a train accident in Graniteville, South Carolina. This information was useful to local responders as an indication of potential protective actions downwind of the release.

Buckley, R. L.; Hunter, C. H.

2005-10-24

305

Advances in petascale kinetic plasma simulation with VPIC and Roadrunner  

SciTech Connect

VPIC, a first-principles 3d electromagnetic charge-conserving relativistic kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, was recently adapted to run on Los Alamos's Roadrunner, the first supercomputer to break a petaflop (10{sup 15} floating point operations per second) in the TOP500 supercomputer performance rankings. They give a brief overview of the modeling capabilities and optimization techniques used in VPIC and the computational characteristics of petascale supercomputers like Roadrunner. They then discuss three applications enabled by VPIC's unprecedented performance on Roadrunner: modeling laser plasma interaction in upcoming inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), modeling short pulse laser GeV ion acceleration and modeling reconnection in magnetic confinement fusion experiments.

Bowers, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roytershteyn, Vadim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwan, Thomas J T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

306

Simulation and ground testing with the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS), an active sensor system that provides near-range 6-degree-of-freedom sensor data, has been developed as part of an automatic rendezvous and docking system for the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART). The sensor determines the relative positions and attitudes between the active sensor and the passive target at ranges up to 300 meters. The AVGS uses laser diodes to illuminate retro-reflectors in the target, a solid-state imager to detect the light returned from the target, and image capture electronics and a digital signal processor to convert the video information into the relative positions and attitudes. The development of the sensor, through initial prototypes, final prototypes, and three flight units, has required a great deal of testing at every phase, and the different types of testing, their effectiveness, and their results, are presented in this paper, focusing on the testing of the flight units. Testing has improved the sensor's performance.

Howard, Richard T.; Johnston, Albert S.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Book, Michael L.

2005-01-01

307

Modeling Physics with Easy Java Simulations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The paper Modeling Physics with Easy Java Simulations describes the use of the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling and authoring tool and shows how this tool can be used to teach mechanics concepts using computer modeling. Although the modeling method can be used without computers, the use of computers allows students to study problems that are difficult and time consuming, to visualize their results, and to communicate their results with others. The combination of computer modeling with theory and experiment can achieve insight and understanding that cannot be achieved with only one approach. Journal article available from http://scitation.aip.org/tpt/

Christian, Wolfgang; Franciscouembre

2008-05-30

308

Fusion Simulation Project (Whole Tokamak Plasma Modeling)  

E-print Network

;PSACI June 7-8, 2007 PPPL FSP Objective and Motivation · Primary objective of Fusion Simulation is expected to cost about a million dollars · Whole device computer simulations needed to optimize discharge Integration Initiatives · Coupling pairs of components before moving to whole device modeling · OFES formed

309

Modeling and Simulating Electronic Textile Applications  

E-print Network

1 Modeling and Simulating Electronic Textile Applications Thomas Martin, Mark Jones, Joshua Edmison@vt.edu Abstract-- This paper describes our experiences with a simulation environment for electronic textiles to the design of electronic textiles, including the physical environment they will be used in, the behavior

310

Advances on Time-dependent DFT Simulations of Electronic Stopping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation damage of reactor materials is a topic of interest and continuous research in the nuclear industry. A single nuclear decay event (e.g. alpha ) produces a cascade of collisions involving the displacement of thousands of atoms in a crystalline material. While atomistic-scale simulations would be the ideal tool to understand these processes, the fact that they currently work on the assumption that electrons respond adiabatically to the atomic motion does not provide valid answers, for example to the stopping power problem. An alternative approach to attacking this problem is a method which explicitly takes into account electron non-adiabatic dynamics. We will present results obtained by time-depending DFT on the electronic stopping power of channeling protons in prototypical metals and insulators obtained by recent implementations of non-adiabatic electron dynamics methods.

Correa, Alfredo; Schleife, Andre; Kanai, Yosuke; Kohanoff, Jorge; Caro, Alfredo J.

2012-02-01

311

A flight simulator for advanced aircraft - Servo design to realization.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discussion of computer-aided design results obtained for a moving-base, three-man flight simulator. From a control viewpoint, the structure is discussed in terms of disturbance torques, damping ratios, natural frequencies, load acceleration, and smoothness. The use of inertia to achieve well-behaved structural transfer functions and smooth or high fidelity load accelerations is demonstrated. Transfer functions in the complex frequency domain, as well as time-dependent solutions to the system, are derived. The relative merits of using position and/or velocity as primary feedback, for a limited travel acceleration device, are discussed. Root locus plots, which were utilized in the control-system design, Bode plots, and time-dependent plots are drawn. In addition, the theoretical ratio of velocity to commanded input Bode plot is compared to the experimental results, and the dramatic effect on the load smoothness plot caused by selecting velocity over position as primary feedback is shown.

King, R. F.

1973-01-01

312

SIMULATION MODELING OF GASTROINTESTINAL ABSORPTION  

EPA Science Inventory

Mathematical dosimetry models incorporate mechanistic determinants of chemical disposition in a living organism to describe relationships between exposure concentration and the internal dose needed for PBPK models and human health risk assessment. Because they rely on determini...

313

Digital elevation models in numerical rockfall simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current state of the art in rigid body rockfall modelling permits full three-dimensional simulation of real rock shapes and their interactions with the terrain. The terrain is represented by digital elevation models DEM, providing the geometric terrain information on which the spatial model parameters are assigned. This is fundamental to numerical simulations of mass movements. DEM's can be obtained from a number of sources and offer spatial resolutions ranging from centimetres up to 90m. The spatial resolution representing the terrain morphology can have a strong bearing on modelling results. In particular if finer scale morphologies (centimetres to meters) such as the terrain roughness of a scree slope or boulder field are included in the DEM. The issue occurs if the meso- to micro- scale roughness is included that would normally be loose surface material, because in the modelling domain the terrain surface is a rigid body. It is at these scales a crossover between representing terrain properties as either model parameters or terrain geometry occurs. Little is known about the optimal resolution to represent terrain in rockfall simulations. In this contribution we present the results of numerical simulations with different DEM resolutions. We sampled the terrain morphology of a highly rockfall active area in Matter valley in Switzerland using LiDAR with a maximum resolution of 50cm. The DEM was resampled at resolutions of 1m, 5m and 20m and rockfall simulations were performed where the model ground impact parameters were held constant. To induce the naturally stochastic initial conditions of rock fall release we vary the rock shapes and release orientation, while the potential energy was held constant. We compare the different simulation results and discuss the influence of the DEM resolution on fully three dimensional rockfall simulations. We find the DEM resolution has a strong influence on the simulation results demonstrating that the selection of the DEM is a crucial step in numerical simulation of rockfalls.

Bühler, Yves; Glover, James; Christen, Marc; Bartelt, Perry

2014-05-01

314

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. (authors)

Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marble, Justin [Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)] [Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)

2013-07-01

315

Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: comparing simulations to experiments.  

PubMed

Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results, which have shown that water droplets on such surfaces adopt an elongated shape due to anisotropic preferential spreading. Details of the contact line motion such as advancing of the contact line in the direction perpendicular to the stripes exhibit pronounced similarities in experiments and simulations. The opposite of spreading, i.e., evaporation of water droplets, leads to a characteristic receding motion first in the direction parallel to the stripes, while the contact line remains pinned perpendicular to the stripes. Only when the aspect ratio is close to unity, the contact line also starts to recede in the perpendicular direction. Very similar behavior was observed in the LBM simulations. Finally, droplet movement can be induced by a gradient in surface wettability. LBM simulations show good semiquantitative agreement with experimental results of decanol droplets on a well-defined striped gradient, which move from high- to low-contact angle surfaces. Similarities and differences for all systems are described and discussed in terms of the predictive capabilities of LBM simulations to model direction wetting. PMID:23944550

Jansen, H Patrick; Sotthewes, Kai; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Kooij, E Stefan

2013-07-01

316

Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: Comparing simulations to experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results, which have shown that water droplets on such surfaces adopt an elongated shape due to anisotropic preferential spreading. Details of the contact line motion such as advancing of the contact line in the direction perpendicular to the stripes exhibit pronounced similarities in experiments and simulations. The opposite of spreading, i.e., evaporation of water droplets, leads to a characteristic receding motion first in the direction parallel to the stripes, while the contact line remains pinned perpendicular to the stripes. Only when the aspect ratio is close to unity, the contact line also starts to recede in the perpendicular direction. Very similar behavior was observed in the LBM simulations. Finally, droplet movement can be induced by a gradient in surface wettability. LBM simulations show good semiquantitative agreement with experimental results of decanol droplets on a well-defined striped gradient, which move from high- to low-contact angle surfaces. Similarities and differences for all systems are described and discussed in terms of the predictive capabilities of LBM simulations to model direction wetting.

Jansen, H. Patrick; Sotthewes, Kai; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Kooij, E. Stefan

2013-07-01

317

Advanced battery modeling using neural networks  

E-print Network

battery models are available today that can accurately predict the performance of the battery system. This thesis presents a modeling technique for batteries employing neural networks. The advantage of using neural networks is that the effect of any...

Arikara, Muralidharan Pushpakam

1993-01-01

318

Computer simulations and physical modelling of erosion  

E-print Network

Computer simulations and physical modelling of erosion C.S. Stuetzle, J. Gross, Z. Chen, B. Cutler in 2 disciplines. 2 / 10 #12;Problem and goals Validation of Erosion Models for Levee Overtopping Levee terrain, a.k.a. soil, · better modeling of local erosion in terrain and earthen structures such as levees

Franklin, W. Randolph

319

Numerical simulations of Hurricane Bertha using a mesoscale atmospheric model  

SciTech Connect

The Regional Atmospheric Model System (RAMS) has been used to simulate Hurricane Bertha as it moved toward and onto shore during the period July 10--12, 1996. Using large-scale atmospheric data from 00 UTC, 11 July (Wednesday evening) to initialize the model, a 36-hour simulation was created for a domain centered over the Atlantic Ocean east of the Florida coast near Jacksonville. The simulated onshore impact time of the hurricane was much earlier than observed (due to the use of results from the large-scale model, which predicted early arrival). However, the movement of the hurricane center (eye) as it approached the North Carolina/South Carolina coast as simulated in RAMS was quite good. Observations revealed a northerly storm track off the South Carolina coast as it moved toward land. As it approached landfall, Hurricane Bertha turned to the north-northeast, roughly paralleling the North Carolina coast before moving inland near Wilmington. Large-scale model forecasts were unable to detect this change in advance and predicted landfall near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; RAMS, however, correctly predicted the parallel coastal movement. For future hurricane activity in the southeast, RAMS is being configured to run in an operational model using input from the large-scale pressure data in hopes of providing more information on predicted hurricane movement and landfall location.

Buckley, R.L.

1996-08-01

320

Theory, modeling, and simulation annual report, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly discusses research on the following topics: development of electronic structure methods; modeling molecular processes in clusters; modeling molecular processes in solution; modeling molecular processes in separations chemistry; modeling interfacial molecular processes; modeling molecular processes in the atmosphere; methods for periodic calculations on solids; chemistry and physics of minerals; graphical user interfaces for computational chemistry codes; visualization and analysis of molecular simulations; integrated computational chemistry environment; and benchmark computations.

Not Available

1993-05-01

321

Aggregate calibration of microscopic traffic simulation models  

E-print Network

The problem of calibration of microscopic simulation models with aggregate data has received significant attention in recent years. But day-to-day variability in inputs such as travel demand has not been considered. In ...

Mahanti, Bhanu Prasad, 1981-

2004-01-01

322

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application  

E-print Network

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application Center for Transportation Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) TAMS application is a web-based tool that supports

323

A Simulation To Model Exponential Growth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a simulation using dice-tossing students in a population cluster to model the growth of cancer cells. This growth is recorded in a scatterplot and compared to an exponential function graph. (KHR)

Appelbaum, Elizabeth Berman

2000-01-01

324

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF SIMULATED PHOTOCHEMICAL SMOG  

EPA Science Inventory

This report deals with the continuing effort to develop a chemical kinetic mechanism to describe the formation of photochemical smog. Using the technique of computer modeling to simulate smog chamber data, several explicit kinetic mechanisms for specific hydrocarbons were analyze...

325

Mathematical Model Development and Simulation Support  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the work performed in support of the Contact Dynamics 6DOF Facility and the Flight Robotics Lab at NASA/ MSFC in the areas of Mathematical Model Development and Simulation Support.

Francis, Ronald C.; Tobbe, Patrick A.

2000-01-01

326

The role of experience and advanced training on performance in a motorcycle simulator.  

PubMed

Motorcyclists are over-represented in collision statistics. While many collisions may be the direct fault of another road user, a considerable number of fatalities and injuries are due to the actions of the rider. While increased riding experience may improve skills, advanced training courses may be required to evoke the safest riding behaviours. The current research assessed the impact of experience and advanced training on rider behaviour using a motorcycle simulator. Novice riders, experienced riders and riders with advanced training traversed a virtual world through varying speed limits and roadways of different curvature. Speed and lane position were monitored. In a comparison of 60mph and 40mph zones, advanced riders rode more slowly in the 40mph zones, and had greater variation in lane position than the other two groups. In the 60mph zones, both advanced and experienced riders had greater lane variation than novices. Across the whole ride, novices tended to position themselves closer to the kerb. In a second analysis across four classifications of curvature (straight, slight, medium, tight) advanced and experienced riders varied their lateral position more so than novices, though advanced riders had greater variation in lane position than even experienced riders in some conditions. The results suggest that experience and advanced training lead to changes in behaviour compared to novice riders which can be interpreted as having a potentially positive impact on road safety. PMID:25180786

Crundall, David; Stedmon, Alex W; Crundall, Elizabeth; Saikayasit, Rossukorn

2014-12-01

327

Modeling & Simulation Data Analysis and Modeling & Simulation for the  

E-print Network

, and designing pulsed detonation propulsion systems. · Worked with Proctor and Gamble on computer codes used - conditions. KIVA applications include performing low and combustion modeling in spark-ignition diesel engines

328

Model abstraction and the simulation sandbox  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Hierarchy of Models, often referred to as the Great Pyramid, depicts the four disparate levels of resolution in which models are typically categorized. These levels range from an Engineering\\/Component level at the bottom, to Theater\\/Campaign level at the apex of the pyramid. Today, the landscape of simulations has evolved from uni-purpose, stove-piped simulations to those that provide

Dawn A. Trevisani; Alex F. Sisti; Michael J. Mayhew

2002-01-01

329

Verification validation and accreditation of simulation models  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents guidelines for conducting verifica- tion, validation and accreditation (VV&A) of simulation models. Fifteen guiding principles are introduced to help the researchers, practitioners and managers better com- prehend what VV&A is all about. The VV&A activities are described in the modeling and simulation life cycle. A taxonomy of more than 77 V&V techniques is provided to assist simulationists

Osman Balci

1997-01-01

330

Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

2011-01-01

331

Minimum-complexity helicopter simulation math model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An example of a minimal complexity simulation helicopter math model is presented. Motivating factors are the computational delays, cost, and inflexibility of the very sophisticated math models now in common use. A helicopter model form is given which addresses each of these factors and provides better engineering understanding of the specific handling qualities features which are apparent to the simulator pilot. The technical approach begins with specification of features which are to be modeled, followed by a build up of individual vehicle components and definition of equations. Model matching and estimation procedures are given which enable the modeling of specific helicopters from basic data sources such as flight manuals. Checkout procedures are given which provide for total model validation. A number of possible model extensions and refinement are discussed. Math model computer programs are defined and listed.

Heffley, Robert K.; Mnich, Marc A.

1988-01-01

332

Development and Validation of Linear Alternator Models for the Advanced Stirling Convertor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two models of the linear alternator of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) have been developed using the Sage 1-D modeling software package. The first model relates the piston motion to electric current by means of a motor constant. The second uses electromagnetic model components to model the magnetic circuit of the alternator. The models are tuned and validated using test data and compared against each other. Results show both models can be tuned to achieve results within 7% of ASC test data under normal operating conditions. Using Sage enables the creation of a complete ASC model to be developed and simulations completed quickly compared to more complex multi-dimensional models. These models allow for better insight into overall Stirling convertor performance, aid with Stirling power system modeling, and in the future support NASA mission planning for Stirling-based power systems.

Metscher, Jonathan F.; Lewandowski, Edward

2014-01-01

333

Methodological advances: using greenhouses to simulate climate change scenarios.  

PubMed

Human activities are increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. Related to this global warming, periods of low water availability are also expected to increase. Thus, CO2 concentration, temperature and water availability are three of the main factors related to climate change that potentially may influence crops and ecosystems. In this report, we describe the use of growth chamber - greenhouses (GCG) and temperature gradient greenhouses (TGG) to simulate climate change scenarios and to investigate possible plant responses. In the GCG, CO2 concentration, temperature and water availability are set to act simultaneously, enabling comparison of a current situation with a future one. Other characteristics of the GCG are a relative large space of work, fine control of the relative humidity, plant fertirrigation and the possibility of light supplementation, within the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) region and/or with ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light. In the TGG, the three above-mentioned factors can act independently or in interaction, enabling more mechanistic studies aimed to elucidate the limiting factor(s) responsible for a given plant response. Examples of experiments, including some aimed to study photosynthetic acclimation, a phenomenon that leads to decreased photosynthetic capacity under long-term exposures to elevated CO2, using GCG and TGG are reported. PMID:25113448

Morales, F; Pascual, I; Sánchez-Díaz, M; Aguirreolea, J; Irigoyen, J J; Goicoechea, N; Antolín, M C; Oyarzun, M; Urdiain, A

2014-09-01

334

Simulation of synthetic aperture radar 2: Simulating SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) using the advanced visual technology system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Advanced Visual Technology System (AVTS) computer image generator was modified to produce highly accurate simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) reflectively and elevation effects that can be precisely correlated with corresponding visual and infrared imagery. The resulting SAR snapshot is a plan view of the selected patch area with the field-of-view corresponding to a selected scale of 0.65, 1.3,

Robert L. Ferguson; John Ellis; Steven R. French; Jeanne Ball; Lisa Spencer; Herbert H. Bell; Peter M. Crane

1989-01-01

335

Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas , S Klasky2  

E-print Network

of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E X B drift of trappedAdvanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas Z Lin1 , Y Xiao1 , I Holod1 , W

Lin, Zhihong

336

WinSRFR: Current Advances in Software for Surface Irrigation Simulation and Analysis  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Significant advances have been made over the last decade in the development of software for surface irrigation analysis. WinSRFR is an integrated tool that combines unsteady flow simulation with tools for system evaluation/parameter estimation, system design, and for operational optimization. Ongoi...

337

Battery Performance of ADEOS (Advanced Earth Observing Satellite) and Ground Simulation Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) is developed with the aim of establishment of platform technology for future spacecraft and inter-orbit communication technology for the transmission of earth observation data. ADEOS uses 5 batteries, consists of two packs. This paper describes, using graphs and tables, the ground simulation tests and results that are carried to determine the performance of the ADEOS batteries.

Koga, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Kuwajima, S.; Kusawake, H.

1997-01-01

338

Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy  

PubMed Central

Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies.

Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

2014-01-01

339

Modelling and simulation of a distributed battery management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the modelling and simulation of a distributed battery management system with a continuous and discrete-event simulation environment. The simulation model focuses on replicating the generic components within the system into model blocks to provide a structured approach in simulating battery networks. The simulation model also deals with three key network levels, which are the process level, the

Darren LIM; A. Anbuky

2004-01-01

340

Chapter 4 Modeling and Simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative Modeling has been the basis of most of the initial research in operations, labeled as Operational Research in Europe, and was the basis of initial management consulting and Operations Research in the USA. Initially, quantitative modeling in Operational Research was oriented very much towards solving real-life problems in operations management rather than towards developing scientific knowledge. Later however, especially

Duane S. Boning; Okumu Ouma

1999-01-01

341

Trimming an aircraft model for flight simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Real-time piloted aircraft simulations with digital computers have been performed at Ames Research Center (ARC) for over two decades. For the simulation of conventional aircraft models, the establishment of initial vehicle and control orientations at various operational flight regimes has been adequately handled by either analog techniques or simple inversion processes. However, exotic helicopter configurations have been introduced recently that require more sophisticated techniques because of their expanded degrees of freedom and environmental vibration levels. At ARC, these techniques are used for the backward solutions to real-time simulation models as required for the generation of trim points. These techniques are presented in this paper with examples from a blade-element helicopter simulation model.

Mcfarland, Richard E.

1987-01-01

342

An advanced overlapping production planning model in manufacturing supply chain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a new approach called advanced overlapping production planning (AOPP) model which considers multi-site process selection, sequential constraints, and capacity constraints in a manufacturing supply chain environment (MSCE). AOPP model may determine the capacity plan and order margin allocation for each site and machines in an MSCE and provide the capacity

Li-Chih Wang; Hung-Lin Shih

2011-01-01

343

Chemical Potentials by Monte Carlo Simulations Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Chemical Potentials by Monte Carlo Simulations Model performs canonical (NVT) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) Monte Carlo simulations focusing the calculation of chemical potentials, for the fluid phases of the Lennard-Jones system, by using the virtual particle insertion method of Widom. Although it can not determine phase-equilibrium directly, the gas-liquid line can be approached as illustrated in the included case study. The model paves the way to uVT and Gibbs Ensemble simulations, and shows the limitation of Widom's method at high fluid densities. The Chemical Potentials by Monte Carlo Simulations Model was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the jar file will run the program if Java is installed. You can modify this simulation if you have EJS installed by right-clicking within the map and selecting "Open Ejs Model" from the pop-up menu item.

Fernandes, Fernando S.

2013-10-30

344

Off-gas adsorption model and simulation - OSPREY  

SciTech Connect

A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and Recovery (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed. (author)

Rutledge, V.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2013-07-01

345

Advances and applications of occupancy models  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Summary: The past decade has seen an explosion in the development and application of models aimed at estimating species occurrence and occupancy dynamics while accounting for possible non-detection or species misidentification. We discuss some recent occupancy estimation methods and the biological systems that motivated their development. Collectively, these models offer tremendous flexibility, but simultaneously place added demands on the investigator. Unlike many mark–recapture scenarios, investigators utilizing occupancy models have the ability, and responsibility, to define their sample units (i.e. sites), replicate sampling occasions, time period over which species occurrence is assumed to be static and even the criteria that constitute ‘detection’ of a target species. Subsequent biological inference and interpretation of model parameters depend on these definitions and the ability to meet model assumptions. We demonstrate the relevance of these definitions by highlighting applications from a single biological system (an amphibian–pathogen system) and discuss situations where the use of occupancy models has been criticized. Finally, we use these applications to suggest future research and model development.

Bailey, Larissa; MacKenzie, Darry I.; Nichols, James D.

2013-01-01

346

Advances in Water Resources 15 (1992) 275-287 A three-dimensional numerical model for water  

E-print Network

Advances in Water Resources 15 (1992) 275-287 A three-dimensional numerical model for water flow Srivastava & T.-C. Jim Yeh Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721. USA A three-dimensional numerical model is developed for the simulation of water flow

347

710 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 40, NO. 3, MAY/JUNE 2004 Advanced SPICE Modeling of Large Power  

E-print Network

710 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 40, NO. 3, MAY/JUNE 2004 Advanced SPICE-state and transient measurements done on an 800-A 1.7-kV Dynex IGBT module at 25 C and 125 C. The Spice model has also shown excellent agreement with mixed mode MEDICI simulations. The Spice model also takes into account

Ng, Wai Tung

348

Advances in numerical simulation of turbulent flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME and JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference, 1st, Portland, OR, June 23-27, 1991  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present conference discusses the modeling of swirling flows with advanced turbulence closures, algebraic expressions for Reynolds stresses, numerical simulation of 3D developing turbulent flows in a square duct with the anisotropic k-epsilon model, the prediction of normal Reynolds stresses with the nonlinear k-epsilon model, combustor flowfield turbulence modeling with the nonlinear k-epsilon model, and the large-eddy simulation of the unsteady turbulent wake of a circular cylinder using FEM. Also discussed are the direct simulation of transient turbulent flows using the generalized method of lines, simulation of 3D shear flows around a nozzle-afterbody, the interface oscillation phenomenon over a cavity in airflow, combustion-wave instabilities in turbulent flows, and modeling the buoyancy-production of dissipation in a plane turbulent plume.

Celik, I.; Kobayashi, T.; Ghia, K. N.; Kurokawa, J.

349

Architecting a Simulation Framework for Model Rehosting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The utility of vehicle math models extends beyond human-in-the-loop simulation. It is desirable to deploy a given model across a multitude of applications that target design, analysis, and research. However, the vehicle model alone represents an incomplete simulation. One must also replicate the environment models (e.g., atmosphere, gravity, terrain) to achieve identical vehicle behavior across all applications. Environment models are increasing in complexity and represent a substantial investment to re-engineer for a new application. A software component that can be rehosted in each application is one solution to the deployment problem. The component must encapsulate both the vehicle and environment models. The component must have a well-defined interface that abstracts the bulk of the logic to operate the models. This paper examines the characteristics of a rehostable modeling component from the perspective of a human-in-the-loop simulation framework. The Langley Standard Real-Time Simulation in C++ (LaSRS++) is used as an example. LaSRS++ was recently redesigned to transform its modeling package into a rehostable component.

Madden, Michael M.

2004-01-01

350

Advances in QM/MM Simulations for Organic and Enzymatic Reactions  

PubMed Central

CONSPECTUS Application of combined quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods focuses on predicting activation barriers and the structures of stationary points for organic and enzymatic reactions. Characterization of the factors that stabilize transition structures in solution and in enzyme active sites provides a basis for design and optimization of catalysts. Continued technological advances allowed expansion from prototypical cases to mechanistic studies featuring detailed enzyme and condensed-phase environments with full integration of the QM calculations and configurational sampling. This required improved algorithms featuring fast QM methods, advances in computing changes in free energies including free-energy perturbation (FEP) calculations, and enhanced configurational sampling. In particular, the present Account highlights development of the PDDG/PM3 semiempirical QM method, computation of multidimensional potentials of mean force (PMF), incorporation of on-the-fly QM in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and a polynomial quadrature method for efficient modeling of proton-transfer reactions. The utility of this QM/MM/MC/FEP methodology is illustrated for a variety of organic reactions including substitution, decarboxylation, elimination, and pericyclic reactions. Comparison with experimental kinetic results on medium effects has verified the accuracy of the QM/MM approach in the full range of solvents from hydrocarbons to water to ionic liquids. Corresponding results from ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods with continuum-based treatments of solvation reveal deficiencies, particularly for protic solvents. Also summarized in this Account are three specific QM/MM applications to biomolecular systems: (1) a recent study that clarified the mechanism for the reaction of 2-pyrone derivatives catalyzed by macrophomate synthase as a tandem Michael-aldol sequence rather than a Diels-Alder reaction; (2) elucidation of the mechanism of action of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an unusual Ser-Ser-Lys proteolytic enzyme; and, (3) the construction of enzymes for Kemp elimination of 5-nitrobenzisoxazole that highlights the utility of QM/MM in the design of artificial enzymes. PMID:19728702

2010-01-01

351

ATHENA (Advanced Thermal Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer) simulation of a loss of coolant accident in a space reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Thermal Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer (ATHENA) code was used to simulate a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a conceptual space reactor design. ATHENA provides the capability of simulating the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the wide variety of systems which are being considered for use in space reactors. Flow loops containing any one of several available working fluids may interact through thermal connections with other loops containing the same or a different working fluid. The code can be used to model special systems such as: heat pipes, point reactor kinetics, plant control systems, turbines, valves, and pumps. This work demonstrates the application of the thermal radiation model which has been recently incorporated into ATHENA and verifies the need for supplemental reactor cooling to prevent reactor fuel damage in the event of a LOCA.

Roth, P.A.; Shumway, R.W.

1988-01-01

352

An Aerodynamic Performance Evaluation of the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of an aerodynamic performance evaluation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS), conducted in association with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics, are presented. The ACFS is a full-mission flight simulator which provides an excellent platform for the critical evaluation of emerging flight systems and aircrew performance. The propulsion and flight dynamics models were evaluated using classical flight test techniques. The aerodynamic performance model of the ACFS was found to realistically represent that of current day, medium range transport aircraft. Recommendations are provided to enhance the capabilities of the ACFS to a level forecast for 1995 transport aircraft. The graphical and tabular results of this study will establish a performance section of the ACFS Operation's Manual.

Donohue, Paul F.

1987-01-01

353

A future Outlook: Web based Simulation of Hydrodynamic models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite recent advances to present simulation results as 3D graphs or animation contours, the modeling user community still faces some shortcomings when trying to move around and analyze data. Typical problems include the lack of common platforms with standard vocabulary to exchange simulation results from different numerical models, insufficient descriptions about data (metadata), lack of robust search and retrieval tools for data, and difficulties to reuse simulation domain knowledge. This research demonstrates how to create a shared simulation domain in the WWW and run a number of models through multi-user interfaces. Firstly, meta-datasets have been developed to describe hydrodynamic model data based on geographic metadata standard (ISO 19115) that has been extended to satisfy the need of the hydrodynamic modeling community. The Extended Markup Language (XML) is used to publish this metadata by the Resource Description Framework (RDF). Specific domain ontology for Web Based Simulation (WBS) has been developed to explicitly define vocabulary for the knowledge based simulation system. Subsequently, this knowledge based system is converted into an object model using Meta Object Family (MOF). The knowledge based system acts as a Meta model for the object oriented system, which aids in reusing the domain knowledge. Specific simulation software has been developed based on the object oriented model. Finally, all model data is stored in an object relational database. Database back-ends help store, retrieve and query information efficiently. This research uses open source software and technology such as Java Servlet and JSP, Apache web server, Tomcat Servlet Engine, PostgresSQL databases, Protégé ontology editor, RDQL and RQL for querying RDF in semantic level, Jena Java API for RDF. Also, we use international standards such as the ISO 19115 metadata standard, and specifications such as XML, RDF, OWL, XMI, and UML. The final web based simulation product is deployed as Web Archive (WAR) files which is platform and OS independent and can be used by Windows, UNIX, or Linux. Keywords: Apache, ISO 19115, Java Servlet, Jena, JSP, Metadata, MOF, Linux, Ontology, OWL, PostgresSQL, Protégé, RDF, RDQL, RQL, Tomcat, UML, UNIX, Windows, WAR, XML

Islam, A. S.; Piasecki, M.

2003-12-01

354

Advanced Information Technology in Simulation Based Life Cycle Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this research a Collaborative Optimization (CO) approach for multidisciplinary systems design is used to develop a decision based design framework for non-deterministic optimization. To date CO strategies have been developed for use in application to deterministic systems design problems. In this research the decision based design (DBD) framework proposed by Hazelrigg is modified for use in a collaborative optimization framework. The Hazelrigg framework as originally proposed provides a single level optimization strategy that combines engineering decisions with business decisions in a single level optimization. By transforming this framework for use in collaborative optimization one can decompose the business and engineering decision making processes. In the new multilevel framework of Decision Based Collaborative Optimization (DBCO) the business decisions are made at the system level. These business decisions result in a set of engineering performance targets that disciplinary engineering design teams seek to satisfy as part of subspace optimizations. The Decision Based Collaborative Optimization framework more accurately models the existing relationship between business and engineering in multidisciplinary systems design.

Renaud, John E.

2003-01-01

355

Multibody Simulation Model of Human Walking  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-dimensional simulational model of a human walking is presented. The biped is anthropomorphic, i.e., its inertial and kinematical properties are similar to human ones. The biped consists of eight rigid bodies. Each leg consists of three parts: thigh, shank, and foot. The trunk is modeled as two rigid bodies connected by a revolute joint. The inertia properties of head

Marek Wojtyra

2003-01-01

356

Transient fault modeling and fault injection simulation  

E-print Network

An accurate transient fault model is presented in this thesis. A 7-term exponential current upset model is derived from the results of a device-level, 3-dimensional, single-event-upset simulation. A curve-fitting algorithm is used to extract...

Yuan, Xuejun

2012-06-07

357

The scientific modeling assistant: An advanced software tool for scientific model building  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on the scientific modeling assistant: an advanced software tool for scientific model building are presented. The objective is to build a specialized software tool to assist in scientific model-building.

Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael H.

1991-01-01

358

Modeling circumstellar envelope with advanced numerical codes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a modeling study on the formation and evolution of the Circumstellar Envelopes (CSEs) of a sample of selected radio-loud objects, based on an innovative interaction between two codes widely used by the scientific community, but in different fields. CLOUDY (Ferland et al. 1998) is a widely used code to model the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the several objects characterized by clouds of gas heated and ionized by a central object. CosmoMC (Lewis & Bridle 2002) instead is usually used for exploring cosmological parameter space. We investigate here on the exploitation of the sampling performance of the Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) engine of CosmoMC to search for a best fit model of the considered objects through the spectral synthesis capacity of CLOUDY.

Procopio, P.; De Rosa, A.; Burigana, C.; Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.

2011-06-01

359

Modeling Innovations Advance Wind Energy Industry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1981, Glenn Research Center scientist Dr. Larry Viterna developed a model that predicted certain elements of wind turbine performance with far greater accuracy than previous methods. The model was met with derision from others in the wind energy industry, but years later, Viterna discovered it had become the most widely used method of its kind, enabling significant wind energy technologies-like the fixed pitch turbines produced by manufacturers like Aerostar Inc. of Westport, Massachusetts-that are providing sustainable, climate friendly energy sources today.

2009-01-01

360

Electronic International Journal: Advanced Modeling and Optimization  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This free, refereed journal is published between two and three times each year. It focuses on computational methods, algorithms, and applications related to modeling and optimization. The papers are quite diverse in topic, since many scientific and engineering disciplines fall within the journal's scope. The second volume of 2003 includes a paper on iris recognition for biometric security, as well as a paper that presents an "Economic Order Quantity" model for perishable goods. Each regular volume is fairly modest in size, averaging about four papers; however, a special issue on financial optimization published in 2002 was significantly longer.

2007-08-14

361

Advances in Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Core-Collapse Supernovae  

E-print Network

We discuss recent advances in the radiative-hydrodynamic modeling of core collapse supernovae in multi-dimensions. A number of earlier attempts at fully radiation-hydrodynamic models utilized either the grey approximation to describe the neutrino distribution or utilized more sophisticated multigroup transport methods restricted to radial rays. In both cases these models have also neglected the O(v/c) terms that couple the radiation and matter strongly in the optically thick regions of the collapsed core. In this paper we present some recent advances that resolve some shortcomings of earlier models.

F. Douglas Swesty; Eric S. Myra

2005-06-08

362

Mars Smart Lander Parachute Simulation Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-body flight simulation for the Mars Smart Lander has been developed that includes six degree-of-freedom rigid-body models for both the supersonically-deployed and subsonically-deployed parachutes. This simulation is designed to be incorporated into a larger simulation of the entire entry, descent and landing (EDL) sequence. The complete end-to-end simulation will provide attitude history predictions of all bodies throughout the flight as well as loads on each of the connecting lines. Other issues such as recontact with jettisoned elements (heat shield, back shield, parachute mortar covers, etc.), design of parachute and attachment points, and desirable line properties can also be addressed readily using this simulation.

Queen, Eric M.; Raiszadeh, Ben

2002-01-01

363

Development of CAPE-OPEN unit operations for advanced power systems modeling  

SciTech Connect

Reaction Engineering International (REI) is developing a suite of CORBA CAPE-OPEN compliant unit operations to support the Department of Energy NETL Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power systems. One of these components will provide an interface to the GateCycle software, which is widely used in the power generation industry for process modeling. Additional CAPE-OPEN components will provide modeling capabilities of varying fidelity for equipment such as a gasifier, air separation unit, syngas cooler, solid oxide fuel cell and water-gas shift reactor. The models used in the components will be a combination of those developed by REI and proprietary models developed by members of the Project's industrial interest group.

Swensen, D.; Zitney, S.; Bockelie, M.

2007-01-01

364

Advances in Swine Biomedical Model Genomics  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive physiology. Swine have been used extensively for studies of infectious disease processes and analyses of preventative strategies, inc...

365

Cost Effective Community Based Dementia Screening: A Markov Model Simulation  

PubMed Central

Background. Given the dementia epidemic and the increasing cost of healthcare, there is a need to assess the economic benefit of community based dementia screening programs. Materials and Methods. Markov model simulations were generated using data obtained from a community based dementia screening program over a one-year period. The models simulated yearly costs of caring for patients based on clinical transitions beginning in pre dementia and extending for 10 years. Results. A total of 93 individuals (74 female, 19 male) were screened for dementia and 12 meeting clinical criteria for either mild cognitive impairment (n = 7) or dementia (n = 5) were identified. Assuming early therapeutic intervention beginning during the year of dementia detection, Markov model simulations demonstrated 9.8% reduction in cost of dementia care over a ten-year simulation period, primarily through increased duration in mild stages and reduced time in more costly moderate and severe stages. Discussion. Community based dementia screening can reduce healthcare costs associated with caring for demented individuals through earlier detection and treatment, resulting in proportionately reduced time in more costly advanced stages. PMID:24649392

Nakamoto, Beau K.; Mendez, Mario F.; Mehta, Bijal; McMurtray, Aaron

2014-01-01

366

Cost effective community based dementia screening: a markov model simulation.  

PubMed

Background. Given the dementia epidemic and the increasing cost of healthcare, there is a need to assess the economic benefit of community based dementia screening programs. Materials and Methods. Markov model simulations were generated using data obtained from a community based dementia screening program over a one-year period. The models simulated yearly costs of caring for patients based on clinical transitions beginning in pre dementia and extending for 10 years. Results. A total of 93 individuals (74 female, 19 male) were screened for dementia and 12 meeting clinical criteria for either mild cognitive impairment (n = 7) or dementia (n = 5) were identified. Assuming early therapeutic intervention beginning during the year of dementia detection, Markov model simulations demonstrated 9.8% reduction in cost of dementia care over a ten-year simulation period, primarily through increased duration in mild stages and reduced time in more costly moderate and severe stages. Discussion. Community based dementia screening can reduce healthcare costs associated with caring for demented individuals through earlier detection and treatment, resulting in proportionately reduced time in more costly advanced stages. PMID:24649392

Saito, Erin; Nakamoto, Beau K; Mendez, Mario F; Mehta, Bijal; McMurtray, Aaron

2014-01-01

367

Advanced manufacturing simulation: Minor system details can be major issues in the real world  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to highlight the complex nature of automated guided vehicle (AGV) simulation model building, and especially how system modelling details affect the end results. This is an important issue in all of the transportation simulation systems, since they are service-based by their nature, and additional inefficiencies create unanticipated performance downgrading. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper uses a

Sandor Ujvari; Olli-pekka Hilmola

2006-01-01

368

Ray tracing simulation of 1-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source for polarization analyses of synchrotron optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we present recent progress on polarization optics using the 1-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Beamline 1-BM was recently repurposed for optics and detector testing. SHADOW software, a ray-tracing program for the simulation of optical systems of synchrotron radiation beamlines, is used to model the beamline. In this paper, we present optical ray-tracing studies for test set-ups that take advantage of the polarization variation of the bending magnet radiation above and below the horizontal plane of the beamline.

Kujala, Naresh; Macrander, Albert; Shi, Xianbo; Reininger, Ruben; Gao, Xuan; Burns, Clement

2014-09-01

369

The role of numerical simulation for the development of an advanced HIFU system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used clinically and is under clinical trials to treat various diseases. An advanced HIFU system employs ultrasound techniques for guidance during HIFU treatment instead of magnetic resonance imaging in current HIFU systems. A HIFU beam imaging for monitoring the HIFU beam and a localized motion imaging for treatment validation of tissue are introduced briefly as the real-time ultrasound monitoring techniques. Numerical simulations have a great impact on the development of real-time ultrasound monitoring as well as the improvement of the safety and efficacy of treatment in advanced HIFU systems. A HIFU simulator was developed to reproduce ultrasound propagation through the body in consideration of the elasticity of tissue, and was validated by comparison with in vitro experiments in which the ultrasound emitted from the phased-array transducer propagates through the acrylic plate acting as a bone phantom. As the result, the defocus and distortion of the ultrasound propagating through the acrylic plate in the simulation quantitatively agree with that in the experimental results. Therefore, the HIFU simulator accurately reproduces the ultrasound propagation through the medium whose shape and physical properties are well known. In addition, it is experimentally confirmed that simulation-assisted focus control of the phased-array transducer enables efficient assignment of the focus to the target. Simulation-assisted focus control can contribute to design of transducers and treatment planning.

Okita, Kohei; Narumi, Ryuta; Azuma, Takashi; Takagi, Shu; Matumoto, Yoichiro

2014-10-01

370

Water system modeling for dispatcher training simulators  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the existing need for training dispatchers in the operation of power systems where it involves managing large water systems. The problem formulation and implementation of water system modeling for the Dispatcher Training Simulators (DTS) are presented in this paper. The method systematically builds the water network descriptions. The model periodically calculates the water system flows, storage values, and currently available hydro generation capacities. The model is controllable by the instructor and provides the simulated telemetry of water system data to the control center functions in the DTS. The water system modeling enhances the power system modeling subsystem of the DTS. The method is validated on a large water system and power system data. The results and the benefits of water system modeling are discussed.

Rajagopal, S.; Sigari, P.G. (Empros Systems International, Minneapolis, MN (United States)); Allen, J.E.; Assadian, M. (Pacific Gas and Electric, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-08-01

371

Rodent models of TDP-43: Recent advances  

PubMed Central

Recently, missense mutations in the gene TARDBP encoding TDP-43 have been linked to familial ALS. The discovery of genes encoding these RNA binding proteins, such as TDP-43 and FUS/TLS, raised the notion that altered RNA metabolism is a major factor underlying the pathogenesis of ALS. To begin to unravel how mutations in TDP-43 cause dysfunction and death of motor neurons, investigators have employed both gain- and loss-of-function studies in rodent model systems. Here, we will summarize major findings from the initial sets of TDP-43 transgenic and knockout rodent models, identify their limitations, and point to future directions toward clarification of disease mechanism(s) and testing of therapeutic strategies that ultimately may lead to novel therapy for this devastating disease. PMID:22608070

Tsao, William; Jeong, Yun Ha; Lin, Sophie; Ling, Jonathan; Price, Donald L.; Chiang, Po-Min; Wong, Philip C.

2013-01-01

372

Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

1993-02-01

373

Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

1993-01-01

374

Simulation Modeling of Software Development Processes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simulation modeling approach is proposed for the prediction of software process productivity indices, such as cost and time-to-market, and the sensitivity analysis of such indices to changes in the organization parameters and user requirements. The approach uses a timed Petri Net and Object Oriented top-down model specification. Results demonstrate the model representativeness, and its usefulness in verifying process conformance to expectations, and in performing continuous process improvement and optimization.

Calavaro, G. F.; Basili, V. R.; Iazeolla, G.

1996-01-01

375

Cogeneration computer model assessment: Advanced cogeneration research study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cogeneration computer simulation models to recommend the most desirable models or their components for use by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) in evaluating potential cogeneration projects was assessed. Existing cogeneration modeling capabilities are described, preferred models are identified, and an approach to the development of a code which will best satisfy SCE requirements is recommended. Five models (CELCAP, COGEN 2, CPA, DEUS, and OASIS) are recommended for further consideration.

Rosenberg, L.

1983-01-01

376

EPANET - AN ADVANCED WATER QUALITY MODELING PACKAGE FOR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

EPANET is a third generation software package for modeling water quality within drinking water distribution systems. he program performs extended period simulation of hydraulic and water quality conditions within pressurized pipe networks. n addition to substance concentration wa...

377

Improving the Aircraft Design Process Using Web-Based Modeling and Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Designing and developing new aircraft systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for reducing design cycle times, but requires a flexible software environment capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary and multifidelity analysis methods, dynamically managing data across heterogeneous computing platforms, and distributing computationally complex tasks. Web-based simulation, with its emphasis on collaborative composition of simulation models, distributed heterogeneous execution, and dynamic multimedia documentation, has the potential to meet these requirements. This paper outlines the current aircraft design process, highlighting its problems and complexities, and presents our vision of an aircraft design process using Web-based modeling and simulation.

Reed, John A.; Follen, Gregory J.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Follen, Gregory J. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

378

Improving the Aircraft Design Process Using Web-based Modeling and Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Designing and developing new aircraft systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for reducing design cycle times, but requires a flexible software environment capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary and muitifidelity analysis methods, dynamically managing data across heterogeneous computing platforms, and distributing computationally complex tasks. Web-based simulation, with its emphasis on collaborative composition of simulation models, distributed heterogeneous execution, and dynamic multimedia documentation, has the potential to meet these requirements. This paper outlines the current aircraft design process, highlighting its problems and complexities, and presents our vision of an aircraft design process using Web-based modeling and simulation.

Reed, John A.; Follen, Gregory J.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

2003-01-01

379

Large-eddy simulation of oscillating boundary layers: Model comparison and validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large-eddy simulations of oscillating boundary layers over smooth and rough walls in the fully turbulent regime have been carried out. Several models for the unresolved subgrid-scale (SGS) stresses are compared, as well as different approximate treatments of the wall layer, where none of the momentum-transporting eddies is resolved. The simulations show that the use of advanced SGS models coupled with

Senthilkumaran Radhakrishnan; Ugo Piomelli

2008-01-01

380

Common modeling system for digital simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Joint Modeling and Simulation System is a tri-service investigation into a common modeling framework for the development digital models. The basis for the success of this framework is an X-window-based, open systems architecture, object-based/oriented methodology, standard interface approach to digital model construction, configuration, execution, and post processing. For years Department of Defense (DOD) agencies have produced various weapon systems/technologies and typically digital representations of the systems/technologies. These digital representations (models) have also been developed for other reasons such as studies and analysis, Cost Effectiveness Analysis (COEA) tradeoffs, etc. Unfortunately, there have been no Modeling and Simulation (M&S) standards, guidelines, or efforts towards commonality in DOD M&S. The typical scenario is an organization hires a contractor to build hardware and in doing so an digital model may be constructed. Until recently, this model was not even obtained by the organization. Even if it was procured, it was on a unique platform, in a unique language, with unique interfaces, and, with the result being UNIQUE maintenance required. Additionally, the constructors of the model expended more effort in writing the 'infrastructure' of the model/simulation (e.g. user interface, database/database management system, data journalizing/archiving, graphical presentations, environment characteristics, other components in the simulation, etc.) than in producing the model of the desired system. Other side effects include: duplication of efforts; varying assumptions; lack of credibility/validation; and decentralization in policy and execution. J-MASS provides the infrastructure, standards, toolset, and architecture to permit M&S developers and analysts to concentrate on the their area of interest.

Painter, Rick

1994-01-01

381

Hot-bench simulation of the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two simulations, one batch and one real-time, of an aeroelastically-scaled wind-tunnel model were developed. The wind-tunnel model was a full-span, free-to-roll model of an advanced fighter concept. The batch simulation was used to generate and verify the real-time simulation and to test candidate control laws prior to implementation. The real-time simulation supported hot-bench testing of a digital controller, which was developed to actively control the elastic deformation of the wind-tunnel model. Time scaling was required for hot-bench testing. The wind-tunnel model, the mathematical models for the simulations, the techniques employed to reduce the hot-bench time-scale factors, and the verification procedures are described.

Buttrill, Carey S.; Houck, Jacob A.

1990-01-01

382

Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Scientific model building can be an intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be easily distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. In this paper, we describe a prototype for a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities. Our prototype has been developed in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling, and is being used to construct models of Titan's atmosphere.

Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael; Podolak, Ester; Mckay, Christopher

1990-01-01

383

Advanced manned space flight simulation and training: An investigation of simulation host computer system concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The findings of a preliminary investigation by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in simulation host computer concepts is presented. It is designed to aid NASA in evaluating simulation technologies for use in spaceflight training. The focus of the investigation is on the next generation of space simulation systems that will be utilized in training personnel for Space Station Freedom operations. SwRI concludes that NASA should pursue a distributed simulation host computer system architecture for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) rather than a centralized mainframe based arrangement. A distributed system offers many advantages and is seen by SwRI as the only architecture that will allow NASA to achieve established functional goals and operational objectives over the life of the Space Station Freedom program. Several distributed, parallel computing systems are available today that offer real-time capabilities for time critical, man-in-the-loop simulation. These systems are flexible in terms of connectivity and configurability, and are easily scaled to meet increasing demands for more computing power.

Montag, Bruce C.; Bishop, Alfred M.; Redfield, Joe B.

1989-01-01

384

CFD design studies of an advanced concept driver for a large blast/thermal simulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Work is underway at the US Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL) to develop a design for a large scale facility to simulate nuclear blast and thermal loading. The facility, termed the US Large Blast/Thermal Simulator (LB/TS), will be used to test full scale military equipment. The blast portion of the simulation will be produced by a compressed gas driven shock tube with a complex geometry. This paper deals with two advanced concepts in blast simulation currently being investigated for possible uses in the LB/TS design. The first is the use of heated driver gas to allow testing in the flow behind the contact surface. The second concept discussed is the use of fast acting valves to control the flow out of the driver and into the expansion tunnel.

Opalka, Klaus O.; Person, Richard J.

1990-07-01

385

Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models  

SciTech Connect

An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor–Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F. [ORNL] [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P. [ORNL] [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-07-30

386

Marine Diesel Engine Process Modelling and Control Using Advanced Technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents some possibilities of practical use of advanced computing technologies applied to the modelling and control of marine diesel engine. The emphasis is put on two well recognised techniques, fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks. Because of the complexity of diesel propulsion engine working in changeable operating regimes and environmental conditions at sea, it is highly desirable to

R. Antonic; Z. Vukic; O. Kuljaca

2005-01-01

387

Advances in Games Technology: Software, Models, and Intelligence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Games technology has undergone tremendous development. In this article, the authors report the rapid advancement that has been observed in the way games software is being developed, as well as in the development of games content using game engines. One area that has gained special attention is modeling the game environment such as terrain and…

Prakash, Edmond; Brindle, Geoff; Jones, Kevin; Zhou, Suiping; Chaudhari, Narendra S.; Wong, Kok-Wai

2009-01-01

388

Computer simulation of a resonant dc link for advanced launch systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of a resonant dc link based actuator power system being built for an advanced launch system application is evaluated for a typical launch scenario using two end-to-end system simulations, one using a digital computer and the other using a hybrid computer. Aspects of system performance from the switching of the power electronic devices to the vehicle aerodynamics are addressed. Using these simulations, it is shown that the resonance dc link actuator adequately stabilize the vehicle against a wind gust during a launch.

Sudhoff, S. D.; Wasynczuk, O.; Krause, P. C.; Kenny, B. H.

1993-01-01

389

Computer simulation of a 20-kHz power system for advanced launch systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of two 20-kHz actuator power systems being built for an advanced launch system are evaluated for typical launch senario using an end-to-end system simulation. Aspects of system performance ranging from the switching of the power electronic devices to the vehicle aerodynamics are represented in the simulation. It is shown that both systems adequately stabilize the vehicle against a wind gust during launch. However, it is also shown that in both cases there are bus voltage and current fluctuations which make system power quality a concern.

Sudhoff, S. D.; Wasynczuk, O.; Krause, P. C.; Kenny, B. H.

1993-01-01

390

Advanced Methodology for Simulation of Complex Flows Using Structured Grid Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Detailed simulations of viscous flows in complicated geometries pose a significant challenge to current capabilities of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). To enable routine application of CFD to this class of problems, advanced methodologies are required that employ (a) automated grid generation, (b) adaptivity, (c) accurate discretizations and efficient solvers, and (d) advanced software techniques. Each of these ingredients contributes to increased accuracy, efficiency (in terms of human effort and computer time), and/or reliability of CFD software. In the long run, methodologies employing structured grid systems will remain a viable choice for routine simulation of flows in complex geometries only if genuinely automatic grid generation techniques for structured grids can be developed and if adaptivity is employed more routinely. More research in both these areas is urgently needed.

Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David

1995-01-01

391

Advancements in the ADAPT Photospheric Flux Transport Model  

E-print Network

Maps of the solar photospheric magnetic flux are fundamental drivers for simulations of the corona and solar wind which makes photospheric simulations important predictors of solar events on Earth. However, observations of the solar photosphere are only made intermittently over small regions of the solar surface. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model uses localized ensemble Kalman filtering techniques to adjust a set of photospheric simulations to agree with the available observations. At the same time this information is propagated to areas of the simulation that have not been observed. ADAPT implements a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) to accomplish data assimilation, allowing the covariance structure of the flux transport model to influence assimilation of photosphere observations while eliminating spurious correlations between ensemble members arising from a limited ensemble size. We give a detailed account of the ADAPT model and the implementation of the LETKF. Advantages of the LETKF scheme over previously implemented assimilation methods are highlighted.

Kyle S. Hickmann; Humberto C. Godinez; Carl J. Henney; C. Nick Arge

2014-10-22

392

Realistic modeling of neurons and networks: towards brain simulation  

PubMed Central

Summary Realistic modeling is a new advanced methodology for investigating brain functions. Realistic modeling is based on a detailed biophysical description of neurons and synapses, which can be integrated into microcircuits. The latter can, in turn, be further integrated to form large-scale brain networks and eventually to reconstruct complex brain systems. Here we provide a review of the realistic simulation strategy and use the cerebellar network as an example. This network has been carefully investigated at molecular and cellular level and has been the object of intense theoretical investigation. The cerebellum is thought to lie at the core of the forward controller operations of the brain and to implement timing and sensory prediction functions. The cerebellum is well described and provides a challenging field in which one of the most advanced realistic microcircuit models has been generated. We illustrate how these models can be elaborated and embedded into robotic control systems to gain insight into how the cellular properties of cerebellar neurons emerge in integrated behaviors. Realistic network modeling opens up new perspectives for the investigation of brain pathologies and for the neurorobotic field. PMID:24139652

D’Angelo, Egidio; Solinas, Sergio; Garrido, Jesus; Casellato, Claudia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; Prestori, Francesca

393

Lifetime prediction modeling of airfoils for advanced power generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of gases produced from coal as a turbine fuel offers an attractive means for efficiently generating electric power from our Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine concepts promise increased efficiency and low emissions on the expense of increased turbine inlet temperature (TIT) and different working fluid. Developing the turbine technology and materials is critical to the creation of these near-zero emission power generation technologies. A computational methodology, based on three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) and damage mechanics is presented for predicting the evolution of creep and fatigue in airfoils. We took a first look at airfoil thermal distributions in these advanced turbine systems based on CFD analysis. The damage mechanics-based creep and fatigue models were implemented as user modified routine in commercial package ANSYS. This routine was used to visualize the creep and fatigue damage evolution over airfoils for hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines concepts, and regions most susceptible to failure were indentified. Model allows for interaction between creep and fatigue damage thus damage due to fatigue and creep processes acting separately in one cycle will affect both the fatigue and creep damage rates in the next cycle. Simulation results were presented for various thermal conductivity of the top coat. Surface maps were created on the airfoil showing the development of the TGO scale and the Al depletion of the bond coat. In conjunction with model development, laboratory-scale experimental validation was executed to evaluate the influence of operational compressive stress levels on the performance of the TBC system. TBC coated single crystal coupons were exposed isothermally in air at 900, 1000, 1100oC with and without compressive load. Exposed samples were cross-sectioned and evaluated with scanning electron microscope (SEM). Performance data was collected based on image analysis. Energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) was employed to study the elemental distribution in TBC system after exposure. Nanoindentation was used to study the mechanical properties (Young's modulus and hardness) of the components in the TBC system and their evolution with temperature and time.

Karaivanov, Ventzislav Gueorguiev

394

Technology, Pedagogy, and Epistemology: Opportunities and Challenges of Using Computer Modeling and Simulation Tools in Elementary Science Methods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study infused computer modeling and simulation tools in a 1-semester undergraduate elementary science methods course to advance preservice teachers' understandings of computer software use in science teaching and to help them learn important aspects of pedagogy and epistemology. Preservice teachers used computer modeling and simulation tools…

Schwarz, Christina V.; Meyer, Jason; Sharma, Ajay

2007-01-01

395

The AFDM (advanced fluid dynamics model) program: Scope and significance  

SciTech Connect

The origins and goals of the advanced fluid dynamics model (AFDM) program are described, and the models, algorithm, and coding used in the resulting AFDM computer program are summarized. A sample fuel-steel boiling pool calculation is presented and compared with a similar SIMMER-II calculation. A subjective assessment of the AFDM developments is given, and areas where future work is possible are detailed. 10 refs.

Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Wilhelm, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France))

1990-01-01

396

WRF4G project: Advances in running climate simulations on the EGI Infrastructure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Weather Research and Forecasting For Grid (WRF4G) project is a two-year Spanish National R&D project, which has started in 2011. It is now a well established project, involving scientists and technical staff from several institutions, which contribute results to international initiatives such as CORDEX and European FP7 projects such as SPECS and EUPORIAS. The aim of the WRF4G project is to homogenize access hybrid Distributed Computer Infrastructures (DCIs), such as HPC and Grid infrastructures, for climate researchers. Additionally, it provides a productive interface to accomplish ambitious climate experiments such as regional hind-cast/forecast and sensitivity studies. Although Grid infrastructures are very powerful, they have some drawbacks for executing climate applications such as the WRF model. This makes necessary to encapsulate the applications in a middleware in order to provide the appropriate services for monitoring and management. Therefore, the challenge of the WRF4G project is to develop a generic adaptation framework (WRF4G framework) to disseminate it to the scientific community. The framework aims at simplifying the model access by releasing climate scientists from technical and computational aspects. In this contribution, we present some new advances of the WRF4G framework, including new components for designing experiments, simulation monitoring and data management. Additionally, we will show how WRF4G makes possible to run complex experiments on EGI infrastructures concurrently over several VOs such as esr and earth.vo.ibergrid. http://www.meteo.unican.es/software/wrf4g This work has been partially funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Spanish National R&D Plan 2008-2011 (CGL2011-28864, WRF4G)

Blanco, Carlos; Cofino, Antonio S.; Fernández Quiruelas, Valvanuz; García, Markel; Fernández, Jesús

2014-05-01

397

Modeling and simulation of coaxial helicopter rotor aerodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A framework is developed for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of a series of helicopter rotor flowfields in hover and in forward flight. The methodology is based on the unsteady solutions of the three-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations recast in a rotating frame of reference. The simulations are carried out by solving the developed mathematical model on hybrid meshes that aim to optimally exploit the benefits of both the structured and the unstructured grids around complex configurations. The computer code is prepared for parallel processing with distributed memory utilization in order to significantly reduce the computational time and the memory requirements. The developed model and the simulation methodology are validated for single-rotor-in-hover flowfields by comparing the present results with the published experimental data. The predictive merit of different turbulence models for complex helicopter aerodynamics are tested extensively. All but the kappa-o and LES results demonstrate acceptable agreement with the experimental data. It was deemed best to use the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for the subsequent rotor flowfield computations. First, the flowfield around a single rotor in forward flight is simulated. These time---accurate computations help to analyze an adverse effect of increasing the forward flight speed. A dissymmetry of the lift on the advancing and the retreating blades is observed for six different advance ratios. Since the coaxial rotor is proposed to mitigate the dissymmetry, it is selected as the next logical step of the present investigation. The time---accurate simulations are successfully obtained for the flowfields generated by first a hovering then a forward-flying coaxial rotor. The results for the coaxial rotor in forward flight verify the aerodynamic balance proposed by the previously published advancing blade concept. The final set of analyses aims to investigate if the gap between the two rotors of the coaxial configuration has any significant effect on the generated forces. The present results indicate either little or no such effect on the lift.

Gecgel, Murat

398

A tree hollow dynamics simulation model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a deterministic computer model for simulating forest dynamics. The model predicts the long-term dynamics of hollow-bearing trees which occur in a single-species (monotypic) forest stand under an array of different timber harvesting regimes over a time scale of centuries. It is applied to a number of different timber harvesting scenarios in the mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans F.

I. R. Ball; D. B. Lindenmayer; H. P. Possingham

399

Byrd Polar Research Center Climate Model Simulation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This set of animations and interactive simulations from the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State University helps students develop an understanding of models used to understand the Earth System. Students consider the types of data that need to be included in a climate model, looking at inputs and outputs as well as variables, such as land surface, and how to measure changes of different parts of Earth's surface over time.

Center, Byrd P.; University, Ohio S.

400

Volumetric object modeling for surgical simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surgical simulation has many applications in medical education, surgical training, surgical plan- ning and intra-operative assistance. However, extending current surface-based computer graphics methods to model phenomena such as the deformation, cutting, tearing or repairing of soft tissues poses significant challenges for real-time interactions. This paper discusses the use of volumetric methods for modeling complex anatomy and tissue interactions. New techniques

Sarah Gibson; Christina Fyock; Eric Grimson; Takeo Kanade; Ron Kikinis; Hugh Lauer; Neil McKenzie; Andrew Mor; Shin Nakajima; Hide Ohkami; Randy Osborne; Joseph Samosky; Akira Sawada

1997-01-01

401

Modeling and Simulation of Count Data  

PubMed Central

Count data, or number of events per time interval, are discrete data arising from repeated time to event observations. Their mean count, or piecewise constant event rate, can be evaluated by discrete probability distributions from the Poisson model family. Clinical trial data characterization often involves population count analysis. This tutorial presents the basics and diagnostics of count modeling and simulation in the context of pharmacometrics. Consideration is given to overdispersion, underdispersion, autocorrelation, and inhomogeneity. PMID:25116273

Plan, E L

2014-01-01

402

Advanced simulation for analysis of critical infrastructure : abstract cascades, the electric power grid, and Fedwire.  

SciTech Connect

Critical Infrastructures are formed by a large number of components that interact within complex networks. As a rule, infrastructures contain strong feedbacks either explicitly through the action of hardware/software control, or implicitly through the action/reaction of people. Individual infrastructures influence others and grow, adapt, and thus evolve in response to their multifaceted physical, economic, cultural, and political environments. Simply put, critical infrastructures are complex adaptive systems. In the Advanced Modeling and Techniques Investigations (AMTI) subgroup of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC), we are studying infrastructures as complex adaptive systems. In one of AMTI's efforts, we are focusing on cascading failure as can occur with devastating results within and between infrastructures. Over the past year we have synthesized and extended the large variety of abstract cascade models developed in the field of complexity science and have started to apply them to specific infrastructures that might experience cascading failure. In this report we introduce our comprehensive model, Polynet, which simulates cascading failure over a wide range of network topologies, interaction rules, and adaptive responses as well as multiple interacting and growing networks. We first demonstrate Polynet for the classical Bac, Tang, and Wiesenfeld or BTW sand-pile in several network topologies. We then apply Polynet to two very different critical infrastructures: the high voltage electric power transmission system which relays electricity from generators to groups of distribution-level consumers, and Fedwire which is a Federal Reserve service for sending large-value payments between banks and other large financial institutions. For these two applications, we tailor interaction rules to represent appropriate unit behavior and consider the influence of random transactions within two stylized networks: a regular homogeneous array and a heterogeneous scale-free (fractal) network. For the stylized electric power grid, our initial simulations demonstrate that the addition of geographically unrestricted random transactions can eventually push a grid to cascading failure, thus supporting the hypothesis that actions of unrestrained power markets (without proper security coordination on market actions) can undermine large scale system stability. We also find that network topology greatly influences system robustness. Homogeneous networks that are 'fish-net' like can withstand many more transaction perturbations before cascading than can scale-free networks. Interestingly, when the homogeneous network finally cascades, it tends to fail in its entirety, while the scale-free tends to compartmentalize failure and thus leads to smaller, more restricted outages. In the case of stylized Fedwire, initial simulations show that as banks adaptively set their individual reserves in response to random transactions, the ratio of the total volume of transactions to individual reserves, or 'turnover ratio', increases with increasing volume. The removal of a bank from interaction within the network then creates a cascade, its speed of propagation increasing as the turnover ratio increases. We also find that propagation is accelerated by patterned transactions (as expected to occur within real markets) and in scale-free networks, by the 'attack' of the most highly connected bank. These results suggest that the time scale for intervention by the Federal Reserve to divert a cascade in Fedwire may be quite short. Ongoing work in our cascade analysis effort is building on both these specific stylized applications to enhance their fidelity as well as embracing new applications. We are implementing markets and additional network interactions (e.g., social, telecommunication, information gathering, and control) that can impose structured drives (perturbations) comparable to those seen in real systems. Understanding the interaction of multiple networks, their interdependencies, and in particular, the underlying mechanisms f

Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Beyeler, Walter Eugene

2004-08-01

403

WATER SUPPLY SIMULATION MODEL. VOLUME 3. DOCUMENTATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This three-volume report describes the development of a water supply simulation model (WSSM), a system of computer programs that allows for a systematic evaluation of the physical and economic characteristics of a water distribution system in a spatial framework. The WSSM concept...

404

Love Kills:. Simulations in Penna Ageing Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The standard Penna ageing model with sexual reproduction is enlarged by adding additional bit-strings for love: Marriage happens only if the male love strings are sufficiently different from the female ones. We simulate at what level of required difference the population dies out.

Stauffer, Dietrich; Cebrat, Stanis?aw; Penna, T. J. P.; Sousa, A. O.

405

Robust three-body water simulation model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most common potentials used in classical simulations of liquid water assume a pairwise additive form. Although these models have been very successful in reproducing many properties of liquid water at ambient conditions, none is able to describe accurately water throughout its complicated phase diagram. The primary reason for this is the neglect of many-body interactions. To this end, a

C. J. Tainter; P. A. Pieniazek; Y.-S. Lin; J. L. Skinner

2011-01-01

406

Modeling and Simulation Information Analysis Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Modeling and Simulation Information Analysis Center (MSIAC) assists the Department of Defense (DoD) in meeting its M&S needs "by providing scientific, technical, and operational support information and services." Through the Help Desk, MSIAC also answers technical inquiries from non-DoD customers, who agree to pay for their service beyond the first two hours. The group has experience in weapons technology including WMD, information management, modeling and simulation, operations analysis, chemical and explosive sciences, material sciences, spectrum engineering, wireless communication, life sciences, medical informatics and telemedicine, transportation systems, and reliability, availability, and maintainability. A wealth of resources are available from this website, including the Modeling & Simulation Resource Repository (MSRR), which is described as "the first place to go for answers to M&S" and Glossary of Modeling and Simulation (M&S) Terms, information on special topics of interest within M&S, and links to related websites. The MSIAC's M&S Journal Online offers quarterly articles of interest to the M&S community free of charge. This site is also reviewed in the March 25, 2005_NSDL MET Report_.

407

Evaluation of reliability modeling tools for advanced fault tolerant systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Computer Aided Reliability Estimation (CARE III) and Automated Reliability Interactice Estimation System (ARIES 82) reliability tools for application to advanced fault tolerance aerospace systems were evaluated. To determine reliability modeling requirements, the evaluation focused on the Draper Laboratories' Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) architecture as an example architecture for fault tolerance aerospace systems. Advantages and limitations were identified for each reliability evaluation tool. The CARE III program was designed primarily for analyzing ultrareliable flight control systems. The ARIES 82 program's primary use was to support university research and teaching. Both CARE III and ARIES 82 were not suited for determining the reliability of complex nodal networks of the type used to interconnect processing sites in the AIPS architecture. It was concluded that ARIES was not suitable for modeling advanced fault tolerant systems. It was further concluded that subject to some limitations (the difficulty in modeling systems with unpowered spare modules, systems where equipment maintenance must be considered, systems where failure depends on the sequence in which faults occurred, and systems where multiple faults greater than a double near coincident faults must be considered), CARE III is best suited for evaluating the reliability of advanced tolerant systems for air transport.

Baker, Robert; Scheper, Charlotte

1986-01-01

408

Modeling and simulation of aquifer storage energy systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer simulation model AQSYST for simulating energy systems employing thermal energy storage in aquifers, or groundwater basins, is described. Aquifers offer a potential and economical way of storing solar heat for long periods of time. The simulation model AQSYST features a modular energy system, in which subsystems and their connections are accurately simulated. The storage simulation in AQSYST is accomplished

M. T. Kangas; P. D. Lund

1994-01-01

409

A survey of recent advances in discrete input parameter discrete-event simulation optimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discrete-event simulation optimization is a problem of significant interest to practitioners interested in extracting useful information about an actual (or yet to be designed) system that can be modeled using discrete-event simulation. This paper presents a survey of the literature on discrete-event simulation optimization published in recent years (1988 to the present), with a particular focus on discrete input parameter

JAMES R. SWISHER; PAUL D. HYDEN; SHELDON H. JACOBSON; LEE W. SCHRUBEN

2004-01-01

410

Computational studies of horizontal axis wind turbines in high wind speed condition using advanced turbulence models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Next generation horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) will operate at very high wind speeds. Existing engineering approaches for modeling the flow phenomena are based on blade element theory, and cannot adequately account for 3-D separated, unsteady flow effects. Therefore, researchers around the world are beginning to model these flows using first principles-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approaches. In this study, an existing first principles-based Navier-Stokes approach is being enhanced to model HAWTs at high wind speeds. The enhancements include improved grid topology, implicit time-marching algorithms, and advanced turbulence models. The advanced turbulence models include the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, k-epsilon, k-o and Shear Stress Transport (k-o-SST) models. These models are also integrated with detached eddy simulation (DES) models. Results are presented for a range of wind speeds, for a configuration termed National Renewable Energy Laboratory Phase VI rotor, tested at NASA Ames Research Center. Grid sensitivity studies are also presented. Additionally, effects of existing transition models on the predictions are assessed. Data presented include power/torque production, radial distribution of normal and tangential pressure forces, root bending moments, and surface pressure fields. Good agreement was obtained between the predictions and experiments for most of the conditions, particularly with the Spalart-Allmaras-DES model.

Benjanirat, Sarun

411

Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

Thomas, Justin

2011-01-01

412

Simulation Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Space Networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In space exploration missions, the coordinated use of spacecraft as communication relays increases the efficiency of the endeavors. To conduct trade-off studies of the performance and resource usage of different communication protocols and network designs, JPL designed a comprehensive extendable tool, the Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE). The design and development of MACHETE began in 2000 and is constantly evolving. Currently, MACHETE contains Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) protocol standards such as Proximity-1, Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS), Packet Telemetry/Telecommand, Space Communications Protocol Specification (SCPS), and the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP). MACHETE uses the Aerospace Corporation s Satellite Orbital Analysis Program (SOAP) to generate the orbital geometry information and contact opportunities. Matlab scripts provide the link characteristics. At the core of MACHETE is a discrete event simulator, QualNet. Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) is an end-to-end architecture providing communication in and/or through highly stressed networking environments. Stressed networking environments include those with intermittent connectivity, large and/or variable delays, and high bit error rates. To provide its services, the DTN protocols reside at the application layer of the constituent internets, forming a store-and-forward overlay network. The key capabilities of the bundling protocols include custody-based reliability, ability to cope with intermittent connectivity, ability to take advantage of scheduled and opportunistic connectivity, and late binding of names to addresses. In this presentation, we report on the addition of MACHETE models needed to support DTN, namely: the Bundle Protocol (BP) model. To illustrate the use of MACHETE with the additional DTN model, we provide an example simulation to benchmark its performance. We demonstrate the use of the DTN protocol and discuss statistics gathered concerning the total time needed to simulate numerous bundle transmissions

Jennings, Esther H.; Segui, John

2006-01-01

413

Computational Spectrum of Agent Model Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The study of human social behavioral systems is finding renewed interest in military, homeland security and other applications. Simulation is the most generally applied approach to studying complex scenarios in such systems. Here, we outline some of the important considerations that underlie the computational aspects of simulation-based study of human social systems. The fundamental imprecision underlying questions and answers in social science makes it necessary to carefully distinguish among different simulation problem classes and to identify the most pertinent set of computational dimensions associated with those classes. We identify a few such classes and present their computational implications. The focus is then shifted to the most challenging combinations in the computational spectrum, namely, large-scale entity counts at moderate to high levels of fidelity. Recent developments in furthering the state-of-the-art in these challenging cases are outlined. A case study of large-scale agent simulation is provided in simulating large numbers (millions) of social entities at real-time speeds on inexpensive hardware. Recent computational results are identified that highlight the potential of modern high-end computing platforms to push the envelope with respect to speed, scale and fidelity of social system simulations. Finally, the problem of shielding the modeler or domain expert from the complex computational aspects is discussed and a few potential solution approaches are identified.

Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL

2010-01-01

414

Quantitative lung SPECT applied on simulated early COPD and humans with advanced COPD  

PubMed Central

Background Reduced ventilation in lung regions affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), reflected as inhomogeneities in the single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung image, is correlated to disease advancement. An analysis method for measuring these inhomogeneities is proposed in this work. The first aim was to develop a quantitative analysis method that could discriminate between Monte Carlo simulated normal and COPD lung SPECT images. A second aim was to evaluate the ability of the present method to discriminate between human subjects with advanced COPD and healthy volunteers. Methods In the simulated COPD study, different activity distributions in the lungs were created to mimic the healthy lung (normal) and different levels of COPD. Gamma camera projections were Monte Carlo simulated, representing clinically acquired projections of a patient who had inhaled 125 MBq 99mTc-Technegas followed by a 10-min SPECT examination. Reconstructions were made with iterative ordered subset expectation maximisation. The coefficient of variance (CV) was calculated for small overlapping volumes covering the 3D reconstructed activity distribution. A CV threshold value (CVT) was calculated as the modal value of the CV distribution of the simulated normal. The area under the distribution curve (AUC), for CV values greater than CVT, AUC(CVT), was then calculated. Moreover, five patients with advanced emphysema and five healthy volunteers inhaled approximately 75 MBq 99mTc-Technegas immediately before the 20-min SPECT acquisition. In the human study, CVT was based on the mean CV distribution of the five healthy volunteers. Results A significant difference (p < 0.001) was found between the Monte-Carlo simulated normal and COPD lung SPECT examinations. The present method identified a total reduction of ventilation of approximately 5%, not visible to the human eye in the reconstructed image. In humans the same method clearly discriminated between the five healthy volunteers and five patients with advanced COPD (p < 0.05). Conclusions While our results are promising, the potential of the AUC(CVT) method to detect less advanced COPD in patients needs further clinical studies. PMID:23597059

2013-01-01

415

Video Modeling: Combining Dynamic Model Simulations with Traditional Video Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Tracker video analysis program allows users to overlay simple dynamic particle models on a video clip. In a typical video modeling experiment students capture and open a digital video file, calibrate the scale, and define appropriate coordinate axes just as for traditional video analysis. But instead of tracking objects with the mouse, students define theoretical force expressions and initial conditions for a dynamic model simulation that synchronizes with and draws itself on the video. The behavior of the model is thus compared directly with that of the real-world motion. Tracker uses the Open Source Physics code library so sophisticated models are possible. Video modeling offers advantages over both traditional video analysis and simulation-only modeling. This paper includes video modeling experiments produced by students in an Introductory Mechanics course.

Brown, Douglas

2008-08-16

416

ADAPTATION OF THE ADVANCED STATISTICAL TRAJECTORY REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION (ASTRAP) MODEL TO THE EPA VAX COMPUTER - MODIFICATIONS AND TESTING  

EPA Science Inventory

The Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model simulates long-term transport and deposition of oxides of and nitrogen. t is a potential screening tool for assessing long-term effects on regional visibility from sulfur emission sources. owever, a rigorou...

417

392 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ADVANCED PACKAGING, VOL. 26, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2003 A Compact Multilayer IC Package Model for  

E-print Network

392 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ADVANCED PACKAGING, VOL. 26, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2003 A Compact Multilayer IC Package Model for Efficient Simulation, Analysis, and Design of High-Performance VLSI Circuits Yungseon Eo, Member, IEEE Abstract--A multilayered integrated circuit (IC) package struc- ture is composed of many

418

Statistical simulation models for Rayleigh and Rician fading  

Microsoft Academic Search

New simulation models are proposed for Rayleigh and Rician fading channels. First, the statistical properties of Clarke's fading model with a finite number of sinusoids are analyzed. An improved Clarke's model is then proposed for the simulation of Rayleigh fading channels. Based on this improved Rayleigh fading model, a novel simulation model is proposed for Rician fading channels. The new

Chengshan Xiao; Yahong R. Zheng; Norman C. Beaulieu

2003-01-01

419

Computational model for protein unfolding simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The protein folding problem is one of the fundamental and important questions in molecular biology. However, the all-atom molecular dynamics studies of protein folding and unfolding are still computationally expensive and severely limited by the time scale of simulation. In this paper, a simple and fast protein unfolding method is proposed based on the conformational stability analyses and structure modeling. In this method, two structure-based conditions are considered to identify the unstable regions of proteins during the unfolding processes. The protein unfolding trajectories are mimicked through iterative structure modeling according to conformational stability analyses. Two proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) and ? -spectrin SH3 domain (SH3) were simulated by this method. Their unfolding pathways are consistent with the previous molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, the transition states of the two proteins were identified in unfolding processes and the theoretical ? values of these transition states showed significant correlations with the experimental data (the correlation coefficients are >0.8). The results indicate that this method is effective in studying protein unfolding. Moreover, we analyzed and discussed the influence of parameters on the unfolding simulation. This simple coarse-grained model may provide a general and fast approach for the mechanism studies of protein folding.

Tian, Xu-Hong; Zheng, Ye-Han; Jiao, Xiong; Liu, Cai-Xing; Chang, Shan

2011-06-01

420

Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations  

PubMed Central

A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a