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Sample records for advanced pancreatic carcinoma

  1. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  2. Percutaneous irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma using the dorsal approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Hester J; Melenhorst, Marleen C A M; Vogel, Jantien A; van Tilborg, Aukje A J M; Nielsen, Karin; Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R

    2015-06-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively. PMID:25288173

  3. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, O. Kusunoki, S.; Kudoh, K.; Takamori, H.; Tsuji, T.; Kanemitsu, K.; Yamashita, Y.

    2006-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods. CTAI was performed in 17 patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer with (n = 11) or without (n = 6) liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The inferior pancreatic artery (IPA) was embolized to achieve delivery of the pancreatic blood supply through only the celiac artery. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the primary tumor size, liver metastasis, and survival time and factors such as tumor size, tumor location, and stage of pancreatic carcinoma; the embolized arteries were analyzed with respect to treatment effects and prognosis. Results. A catheter was fixed in the gastroduodenal artery and splenic artery in 10 and 7 patients, respectively. Complete peripancreatic arterial occlusion was successful in 10 patients. CT showed a decrease in tumor size in 6 of 17 (35%) patients and a decrease in liver metastases in 6 of 11 (55%) patients. The survival time ranged from 4 to 18 months (mean {+-} SD, 8.8 {+-} 1.5 months). Complete embolization of arteries surrounding the pancreas was achieved in 10 patients; they manifested superior treatment effects and prognoses (p < 0.05). Conclusion. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, long-term CTAI with systemic chemotherapy appeared to be effective not only against the primary tumor but also against liver metastases. Patients with successfully occluded peripancreatic arteries tended to survive longer.

  4. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  5. Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Béchade, Dominique; Desjardin, Marie; Salmon, Emma; Désolneux, Grégoire; Bécouarn, Yves; Evrard, Serge; Fonck, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant neoplasm that accounts for 1–2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Here we report two cases of ACC and describe their clinical features, the therapies used to treat them, and their prognosis. The first patient was a 65-year-old woman who had an abdominal CT scan for a urinary infection. Fortuitously, a rounded and well-delimited corporeal pancreatic tumor was discovered. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration revealed an ACC. During the puncture, a hypoechoic cavity appeared inside the lesion, corresponding to a probable necrotic area. Treatment consisted of a distal splenopancreatectomy. The second patient was a 75-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain. An abdominal CT scan showed a cephalic pancreatic lesion and two hepatic metastases. An EUS-guided fine needle aspiration showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which enabled an objective response after 6 cycles.

  6. Advances in diagnosis, treatment and palliation of pancreatic carcinoma: 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chakshu; Eltawil, Karim M; Renfrew, Paul D; Walsh, Mark J; Molinari, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Several advances in genetics, diagnosis and palliation of pancreatic cancer (PC) have occurred in the last decades. A multidisciplinary approach to this disease is therefore recommended. PC is relatively common as it is the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality. Most patients present with obstructive jaundice, epigastric or back pain, weight loss and anorexia. Despite improvements in diagnostic modalities, the majority of cases are still detected in advanced stages. The only curative treatment for PC remains surgical resection. No more than 20% of patients are candidates for surgery at the time of diagnosis and survival remains quite poor as adjuvant therapies are not very effective. A small percentage of patients with borderline non-resectable PC might benefit from neo-adjuvant chemoradiation therapy enabling them to undergo resection; however, randomized controlled studies are needed to prove the benefits of this strategy. Patients with unresectable PC benefit from palliative interventions such as biliary decompression and celiac plexus block. Further clinical trials to evaluate new chemo and radiation protocols as well as identification of genetic markers for PC are needed to improve the overall survival of patients affected by PC, as the current overall 5-year survival rate of patients affected by PC is still less than 5%. The aim of this article is to review the most recent high quality literature on this topic. PMID:21412497

  7. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  8. Comparison of CT and PET-CT based planning of radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Topkan, Erkan; Yavuz, Ali A; Aydin, Mehmet; Onal, Cem; Yapar, Fuat; Yavuz, Melek N

    2008-01-01

    Background To compare computed tomography (CT) with co-registered positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) as the basis for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). Methods Fourteen patients with unresectable LAPC had both CT and PET images acquired. For each patient, two three-dimensional conformal plans were made using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. We analyzed differences in treatment plans and doses of radiation to primary tumors and critical organs. Results Changes in GTV delineation were necessary in 5 patients based on PET-CT information. In these patients, the average increase in GTV was 29.7%, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the primary tumor beyond that defined by CT. For all patients, the GTVCT versus GTVPET-CT was 92.5 ± 32.3 cm3 versus 104.5 ± 32.6 cm3 (p = 0.009). Toxicity analysis revealed no clinically significant differences between two plans with regard to doses to critical organs. Conclusion Co-registration of PET and CT information in unresectable LAPC may improve the delineation of GTV and theoretically reduce the likelihood of geographic misses. PMID:18808725

  9. Thrombosis and Pancreatic Carcinoma Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Abraham; Haws, Claude C.; Thomas, Eapen

    1982-01-01

    A case of recurrent pulmonary embolism from thrombophlebitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma is reported. There is an increased incidence of thrombophlebitis with all tumors, but carcinoma of the pancreas is statistically more frequently responsible. The higher incidence of thrombophlebitis with tumors of the body and tail of the pancreas is probably due to the low trypsin levels associated with these tumors. Trypsin levels are directly related to plasma antithrombin levels and mucinous adenocarcinomas are more commonly associated with thrombus formation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:7120446

  10. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811625

  11. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  12. Adenoviral p53 gene transfer and gemcitabine in three patients with liver metastases due to advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Christian; Fischer, Rainer; Ehninger, Gerhard; Haag, Cornelie

    2007-01-01

    Background. Current therapies for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas do not improve the life expectancy of patients. Methods. In a non-randomized pilot trail we tested whether a local therapy based upon an adenoviral gene transfer of wild type p53 in combination with gemcitabine administration would be safe in patients with liver metastases due to pancreatic carcinoma. We report on the clinical course of three patients with respect to safety, tolerability and tumor response. Results. Transient grade III toxicities occurred with fever, leucopenia, elevation of AP, ALT, AST, GGT, while grade IV toxicity occurred for bilirubin only. Laboratory tests suggested disseminated intravascular coagulation in all three patients, but fine needle biopsies of liver did not show any histological evidence of thrombus or clot formation. Progression of liver metastases was documented in one and stable disease in another patient two months after treatment. However, a major improvement with regression of the indexed lesion by 80% occurred in a third patient after a single administration of 7.5×1012 viral particles, and time to progression was extended to six months. Conclusion. The combination therapy of viral gene transfer and chemotherapy temporarily controls and diminishes tumor burden. Improvement of the toxicity profile is necessary. Further trials are warranted to improve treatment and life expectancy of patients suffering from fatal diseases such as pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:18333108

  13. Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

  14. A prospective, randomized trial of pancreatectomy combined with isolated hepatic perfusion via a dual route or conventional postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic head carcinoma.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaojun; Kong, Yalin; Wen, Dongqing; Liu, Chengli; Xiao, Mei; Zhao, Gang; Zhen, Yuying; Zhang, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of locally advanced pancreatic head carcinoma after Whipple remains poor. This study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of regional lymphadenectomy and chemotherapy of isolated hypoxic perfusion (IHP) via dual-route, and to analyze the effect for survival period. Consecutive patients subjected to our department from January 1, 2006 to December 31 2011 for locally advanced pancreatic head carcinoma were prospectively divided into two groups according to therapeutic modality, and clinical and follow-up data was recorded. In study group, operation duration and postoperative stay time were shorter, blood loss and blood transfusion were less, and incidence of complications was lower. The mean and median survival time was 17.4 ± 0.76 months and 18.0 months in study group, longer than control group of 14.1 ± 0.85 months and 17.6 months. Regional lymphadenectomy can be performed with low mortality and morbidity, and combined postoperative IHP via dual-route can improve survival time. PMID:26131274

  15. Pancreatic carcinoma: differences between patients with or without diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Girelli, C M; Reguzzoni, G; Limido, E; Savastano, A; Rocca, F

    1995-04-01

    In order to assess the prevalence and type of diabetes mellitus in patients with pancreatic carcinoma and if the risk factors for the cancer have a different distribution among diabetics and non-diabetics, we reviewed the charts of 127 histologically and/or cytologically proven pancreatic carcinomas consecutively diagnosed from 1977 to 1989 and referred to our Primary Care Hospital from the attending physician. 48 out of 127 (37.7%) subjects were found to be diabetic; 3 had long standing insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, 10 long standing non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 35 (73% of all diabetics) new onset diabetes mellitus. 5 out of 10 long standing non insulin dependent diabetics showed secondary failure to oral antidiabetic agents and weight loss in the last six months before the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. When compared to non-diabetics, all diabetics were older (p = 0.05), drank less alcohol (p = 0.047) and had a higher rate of previous neoplasms (p = 0.005). New onset diabetics had a less advanced cancer than those of long standing (p = 0.009). Our study calls for a careful search for pancreatic carcinoma in new onset diabetes of elderly and in long standing, weight losing, non insulin dependent diabetics on secondary failure to oral antidiabetic agents and support the hypothesis that diabetes associated pancreatic carcinoma may bear an its own etiopathogenesis. PMID:7617956

  16. Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: A Phase I Single-Dose Escalation Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Seza A.; Cohen, Steven J.; Pennington, Kenneth L.; Zuckier, Lionel S.; Hauke, Ralph J.; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V.; Sharkey, Robert M.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of 90Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan (90Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received 111In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before 90Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). Results 111In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before 90Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received 90Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m2 (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with 90Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m2 encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m2 as the maximal tolerated 90Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%–52% tumor diameter shrinkage). Conclusion 90Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated 90Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:21527562

  17. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. PMID:25294271

  18. Lymphatic drainage and CTV in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morganti, Alessio G; Cellini, Numa; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Macchia, Gabriella; Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; Deodato, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Trodella, Lucio

    2003-01-01

    CTV definition in exclusive or adjuvant radiation therapy of pancreatic carcinoma is essentially based on the opinion of "expert" authors and on the knowledge of lymphatic pathways. The subject has been widely debated. Radiotherapy treatments of the entire upper abdomen (liver and pancreatic region), pancreas and lymph node stations, to volumes focused on macroscopic tumor only, have been proposed. Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is characterized by the frequent, early appearance of metastasis via the lymphatic route. Most commonly involved lymph node stations include those of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric, peripancreatic, lumboaortic lymph nodes, those of the hepatic portal (the latter in particular for pancreatic head tumors) and of the hilum of spleen (the latter in particular for pancreatic tail tumors). The possible multicentricity of pancreatic carcinoma, most likely due to intraductal spread, should lead to the inclusion in the CTV of the entire pancreatic parenchyma. This should be considered also for the frequent perineural intra- or extrapancreatic spread of pancreatic carcinoma present also in small tumors (T1). In extrapancreatic spread the retropancreatic adipose tissue should be included in the CTV at least at the GTV level. At the present state of knowledge, in the absence of pattern of failure analysis and of comparison of different treatment approaches, in terms of the definition of volumes of interest, CTV definitions which include lymphatic drainage stations, most part of pancreatic parenchyma and retropancreatic adipose tissue seem justified especially in treatments for cure. In palliation, the CTV may be limited to the GTV and the adipose tissue behind it. PMID:15018319

  19. A hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head.

    PubMed

    Stamatova, D; Theilmann, L; Spiegelberg, C

    2016-12-01

    Hepatoid carcinoma (HC) is an extremely rare form of neoplasm. Its cellular structure resembles that of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To date, only 26 cases of hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas have been reported in the literature. We report the diagnosis of a hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head in a 78-year-old male patient. The tumor was detected incidentally during routine abdominal ultrasound scanning. Laboratory tests did not show any abnormalities except for a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. After CT, MRI, and laparoscopic biopsy that failed to obtain the diagnosis, the patient underwent a Whipple procedure. The final pathology report described a hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head (pathological T3, N0 (0/10), L0, V0, R0, M0). After the patient recovered, no further therapy was recommended by the tumor board and he was discharged. Regular follow-up was suggested; however, the patient suddenly died of acute coronary artery disease 2 months after surgery. PMID:27488314

  20. A phase I/II study of leucovorin, carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (LCF) in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site or advanced oesophagogastric/pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Rigg, A.; Cunningham, D.; Gore, M.; Hill, M.; O'Brien, M.; Nicolson, M.; Chang, J.; Watson, M.; Norman, A.; Hill, A.; Oates, J.; Moore, H.; Ross, P.

    1997-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUPS) accounts for 5-10% of all malignancies. Forty patients with metastatic CUPS or advanced oesophagogastric/pancreatic adenocarcinomas were recruited. Eligibility included ECOG performance status 0-2, minimum life expectancy of 3 months and measurable disease. The regimen consisted of bolus intravenous 5 fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (20 mg m-2) days 1-5 and carboplatin (AUC5) on day 3. The leucovorin/carboplatin/5-FU (LCF) was repeated every 4 weeks. The starting dose of 5-FU was 350 mg m-2 day-1 with escalation to 370 and then 400 mg m-2 day -1 after the toxicity at the previous level had been assessed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the dosage of 5-FU that achieved 60% grade 3/4 toxicity. In addition, objective and symptomatic responses, quality of life and survival were assessed. The MTD of 5-FU in the LCF regimen was 370 mg m-2. The predominant toxicity was asymptomatic marrow toxicity. The 350 mg m-2 level was then expanded. There were two toxic deaths due to neutropenic sepsis, one at 370 mg m-2 after one course and one at 350 mg m-2 after four courses. The objective response rate was 25% with one complete response (CR) and nine partial responses (PRs). The median duration of response was 3.4 months (range 1-10). The CR and eight of the nine PRs were in CUPS patients. Twelve patients developed progressive disease on LCF. Median survival for all 40 patients was 7.8 months (10 months median survival for those treated at 350 mg m-2). The majority of patients described a symptomatic improvement with LCF chemotherapy. The recommended dose of 5-FU for future studies is 350 mg m-2 combined with leucovorin 20 mg m-2 and carboplatin (AUC5). PMID:9000605

  1. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Si-Biao; Qin, Shan-Yu; Chen, Wen; Luo, Wei; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: We searched the literature for studies reporting the sensitivity, specificity, and other accuracy measures of serum CA19-9 levels for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Pooled analysis was performed using random-effects models, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Study quality was assessed using Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy and Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy tools. RESULTS: A total of 34 studies involving 3125 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and 2061 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. Pooled analysis of the ability of CA19-9 level to differentiate pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis showed the following effect estimates: sensitivity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.80-0.83); specificity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.82); positive likelihood ratio, 4.08 (95%CI: 3.39-4.91); negative likelihood ratio, 0.24 (95%CI: 0.21-0.28); and diagnostic odds ratio, 19.31 (95%CI: 14.40-25.90). The area under the ROC curve was 0.88. No significant publication bias was detected. CONCLUSION: Elevated CA19-9 by itself is insufficient for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis, however, it increases suspicion of pancreatic carcinoma and may complement other clinical findings to improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID:25892884

  2. Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Pancreatic metastases from ovarian carcinoma--diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Hadzri, M Hasmoni; Rosemi, Salleh

    2012-04-01

    Pancreatic metastases are very uncommon and originate most commonly from lung, colon, breast and kidney cancer. Ovarian adenocarcinoma has been reported as a primary site of pancreatic metastasis, but its diagnosis has rarely being reported by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). We report a case of multiple metastases to the pancreas from ovarian carcinoma occurring four years after original resection of the primary tumour. Our patient presented with severe epigastric pain which was initially treated as acute pancreatitis. Further imaging modalities showed multiple large pseudocystic lesions in the pancreatic head and body. Subsequent EUS-FNA confirmed that the lesions were metastatic disease from an advanced ovarian carcinoma. She underwent palliative chemotherapy and the pancreatic lesion showed receding size. PMID:22822646

  4. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27290644

  5. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  6. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  7. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. Advances in Management of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Janisch, Nigeen H; Gardner, Timothy B

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews advances in the management of acute pancreatitis. Medical treatment has been primarily supportive for this diagnosis, and despite extensive research efforts, there are no pharmacologic therapies that improve prognosis. The current mainstay of management, notwithstanding the ongoing debate regarding the volume, fluid type, and rate of administration, is aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. Although antibiotics were used consistently for prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis to prevent infection, they are no longer used unless infection is documented. Enteral nutrition, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, is considered a cornerstone in management of this disease. PMID:26895677

  9. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ballarin, Roberto; Spaggiari, Mario; Cautero, Nicola; De Ruvo, Nicola; Montalti, Roberto; Longo, Cristina; Pecchi, Anna; Giacobazzi, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio

    2011-11-21

    Pancreatic metastases are rare, with a reported incidence varying from 1.6% to 11% in autopsy studies of patients with advanced malignancy. In clinical series, the frequency of pancreatic metastases ranges from 2% to 5% of all pancreatic malignant tumors. However, the pancreas is an elective site for metastases from carcinoma of the kidney and this peculiarity has been reported by several studies. The epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are known from single-institution case reports and literature reviews. There is currently very limited experience with the surgical resection of isolated pancreatic metastasis, and the role of surgery in the management of these patients has not been clearly defined. In fact, for many years pancreatic resections were associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, and metastatic disease to the pancreas was considered to be a terminal-stage condition. More recently, a significant reduction in the operative risk following major pancreatic surgery has been demonstrated, thus extending the indication for these operations to patients with metastatic disease. PMID:22147975

  10. [A case of pancreatic carcinoma presenting as pancreaticopleural fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Tanno, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Tomoya; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Sasajima, Junpei; Koizumi, Kazuya; Mizukami, Yusuke; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kasai, Shinichi; Yoshida, Yukinori; Watanabe, Naomi; Okumura, Toshikatsu; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2010-05-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted with left pleural effusion, and an amylase level of 30994IU/l. A diagnosis of pancreaticopleural fistula was made, based on the findings of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP). After the placement of an endoscopic naso-pancreatic drainage tube, the pleural effusion markedly reduced. When ERP was performed for internal drainage, the main pancreatic duct and stricture were biopsied and showed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma histologically. CT revealed a mass in the head of the pancreas. He underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of pancreatic carcinoma presenting as pancreaticopleural fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion. Clinicians should pay attention to the possible presence of cancer and pancreaticopleural fistula in patients with pancreatic pleural effusion. PMID:20460853

  11. Pathology and Surgical Treatment of High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: an Evolving Landscape.

    PubMed

    Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Kaemmerer, Daniel; Gaujoux, Sebastien; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Verbeke, Caroline Sophie; Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare, accounting for less than 5 % of all pancreatic tumors. High-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (hgPNECs) represent about 5 % of all PNENs. They show highly aggressive behavior with dismal prognosis. Throughout the last two decades, there has been a notable progress in basic and clinical research of PNENs and a therapeutic trend towards both more aggressive and minimally invasive surgery. Despite these advances, hgPNECs as a distinct clinical entity remains largely unexplored among surgeons. This review of current development in pathology reporting and surgical treatment of hgPNECs aims at increasing the awareness of an evolving field in pancreatic surgery. PMID:26984415

  12. Non-focal enlargement in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, J.; Simeone, J.F.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Mueller, P.R.; van Sonnenberg, E.; Neff, C.C.

    1982-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma can appear radiographically as enlargement of the major part of the pancreas. In this series, part or all of three or more pancreatic segments (head, neck, body, and tail) were involved in 27% of patients with adenocarcinoma who had computed tomography. Differentiation from pure pancreatitis may require additional radiographic studies. The varied tissue composition of a pancreas enlarged by adenocarcinoma will often require biopsy of multiple sites for confirmation.

  13. Recent Advances in Managing Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Janisch, Nigeen; Gardner, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the recent advances in managing acute pancreatitis. Supportive care has long been the standard of treatment for this disease despite extensive, but ultimately unsuccessful, efforts to develop disease-specific pharmacologic therapies. The primary interventions center on aggressive fluid resuscitation, initiation of early enteral nutrition, targeted antibiotic therapy, and the management of complications. In this article, we will detail treatment of acute pancreatitis with a focus on intravenous fluid resuscitation, enteral feeding, and the current evidence behind the use of antibiotics and other pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26918139

  14. New treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Gary; Ghaneh, Paula; Costello, Eithne; Greenhalf, William; Neoptolemos, John P

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a very high mortality rate and affects approximately 230,000 individuals worldwide. Gemcitabine has become established as the standard therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer; however, the survival advantage is small. Adjuvant chemotherapy using either 5-fluorouracil or gemcitabine is now established in pancreatic cancer as an alternative therapy. Combinations of gemcitabine with either platin agents or capecitabine may be advantageous. Anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF agents have been unsuccessful but multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors are under investigation. Of the increasing number of immunological agents, the GV1001 antitelomerase vaccine holds some interest. Targeted agents against important mitogenic pathways, including MEK/ERK, Src, PI3K/Akt, mTOR, Hedgehog and NF-kappaB, as well as agents targeting histone deacetylase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, heat shock protein 90 and other agents such as beta-lapachone, hold considerable interest for further development. However, the probability of individual success is low. PMID:19072345

  15. Pancreatic carcinoma masked as fever of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ning; Xing, Cheng; Chang, Xiaoyan; Dai, Menghua; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pancreatic carcinoma is a highly lethal malignancy. Common presenting features of pancreatic cancer include anorexia, asthenia, weight loss, pain, and obstructive jaundice. Nevertheless, fever as a symptom, or even primary manifestation of pancreatic cancer is rather rare. Methods: Here, we report a 63-year-old male patient presenting with daily fevers, night sweats, and fatigue of 2-month duration. Laboratory findings showed elevated white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP). A computed tomography scan demonstrated a tumor between the duodenum and pancreatic head. Chest radiograph was normal. Results: The patient underwent an uneventful tumor resection. Histological examination of a surgical specimen demonstrated an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma originated from pancreatic head. The tumor was compatible with TNM stage IIA (T3N0M0). Complete resolution of the fever was achieved on post-operative day 4 and no recurrence of the tumor or neoplastic fever happen during the 39-month follow-up. Conclusion: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma could manifest as neoplastic fever at the time of diagnosis. If the tumor is resectable, surgical resection is a safe and curative form of therapy not only for the fever but also for the original carcinoma. PMID:27583884

  16. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  17. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  18. Endosonography and cytology in diagnosing and staging pancreatic body and tail carcinoma: Preliminary results of endosonographic guided puncture

    SciTech Connect

    Tio, T.L.; Sie, L.H.; Tytgat, G.N.J. Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam )

    1993-01-01

    Endosonography was performed in diagnosing and staging pancreatic body and tail carcinoma in two patients. In the first case endoscopy, abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomography were nondiagnostic in diagnosing the origin of submucosal gastric abnormalities. Endosonography diagnosed a pancreatic tail carcinoma with submucosal gastric involvement, and this was confirmed by endosonographic-guided cytology. Fundus varices due to segmented splenic vein involvement were found. Surgery was not recommended due to the advanced disease. In the second case pancreatic body carcinoma was diagnosed by ERCP and computed tomography. Transcutaneous ultrasonographic-guided cytological puncture confirmed the diagnosis. Endosonography revealed additional information of segmental portal hypertension with fundic varices due to splenic vein involvement. Autopsy confirmed the endosonographic diagnosis. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers. These patients often have multiple symptoms, and integrated supportive care is critical in helping them remain well for as long as possible. Fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is known to improve overall survival (OS) by approximately 3 months, compared to the best supportive care alone. A 1997 study comparing gemcitabine and fluorouracil treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer patients showed an improvement in OS of 1 month in patients receiving gemcitabine. Over the next 10 years, multiple randomized studies compared single-agent gemcitabine with combination chemotherapy and showed no effective survival improvement. However, the addition of erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, was associated with a significant improvement in OS of approximately 2 weeks. However, adoption of this regimen has not been widespread because of its limited effect and added toxicity. Two clinical trials have recently prolonged OS in advanced pancreatic cancer patients by almost 1 year. The first compared FOLFIRINOX with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with a significant improvement in median survival. The second compared gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with improvements in OS. At present, these regimens are considered standard treatment for patients with good performance statuses. PMID:27114434

  20. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  1. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography of Pancreatic Carcinoma: Correlation with Pathologic Findings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjie; Yan, Kun; Fan, Zhihui; Sun, Li; Wu, Wei; Yang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We concluded that contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has clinical value in identifying the pathologic changes of pancreatic carcinomas. Forty-three patients diagnosed with pancreatic carcinoma through surgery were retrospectively investigated. CEUS examinations were performed on all patients before surgery. Enhancement patterns on CEUS were observed. Time-intensity curves of CEUS were generated for the regions of interest in the pancreas, and quantitative parameters were obtained. Resected cancer specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histologic analysis, and the microvascular density (MVD) of the specimens was determined by CD34 immunohistochemical staining. Enhancement patterns of CEUS were compared with histopathologic findings in pancreatic carcinomas. Correlations between time-intensity curve parameters and microvascular density were analyzed. Twenty cases manifested centripetal enhancement, and 23 cases, global enhancement. The amount of tumor necrosis or mucus in the centripetally enhanced pancreatic carcinomas was greater than that in the globally enhanced pancreatic carcinomas (p = 0.027). Thirty-eight of 43 (88.4%) pancreatic carcinomas manifested hypo-enhancement with a maximum intensity (IMAX) <90%. Contrast arrival time in pancreatic carcinoma was longer than that in adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). IMAX was positively correlated with microvascular density (r = 0.577, p < 0.05). We concluded that CEUS manifestations could reflect the histologic changes of pancreatic carcinomas and CEUS can be used to evaluate blood perfusion of tumors, as IMAX is positively correlated with microvascular density. PMID:26806440

  2. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists. PMID:27376795

  3. Advances in managing hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Reataza, Marielle; Imagawa, David K

    2014-06-01

    Multiple modalities for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma are available, depending on tumor size and number. Surgical resection remains the gold standard, so long as the residual liver function reserve is sufficient. In patients with advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation is the preferred option, as these patients may not have adequate hepatic reserve after resection. Salvage liver transplantation has also become an option for a select few patients who recur after surgical resection. Ablative techniques have been used for palliation as well as to either completely destroy the tumor, act as an adjunct to resection, or downstage the tumor to meet Milan criteria such that a patient may be a candidate for liver transplantation. Radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, chemoembolization, radioembolization, and irreversible electroporation have all been used in this capacity. Currently, sorafenib is the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved chemotherapeutic for hepatocellular carcinoma. The efficacy of sorafenib, in combination with other agents, transarterial chemoembolization, and surgical resection is currently being investigated. Sunitinib and brivanib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have failed as potential first- or second-line options for chemotherapy. Bevacizumab in combination with erlotinib is also currently being studied. Final analysis for ramucirumab and axitinib are pending. Tivantinib, a selective mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) inhibitor, is also undergoing clinical trials for efficacy in MET-high tumors. This review serves to emphasize the current and new technologies emerging in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24810646

  4. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  5. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  6. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-12-10

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  7. Unusual early-stage pancreatic sarcomatoid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chuan-Li; Jin, Ping; Han, Chong-Xu; Xiao, Qin; Wang, Dao-Rong; Shi, Lin; Wang, Da-Xin; Chen, Hui

    2013-11-21

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the pancreas (SCP) is a very rare pathological type of carcinoma that usually has a poor prognosis. Its pathogenesis has not been elucidated. We herein report a case of an early-stage SCP involving successful treatment and a good prognosis. The patient was a 48-year-old Chinese man with a 5-mo history of vague abdominal pain. Ultrasonography revealed a 93 mm × 94 mm × 75 mm mass of mixed echogenicity in the tail of the pancreas. Laboratory test results were within the normal range, with the exception of an obviously increased pretreatment neuron-specific enolase level. The plasma transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 and interleukin-11 levels were obviously increased according to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Microscopically, the excised tumor tissue comprised cancer cells and mesenchymal cells. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive for α-1-antichymotrypsin, pan-cytokeratin, cytokeratin 19, cytokeratin 8/18, and vimentin and negative for CD68 and lysozyme. The pathogenetic mechanism of this case shows that TGFβ1 may regulate the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in SCP. With early eradication of the tumor and systemic therapy, this patient has been alive for more than 3 years without tumor recurrence or distant metastasis. This case is also the first to show that TGFβ1 may regulate the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in early-stage SCP. PMID:24282372

  8. Pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    DU, YANG; WANG, YING; TANG, JIE; GE, JUN; QIN, QING; JIANG, LI; LIU, XIAOKE; ZHU, XIANGLAN; WANG, YONGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is a rare type of cancer. Unlike other thymic epithelial tumors and carcinoids originating in other locations, thymic NEC possesses a more aggressive biological behavior, including invasion to proximal structures, local recurrence and distant hematogenous metastasis. Distant metastasis is often observed in the bones, lungs, spleen, liver and adrenal glands. However, pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic NEC is extremely uncommon, and only a few cases of patients with this disease have been reported. The current study presents the case of a patient with pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic NEC. The patient was admitted to hospital with an anterior mediastinal neoplasm, which was identified using chest enhanced computed tomography. The patient underwent a monobloc excision of the tumor with resection of involved structures. Subsequently, a pathological diagnosis of atypical thymic carcinoid was provided, according to the morphological characteristics observed and the expression of neuroendocrine markers, as identified by immunohistochemistry. Following surgery, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, ~2 years after surgery, metastasis at the pancreatic head was identified. The patient underwent a total pancreatectomy and splenectomy, and did not receive any post-operative therapies; however, the patient succumbed to the disease 9 months following surgery. Overall, the results from the present study demonstrate the clinical features of thymic NEC, which may aid with the diagnosis of this rare disease in other patients. PMID:26998098

  9. Proteomic analysis of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and pancreatic carcinoma in rat models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Hai-Lin; Li, Ya; Yuan, Ping

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect the proteomic variabilities of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in rat models and to identify potential biomarkers. METHODS: Sixty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into three groups. The rats had DMBA implanted into their pancreas for one (n = 20) or two months (n = 20) or assigned to the normal group (n = 20). The rats were killed after one or two months, and were evaluated histopathologically. Three tissue samples from each group of rats with either normal pancreas, PanIN (PanIN-2) or PC were examined by 2D-DIGE. The different expression spot features were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight/time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of enolase 1, a differentially expressed protein, was identified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: There was significant difference in the proportions of neoplastic changes between the 1- and 2-mogroups (P = 0.0488). There was an increase in the frequency of adenocarcinomas in the 2-mo group compared with the 1-mo group (P = 0.0309). No neoplastic changes were observed in any of the animals in the normal group. Enolase 1, pancreatic ELA3B, necdin, Hbp23, CHD3, hnRNP A2/B1, Rap80, and Gnb2l1 were up-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues, and CEL, TPT1, NME2, PCK2, an unnamed protein product, and glycine C-acetyltransferase were down-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues. The immunohistochemical results showed that enolase 1 expression was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer tissues of rats and humans. CONCLUSION: The pancreatic protein expression changes induced by DMBA suggest potential molecular targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of PC. PMID:21472101

  10. Clinical studies in the second line setting of advanced pancreatic cancer: are we making any progress?

    PubMed

    Ramfidis, Vassilios S; Strimpakos, Alexios S; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad W

    2012-07-01

    Despite the enormous advances in clinical research in oncology, the prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma remains poor. The therapeutic options in this type of cancer are very limited, with modest results at present. In the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, four interesting trials on the second line treatment of pancreatic cancer were presented. The first study (Abstract #4017) with a phase II design suggested that maintenance therapy with sunitinib, after a complete course of standard first line treatment, was feasible and effective while the second phase I/II study (Abstract #4034) evaluated the role of trabedersen, an agent that inhibits TGF-β2 expression. Finally, the efficacy and toxicity of lapatinib combined with either FOLFOX (Abstract #e14533) or capecitabine (Abstract #e14569) were examined in the second line setting of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22797389

  11. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  12. Pancreatic Metastasis from Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Chihiro; Naoe, Hideaki; Hashigo, Shunpei; Tsutsumi, Hideharu; Ishii, Shotaro; Konoe, Takeyasu; Watanabe, Takehisa; Shono, Takashi; Sakurai, Kouichi; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Ikuta, Yoshiaki; Chikamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Motohiko; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Baba, Hideo; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Sasaki, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic cancers of the pancreas are rare, accounting for approximately 2–4% of all pancreatic malignancies. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common solid tumor that metastasizes to the pancreas. Here, we present a case of uterine cervical carcinoma metastasizing to the pancreas and review the literature regarding this rare event. A 44-year-old woman with a uterine cervical tumor had undergone radical hysterectomy and had been diagnosed pathologically with stage Ib mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma in 2004. She underwent concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy postoperatively. Pulmonary metastases subsequently appeared in 2008 and 2011, and she underwent complete resection of the lung tumors by video-assisted thoracic surgery. Although she was followed up without any treatment and with no other recurrences, positron emission tomography revealed an area of abnormal uptake within the pancreatic body in 2012. Enhanced computed tomography demonstrated a 20-mm lesion in the pancreatic body and upstream pancreatic duct dilatation. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration was performed and pathological examination suggested neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC). On the basis of these results and the patient's oncological background, lesions in the pancreatic body were diagnosed as secondary metastasis from the cervical carcinoma that had been treated 8 years earlier. No other distant metastases were visualized, and the patient subsequently underwent middle pancreatectomy. Pathological examination showed NEC consistent with pancreatic metastasis from the uterine cervical carcinoma. The patient has survived 7 months since the middle pancreatectomy without any signs of local recurrence or other metastatic lesions. PMID:23741220

  13. UFT plus leucovorin in advanced hepatobiliary tumors and pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Mani, S

    1997-09-01

    UFT (tegafur and uracil) has been studied extensively in Japan, with documented efficacy in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancer. In the United States, UFT with or without leucovorin has not undergone phase II testing in these malignancies. Our current trial is designed primarily to assess the efficacy in terms of response rates to UFT with leucovorin in patients with advanced hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancer. Secondary objectives include determining response duration, time to disease progression, overall survival, quality of life, and toxicity. PMID:9348584

  14. New advances in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sonia; Herrera, Iván; Irurzun, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in cirrhotic patients and the third cause of cancer related deaths. Most HCC are associated with well known underlying risk factors, in fact, HCC arise in cirrhotic patients in up to 90% of cases, mainly due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcohol abuse. The worldwide prevention strategies are conducted to avoid the infection of new subjects and to minimize the risk of liver disease progression in infected patients. HCC is a condition which lends itself to surveillance as at-risk individuals can readily be identified. The American and European guidelines recommended implementation of surveillance programs with ultrasound every six months in patient at-risk for developing HCC. The diagnosis of HCC can be based on non-invasive criteria (only in cirrhotic patient) or pathology. Accurately staging patients is essential to oncology practice. The ideal tumour staging system in HCC needs to account for both tumour characteristics and liver function. Treatment allocation is based on several factors: Liver function, size and number of tumours, macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. The recommendations in terms of selection for different treatment strategies must be based on evidence-based data. Resection, liver transplant and interventional radiology treatment are mainstays of HCC therapy and achieve the best outcomes in well-selected candidates. Chemoembolization is the most widely used treatment for unresectable HCC or progression after curative treatment. Finally, in patients with advanced HCC with preserved liver function, sorafenib is the only approved systemic drug that has demonstrated a survival benefit and is the standard of care in this group of patients. PMID:27028578

  15. New advances in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Sonia; Herrera, Iván; Irurzun, Javier

    2016-03-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in cirrhotic patients and the third cause of cancer related deaths. Most HCC are associated with well known underlying risk factors, in fact, HCC arise in cirrhotic patients in up to 90% of cases, mainly due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcohol abuse. The worldwide prevention strategies are conducted to avoid the infection of new subjects and to minimize the risk of liver disease progression in infected patients. HCC is a condition which lends itself to surveillance as at-risk individuals can readily be identified. The American and European guidelines recommended implementation of surveillance programs with ultrasound every six months in patient at-risk for developing HCC. The diagnosis of HCC can be based on non-invasive criteria (only in cirrhotic patient) or pathology. Accurately staging patients is essential to oncology practice. The ideal tumour staging system in HCC needs to account for both tumour characteristics and liver function. Treatment allocation is based on several factors: Liver function, size and number of tumours, macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. The recommendations in terms of selection for different treatment strategies must be based on evidence-based data. Resection, liver transplant and interventional radiology treatment are mainstays of HCC therapy and achieve the best outcomes in well-selected candidates. Chemoembolization is the most widely used treatment for unresectable HCC or progression after curative treatment. Finally, in patients with advanced HCC with preserved liver function, sorafenib is the only approved systemic drug that has demonstrated a survival benefit and is the standard of care in this group of patients. PMID:27028578

  16. A case of hyperfunctioning pancreatic mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) arising from ectopic pancreatic tissue in the liver.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christopher J; Hostetler, Valerie; Dunn, Dell

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a hyperfunctioning mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) arising from ectopic pancreatic tissue in the liver. To our knowledge, the imaging appearance of a MANEC in the liver has never been reported. Literature on MANEC and its imaging features, including its appearance on the MR hepatobiliary phase and differential considerations, are reviewed and discussed. PMID:27190559

  17. A case of hyperfunctioning pancreatic mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) arising from ectopic pancreatic tissue in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Christopher J.; Hostetler, Valerie; Dunn, Dell

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a hyperfunctioning mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) arising from ectopic pancreatic tissue in the liver. To our knowledge, the imaging appearance of a MANEC in the liver has never been reported. Literature on MANEC and its imaging features, including its appearance on the MR hepatobiliary phase and differential considerations, are reviewed and discussed. PMID:27190559

  18. Advances in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Aghdassi, Ali A; Budde, Christoph; Nitsche, Claudia; Sauter, Gabriele; Persike, Maria; Günther, Annett; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the past, chronic pancreatitis has been regarded as a fairly uniform and largely untreatable disorder that most commonly affects patients who both lack gainful employment or adequate insurance coverage and have a tendency to smoke and drink. Large clinical trials suggest that this perception is not only misguided and discriminatory but also not based on facts. We forgot that the perception of chronic liver disease was similar before World War II, and just like liver cirrhosis the fibrosis and cirrhosis of the pancreas--i.e. chronic pancreatitis--is the end result of a range of environmental, inflammatory, infectious and genetic disorders. A growing number of these have only recently been recognized as a distinct entity and several of which are becoming truly treatable. A large proportion of the risk for developing pancreatitis is conveyed by genetic risk factors, and we estimate that less than half of those have been identified so far. The same holds true for protective factors that can prevent pancreatitis, even in the face of excessive alcohol abuse. Various gene mutations and polymorphisms appear to determine an individual's susceptibility for developing pancreatic disease, for the severity of the disease, and for the disease progression. The spectrum of genotype/phenotype associations ranges from straightforward autosomal dominant traits with near-complete penetrance, as for the most common mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1), to moderate risks factors without mendelian inheritance patterns, as for SPINK1 and CFTR mutations, to very subtle risk associations and disease modifiers that can only be identified in large cohort studies, as for the chymotrypsin C, calcium-sensing receptor and the anionic trypsin (PRSS2) mutations. Only a better understanding of the disease mechanisms that underlie these changes will make an individualized therapy of pancreatic disorders a realistic option. PMID:20814206

  19. Pancreatic Pseudocysts: Advances in Endoscopic Management.

    PubMed

    Ge, Phillip S; Weizmann, Mikhayla; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic drainage is the first-line therapy in the management of pancreatic pseudocysts. Before endoscopic drainage, clinicians should exclude the presence of pancreatic cystic neoplasms and avoid drainage of immature peripancreatic fluid collections or pseudoaneurysms. The indication for endoscopic drainage is not dependent on absolute cyst size alone, but on the presence of attributable signs or symptoms. Endoscopic management should be performed as part of a multidisciplinary approach in close cooperation with surgeons and interventional radiologists. Drainage may be performed either via a transpapillary approach or a transmural approach; additionally, endoscopic necrosectomy may be performed for patients with walled-off necrosis. PMID:26895678

  20. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  1. Growth inhibitory effect of the ternary complex factor Net on human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Baiwen; Ni, Peihua; Zhu, Qi; Cao, Haixia; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Su; Au, Chris; Zhang, Yongping

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies and carries the most dismal prognoses of all cancers. A better understanding of the genes involving in tumor development may allow us to tackle this rapidly progressive disease. The Net gene belongs to the ternary complex transcription factor (TCF) family and is regulated by the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway. Under basal conditions, Net shows strong repressing function on transcription of proto-oncogene gene c-fos. Moreover, the lower expression of Net has been noted in some carcinoma cells, such as cervical cancer. To study the effect of Net on c-fos expression and its potential role in the growth of pancreatic carcinoma, we developed a recombinant plasmid, a pEGFP-N1-Net, which codes for Net-EGFP fusion proteins, and stably transfected it into BxPC-3 human pancreatic carcinoma cells. Using stable transformants, we were able to show that overexpression of Net decreased the expression of c-fos and inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that Net overexpression inhibited cell cycle progression. These findings suggested that loss of Net repression could augment c-fos expression and further trigger neoplastic cell proliferation, which was involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, Net might be a potential target for the treatment of c-fos-positive pancreatic cancer. PMID:18832796

  2. Recent Advances and Prospects for Multimodality Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Awalpreet S; Khoo, Allison; Aliru, Maureen L; Arora, Harpreet K; Gunther, Jillian R; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    The outcomes for treatment of pancreatic cancer have not improved dramatically in many decades. However, the recent promising results with combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease increase optimism for future treatments. With greater control of overt or occult metastatic disease, there will likely be an expanding role for local treatment modalities, especially given that nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients have locally destructive disease without distant metastatic disease at the time of death. Technical advances have allowed for the safe delivery of dose-escalated radiation therapy, which can then be combined with chemotherapy, targeted agents, immunotherapy, and nanoparticulate drug delivery techniques to produce novel and improved synergistic effects. Here we discuss recent advances and future directions for multimodality therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27619253

  3. The monoclonal anti-BCL10 antibody (clone 331.1) is a sensitive and specific marker of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma and pancreatic metaplasia.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Franzi, Francesca; Marchet, Silvia; Finzi, Giovanna; Clerici, Moira; Vigetti, Davide; Chiaravalli, Anna Maria; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare pancreatic cancer which may be difficult to distinguish from other solid nonadenocarcinoma tumors. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of acinar differentiation, obtained with antibodies recognizing various pancreatic enzymes that, although specific, show different sensitivity. The C-terminal portion of the BCL10 protein shows homology with carboxyl ester hydrolase (CEH), an enzyme produced by pancreatic acinar cells. We investigated the usefulness of a C-terminal BCL10 monoclonal antibody in the diagnosis of ACCs. We examined normal pancreases and different pancreatic tumors including ACCs, mixed acinar-endocrine carcinomas, ductal adenocarcinomas, mucinous, serous, solid pseudopapillary, and endocrine neoplasms. In addition, various normal tissues and cases of pancreatic metaplasia of the gastroesophageal mucosa, cases of ectopic pancreas, gastrointestinal endocrine tumors, salivary and breast acinic cell carcinomas, gastric adenocarcinomas with and without acinar differentiation, and hepatocellular carcinomas were studied. BCL10 immunoreactivity paralleled that of CEH and was restricted to acinar cells of normal and ectopic pancreas, of pancreatic metaplasia, and of ACCs. The anti-BCL10 antibody was more sensitive in detecting ACCs and pancreatic metaplasia than antibodies directed against other pancreatic enzymes. We suggest using BCL10 antibody for diagnosing pancreatic tumors and whenever an acinar differentiation is suspected in gastrointestinal neoplastic and metaplastic lesions. PMID:19066953

  4. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A.; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  5. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  6. KRAS G12D Mutation Subtype Is A Prognostic Factor for Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bournet, Barbara; Muscari, Fabrice; Buscail, Camille; Assenat, Eric; Barthet, Marc; Hammel, Pascal; Selves, Janick; Guimbaud, Rosine; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There is no molecular biomarker available in the clinical practice to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. This multicenter prospective study aimed to investigate the role of KRAS mutation subtypes within the primary tumor to determine the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: The exon-2 KRAS mutation status was tested on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy material (primary tumor; restriction fragment-length polymorphism plus sequencing and TaqMan allelic discrimination) of patients with proven locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic ductal carcinoma. We used the Kaplan–Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox's model to evaluate the impact of KRAS status on the overall survival (OS), adjusting for age, stage of disease, clinical performance status, CA 19-9 levels, and treatment. Results: A total of 219 patients (men: 116; mean age: 67±9.4 years) were included: 147 harbored a codon-12 KRAS mutation (G12D: 73; G12V: 53; G12R: 21) and 72 had a wild-type KRAS. There was no difference in the OS between patients with a mutant KRAS (8 months; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 8.7–12.3) and the wild-type (9 months; 95% CI: 8.7–12.8; hazard ratio (HR): 1.03; P=0.82). However, the patients with a G12D mutation had a significantly shorter OS (6 months; 95% CI: 6.4–9.7) compared with the other patients (OS: 9 months; 95% CI: 10–13; HR: 1.47; P=0.003; i.e., wild type: 9 months, G12V: 9 months, G12R: 14 months). Similar results were observed in the subgroup of 162 patients who received chemotherapy (HR: 1.66; P=0.0013; G12D (n=49): 8 months, wild type (n=56): 10 months, G12V (n=38): 10 months, G12R (n=19): 14 months). Multivariate analyses identified KRAS G12D as an independent predictor for worse prognosis within the entire series (HR: 1.44; P=0.01) and in the subgroup of patients that received chemotherapy (HR: 1.84; P=0.02). Conclusions: The KRAS G12D mutation subtype is an independent prognostic

  7. A malignant cause of hypoglycaemia: a metastatic insulin-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Mark Anthony; Pagsisihan, Daveric; Berberabe, A'Ericson; Palugod-Lopez, Elaine Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of insulinomas are benign. We report a case of a malignant form of insulinoma. A 46-year-old man presented with behavioural changes associated with hypoglycaemia. Diagnostic work up revealed high serum insulin, high C-peptide and low glucose levels, compatible with endogenous hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed a pancreatic head mass and multiple liver masses. Biopsy of the pancreatic mass revealed a grade three pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. Histological analysis of a liver mass showed that it was identical to the pancreatic mass, confirming its metastatic nature. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy with en bloc splenectomy. There was persistence of hypoglycaemic symptoms after removal of the pancreatic mass, suggesting that the liver metastases were also functioning. Symptoms were controlled by diazoxide and octreotide long-acting release. The patient is already 1 year postsurgery with no recurrence of severe hypoglycaemia, and he has good functional capacity and has returned to his office job. PMID:26994053

  8. Massive renal urothelial carcinoma with renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and adrenal metastasis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Gao, Liang; Wu, Weilu; Chen, Peng; Bu, Siyuan; Wei, Qiang; Yang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old female patient presented with a massive left renal tumor, recurrent left flank pain and gross hematuria. The tumor was accompanied by a renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and a solitary adrenal metastasis. Radical nephrectomy, distal pancreatectomy, ipsilateral adrenalectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histopathological examination suggested high-grade urothelial carcinoma (UC); however, tumor recurrence and multiple metastases were detected only 3 months after the surgery, and the patient succumbed during follow-up 1 month later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of renal UC of such advanced stage with renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and a solitary adrenal metastasis. PMID:27446406

  9. Triple bypass for advanced pancreatic head cancer associated with biliary stricture, duodenal stenosis, and recurrent obstructive pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yuzan; Sato, Norihiro; Tamura, Toshihisa; Hirata, Keiji

    2016-12-01

    Bypass surgery for cancer of the pancreatic head is usually done to palliate the obstructive symptoms in the biliary and/or digestive system. However, it is uncommon for patients to require pancreatic duct drainage for recurrent obstructive pancreatitis. In this article, we report a surgical technique of triple bypass consisting of Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy, gastrojejunostomy, and pancreaticojejunostomy for advanced pancreatic cancer. A 76-year-old male patient with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic head cancer was referred to our department for biliary stricture, duodenal stenosis, and recurrent obstructive pancreatitis associated with persistent pancreatic pseudocyst. In an attempt to resolve all these problems simultaneously, a triple bypass was performed. The patient survived and continued to receive chemotherapy for almost 1 year after surgery without any serious complications. Thus, triple bypass is a useful surgical technique that could relief symptoms and offer better quality of life to patients with advanced pancreatic cancer presenting with biliary stricture, duodenal stenosis, and severe obstructive pancreatitis difficult to treat by medication or endoscopic procedures. PMID:27495991

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haoran; Song, Tianqiang

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the growing knowledge on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), as well as continuous improvement in imaging techniques and experienced interpretation of imaging features of the nodules in cirrhotic liver, the detection and characterization of HCC has improved in the past decade. A number of practice guidelines for imaging diagnosis have been developed to reduce interpretation variability and standardize management of HCC, and they are constantly updated with advances in imaging techniques and evidence based data from clinical series. In this article, we strive to review the imaging techniques and the characteristic features of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhotic liver, with emphasis on the diagnostic value of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and utilization of hepatocyte-specific MRI contrast agents. We also briefly describe the concept of liver imaging reporting and data systems and discuss the consensus and controversy of major practice guidelines. PMID:26632539

  11. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  13. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Looking beyond traditional chemotherapy and radiation.

    PubMed

    Savir, Guy; Huber, Kathryn E; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-01

    About a third of all pancreatic cancer is found to be locally advanced at the time of diagnosis, where the tumor is inoperable but remains localized to the pancreas and regional lymphatics. Sadly, this remains a universally deadly disease with progression to distant disease being the predominant mode of failure and average survival under one year. Optimal treatment of these patients continues to be an area of controversy, with chemotherapy alone being the treatment preference in Europe, and chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in selected patients, preferred in the USA. The aim of this paper is to summarize the key abstracts presented at the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting that address evolving approaches to the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The late breaking abstract (#LBA4003) provided additional European data showing non-superiority of chemoradiation compared to chemotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients without distant progression following 4 months of chemotherapy. Another late breaking abstract, (#LBA4004), unfortunately showed a promising new complement to gemcitabine and capecitabine using immunotherapy in the form of a T-helper vaccine did not translate to improved survival in the phase III setting. PMID:23846922

  14. Omental acinar cell carcinoma of pancreatic origin in a child: a clinicopathological rarity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shilpa; Agarwal, Shipra; Nagendla, Murali Krishna; Gupta, Devendra K

    2016-03-01

    A 6-year-old boy presented with a large subhepatic mass associated with pain abdomen. Exploration revealed a tumor in lesser omentum, completely separate from the normal pancreas that was excised completely. Histopathology suggested acinar cell carcinoma of pancreatic origin in an ectopic location. The child is well at 5 months follow-up. PMID:26694824

  15. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  16. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review of the clinical and radiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with a pancreatic tumor detected during her annual health examination. She had undergone left nephrectomy 13 years previously for renal cell carcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two tumors in the head and body of the pancreas, a hypervascular tumor and a hypovascular tumor with an enhanced rim, respectively. She underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and metastatic pancreatic tumors arising from the kidney with clustered clear cell carcinoma immunohistochemically positive for CD10 were diagnosed. This report presents the different enhancement features of different lesions on CT scans. Because the enhancement features of lesions have been reported to vary according to the size of the metastatic tumor, a knowledge of the history of renal cell carcinoma is crucial for diagnosis. PMID:24209713

  17. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review of the clinical and radiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshinori; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Kimura, Yuki; Masugi, Yohei; Ito, Homare; Terauchi, Toshiaki; Kimata, Masaru; Furukawa, Junji; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ogata, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with a pancreatic tumor detected during her annual health examination. She had undergone left nephrectomy 13 years previously for renal cell carcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two tumors in the head and body of the pancreas, a hypervascular tumor and a hypovascular tumor with an enhanced rim, respectively. She underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and metastatic pancreatic tumors arising from the kidney with clustered clear cell carcinoma immunohistochemically positive for CD10 were diagnosed. This report presents the different enhancement features of different lesions on CT scans. Because the enhancement features of lesions have been reported to vary according to the size of the metastatic tumor, a knowledge of the history of renal cell carcinoma is crucial for diagnosis. PMID:24209713

  18. Efficacy of Contrast-enhanced Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uekitani, Toshiyuki; Kaino, Seiji; Harima, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeyuki; Sen-yo, Manabu; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Distinguishing pancreatic ductal carcinoma (DC) from other pancreatic masses remains challenging. This study aims at evaluating the efficacy of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography (CEH-EUS) in the diagnosis of DC. Patients and Methods: Forty-nine patients with solid pancreatic mass lesions underwent CEH-EUS. EUS (B-mode) was used to evaluate the inner echoes, distributions, and borders of the masses. The vascular patterns of the masses were evaluated with CEH-EUS at 30–50 s (early phase) and 70–90 s (late phase) after the administration of Sonazoid®. Results: The final diagnoses included DCs (37), mass-forming pancreatitis (6), endocrine neoplasms (3), a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (1), a metastatic carcinoma (1), and an acinar cell carcinoma (1). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the diagnoses of DC in hypoechoic masses using EUS (B-mode) were 89.2%, 16.7%, and 71.4%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of DC in hypovascular masses using CEH-EUS were 73.0%, 91.7%, and 77.6% in the early phase and 83.8%, 91.7%, and 85.7% in the late phase, respectively. Conclusions: CEH-EUS for the diagnosis of DC is superior to EUS. CEH-EUS in the late phase was particularly efficacious in the diagnosis of DC. PMID:27184637

  19. A comparative proteomic study of plasma in feline pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify diagnostic biomarkers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Meachem, Melissa D.; Snead, Elisabeth R.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Jackson, Marion L.; Dickinson, Ryan; Larson, Victoria; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    While pancreatitis is now recognized as a common ailment in cats, the diagnosis remains challenging due to discordant results and suboptimal sensitivity of ultrasound and specific feline pancreatic lipase (Spec fPL) assay. Pancreatitis also shares similar clinical features with pancreatic carcinoma, a rare but aggressive disease with a grave prognosis. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the plasma proteomes of normal healthy cats (n = 6), cats with pancreatitis (n = 6), and cats with pancreatic carcinoma (n = 6) in order to identify potential new biomarkers of feline pancreatic disease. After plasma protein separation by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein spots were detected by Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 staining and identified by mass spectrometry. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), and apolipoprotein-A1 precursor (Pre Apo-A1) appeared to be differentially expressed, which suggests the presence of a systemic acute-phase response and alteration of lipid metabolism in cats with pancreatic disease. Future studies involving greater case numbers are needed in order to assess the utility of these proteins as potential biomarkers. More sensitive proteomic techniques may also be helpful in detecting significant but low-abundance proteins. PMID:26130850

  20. Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer by percutaneous and intraoperative irreversible electroporation: general hospital cancer center experience.

    PubMed

    Lambert, L; Horejs, J; Krska, Z; Hoskovec, D; Petruzelka, L; Krechler, T; Kriz, P; Briza, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of irreversible electroporation (IRE) and the outcome of patients undergoing IRE of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Twenty-one patients with unresectable PC underwent open (n=19) or percutaneous (n=2) IRE of the tumor using the Nanoknife system with two electrodes that were repositioned several times to affect the whole mass. The size of the tumor was 39±10mm with a range from 21 to 65mm. Five patients underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and seven patients were treated with chemotherapy after IRE. Complications occurred in five patients, which resulted in prolongation of the average hospital stay from 10 to 34 days. There was no mortality in the first postoperative month. Median survival after IRE was 10.2 months compared to 9.3 months in a matched cohort (hazard ratio = .54, p = .053). The quality of life was declining slowly. 81% of time after IRE the Karnofsky performance status was ≥70 and sharp decline occurred approximately 8 weeks before death.In conclusion, IRE is a safe palliative treatment option for a percentage of patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. The patients treated with open IRE lived a decent life until 8 weeks before their death. We believe that IRE of pancreatic carcinoma can be regarded as an option, if imaging or explorative laparotomy show that R0 resection in not possible. PMID:26774149

  1. An Open-Label Study of a Novel JAK-inhibitor, INCB047986, Given in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

  2. Incidental detection of pancreatic hemangioma mimicking a metastatic tumor of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Ji-Ye; Choi, Jin Young; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2016-05-01

    Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important. PMID:27212999

  3. Incidental detection of pancreatic hemangioma mimicking a metastatic tumor of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Ji-Ye; Choi, Jin Young; Choi, Young Deuk

    2016-01-01

    Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  5. Prolonged Survival in a Patient with a Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Anne; Baldini, Capucine; Vuagnat, Perrine; Makhloufi, Samira; Desauw, Christophe; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare entity. Herein we present the case of a 50-year-old male patient with an unlimited mass on the pancreatic corpus and tail with peripancreatic effusion and multiple metastases in the liver and spleen. A liver biopsy showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received 9 cycles of gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which had to be stopped because of a persistent grade 2 neuropathy. A CT scan showed complete response after 14 years. At the age of 61 years, a localized prostatic cancer was diagnosed, treated by prostatectomy. The patient carried a BRCA2 mutation. None of the precedent case reports describe a chemosensibility to the GEMOX regimen. In spite of the lack of study in these patients, chemotherapy with oxaliplatin seems to be the most effective. Long survival can be expected. PMID:26600777

  6. Prolonged Survival in a Patient with a Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Anne; Baldini, Capucine; Vuagnat, Perrine; Makhloufi, Samira; Desauw, Christophe; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare entity. Herein we present the case of a 50-year-old male patient with an unlimited mass on the pancreatic corpus and tail with peripancreatic effusion and multiple metastases in the liver and spleen. A liver biopsy showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received 9 cycles of gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which had to be stopped because of a persistent grade 2 neuropathy. A CT scan showed complete response after 14 years. At the age of 61 years, a localized prostatic cancer was diagnosed, treated by prostatectomy. The patient carried a BRCA2 mutation. None of the precedent case reports describe a chemosensibility to the GEMOX regimen. In spite of the lack of study in these patients, chemotherapy with oxaliplatin seems to be the most effective. Long survival can be expected. PMID:26600777

  7. Postmortem examination of 22 pancreatic carcinoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Castro, J.R.; Quivey, J.M.; Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.; Tobias, C.A.; Walton, R.E.; Peters, T.C.

    1984-02-01

    Postmortem findings are available in this report in 22 patients with pancreatic carcinoma treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; California. This represents the largest group evaluated histologically in the literature and is the first report evaluating effects of particle radiation in pancreatic tissue. Patient survival after therapy averaged 9 months. Most died of infection and/or pulmonary emboli. Local control was achieved in 27%. The pancreatic tumors had histologically more severe radiation changes than nontumor bearing pancreas. Irradiated bone marrow was severely hypocellular, and irradiated skin was atrophic. Five patients had radiation injury in the gastrointestinal tract. The spinal cord, liver, and kidneys showed no damage. This study demonstrates the safety of helium particle irradiation with present therapeutic planning. Injury to tumor was seen without excessive damage to adjacent tissues.

  8. ADVANCES IN MOLECULAR IMAGING OF PANCREATIC BETA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mai; Lubag, Angelo; McGuire, Michael J.; Seliounine, Serguei Y.; Tsyganov, Edward N.; Antich, Peter P.; Sherry, A. Dean; Brown, Kathlynn C.; Sun, Xiankai

    2009-01-01

    The development of non-invasive imaging methods for early diagnosis of the beta cell associated metabolic diseases, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D), has recently drawn considerable interest from the molecular imaging community as well as clinical investigators. Due to the challenges imposed by the location of the pancreas, the sparsely dispersed beta cell population within the pancreas, and the poor understanding of the pathogenesis of the diseases, clinical diagnosis of beta cell abnormalities is still limited. Current diagnostic methods are invasive, often inaccurate, and usually performed post-onset of the disease. Advances in imaging techniques for probing beta cell mass and function are needed to address this critical health care problem. A variety of currently available imaging techniques have been tested for the assessment of the pancreatic beta cell islets. Here we discuss the current advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and nuclear imaging for the study of beta cell diseases. Spurred by early successes in nuclear imaging techniques for beta cells, especially positron emission tomography (PET), the need for beta cell specific ligands has expanded. Progress in the field for obtaining such ligands is presented. Additionally, we report our preliminary efforts of developing such a peptidic ligand for PET imaging of the pancreatic beta cells. PMID:18508529

  9. Advances of stereotactic body radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qichun; Yu, Wei; Rosati, Lauren M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PCA) is one of the most aggressive tumors with few effective treatment modalities. It is the 4th and 7th leading cause of cancer death in the United States and China, respectively. At the time of diagnosis, only 20% of cases present with a resectable tumor, and about 40% with a locally advanced tumor that is considered unresectable. Even resected patients still have a poor prognosis, with an incidence of local recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. It is also reported that up to 30% of PCA patients die from locally obstructive disease with few or no distant metastases. These findings have highlighted the importance of local radiation therapy in the treatment of PCA. As the role of conventional chemoradiotherapy remains controversial, the dawn of the pancreas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) era represents a potential paradigm shift in the management of PCA. SBRT delivers a higher biological effective dose to the tumor with sharp dose escalation in a shorter treatment time course. Pancreas SBRT is a novel therapeutic option to achieve local tumor control with minimal toxicity. Herein, we review the advancement of SBRT for PCA patients with different stages of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26361404

  10. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy in newly diagnosed pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Bala, Asif; Ali, Butool; Khan, Husna; Bracamonte, Erika; Sussman, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Acute oxalate nephropathy can occur due to primary hyperoxaluria and secondary hyperoxaluria. The primary hyperoxalurias are a group of autosomal recessive disorders of endogenous oxalate overproduction. Secondary hyperoxaluria may occur as a result of excess dietary intake, poisoning with oxalate precursors (ethylene glycol), or enteric hyperoxaluria. The differential diagnosis of enteric hyperoxaluria includes inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, bariatric surgery (with jejunoileal bypass or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), celiac disease, partial colectomy, and chronic pancreatitis. The common etiology in all these processes is fat malabsorption, steatorrhea, saponification of calcium, and absorption of free oxalate. Hyperoxaluria causes increased urinary oxalate excretion, urolithiasis (promoted by hypovolemia, decreased urinary pH caused by metabolic acidosis, and decreased citrate and magnesium concentrations in urine), tubulointerstitial oxalate deposits, and tubulointerstitial nephritis. We report a rare case of acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy and exocrine insufficiency caused by newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:26614399

  11. High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy in combination with gemcitabine for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Yan, Tao; Wang, Guojin; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Dinghua

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy combined with gemcitabine in treating unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods The 45 patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma were randomized into two groups. The patients in the experimental group (n=23) received HIFU in combination with gemcitabine and those in the control group (n=22) received gemcitabine alone. The effect and clinical benefit rates in the two groups were compared. The median survival time and 6-month and 12-month survival rates were calculated by Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. Results The median survival time and 6-month survival rate were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (8.91 months vs 5.53 months, 73.9% vs 40.9%, respectively P<0.05), but 12-month survival rate was not statistically different between the two groups (13.0% vs 4.5%, P>0.05). The clinical benefit rates in the experimental group and the control group were 69.6% and 36.3%, respectively (P<0.05). The pain remission rate in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group (65.2% vs 31.8%, P<0.05). Conclusion HIFU in combination with gemcitabine is better than gemcitabine alone. This combinatorial therapy may become a better and effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27194912

  12. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in pancreatic acinar carcinoma of rat.

    PubMed

    Taton, G; Delhaye, M; Swillens, S; Morisset, J; Larose, L; Longnecker, D S; Poirier, G G

    1985-04-15

    The active enantiomer of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H(-)QNB) was used as a ligand to evaluate the muscarinic receptors. The 3H(-)QNB binding characteristics of muscarinic cholinergic receptors obtained from normal and neoplastic tissues were studied to determine changes in receptor properties during neoplastic transformation. Saturable and stereospecific binding sites for 3H(-)QNB are present in homogenates of rat pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The proportions of high- and low-affinity agonist binding sites are similar for neoplastic and normal tissues. The density of muscarinic receptors is higher in neoplastic (200 femtomoles/mg protein) than in normal pancreatic homogenates (80 femtomoles/mg protein). The muscarinic binding sites of the neoplastic and fetal pancreas show similar KD values which are higher than those observed for normal pancreas. PMID:2580801

  13. Capecitabine and radiation therapy preceded and followed by combination chemotherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Bryan J.; McGinn, Cornelius J.; Chang, Alfred E.; Colletti, Lisa M.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Hejna, Gwen F. P.A.; Zalupski, Mark M. . E-mail: Zalupski@umich.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the tolerance and toxicity of radiation therapy (RT) and capecitabine in patients with advanced, unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. To control micrometastatic disease, combination chemotherapy (gemcitabine and cisplatin) before and after combined modality therapy (CMT) was planned. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer were eligible. Gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} and cisplatin 35 mg/m{sup 2} were administered on Days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle for two cycles. RT was then given to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions. Patients were treated with capecitabine 1330 mg/m{sup 2} daily during RT. After CMT, two additional cycles of gemcitabine and cisplatin completed the treatment. Results: Twenty-three patients were treated. Eighteen patients completed CMT. One patient was removed from study during CMT for toxicity issues. Treatment delays and dose reductions were common during the final two cycles of gemcitabine and cisplatin as a result of myelosuppression. Median survival was 10.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.6, 13.7) for all 23 patients and 12.8 months (95% CI = 8.2, 18.9) for 18 patients without metastasis. Conclusion: Combined modality therapy with RT and capecitabine was well tolerated. Chemotherapy after CMT was difficult to complete owing to cumulative myelosuppression. Survival, response, and toxicity were comparable to infusional 5-fluorouracil and RT.

  14. Management of advanced primary urethral carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Dayyani, Farshid; Hoffman, Karen; Eifel, Patricia; Guo, Charles; Vikram, Raghu; Pagliaro, Lance C; Pettaway, Curtis

    2014-07-01

    Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare malignancy accounting for <1% of genitourinary cancers, with a predilection for men and African-Americans. The sites and histology of urethral carcinoma vary by gender and anatomical location. Squamous cell carcinoma is most common among both genders but adenocarcinomas are noted in 15-35% of cases among women. Obstructive or irritative symptoms and haematuria are common modes of presentation. Clinical evaluation includes cystourethroscopy with biopsy and examination under anaesthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a highly effective method to image the primary tumour while defıning the potential involvement of surrounding structures. Most tumours are localised, with regional metastases to nodal sites seen in up to 30% of cases in both genders, while distant metastases at presentation are rare (0-6%), but occur in up to 40% of cases with recurrent disease. Among men, the two most important prognostic factors are disease location and stage. Low-stage tumours (T1-2) and tumours involving the fossa navicularis or the penile urethra have a better prognosis than higher stage tumours (>T2 or N+) and lesions involving the bulbomembranous urethra. In women, in addition to stage and location, the size of the tumour has also prognostic implications. While surgery and radiation therapy (RT) are of benefit in early stage disease, advanced stage PUC requires multimodal treatment strategies to optimise local control and survival. These include induction chemotherapy followed by surgery or RT and concurrent chemoradiation with or without surgery. The latter strategy has been used successfully to treat other human papillomavirus-related cancers of the vagina, cervix and anus and may be of value in achieving organ preservation. Given the rarity of PUC, prospective multi-institutional studies are needed to better define the optimal treatment approach for this disease entity. PMID:24447439

  15. Characterization of 47D10, a glycoprotein associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.K.; Kato, K.P.; Murray, J.H.; Wolfe, H.; Rabin, H.; Carney, W.P.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb), 47D10, was raised against a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549. 47D10 bound to lines derived from breast, colon, lung, and pancreatic tumors, but not to normal fibroblasts. Granulocytes also expressed 47D10 but red blood cells and lymphocytes were negative. Immunoperoxidase staining of paraffin-embedded tissues indicated that 47D10 was reactive with 36 out of 38 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but not with chronic pancreatitis, regenerative pancreas or normal pancreas. The 47D10 antigen was a group of surface glycoproteins ranging from 63-97Kd (average Mr 85Kd). The antigen could be labeled by /sup 35/S-methionine, /sup 125/I, tritiated glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. Pulse-chase labeling showed that the 63-97Kd mature antigens were derived from precursors of 63Kd and 65Kd. The mature antigen was sensitive to endoglycosidase F (endo F) whereas the precursors were susceptible to both endoglycosidase H and endo F. Endo F digestion resulted in a polypeptide of 38Kd. Therefore, the 47D10 antigen is composed of at least 55% N-linked carbohydrates. The 47D10 MAb seems to be distinct from previously identified MAb against pancreatic tumors and may be useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma.

  16. Treatment of advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    Although thymic epithelial tumors are rare, they are relatively common among neoplasms of the anterior superior mediastinum. They usually exhibit indolent behavior, but do have the capacity to invade surrounding structures and metastasize to distant sites. Thymic carcinomas are rare, but are highly aggressive tumors that are associated with a poor prognosis. The mainstay of therapy is complete surgical resection. Locally advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma require a multimodality treatment approach with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy to decrease the chances of recurrence and improve survival. The risk of disease recurrence lasts for a number of years after completion of primary therapy. A majority of cases of recurrent disease present as pleural recurrences. Once again, surgical resection of recurrent disease represents the cornerstone of successful therapy and is critical to long-term survival. In recent years, a better understanding of the biologic basis of thymic epithelial tumors has led to the emergence of targeted therapy directed against this malignancy. PMID:19381821

  17. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  18. Advances of imaging for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2010-07-01

    A variety of imaging modalities, including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine, and angiography, are currently used in evaluating patients with chronic liver disease and suspected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Further technological advancement will undoubtedly have a major impact on liver tumor imaging. Increased speed of data acquisition and consequently shorter scan times in CT and MRI show further improvement in resolution by further reducing motion artifacts. Development of new contrast materials for liver tumor imaging in US and MRI improve tumor detection and characterization by increasing the contrast resolution. Currently available advanced US techniques in the evaluation of HCC are various harmonic imaging techniques with contrast agents, volume imaging, and recently, US elastography, that has been developing and might play a role in characterizing liver nodules in the future. The latest advance in CT is the multidetector (MD) CT scanner where a 256- or 320-detector CT was introduced. Recent studies describe the high sensitivity of double arterial phase imaging in hepatic tumor detection and the usefulness of CT angiography by using MD CT in a detailed assessment of hepatic arterial anatomy using a three-dimensional dataset. In addition, perfusion CT imaging is also being developed and can be used for the characterization and treatment monitoring of HCC. Dual-energy CT with new technology is also continuously progressing. Advances in MR technology, including hardware and pulse sequence implementation, allow acquisition times to be reduced to the time frame of one breathhold, providing multiphasic dynamic MRI. Functional MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI, MR elastography, and new MR contrast agent with dual function have been investigated for the clinical utility of detection and characterization of HCCs. Functional MRI has a potential to be a promising technique for assessing HCC. PMID:20616584

  19. Experimental virotherapy of chemoresistant pancreatic carcinoma using infectivity-enhanced fiber-mosaic oncolytic adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Curiel, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a significant clinical problem and novel therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Recent advances in conditionally replicative adenovirus-based (CRAd) oncolytic virus design allow the application of CRAd vectors as a therapeutic strategy to efficiently target and eradicate chemoresistant pancreatic cancer cells thereby improving the efficacy of pancreatic cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to construct and validate the efficacy of an infectivity-enhanced, liver-untargeted, tumor-specific CRAd vector. A panel of CRAds has been derived which embody the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter for conditional replication, two fiber complex mosaicism for targeting expansion, and hexon hypervariable region 7 (HVR7) modification for liver untargeting. We evaluated CRAds for cancer virotherapy using a human pancreatic tumor xenograft model. Employment of the fiber mosaic approach improved CRAd replication in pancreatic tumor xenografts. Substitution of the HVR7 of the Ad5 hexon for Ad serotype 3 hexon resulted in decreased liver tropism of systemically administrated CRAd. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of complex mosaicism increased efficacy of the combination of oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy in a human pancreatic tumor xenograft model. PMID:24903014

  20. Inflammatory networks and immune surveillance of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vonderheide, Robert H.; Bayne, Lauren J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated inflammation plays an important role in restraining anti-tumor immunity, particularly in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) for which a massive infiltration of immunosuppressive leukocytes into the tumor stroma is an early and consistent event in oncogenesis. This pathophysiology is in contrast to many other solid tumors for which infiltration of effector T cells is often prominent, associated with improved clinical outcomes, and mechanistically contributes to tumor immunoediting that ultimately can mediate immune escape. In PDA, increasing evidence suggests that the ras oncogene drives an inflammatory program that establishes immune privilege in the tumor microenvironment. Indeed, PDA cells might remain intrinsically sensitive to T cell killing because they have never been exposed to T cell selective pressure in vivo. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies demonstrate that derailing immune suppressive pathways in the PDA microenvironment, such as tumor derived GM-CSF, facilitates T-cell mediated tumor rejection. These findings carry major implications for the development of novel, combination immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23422836

  1. Imaging Characteristics and Prevalence of Pancreatic Carcinoma in Kosovo During 2011-2015 - Diagnostic Method as Choice

    PubMed Central

    Dedushi, Kreshnike; Kabashi, Serbeze; Mucaj, Sefedin; Hasbahta, Gazmed; Ramadani, Naser; Hoxhaj, Astrit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is the 10thmost common malignancy and the 4thlargest cancer killer in adults. Aim: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the number of cases presented with pancreatic carcinoma during the years 2011-2015, our experience of the imaging characteristics of pancreatic carcinoma. We evaluated prevalence of the pancreatic cancers, distant metastases and other local infiltration signs among the total cases of the pancreatic cancers diagnosed in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo, with the aim to compare these research findings to similar studies made in the developed countries. This is a retrospective research study done during the period of 2011-2015. Materials and Methodology: This retrospective research study includes 362 patients recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, examined in the period of 2011-2015 at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The imaging diagnostics are performed with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens, MSCT Emotion 6 Siemens, and 1.5T MRI Symphony Siemens, biopsy guide with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens in the Radiologic Clinic of UCCK; while the histopathology diagnostics has been performed in Clinic of Pathology at UCCK and prevalence is taken from the number of cases Reported at the Institute of Oncology Institute of Statistics and NIPH (National Institute of Public Health of Kosovo). Results: Out of a total of the 362 patients diagnosed with pancreas cancer, results is female 39.5% (n=143) and male 61.5% (n=219), report M: F (1: 1.6), 286 cases resulted in head and neck 79 % (n=286), 76 cases resulted in body and tail cancers (21%), distant metastases in first imaging modality were found in(n=155) patients 43 %, local infiltration was found in patients: gastric infiltration 15 % (n=54), duodenal and papilla infiltration 26% (n=94), local infiltration spleen 16% (n=57), local infiltration mesentery 43 % (n= 155), dilated biliary tree 34 % (n=123), regional lymph node infiltration 83 % (n= 300). Out of a total

  2. Clinical Impact of Pancreatic Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Paolo; Doucet, Ludovic; Giglione, Palma; Grünwald, Viktor; Melichar, Bohuslav; Galli, Luca; De Giorgi, Ugo; Sabbatini, Roberto; Ortega, Cinzia; Santoni, Matteo; Bamias, Aristotelis; Verzoni, Elena; Derosa, Lisa; Studentova, Hana; Pacifici, Monica; Coppa, Jorgelina; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; de Braud, Filippo; Porta, Camillo; Escudier, Bernard; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are uncommon and their prognostic significance is not well defined. In this analysis we evaluated the outcome of patients with pancreatic metastases treated with either targeted therapies or local treatment to the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma treated between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 11 European centers. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to evaluate progression-free survival and overall survival. Cox's proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis. In total, 276 PM patients were evaluated, including 77 (28%) patients treated by either surgery or radiotherapy to the pancreas, and 256 (93%) who received systemic therapy. Median time from nephrectomy to diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 91 months (IQR 54-142). Disease control rate after first-line TTs was 84%, with a median progression-free survival of 12 months (95% CI 10-14). Median overall survival was 73 months (95% CI 61-86) with a 5-year OS of 58%. Median OS of patients treated with local treatment was 106 months (95% CI 78-204) with a 5-year overall survival of 75%. On multivariable analysis, nephrectomy (HR 5.31; 95%CI 2.36-11.92; p<0.0001), Memorial Sloan Kettering/International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium prognostic score (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.94-2.23 for intermediate vs good vs risk; HR 2.76 95%, CI 1.43-5.35 for poor vs good risk p = 0.0099) and pancreatic local treatment (HR 0.48; 95%CI 0.30-0.78 p = 0.0029) were associated with overall survival. Difference in median OS between patients with PM and that reported in a matched-control group of mRCC patients with extrapancreatic metastases was statistically significant (p < .0001). Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma usually occur years after nephrectomy, are associated with an indolent behavior and a prolonged survival. Targeted therapies and locoregional

  3. Clinical Impact of Pancreatic Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Paolo; Doucet, Ludovic; Giglione, Palma; Grünwald, Viktor; Melichar, Bohuslav; Galli, Luca; De Giorgi, Ugo; Sabbatini, Roberto; Ortega, Cinzia; Santoni, Matteo; Bamias, Aristotelis; Verzoni, Elena; Derosa, Lisa; Studentova, Hana; Pacifici, Monica; Coppa, Jorgelina; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; de Braud, Filippo; Porta, Camillo; Escudier, Bernard; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are uncommon and their prognostic significance is not well defined. In this analysis we evaluated the outcome of patients with pancreatic metastases treated with either targeted therapies or local treatment to the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma treated between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 11 European centers. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to evaluate progression-free survival and overall survival. Cox’s proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis. In total, 276 PM patients were evaluated, including 77 (28%) patients treated by either surgery or radiotherapy to the pancreas, and 256 (93%) who received systemic therapy. Median time from nephrectomy to diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 91 months (IQR 54–142). Disease control rate after first-line TTs was 84%, with a median progression-free survival of 12 months (95% CI 10–14). Median overall survival was 73 months (95% CI 61–86) with a 5-year OS of 58%. Median OS of patients treated with local treatment was 106 months (95% CI 78–204) with a 5-year overall survival of 75%. On multivariable analysis, nephrectomy (HR 5.31; 95%CI 2.36–11.92; p<0.0001), Memorial Sloan Kettering/International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium prognostic score (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.94–2.23 for intermediate vs good vs risk; HR 2.76 95%, CI 1.43–5.35 for poor vs good risk p = 0.0099) and pancreatic local treatment (HR 0.48; 95%CI 0.30–0.78 p = 0.0029) were associated with overall survival. Difference in median OS between patients with PM and that reported in a matched-control group of mRCC patients with extrapancreatic metastases was statistically significant (p < .0001). Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma usually occur years after nephrectomy, are associated with an indolent behavior and a prolonged survival. Targeted therapies and

  4. KLF4 is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Francesca; Morelli, Mariangela; Menicagli, Michele; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Zavaglia, Katia; Paolucci, Alessandra; Campani, Daniela; Aretini, Paolo; Boggi, Ugo; Mosca, Franco; Cavazzana, Andrea; Cartegni, Luca; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria

    2011-01-01

    Ductal pancreatic carcinoma (DPC) is a deadly disease with an incidence of 9 cases in 100,000 people per year and a mortality rate close to 100%. Allelic losses in the long arm of chromosome 9 are commonly encountered in many human malignancies but no data are yet available about DPC. We screened 40 laser-microdissected DPC samples and 6 pre-invasive lesions for 9 microsatellite mapping markers of region 9q21.3 through 9q34.2. A small overlapping region of deletion, spanning 8 million base pairs, was identified between D9S127 and D9S105. Two genes, RSG3 and KLF4, mapped to 9q31.1 through 9q32, were further investigated. A highly significant association was found between KLF4 gene expression levels and genomic status. Similarly, absence of immunohistochemical expression of KLF4 protein was found in 86.8% cases of DPC (33/38). Overexpression of KLF4 in a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line induced a significant decrease in the proliferation associated with up-regulation of p21 and the down-regulation of cyclin D1. In conclusion, we identified a novel oncosuppressor region located at the 9q 31.1-3 locus that is lost in DPC at high frequency. Loss of KLF4 expression is closely related to the genomic loss, and its restoration inhibits cancer cell proliferation, suggesting a key suppressor role in pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:21224073

  5. Long-Term Progression-Free Survival in a Patient with Locally Advanced, Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Leonel A; Matin, Mahan; Bold, Richard J; Tanaka, Michael I; Monjazeb, Arta M

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is amongst the most lethal malignancies with dismal five-year survival rates. Surgical excision is the mainstay of therapy and unresectable disease is considered incurable. Herein, we describe a patient with unresectable, advanced stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma with a remarkable clinical course following definitive chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26824007

  6. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  7. Advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a review of current treatment strategies and developing therapies

    PubMed Central

    Teague, Andrea; Lim, Kian-Huat

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest solid malignancies. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of presentation and, unfortunately, this severely limits the number of patients who can undergo surgical resection, which offers the only chance for cure. Recent therapeutic advances for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have extended overall survival, but prognosis still remains grim. Given that traditional chemotherapy is ineffective in curing advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, current research is taking a multidirectional approach in the hopes of developing more effective treatments. This article reviews the major clinical trial data that is the basis for the current chemotherapy regimens used as first- and second-line treatments for advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We also review the current ongoing clinical trials, which include the use of agents targeting the oncogenic network signaling of K-Ras, agents targeting the extracellular matrix, and immune therapies. PMID:25755680

  8. Nab-paclitaxel as alternative treatment regimen in advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Unseld, Matthias; Scheithauer, Werner; Weigl, Roman; Kornek, Gabriela; Stranzl, Nadja; Bianconi, Daniela; Brunauer, Georg; Steger, Guenther; Zielinski, Christoph C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma has a poor prognosis with limited therapeutic options. Nab-paclitaxel has recently been described to be beneficial in metastatic pancreatic cancer improving overall and progression free survival (PFS). The potential antitumor activity of nab-paclitaxel in cholangiocellular carcinoma is hitherto unknown. Methods We retrospectively analyzed an institutional cholangiocellular carcinoma registry to determine the potential biological activity of nab-paclitaxel in advanced intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma. Disease control rate (DCR), PFS and overall survival (OS) upon nab-paclitaxel based treatment, after failure of platinum-containing first-line combination chemotherapy, was assessed. Results Twelve patients were identified. Five of 12 patients (42%) received nab-paclitaxel as second line, and 7 patients (56%) as third-line treatment. The objective DCR with nab-paclitaxel was 83% (10/12 patients). One patient had a complete remission (CR), two patients had a partial remission (PR) and 7 patients had stable disease (SD). Disease was rated progressive in two patients. In all 12 patients receiving nab-paclitaxel the median time to progression was 6 months (range, 2.1–19.5 months). Median OS after initiation of nab-paclitaxel treatment was 9 months (2.1–28.4 months). The median time of survival after diagnosis of advanced disease was 21.5 months, whereby 3 patients were alive at the date of censoring (04/01/2015). Conclusions This is the first report suggesting substantial antitumor activity of nab-paclitaxel in advanced cholangiocellular carcinoma. In this small series, nab-paclitaxel based salvage chemotherapy appears to have a biological activity by controlling the disease and positively affecting survival. Randomized trials in this disease entity and subgroup of patients are urged. PMID:27563449

  9. Advances in systemic treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wan-Ling; Tan, Eng-Huat; Lim, Darren Wan-Teck; Ng, Quan-Sing; Tan, Daniel Shao-Weng; Jain, Amit; Ang, Mei-Kim

    2016-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a unique disease endemic in Asia. It is etiologically linked to the Epstein-Barr virus and is both radio- and chemo-sensitive. While radiotherapy (RT) remains the primary treatment modality with high cure rates for early stage disease, systemic treatment forms an important integral component in the treatment of NPC, both in the non-metastatic as well as palliative setting. Presently, standard therapy in locally advanced NPC comprises conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy administered concurrently during RT. The role of induction chemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy remain to be well-defined. Further research strategies in non-metastatic disease will require better identification of patients with high risk disease, and determining the optimal sequence and combination of chemotherapeutic regimens. In metastatic disease, whilst chemotherapy remains the mainstay of care, resistance inevitably develops. Development of molecularly targeted therapies has not yielded much success to date, and further research has been focused on development of EBV-targeted strategies such as vaccination or administration of cytotoxic T-cells directed towards EBV, as well as evaluation of immune checkpoint inhibition approaches. PMID:27121881

  10. Multimodal therapy in locally advanced breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, M.J.; Andriole, D.P.; Kraybill, W.G.; Khojasteh, A. )

    1990-12-01

    Among 879 patients treated for breast cancer between 1975 and 1984, advanced disease was found in 125 (14%). A subgroup of 34 (4%) presented with untreated locally advanced disease without demonstrable distant metastases at the time of diagnosis (stage IIIB = T4abed, NX-2,MO). During the first 5 years (1975 through 1979), 17 patients were treated primarily with sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy (Group A). From 1980 to 1984 (Group B), the management consisted of four courses of induction multi-drug chemotherapy followed primarily by mastectomy and additional chemotherapy. The mean follow-up for the most recent group (Group B) is 48 months. Follow-up was complete. While the local disease control rate was the same for both groups (76%), the survival was remarkably different. Group A patients experienced a median survival of 15 months, and only one survived 5 years. In Group B, the median survival was 56 months with nine patients (53%) alive between 40 and 76 months, seven (41%) of whom are 5-year survivors. While the overall mortality of patients with inflammatory breast cancer was greater in both groups when compared with the group with noninflammatory disease, the survival of patients in Group B was better than in Group A for both inflammatory and noninflammatory cancers (p less than 0.01). Estrogen receptor, nodal, and menopausal status did not influence survival. These data suggest that neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves survival for patients with stage IIIB breast carcinoma and delays the establishment or progression of distant metastases. Mastectomy is an important component in the treatment of this disease.

  11. Phytotherapy of chronic abdominal pain following pancreatic carcinoma surgery: a single case observation

    PubMed Central

    Wiebelitz, Karl Rüdiger; Beer, André-Michael

    2012-01-01

    A patient with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed in 2005 suffered from chronic abdominal pain 6 years later that did not respond to conventional pain treatment according to guidelines. Furthermore, several complementary medical approaches remained ineffective. In the long run, only an Iberis amara drug combination relieved pain sufficiently. The drug is registered in Germany for the indications irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. The multi-target approach of this combination drug may account for the effectiveness under these fundamentally different pathophysiological conditions. No serious undesired effects have been described in the use of this drug for other indications and none were observed in this case. PMID:23097614

  12. Metronomic temozolomide as second line treatment for metastatic poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De Divitiis, C; von Arx, C; Grimaldi, A M; Cicala, D; Tatangelo, F; Arcella, A; Romano, G M; Simeone, E; Iaffaioli, R V; Ascierto, P A; Tafuto, S

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (NEN) are a group of heterogeneous malignancies derived from neuroendocrine cell compartment, with different roles in both endocrine and nervous system. Most NETs have gastroentero-pancreatic (GEP) origin, arising in the foregut, midgut, or hindgut. The 2010 WHO classification divides GEP-NETs into two main subgroups, neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC), according with Ki-67 levels. NET are tumors with low (<20 %) Ki-67 value, and NECs, including small cell lung carcinomas and Merkel Cell carcinomas, are all NETs with high Ki-67 levels (>20 %-G3). Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) are usually treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. Here we present a case of a patient with pancreatic NEC progressing after cisplatin and etoposide, treated with temozolomide as palliative, second line treatment. According with the poor Performance Status (PS = 2) and to reduce the toxicity of the treatment was chosen an intermittent dosing regimen of metronomic temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)/day-one-week-on/on-week-off). MGMT resulted methylated. On July 2014 the patient started the treatment. On August 2014 the patient obtained a significant clinical benefit (PS = 0) and the total body CT scan performed on October 2014 showed a RECIST partial response on all the sites of disease. No drug-related side effects were reported by the patient. After 18 months of therapy the treatment continues without significant toxicity, and with further remission of the metastases. Treatment with metronomic "one-week-on/on-week-off" Temozolomide can be considered a good treatment option in patients with poor performance status, affected by pNEC with MGMT methylation. PMID:27142424

  13. [Resection for advanced pancreatic cancer following multimodal therapy].

    PubMed

    Kleeff, J; Stöß, C; Yip, V; Knoefel, W T

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients presenting with borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable tumors remain a therapeutic challenge. Despite the lack of high quality randomized controlled trials, perioperative neoadjuvant treatment strategies are often employed for this group of patients. At present the FOLFIRINOX regimen, which was established in the palliative setting, is the backbone of neoadjuvant therapy, whereas local ablative treatment, such as stereotactic irradiation and irreversible electroporation are currently under investigation. Resection after modern multimodal neoadjuvant therapy follows the same principles and guidelines as upfront surgery specifically regarding the extent of resection, e.g. lymphadenectomy, vascular resection and multivisceral resection. Because it is still exceedingly difficult to predict tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy, a special treatment approach is necessary. In the case of localized stable disease following neoadjuvant therapy, aggressive surgical exploration with serial frozen sections at critical (vascular) margins might be necessary to minimize the risk of debulking procedures and maximize the chance of a curative resection. A multidisciplinary and individualized approach is mandatory in this challenging group of patients. PMID:27138271

  14. Advances and challenges in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdelalim, Essam M; Emara, Mohamed M

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are able to differentiate into several cell types, including pancreatic β cells. Differentiation of pancreatic β cells depends on certain transcription factors, which function in a coordinated way during pancreas development. The existing protocols for in vitro differentiation produce pancreatic β cells, which are not highly responsive to glucose stimulation except after their transplantation into immune-compromised mice and allowing several weeks for further differentiation to ensure the maturation of these cells in vivo. Thus, although the substantial improvement that has been made for the differentiation of induced PSCs and embryonic stem cells toward pancreatic β cells, several challenges still hindering their full generation. Here, we summarize recent advances in the differentiation of PSCs into pancreatic β cells and discuss the challenges facing their differentiation as well as the different applications of these potential PSC-derived β cells. PMID:25621117

  15. Thickening of the celiac axis and/or superior mesenteric artery: a sign of pancreatic carcinoma on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Bosniak, M.A.; Ambos, M.A.; Beranbaum, E.R.

    1981-11-01

    Of 53 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas studied by computed tomography, 20 (37.7%) had apparent thickening of either the celiac axis or superior mesenteric artery. In 6 of them, the pancreatic mass was poorly defined. The frequency of this sign, correlation with angiographic findings, and pathogenesis are discussed.

  16. Spiclomazine Induces Apoptosis Associated with the Suppression of Cell Viability, Migration and Invasion in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuojia; Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2013-01-01

    The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver (HL-7702) cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion. PMID:23840452

  17. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient's clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  18. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient’s clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  19. Repeated pancreatectomy for metachronous duodenal and pancreatic metastases of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hata, Tatsuo; Sakata, Naoaki; Aoki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kanno, Atsushi; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Unno, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman had undergone left nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma 13 years previously. Ten years later, a solitary metastatic tumor had been detected in the pancreatic tail and she had undergone subsequent resection of the pancreatic tail and spleen. Three years after surgery, she was admitted to our hospital for severe anemia resulting from gastrointestinal tract bleeding. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 3-cm solid tumor at the oral side of the papilla of Vater. Histology of the bioptic duodenal tissue revealed inflammatory granulation without malignancy. Computed tomography showed a well-contrasted hypervascular tumor in the descending portion of the duodenum. We diagnosed the patient with metachronous duodenal metastasis of renal cell carcinoma and performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy. An ulcerated polypoid mass was detected at the oral side of the papilla of Vater. Histology revealed clear cell carcinoma coated by granulation tissue across the surface of the tumor. Immunohistology demonstrated that the cells were positive for vimentin, CD10 and epithelial membrane antigen and negative for CK7. After a repeated pancreatectomy, the patient had no symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding and maintained good glucose tolerance without insulin therapy because the remnant pancreas functioned well. In conclusion, for the diagnosis of patients who have previously undergone nephrectomy and present with gastrointestinal bleeding, the possibility of metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract, including the duodenum, should be considered. With respect to surgical treatment, the pancreas should be minimally resected to maintain a free surgical margin during the first surgery taking into account further metachronous metastasis to the duodenum and pancreas. PMID:24403883

  20. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  1. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  2. Prolonged complete response following gemcitabine-erlotinib combined therapy in advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    CZARNECKA, ANNA M.; KORZEŃ, PIOTR; NOWAK-DEMENT, ANNA; KUKWA, WOJCIECH; KORNILUK, JAN; SZCZYLIK, CEZARY

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal types of malignant solid tumor and is typically associated with a poor prognosis. The majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced-stage disease, therefore, the median survival period is <6 months. Recently, a number of basic research projects and clinical trials were undertaken with the aim of improving treatment outcomes in pancreatic cancer; however, only one agent, erlotinib, passed the clinical trials. Erlotinib is an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor, which when overexpressed in cancer, promotes angiogenesis, cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency approved erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine for the first-line treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first to report a case of pancreatic cancer treated with this regimen alone to achieve a complete response (CR). A 40-year-old male with a medical history of chronic pancreatitis and hypertension was diagnosed with medically inoperable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Following palliative surgery, the patient began palliative gemcitabine and erlotinib chemotherapy. After three months, this treatment strategy resulted in a CR, as determined by imaging studies. Therapy was discontinued after 14 months due to the development of peritoneal metastases and the patient was referred for treatment with the folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin regimen. A CR is rarely reported in pancreatic cancer, however, a treatment strategy of gemcitabine and erlotinib may induce rapid regression of advanced-stage disease. PMID:26893699

  3. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... open. Balloon dilatation. Some endoscopes have a small balloon that the doctor uses to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  4. Fractionated Radioimmunotherapy With 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan and Low-Dose Gemcitabine Is Active in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ocean, Allyson J.; Pennington, Kenneth L.; Guarino, Michael J.; Sheikh, Arif; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Serafini, Aldo N.; Lee, Daniel; Sung, Max W.; Gulec, Seza A.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Manzone, Timothy; Holt, Michael; O’Neil, Bert H.; Hall, Nathan; Montero, Alberto J.; Kauh, John; Gold, David V.; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been demonstrated that the humanized clivatuzumab tetraxetan (hPAM4) antibody targets pancreatic ductal carcinoma selectively. After a trial of radioimmunotherapy that determined the maximum tolerated dose of single-dose yttrium-90-labeled hPAM4 (90Y-hPAM4) and produced objective responses in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal carcinoma, the authors studied fractionated radioimmunotherapy combined with low-dose gemcitabine in this disease. METHODS Thirty-eight previously untreated patients (33 patients with stage IV disease and 5 patients with stage III disease) received gemcitabine 200 mg/m2 weekly for 4 weeks with 90Y-hPAM4 given weekly in Weeks 2, 3, and 4 (cycle 1), and the same cycle was repeated in 13 patients (cycles 2–4). In the first part of the study, 19 patients received escalating weekly 90Y doses of 6.5 mCi/m2, 9.0 mCi/m2, 12.0 mCi/m2, and 15.0 mCi/m2. In the second portion, 19 additional patients received weekly doses of 9.0 mCi/m2 or 12.0 mCi/m2. RESULTS Grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia or neutropenia (according to version 3.0 of the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) developed in 28 of 38 patients after cycle 1 and in all retreated patients; no grade >3 nonhematologic toxicities occurred. Fractionated dosing of cycle 1 allowed almost twice the radiation dose compared with single-dose radioimmunotherapy. The maximum tolerated dose of 90Y-hPAM4 was 12.0 mCi/m2 weekly for 3 weeks for cycle 1, with ≤9.0 mCi/m2 weekly for 3 weeks for subsequent cycles, and that dose will be used in future trials. Six patients (16%) had partial responses according to computed tomography-based Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, and 16 patients (42%) had stabilization as their best response (58% disease control). The median overall survival was 7.7 months for all 38 patients, including 11.8 months for those who received repeated cycles (46% [6 of 13 patients] ≥1 year), with improved efficacy at

  5. Combination of Recombinant Adenovirus-p53 with Radiochemotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-luan; Cai, Yong; Zhang, Shan-wen; Xiao, Shao-wen; Li, Xiao-fan; Duan, You-jia; Li, Yong-heng; Xu, Bo; Yan, Kun

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of the combination of recombinant adenovirus-p53 (rAd-p53) with radiochemotherapy for treating unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods The eligible patients received concurrent rAd-p53 intratumoral injection and radiochemotherapy. Intratumoral injection of rAd-p53 was guided by B ultrasound. Radiochemotherapy consisted of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at two dose levels and intravenous gemcitabine (Gem). For radiotherapy, gross target volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were 55-60 Gy and 45-55 Gy in 25-30 fractions, respectively. Concurrent intravenous gemcitabine was administered at 350 mg/m2, weekly, for 6 weeks. The primary end points included toxicity, clinical benefit response (CBR) and disease control rate (DCR). The secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Fifteen eligible patients were enrolled. Eight patients (53.3%) were evaluated as CBR and 12 (80%) achieved DCR. The median PFS and OS were 6.7 and 13.8 months, respectively. One-year PFS and OS were 40.0% and 51.1%, respectively. There were 8 (53.3%) patients reported grade 3 toxicities including neutropenia (6 patients, 40%), fever (1 patient, 6.7%) and fatigue (1 patient, 6.7%). There was no grade 4 toxicity reported. Conclusion Combination of rAd-p53 in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma showed encouraging efficacious benefit and was well tolerated. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm the improvement of PFS and OS. PMID:23467436

  6. Combination of Two Targeted Medications (Bevacizumab Plus Cetuximab) Improve the Therapeutic Response of Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Huang, Ming-Te; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Wang, Chien-Kai; Tai, Chen-Jei; Chang, Chun-Chao; Hsieh, Cheng-I.; Chang, Yu-Jia; Wu, Chang-Jer; Kuo, Li-Jen; Wei, Po-Lei; Chen, Ray-Jade; Chiou, Hung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety profiles of the targeted medications, bevacizumab and cetuximab, in combination with cytostatic drugs in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. In this retrospective phase 2 study, a total of 59 patients with pancreatic cancer were recruited and received conventional (gemcitabine, cisplatin, and fluorouracil) or targeted regimen (conventional plus bevacizumab and cetuximab for the first cycle) in 2-week intervals for four cycles. The primary end-point for this study was the overall response rate. Secondary end-points were progression-free survival and the safety profiles of the combined therapy. The median time-to-progression and overall survival were 3 and 7 months, respectively, in the conventional treatment group as well as 11 and 13 months, respectively, in the targeted medications treatment group. The most common adverse events in both treatment groups were nausea and vomiting. Moderate (Grade 2) nausea and vomiting were more common in the conventional group than the targeted group but severe (Grade 3) nausea and vomiting were more common in the targeted group. Bevacizumab and cetuximab in combination with gemcitabine, cisplatin, and fluorouracil may help lengthen overall survival up to six months for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:27082562

  7. Chemotherapy and prognosis in advanced thymic carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhengbo; Yu, Xinmin; Zhang, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The role of chemotherapy in treating advanced thymic carcinoma is unclear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognostic factors for patients with advanced thymic carcinoma. METHODS: A retrospective review of the medical records of 86 patients treated with chemotherapy for advanced thymic carcinoma was conducted between 2000 and 2012 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, chemotherapy regimens and prognostic factors were analyzed. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan–Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Of the 86 patients, 56 were male and 30 were female. The median survival time was 24.5 months. For the first-line chemotherapy treatment, the objective response rate was 47.7% and the disease control rate was 80.2%. The median progression-free survival for all patients was 6.5 months for first-line chemotherapy. No significant differences in progression-free survival were observed among the different chemotherapy regimens. Multivariate analyses revealed that the prognostic factors for overall survival included performance status (p=0.043), histology grade (p=0.048), and liver metastasis (p=0.047). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that there is no difference in efficacy between multiagent and doublet regimens. The prognosis of patients with advanced thymic carcinoma can be predicted based on histological grade, liver metastasis and performance status. PMID:26735216

  8. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  9. How Grim is Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Enoworock, George; Mokake, Martin; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma continues to be the most lethal malignancy with rising incidence. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world due to its low treatment success rate. In addition, because of its rapid growth and silent course, diagnosis is often only established in the advanced stages. As one of the most aggressive malignancies, the treatment of this disease is a great challenge to clinicians. This paper reviewed the natural history of pancreatic cancer, the current clinical practice and the future in pancreatic cancer management. PMID:27471581

  10. Aldesleukin in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schmidinger, Manuela; Hejna, Michael; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2004-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma accounts for 2-3% of all malignancies. The most common subtype [85%] is the clear cell variant. A total of 30% of patients present with metastatic disease at diagnosis and another 30-40% will develop metastases during the course of the disease. Conventional cancer treatment is not effective, but cytokines including recombinant interleukin-2 (aldesleukin) have demonstrated clinical activity of various degrees. This drug profile provides a review of the literature on studies using aldesleukin in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Aldesleukin has been used in different dose schedules applying various administration routes, as either monotherapy or in combination with other cytokines, chemotherapy, endocrine treatment and adoptive cellular immunotherapy. Although a large number of randomized trials have been performed with different treatment strategies, it still remains uncertain whether the dose or combination of aldesleukin with other agents substantially influence treatment outcome. It appears that factors other than those that are treatment related are responsible for the course of the disease. PMID:15606326

  11. Utility of ovarian biopsy in pancreatic metastasis of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KOHEI; NAKAYAMA, KENTARO; ISHIKAWA, MASAKO; ISHIKAWA, NORIYOSHI; NAGASE, MAMIKO; KATAGIRI, HIROSHI; ISHIBASHI, TOMOKA; SATO, EMI; IIDA, KOHJI; SULTANA, RAZIA; KYO, SATORU

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare that ovarian carcinoma metastasizes to the pancreas, and pathological diagnosis is required to confirm the primary site. The present study reported a 73-year-old woman with serous carcinoma of the ovary that metastasized to the tail of the pancreas. Metastasis was confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical examination of a biopsy of the ovarian tumor, an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreatic tumor and computerized tomography-guided paraaortic lymph node biopsy. A biopsy of the ovarian tumor is useful to make a precise diagnosis and to determine proper treatment when ovarian and pancreatic tumors are identified at the same time and the primary neoplasm is uncertain. PMID:27330762

  12. Technical advances in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial placement for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya; DiMaio, Christopher J.; Siersema, Peter D.; Wagh, Mihir S.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has an important role in the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer and can be used alone or in conjunction with surgery and/or systemic chemotherapy. Because of the challenge of delivering an accurate and optimal radiation dose, image-guided radiation therapy can be used to improve targeting. Fiducial markers can be placed in the tumor and used for localization in patients undergoing image-guided radiation therapy. The safety and feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided placement of fiducials has been assessed and reported for the management of pancreatic cancer. We herein review the technique, efficacy, and safety profile of EUS-guided fiducial placement. In addition, we highlight recent advances and technological upgrades in EUS-guided fiducial delivery systems for pancreatic cancer most relevant to practicing gastroenterologists and interventional endoscopists. PMID:26355267

  13. Technical advances in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial placement for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya; DiMaio, Christopher J; Siersema, Peter D; Wagh, Mihir S

    2015-08-01

    Radiation therapy has an important role in the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer and can be used alone or in conjunction with surgery and/or systemic chemotherapy. Because of the challenge of delivering an accurate and optimal radiation dose, image-guided radiation therapy can be used to improve targeting. Fiducial markers can be placed in the tumor and used for localization in patients undergoing image-guided radiation therapy. The safety and feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided placement of fiducials has been assessed and reported for the management of pancreatic cancer. We herein review the technique, efficacy, and safety profile of EUS-guided fiducial placement. In addition, we highlight recent advances and technological upgrades in EUS-guided fiducial delivery systems for pancreatic cancer most relevant to practicing gastroenterologists and interventional endoscopists. PMID:26355267

  14. Molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and impact of therapeutic advances

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Bandoh, Salome; Roberts, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality and has an increasing incidence worldwide. HCC can be induced by multiple etiologies, is influenced by many risk factors, and has a complex pathogenesis. Furthermore, HCCs exhibit substantial heterogeneity, which compounds the difficulties in developing effective therapies against this highly lethal cancer. With advances in cancer biology and molecular and genetic profiling, a number of different mechanisms involved in the development and progression of HCC have been identified. Despite the advances in this area, the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma is still not completely understood. This review aims to elaborate our current understanding of the most relevant genetic alterations and molecular pathways involved in the development and progression of HCC, and anticipate the potential impact of future advances on therapeutic drug development. PMID:27239288

  15. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  16. Update on phase I studies in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Hunting in darkness?

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Alexios S; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-01

    Over the last twenty years, there is a limited number of effective cytotoxic or biological agents that managed to get approval in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite numerous trials, investments in translational research and generally in health care, the survival of pancreatic cancer patients has improved by a few only months. This disappointing reality necessitates a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease and the identification of targetable alterations which might lead to development of more effective drugs or better combinations. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, few novel agents and new therapeutic concepts, tested in phase I studies in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, were presented. The first notable phase I study referred to the combination of chemotherapy with local delivery of silencing RNA against the K-ras mutation G12D, in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which was well tolerated and promising (Abstract #4037). The second one referred to a combination of gemcitabine with pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase (PEGPH20), an inhibitor of hyaluronan which as a matrix glycosaminoglycan is believed to play role in the reduced drug delivery to cancer (Abstract #4010). The other notable abstract was related to an early phase study which tested the safety and toxicity of arctigenin, a traditional herbal agent found in Arctium lappa Linné, administered as an oral formulation (GMS-01) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patient resistant to standard chemotherapy (Abstract #2559). The aforementioned early phase studies open new therapeutic approaches which deserve further testing in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23846926

  17. Phase I trial of gefitinib with concurrent radiotherapy and fixed 2-h gemcitabine infusion, in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, Joan . E-mail: jmaurel@clinic.ub.es; Martin-Richard, Marta; Conill, Carlos; Sanchez, Marcelo; Petriz, Lourdes; Gines, Angels; Miquel, Rosa; Gallego, Rosa; Cajal, Rosana; Ayuso, Carmen; Navarro, Salvador; Marmol, Maribel; Nadal, Cristina; Auge, Josep Maria; Gascon, Pere; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancers are resistant to radiotherapy (RT) and current chemotherapy agents. Epidermal growth factor receptor is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and in vitro studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors can overcome radio- and chemoresistance. The aim of the study was to determine whether the addition of gefitinib to RT and gemcitabine for patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) was feasible and safe. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with pathologically proven LAPC, based on major vascular invasion based on helical computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, were entered into the study. The targeted irradiated volume included the tumor and 2-cm margin. Prophylactic irradiation of regional nodes was not allowed. Patients with >500 cm{sup 3} of planning tumor volume were excluded. An initial cohort of 6 patients was treated with RT (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) plus concomitant gefitinib (250 mg/day). Successive cohorts of patients received 100, 150, and 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day of gemcitabine in a 2-h infusion over Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 with gefitinib (250 mg/day) and RT. Gefitinib was continued after RT until progression. A pharmacodynamic study of angiogenic markers was also performed to evaluate a possible antiangiogenic effect. Results: There were no dose-limiting toxicities. Common toxicities were mild neutropenia, asthenia, diarrhea, cutaneous rash and nausea/vomiting. The median (95% confidence interval [CI]) progression-free survival was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.9-5.5) months, and the median overall survival was 7.5 (95% CI 5.2-9.9) months. No significant reduction of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 was observed after treatment. Conclusion: Our results support that the combination of gefitinib, RT, and gemcitabine has an acceptable toxicity but with modest activity in LAPC.

  18. A spindle cell anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma with rhabdoid features following curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihisa; Yonehara, Shuji; Kuranishi, Fumito; Nakahara, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (ANPC) accounts for ~5% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases. Due to its rarity, its clinical features and surgical outcomes remain to be clearly understood. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to Onomichi General Hospital (Onomichi, Japan) in April 2015 without any significant past medical history. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a 9.5×8.0 cm tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient developed acute abdominal pain 3 weeks later and the CT revealed massive abdominal bleeding caused by tumor rupture. The tumor increased in size and reached 12.0×10.0 cm in maximal diameter. The tumor doubling time was estimated to be 13 days. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT confirmed the absence of distant metastasis since FDG accumulation was detected only in the tumor lesion. Emergency distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features. The patient succumbed to mortality 8 months following the surgery while undergoing systemic adjuvant chemotherapy for multiple liver metastases. ANPC is difficult to detect in the early stages due to its progressive nature and atypical radiological findings. Long-term survival can be achieved only by curative resection; therefore, surgical resection must be performed whenever possible, even if the chance of long-term survival following surgery is considered dismal. As the present case suggested, spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features is highly aggressive and curative-intent resection must not be delayed. PMID:27446572

  19. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  20. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-08-21

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  1. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledocho-duodenostomy in advanced pancreatic cancer with duodenal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Mella, José Manuel; Guidi, Martín; De María, Julio; Hwang, Hui-Jer; Curvale, Cecilia R; Matano, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is considered the first-approach for biliary drainage. In cases of ERCP failure, patients are usually referred for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgical biliary bypass. In the last decade, the indications of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer have increased, and numerous cases of EUS-guided biliary drainage have been reported in patients with failures during the ERCP. Our goal is to report a patient with locally advanced pancreatic cancer who presented with painless jaundice and cholestasis with biliary and duodenal obstruction. A EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy was performed by placement of a self-expanding metal stent. PMID:26502467

  2. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  3. Recent advances in the imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    You, Myung-Won; Kim, Kyoung Won; Lee, So Jung; Shin, Yong Moon; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The role of imaging is crucial for the surveillance, diagnosis, staging and treatment monitoring of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Over the past few years, considerable technical advances were made in imaging of HCCs. New imaging technology, however, has introduced new challenges in our clinical practice. In this article, the current status of clinical imaging techniques for HCC is addressed. The diagnostic performance of imaging techniques in the context of recent clinical guidelines is also presented. PMID:25834808

  4. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  5. High intensity focused ultrasound: A noninvasive therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The noninvasive ablation of pancreatic cancer with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) energy is received increasingly widespread interest. With rapidly temperature rise to cytotoxic levels within the focal volume of ultrasound beams, HIFU can selectively ablate a targeted lesion of the pancreas without any damage to surrounding or overlying tissues. Preliminary studies suggest that this approach is technical safe and feasible, and can be used alone or in combination with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. It can effectively alleviate cancer-related abdominal pain, and may confer an additional survival benefit with few significant complications. This review provides a brief overview of HIFU, describes current clinical applications, summarizes characteristics of continuous and pulsed HIFU, and discusses future applications and challenges in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25469016

  6. High intensity focused ultrasound: a noninvasive therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng

    2014-11-28

    The noninvasive ablation of pancreatic cancer with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) energy is received increasingly widespread interest. With rapidly temperature rise to cytotoxic levels within the focal volume of ultrasound beams, HIFU can selectively ablate a targeted lesion of the pancreas without any damage to surrounding or overlying tissues. Preliminary studies suggest that this approach is technical safe and feasible, and can be used alone or in combination with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. It can effectively alleviate cancer-related abdominal pain, and may confer an additional survival benefit with few significant complications. This review provides a brief overview of HIFU, describes current clinical applications, summarizes characteristics of continuous and pulsed HIFU, and discusses future applications and challenges in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25469016

  7. Review of experimental animal models of biliary acute pancreatitis and recent advances in basic research

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Mei H; Huang, Wei; Latawiec, Diane; Jiang, Kun; Booth, David M; Elliott, Victoria; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Xia, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a formidable disease, which, in severe forms, causes significant mortality. Biliary AP, or gallstone obstruction-associated AP, accounts for 30–50% of all clinical cases of AP. In biliary AP, pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) death (the initiating event in the disease) is believed to occur as acinar cells make contact with bile salts when bile refluxes into the pancreatic duct. Recent advances have unveiled an important receptor responsible for the major function of bile acids on acinar cells, namely, the cell surface G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 (Gpbar1), located in the apical pole of the PAC. High concentrations of bile acids induce cytosolic Ca2+ overload and inhibit mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, resulting in cell injury to both PACs and pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Various bile salts are employed to induce experimental AP, most commonly sodium taurocholate. Recent characterization of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulphate on PACs has led researchers to focus on this bile salt because of its potency in causing acinar cell injury at relatively low, sub-detergent concentrations, which strongly implicates action via the receptor Gpbar1. Improved surgical techniques have enabled the infusion of bile salts into the pancreatic duct to induce experimental biliary AP in mice, which allows the use of these transgenic animals as powerful tools. This review summarizes recent findings using transgenic mice in experimental biliary AP. PMID:22221567

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy using CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ting-Shi; Liang, Ping; Lu, Huan-Zhen; Liang, Jian-Ning; Liu, Jian-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Ying-Chuan; Tang, Min-Yang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy using CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: From June 2010 to May 2014, 25 patients with locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy. Nine patients presented with unresectable locally advanced disease and 16 had metastatic disease. Primary end-points of this study were overall survival, relief of abdominal pain, and toxicity. RESULTS: Fourteen patients were treated with a total dose of 30-36 Gy in three fractions and the remainder with 40-48 Gy in four fractions. Median follow-up was 11 mo (range: 2-25 mo). The median survival duration calculated from the time of stereotactic body radiotherapy for the entire group, the locally advanced group, and the metastatic group was 9.0 mo, 13.5 mo, and 8.5 mo, respectively. Overall survival was 37% and 18% at one and two years, respectively. Abdominal pain relief was achieved within 2 wk of completing radiotherapy in the patients who received successful palliation (13 of 20 patients had significant pain). Five patients (20%) had grade 1 nausea, and one (4%) had grade 2 nausea. No acute grade 3+ toxicity was seen. CONCLUSION: Stereotactic body radiotherapy using the CyberKnife system is a promising, noninvasive, palliative treatment with acceptable toxicity for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:26185389

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pancreatic Metastases of a Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Waltraud; Fottner, Christian; Hansen, Torsten; Schad, Arno; Schadmand-Fischer, Simin; Weber, Matthias M.; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Lang, Hauke; Musholt, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Apart from regional lymph node metastases, systemic metastases occur sporadically in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC). The lung and bones are the most frequent localizations. Additionally known but extremely rare locations are metastases of the skeletal muscles, ovaries, submandibular gland, sphenoidal sinus, brain, adrenals, and, as shown in only two previously published cases to date, the pancreas. Summary In this article we report about two additional patients with pancreatic metastases from PTC. There is almost no prior experience about therapeutic approaches to this type of metastases. In both patients distant metastases within the pancreas were successfully removed. Postoperative histology confirmed the diagnoses. Supplemental genetic analysis did not demonstrate a BRAF V600E mutation or expression of a RET/PTC1 rearrangement in one case, but revealed a BRAF V600E mutation in the second case. Surgery avoided impending complications maintaining quality of life. One patient had a tumor-specific survival of 42 months. The other patient has occult disease. Conclusions Our two patients benefited of a calculated aggressive surgical action. Thus, if low perioperative mortality and morbidity can be warranted, surgical measures are justifiable in selected cases. PMID:20025539

  10. Sensitivity of cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells to Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Wu, M C; Arimura, G K; Holcenberg, J S; Yunis, A A

    1982-09-01

    Cultured human pancreatic carcinoma cells (MIA PaCa-2) have been shown previously to be very sensitive to E. coli L-asparaginase (EC II). The present studies have demonstrated that another enzyme, Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase (AGA) is much more effective in inhibiting cell growth. At the concentration of 0.0025 U/ml of AGA activity the enzyme totally inhibited cell growth, whereas the EC II with the same concentration did not show any effect. The inhibition of cell growth correlated well with inhibition of protein and glycoprotein synthesis. The addition of L-glutamine at the concentration of 1 mM completely reversed the inhibition of protein synthesis. Similarly, the addition of L-glutamine at the concentration of 3 mM daily on 3 successive days after adding AGA resulted in significant reversal of growth inhibition. The results of this study indicate that the action of AGA on MIA PaCa-2 is, to a great extent, exerted through its L-glutaminase activity. PMID:7173949

  11. Apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma cell-1 cells induced by Yin Chen Hao Decoction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai-Bo; Chen, Jing-Ming; Shao, Li-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (PANC-1) cells apoptosis and Bcl-2 and Bax expression induced by Yin Chen Hao Decoction (YCHD). METHODS: The cell growth inhibitory rate was determined by MTT assay. Apoptosis of PANC-1 cells before and after treatment with YCHD was determined by TUNEL staining. Expression of the apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2 and Bax, was detected by immunohistochemical staining and reverse transcription -PCR. RESULTS: YCHD inhibited the growth of PANC-1 cells. Following treatment with YCHD for 24-96 h, the apoptotic rate of PANC-1 cells increased with time. In addition, the positive rate of Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in a time-dependent manner, whereas the positive rate of Bax protein expression increased in a time-dependent manner. Following treatment of with YCHD for 24-96h, expression of BAX mRNA increased gradually and BCL-2 mRNA reduced gradually with time. CONCLUSION: YCHD induces apoptosis of PANC-1 cells mediated in part via up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. PMID:26217086

  12. Pylorus-Preserving Versus Pylorus-Resecting Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Periampullary and Pancreatic Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong; Wu, He-Shui; Chen, Xing-Lin; Wang, Chun-You; Gou, Shan-Miao; Xiao, Jun; He, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Qi-Jun; Li, Yong-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the long-term survival, mortality, morbidity and the operation-related events in patients with periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma undergoing pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) and pylorus-resecting pancreaticoduodenectomy (PRPD). Method A systematic search of literature databases (Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science) was performed to identify studies. Outcome measures comparing PPPD versus PRPD for periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma were long-term survival, mortality, morbidity (overall morbidity, delayed gastric emptying [DGE], pancreatic fistula, wound infection, postoperative bleeding, biliary leakage, ascites and gastroenterostomy leakage) and operation related events (hospital stays, operating time, intraoperative blood loss and red blood cell transfusions). Results Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including 622 patients were identified and included in the analysis. Among these patients, it revealed no difference in long-term survival between the PPPD and PRPD groups (HR = 0.23, p = 0.11). There was a lower rate of DGE (RR = 2.35, p = 0.04, 95% CI, 1.06–5.21) with PRPD. Mortality, overall morbidity, pancreatic fistula, wound infection, postoperative bleeding, biliary leakage, ascites and gastroenterostomy leakage were not significantly different between the groups. PPPDs were performed more quickly than PRPDs (WMD = 53.25 minutes, p = 0.01, 95% CI, 12.53–93.97); and there was less estimated intraoperative blood loss (WMD = 365.21 ml, p = 0.006, 95% CI, 102.71–627.71) and fewer red blood cell transfusions (WMD = 0.29 U, p = 0.003, 95% CI, 0.10–0.48) in patients undergoing PPPD. The hospital stays showed no significant difference. Conclusions PPPD had advantages over PRPD in operating time, intraoperative blood loss and red blood cell transfusions, but had a significantly higher rate of DGE for periampullary and

  13. Bitter melon juice activates cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase causing apoptotic death of human pancreatic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, suggesting critical needs for additional drugs to improve disease outcome. In this study, we examined efficacy and associated mechanism of a novel agent bitter melon juice (BMJ) against pancreatic carcinoma cells both in culture and nude mice. BMJ anticancer efficacy was analyzed in human pancreatic carcinoma BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-2, AsPC-1 and Capan-2 cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, cell death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and annexin/propidium iodide assays. BMJ effect on apoptosis regulators was assessed by immunoblotting. In vivo BMJ efficacy was evaluated against MiaPaCa-2 tumors in nude mice, and xenograft was analyzed for biomarkers by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results showed that BMJ (2–5% v/v) decreases cell viability in all four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing strong apoptotic death. At molecular level, BMJ caused caspases activation, altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and cytochrome-c release into the cytosol. Additionally, BMJ decreased survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein but increased p21, CHOP and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38) levels. Importantly, BMJ activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a biomarker for cellular energy status, and an AMPK inhibitor (Compound C) reversed BMJ-induced caspase-3 activation suggesting activated AMPK involvement in BMJ-induced apoptosis. In vivo, oral administration of lyophilized BMJ (5mg in 100 µl water/day/mouse) for 6 weeks inhibited MiaPaCa-2 tumor xenograft growth by 60% (P < 0.01) without noticeable toxicity in nude mice. IHC analyses of MiaPaCa-2 xenografts showed that BMJ also inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and activates AMPK in vivo. Overall, BMJ exerts strong anticancer efficacy against human pancreatic carcinoma cells, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its clinical

  14. Smad4 inhibits cell migration via suppression of JNK activity in human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XUEYING; CAO, JUNXIA; PEI, YUJUN; ZHANG, JIYAN; WANG, QINGYANG

    2016-01-01

    Smad4 is a common Smad and is a key downstream regulator of the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway, in which Smad4 often acts as a potent tumor suppressor and functions in a highly context-dependent manner, particularly in pancreatic cancer. However, little is known regarding whether Smad4 regulates other signaling pathways involved in pancreatic cancer. The present study demonstrated that Smad4 downregulates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity using a Smad4 loss-of-function or gain-of-function analysis. Additionally, stable overexpression of Smad4 clearly affected the migration of human pancreatic epithelioid carcinoma PANC-1 cells, but did not affect cell growth. In addition, the present study revealed that upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 is required for the reduction of JNK activity by Smad4, leading to a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inhibiting cell migration. Overall, the present findings indicate that Smad4 may suppress JNK activation and inhibit the tumor characteristics of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27123137

  15. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  16. Pancreatic Hepatoid Carcinoma Mimicking a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm: A Challenging Case on Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yutaka; Kato, Hironari; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Harada, Ryo; Oda, Shinsuke; Fushimi, Soichiro; Mizukawa, Shou; Yabe, Shuntaro; Uchida, Daisuke; Seki, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Yagi, Takahito; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of a 45 mm pancreatic mass found during a medical examination. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology showed polygonal cells with pseudopapillary structures. The tumor cells were positive for nuclear/cytoplasmic β-catenin and CD10, and negative for chromogranin A. After a tentative diagnosis of a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, middle pancreatectomy was performed. Histologically, polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm formed in the trabeculae and were immunohistochemically positive for HepPar1 and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II. The tumor was finally diagnosed to be pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma. No recurrence occurred for 12 months, even without adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27580541

  17. Toxicity and Efficacy of Concurrent Gemcitabine and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher; Janjan, N; Evans, D; Wolff, R; Ballo, M; Milas, L; Mason, K; Charnsangavej, C; Pisters, P; Lee, J; Lenzi, R; Vauthey, J; Wong, A; Phan, T; Nguyen, Q; Abbruzzese, J

    2001-01-01

    Gemcitabine has been demonstrated to be a potentradiosensitizer in the laboratory and in the clinic (1-7)and has proven clinical systemic activity to pancreaticcancer. Responses to systemic gemcitabine inpatients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinomahave been documented in phase I, phase II, and phaseIII clinical settings (8,9). Moreover, a recent randomizedtrial of gemcitabine vs 5-FU as first-linetherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinomademonstrated a modest median survivalbenefit (4.41 vs 5.65 mo,p= 0.0025) for those patientswho received gemcitabine compared to those whoreceived 5-FU (10). In addition, gemcitabine wasshown to improve cancer-related symptoms and performancestatus as assessed by a quantitative clinicalbenefit scale in both untreated and previouslytreated patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma ofthe pancreas (10,11). Based on these data, the FDAapproved gemcitabine as a first-line agent for patientswith advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. PMID:12754400

  18. Progress in systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin-Lei; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer, mainly consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is one of common malignancies worldwide, and prevalent among the Chinese population. A diagnosis of early stage HCC has proven to be very difficult because of its insidious feature in onset and development. At the time of diagnosis, most HCC cases are locally advanced and/or distant metastatic, which results in difficulty to be treated and poor prognosis. For advanced HCC, systemic therapy is frequently adopted as an important palliative method. In recent years, clinical studies and observations have often reported about systemic anti-cancer therapy of advanced HCC, including molecular target therapy, systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this article, we review these treatment modalities to provide a reference for clinicians. PMID:27547002

  19. A case of long-term 24-month survival in pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma (giant cell type) after S1 postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Toshikatsu; Fujii, Kensuke; Kataoka, Jun; Tominaga, Tomo; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the case of a 70-year-old female patient diagnosed with pancreatic carcinoma. An abdominal enhanced computed tomography scan revealed a poorly enhanced mass (17 mm × 15 mm in size) in the pancreatic head. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed stenosis of the main pancreatic and common bile ducts caused by a mass-neighboring cyst. Based on these findings, we performed subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The patient demonstrated a good postoperative course, and was discharged from our hospital in remission 49 days after the surgery. Pathological findings confirmed that it was anaplastic pancreas carcinoma (giant cell type). After the surgery, we performed S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy 100 mg/day for four weeks, repeated similarly every six weeks for a total of four courses. We have followed this case for over 2 years so far with adjuvant chemotherapy, and no recurrence or metastasis has been revealed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 in patients with resected anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas is also recommended as a result of Japan Adjuvant Study Group of Pancreatic Cancer 01(JASPAC-01) like the ordinary pancreatic ductal carcinomas. There is a possibility to achieve long-term survival in cases in which multidisciplinary treatment such as a curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy are performed. PMID:27111877

  20. Targeting of cancer stem cell marker EpCAM by bispecific antibody EpCAMxCD3 inhibits pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salnikov, Alexei V; Groth, Ariane; Apel, Anja; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Beckermann, Benjamin M; Khamidjanov, Akmal; Ryschich, Eduard; Büchler, Markus W; Herr, Ingrid; Moldenhauer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor survival rate, and new therapeutic strategies are needed. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), suggested as a marker for cancer stem cells, is over-expressed on most pancreatic tumour cells but not on normal cells and may be an ideal therapeutic target. We evaluated the anti-tumour efficiency of bispecific EpCAMxCD3 antibody linking tumour cells and T lymphocytes. In NOD SCID mice, EpCAMxCD3 had a long serum half-life (t1/2∼ 7 days). EpCAMxCD3 significantly retarded growth of BxPC-3 pancreatic carcinoma xenografts. For mimicking a pancreatic cancer microenvironment in vitro, we used a three-dimensional tumour reconstruct system, in which lymphocytes were co-cultured with tumour cells and fibroblasts in a collagen matrix. In this in vivo–like system, EpCAMxCD3 potently stimulated production of the effector cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α by extracorporally pre-activated lymphocytes. Moreover, compared with a bivalent anti-CD3 antibody, EpCAMxCD3 more efficiently activated the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ by non-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Most excitingly, we demonstrate for the first time that EpCAMxCD3 induces prolonged contacts between lymphocytes and tumour cells, which may be the main reason for the observed anti-tumour effects. As an important prerequisite for future use in patients, EpCAMxCD3 did not alter lymphocyte migration as measured by time-lapse video microscopy. Our data may open a way to improve the immune response and treatment outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:20196789

  1. FDG-PET in diagnosis, staging and prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Jin-Lu; Qin, Xin-Gan; Huang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential role of positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis predicting of pancreatic carcinoma (PC). METHODS: A systematic review of relevant literatures in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library was performed. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic and staging studies, and HRs for prognosis predicting studies were pooled. The bivariate model was used for diagnostic studies and the random-effect model for prognostic studies. Heterogeneity between included studies was tested using χ2 test, and subgroup analysis was performed to explain the heterogeneities. All of the calculations were performed using Stata version 11.0. RESULTS: A total of 39 studies were included. The pooled sensitivity of PET in diagnosing PC (30 studies, 1582 patients), evaluating N stating (4 studies, 101 patients) and liver metastasis (7 studies, 316 patients) were 0.91 (95%CI: 0.88-0.93), 0.64 (95%CI: 0.50-0.76), and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.52-0.79), respectively; and the corresponding specificity was 0.81 (95%CI: 0.75-0.85), 0.81 (95%CI: 0.25-0.85), and 0.96 (95%CI: 0.89-0.98), respectively. In prognosis analysis (6 studies, 198 patients), significant difference of overall survival was observed between high and low standardized uptake value groups (HR = 2.39, 95%CI: 1.57-3.63). Subgroup analysis showed that PET/CT was more sensitive than PET alone in evaluating liver metastasis of PC, 0.82 (95%CI: 0.48-0.98) and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.52-0.79), respectively. CONCLUSION: PET can be used as a valuable diagnostic and predictive tool for PC, but its effect in the staging of PC remains indeterminate. PMID:23922481

  2. The effects of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) on body composition of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Henrique A.; Baracos, Vickie E.; Hong, David S.; Abbruzzese, James; Bruera, Eduardo; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Curcumin is a natural product that is often explored by patients with cancer. Weight loss due to fat and muscle depletion is a hallmark of pancreatic cancer and is associated with worse outcomes. Studies of curcumin's effects on muscularity show conflicting results in animal models. Methods and results Retrospective matched 1:2 case-control study to evaluate the effects of curcumin on body composition (determined by computerized tomography) of 66 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (22 treated,44 controls). Average age (SEM) was 63(1.8) years, 30/66(45%) women, median number of prior therapies was 2, median (IQR) time from advanced pancreatic cancer diagnosis to baseline image was 7(2-13.5) months (p>0.2, all variables). All patients lost weight (3.3% and 1.3%, treated vs. control, p=0.13). Treated patients lost more muscle (median [IQR] percent change −4.8[−9.1,-0.1] vs. −0.05%[−4.2, 2.6] in controls,p<0.001) and fat (median [IQR] percent change −6.8%[−15,-0.6] vs. −4.0%[−7.6, 1.3] in controls,p=0.04). Subcutaneous fat was more affected in the treated patients. Sarcopenic patients treated with curcumin(n=15) had survival of 169(115-223) days vs. 299(229-369) sarcopenic controls(p=0.024). No survival difference was found amongst non-sarcopenic patients. Conclusions Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with curcumin showed significantly greater loss of subcutaneous fat and muscle than matched untreated controls. PMID:26934122

  3. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  4. Increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and reduced tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 expression correlate with angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu-Lu; Wu, Yang; Huang, Da-Wei; Tang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)-2 are known to influence tumor angiogenesis and progression. This work aimed to describe the levels of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 expression associated with tumor angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Expression of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 in carcinoma tissues and paracarcinomatous tissues was assayed by immunostaining. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34 in tumor tissues was also assayed by immunostaining. The correlations of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 with VEGF, microvessel density (MVD), and early postoperative recurrence were analyzed. The results showed that MMP-2 expression was significantly increased (P < 0.05) and TFPI-2 expression was significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues compared with paracarcinomatous tissues. MMP-2 expression was positively correlated with VEGF (r = 0.594, P < 0.001) and MVD (r = 0.432, P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues. TFPI-2 expression was negatively correlated with VEGF (r = -0.654, P < 0.001) and MVD (r = -0.360, P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that up-regulated MMP-2 and down-regulated TFPI-2 were independent predictors of early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the combination of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 was a reliable predictive model of early recurrence. We conclude that increased MMP-2 expression and reduced TFPI-2 expression are closely linked to angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma. Immunohistochemical assay of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 may be useful for predicting early relapse of pancreatic carcinoma after surgery. PMID:26807187

  5. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride Followed By the Same Chemotherapy Regimen With or Without Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine or Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary-Mucinous Neoplasm; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer

  6. MM-398 (nanoliposomal irinotecan): emergence of a novel therapy for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Julia; Ko, Andrew H

    2016-02-01

    While progress in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer has accelerated in recent years, this malignancy continues to have an exceedingly poor prognosis, with no standard of care options beyond front-line chemotherapy. Currently, there are a number of new therapeutic agents in varying stages of clinical development, including molecularly targeted agents, immunotherapies, and modified versions of cytotoxics. MM-398, a novel nanoliposomal formulation of irinotecan, was designed to maximize tumor exposure while minimizing systemic toxicity due to its favorable pharmacokinetic profile. Overall, across multiple clinical trials in multiple disease indications, MM-398 has been shown to have a favorable safety and tolerability profile compared with standard irinotecan. Recent results of the Phase III NAPOLI-1 trial in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer refractory to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy have shown a significant improvement in overall survival of MM-398 when combined with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin, compared with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin alone. This review focuses on the development and pharmacokinetic properties of MM-398, followed by evaluation of its safety and efficacy with a primary emphasis on clinical trials in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26685802

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life in SCALOP, a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Comparing Chemoradiation Therapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Christopher N.; Mukherjee, Somnath; Bridgewater, John; Falk, Stephen; Crosby, Tom; McDonald, Alec; Joseph, George; Staffurth, John; Abrams, Ross A.; Blazeby, Jane M.; Bridges, Sarah; Dutton, Peter; Griffiths, Gareth; Maughan, Tim; Johnson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) provides survival benefits but may result in considerable toxicity. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) measurements during CRT have not been widely reported. This paper reports HRQL data from the Selective Chemoradiation in Advanced Localised Pancreatic Cancer (SCALOP) trial, including validation of the QLQ-PAN26 tool in CRT. Methods and Materials Patients with locally advanced, inoperable, nonmetastatic carcinoma of the pancreas were eligible. Following 12 weeks of induction gemcitabine plus capecitabine (GEMCAP) chemotherapy, patients with stable and responding disease were randomized to a further cycle of GEMCAP followed by capecitabine- or gemcitabine-based CRT. HRQL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the EORTC Pancreatic Cancer module (PAN26). Results A total of 114 patients from 28 UK centers were registered and 74 patients randomized. There was improvement in the majority of HRQL scales during induction chemotherapy. Patients with significant deterioration in fatigue, appetite loss, and gastrointestinal symptoms during CRT recovered within 3 weeks following CRT. Differences in changes in HRQL scores between trial arms rarely reached statistical significance; however, where they did, they favored capecitabine therapy. PAN26 scales had good internal consistency and were able to distinguish between subgroups of patients experiencing toxicity. Conclusions Although there is deterioration in HRQL following CRT, this resolves within 3 weeks. HRQL data support the use of capecitabine- over gemcitabine-based chemoradiation. The QLQ-PAN26 is a reliable and valid tool for use in patients receiving CRT. PMID:26530749

  8. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  9. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  10. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-08-28

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  11. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  12. Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 promotes cell invasion and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaochun; Han, Ye; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Wei; Guo, Xiaobo; Li, Pu; Wang, Yunliang; Li, Dechun; Zhou, Jin; Zhi, Qiaoming

    2016-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), also known as vascular endothelial stain, was firstly identified as a modulator of smooth muscle cell migration. Though the expression of EGFL7 was reported to be up-regulated during tumorigenesis, the clinical and biological functions of EGFL7 in pancreatic carcinoma (PC) were still not fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the serum EGFL7 level in PC tissues was statistically higher than that in normal subjects (p<0.001), and its level in non-resectable patients was also higher than that in resectable ones (p=0.013). Among these resectable PC patients, the postoperative EGFL7 expression was significantly down-regulated when tumors were resected (p=0.018). Using the immunohistochemistry method, our results demonstrated that the positive expression of EGFL7 was significantly associated with the TNM stage (p=0.024), lymph node metastasis (p=0.003) and local invasion (p=0.022), and the EGFL7 expression closely correlated to the micro-vessel density (MVD) in PC tissues by Spearman analysis (r=0.941, p=0.000). In vitro, EGFL7 was silenced by the small interference RNA in PC cells, and our data indicated that down-regulation of EGFL7 did not influence the cycle progression, proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis of PC cells (p>0.05), whereas inhibition of EGFL7 expression could decrease PaCa-2 cell invasion (p<0.05). More interestingly, by tubular formation, Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and ELISA assays, our results revealed that silencing EGFL7 expression represented a strong inhibiting effect on tubular formation of micro-vessels through down-regulating the protein levels of VEGF and Ang-2 (p<0.05). Our results raised the possibility of using EGFL7as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapy target of PC, and down-regulation of EGFL7 might be considered to be a potentially important molecular treatment strategy for patients with PC. PMID:26796281

  13. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  14. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN) - a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g) or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM) kg. During treatment body-mass-index increased by 3,4 ± 1,4% under L-Carnitine and decreased (−1,5 ± 1,4%) in controls (p < 0,05). Moreover, nutritional status (body cell mass, body fat) and quality-of-life parameters improved under L-Carnitine. There was a trend towards an increased overall survival in the L-Carnitine group (median 519 ± 50 d versus 399 ± 43 d, not significant) and towards a reduced hospital-stay (36 ± 4d versus 41 ± 9d,n.s.). Conclusion While these data are preliminary and need confirmation they indicate that patients with pancreatic cancer may have a clinically relevant benefit from the inexpensive and well tolerated oral supplementation of L-Carnitine. PMID:22824168

  15. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  16. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis, and pancreatic polypeptide hypersecretion: a new association and clinical and hormonal responses to long-acting somatostatin analog SMS 201-995.

    PubMed

    Jerkins, T W; Sacks, H S; O'Dorisio, T M; Tuttle, S; Solomon, S S

    1987-06-01

    We describe a 63-yr-old man with disseminated medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and pancreatic nesidioblastosis and microadenosis with pancreatic polypeptide (PP) hypersecretion. His major symptoms were watery diarrhea, flushing, and abdominal bloating; these and the elevated plasma PP levels did not change after resection of the distal two thirds of the pancreas, which contained a 2-cm mass of nesidioblastotic tissue. Postoperatively, a long-acting somatostatin analog, SMS 201-995 (100 micrograms/day), normalized PP secretion acutely and chronically (7 months) and ameliorated his symptoms. The analog had no side-effects and did not alter glucose tolerance, calcitonin hypersecretion, or growth of the medullary carcinoma, but it did inhibit GH secretion. After withdrawal from therapy for 1 month, PP hypersecretion and all symptoms except diarrhea recurred. The coexistence of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and PP cell nesidioblastosis represents a new variant of the overlap syndromes between multiple endocrine neoplasia types I and II. Patients with medullary carcinoma and unexplained watery diarrhea should have fasting gastroenteropancreatic hormone assays done to screen for a potential gastrointestinal or pancreatic origin for the diarrhea. PMID:2883196

  17. A case of pancreatic heterotopy of duodenal wall, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor and intraepithelial neoplasm of pancreas, papillary carcinoma of kidney in a single patient.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Cinzia; Franciosi, Claudio; Degrate, Luca; Caprotti, Roberto; Romano, Fabrizio; Perego, Elisa; Trezzi, Rosangela; Leone, Biagio Eugenio; Uggeri, Franco

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of the contemporaneous presence of two histologically different pancreatic neoplasms, one renal cancer and one embryogenic duodenal anomaly in a single patient. A 66-year-old man underwent ultrasound examination because of urinary disorders; a solid neoformation within the inferior pole of the left kidney was observed. Computed tomography confirmed the renal lesion, but also a heterogeneous mass within the pancreatic head appeared without bile ducts dilatation. Abdominal magnetic resonance revealed a multiloculated cystic component of the pancreatic mass. A second CT scan confirmed the renal and biliary findings, but it revealed a modest enlargement of the pancreatic asymptomatic mass. A resection of the left kidney inferior pole and a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy were performed. Histopathologic analysis of the surgical specimen revealed mild differentiated papillary renal carcinoma, intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma of the pancreatic head, foci of intraepithelial pancreatic neoplasm and pancreatic heterotopy of duodenal muscular and submucosal layers. The coexistence of several primaries and anomalies in one patient led us to suppose a genetic predisposition to different lesions, even in the absence of known familial genetic syndromes. The study of such cases may help to improve the investigation of molecular correlations and etiological factors of different solid tumors. Nowadays, surgery is the only effective cure. PMID:17168444

  18. Chemotherapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in the sorafenib age

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Koji; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2014-01-01

    The kinase inhibitor sorafenib is the only systemic therapy proven to have a positive effect on survival of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). After development of sorafenib and its introduction as a therapeutic agent used in the clinic, several critical questions have been raised. Clinical parameters and biomarkers predicting sorafenib efficacy are the most important issues that need to be elucidated. Although it is difficult to know the responders in advance using conventional characteristics of patients, there are specific serum cytokines and/or gene amplification in tumor tissues that have been reported to predict efficacy of sorafenib. Risk and benefits of continuation of sorafenib beyond radiological progression is another issue to consider because no other standard therapy for advanced HCC as yet exists. In addition, effectiveness of the expanded application of sorafenib is still controversial, although a few studies have shed some light on combinational treatment with sorafenib for intermediate-stage HCC. Recently, over 50 relevant drugs have been developed and are currently under investigation. The efficacy of some of these drugs has been extensively examined, but none have demonstrated any superiority over sorafenib, so far. However, there are several drugs that have shown efficacy for treatment after sorafenib failure, and these are proceeding to further studies. To address these issues and questions, we have done extensive literature review and summarize the most current status of therapeutic application of sorafenib. PMID:24764653

  19. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  20. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  1. The concept and controversy of retroperitoneal nerve dissection in pancreatic head carcinoma (Review).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Taihong; Lau, Wan Yee; Wang, Xin; Sun, Jingfeng; Yuan, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yewei

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic head cancer is a common but the most lethal cancer of the human digestive system. It is invasive, resulting in early infiltration of adjacent structures and lymph node and distant metastases. Its biological characteristics of neurotropic growth lead to early neural invasion (NI) which is an independent prognostic factor of survival for pancreatic cancer. Radical surgical resection remains the only form of curative treatment. The extent of surgical resection and whether extended resection results in better long-term survival have been controversial. Studies have reported that peripancreatic plexus invasion is a frequent cause of pancreatic cancer recurrence and death. The relationship between cancer microenvironment and nerve cells, and whether the peripancreatic nerve plexus nearby needs to be resected require further studies. The present review aims to discuss the role of peripancreatic nerve and its implications in pancreatic head cancer resection. PMID:26458369

  2. Individual in-vitro sensitivities of human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesta, K. T.; Dmytrijuk, Andrew; Schlag, Peter M.; Mang, Thomas S.

    1992-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative in the treatment of pancreatic cancer in man, due to the low sensitivity of the normal pancreas to PDT as shown in preclinical studies. Investigations on four human pancreatic cancer lines (MIA PaCa-2, PaCa 1, PaCa 3, and CAPAN 2) in vitro demonstrated a considerable variety in PDT-sensitivity proportional to the degree of differentiation, which was related to photosensitizer-uptake (PhotofrinTM). The well differentiated pancreatic tumor line Capan 2 showed a close relationship between high cell density and increased PDT-resistance. The Photofrin uptake of Capan 2 at high cell densities could be increased by short trypsinization prior to photosensitizer exposure. The data supports the hypothesis that a complex intercellular organization reduces the cell surface available for photosensitizer uptake and may cause the relative PDT resistance of normal pancreatic tissues and highly differentiated tumors.

  3. Estimating Optimal Dose of Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine for Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Mature Results of GEMRT-01 Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Chauffert, Bruno; Wautot, Virginie

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To accurately determine the maximal tolerated dose, feasibility, and antitumor activity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy including twice-weekly gemcitabine in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were included in this Phase I trial. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 50 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with twice-weekly gemcitabine was administered during the 5 weeks of radiotherapy, from an initial dose of 30 mg/m{sup 2}. The gemcitabine doses were escalated in 10-mg/m{sup 2} increments in a three-plus-three design, until dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Results: A total of 35 patients were included in the trial. The feasibility of chemoradiotherapy was high, because all the patients received the planned total radiation dose, and 26 patients (74%) received {>=}70% of the planned chemotherapy dose. The mean total delivered dose of gemcitabine was 417 mg/m{sup 2} (i.e., 77% of the prescribed dose). The maximal tolerated dose of twice-weekly gemcitabine was 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Of the 35 patients, 13 had a partial response (37%) and 21 had stable disease (60%). Overall, the median survival and the 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rates were 10.6 months and 82%, 31%, and 11%, respectively. Survival was significantly longer in patients with an initial performance status of 0 or 1 (p = .004). Conclusion: Our mature data have indicated that gemcitabine doses can be increased {<=}70 mg/m{sup 2}, when delivered twice-weekly with concurrent radiotherapy. This combination shows promises to achieve better recurrence-free and overall survival. These results will serve as a basis for further implementation of the multimodal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  4. Proteomic strategies in the search for novel pancreatic cancer biomarkers and drug targets: recent advances and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; McVey, Gerard; Clynes, Martin; Moriarty, Michael; Meleady, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers; despite a low incidence rate it is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Improvement of the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment remains the main focus of pancreatic cancer research. Rapid developments in proteomic technologies has improved our understanding of the pancreatic cancer proteome. Here, the authors summarise the recent proteomic strategies undertaken in the search for: novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, pancreatic cancer-specific proteins which may be used for novel targeted therapies and proteins which may be useful for monitoring disease progression post-therapy. Recent advances and findings discussed here provide great promise of having a significant clinical impact and improving the outcome of patients with this malignancy. PMID:26985644

  5. 125I particle implantation combined with chemoradiotherapy to treat advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J-M; Jiang, H-T; Di, X-Y; Zhu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapy effects of 125I implantation combined with chemoradiotherapy on pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: 30 patients with Stage III or IV pancreatic cancer were equally divided into two groups (control and treatment group). The patients in the treatment group (nine males, six females) received chemotherapy in the first week and 125I implantation in the third week, followed by combined chemoradiotherapy in the fifth week. The patients in the control group (10 males, 5 females) received the same treatment except 125I implantation. The therapy in the control group and treatment group was repeated every 4 weeks. Results: The median conformal radiotherapy dose in the treatment group (30.62 Gy) was significantly lower than that in the control group (47.86 Gy). The total radiation dose was 88.71 ± 27.39 Gy, and the surface activity was 0.6 mCi in the treatment group. After treatment, the average tumour size decreased both in the treatment group [9.17 cm2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.60–12.74, p < 0.001] and in the control group (4.54 cm2, 95% CI: 2.74–6.35, p < 0.001). The median survival time in the treatment group was 14 months (95% CI: 12.215–14.785) and in the control group was 12 months (95% CI: 10.884–13.116). There was no statistical significance in survival rates between the two groups (χ2 = 0.908, p = 0.341). Conclusion: 125I implanted into tumour combined with chemoradiotherapy has higher local control rate of advanced pancreatic cancer than chemoradiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: We combined chemoradiotherapy with 125I implantation to treat advanced pancreatic cancer and obtained a higher local control rate and better quality of life than when using chemoradiatherapy alone. PMID:24625042

  6. Sunitinib re-challenge in advanced renal-cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Porta, C; Paglino, C; Grünwald, V

    2014-01-01

    Despite offering significant clinical benefits in advanced renal-cell carcinoma (RCC), the effectiveness of targeted therapies eventually declines with the development of resistance. Defining optimal sequences of therapy is therefore the focus of much current research. There is also evidence that treatment ‘re-challenge' may be an effective strategy in some patients. We review evidence to evaluate whether sunitinib may have value as re-challenge therapy in patients who have progressed on prior targeted therapy with sunitinib and/or an alternative tyrosine kinase inhibitor or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor. Re-challenge with sunitinib appears to be of clinical benefit, thus representing a feasible therapeutic option for patients with advanced RCC who are refractory to other treatments and are able to receive further therapy. These observations support hypotheses that resistance to targeted agents is transient and can be at least partially reversed by re-introduction of the same agent after a treatment break. Median progression-free survival durations appear to be shorter and response rates lower on re-challenge than following initial treatment, although a wider interval between treatments appears to increase response to sunitinib re-challenge. PMID:24800947

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnosis, management, and long term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bodzin, Adam S; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a common and lethal malignancy worldwide and arises in the setting of a host of diseases. The incidence continues to increase despite multiple vaccines and therapies for viruses such as the hepatitis B and C viruses. In addition, due to the growing incidence of obesity in Western society, there is anticipation that there will be a growing population with HCC due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Due to the growing frequency of this disease, screening is recommended using ultrasound with further imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography used for further characterization of masses. Great advances have been made to help with the early diagnosis of small lesions leading to potential curative resection or transplantation. Resection and transplantation maybe used in a variety of patients that are carefully selected based on underlying liver disease. Using certain guidelines and clinical acumen patients may have good outcomes with either resection or transplantation however many patients are inoperable at time of presentation. Fortunately, the use of new locoregional therapies has made down staging patients a potential option making them potential surgical candidates. Despite a growing population with HCC, new advances in viral therapies, chemotherapeutics, and an expanding population of surgical and transplant candidates might all contribute to improved long-term survival of these patients. PMID:26019732

  8. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  9. Transcatheter Arterial Infusion Therapy in the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Keiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Itoh, Tuyoshi; Okajima, Kaoru; Murata, Rumi; Takagi, Takehisa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) therapy in 18 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: The drugs infused were epirubicin 60 mg, mitomycin C 20 mg, and 5-fluorouracil 500 mg. The efficacy of TAI was evaluated by a tumor marker (CA19-9), computed tomography (CT) findings, and postoperative histopathological specimens. Results: In 10 of 15 cases, the tumor marker level was decreased after TAI therapy. In 6 of 14 cases, CT showed a decrease in the tumor size, and in 1 case, the tumor disappeared completely. In 6 cases the tumor could be resected. Necrosis, fibrosis, and degeneration of cancer cells were seen in 3 of 4 cases for whom a histopathological evaluation was done. The median survival was 11 months. In 17 patients back pain was the chief complaint, and was reduced to a self-controlled level in 10 patients following TAI therapy. No major complications were encountered. Conclusion: TAI appears to be an effective palliative treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer.

  10. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  11. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:25036383

  12. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26199449

  13. [Incretin-based antidiabetic treatment and diseases of the pancreas (pancreatitis, pancreas carcinoma)].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years incretin-based antidiabetic drugs became increasingly popular and widely used for treating patients with type 2 diabetes. Immediately after launching, case reports and small case series were published on the potential side effects of the new drugs, with special attention to pancreatic disorders such as acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. As clinical observations accumulated, these side-effects were noted with nearly all drugs of this class. Although these side-effects proved to be rare, an intensive debate evolved in the literature. Opinion of diabetes specialists and representatives of pharmaceutical industry as well as position statements of different international scientific boards and health authorities were published. In addition, results of randomized clinical trials with incretin-based therapy and meta-analyses became available. Importantly, in everyday clinical practice, the label of the given drug should be followed. With regards to incretins, physicians should be cautious if pancreatitis in the patients' past medical history is documented. Early differential diagnosis of any abdominal pain during treatment of incretin-based therapy should be made and the drug should be discontinued if pancreatitis is verified. Continuous post-marketing surveillance and side-effect analysis are still justified with incretin-based antidiabetic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27017851

  14. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH. PMID:26683769

  15. An Investigation Of Photodynamic Therapy In The Treatment Of Pancreatic Carcinoma: Dihematoporphyrin Ether Uptake And Photobleaching Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1988-02-01

    Results of dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE) uptake and fluorescence kinetics show that the concentration in the pancreas is on the order of 40-60 μg DHE/g of tissue at an injected dose of 40 mg/kg. Previously concentrations on this order have only been found in organs of the reticuloendothelial system. Two intrapancreatic carcinoma models, one of acinar origin (rat) and one of ductal orgin (hamster), were studied. Both showed equal or higher concentrations of DHE as compared to normal pancreas when fluorescence measurements and chemical extraction procedures were performed. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment of the normal pancreas and pancreatic tumors yielded atypical results. When the normal pancreas with DHE present is exposed to 630 nm light from a dye laser (75 mW/cm2, 30 min), the normal photobleaching measurable by fluorescence decay does not occur. Yet, the pancreatic tumor responds with a relatively normal fluorescence decay pattern, with hemorrhaging and a resultant loss of measurable DHE concentration. These results represent the emergence of an entirely new modality, with substantial potential for the treatment of cancer of the pancreas.

  16. Yttrium-90 radioembolization for advanced inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Victor Ho-Fun; Leung, Dennis KC; Luk, Mai-Yee; Tong, Chi-Chung; Law, Martin WM; Ng, Sherry CY; Wong, Ka-Kin; Poon, Ronnie TP; Kwong, Dora LW; Leung, To-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Advanced inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) conferring a grave prognosis may benefit from yttrium-90 (90Y) radioembolization. Methods Thirty patients with advanced inoperable HCC including those with any lesion >8 cm in maximal diameter or multiple bi-lobar lesions (totally more than five lesions), or portal vein thrombosis treated with radioembolization were reviewed. Treatment efficacy and safety were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for identifying potential prognostic factors. Results After a median follow-up of 18.3 months, the response rate was 30.0%, and the disease control rate was 50.0%. Median overall progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3.3 months and 13.2 months, respectively. Longer median PFS was noted in those who had transarterial chemoembolization before radioembolization (7.3 months vs 3.1 months; P=0.021) and duration of alfafeto protein (AFP) response ≥6 months (11.8 months vs 3.0 months; P<0.001). Longer median OS was also revealed in those without portal vein thrombosis (17.1 months vs 4.4 months; P=0.015) and those whose duration of AFP response was ≥6 months (21.2 months vs 8.6 months; P=0.001). Seventeen patients (56.7%) developed treatment-related complications including five (16.7%) grade 3 events. Multivariate analysis revealed that treatment responders (P=0.001) and duration of AFP response ≥6 months (P=0.006) were prognostic of PFS, whereas the absence of portal vein invasion (P=0.025), treatment responders (P=0.010), and duration of AFP response ≥6 months (P=0.001) were prognostic of OS. Conclusion 90Y radioembolization is an alternative treatment with a promising outcome for poor-risk advanced inoperable HCC. PMID:26640386

  17. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients. PMID:26716894

  18. Telomerase (GV1001) vaccination together with gemcitabine in advanced pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Staff, Caroline; Mozaffari, Fariba; Frödin, Jan-Erik; Mellstedt, Håkan; Liljefors, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Telomerase is expressed in 85-90 % of pancreatic adenocarcinomas and might be a target for active cancer immunotherapy. A study was conducted to investigate safety and immunogenicity in non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma patients using a 16-amino acid telomerase peptide (GV1001) for vaccination in combination with GM-CSF and gemcitabine as first line treatment. Three different vaccine treatment schedules were used; [A (n=6), B (n=6) and C (n=5)]. Groups A/B received GV1001, GM-CSF and gemcitabine concurrently. Group C received initially GV1001 and GM-CSF while gemcitabine was added at disease progression. Group D (n=4) was treated with gemcitabine alone. Adverse events (AE) related to vaccination were mild (grades I-II). Grade III AEs were few and transient. An induced GV 1001‑specific immune response was defined as an increase ≥2 above the baseline value in one of the assays (DTH, proliferation, ELISPOT and cytokine secretion assays, respectively). A telomerase‑specific immune response was noted in 4/6 patients in group A, 4/6 patients in group B and 2/5 patients in group C. An induced ras‑specific immune response (antigenic spreading) was seen in 5 of the 17 patients. The cytokine pattern was that of a Th1-like profile. A treatment induced telomerase or ras response was also noted in group D. All responses were weak and transient. A significant decrease in regulatory T-cells over time was noted in patients in groups A and B (p<0.05). Telomerase vaccination (GV1001) in combination with chemotherapy appeared to be safe but the immune responses were weak and transient. Measures have to be taken to optimize immune responses of GV1001 for it to be considered of clinical interest. PMID:24919654

  19. Gemcitabine-Based Regional Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Yang, Xuerong; Zhou, Guofeng; Chen, Yi; Li, Changyu; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study was carried out to investigate the prognostic factors in patients who received intra-arterial infusion for advanced pancreatic cancer. In addition, the detailed procedure of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy was described. A total of 354 patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were recruited from January 2012, to April 2015, at Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Demographic and clinic characteristics of the patients were extracted from electronic medical records. Restricted cubic spline was used to assess the nonliner regression between baseline CA19-9 value and overall survival. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the association between overall survival and clinical characteristics. Of all 354 included patients, 230 (65%) were male (male/female ratio = 1.8), and 72 (20%) patients were diagnosed with detectable distant metastases. Pretreatment CA19-9 value of patients with metastases was significantly higher as compared to those with locally advanced cancer (median: 922.30 vs 357.00 U/mL, P = 0.0090). Totally 274 patients completed 1 cycle of intra-arterial infusion, whereas 80 patients received 2 or more cycles of the chemotherapy. For all the 354 patients, median OS was 7.0 months (95% CI: 6.0, 8.0 months) with a 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rate of 0.48, 0.28, and 0.18, respectively. The median OS of patients, who received 1 cycle of intra-arterial infusion therapy, was 6.0 months (95% CI: 5.0, 8.0 months), which was similar to 7.0 months (95% CI: 6.0, 9.0 months) in patients who received 2 or more cycles. Restricted cubic spline revealed the nonline association between baseline CA19-9 and prognosis. The Cox proportional hazard model showed that age, CA19-9 baseline, CA19-9 value, and tumor location were significantly associated with the OS. In conclusion, the gemcitabine-based RIAC presented a potential treatment method for advanced

  20. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  1. Recent advances in multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Asmaa I; Waked, Imam

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing, and it is currently the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Potentially curative treatment options for HCC include resection, transplantation, and percutaneous ablation, whereas palliative treatments include trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE), radioembolization, and systemic treatments. Due to the diversity of available treatment options and patients’ presentations, a multidisciplinary team should decide clinical management of HCC, according to tumor characteristics and stage of liver disease. Potentially curative treatments are suitable for very-early- and early-stage HCC. However, the vast majority of HCC patients are diagnosed in later stages, where the tumor characteristics or progress of liver disease prevent curative interventions. For patients with intermediate-stage HCC, TACE and radioembolization improve survival and are being evaluated in addition to potentially curative therapies or with systemic targeted therapy. There is currently no effective systemic chemotherapy, immunologic, or hormonal therapy for HCC, and sorafenib is the only approved molecular-targeted treatment for advanced HCC. Other targeted agents are under investigation; trials comparing new agents in combination with sorafenib are ongoing. Combinations of systemic targeted therapies with local treatments are being evaluated for further improvements in HCC patient outcomes. This article provides an updated and comprehensive overview of the current standards and trends in the treatment of HCC. PMID:25866604

  2. Progress of Molecular Targeted Therapies for Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Matteo; Amantini, Consuelo; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Santoni, Giorgio; Cascinu, Stefano; Muzzonigro, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a crucial role in tumor angiogenesis. VEGF expression in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is mostly regulated by hypoxia, predominantly via the hypoxia-induced factor (HIF)/Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway. Advances in our knowledge of VEGF role in tumor angiogenesis, growth, and progression have permitted development of new approaches for the treatment of mRCC, including several agents targeting VEGF and VEGF receptors: tyrosine kinase pathway, serine/threonine kinases, α5β1-integrin, deacetylase, CD70, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), AKT, and phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K). Starting from sorafenib and sunitinib, several targeted therapies have been approved for mRCC treatment, with a long list of agents in course of evaluation, such as tivozanib, cediranib, and VEGF-Trap. Here we illustrate the main steps of tumor angiogenesis process, defining the pertinent therapeutic targets and the efficacy and toxicity profiles of these new promising agents. PMID:24093097

  3. Chemotherapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Bishal; Shimokata, Tomoya; Honda, Kazunori; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy, in combination with a local treatment, has a role in nearly all the settings of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LAHNSCC) treatment: as definitive, adjuvant or induction therapy. However, despite many years of trials, controversies still exist regarding the best approach to using chemotherapy in the multi-modal treatment of LAHNSCC. Opinions are divided on sequential versus concurrent use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for unresectable LAHNSCC. More debate exists on whether the addition of induction chemotherapy to concomitant chemoradiotherapy is clinically meaningful. After the approval of cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy for this disease, making treatment choices have become further complicated. Although new data from trials are arriving every year, the results have been inconclusive. In this review, we provide the readers with the latest information on various strategies of using chemotherapy and cetuximab that will help to make an evidence-based decision in the treatment of LAHNSCC, including the approach to larynx preservation. We conclude that with the available information, concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be preferred over induction chemotherapy, except in the setting of larynx preservation. Furthermore, given the paucity of positive data and severe financial toxicity associated with cetuximab, concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be the preferred choice over cetuximab-radiotherapy. Future trials in head and neck cancer should be properly planned to address these controversies and provide clear solutions. PMID:26924194

  4. Photodynamic therapy of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (VERTPAC study): final clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, M. T.; Jermyn, M.; Gillams, A.; Mosse, S.; Kent, E.; Bown, S. G.; Hasan, T.; Pogue, B. W.; Pereira, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    We undertook a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 15 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Needle placement and laser delivery were technically successful in all patients. Thirteen patients were treated with a single laser fibre. Three treatments were carried out each at 5, 10 and 20 J/cm2; and 5 treatments (4 patients) at 40 J/cm2. A further 2 patients were treated with 2 or 3 laser fibres at 40 J/cm2. Tumour necrosis was measured on CT (computed tomography) by two radiologists 5 days after treatment. There was a clear dosedependent increase in necrosis with a median area of 20 x 16 mm (range 18 x 16 to 35 x 30 mm) at 40 J/cm2. In the 2 patients treated with multiple fibres, necrosis was 40 x 36 mm and 30 x 28 mm, respectively. There were no early complications in patients treated with a single fibre. Both patients treated with multiple fibres had evidence on CT of inflammatory change occurring anterior to the pancreas but without clinical deterioration. These results suggest that single fibre verteporfin PDT is safe in a clinical setting up to 40J/cm2 and produces a dose-dependent area of pancreatic necrosis.

  5. CT Findings of Patients Treated with Irreversible Electroporation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Akinwande, Olaguoke; Ahmad, Shakeeb S; Van Meter, Tracy; Schulz, Brittany; Martin, Robert C G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), IRE has been shown to be safe for local disease control and palliation. As IRE continues to gain acceptance it is important to characterize the expected imaging findings. Materials and Methods. A review of our prospective soft tissue ablation registry from July 2010 to June 2013 was performed on patients who had undergone IRE for LAPC. Five masses treated with intraoperative IRE ablation for pancreatic tumors that underwent CT imaging before and after ablation were reviewed. Results and Discussion. Following IRE, the postablation bed is larger than the original ablated tumor. This ablation zone may get smaller in size (due to decreased edema and hyperemia) in the following months and more importantly remains stable provided there is no recurrence. In cases of recurrent disease there is increased size of the ablation bed, mass effect, and new or worsening vascular encasement or occlusion. Conclusion. CT imaging remains the best current imaging modality to assess post-IRE ablation changes. Serial imaging over at least 2-6 months must be employed to detect recurrence by comparing with prior studies in conjunction with clinical and serum studies. Larger imaging studies are underway to evaluate a more ideal imaging modality for this unique patient population. PMID:26649039

  6. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  7. Overexpression of homeobox B-13 correlates with angiogenesis, aberrant expression of EMT markers, aggressive characteristics and poor prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu-Lu; Wu, Yang; Cai, Chong-Yang; Tang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the expression of homeobox B (Hoxb)-13 and analyze its relationship with tumor angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated markers (E-cadherin and vimentin), clinicopathologic data and prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was applied to determine the level of Hoxb-13 expression in tumor tissues and surrounding non-tumor tissues from 85 subjects with pancreatic carcinoma. Besides, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD31, E-cadherin and vimentin were also detected in tumor tissues by immunostaining. We found that the level of Hoxb-13 expression was significantly higher in pancreatic carcinoma tissues than in paracarcinomatous tissues (P < 0.05). Hoxb-13 staining was positively correlated with VEGF (r = 0.429, P < 0.001) and microvessel density (MVD) (r = 0.454, P < 0.001). Likewise, Hoxb-13 staining was positively correlated with vimentin (r = 0.448, P < 0.001); while it was negatively correlated with E-cadherin (r = -0.405, P < 0.001). High Hoxb-13 expression was associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics, worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001) and worse overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that Hoxb-13 was an independent predictor for poor DFS (P < 0.001) and OS (P = 0.002). In conclusion, our data show that overexpressed Hoxb-13 is correlated with tumor angiogenesis, aberrant expression of EMT-associated markers and aggressive clinicopathological characteristics, and serves as a promising marker for unfavourable prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:26261579

  8. Pancreatic panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahawish, Karim; Iyasere, Isoken T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian man presenting with polyarthritis, weight loss and multiple tender cutaneous nodules. Abnormal liver function tests prompted imaging of the liver which demonstrated liver metastases. Biopsy of the liver lesions confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:25150233

  9. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  10. Systematic review of novel ablative methods in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Margaret G; Bramis, Konstantinos; Pereira, Stephen P; Fusai, Giuseppe K

    2014-01-01

    Unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer with or without metastatic disease is associated with a very poor prognosis. Current standard therapy is limited to chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Few regimens have been shown to have a substantial survival advantage and novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thermal and laser based ablative techniques are widely used in many solid organ malignancies. Initial studies in the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Modifications to the various applications, in particular combining the techniques with high quality imaging such as computed tomography and intraoperative or endoscopic ultrasound has enabled real time treatment monitoring and significant improvements in safety. We conducted a systematic review of the literature up to October 2013. Initial studies suggest that ablative therapies may confer an additional survival benefit over best supportive care but randomised studies are required to validate these findings. PMID:24605026

  11. [R0 Resection of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer after Combination Chemotherapy with Gemcitabine and S-1].

    PubMed

    Kametaka, Hisashi; Makino, Hironobu; Fukada, Tadaomi; Seike, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takashi; Hasegawa, Akio

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old female was referred to our institution in October 2014 for additional therapy for cancer of the head of the pancreas. Utilizing a computed tomography scan, he was initially diagnosed with locally advanced unresectable cancer because of massive invasion to the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Combination chemotherapy consisting of gemcitabine and S-1 was administrated for 10 months. Since the tumor was remarkably reduced after chemotherapy, pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with portal vein resection was performed. Since the histopathological findings indicated few residual cancer tissues, our chemotherapy was considered dramatically effective. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient remains well and without any recurrences 14 months after the surgery. We therefore report a case of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer, which achieved R0 resection after combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and S-1. PMID:26805123

  12. Correlation between Ultrasound Reflection Intensity and Tumor Ablation Ratio of Late-Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma in HIFU Therapy: Dynamic Observation on Ultrasound Reflection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:24453916

  13. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties. PMID:23300736

  14. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant.

  15. Phase II clinical trial of ex vivo-expanded cytokine-induced killer cells therapy in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young

    2014-09-01

    Second-line chemotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer has shown disappointing survival outcomes due to rapid disease progression and performance deterioration. The aim of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adoptive immunotherapy using ex vivo-expanded, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells in gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who showed disease progression during gemcitabine-based chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. For generation of CIK cells, peripheral blood samples were collected from each patient and cultured with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody and IL-2. Patients received CIK cells intravenously 10 times, every week for 5 weeks and then every other week for 10 weeks. Twenty patients were enrolled between November 2009 and September 2010. The disease control rate was 25 % (4/16 patients). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 11.0 weeks (95 % CI 8.8-13.2), and the median overall survival (OS) was 26.6 weeks (95 % CI 8.6-44.6). Grade 3 toxicities included general weakness in two patients and thrombocytopenia in one patient. Grade 4 hematologic or non-hematologic toxicity was not observed. Patients showed improvement in pancreatic pain, gastrointestinal distress, jaundice, body image alterations, altered bowel habits, health satisfaction, and sexuality when assessing quality of life (QoL). Adoptive immunotherapy using CIK cells showed comparable PFS and OS to survival data of previous trials that assessed conventional chemotherapies while maintaining tolerability and showing encouraging results in terms of patient QoL in gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer (clinicalTrials.gov number NCT00965718). PMID:24916038

  16. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging. PMID:24464989

  17. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  18. Recent advances in the surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morise, Zenichi; Kawabe, Norihiko; Tomishige, Hirokazu; Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kawase, Jin; Arakawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Rie; Isetani, Masashi

    2014-10-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy. The treatment of HCC is complex and complicated by the severity of associated chronic liver disease, the stage of HCC, and the clinical condition of the patient. Liver resection (LR) is one of the most efficient treatments for patients with HCC, with an expected 5-year survival of 38%-61% depending on the stage of the disease. Improved liver function assessment, increased understanding of segmental liver anatomy from advanced imaging studies, and surgical technical progress are important factors that have led to reduced mortality in patients with HCC. The indication for LR may be expanded due to emerging evidences from laparoscopic hepatectomies and combined treatments with newly developed chemotherapies. Liver transplantation (LT) is considered as an ideal treatment for removal of existing tumors and the injured/preneoplastic underlying liver tissue with impaired liver function and the risk of multicentric carcinogenesis that results from chronically injured liver. However, LT is restricted to patients with minimal risk of tumor recurrence under immunosuppression. The expansion of criteria for LT in HCC patients is still under trial and discussion. Limited availability of grafts, as well as the risk and the cost of transplantation have led to considerable interest in expansion of the donor pool, living donor-related transplantation, and combined treatment involving LR and LT. This highlight presents evidence concerning recent studies evaluating LR and LT in HCC patients. In addition, alternative therapies for the treatment of early stage tumors and the management of patients on transplant waiting lists are discussed. PMID:25339825

  19. Recent advances in the surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morise, Zenichi; Kawabe, Norihiko; Tomishige, Hirokazu; Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kawase, Jin; Arakawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Rie; Isetani, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy. The treatment of HCC is complex and complicated by the severity of associated chronic liver disease, the stage of HCC, and the clinical condition of the patient. Liver resection (LR) is one of the most efficient treatments for patients with HCC, with an expected 5-year survival of 38%-61% depending on the stage of the disease. Improved liver function assessment, increased understanding of segmental liver anatomy from advanced imaging studies, and surgical technical progress are important factors that have led to reduced mortality in patients with HCC. The indication for LR may be expanded due to emerging evidences from laparoscopic hepatectomies and combined treatments with newly developed chemotherapies. Liver transplantation (LT) is considered as an ideal treatment for removal of existing tumors and the injured/preneoplastic underlying liver tissue with impaired liver function and the risk of multicentric carcinogenesis that results from chronically injured liver. However, LT is restricted to patients with minimal risk of tumor recurrence under immunosuppression. The expansion of criteria for LT in HCC patients is still under trial and discussion. Limited availability of grafts, as well as the risk and the cost of transplantation have led to considerable interest in expansion of the donor pool, living donor-related transplantation, and combined treatment involving LR and LT. This highlight presents evidence concerning recent studies evaluating LR and LT in HCC patients. In addition, alternative therapies for the treatment of early stage tumors and the management of patients on transplant waiting lists are discussed. PMID:25339825

  20. Whole abdominal irradiation following chemotherapy in advanced ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuten, A; Stein, M; Steiner, M; Rubinov, R; Epelbaum, R; Cohen, Y

    1988-02-01

    One hundred and sixteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma, who underwent primary cytoreductive surgery, received 6-11 courses of chemotherapy by cis-platin (50 mg/m2) and adriamycin (50 mg/m2) every 21 days. This was followed by second look laparotomy in 66 patients with no clinical evidence of disease. Consolidation abdominal irradiation was administered to 43 patients. Two techniques of irradiation were employed: between 1980-1983 whole abdominal irradiation was used and patients were to receive 3000 cGy in 4 weeks (Schedule I). Due to myelosuppression only 13 of 26 patients (50%) completed the planned dose of radiation. Between 1983-1985 the target volume was divided into upper and lower parts. First, the lower abdomen received 3000 cGy in 3 weeks, and then the upper abdomen received the same dose (Schedule II). Sixteen of seventeen patients (94%) thus treated, completed the planned dose of radiation. The actuarial survival for all 116 patients was 28% of 5 years. Irradiated patients with negative second look laparotomy had a survival probability of 100% at 24 months. Irradiated patients with microscopic disease at second look operation had an actuarial 5-year survival of 66%. Patients with minimal residual disease at second look laparotomy, receiving consolidation abdominal irradiation, had an actuarial survival of 5% only at 36 months. It is concluded that consolidation radiotherapy is effective in patients with negative or microscopic residual disease at second-look laparotomy. In regard to bone marrow tolerance, split field technique of irradiation is preferred. PMID:3338949

  1. Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB039110 and/or Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB050465 in Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Endometrial Cancer; Melanoma; Microsatellite Unstable (MSI) Colorectal Cancer; MMR-deficient Tumors; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Genitourinary Tract; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

  2. A Challenging Surgical Approach to Locally Advanced Primary Urethral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Spilotros, Marco; Vavallo, Antonio; Palazzo, Silvano; Miacola, Carlos; Forte, Saverio; Matera, Matteo; Campagna, Marcello; Colamonico, Ottavio; Schiralli, Francesco; Sebastiani, Francesco; Di Cosmo, Federica; Bettocchi, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Vincenti, Leonardo; Ludovico, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare and aggressive cancer, often underdetected and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. We report a case of advanced PUC, surgically treated with combined approaches. A 47-year-old man underwent transurethral resection of a urethral lesion with histological evidence of a poorly differentiated squamous cancer of the bulbomembranous urethra. Computed tomography (CT) and bone scans excluded metastatic spread of the disease but showed involvement of both corpora cavernosa (cT3N0M0). A radical surgical approach was advised, but the patient refused this and opted for chemotherapy. After 17 months the patient was referred to our department due to the evidence of a fistula in the scrotal area. CT scan showed bilateral metastatic disease in the inguinal, external iliac, and obturator lymph nodes as well as the involvement of both corpora cavernosa. Additionally, a fistula originating from the right corpus cavernosum extended to the scrotal skin. At this stage, the patient accepted the surgical treatment, consisting of different phases. Phase I: Radical extraperitoneal cystoprostatectomy with iliac-obturator lymph nodes dissection. Phase II: Creation of a urinary diversion through a Bricker ileal conduit. Phase III: Repositioning of the patient in lithotomic position for an overturned Y skin incision, total penectomy, fistula excision, and “en bloc” removal of surgical specimens including the bladder, through the perineal breach. Phase IV: Right inguinal lymphadenectomy. The procedure lasted 9-and-a-half hours, was complication-free, and intraoperative blood loss was 600 mL. The patient was discharged 8 days after surgery. Pathological examination documented a T4N2M0 tumor. The clinical situation was stable during the first 3 months postoperatively but then metastatic spread occurred, not responsive to adjuvant chemotherapy, which led to the patient's death 6 months after surgery. Patients with advanced stage tumors of

  3. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  4. Recent advances in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: towards multidisciplinary personalized care.

    PubMed

    Bex, Axel; Gore, Martin; Mulders, Peter; Sternberg, Cora N

    2012-11-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? With recent improvements in the prognosis for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), focus is now shifting towards maximising clinical benefit from targeted therapies. Factors other than efficacy data are increasingly being considered when selecting a treatment strategy, with a view towards optimising clinical outcomes. This review examines the development and efficacy of targeted agents for the management of mRCC and discusses the potential factors, including resistance mechanisms, sequential therapy, prognostic and predictive markers of response, and adverse event management, that may contribute to successful individually tallored treatment of patients with this disease. • Targeted agents have substantially improved outcomes for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). • Treatment focus is now shifting towards achieving a continuum of care such that long-term benefit and extended survival may be achieved through the optimal use of targeted agents. • To achieve this goal, a number of factors which impact on treatment selection and outcomes need to be considered when treating patients with mRCC, such as the optimal sequence of targeted therapies (and the related issue of resistance mechanisms). • Recent advances are also likely to impact on the future treatment of mRCC. Examples include the identification of predictive biomarkers as well as a consideration of patient risk profiles or the safety profile of the selected targeted agent. In addition, attention is focusing on re-defining the role of surgery for the treatment of RCC in the context of targeted therapies. • This review examines the recent and future advances that offer the potential for personalizing treatment by selecting the most appropriate treatment for each patient with a view towards optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:22624610

  5. Recent advances in the management of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ana M.; Nanus, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have significantly improved over the past few years with the recent approval of two new agents resulting in prolonged progression-free and overall survival. PMID:27019698

  6. Original Article A phase I study of imexon plus gemcitabine as first-line therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Steven J.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Modiano, Manuel R.; Conkling, Paul; Patt, Yehuda Z.; Davis, Peg; Dorr, Robert T.; Boytim, Michelle L.; Hersh, Evan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Imexon is an aziridine-derived iminopyrrolidone which has synergy with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Gemcitabine is a standard therapy for pancreatic cancer. We performed a phase I trial of imexon and gemcitabine to evaluate safety, dose limiting toxicity (DLT), and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods Patients with untreated locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma received therapy in sequential cohorts on regimen A (n=19; imexon 200 or 280 mg/m2 intravenously (IV) over 30 minutes days 1–5, 15–19 and gemcitabine 800 or 1,000 mg/m2 IV over 30 minutes on days 1,8,15 every 28 days) or regimen B (n=86; imexon 280–1,300 mg/m2 IV over 30–60 minutes days 1, 8, and 15 and gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 IV over 30 minutes on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). Results One hundred-five patients received 340 treatment cycles (median 2, range 1–16). Patient characteristics: median age 63, 61% male, ECOG PS 0/1 50%/50%, 93% metastatic. DLT was abdominal cramping and pain, often with transient, acute diarrhea. Best response was confirmed partial response (PR) in 11.4%, 8.9% unconfirmed PR, and 48.1% with stable disease. There was a dose proportional increase in imexon AUC across the doses tested with terminal half-life 69 minutes at the MTD and no alteration of gemcitabine pharmacokinetics. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose of imexon is 875 mg/m2 with gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2. DLT was acute abdominal pain and cramping. Encouraging antitumor responses support further evaluation of this combination in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:19855966

  7. Pancreatic-carcinoma-cell-derived pro-angiogenic factors can induce endothelial-cell differentiation of a subset of circulating CD34+ progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CD34+ progenitor cells comprise both hematopoietic and endothelial progenitor cells. Recent studies suggest that circulating endothelial progenitor cells are recruited into the angiogenic vascular system of several cancers, including pancreatic carcinoma, and that they correlate with clinical progress. However, whether endothelial progenitor cell mobilization occurs in response to cytokine release by tumor cells is still unclear. Methods The chemotactic- and/or differentiating-activities of the poorly-differentiated pancreatic carcinoma cell line PT45, and of the immortal H6c7 cell line, a line of near-normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells, on endothelial progenitor cells were investigated in vitro using circulating CD34+ as model. Results The study showed that Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor produced by PT45 cells and, at lesser extent, by H6c7 cells, predominantly chemoattract peripheral blood CD34+ expressing the type 2 relative receptor. Addition of PT45-conditioned medium to CD34+ cells, cultured under conditions supporting myeloid cell development, diverted the differentiation of a subset of these progenitor cells into cells expressing endothelial cell markers, such as CD146, CD105, VE-cadherin and von Willebrand Factor-related antigen. Moreover, these endothelial-like cells formed capillary networks in vitro, chiefly through the release of Angiopoietin-1 by PT45 cells. Conclusions The results demonstrate that pancreatic-carcinoma cells potentially attract circulating endothelial progenitor cells to the tumor site, by releasing high levels of pro-angiogenic factors such as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Angiopoietin-1, and may direct the differentiation of these cell subsets of the CD34+ cell population into endothelial cells; the latter cells may become a component of the newly-formed vessels, contributing to angiogenesis-mediated tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:24341512

  8. Targeting of XIAP combined with systemic mesenchymal stem cell-mediated delivery of sTRAIL ligand inhibits metastatic growth of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Andrea; Albarenque, Stella Maris; Deedigan, Laura; Yu, Rui; Reidy, Mairead; Fulda, Simone; Zwacka, Ralf Michael

    2010-11-01

    Disseminating tumors are one of the gravest medical problems. Here, we combine the tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing activity of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to infiltrate both tumor and lymphatic tissues to target primary tumors as well as disseminated cancer cells in a human pancreatic cancer mouse model. Furthermore, we targeted X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) by RNA interference (RNAi) inside the cancer cells to make use of the apoptosis sensitization as well the antimetastatic effect that is afforded by XIAP silencing. We generated MSCs, termed MSC.sTRAIL, that express and secrete a trimeric form of soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL). MSC.sTRAIL triggered limited apoptosis in human pancreatic carcinoma cells that were resistant to soluble recombinant TRAIL, which is most likely due to the enhanced effect of the direct, cell-mediated delivery of trimeric TRAIL. MSC.sTRAIL-mediated cell death was markedly increased by concomitant knockdown of XIAP by RNAi in the cancer cells. These findings were confirmed in xenograft models, in which tumors from the parental pancreatic carcinoma cells showed only growth retardation on treatment with MSC.sTRAIL, whereas tumors with silenced XIAP that were treated with MSC.sTRAIL went into remission. Moreover, animals with XIAP-negative xenografts treated with MSC.sTRAIL were almost free of lung metastasis, whereas animals treated with control MSCs showed substantial metastatic growth in the lungs. In summary, this is the first demonstration that a combined approach using systemic MSC-mediated delivery of sTRAIL together with XIAP inhibition suppresses metastatic growth of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:20882532

  9. Paclitaxel and cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy followed by surgery in locally advanced thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Minoru; Obase, Yasushi; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Mohri, Keiji; Ueno, Shiro; Hayama, Makio; Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Nishimura, Hironori; Nakata, Masao; Oka, Mikio

    2007-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare neoplasm with a poor prognosis. We report the clinical course of a patient who received complete surgical resection after effective induction treatment. A 72-year-old woman with advanced thymic carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma, stage IVb) was considered as nonresectable due to invasion of neighboring organs and mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Two cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of paclitaxel (180 mg/m2) plus cisplatin (80 mg/m2), combined with thoracic radiotherapy (total 54 Gy) were performed concurrently and complete radical resection could then be performed. She is currently alive and ambulatory and has remained disease-free for two years. This multimodal treatment may be a good treatment option for locally advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:17595782

  10. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-03

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  11. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  12. Rehabilitation of an Advanced Case of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Caldas, Lorena Frange; Castro, Paulo Henrique de Souza; de Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; Volpato, Maria Carmen Palma Faria; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Álvaro Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is a cancer of the salivary gland that primarily affects the parotid, submandibular, and accessory salivary glands. Its growth is slow and it has infiltrative nature. A 46-year-old female patient coming from the rural area presented a lesion on the palate and reported pain in the region for three years. After incisional biopsy, and histopathological diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the cribriform type of minor salivary gland, superior hemimaxillectomy and adjuvant treatment with radiotherapy and maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation were performed. PMID:25709844

  13. “Puestow modified procedure in the era of advanced endoscopic interventions for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis. A two cases report”

    PubMed Central

    Fragulidis, Georgios P.; Vezakis, Αntonios; Dellaportas, Dionissios; Sotirova, Ira; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Kontis, Elliseos; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic duct calculi in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients are the main cause of intractable pain which is their main symptom. Decompression options of for the main pancreatic duct are both surgical and advanced endoscopic procedures. Presentation of cases A 64-year-old male with known CP due to alcohol consumption and a 36-year-old female with known idiopathic CP and pancreatic duct calculi were managed recently in our hospital where endoscopic procedures were unsuccessful. A surgical therapy was considered and a longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure) in both patients was performed with excellent results. Discussion Over the last 30 years, endoscopic procedures are developed to manage pancreatic duct strictures and calculi of the main pancreatic duct in CP patients. In both of our cases endoscopic therapy was first attempted but failed to extract the pancreatic duct stones, due to their size and speculations. Modified Puestow procedure was performed for both and it was successful for long term pain relief. Conclusion Despite advancement in endoscopic interventions and less invasive therapies for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis we consider that classic surgical management can be appropriate in certain cases. PMID:26318135

  14. Optical characterization of lesions and identification of surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma by using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has become a powerful instrument for imaging unstained tissue samples in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) stain can be used to characterize lesions and identify surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The specimens of a pancreatic metastasis from RCC, as well as a primary RCC from a patient, were examined by TPEF microscopy and compared with their corresponding H-E stained histopathological results. The results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of unstained histological sections of pancreatic metastasis from RCC can reveal that the typical morphology of the tissue and cells in cancer tissues is different from the normal pancreas. It also clearly presented histopathological features of the collagenous capsule, which is an important boundary symbol to identify normal and cancerous tissue and to instruct surgical operation. It indicated the feasibility of using TPEF microscopy to make an optical diagnosis of lesions and identify the surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from RCC.

  15. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Sexton, Sandra; LeVea, Charles M.; Caraker, Susan M.; Hajduczok, George; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene while classically associated with expression in the kidney is also expressed in many other extra-renal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within renin specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon, furthermore an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to lymph nodes and liver, mimicking human disease and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides a unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying co-operating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease. PMID:24292676

  16. Impact of Comorbidity and Age on Determinants Therapeutic Strategies in Advanced Pancreatic Head Cancer Patients With Obstructive Jaundices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Guang; Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Dai, Ming-Shen; Lin, Chin; Lu, Chieh-Sheng; Su, Sui-Lung; Chang, Ping-Ying; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Chen, Jia-Hong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Yeu-Chin; Ho, Ching Liang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The current retrospective study aimed to investigate the relationship between prognostic factors and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced pancreatic head cancers who initially presented with obstructive jaundice. Furthermore, the impact of age and comorbidities on therapeutic strategies in such patients was evaluated. A total of 79 advanced pancreatic head cancer patients who were treated at our institution between January 2006 and November 2013 were reviewed. We analyzed OS risk factors including sex, age, laboratory characteristics, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, Charlson Comorbidity Index Scores (CCIS), and therapeutic strategies using Cox proportional hazards regression models. There was no difference in the OS of patients according to the type biliary drainage procedure they underwent. Other related factors, such as better performance status, lower CCIS, and receiving chemotherapy significantly correlated with survival in multivariate analyses. There was a significant survival benefit in systemic chemotherapy compared to best supportive care (BSC) or local radiotherapy. However, no survival benefit was found in elderly patients (age >70 years) undergoing systemic therapy compared to younger patients, except in those elderly patients with CCIS ≤ 1. In advanced pancreatic head cancer patients with obstructive jaundice, systemic therapy and adequate biliary drainage were still the most effective procedures for improving OS in the general population. However, in elderly patients with relatively higher CCIS, BSC with adequate biliary drainage was palliative and no less effective than systemic/local therapies. PMID:26252308

  17. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo . E-mail: yama.take@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 3 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated.

  18. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  19. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  20. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Activates the AIM2 Inflammasome in Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Rui; Chen, Ruochan; Xie, Min; Cao, Lizhi; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin; Zeh, Herbert J

    2016-05-15

    Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, no specific treatments for AP exist, primarily due to the lack of a mechanistic understanding of sterile inflammation and the resultant multisystem organ dysfunction, the pathologic response of AP linked to early death. In this study, we demonstrate that the class III major histocompatibility region III receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) contributes to AP by modulating inflammasome activation in macrophages. RAGE mediated nucleosome-induced absent in melanoma 2 (but not NLRP3) inflammasome activation by modulating dsRNA-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation in macrophages. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of the RAGE-dsRNA-dependent protein kinase pathway attenuated the release of inflammasome-dependent exosomal leaderless cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and high-mobility group box 1) in vitro. RAGE or absent in melanoma 2 depletion in mice limited tissue injury, reduced systemic inflammation, and protected against AP induced by l-arginine or cerulein in experimental animal models. These findings define a novel role for RAGE in the propagation of the innate immune response with activation of the nucleosome-mediated inflammasome and will help guide future development of therapeutic strategies to treat AP. PMID:27045109

  1. Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Flourishing Novel Approaches in the Era of Biological Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanne W.; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  2. Advanced pancreatic cancer: flourishing novel approaches in the era of biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joanne W; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie; Yau, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  3. Beyond first-line chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: An expanding array of therapeutic options?

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Evan J; Ko, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of therapeutic options are now available for the first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, the optimal choice for treatment in the second-line setting and beyond is less well defined. A variety of cytotoxic agents, either alone or in combination, have been evaluated, although primarily in the context of small single-arm or retrospective studies. Most regimens have been associated with median progression-free survival rates in the range of 2-4 mo and overall survival rates between 4-8 mo, highlighting the very poor prognosis of patients who are candidates for such treatment. Targeted therapies studied in this chemotherapy-refractory setting, meanwhile, have produced even worse efficacy results. In the current article, we review the clinical evidence for treatment of refractory disease, primarily in patients who have progressed on front-line gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. In the process, we highlight the limitations of the available data to date as well as some of the challenges in designing appropriate clinical trials in this salvage setting, including how to select an appropriate control arm given the absence of a well-established reference standard, and the importance of incorporating predictive biomarkers and quality of life measures whenever possible into study design. PMID:24605022

  4. Inherited pancreatic endocrine tumor syndromes: advances in molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis, management and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Robert T.; Berna, Marc J.; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) can occur in as part of four inherited disorders including: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1(NF-1) [von Recklinghausen’s disease] and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The relative frequency with which patients with these disorders develop PETs is MEN1>VHL>NF-1>TSC. Over the last few years there have been major advances in the understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders as well in the localization, medical and surgical treatment of the PETs in these patients. The study of the PETs in these disorders has not only provided insights into the possible pathogenesis of sporadic PETs, but have also presented a number of unique management and treatment issues, some of which are applicable to patients with sporadic PETs. Therefore the study of PETs in these uncommon disorders has provided valuable insights that in many cases are applicable to the general group of patients with sporadic PETs. In this article these areas are briefly reviewed as well as the current state of knowledge of the PETs in these disorders and the controversies that exist in their management are briefly summarized and discussed. PMID:18798544

  5. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  6. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  7. Analysis of clinical efficacy of CyberKnife® treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yongchun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Li, Fengtong; Dong, Yang; Zhuang, Hongqing; Wang, Jingsheng; Chen, Huaming; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CyberKnife® treatment for locally-advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods The efficacy of CyberKnife® treatment was analyzed in 59 LAPC patients treated between October 2006 and September 2014. The median tumor volume was 27.1 mL (13.0–125.145 mL). The median prescribed dose was 45 Gy (35–50 Gy), delivered in 5 fractions (3–8 fractions). The overall survival (OS) rates and freedom from local progression (FFLP) rates were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier survival curve. Results The median follow-up for all patients was 10.9 months (3.2–48.7 months) and 15.6 months (3.9–37.6 months) among surviving patients. The median OS was 12.5 months, and the 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 53.9% and 35.1%, respectively. The 1-year FFLP rate was 90.8% based on the computed tomography (CT) evaluation. Grade 1–2 acute and late-stage gastrointestinal (GI) reactions were observed in 61% of the patients. One patient experienced grade 3 toxicity. Conclusion Excellent clinical efficacy was obtained after treatment of LAPC using CyberKnife®, with minimal toxicity. PMID:26109866

  8. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  9. Anaplastic Carcinoma Arising in a Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm Masquerading as Pancreatic Pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Aldaoud, Najla; Joudeh, Amani; Al-Momen, Sami; Alnahawi, Mamdouh; Al-Abbadi, Mousa A

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) of the pancreas can vary from benign to premalignant and malignant. Preoperative diagnosis is essential to offer the patient appropriate treatment. Occasionally these cases may harbor anaplastic carcinoma while clinically masquerade as a pseudocyst. Here in, we report an unusual case of a 37-year old female presented with recurrent abdominal pain that was suspected clinically and by imaging studies to have a pseudocyst. EUS-FNA with internal drainage of the cyst was performed. Cytological evaluation of the cyst fluid showed numerous inflammatory cells composed mainly of many neutrophils admixed with macrophages reminiscent of the usual pseudocyst content but there were scattered rare dyscohesive malignant cells which were highly pleomorphic with multinucleation. Immunostains on the cell block showed immunoreactivity of these cells including the multinucleated cells for Cam 5.2 and AE1/AE3 and focally for Ber-Ep4, Moc -31, and CA19-9. The subsequent resection confirmed the presence of anaplastic (undifferentiated) carcinoma (AC) arising in a MCN of the pancreas. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:538-542. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028547

  10. Soluble B7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Liu, Danqing; Chen, Qijun; Yang, Chong; Wang, Bo; Wu, Heshui

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a relationship between soluble B7-H3 (sB7-H3) and the poor prognosis of patients with malignant tumors, and increasing evidence has shown a connection between sB7-H3 and NF-κB in tumor progression. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that sB7-H3 promotes the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway. In this study, we observed that sB7-H3 was highly expressed in mB7-H3-positive pancreatic carcinoma (PCa) cells. Exogenous sB7-H3 significantly increased NF-κB activity and promoted the migration and invasion of PCa cells. Further studies proved that sB7-H3 first up-regulated TLR4 expression, then activated NF-κB signaling and finally promoted IL-8 and VEGF expression. In contrast, the silencing of TLR4 using a stable short hairpin RNA significantly decreased the sB7-H3-induced activity of NF-κB and the expression of IL-8 and VEGF in PCa cells. In vivo animal experiments further demonstrated that TLR4-knock-down tumor cells displayed a decreased ability to metastasize compared with the control tumor cells after being induced by sB7-H3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that sB7-H3 promotes invasion and metastasis through the TLR4/NF-κB pathway in pancreatic carcinoma cells. PMID:27273624