These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

National Institute for Advanced Transportation Technology ANNUAL REPORT  

E-print Network

for Sustainable Transportation MISSION our mission is to develop engineering solutions (knowledge and technologyNational Institute for Advanced Transportation Technology ANNUAL REPORT PREPARED FOR UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTERS PROGRAM RESEARCH AND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT

Kyte, Michael

2

Advanced control technology and its potential for future transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics covered include fly by wire, digital control, control configured vehicles, applications to advanced flight vehicles, advanced propulsion control systems, and active control technology for transport aircraft.

1976-01-01

3

National Institute for Advanced Transportation Technology PREPARED FOR UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTERS PROGRAM  

E-print Network

for Sustainable Transportation MISSION our mission is to develop engineering solutions (knowledge and technologyNational Institute for Advanced Transportation Technology PREPARED FOR UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTERS PROGRAM RESEARCH AND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL

Kyte, Michael

4

Application of advanced technologies to future military transports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Long range military transport technologies are addressed with emphasis of defining the potential benefits of the hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) concept currently being flight tested. Results of a 1990's global range transport study are presented showing the expected payoff from application of advanced technologies. Technology forecast for military transports is also presented.

Clark, Rodney L.; Lange, Roy H.; Wagner, Richard D.

1990-01-01

5

Advanced technology and future earth-orbit transportation systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper is concerned with the identification and evaluation of technology developments which offer potential for high return on investment when applied to advanced transportation systems. These procedures are applied in a study of winged single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles, which are considered feasible by the 1990s. Advanced technology is considered a key element in achieving improved economics, and near term investment in selected technology areas is recommended.

Henry, B. Z.; Eldred, C. H.

1977-01-01

6

Technology requirements for advanced earth-orbital transportation systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Areas of advanced technology that are either critical or offer significant benefits to the development of future Earth-orbit transportation systems were identified. Technology assessment was based on the application of these technologies to fully reusable, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle concepts with horizontal landing capability. Study guidelines included mission requirements similar to space shuttle, an operational capability begining in 1995, and main propulsion to be advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. Also evaluated was the technical and economic feasibility of this class of SSTO concepts and the comparative features of three operational take-off modes, which were vertical boost, horizontal sled launch, and horizontal take-off with subsequent inflight fueling. Projections of both normal and accelerated technology growth were made. Figures of merit were derived to provide relative rankings of technology areas. The influence of selected accelerated areas on vehicle design and program costs was analyzed by developing near-optimum point designs.

Haefeli, R. C.; Littler, E. G.; Hurley, J. B.; Winter, M. G.

1977-01-01

7

Advanced cockpit technology for future civil transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review is presented of advanced cockpit technology for future civil transport aircraft, covering the present state-of-the-art and major technologies, including flat-panel displays, graphics and pictorial displays. Pilot aiding/automation/human-centered design and imaging sensor/flight systems technology (for low-visibility operations) are also presented. NASA Langley Research Center's recent results in pictorial displays and on future developments in large-screen display technologies are discussed. Major characteristics foreseen for the future high-speed civil transport include fault-tolerant digital avionics and controls/displays with extensive human-centered automation, and unusually clean, uncluttered interface with natural crew interaction via touch, voice/tactile means.

Hatfield, Jack J.; Parrish, Russell V.

1990-01-01

8

Human factors of advanced technology (glass cockpit) transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A three-year study of airline crews at two U.S. airlines who were flying an advanced technology aircraft, the Boeing 757 is discussed. The opinions and experiences of these pilots as they view the advanced, automated features of this aircraft, and contrast them with previous models they have flown are discussed. Training for advanced automation; (2) cockpit errors and error reduction; (3) management of cockpit workload; and (4) general attitudes toward cockpit automation are emphasized. The limitations of the air traffic control (ATC) system on the ability to utilize the advanced features of the new aircraft are discussed. In general the pilots are enthusiastic about flying an advanced technology aircraft, but they express mixed feelings about the impact of automation on workload, crew errors, and ability to manage the flight.

Wiener, Earl L.

1989-01-01

9

Assessment of the impact of advanced air-transport technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The long term prospects for commercial supersonic transportation appear attractive enough to keep supersonic research active and reasonably healthy. On the other hand, the uncertainties surrounding an advanced supersonic transport, (AST) specifically fuel price, fuel availability and noise, are too significant to warrant an accelerated research and development program until they are better resolved. It is estimated that an AST could capture about $50 billion (1979 dollars) of the potential $150 billion in sales up to the year 2010.

Maxwell, R. L.; Dickinson, L. V., Jr.

1981-01-01

10

Study of the application of advanced technologies to long range transport aircraft. Volume 2: Advanced technology program recommendations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The benefits of the application of advanced technology to future transport aircraft were investigated. The noise reduction goals established by the CARD (Civil Aviation Research and Development) study for the 1981-1985 time period can be satisfied. Reduced terminal area and airway congestion can result from use of advanced on-board systems and operating procedures. The use of advanced structural design concepts can result in greatly reduced gross weight and improved operating economics. The full potential of these benefits can be realized in a 1985 airplane by implementing a research and development program that is funded to an average level of approximately $55 million per year over a ten year period.

1972-01-01

11

Advances in Space Transportation Technology Toward the NASA Goals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has set goals to increase safety by one hundred times while reducing cost tenfold over the next decade. This dramatic increase in safety will come by departing from a past emphasis on cost and performance to a new paradigm of safety and reliability, which, in turn, will drive down cost. To accomplish this, vehicle systems must be inherently reliable, functionally redundant wherever practical and designed to minimize or eliminate catastrophic failure modes. Over the next twenty-five years, NASA has set goals to increase safety ten thousand times while reducing cost one hundred fold. Safety will increase towards today's airline safety and the low price per flight has the potential to enable a 15-fold increase in the size of the current projected space launch market. This level of improvement is comparable to the developments in the 1970s in the computer microprocessor when microchips went from hundreds of thousands to tens of thousands of dollars - hailing the era of the personal computer. In order to achieve such ambitious cost goals, today's partial and fully expendable rockets must be replaced by fully reusable systems. A RLV can eliminate assembly and checkout of the large number of complex interfaces on today's Space Shuttle. Full reusability will eliminate the necessity to throw away expensive hardware and the need for on-going production. Systems in ten years will have to accommodate 50 to 100 missions per year and could be commercially certified for hundreds of flights. In twenty-five years, the number of flights per year could jump to over 1,000, which will require certification for thousands of flights. The large increase in flights per year will demand that current operations and maintenance procedures be revolutionized. Unlike the current shuttle, which requires several thousand personnel over five months to process, the next generation system must be turned around in one week with less than one hundred personnel. In contrast to the rigorous disassembly and inspections required for the Space Shuttle's subsystems, the next generation vehicle's on-board health monitoring systems will could tell the ground crews which systems need replacement before landing. In twenty-five years, vehicles will be re-flown within one with crews numbering less than one hundred. Fully automated ground processing systems must require only a handful of personnel to launch the vehicle. Due to the increased intelligence of on-board systems, only cursory walk-around inspections would be required between flights An assessment of the progress in breakthrough technologies toward these goals by the NASA Advanced Space Transportation Program is presented. These breakthrough technologies include combined rocket and air breathing propulsion, high strength lightweight structures, high temperature materials, vehicle health management, and flight operations.

Lyles, Garry M.

2000-01-01

12

Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion  

SciTech Connect

This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

Per F. Peterson

2010-03-01

13

NREL - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems 2010  

SciTech Connect

We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the nation achieve these goals by developing transportation technologies like: advanced vehicle systems and components; alternative fuels; as well as fuel cells, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid vehicles. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/advanced_vehicles_fuels.html

None

2010-01-01

14

An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 1: Engine design study assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial tranport engine are presented. The results of the phase 1 study effort cover the following areas: (1) statement of an airline's major objectives for future transport engines, (2) airline's method of evaluating engine proposals, (3) description of an optimum engine for a long range subsonic commercial transport including installation and critical design features, (4) discussion of engine performance problems and experience with performance degradation, (5) trends in engine and pod prices with increasing technology and objectives for the future, (6) discussion of the research objectives for composites, reversers, advanced components, engine control systems, and devices to reduce the impact of engine stall, and (7) discussion of the airline objectives for noise and pollution reduction.

Sallee, G. P.

1973-01-01

15

Technological Advancements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

Kennedy, Mike

2010-01-01

16

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

SciTech Connect

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16

17

Workshop on Critical Issues in Microgravity Fluids, Transport, and Reaction Processes in Advanced Human Support Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This workshop was designed to bring the experts from the Advanced Human Support Technologies communities together to identify the most pressing and fruitful areas of research where success hinges on collaborative research between the two communities. Thus an effort was made to bring together experts in both advanced human support technologies and microgravity fluids, transport and reaction processes. Expertise was drawn from academia, national laboratories, and the federal government. The intent was to bring about a thorough exchange of ideas and develop recommendations to address the significant open design and operation issues for human support systems that are affected by fluid physics, transport and reaction processes. This report provides a summary of key discussions, findings, and recommendations.

Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Joshi, Jitendra A.

2004-01-01

18

Advanced Seal Technology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The limitations of present aircraft gas turbine engine dynamic seal technology were reviewed and the effect of gas path seal losses on four representative current and advanced transport and fighter aircraft engine cycles was established. Four key seal loc...

F. H. Mahler

1972-01-01

19

Advanced Space Transportation Concepts and Propulsion Technologies for a New Delivery Paradigm  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes Advanced Space Transportation Concepts and Propulsion Technologies for a New Delivery Paradigm. It builds on the work of the previous paper "Approach to an Affordable and Productive Space Transportation System". The scope includes both flight and ground system elements, and focuses on their compatibility and capability to achieve a technical solution that is operationally productive and also affordable. A clear and revolutionary approach, including advanced propulsion systems (advanced LOX rich booster engine concept having independent LOX and fuel cooling systems, thrust augmentation with LOX rich boost and fuel rich operation at altitude), improved vehicle concepts (autogeneous pressurization, turbo alternator for electric power during ascent, hot gases to purge system and keep moisture out), and ground delivery systems, was examined. Previous papers by the authors and other members of the Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) focused on space flight system engineering methods, along with operationally efficient propulsion system concepts and technologies. This paper continues the previous work by exploring the propulsion technology aspects in more depth and how they may enable the vehicle designs from the previous paper. Subsequent papers will explore the vehicle design, the ground support system, and the operations aspects of the new delivery paradigm in greater detail.

Robinson, John W.; McCleskey, Carey M.; Rhodes, Russel E.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Henderson, Edward M.; Joyner, Claude R., III; Levack, Daniel J. H.

2013-01-01

20

Study of the application of advanced technologies to long-range transport aircraft. Volume 2: Research and development requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Investigations were conducted to evaluate the relative benefits attainable through the exploitation of advanced technologies and to identify future research and development efforts required to permit the application of selected technologies to transport aircraft entering commercial operation in 1985. Results show that technology advances, particularly in the areas of composite materials, supercritical aerodynamics, and active control systems, will permit the development of long-range, high-payload commercial transports operating at high-subsonic speeds with direct operating costs lower than those of current aircraft. These advanced transports also achieve lower noise levels and lower engine pollutant emissions than current transports. Research and development efforts, including analytical investigations, laboratory test programs, and flight test programs, are required in essentially all technology areas to achieve the potential technology benefits.

Lange, R. H.; Sturgeon, R. F.; Adams, W. E.; Bradley, E. S.; Cahill, J. F.; Eudaily, R. R.; Hancock, J. P.; Moore, J. W.

1972-01-01

21

Application of Advanced Technologies to Small, Short-haul Air Transports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted of the application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul transport aircraft. A three abreast, 30 passenger design for flights of approximately 100 nautical miles was evaluated. Higher wing loading, active flight control, and a gust alleviation system results in improved ride quality. Substantial savings in fuel and direct operating cost are forecast. An aircraft of this configuration also has significant benefits in forms of reliability and operability which should enable it to sell a total of 450 units through 1990, of which 80% are for airline use.

Adcock, C.; Coverston, C.; Knapton, B.

1980-01-01

22

A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

1998-01-01

23

The development and evaluation of advanced technology laminar-flow-control subsonic transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of applying laminar flow control (LFC) to the wings and empennage of long-range subsonic transport aircraft for initial operation in 1985. For a design mission range of 5500 n mi, advanced technology LFC and turbulent-flow aircraft were developed for a 200-passenger payload, and compared on the basis of production costs, direct operating costs, and fuel efficiency. Parametric analyses were conducted to establish optimum geometry, advanced system concepts were evaluated, and configuration variations maximizing the effectiveness of LFC were developed. The final comparisons include consideation of maintenance costs and procedures, manufacturing costs and procedures, and operational considerations peculiar to LFC aircraft.

Sturgeon, R. F.

1978-01-01

24

Continued Development and Application of Circulation Control Pneumatic Technology to Advanced Transport Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Personnel of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) Aerospace and Transportation Lab have completed a four-year grant program to develop and evaluate the pneumatic aerodynamic technology known as Circulation Control (CC) or Circulation Control Wing (CCW) for advanced transport aircraft. This pneumatic technology, which employs low-level blowing from tangential slots over round or near-round trailing edges of airfoils, greatly augments the circulation around a lifting or control surface and thus enhances the aerodynamic forces and moments generated by that surface. Two-dimensional force augmentations as high as 80 times the input blowing momentum coefficient have been recorded experimentally for these blown devices, thus providing returns of 8000% on the jet momentum expended. A further benefit is the absence of moving parts such as mechanical flaps, slats, spoilers, ailerons, elevators and rudders from these pneumatic surfaces, or the use of only very small, simple, blown aerodynamic surfaces on synergistic designs which integrate the lift, drag and control surfaces. The application of these devices to advanced aircraft can offer significant benefits in their performance, efficiency, simplicity, reliability, economic cost of operation, noise reduction, and safety of flight. To further develop and evaluate this potential, this research effort was conducted by GTRI under grant for the NASA Langley Research Center, Applied Aerodynamics Division, Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch, between June 14, 1993 and May 31, 1997.

Englar, Robert J.

1998-01-01

25

Propulsion technology needs for advanced space transportation systems. [orbit maneuvering engine (space shuttle), space shuttle boosters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plans are formulated for chemical propulsion technology programs to meet the needs of advanced space transportation systems from 1980 to the year 2000. The many possible vehicle applications are reviewed and cataloged to isolate the common threads of primary propulsion technology that satisfies near term requirements in the first decade and at the same time establish the technology groundwork for various potential far term applications in the second decade. Thrust classes of primary propulsion engines that are apparent include: (1) 5,000 to 30,000 pounds thrust for upper stages and space maneuvering; and (2) large booster engines of over 250,000 pounds thrust. Major classes of propulsion systems and the important subdivisions of each class are identified. The relative importance of each class is discussed in terms of the number of potential applications, the likelihood of that application materializing, and the criticality of the technology needed. Specific technology programs are described and scheduled to fulfill the anticipated primary propulsion technology requirements.

Gregory, J. W.

1975-01-01

26

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

1986-01-01

27

Performance potential of an advanced technology Mach 3 turbojet engine installed on a conceptual high-speed civil transport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of an advanced technology conceptual turbojet optimized for a high-speed civil aircraft is presented. This information represents an estimate of performance of a Mach 3 Brayton (gas turbine) cycle engine optimized for minimum fuel burned at supersonic cruise. This conceptual engine had no noise or environmental constraints imposed upon it. The purpose of this data is to define an upper boundary on the propulsion performance for a conceptual commercial Mach 3 transport design. A comparison is presented demonstrating the impact of the technology proposed for this conceptual engine on the weight and other characteristics of a proposed high-speed civil transport. This comparison indicates that the advanced technology turbojet described could reduce the gross weight of a hypothetical Mach 3 high-speed civil transport design from about 714,000 pounds to about 545,000 pounds. The aircraft with the baseline engine and the aircraft with the advanced technology engine are described.

Morris, Shelby J., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.; Coen, Peter G.

1989-01-01

28

Advanced Learning Technologies (ALT)  

NSF Publications Database

... Technologies (ALT) Synopsis of Program: Through the Advanced Learning Technologies (ALT) program ... technologies, and (2) advances research in computer science, information technology, learning, and ...

29

CTOL Transport Technology, 1978. [conferences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology associated with advanced conventional takeoff and landing transport aircraft is discussed. Topics covered include: advanced aerodynamics and active controls; operations and safety; and advanced systems. Emphasis is placed on increased energy efficiency.

1978-01-01

30

Analysis and Preliminary Design of an Advanced Technology Transport Flight Control System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The analysis and preliminary design of an advanced technology transport aircraft flight control system using avionics and flight control concepts appropriate to the 1980-1985 time period are discussed. Specifically, the techniques and requirements of the flight control system were established, a number of candidate configurations were defined, and an evaluation of these configurations was performed to establish a recommended approach. Candidate configurations based on redundant integration of various sensor types, computational methods, servo actuator arrangements and data-transfer techniques were defined to the functional module and piece-part level. Life-cycle costs, for the flight control configurations, as determined in an operational environment model for 200 aircraft over a 15-year service life, were the basis of the optimum configuration selection tradeoff. The recommended system concept is a quad digital computer configuration utilizing a small microprocessor for input/output control, a hexad skewed set of conventional sensors for body rate and body acceleration, and triple integrated actuators.

Frazzini, R.; Vaughn, D.

1975-01-01

31

Potential impacts of advanced aerodynamic technology on air transportation system productivity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Summaries of a workshop held at NASA Langley Research Center in 1993 to explore the application of advanced aerodynamics to airport productivity improvement are discussed. Sessions included discussions of terminal area productivity problems and advanced aerodynamic technologies for enhanced high lift and reduced noise, emissions, and wake vortex hazard with emphasis upon advanced aircraft configurations and multidisciplinary solution options.

Bushnell, Dennis M. (editor)

1994-01-01

32

Application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul transport aircraft (STAT)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The benefits of selected advanced technologies for 19 and 30 passenger, short-haul aircraft were identified. Advanced technologies were investigated in four areas: aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and ride quality. Configuration sensitivity studies were conducted to show design tradeoffs associated with passenger capacity, cabin comfort level, and design field length.

Kraus, E. F.; Mall, O. D.; Awker, R. W.; Scholl, J. W.

1982-01-01

33

Application of advanced technologies to derivatives of current small transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mission requirements of the derivative design were the same as the baseline to readily identify the advanced technology benefits achieved. Advanced technologies investigated were in the areas of propulsion, structures and aerodynamics and a direct operating cost benefit analysis conducted to identify the most promising. Engine improvements appear most promising and combined with propeller, airfoil, surface coating and composite advanced technologies give a 21-25 percent DOC savings. A 17 percent higher acquisition cost is offset by a 34 percent savings in fuel used.

Renze, P. P.; Terry, J. E.

1981-01-01

34

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

1999-10-15

35

Aeronautical fuel conservation possibilities for advanced subsonic transports. [application of aeronautical technology for drag and weight reduction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The anticipated growth of air transportation is in danger of being constrained by increased prices and insecure sources of petroleum-based fuel. Fuel-conservation possibilities attainable through the application of advances in aeronautical technology to aircraft design are identified with the intent of stimulating NASA R and T and systems-study activities in the various disciplinary areas. The material includes drag reduction; weight reduction; increased efficiency of main and auxiliary power systems; unconventional air transport of cargo; and operational changes.

Braslow, A. L.; Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

1973-01-01

36

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

1982-01-01

37

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

1981-01-01

38

A fuel conservation study for transport aircraft utilizing advanced technology and hydrogen fuel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The conservation of fossil fuels in commercial aviation was investigated. Four categories of aircraft were selected for investigation: (1) conventional, medium range, low take-off gross weight; (2) conventional, long range, high take-off gross weights; (3) large take-off gross weight aircraft that might find future applications using both conventional and advanced technology; and (4) advanced technology aircraft of the future powered with liquid hydrogen fuel. It is concluded that the hydrogen fueled aircraft can perform at reduced size and gross weight the same payload/range mission as conventionally fueled aircraft.

Berry, W.; Calleson, R.; Espil, J.; Quartero, C.; Swanson, E.

1972-01-01

39

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-01-30

40

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This is the third quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Jan. 1, 2002 and Mar. 31, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop, progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); and (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

2002-04-30

41

Advanced composites technology program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provides a brief overview of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. Critical technology issues that must be addressed and solved to develop composite primary structures for transport aircraft are delineated. The program schedule and milestones are included. Work completed in the first 3 years of the program indicates the potential for achieving composite structures that weigh less and are cost effective relative to conventional aluminum structure. Selected technical accomplishments are noted. Readers who are seeking more in-depth technical information should study the other papers included in these proceedings.

Davis, John G., Jr.

1993-01-01

42

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport: Project Plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The state of the art of active controls technology (ACT) and a recommended ACT development program plan are reviewed. The performance benefits and cost of ownership of an integrated application of ACT to civil transport aircraft is to be assessed along with the risk and laboratory and/or flight experiments designed to reduce the technical risks to a commercially acceptable level.

1981-01-01

43

Study of the application of advanced technologies to laminar flow control systems for subsonic transports. Volume I. Summary. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of applying laminar flow control to the wings and empennage of long-range subsonic transport aircraft compatible with initial operation in 1985. For a design mission range of 10,186 km (5500 n mi), advanced technology laminar-flow-control (LFC) and turbulent-flow (TF) aircraft were developed for both 200 and 400-passenger payloads, and

R. F. Sturgeon; J. A. Bennett; F. R. Etchberger; R. S. Ferrill; L. E. Meade

1976-01-01

44

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This is the first quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between July 1, 2002 and Sept. 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System, (b) New Research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings (Task 12), Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk, Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2002-10-30

45

AVID - A design system for technology studies of advanced transportation concepts. [Aerospace Vehicle Interactive Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic AVID (Aerospace Vehicle Interactive Design) is a general system for conceptual and preliminary design currently being applied to a broad range of future space transportation and spacecraft vehicle concepts. AVID hardware includes a minicomputer allowing rapid designer interaction. AVID software includes (1) an executive program and communication data base which provide the automated capability to couple individual programs, either individually in an interactive mode or chained together in an automatic sequence mode; and (2) the individual technology and utility programs which provide analysis capability in areas such as graphics, aerodynamics, propulsion, flight performance, weights, sizing, and costs.

Wilhite, A. W.; Rehder, J. J.

1979-01-01

46

Advanced composite fuselage technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boeing's ATCAS program has completed its third year and continues to progress towards a goal to demonstrate composite fuselage technology with cost and weight advantages over aluminum. Work on this program is performed by an integrated team that includes several groups within The Boeing Company, industrial and university subcontractors, and technical support from NASA. During the course of the program, the ATCAS team has continued to perform a critical review of composite developments by recognizing advances in metal fuselage technology. Despite recent material, structural design, and manufacturing advancements for metals, polymeric matrix composite designs studied in ATCAS still project significant cost and weight advantages for future applications. A critical path to demonstrating technology readiness for composite transport fuselage structures was created to summarize ATCAS tasks for Phases A, B, and C. This includes a global schedule and list of technical issues which will be addressed throughout the course of studies. Work performed in ATCAS since the last ACT conference is also summarized. Most activities relate to crown quadrant manufacturing scaleup and performance verification. The former was highlighted by fabricating a curved, 7 ft. by 10 ft. panel, with cocured hat-stiffeners and cobonded J-frames. In building to this scale, process developments were achieved for tow-placed skins, drape formed stiffeners, braided/RTM frames, and panel cure tooling. Over 700 tests and supporting analyses have been performed for crown material and design evaluation, including structural tests that demonstrated limit load requirements for severed stiffener/skin failsafe damage conditions. Analysis of tests for tow-placed hybrid laminates with large damage indicates a tensile fracture toughness that is higher than that observed for advanced aluminum alloys. Additional recent ATCAS achievements include crown supporting technology, keel quadrant design evaluation, and sandwich process development.

Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Smith, Peter J.; Horton, Ray E.

1993-01-01

47

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY FUNDING PERIOD JULY 1, 2005 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2006 -FY05  

E-print Network

Sustainable Energy and Transportation Laboratory (drawing by Jessica Friend). THEME: Advanced Transportation students · Environmentally-friendly and sustainable transportation · Life-long learning · Interdisciplinary systems more sustainable? · How can we reduce the environmental impacts of our transportation system

Kyte, Michael

48

February 2000 Advanced Technology Program  

E-print Network

February 2000 Advanced Technology Program Information Infrastructure for Healthcare Focused Program OF COMMERCE Economic Assessment Office Technology Administration Advanced Technology Program National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 NISTIR 6477 Advanced Technology Program

49

For more information about Clean Transportation projects at the North Carolina Solar Center visit www.cleantransportation.org 12/3/13 Clean Fuel Advanced Technology Information Matrix  

E-print Network

For more information about Clean Transportation projects at the North Carolina Solar Center visit.org/using-biodiesel/oem-information/oem-statement-summary-chart. 3 Versus comparable 2LT automatic: http://www.chevrolet.com/cruze-compact-car.html. 4 Based on Wake for transportation prices. #12;This document is a product of the NC Solar Center's Clean Fuel Advanced Technology

50

State Technologies Advancement Collaborative  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5) Hydrogen Technology Learning Centers, (6) Fossil Energy, and (7) Rebuild America.

David S. Terry

2012-01-30

51

Outlook for advanced concepts in transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present air transport system is expected to continue until the turn of the century, but significant technological advances will have been incorporated into the existing aircraft. With a few exceptions, such as the SST, the development of all-new transports will be inhibited by economic constraints. The outlook for advanced transport aircraft concepts in the 21st century indicates new vehicles may be developed, such as air cushion landing gears, away from the airport; flatbed transports, at the airport; and aerial relay transports, in the air. Some of the new technologies and vehicle configurations are discussed, and their impact on aircraft maintenance, airport runways, taxiways, and cargo loading facilities is examined.

Conner, D. W.

1980-01-01

52

Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,  

E-print Network

FOR FUEL CELL AND HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGIES MICHAEL P. RAMAGE, NAE,[1] Chair, ExxonMobil Research number of vehicles that can be fueled by hydrogen by 2020 and potential fuel and CO2 savings ďż˝ Determine11 Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug

53

Advanced Technological Education (ATE)  

NSF Publications Database

Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Program Solicitation NSF 05-530 Replaces Document NSF ... that have not previously submitted to the ATE program. Please see the full text of this solicitation ...

54

THEME 7: TRANSPORT INCLUDING AERONAUTICS Based on technological advances, develop integrated, "greener", "smarter" and safer  

E-print Network

the competitiveness and the leading role attained by the European industries in the global market. CONTEXT (TRANSPORT.g. society, environment, energy, economy and industrial activity). · Basic and applied research contributing theme) [Overview of relevant policy developments] [Explanation of: structure/focus of calls during year

Meju, Max

55

Advanced technologies applied to reduce the operating costs of small commuter transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of new aerodynamic, structural, and propulsion technologies to a specified baseline commuter aircraft is studied. The assessment models can be used on a desktop calculator and include a sizing program, operating cost program, and passenger ride qualities model. Evaluation is done with a step-by-step approach and is applied to range, number and type of engines, structure, wing selection, and configuration. A 40 percent direct operating cost saving is anticipated compared to current well established commuter aircraft.

Masefield, O.; Turi, A.; Reinicke, M.

1982-01-01

56

RITA Office of Research, Development and Technology This month: Rutgers' Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation | February 2013  

E-print Network

Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology to assess storm damage on buildings, roadwaysRITA Office of Research, Development and Technology This month: Rutgers' Center for Advanced to learn from and quantify the disastrous effects of a major storm and use that data to help communities

Neimark, Alexander V.

57

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

2004-09-30

58

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation  

E-print Network

Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Venkat Srinivasan of the DOE/EERE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to develop batteries for vehicular applications double the energy density of presently available Li batteries · HEV: low-T operation, cost, and abuse

Knowles, David William

59

Advanced technology lunar telescope  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new type of telescope pointing system designed specifically for space and lunar applications will be discussed, based upon a prototype advanced technology telescope under investigation. The focus here will be the system of hybrid superconductor magnetic bearings (HSMB) used to provide isolation support and steering functions. HSMB's are combinations of high temperature superconductors, permanent magnets, and coils, being passive

Thomas L. Wilson; Wei-Kan Chu; Peter C. Chen

1994-01-01

60

Advanced solar dynamic technology program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs and discussion on Advanced Solar Dynamic Technology Program are presented. Topics covered include: advanced solar dynamic technology program; advanced concentrators; advanced heat receivers; power conversion systems; dished all metal honeycomb sandwich panels; Stirling cavity heat pipe receiver; Brayton solar receiver; and thermal energy storage technology.

Calogeras, James

1990-01-01

61

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01

62

Advanced nuclear propulsion technologies  

SciTech Connect

Advanced nuclear propulsion can take on several forms. Radioactive thrust sheets directly use the decay of radioactive nuclei to provide propulsion. The fissioning of nuclei has been extensively studied for propulsion both analytically and experimentally. Fusion has been analytically examined as a means of providing propulsion during the last few decades. In the last decade, serious attention has been given to the direct annihilation of matter. Each of these technologies is discussed in this paper with the greatest emphasis on antiproton annihilation propulsion.

Cassenti, B.N. (United Technologies Research, Arlington, VA (United States))

1991-01-01

63

Advanced propulsion for LEO-Moon transport. 3: Transportation model. M.S. Thesis - California Univ.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simplified computational model of low Earth orbit-Moon transportation system has been developed to provide insight into the benefits of new transportation technologies. A reference transportation infrastructure, based upon near-term technology developments, is used as a departure point for assessing other, more advanced alternatives. Comparison of the benefits of technology application, measured in terms of a mass payback ratio, suggests that several of the advanced technology alternatives could substantially improve the efficiency of low Earth orbit-Moon transportation.

Henley, Mark W.

1992-01-01

64

Can advanced technology improve future commuter aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The short-haul service abandoned by the trunk and local airlines is being picked up by the commuter airlines using small turboprop-powered aircraft. Most of the existing small transport aircraft currently available represent a relatively old technology level. However, several manufacturers have initiated the development of new or improved commuter transport aircraft. These aircraft are relatively conservative in terms of technology. An examination is conducted of advanced technology to identify those technologies that, if developed, would provide the largest improvements for future generations of these aircraft. Attention is given to commuter aircraft operating cost, aerodynamics, structures and materials, propulsion, aircraft systems, and technology integration. It is found that advanced technology can improve future commuter aircraft and that the largest of these improvements will come from the synergistic combination of technological advances in all of the aircraft disciplines. The most important goals are related to improved fuel efficiency and increased aircraft productivity.

Williams, L. J.; Snow, D. B.

1981-01-01

65

Advanced geothermal technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the U.S. Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico was producing 10 MW thermal, and still climbing, proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction was demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive.

Whetten, J. T.; Murphy, H. D.; Hanold, R. J.; Myers, C. W.; Dunn, J. C.

66

Conservation and renewable energy technologies for transportation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is charged with long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research and development of promising transportation technologies that are unlikely to be undertaken by the private sector alone. OTT activities are designed to develop an advanced technology base within the U.S. transportation industry for future manufacture of more energy-efficient, fuel-flexible, and environmentally sound transportation systems. OTT operations are focused on three areas: advanced automotive propulsion systems including gas turbines, low heat rejection diesel, and electric vehicle technologies; advanced materials development and tribology research; and research, development, demonstration, test, and evaluation (including field testing in fleet operations) of alternative fuels. Five papers describing the transportation technologies program have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

1990-11-01

67

Advanced gearbox technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advanced 13,000 HP, counterrotating (CR) gearbox was designed and successfully tested to provide a technology base for future designs of geared propfan propulsion systems for both commercial and military aircraft. The advanced technology CR gearbox was designed for high efficiency, low weight, long life, and improved maintainability. The differential planetary CR gearbox features double helical gears, double row cylindrical roller bearings integral with planet gears, tapered roller prop support bearings, and a flexible ring gear and diaphragm to provide load sharing. A new Allison propfan back-to-back gearbox test facility was constructed. Extensive rotating and stationary instrumentation was used to measure temperature, strain, vibration, deflection and efficiency under representative flight operating conditions. The tests verified smooth, efficient gearbox operation. The highly-instrumented advanced CR gearbox was successfully tested to design speed and power (13,000 HP), and to a 115 percent overspeed condition. Measured CR gearbox efficiency was 99.3 percent at the design point based on heat loss to the oil. Tests demonstrated low vibration characteristics of double helical gearing, proper gear tooth load sharing, low stress levels, and the high load capacity of the prop tapered roller bearings. Applied external prop loads did not significantly affect gearbox temperature, vibration, or stress levels. Gearbox hardware was in excellent condition after the tests with no indication of distress.

Anderson, N. E.; Cedoz, R. W.; Salama, E. E.; Wagner, D. A.

1987-01-01

68

Outlook for advanced concepts in transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Air transportation demand trends, air transportation system goals, and air transportation system trends well into the 21st century were examined in detail. The outlook is for continued growth in both air passenger travel and air freight movements. The present system, with some improvements, is expected to continue to the turn of the century and to utilize technologically upgraded, derivative versions of today's aircraft, plus possibly some new aircraft for supersonic long haul, short haul, and high density commuter service. Severe constraints of the system, expected by early in the 21st century, should lead to innovations at the airport, away from the airport, and in the air. The innovations are illustrated by descriptions of three candidate systems involving advanced aircraft concepts. Advanced technologies and vehicles expected to impact the airport are illustrated by descriptions of laminar flow control aircraft, very large air freighters and cryogenically fueled transports.

Conner, D. W.

1980-01-01

69

Advanced technology lunar telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new type of telescope pointing system designed specifically for space and lunar applications will be discussed, based upon a prototype advanced technology telescope under investigation. The focus here will be the system of hybrid superconductor magnetic bearings (HSMB) used to provide isolation support and steering functions. HSMB's are combinations of high temperature superconductors, permanent magnets, and coils, being passive (requiring no power), noncontact, and essentially frictionless. These also are well suited to long-term unattended operation in the space environment. The characteristics of these subsystems, their expected behavior under space vacuum, and thermal and radiation environments are discussed.

Wilson, Thomas L.; Chu, Wei-Kan; Chen, Peter C.

1994-01-01

70

Horizontal well technology advances  

SciTech Connect

The technology of drilling long horizontal wells, either for gravity drainage alone, or for steam-assisted processes, has advanced considerably in recent years. It appears to hold great promise for application to a number of tar sand reservoirs. A useful review of the state of the art was given by S. Joshi of Phillips Petroleum at the 1986 DOE Tar Sand Symposium held in Jackson, Wyoming. Currently, technology exists to drill up to 2000 ft long horizontal wellbores. Horizontal well drilling costs are about 1.5 to 2 times greater than vertical well costs. The paper describes cyclic steam stimulation, steam drive, steam assisted gravity drainage, and case histories of horizontal well-steam flood projects, as well as horizontal well economics. 6 figures, 2 tables.

Not Available

1986-12-01

71

SCANNING THE TECHNOLOGY Scanning Advanced  

E-print Network

SCANNING THE TECHNOLOGY Scanning Advanced Automobile Technology BY HAMID GHARAVI National Institute and advances in sensor technologies provide computational power and real time information, which can be used of Standards and Technology Guest Editor K. VENKATESH PRASAD Ford Motor Company Guest Editor PETROS IOANNOU

72

Advanced structures technology and aircraft safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA research and development on advanced aeronautical structures technology related to flight safety is reviewed. The effort is categorized as research in the technology base and projects sponsored by the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Project Office. Base technology research includes mechanics of composite structures, crash dynamics, and landing dynamics. The ACEE projects involve development and fabrication of selected composite structural components for existing commercial transport aircraft. Technology emanating from this research is intended to result in airframe structures with improved efficiency and safety.

Mccomb, H. G., Jr.

1983-01-01

73

Advanced optical instruments technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William (uw319824)

1992-01-01

74

A review of advanced turboprop transport aircraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of advanced technologies shows the potential for significant improvement in the fuel efficiency and operating costs of future transport aircraft envisioned for operation in the 1990s time period. One of the more promising advanced technologies is embodied in an advanced turboprop concept originated by Hamilton Standard and NASA and known as the propfan. The propfan concept features a highly loaded multibladed, variable pitch propeller geared to a high pressure ratio gas turbine engine. The blades have high sweepback and advanced airfoil sections to achieve 80 percent propulsive efficiency at M=0.80 cruise speed. Aircraft system studies have shown improvements in fuel efficiency of 15-20 percent for propfan advanced transport aircraft as compared to equivalent turbofan transports. Beginning with the Lockheed C-130 and Electra turboprop aircraft, this paper presents an overview of the evolution of propfan aircraft design concepts and system studies. These system studies include possible civil and military transport applications and data on the performance, community and far-field noise characteristics and operating costs of propfan aircraft design concepts. NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program propfan projects with industry are reviewed with respect to system studies of propfan aircraft and recommended flight development programs.

Lange, Roy H.

75

Integrative application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial act configuration design study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance and economic benefits of a constrained application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) are identified, and the approach to airplane design is established for subsequent steps leading to the development of a less constrained final ACT configuration. The active controls configurations are measured against a conventional baseline configuration, a state-of-the-art transport, to determine whether the performance and economic changes resulting from ACT merit proceeding with the project. The technology established by the conventional baseline configuration was held constant except for the addition of ACT. The wing, with the same planform, was moved forward on the initial ACT configuration to move the loading range aft relative to the wing mean aerodynamic chord. Wing trailing-edge surfaces and surface controls also were reconfigured for load alleviation and structural stabilization.

1980-01-01

76

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-07-30

77

Advanced Aerogel Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has made aerogels for NASA flight missions, e.g., Stardust, 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers and the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory, as well as NASA research projects for the past 14 years. During that time it has produced aerogels of a range of shapes, sizes, densities and compositions. Research is ongoing in the development of aerogels for future sample capture and return missions and for thermal insulation for both spacecraft and scientific instruments. For the past several years, the JPL Aerogel Laboratory has been developing, producing and testing a new composite material for use as the high temperature thermal insulation in the Advanced Sterling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) being developed by Lockheed Martin and NASA. The composite is made up of a glass fiber felt, silica aerogel, Titania powder, and silica powder. The oxide powders are included to reduce irradiative heat transport at elevated temperatures. These materials have thermal conductivity values that are the same as the best commercially produced high temperature insulation materials, and yet are 40% lighter. By greatly reducing the amount of oxide powder in the composite, the density, and therefore for the value of the thermal conductivity, would be reduced. The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has experimented with using glass fiber felt, expanded glass fiber felt and loose fibers to add structural integrity to silica aerogels. However, this work has been directed toward high temperature applications. By conducting a brief investigation of the optimal combination of fiber reinforcement and aerogel density, a durable, extremely efficient thermal insulation material for ambient temperature applications would be produced. If a transparent thermal insulation is desired, then aerogel is an excellent candidate material. At typical ambient temperatures, silica aerogel prevents the transport of heat via convection and conduction due to its highly porous nature. To prevent irradiative thermal transport, silica aerogel can be used in conjunction with a transparent polymeric material that blocks infrared radiation. The transparency of silica aerogel is typically greater than 90% for visible wavelengths from 500 nm to 900 nm for a 5 mm long path length.

Jones, Steven

2013-01-01

78

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

We have tested the loop elevation system. We raised the mast to approximately 25 to 30 degrees from horizontal. All went well. However, while lowering the mast, it moved laterally a couple of degrees. Upon visual inspection, severe spalling of the concrete on the face of the support pillar, and deformation of the steel support structure was observed. At this time, the facility is ready for testing in the horizontal position. A new air compressor has been received and set in place for the ACTS test loop. A new laboratory has been built near the ACTS test loop Roughened cups and rotors for the viscometer (RS300) were obtained. Rheologies of aqueous foams were measured using three different cup-rotor assemblies that have different surface roughness. The relationship between surface roughness and foam rheology was investigated. Re-calibration of nuclear densitometers has been finished. The re-calibration was also performed with 1% surfactant foam. A new cuttings injection system was installed at the bottom of the injection tower. It replaced the previous injection auger. A mechanistic model for cuttings transport with aerated mud has been developed. Cuttings transport mechanisms with aerated water at various conditions were experimentally investigated. A total of 39 tests were performed. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental measurements show a satisfactory agreement. Results from the ultrasonic monitoring system indicated that we could distinguish between different sand levels. We also have devised ways to achieve consistency of performance by securing the sensors in the caps in exactly the same manner as long as the sensors are not removed from the caps. A preliminary test was conducted on the main flow loop at 100 gpm flow rate and 20 lb/min cuttings injection rate. The measured bed thickness using the ultrasonic method showed a satisfactory agreement with nuclear densitometer readings. Thirty different data points were collected after the test section was put into liquid holdup mode. Readings indicated 2.5 to 2.7 inches of sand. The corresponding nuclear densitometers readings were between 2.5 and 3.1 inches. Lab tests were conducted to check an on-line viewing system. Sharp images were obtained through a CCD camera with the use of a ring light or fiber light. A prototype device for measuring the average bubble size for the foam generator-viscometer was constructed from a 1/2 inch fitting. The new windowed cell has been received and installed on the ACTF Bubble Characterization Cart.

Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

2004-07-31

79

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with water under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic drilling fluids. Initial calibration tests have been conducted by using water. Currently, the base oil of the Petrobras synthetic drilling fluid is being tested. Foam flow experiments have been conducted. Currently, more experiments are being conducted while data are being analyzed to characterize the rheology of the foam. Cuttings transport experiments have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Preliminary results have shown that it may not be possible to avoid cuttings bed deposition under any practical combination of air and water flow rates. Foam stability analyses have been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. A software for controlling the data sampling and data storage during cuttings monitoring process have been developed.

Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu; Sri Suresh Kumar Thiroveedhula

2000-04-30

80

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wing Planform Study and Final Configuration Selection Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is documented. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 44% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3589 km 1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block-fuel reduction. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation, and begin the required control system development and test.

1981-01-01

81

Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial ACT configuration design study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The initial ACT configuration design task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is summarized. A constrained application of active controls technology (ACT) resulted in significant improvements over a conventional baseline configuration previously established. The configuration uses the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, payload, and design requirements/objectives as the baseline, except for flying qualities, flutter, and ACT. The baseline wing is moved forward 1.68 m. The configuration incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle of attack limiter, wing load alleviation, and flutter mode control. This resulted in a 930 kg reduction in airplane operating empty weight and a 3.6% improvement in cruise efficiency, yielding a 13% range increase. Adjusted to the 3590 km baseline mission range, this amounts to 6% block fuel reduction and a 15.7% higher incremental return on investment, using 1978 dollars and fuel cost.

1980-01-01

82

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the Wing Planform Study Task and Final Configuration Selection of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology (except for ACT), takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail sizes), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3590 km) (1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block fuel reduction. Good takeoff performance at high-altitude airports on a hot day was also achieved. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation and begin the required control system development and testing.

1981-01-01

83

Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

Olivier, S

2001-09-18

84

Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses contents of new publication released by the International Technology Education Association: "Advancing Excellence in Technology Literacy: Student Assessment, Professional Development, and Program Standards," intended to provide the means for implementing technology standards published in 2000 ("Standards for Technology Literacy") in K-12…

Dugger, William E., Jr.; Meade, Shelli D.; Delany, Lisa; Nichols, Crystal

2003-01-01

85

Advanced stitching technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the design of textile composites, the selection of materials and constructional techniques must be matched with product performance, productivity, and cost requirements. Constructional techniques vary. A classification of various textile composite systems is given. In general, the chopped fiber system is not suitable for structural composite applications because of fiber discontinuity, uncontrolled fiber orientation and a lack of fiber integration or entanglement. Linear filament yarn systems are acceptable for structural components which are exposed to simple tension in their applications. To qualify for more general use as structural components, filament yarn systems must be multi-directionally positioned. With the most sophisticated filament winding and laying techniques, however, the Type 2 systems have limited potential for general load-bearing applications because of a lack of filament integration or entanglement, which means vulnerability to splitting and delamination among filament layers. The laminar systems (Type 3) represented by a variety of simple fabrics (woven, knitted, braided and nonwoven) are especially suitable for load-bearing panels in flat form and for beams in a roled up to wound form. The totally integrated, advanced fabric system (Type 4) are thought to be the most reliable for general load-bearing applications because of fiber continuity and because of controlled multiaxial fiber orientation and entanglement. Consequently, the risk of splitting and delamination is minimized and practically omitted. Type 4 systems can be woven, knitted, braided or stitched through with very special equipment. Multiaxial fabric technologies are discussed.

Scardino, Frank L.

1992-01-01

86

Space Transportation Systems Technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document is the final report by the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on contracted support provided to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Contract NAS8-99060, 'Space Transportation Systems Technologies'. This contract, initiated by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on February 8, 1999, was focused on space systems technologies that directly support NASA's space flight goals. It was awarded as a Cost-Plus-Incentive-Fee (CPIF) contract to SAIC, following a competitive procurement via NASA Research Announcement, NRA 8-21. This NRA was specifically focused on tasks related to Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs). Through Task Area 3 (TA-3), "Other Related Technology" of this NRA contract, SAIC extensively supported the Space Transportation Directorate of MSFC in effectively directing, integrating, and setting its mission, operations, and safety priorities for future RLV-focused space flight. Following an initially contracted Base Year (February 8, 1999 through September 30, 1999), two option years were added to the contract. These were Option Year 1 (October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2000) and Option Year 2 (October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001). This report overviews SAIC's accomplishments for the Base Year, Option Year 1, and Option Year 2, and summarizes the support provided by SAIC to the Space Transportation Directorate, NASA/MSFC.

Laue, Jay H.

2001-01-01

87

Center for Advanced Automotive Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Advanced Technological Education (ATE) center located at Macomb Community College, and among many other efforts, houses a comprehensive, up-to-date educational resource library available to the public. This library contains resources as small as a single presentation or assignment, to complete modules and courses taught at community colleges and universities in the fields of automotive, engineering, and technology. The scope of this library includes advanced automotive technology, alternative fuels, the smart grid interface, and related industry reports.

2013-06-26

88

Nuclear propulsion technology advanced fuels technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on advanced fuels technology are presented. Topics covered include: nuclear thermal propulsion reactor and fuel requirements; propulsion efficiency and temperature; uranium fuel compounds; melting point experiments; fabrication techniques; and sintered microspheres.

Stark, Walter A., Jr.

1993-01-01

89

Advances in Technology To Realize  

E-print Network

Advances in Technology To Realize Fusion Energy in the International Context Kathryn A. McCarthy Deputy Associate Laboratory Director Nuclear Science & Technology Idaho National Laboratory 2008 AAAS Meeting Boston, Massachusetts February 16, 2008 #12;2 The US Enabling Technology Research Mission

90

HyperTransport Technology: Simplifying System Design  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

HyperTransport technology is an architecture that allows data transfer between chips in excess of ten gigabytes per second. This white paper from Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), released in October 2002, considers the potential of HyperTransport in designing an input/ output bus for a microprocessor. The technology, while accommodating high speed demands, requires relatively little power, making it ideal for a wide range of applications. The report outlines the advantages of HyperTransport technology over other bus designs, concluding that it can be easier to implement while having superior performance at a lower cost.

2002-01-01

91

Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

1997-01-01

92

Advanced Modular Inverter Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

Electric and hybrid-electric vehicle systems require an inverter to convert the direct current (DC) output of the energy generation/storage system (engine, fuel cells, or batteries) to the alternating current (AC) that vehicle propulsion motors use. Vehicle support systems, such as lights and air conditioning, also use the inverter AC output. Distributed energy systems require an inverter to provide the high quality AC output that energy system customers demand. Today's inverters are expensive due to the cost of the power electronics components, and system designers must also tailor the inverter for individual applications. Thus, the benefits of mass production are not available, resulting in high initial procurement costs as well as high inverter maintenance and repair costs. Electricore, Inc. (www.electricore.org) a public good 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit advanced technology development consortium assembled a highly qualified team consisting of AeroVironment Inc. (www.aerovironment.com) and Delphi Automotive Systems LLC (Delphi), (www.delphi.com), as equal tiered technical leads, to develop an advanced, modular construction, inverter packaging technology that will offer a 30% cost reduction over conventional designs adding to the development of energy conversion technologies for crosscutting applications in the building, industry, transportation, and utility sectors. The proposed inverter allows for a reduction of weight and size of power electronics in the above-mentioned sectors and is scalable over the range of 15 to 500kW. The main objective of this program was to optimize existing AeroVironment inverter technology to improve power density, reliability and producibility as well as develop new topology to reduce line filter size. The newly developed inverter design will be used in automotive and distribution generation applications. In the first part of this program the high-density power stages were redesigned, optimized and fabricated. One of the main tasks was to design and validate new gate drive circuits to provide the capability of high temp operation. The new power stages and controls were later validated through extensive performance, durability and environmental tests. To further validate the design, two power stages and controls were integrated into a grid-tied load bank test fixture, a real application for field-testing. This fixture was designed to test motor drives with PWM output up to 50kW. In the second part of this program the new control topology based on sub-phases control and interphase transformer technology was successfully developed and validated. The main advantage of this technology is to reduce magnetic mass, loss and current ripple. This report summarizes the results of the advanced modular inverter technology development and details: (1) Power stage development and fabrication (2) Power stage validation testing (3) Grid-tied test fixture fabrication and initial testing (4) Interphase transformer technology development

Adam Szczepanek

2006-02-04

93

Small transport aircraft technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

Williams, L. J.

1983-01-01

94

Advanced interdisciplinary technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following topics are presented in view graph form: (1) breakthrough trust (space research and technology assessment); (2) bionics (technology derivatives from biological systems); (3) biodynamics (modeling of human biomechanical performance based on anatomical data); and (4) tethered atmospheric research probes.

Anderson, John L.

1990-01-01

95

Technology for Transportation Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boston Insulated Wire & Cable developed a new polyimide foam material, commercially known as Solimide, which resists ignition. It chars and decomposes when exposed to open flames. Used in the space shuttle, the material does not "outgas" until it begins to char making it safer than current materials with respect to toxic fumes. The polyimide can be made in two forms: a resilient foam and a rigid foam. Used in commercial transport interiors for such soft components as seat cushions to door, wall, floor, and ceiling panels. Material's flame resistance could lengthen from two minutes to five minutes, the time needed for passenger evacuation in a ground emergency. Could help reduce airline fuel consumption, since the foam is 50% lighter than current materials. Low-smoke cable assemblies used in rapid transit systems consists of an advanced wire and cable jacketing material with superior flame resistance and smoke retardation characteristics. Being supplied to mass transit systems in the U.S. and abroad.

1981-01-01

96

erlangen graduate school in advanced optical technologies  

E-print Network

erlangen graduate school in advanced optical technologies Curriculum The interdisciplinary The Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT) was established at the University. Bräuer (Director of Administration) Contact Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies

Fiebig, Peter

97

CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE ADVANCED SENSING TECHNOLOGIES AND ADVANCED REPAIR MATERIALS  

E-print Network

CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE ADVANCED SENSING TECHNOLOGIES AND ADVANCED REPAIR MATERIALS The proposed topic: "Advanced Sensing Technologies and Advanced Repair Materials for the Infrastructure: Water is to advance the state-of-the-art of sensing technologies that will make automatic sensing of the structural

Magee, Joseph W.

98

Partnership for Advancing Technologies in Housing (PATH)  

NSF Publications Database

... Technology Systems Interactions and Whole House Approaches PATH?s mission is to advance technology ... technology arena. Far reaching exploratory research that can lead to breakthrough technologies and ...

99

Advanced Composite Fuselage Technology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Boeing's ATCAS program has completed its third year and continues to progress towards a goal to demonstrate composite fuselage technology with cost and weight advantages over aluminum. Work on this program is performed by an integrated team that includes ...

L. B. Ilcewicz, P. J. Smith, R. E. Horton

1993-01-01

100

BBW AWB Advanced Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Taking advanced braking systems to the next level, some automotive R&D institutions have announced production contracts with\\u000a major automotive vehicle manufacturers for electro-fluido-mechanical braking (EFMB) and electro-pneumo-mechanical braking (EPMB).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Additionally, some automotive R&D institutions have development contracts with leading vehicle manufacturers to develop regenerative\\u000a braking based on an EFMB or EPMB BBW AWB dispulsion mechatronic control system. At the forefront

B. T. Fijalkowski

101

Advanced engine technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book provides a comprehensive reference for anyone wanting to study the way in which modern vehicle engines work, and why they are designed as they are. The book covers virtually all configurations of commercially-produced engines, and features the latest engine technology including up-to-date coverage of electronic engine management and exhaust emission control. Chapters cover valves and camshafts; camshaft chain

Heisler

1995-01-01

102

Advances in energy technology  

SciTech Connect

Papers on various topics of energy conservation, new passive solar heating and storage devices, governmental particiaption in developing energy technologies, and the development of diverse energy sources and safety features are presented. Attention is given to recent shifts in the federal and state government roles in energy research, development and economic incentives. The applications of passive solar walls, flat plate collectors and trombe walls as retorfits for houses, institutions, and industries were examined. Attention was given to the implementation of wind power by a zoo and the use of spoilers as speed control devices in a Darrieus wind turbine. Aspects of gasohol, coal, synfuel, and laser-pyrolyzed coal products use are investigated. Finally, the economic, social, and political factors influencing energy system selection are explored, together with conservation practices in housing, government, and industry, and new simulators for enhancing nuclear power plant safety.

Sauer, H.J. Jr.; Hegler, B.E.

1982-01-01

103

Advanced Technology for Engineering Education  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Technology for Engineering Education, held at the Peninsula Graduate Engineering Center, Hampton, Virginia, February 24-25, 1998. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of advanced technologies for engineering education and to explore the possibility of forming a consortium of interested individuals/universities for curriculum reform and development using advanced technologies. The presentations covered novel delivery systems and several implementations of new technologies for engineering education. Certain materials and products are identified in this publication in order to specify adequately the materials and products that were investigated in the research effort. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement of products by NASA, nor does it imply that the materials and products are the only ones or the best ones available for this purpose. In many cases equivalent materials and products are available and would probably produce equivalent results.

Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

1998-01-01

104

Advanced Air Bag Technology Assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a result of the concern for the growing number of air-bag-induced injuries and fatalities, the administrators of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) agreed to a cooperative effort that "leverages NHTSA's expertise in motor vehicle safety restraint systems and biomechanics with NASAs position as one of the leaders in advanced technology development... to enable the state of air bag safety technology to advance at a faster pace..." They signed a NASA/NHTSA memorandum of understanding for NASA to "evaluate air bag to assess advanced air bag performance, establish the technological potential for improved technology (smart) air bag systems, and identify key expertise and technology within the agency (i.e., NASA) that can potentially contribute significantly to the improved effectiveness of air bags." NASA is committed to contributing to NHTSAs effort to: (1) understand and define critical parameters affecting air bag performance; (2) systematically assess air bag technology state of the art and its future potential; and (3) identify new concepts for air bag systems. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) was selected by NASA to respond to the memorandum of understanding by conducting an advanced air bag technology assessment. JPL analyzed the nature of the need for occupant restraint, how air bags operate alone and with safety belts to provide restraint, and the potential hazards introduced by the technology. This analysis yielded a set of critical parameters for restraint systems. The researchers examined data on the performance of current air bag technology, and searched for and assessed how new technologies could reduce the hazards introduced by air bags while providing the restraint protection that is their primary purpose. The critical parameters which were derived are: (1) the crash severity; (2) the use of seat belts; (3) the physical characteristics of the occupants; (4) the proximity of the occupants to the airbag module; (5) the deployment time, which includes the time to sense the need for deployment, the inflator response parameters, the air bag response, and the reliability of the air bag. The requirements for an advanced air bag technology is discussed. These requirements includes that the system use information related to: (1) the crash severity; (2) the status of belt usage; (3) the occupant category; and (4) the proximity to the air bag to adjust air bag deployment. The parameters for the response of the air bag are: (1) deployment time; (2) inflator parameters; and (3) air bag response and reliability. The state of occupant protection advanced technology is reviewed. This review includes: the current safety restraint systems, and advanced technology characteristics. These characteristics are summarized in a table, which has information regarding the technology item, the potential, and an date of expected utilization. The use of technology and expertise at NASA centers is discussed. NASA expertise relating to sensors, computing, simulation, propellants, propulsion, inflatable systems, systems analysis and engineering is considered most useful. Specific NASA technology developments, which were included in the study are: (1) a capacitive detector; (2) stereoscopic vision system; (3) improved crash sensors; (4) the use of the acoustic signature of the crash to determine crash severity; and (5) the use of radar antenna for pre-crash sensing. Information relating to injury risk assessment is included, as is a summary of the areas of the technology which requires further development.

Phen, R. L.; Dowdy, M. W.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Kim. E.-H.; Moore, N. R.; VanZandt, T. R.

1998-01-01

105

Advancing Technology: A Corporate Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the creation and eventual demise of a technologically advanced distance-learning facility. Concludes that it is critical, especially in an expensive high-tech environment, to listen to the customers and use their feedback to constantly improve service. (SR)

Kovacs, Bob

1994-01-01

106

TECHcitement: Advances in Technological Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication includes seven articles. "ATE Grants Generate Life-Changing Experiences" discusses the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grants, which provide seed money and other support that community college educators use to enhance technical training and improve math and science instruction. "Phone…

American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

107

Advanced planning and scheduling technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents research on the core technology in advanced planning and scheduling (APS) systems that are currently the state-of-art in supply chain planning and optimisation. Further research is needed to enable the opportunities given, especially the area of combined planning and scheduling. Mixed integer linear programming (MILP) methods have been successfully applied to solve diverse problems, such as planning

Kenn Steger-Jensen; Hans-Henrik Hvolby; Peter Nielsen; Izabela Nielsen

2011-01-01

108

Advances in GPS translator technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1974, two generations of tracking systems employing Global Positioning System (GPS) translators have supported the Navy Trident Fleet Ballistic Missile program. Currently a third generation system is being developed by the GPS Range Applications Joint Program Office (RAJPO) for the SD1 Exoatmospheric Reentry Intercept System (ERIS) program. Further advances in technology are expected to significantly reduce the size, weight

John B. McConnell; Robert H. Greenberg; Robert B. Pickett; Phillip C. Wildhagen; Alison K. Brown

1989-01-01

109

DARPA's advanced technology GPS chipset  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Technology advances have made possible substantial reductions in size, weight, power, and cost of GPS receivers over the last decade. This trend continues with the exploitation of cutting-edge device technologies, most notably VLSI and MMIC. Five new chips based on these technologies are defined and described in detail. With mix-and-match techniques these chips can be used to implement a variety of GPS sets from single channel through multiple channel. The implementation status of the chips is presented, and their integration into a demonstration receiver is discussed.

Hemesath, N. B.; Bruckner, J. M. H.

110

Technology: Manufacturing, Transportation, Construction, Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The technology-based student activities in this curriculum resource book are intended to be incorporated into any industrial arts/technology education program. The activities are classified according to one of four technological systems--construction, communications, manufacturing, and transportation. Within the four parts of the guide, individual…

North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

111

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Test act system validation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of the Test Active Control Technology (ACT) System laboratory tests was to verify and validate the system concept, hardware, and software. The initial lab tests were open loop hardware tests of the Test ACT System as designed and built. During the course of the testing, minor problems were uncovered and corrected. Major software tests were run. The initial software testing was also open loop. These tests examined pitch control laws, wing load alleviation, signal selection/fault detection (SSFD), and output management. The Test ACT System was modified to interface with the direct drive valve (DDV) modules. The initial testing identified problem areas with DDV nonlinearities, valve friction induced limit cycling, DDV control loop instability, and channel command mismatch. The other DDV issue investigated was the ability to detect and isolate failures. Some simple schemes for failure detection were tested but were not completely satisfactory. The Test ACT System architecture continues to appear promising for ACT/FBW applications in systems that must be immune to worst case generic digital faults, and be able to tolerate two sequential nongeneric faults with no reduction in performance. The challenge in such an implementation would be to keep the analog element sufficiently simple to achieve the necessary reliability.

1985-01-01

112

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An active controls technology (ACT) system architecture was selected based on current technology system elements and optimal control theory was evaluated for use in analyzing and synthesizing ACT multiple control laws. The system selected employs three redundant computers to implement all of the ACT functions, four redundant smaller computers to implement the crucial pitch-augmented stability function, and a separate maintenance and display computer. The reliability objective of probability of crucial function failure of less than 1 x 10 to the -9th power per flight of 1 hr can be met with current technology system components, if the software is assumed fault free and coverage approaching 1.0 can be provided. The optimal control theory approach to ACT control law synthesis yielded comparable control law performance much more systematically and directly than the classical s-domain approach. The ACT control law performance, although somewhat degraded by the inclusion of representative nonlinearities, remained quite effective. Certain high-frequency gust-load alleviation functions may require increased surface rate capability.

Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

1981-01-01

113

Advanced Technology Briefing to VLT/PAC  

E-print Network

Advanced Technology Briefing to VLT/PAC Mohamed Abdou VLT, San Diego December 10, 1998 #12;M. Abdou VLT/PAC Meeting, Dec. 10, 1998 Advanced Technology ­ Scope Advanced technology is concerned with the longer-term technologies for high power density fusion systems that will have the greatest impact

California at Los Angeles, University of

114

Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project  

SciTech Connect

Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

Johnson, D.R.

1991-07-01

115

Subsea completion technology needs advances  

SciTech Connect

Subsea technology needs further advances to reduce operational costs before operators will expand the use of subsea well completions in the Gulf of Mexico. They will continue to choose surface completion-oriented systems as long as these are more economical operationally than subsea system. Designs of subsea equipment such as trees, connectors, control pods, umbilicals, and flow lines, must bring about reductions in the cost of both installation and workover compatibility. Remote operated vehicle (ROV) manipulation is one avenue that should be exploited. The bottom line is that significant cooperation between equipment manufacturers and ROV companies is needed to develop advanced ROV technology, and operators should be involved to help guide operational strategies.

Ledbetter, R. [Ledbetter (Ron), Houston, TX (United States)

1995-09-18

116

Advanced supersonic cruise aircraft technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multidiscipline approach is taken to the application of the latest technology to supersonic cruise aircraft concept definition, and current problem areas are identified. Particular attention is given to the performance of the AST-100 advanced supersonic cruise vehicle with emphasis on aerodynamic characteristics, noise and chemical emission, and mission analysis. A recently developed aircraft sizing and performance computer program was used to determine allowable wing loading and takeoff gross weight sensitivity to structural weight reduction.

Baber, H. T., Jr.; Driver, C.

1977-01-01

117

Future subsonic transport engine technology improvements and resultant propulsion alternatives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major contenders for engines to power future subsonic transports include the conventional high bypass turbofan, the geared turbofan of somewhat higher bypass ratio, and the high disk loading turboprop. Typical designs involving projected advancements in technology are described and compared to a current turbofan. The key technology features for each of the advanced engines are identified and their relative

R. E. Neitzel

1977-01-01

118

Advances in lens implant technology  

PubMed Central

Cataract surgery is one of the oldest and the most frequent outpatient clinic operations in medicine performed worldwide. The clouded human crystalline lens is replaced by an artificial intraocular lens implanted into the capsular bag. During the last six decades, cataract surgery has undergone rapid development from a traumatic, manual surgical procedure with implantation of a simple lens to a minimally invasive intervention increasingly assisted by high technology and a broad variety of implants customized for each patient’s individual requirements. This review discusses the major advances in this field and focuses on the main challenge remaining – the treatment of presbyopia. The demand for correction of presbyopia is increasing, reflecting the global growth of the ageing population. Pearls and pitfalls of currently applied methods to correct presbyopia and different approaches under investigation, both in lens implant technology and in surgical technology, are discussed. PMID:23413369

Kampik, Anselm; Dexl, Alois K.; Zimmermann, Nicole; Glasser, Adrian; Baumeister, Martin; Kohnen, Thomas

2013-01-01

119

Advanced thermal management technologies for defense electronics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermal management technology plays a key role in the continuing miniaturization, performance improvements, and higher reliability of electronic systems. For the past decade, and particularly, the past 4 years, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has aggressively pursued the application of micro- and nano-technology to reduce or remove thermal constraints on the performance of defense electronic systems. The DARPA Thermal Management Technologies (TMT) portfolio is comprised of five technical thrust areas: Thermal Ground Plane (TGP), Microtechnologies for Air-Cooled Exchangers (MACE), NanoThermal Interfaces (NTI), Active Cooling Modules (ACM), and Near Junction Thermal Transport (NJTT). An overview of the TMT program will be presented with emphasis on the goals and status of these efforts relative to the current State-of-the-Art. The presentation will close with future challenges and opportunities in the thermal management of defense electronics.

Bloschock, Kristen P.; Bar-Cohen, Avram

2012-05-01

120

Center for Advanced Separation Technology  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, CAST is now a five-university consortium – Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah and Montana Tech, - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FE0000699, Center for Advanced Separation Technology. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in two broad areas: Advanced Pre-Combustion Clean Coal Technologies and Gas-Gas Separations. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the five member universities. These were reviewed and the selected proposals were forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed below by category, along with abstracts from their final reports.

Honaker, Rick

2013-09-30

121

Technology advances in wideband packet switching  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examine some recent technology advances in the evolution of wideband packet technology (WPT). These advances include contention resolution in WPT switch fabrics, GaAs implementation of WPT switch fabric, and packet processing in trunk interfaces. It is concluded that WPT architectures are ideally suited for aggressive incorporation in advanced VLSI technology particularly for the implementation of the core of

A. K. Vaidya; M. A. Pashan

1988-01-01

122

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HEALTHCARE  

E-print Network

. In addition, it was an explicit goal of the researchers to provide intelligence to the Advanced TechnologyADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HEALTHCARE: Case Studies from a Focused. We also thank a number of reviewers within and outside the Advanced Technology Program, including BJ

123

Systems study of transport aircraft incorporating advanced aluminum alloys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was performed to quantify the potential benefits of utilizing advanced aluminum alloys in commercial transport aircraft and to define the effort necessary to develop fully the alloys to a viable commercial production capability. The comprehensive investigation (1) established realistic advanced aluminum alloy property goals to maximize aircraft systems effectiveness (2) identified performance and economic benefits of incorporating the advanced alloy in future advanced technology commercial aircraft designs (3) provided a recommended plan for development and integration of the alloys into commercial aircraft production (4) provided an indication of the timing and investigation required by the metal producing industry to support the projected market and (5) evaluate application of advanced aluminum alloys to other aerospace and transit systems as a secondary objective. The results of the investigation provided a roadmap and identified key issues requiring attention in an advanced aluminum alloy and applications technology development program.

Sakata, I. F.

1982-01-01

124

Technology 1993-transportation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developments and events during 1992 are reviewed. The drive toward intelligent vehicle-highway systems was given an extra push by the Intermodal Surface Transportation and Efficiency Act, which was signed into US law in December 1991. The demand for zero emissions has revived work on electric vehicles. In spite of high installation costs, high-speed rail projects moved ahead, and nonstop air-traffic

D. Dooling

1993-01-01

125

Advances in Genome Biology & Technology  

SciTech Connect

This year's meeting focused on the latest advances in new DNA sequencing technologies and the applications of genomics to disease areas in biology and biomedicine. Daytime plenary sessions highlighted cutting-edge research in areas such as complex genetic diseases, comparative genomics, medical sequencing, massively parallel DNA sequencing, and synthetic biology. Technical approaches being developed and utilized in contemporary genomics research were presented during evening concurrent sessions. Also, as in previous years, poster sessions bridged the morning and afternoon plenary sessions. In addition, for the third year in a row, the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting was preceded by a pre-meeting workshop that aimed to provide an introductory overview for trainees and other meeting attendees. This year, speakers at the workshop focused on next-generation sequencing technologies, including their experiences, findings, and helpful advise for others contemplating using these platforms in their research. Speakers from genome centers and core sequencing facilities were featured and the workshop ended with a roundtable discussion, during which speakers fielded questions from the audience.

Thomas J. Albert, Jon R. Armstrong, Raymond K. Auerback, W. Brad Barbazuk, et al.

2007-12-01

126

Advances in nondestructive evaluation technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research at NASA Langley's Materials Characterization Instrumentation Section has followed the philosophy of improving the science base of nondestructive evaluation and advancing the state of the art of quantitative interpretability of physical measurements of materials. Details of several R&D programs choosen to highlight the last several years are given. Applications of these technologies are presented in the area of stress measurement, characterization of metal heat treatment, and evaluation of material internal structure. A second focus of the program is on quantitative transducers/measurements that have resulted in better data in irregular inhomogeneous materials such as composites. Examples are presented of new capabilities resulting from these advances that include fatigue and impact damage evaluation.

Heyman, J. S.

1982-01-01

127

Advances in traction drive technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Traction drives are traced from early uses as main transmissions in automobiles at the turn of the century to modern, high-powered traction drives capable of transmitting hundreds of horsepower. Recent advances in technology are described which enable today's traction drive to be a serious candidate for off-highway vehicles and helicopter applications. Improvements in materials, traction fluids, design techniques, power loss and life prediction methods will be highlighted. Performance characteristics of the Nasvytis fixed-ratio drive are given. Promising future drive applications, such as helicopter main transmissions and servo-control positioning mechanisms are also addressed.

Loewenthal, S. H.; Anderson, N. E.; Rohn, D. A.

1983-01-01

128

Careers in Advanced Manufacturing Technologies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive activity produced for Teachers' Domain investigates five possible career paths in advanced manufacturing technologies: design and development; production and quality assurance; inventory and distribution; health, safety, and environment; and installation, maintenance, and repair. Explore each path to learn more about the education and experience required for particular jobs such as model maker, industrial designer, machinist, quality control inspector, storage and distribution manager, purchasing agent, environmental science and protection technician, industrial safety and health engineer, industrial machinery technician, and industrial electronics technician. The interactive is accompanied by a background essay, standards alignment, and discussion questions.

2012-05-23

129

Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies (CAST) at the University of Arkansas is dedicated to applications in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, digital photogrammetry and interoperability, and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). This enormous site contains a wide range of research activities in spatial technologies as applied to the disciplines of environmental studies, archaeology, historical preservation, landscape architecture, urban and rural planning, spatial statistics, and data development. Within the Reports and Publications section, the Arkansas Gap Analysis Program (GAP) final report is available (in HTML and .pdf formats) and, though the work itself was completed in 1998, the report provides excellent information on biodiversity assessment and land-cover mapping (For the national Gap Analysis Program Website, see the September 17, 1997 Scout Report for Science & Engineering). Each of the research areas of the site contains documentation of projects and links to related sites.

2005-12-07

130

Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

2014-01-01

131

A methodology for hypersonic transport technology planning  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A systematic procedure by which the relative economic value of technology factors affecting design, configuration, and operation of a hypersonic cruise transport can be evaluated is discussed. Use of the methodology results in identification of first-order economic gains potentially achievable by projected advances in each of the definable, hypersonic technologies. Starting with a baseline vehicle, the formulas, procedures and forms which are integral parts of this methodology are developed. A demonstration of the methodology is presented for one specific hypersonic vehicle system.

Repic, E. M.; Olson, G. A.; Milliken, R. J.

1973-01-01

132

Transportation (technology 86)  

SciTech Connect

As railroads strive to cut operating and maintenance costs in an increasingly competitive transportation industry, AC propulsion and microprocessors figure prominently in their plans. New generations of locomotives and cars incorporating AC propulsion and microprocessors entered service last year, and the trend is destined to continue. Electronics is also making possible freight trains that rely on a telemetry unit at the rear to monitor airbrake pressure, instead of a manned caboose. AC is gaining acceptance because it permits simpler motors with fewer parts to wear and replace, and it saves energy by allowing the traction motors to work as generators during braking. Microprocessors are being used in locomotives not only to reduce energy waste through better regulation of traction motor currents and auxiliary devices such as cooling fans, but also to control engine speed, braking, and other functions.

Caplan, G.

1986-01-01

133

Advanced Technology Spark-Ignition Aircraft Piston Engine Design Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advanced technology, spark ignition, aircraft piston engine design study was conducted to determine the improvements that could be made by taking advantage of technology that could reasonably be expected to be made available for an engine intended for production by January 1, 1990. Two engines were proposed to account for levels of technology considered to be moderate risk and high risk. The moderate risk technology engine is a homogeneous charge engine operating on avgas and offers a 40% improvement in transportation efficiency over present designs. The high risk technology engine, with a stratified charge combustion system using kerosene-based jet fuel, projects a 65% improvement in transportation efficiency. Technology enablement program plans are proposed herein to set a timetable for the successful integration of each item of required advanced technology into the engine design.

Stuckas, K. J.

1980-01-01

134

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT PLAN Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope  

E-print Network

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT PLAN for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope, and Ronald Polidan. #12;Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 22 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 (ATLAST) A Roadmap for UVIOR Technology, 2010-2020 24 April, 2009 T. Tupper Hyde, ATLAST Technologist

Sirianni, Marco

135

Technology Roadmap Biofuels for Transport  

E-print Network

­ particularly in terms of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions that contribute to climate change. n Improve and increased oil demand will heighten concerns over the security of supplies. We can and must change the path2035 2040 2045 2050 Technology Roadmap Biofuels for Transport #12;INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY

136

TECHNOLOGIES SUPPORTIVE OF SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Meeting the growing demand for personal mobility and transport of goods in a sustainable way presents a wide range of interrelated engineering and public policy challenges. This chapter reviews some of the technical options being developed for mitigating the local and global environmental impact of road vehicles, made possible using developments in the materials and combustion sciences, sensor technologies,

A. Dearing

2000-01-01

137

Maricopa Advanced Technology Education Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There is a great deal of interest in the world of educational development in the growing fields of the semiconductor business, and the Maricopa Advanced Technology Center (MATEC) has been involved in this area of research since 1994. The Center is a division of the Maricopa Community Colleges in Arizona, and they are primarily interested in assisting students and faculty who wish to keep abreast of the evolving skills needed in this area, along with developments in the electronics and automated manufacturing industries. Most visitors will want to take a look at the "Curriculum Development" area, which features samples of their work, including illustrative animations, annual reports, and information about the skill standards that inform the basis of each educational activity created at the Center. Additionally, the "Education & Career Opportunities" section contains a virtual presentation titled "Working in the Semiconductor Manufacturing Industry", which will be of use to those considering a career in this area.

138

Recent Advances in Chamber Science and Technology  

E-print Network

Recent Advances in Chamber Science and Technology Mohamed Abdou April 8, 2002ISFNT-6 San Diego, USA #12;Recent Advances in Chamber Science & Technology OutlineOutline · Highlights of Major World - Experiments - Analysis & Design #12;Highlights of Major World Programs on Chamber (Blanket) Technology

Abdou, Mohamed

139

Advances in bipolar IC technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Si bipolar transistors and integrated circuits are widely used for high performance gate arrays and high speed cache memories, and have since become the backbone of the high speed computers. Steady improvements in the understanding of the design and scaling of the small dimension bipolar transistors together with the advances in the process technology have led to the realization of ever faster bipolar transistor and circuits. The improvement is expected from scaling down to 0.25 micron dimension. The theoretical limit of scaling is reached when the base width is reduced to about 25 nm. At such a dimension, the mean free path of electron is comparable to the base width and the validity of the statistical drift diffusion equation describing the device operation becomes questionable. Various second order effects in device physics which were of no concern in designing 2 micron or larger devices now become important at one micron and submicron level. They are the heavy doping effects in the base, the reverse tunneling current, the contact to the shallow emitter and the base widening effects. These and further advances are briefly discussed.

Tang, D. D.; Ning, T. H.

1987-10-01

140

Advanced Technology and Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This fact sheet provides a basic overview of today's alternative fuel choices--including biofuels, biodiesel, electricity, and hydrogen--alternative fuel vehicles, and advanced vehicle technology, such as hybrid electric vehicles, fuel cells and advanced drive trains.

Tuttle

2001-01-01

141

Advances in solar thermal electricity technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various advanced solar thermal electricity technologies are reviewed with an emphasis on new technology and new market approaches.In single-axis tracking technology, the conventional parabolic trough collector is the mainstream established technology and is under continued development but is soon to face competition from two linear Fresnel reflector (LFR) technologies, the CLFR and Solarmundo. A Solarmundo prototype has been built in

D. Mills

2004-01-01

142

Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 9-10, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees were from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objective of the workshop was to assess the status and effectiveness of different advanced training technologies and learning environments.

Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

1999-01-01

143

ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity. Retrofit technologies that address the challenges of slow-speed integral compression are: (1) optimum turndown using a combination of speed and clearance with single-acting operation as a last resort; (2) if single-acting is required, implement infinite length nozzles to address nozzle pulsation and tunable side branch absorbers for 1x lateral pulsations; and (3) advanced valves, either the semi-active plate valve or the passive rotary valve, to extend valve life to three years with half the pressure drop. This next generation of slow-speed compression should attain 95% efficiency, a three-year valve life, and expanded turndown. New equipment technologies that address the challenges of large-horsepower, high-speed compression are: (1) optimum turndown with unit speed; (2) tapered nozzles to effectively reduce nozzle pulsation with half the pressure drop and minimization of mechanical cylinder stretch induced vibrations; (3) tunable side branch absorber or higher-order filter bottle to address lateral piping pulsations over the entire extended speed range with minimal pressure drop; and (4) semi-active plate valves or passive rotary valves to extend valve life with half the pressure drop. This next generation of large-horsepower, high-speed compression should attain 90% efficiency, a two-year valve life, 50% turndown, and less than 0.75 IPS vibration. This program has generated proof-of-concept technologies with the potential to meet these ambitious goals. Full development of these identified technologies is underway. The GMRC has committed to pursue the most promising enabling technologies for their industry.

Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

2005-12-01

144

Advanced propulsion for LEO-Moon transport. 1: A method for evaluating advanced propulsion performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report describes a study to evaluate the benefits of advanced propulsion technologies for transporting materials between low Earth orbit and the Moon. A relatively conventional reference transportation system, and several other systems, each of which includes one advanced technology component, are compared in terms of how well they perform a chosen mission objective. The evaluation method is based on a pairwise life-cycle cost comparison of each of the advanced systems with the reference system. Somewhat novel and economically important features of the procedure are the inclusion not only of mass payback ratios based on Earth launch costs, but also of repair and capital acquisition costs, and of adjustments in the latter to reflect the technological maturity of the advanced technologies. The required input information is developed by panels of experts. The overall scope and approach of the study are presented in the introduction. The bulk of the paper describes the evaluation method; the reference system and an advanced transportation system, including a spinning tether in an eccentric Earth orbit, are used to illustrate it.

Stern, Martin O.

1992-01-01

145

[Advances on transgene containment technologies].  

PubMed

The biosecurity of transgenic organism has been widely concerned and extremely restricted its application. Recently, many technological strategies have been developed to ensure its biosecurity. Thus, transgene containment technologies have become one of the hotspots in current transgenic research. In this paper, several transgene containment technologies, such as marker-free transgenic technology, safety marker transgenic technology, chloroplast transgenic technologies, terminator technology, male sterility technology, and 'GM-gene-deletor'technology were reviewed and evaluated. 'GM-gene-deletor' technology, as one of these technologies, demonstrated a prosperous future for safe application of transgenic organisms. Finally, the strategies for developing new transgene containment technologies have been suggested. PMID:21586390

Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Jin-Feng; Fu, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Jing; Yuan, Wen-Jun

2011-05-01

146

NASA technology program for future civil air transports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An assessment is undertaken of the development status of technology, applicable to future civil air transport design, which is currently undergoing conceptual study or testing at NASA facilities. The NASA civil air transport effort emphasizes advanced aerodynamic computational capabilities, fuel-efficient engines, advanced turboprops, composite primary structure materials, advanced aerodynamic concepts in boundary layer laminarization and aircraft configuration, refined control, guidance and flight management systems, and the integration of all these design elements into optimal systems. Attention is given to such novel transport aircraft design concepts as forward swept wings, twin fuselages, sandwich composite structures, and swept blade propfans.

Wright, H. T.

1983-01-01

147

Technology Advances for Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The field of radio astronomy continues to provide fundamental contributions to the understanding of the evolution, and inner workings of, our universe. It has done so from its humble beginnings, where single antennas and receivers were used for observation, to today's focal plane arrays and interferometers. The number of receiving elements (pixels) in these instruments is quickly growing, currently approaching one hundred. For the instruments of tomorrow, the number of receiving elements will be in the thousands. Such instruments will enable researchers to peer deeper into the fabric of our universe and do so at faster survey speeds. They will provide enormous capability, both for unraveling today's mysteries as well as for the discovery of new phenomena. Among other challenges, producing the large numbers of low-noise amplifiers required for these instruments will be no easy task. The work described in this thesis advances the state of the art in three critical areas, technological advancements necessary for the future design and manufacturing of thousands of low-noise amplifiers. These areas being: the automated, cryogenic, probing of diameter100 mm indium phosphide wafers; a system for measuring the noise parameters of devices at cryogenic temperatures; and the development of low-noise, silicon germanium amplifiers for terahertz mixer receivers. The four chapters that comprise the body of this work detail the background, design, assembly, and testing involved in these contributions. Also included is a brief survey of noise parameters, the knowledge of which is fundamental to the design of low-noise amplifiers and the optimization of the system noise temperature for large, dense, interferometers.

Russell, Damon Stuart

148

Concept for Space Technology Advancement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The space industry is based on an antiquated concept of disposable rockets, earth construction, and non-repairable satellites. Current space vehicle concepts hearken from a time of Cold War animosity and expeditiousness. Space systems are put together in small, single-purpose chunks that are launched with mighty, single-use rockets. Spacecraft need to change to a more versatile, capable, reusable, and mission efficient design. The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) that President Bush put forward in his space initiative on Jan. 14, 2004 is a small first step. But like all first steps, the risk of eventual failure is great without a complementary set of steps, a reliable handhold, and a goal, which are outlined in this paper. The system for space access and development needs to be overhauled to allow for the access to space to complement the building in space, which promotes the production of goods in space, which enhances the exploitation of space resources… and the list goes on. Without supplemental and complementary infrastructure, all political, scientific, and idealistic endeavors to explore and exploit the near solar system will result in quagmires of failures and indecision. Renewed focus on fundamentals, integration, total-system consideration, and solid engineering can avoid catastrophe. Mission success, simple solutions, mission efficiency, and proper testing all seem to have been lost in the chase for the nickels and dimes. These items will increase capabilities available from a system or combination of systems. New propulsion options and materials will enable vehicles previously unachievable. Future spacecraft should exploit modular designs for repeatability and reduced cost. Space construction should use these modular systems on major components built in orbit. All vehicles should apply smart designs and monitoring systems for increased reliability and system awareness. Crew safety systems must use this awareness in alerting the crew, aiding collision detection and avoidance, damage control and mitigation, and crew ejection systems. These systems, working together, will greatly increase survivability of crewed systems. Implicit in this varied list of technology and integration is industry risk. Aerospace industry must relearn to accept risk in space technology development in order to advance capability. All of these items wrap up in a total system view that will allow for more advanced, reliable capability in space.

Hansen, Jeremiah J.

2005-02-01

149

Technological advances in avalanche survival.  

PubMed

Over the last decade, a proliferation of interest has emerged in the area of avalanche survival, yielding both an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of death after avalanche burial and technological advances in the development of survival equipment. The dismal survival statistics born out of the modern era of winter recreation unmistakably reveal that elapsed time and depth of burial are the most critical variables of survival and the focus of newer survival devices on the market. Although blunt trauma may kill up to one third of avalanche victims, early asphyxiation is the predominant mechanism of death, and hypothermia is rare. A survival plateau or delay in asphyxiation may be seen in those buried in respiratory communication with an air pocket until a critical accumulation of CO2 or an ice lens develops. The newest survival devices available for adjunctive protection, along with a transceiver and shovel, are the artificial air pocket device (AvaLung), the avalanche air bag system (ABS), and the Avalanche Ball. The artificial air pocket prolongs adequate respiration during snow burial and may improve survival by delaying asphyxiation. The ABS, which forces the wearer to the surface of the avalanche debris by inverse segregation to help prevent burial, has been in use in Europe for the last 10 years with an impressive track record. Finally, the Avalanche Ball is a visual locator device in the form of a spring-loaded ball attached to a tether, which is released from a fanny pack by a rip cord. Despite the excitement surrounding these novel technologies, avalanche avoidance through knowledge and conservative judgment will always be the mainstay of avalanche survival, never to be replaced by any device. PMID:12092969

Radwin, Martin I; Grissom, Colin K

2002-01-01

150

Recent Advances in Synthetic Membrane Transporters  

PubMed Central

It is 25 years since the first report of a synthetic ion channel transporter. Today, dozens of molecular and supramolecular designs have been developed to facilitate ion and small molecule transport across a bilayer membrane. Presented here is a concise summary of the advances made over the past four years. The transporters are grouped into three mechanistic classes: mobile carrier, monomeric channel, and self-assembled pore. Common building blocks are crown ethers, steroids, cyclodextrins, peptides, curcubiturils, and calixarenes. The eventual goal is to produce functional supramolecular devices such as sensors, enzyme assays, and lead candidates for pharmaceutical development. PMID:20376284

McNALLY, BETH A.; LEEVY, W. MATTHEW; SMITH, BRADLEY D.

2010-01-01

151

Small Aircraft Transportation System Concept and Technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper summarizes both the vision and the early public-private collaborative research for the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). The paper outlines an operational definition of SATS, describes how SATS conceptually differs from current air transportation capabilities, introduces four SATS operating capabilities, and explains the relation between the SATS operating capabilities and the potential for expanded air mobility. The SATS technology roadmap encompasses on-demand, widely distributed, point-to-point air mobility, through hired-pilot modes in the nearer-term, and through self-operated user modes in the farther-term. The nearer-term concept is based on aircraft and airspace technologies being developed to make the use of smaller, more widely distributed community reliever and general aviation airports and their runways more useful in more weather conditions, in commercial hired-pilot service modes. The farther-term vision is based on technical concepts that could be developed to simplify or automate many of the operational functions in the aircraft and the airspace for meeting future public transportation needs, in personally operated modes. NASA technology strategies form a roadmap between the nearer-term concept and the farther-term vision. This paper outlines a roadmap for scalable, on-demand, distributed air mobility technologies for vehicle and airspace systems. The audiences for the paper include General Aviation manufacturers, small aircraft transportation service providers, the flight training industry, airport and transportation authorities at the Federal, state and local levels, and organizations involved in planning for future National Airspace System advancements.

Holmes, Bruce J.; Durham, Michael H.; Tarry, Scott E.

2005-01-01

152

AGT (Advanced Gas Turbine) technology project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overall summary documentation is provided for the Advanced Gas Turbine Technology Project conducted by the Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors. This advanced, high risk work was initiated in October 1979 under charter from the U.S. Congress to promote an engine for transportation that would provide an alternate to reciprocating spark ignition (SI) engines for the U.S. automotive industry and simultaneously establish the feasibility of advanced ceramic materials for hot section components to be used in an automotive gas turbine. As this program evolved, dictates of available funding, Government charter, and technical developments caused program emphases to focus on the development and demonstration of the ceramic turbine hot section and away from the development of engine and powertrain technologies and subsequent vehicular demonstrations. Program technical performance concluded in June 1987. The AGT 100 program successfully achieved project objectives with significant technology advances. Specific AGT 100 program achievements are: (1) Ceramic component feasibility for use in gas turbine engines has been demonstrated; (2) A new, 100 hp engine was designed, fabricated, and tested for 572 hour at operating temperatures to 2200 F, uncooled; (3) Statistical design methodology has been applied and correlated to experimental data acquired from over 5500 hour of rig and engine testing; (4) Ceramic component processing capability has progressed from a rudimentary level able to fabricate simple parts to a sophisticated level able to provide complex geometries such as rotors and scrolls; (5) Required improvements for monolithic and composite ceramic gas turbine components to meet automotive reliability, performance, and cost goals have been identified; (6) The combustor design demonstrated lower emissions than 1986 Federal Standards on methanol, JP-5, and diesel fuel. Thus, the potential for meeting emission standards and multifuel capability has been initiated; (7) Small turbine engine aerodynamic and mechanical design capability has been initiated; and (8) An infrastructure of manpower, facilities, materials, and fabrication capabilities has been established which is available for continued development of ceramic component technology in gas turbine and other heat engines.

1988-01-01

153

CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An  

E-print Network

PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Updated Analysis of Advanced/2003) #12;PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Analysis of Advanced Technology

154

Recent Advances in Pacemaker Lead Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cardiac pacemaker lead is a relatively fragile cable of insulated conductor wire implanted into the hostile environment of the human body. In comparison with the marked advances in pulse generator and sensor technology, concomitant advances in pacing leads have occurred slowly. This chapter will address recent engineering advances and clinical application of modern lead design.

Harry G. Mond

1999-01-01

155

Sensor technology advances and future trends  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent advances of sensor technologies have been powered by high-speed and low-cost electronic circuits, novel signal processing methods, and advanced manufacturing technologies. The synergetic interaction of new developments in these fields provides promising technical solutions increasing the quality, reliability, and economic efficiency of technical products. With selected examples, we will give an overview about the significant developments of methods, structures,

Olfa Kanoun; Hans-Rolf Trankler

2004-01-01

156

Advancing Excellence in Information Technology at the  

E-print Network

Advancing Excellence in Information Technology at the University of Minnesota March 20, 2010 #12 that advances academic priorities is imperative. · Proposed: Highly Coordinated Model ­ The IT directors serve;Working Group Massoud Amin, Director, Technological Leadership Institute, and Professor, Institute

Minnesota, University of

157

Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project-longitudinal handling qualities study of a relaxed-stability airplane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a piloted simulation of longitudinal handling qualities of an airplane with relaxed static stability are described. This task was performed under the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the NASA Energy Efficient Transport Program. A representative medium range transport airplane, the Boeing Model 757, was simulated. Evaluations were made of the unaugmented airplane and of the airplane with an Essential Pitch Augmented Stability (PAS) System and with a Primary PAS System at various center of gravity (cg) conditions. Level 2 pilot ratings were attained with cg locations aft to about 57% mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) or 6% aft of the neutral point for unaugmented landing approach. For Mach = 0.80, unaugmented cruise Level 2 ratings were attained to 47% MAC or 5% forward of the maneuver point. The augmented airplane model provided handling qualities close to or within the Level 1 boundary at all cg locations for both Essential and Primary PAS. Analyses of the test conditions when compared with existing handling qualities criteria based on classical unaugmented airplane characteristics agreed well with the pilot ratings. The unaugmented results are comparable to those reported by both the Douglas Aircraft Company and Lockheed California Company from simulation investigations of transport configurations with roughly similar dimensional and mass characteristics.

1983-01-01

158

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations for US Manufacturers in Advanced  

E-print Network

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations for US Manufacturers in Advanced includes technology deployment that promotes use of advanced technologies and better energy management by the targeted project. Projects that focus on advanced manufacturing and materials technologies for commercial

Pennycook, Steve

159

Applications of advanced transport aircraft in developing countries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four representative market scenarios were studied to evaluate the relative performance of air-and surface-based transportation systems in meeting the needs of two developing contries, Brazil and Indonesia, which were selected for detailed case studies. The market scenarios were: remote mining, low-density transport, tropical forestry, and large cargo aircraft serving processing centers in resource-rich, remote areas. The long-term potential of various aircraft types, together with fleet requirements and necessary technology advances, is determined for each application.

Gobetz, F. W.; Assarabowski, R. J.; Leshane, A. A.

1978-01-01

160

Opportunities with the Advanced Technology Group  

E-print Network

collaboration partner or employer, you'll have the chance to make an impact from day one with an innovativeOpportunities with the Advanced Technology Group Explore the ideas and technology that will define storage and data management solutions provider. You'll find leading-edge technology and an environment

161

Low speed propellers: Impact of advanced technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sensitivity studies performed to evaluate the potential of several advanced technological elements on propeller performance, noise, weight, and cost for general aviation aircraft are discussed. Studies indicate that the application of advanced technologies to general aviation propellers can reduce fuel consumption in future aircraft an average of ten percent, meeting current regulatory noise limits. Through the use of composite blade construction, up to 25 percent propeller weight reduction can be achieved. This weight reduction in addition to seven percent propeller efficiency improvements through application of advanced technologies result in four percent reduction in direct operating costs, ten percent reduction in aircraft acquisition cost, and seven percent lower gross weight for general aviation aircraft.

Keiter, I. D.

1980-01-01

162

Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

1997-01-01

163

Application of advanced technology to LMR control  

SciTech Connect

Key issues must be resolved to preserve the nuclear option; including new considerations for safety, economics, waste, transportation, diversion, etc. The programs at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are now carefully focused to provide answers to the above concerns in connection with the Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne. Safety features that are inherent in plant design, coupled with automating plant control to help achieve the above objectives are more than just an issue of installing controllers and exotic algorithms, they include the complete integration of plant design, control strategy, and information presentation. Current technology development, both at Argonne and elsewhere includes efforts relating to the use of Artificial Intelligence, sensor/signal validation in many forms, pattern recognition, optimal develop and/or adopt promising technologies, and integrate them into an operating power plant for proof of value. After they have proven useful at EBR-II, it is expected that they can be incorporated into advanced designs such as PRISM and/or included in backfit activities as well. 6 refs.

Lindsay, R.W.

1989-01-01

164

Graphite/Polyimide Composites. [conference on Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology developed under the Composites for Advanced Space Transportation System Project is reported. Specific topics covered include fabrication, adhesives, test methods, structural integrity, design and analysis, advanced technology developments, high temperature polymer research, and the state of the art of graphite/polyimide composites.

Dexter, H. B. (editor); Davis, J. G., Jr. (editor)

1979-01-01

165

Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system  

SciTech Connect

At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

NONE

1998-09-01

166

Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

1984-01-01

167

Technology and Educating Seniors about Advance Directives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advance directives allow individuals to maintain control of their health care should they become unable to communicate. To benefit from them, adults need to be educated about their purpose and use, advanced medical technology, and end-of-life decision making. (SK)

Molloy, D. W.; Stiller, A. K.; Russo, R.

2000-01-01

168

Rotorcraft technology at Boeing Vertol: Recent advances  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is presented of key accomplishments in the rotorcraft development at Boeing Vertol. Projects of particular significance: high speed rotor development and the Model 360 Advanced Technology Helicopter. Areas addressed in the overview are: advanced rotors with reduced noise and vibration, 3-D aerodynamic modeling, flight control and avionics, active control, automated diagnostics and prognostics, composite structures, and drive systems.

Shaw, John; Dadone, Leo; Wiesner, Robert

1988-01-01

169

IMPROVING FISHERIES SCIENCE WITH ADVANCED SAMPLING TECHNOLOGIES FEATURE ARTICLE 2  

E-print Network

67 IMPROVING FISHERIES SCIENCE WITH ADVANCED SAMPLING TECHNOLOGIES FEATURE ARTICLE 2 INTRODUCTION of advanced sam- pling technologies for providing accurate, precise, and timely population estimates development of survey operations that combine advanced sampling technologies with conventional methods

170

10 CFR 611.3 - Advanced technology vehicle.  

...2014-01-01 false Advanced technology vehicle. 611.3 Section...ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE...General § 611.3 Advanced technology vehicle. In order to...

2014-01-01

171

10 CFR 611.3 - Advanced technology vehicle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Advanced technology vehicle. 611.3 Section...ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE...General § 611.3 Advanced technology vehicle. In order to...

2012-01-01

172

10 CFR 611.3 - Advanced technology vehicle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Advanced technology vehicle. 611.3 Section...ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE...General § 611.3 Advanced technology vehicle. In order to...

2011-01-01

173

10 CFR 611.3 - Advanced technology vehicle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Advanced technology vehicle. 611.3 Section...ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE...General § 611.3 Advanced technology vehicle. In order to...

2013-01-01

174

Rail Transportation Program (RTP) Michigan Technological University  

E-print Network

Contact us Rail Transportation Program (RTP) Michigan Technological University 1400 Townsend Drive Houghton, MI 49931 (906) 487-3547 Email: rail@mtu.edu www.cee.mtu.edu/railroad RTP Director Pasi Lautala. RailTransportationProgram #12;Transportation Institute The Rail Transportation Program The Rail

175

TECHNOLOGIES TO OPTIMIZE ADVANCED TOKAMAK  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Commercial fusion power systems must operate near the limits of the engineering systems and plasma parameters. Achieving these objectives will require real time feedback control of the plasma. This paper describes plasma control systems being used in the national DIII-D advanced tokamak research program.

SIMONEN, TC

2004-01-01

176

Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-01

177

Advances in Nuclear Monitoring Technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Homeland security requires low-cost, large-area detectors for locating and identifying weapons-usable nuclear materials and monitors for radiological isotopes that are more robust than current systems. Recent advances in electronics materials and nanotechnology, specifically organic semiconductors and inorganic quantum dots, offer potential improvements. We provide an overview of the physical processes involved in radiation detection using these new materials in the design of new device structures. Examples include recent efforts on quantum dots, as well as more traditional radiation-detecting materials such as CdZnTe and high-pressure xenon. Detector improvements demand not only new materials but also enhanced data-analysis tools that reduce false alarms and thus increase the quality of decisions. Additional computing power on hand-held platforms should enable the application of advanced algorithms to radiation-detection problems in the field, reducing the need to transmit data and thus delay analysis.

Park, Brent

2006-03-01

178

Assurance Technology Challenges of Advanced Space Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The initiative to explore space and extend a human presence across our solar system to revisit the moon and Mars post enormous technological challenges to the nation's space agency and aerospace industry. Key areas of technology development needs to enable the endeavor include advanced materials, structures and mechanisms; micro/nano sensors and detectors; power generation, storage and management; advanced thermal and cryogenic control; guidance, navigation and control; command and data handling; advanced propulsion; advanced communication; on-board processing; advanced information technology systems; modular and reconfigurable systems; precision formation flying; solar sails; distributed observing systems; space robotics; and etc. Quality assurance concerns such as functional performance, structural integrity, radiation tolerance, health monitoring, diagnosis, maintenance, calibration, and initialization can affect the performance of systems and subsystems. It is thus imperative to employ innovative nondestructive evaluation methodologies to ensure quality and integrity of advanced space systems. Advancements in integrated multi-functional sensor systems, autonomous inspection approaches, distributed embedded sensors, roaming inspectors, and shape adaptive sensors are sought. Concepts in computational models for signal processing and data interpretation to establish quantitative characterization and event determination are also of interest. Prospective evaluation technologies include ultrasonics, laser ultrasonics, optics and fiber optics, shearography, video optics and metrology, thermography, electromagnetics, acoustic emission, x-ray, data management, biomimetics, and nano-scale sensing approaches for structural health monitoring.

Chern, E. James

2004-01-01

179

NCI Workshop- Advanced Technologies in Radiation Oncology  

Cancer.gov

Push the basic science- it is the basis for how technology works and can enhance technological advances, Help lead in a good-for-society agenda (e.g. CDRP program and others), Provide role models for mentoring and doing the right thing, Keep the best interests of patients ahead of institution (and self) interests.

180

The advanced technology development center (ATDC)  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA is building the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) to provide a ``national resource'' for the research, development, demonstration, testing, and qualification of Spaceport and Range Technologies. The ATDC will be located at Space Launch Complex 20 (SLC-20) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. SLC-20 currently provides a processing and launch capability for small-scale rockets: this capability

Gregory R. Clements

2002-01-01

181

The advanced technology development center (ATDC)  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA is building the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) to provide a “national resource” for the research, development, demonstration, testing, and qualification of Spaceport and Range Technologies. The ATDC will be located at Space Launch Complex 20 (SLC-20) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. SLC-20 currently provides a processing and launch capability for small-scale rockets: this capability

Gregory R. Clements

2002-01-01

182

One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

Heaps, William S.

2010-01-01

183

Technological Advances and the Study of Reading.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent technological advances in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology have unearthed structural and functional patterns in the brain that can be associated with severe reading disabilities. As a response, this paper examines several computer-driven technologies whose capabilities shed light on brain-related issues germane to reading, with the intent…

Henk, William A.

184

Advanced technologies for future environmental satellite systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental satellites today are designed to meet the most requirements possible within the constraints of budget, reliability, availability, robustness, manufacturability, and the state of the art in affordable technology. As we learn more and more about observing and forecasting, requirements continue to be developed and validated for measurements that can benefit from for advances in technology. The goal is to

Gerald J. Dittberner; Michael J. Crison; Shyam Bajpai; Benjamin L. Diedrich

2004-01-01

185

Beckman Institute FOR ADVANCED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY  

E-print Network

Beckman Institute FOR ADVANCED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY · · · · · · · · · AnnualReport········· #12 Biological Intelligence Highlights 4 Faculty Profile: Jennifer Cole 8 Human-Computer Intelligent Interaction Laboratory 46 Imaging Technology Group 48 Beckman Institute Graduate Fellows Program 50 Beckman Institute

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

186

Aircraft System Analysis of Technology Benefits to Civil Transport Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aircraft systems analysis was conducted to evaluate the net benefits of advanced technologies on two conceptual civil transport rotorcraft, to quantify the potential of future civil rotorcraft to become operationally viable and economically competitive, with the ultimate goal of alleviating congestion in our airways, runways and terminals. These questions are three of many that must be resolved for the successful introduction of civil transport rotorcraft: 1) Can civil transport rotorcraft actually relieve current airport congestion and improve overall air traffic and passenger throughput at busy hub airports? What is that operational scenario? 2) Can advanced technology make future civil rotorcraft economically competitive in scheduled passenger transport? What are those enabling technologies? 3) What level of investment is necessary to mature the key enabling technologies? This study addresses the first two questions, and several others, by applying a systems analysis approach to a broad spectrum of potential advanced technologies at a conceptual level of design. The method was to identify those advanced technologies that showed the most promise and to quantify their benefits to the design, development, production, and operation of future civil rotorcraft. Adjustments are made to sizing data by subject matter experts to reflect the introduction of new technologies that offer improved performance, reduced weight, reduced maintenance, or reduced cost. This study used projected benefits from new, advanced technologies, generally based on research results, analysis, or small-scale test data. The technologies are identified, categorized and quantified in the report. The net benefit of selected advanced technologies is quantified for two civil transport rotorcraft concepts, a Single Main Rotor Compound (SMRC) helicopter designed for 250 ktas cruise airspeed and a Civil Tilt Rotor (CTR) designed for 350 ktas cruise airspeed. A baseline design of each concept was sized for a representative civil passenger transport mission, using current technology. Individual advanced technologies are quantified and applied to resize the aircraft, thereby quantifying the net benefit of that technology to the rotorcraft. Estimates of development cost, production cost and operating and support costs are made with a commercial cost estimating program, calibrated to Boeing products with adjustments for future civil production processes. A cost metric of cash direct operating cost per available seat-mile (DOC ASM) is used to compare the cost benefit of the technologies. The same metric is used to compare results with turboprop operating costs. Reduced engine SFC was the most advantageous advanced technology for both rotorcraft concepts. Structural weight reduction was the second most beneficial technology, followed by advanced drive systems and then by technology for rotorcraft performance. Most of the technologies evaluated in this report should apply similarly to conventional helicopters. The implicit assumption is that resources will become available to mature the technologies for fullscale production aircraft. That assumption is certainly the weak link in any forecast of future possibilities. The analysis serves the purpose of identifying which technologies offer the most potential benefit, and thus the ones that should receive the highest priority for continued development. This study directly addressed the following NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) subtopics: SR W.4.8.I.J Establish capability for rotorcraft system analysis and SRW. 4.8.I.4 Conduct limited technology benefit assessment on baseline rotorcraft configurations.

Wilkerson, Joseph B.; Smith, Roger L.

2008-01-01

187

Application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a preliminary design study which investigates the use of selected advanced technologies to achieve low cost design for small (50-passenger), short haul (50 to 1000 mile) transports are reported. The largest single item in the cost of manufacturing an airplane of this type is labor. A careful examination of advanced technology to airframe structure was performed since one of the most labor-intensive parts of the airplane is structures. Also, preliminary investigation of advanced aerodynamics flight controls, ride control and gust load alleviation systems, aircraft systems and turbo-prop propulsion systems was performed. The most beneficial advanced technology examined was bonded aluminum primary structure. The use of this structure in large wing panels and body sections resulted in a greatly reduced number of parts and fasteners and therefore, labor hours. The resultant cost of assembled airplane structure was reduced by 40% and the total airplane manufacturing cost by 16% - a major cost reduction. With further development, test verification and optimization appreciable weight saving is also achievable. Other advanced technology items which showed significant gains are as follows: (1) advanced turboprop-reduced block fuel by 15.30% depending on range; (2) configuration revisions (vee-tail)-empennage cost reduction of 25%; (3) leading-edge flap addition-weight reduction of 2500 pounds.

Andrews, D. G.; Brubaker, P. W.; Bryant, S. L.; Clay, C. W.; Giridharadas, B.; Hamamoto, M.; Kelly, T. J.; Proctor, D. K.; Myron, C. E.; Sullivan, R. L.

1978-01-01

188

Preliminary assessment of industrial needs for an advanced ocean technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A quick-look review of selected ocean industries is presented for the purpose of providing NASA OSTA with an assessment of technology needs and market potential. The size and growth potential, needs and problem areas, technology presently used and its suppliers, are given for industries involved in deep ocean mining, petrochemicals ocean energy conversion. Supporting services such as ocean bottom surveying; underwater transportation, data collection, and work systems; and inspection and diving services are included. Examples of key problem areas that are amenable to advanced technology solutions are included. Major companies are listed.

Mourad, A. G.; Maher, K. M.; Balon, J. E.; Coyle, A. G.; Henkener, J. A.

1979-01-01

189

Evaluation of undeveloped rocket engine cycle applications to advanced transportation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Undeveloped pump-fed, liquid propellant rocket engine cycles were assessed and evaluated for application to Next Manned Transportation System (NMTS) vehicles, which would include the evolving Space Transportation System (STS Evolution), the Personnel Launch System (PLS), and the Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS). Undeveloped engine cycles selected for further analysis had potential for increased reliability, more maintainability, reduced cost, and improved (or possibly level) performance when compared to the existing SSME and proposed STME engines. The split expander (SX) cycle, the full flow staged combustion (FFSC) cycle, and a hybrid version of the FFSC, which has a LOX expander drive for the LOX pump, were selected for definition and analysis. Technology requirements and issues were identified and analyses of vehicle systems weight deltas using the SX and FFSC cycles in AMLS vehicles were performed. A strawman schedule and cost estimate for FFSC subsystem technology developments and integrated engine system demonstration was also provided.

1990-01-01

190

Advancements in subsurface barrier wall technology  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface barrier walls are enjoying a resurgence in popularity as components of site remediation systems largely for two reasons. First, treatment technologies have shown themselves to be incapable of fully managing a large proportion of waste disposal sites, especially large landfills, DNAPL sites, and large industrial plant sites, thus underscoring the importance of site-wide containment technologies such as subsurface barrier walls. The second factor is a parallel advancement in the technologies of barrier wall construction. Advancements, include a variety of geomembrane-based barrier walls, jet grouting techniques, deep soil mixing, and the ability to construct deep barrier walls (greater than 150 feet deep) using interlocking plastic concrete panels. These advancements have led to barrier walls which are not only more impervious, more resistant to chemical attack, and capable of achieving greater depths, but in many cases are less costly than earlier technologies.

Mutch, R.D. Jr.; Ash, R.E. IV [Eckenfelder Inc., Mahwah, NJ (United States); Cavalli, N.J. [Hayward-Baker, Yonkers, NY (United States)

1994-12-31

191

Advanced Robotics Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and robotics technologies have  

E-print Network

Advanced Robotics Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and robotics technologies have revolutionized robot technologies for clinical use, researchers and clinicians at Canadian Surgical Technologies & Advanced Robotics (CSTAR) are setting international standards for surgical technology, treatment innovation

Denham, Graham

192

Creative Expressions in Advanced Technological Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The ATETV project delivers web-based videos to connect students to careers in advanced technology. This episode of ATETV looks at Architectural Technology, Rapid Prototyping, and Geospatial Technology programs. The video shows the amount of real world experience the students obtain, as well as giving a general background on the programs themselves. It can be viewed whole, or in three segments: "Drawing on a New Career," "Rapid Prototypers: Inventors of New Technology," and "Pointing the Way with Computer Mapping Technology." The running time for the full episode is 8:15.

2010-07-27

193

Advances in Business Transformation Technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The backbone of the World economy has shifted from agriculture to manufacturing to information. It is now entering a new phase known as an innovation-based economy where economic value will be created in services we provide with information to improve business, government, education, and people's daily workspace. Accordingly, the focus of computing and information technologies is shifting to their applications

Juhnyoung Lee

2007-01-01

194

Future developments in transport aircraft noise reduction technology  

SciTech Connect

During the past 13 years, important advances in the technology of aircraft noise control have resulted from industry and government research programs. Quieter commercial transport airplanes have entered the fleet and additional new designs now committed to production will begin service in a few years. This paper indicates the noise reductions that will be achieved by the quieter transports that will replace the older designs and remarks on the outlook for still quieter designs.

Pendley, R.E.

1982-01-01

195

Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances  

SciTech Connect

This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area.

Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

2004-06-18

196

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

Christopher E. Hull

2005-11-04

197

Evaluation of advanced bladder technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research conducted during this period is reported. Studies presented include: (1) diffusion and permeation of CO2, O2, N2, and NO2 through polytetra fluoroethylene; (2) diffusion, permeation and solubility of simple gases (CO2, O2, N2, CH4, C2H6, C3H8, and C2H4) through a copolymer of hexafluoro propylene and tetrafluoro ethylene (FEP); (3) viscous flow and diffusion of gases throug small apertures; (4) diffusion and permeation of O2, N2, CO2, CH4, C2H6, and C3H8 through nitroso rubber; and (5) results of gas transport studies with carborane siloxane, nitroso rubber, silicone membrane, krytox coating on teflon, and FEP coated glass cloth. Publications generated under this program are listed.

Christensen, M. V.; Pasternak, R. A.

1972-01-01

198

Advances in multiphoton microscopy technology  

PubMed Central

Multiphoton microscopy has enabled unprecedented dynamic exploration in living organisms. A significant challenge in biological research is the dynamic imaging of features deep within living organisms, which permits the real-time analysis of cellular structure and function. To make progress in our understanding of biological machinery, optical microscopes must be capable of rapid, targeted access deep within samples at high resolution. In this Review, we discuss the basic architecture of a multiphoton microscope capable of such analysis and summarize the state-of-the-art technologies for the quantitative imaging of biological phenomena. PMID:24307915

Hoover, Erich E.; Squier, Jeff A.

2013-01-01

199

Advanced neutral-beam technology  

SciTech Connect

Extensive development will be required to achieve the 50- to 75-MW, 175- to 200-keV, 5- to 10-sec pulses of deuterium atoms envisioned for ETF and INTOR. Multi-megawatt injector systems are large (and expansive); they consist of large vacuum tanks with many square meters of cryogenic pumping panels, beam dumps capable of dissipating several megawatts of un-neutralized beam, bending magnets, electrical power systems capable of fast turnoff with low (capacity) stored energy, and, of course, the injector modules (ion sources and accelerators). The technology requirements associated with these components are described.

Berkner, K.H.

1980-09-01

200

Advanced RF Front End Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ability to achieve low-mass low-cost micro/nanospacecraft for Deep Space exploration requires extensive miniaturization of all subsystems. The front end of the Telecommunication subsystem is an area in which major mass (factor of 10) and volume (factor of 100) reduction can be achieved via the development of new silicon based micromachined technology and devices. Major components that make up the front end include single-pole and double-throw switches, diplexer, and solid state power amplifier. JPL's Center For Space Microsystems - System On A Chip (SOAC) Program has addressed the challenges of front end miniaturization (switches and diplexers). Our objectives were to develop the main components that comprise a communication front end and enable integration in a single module that we refer to as a 'cube'. In this paper we will provide the latest status of our Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) switches and surface micromachined filter development. Based on the significant progress achieved we can begin to provide guidelines of the proper system insertion for these emerging technologies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Herman, M. I.; Valas, S.; Katehi, L. P. B.

2001-01-01

201

Advancing Sensor Technology for Aerospace Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) and Glenn Research Center (GRC) participate in the development of technologies for propulsion testing and propulsion applications in air and space transportation. Future transportation systems and the test facilities needed to develop and sustain them are becoming increasingly complex. Sensor technology is a fundamental pillar that makes possible development of complex systems that must operate in automatic mode (closed loop systems), or even in assisted-autonomous mode (highly self-sufficient systems such as planetary exploration spacecraft). Hence, a great deal of effort is dedicated to develop new sensors and related technologies to be used in research facilities, test facilities, and in vehicles and equipment. This paper describes sensor technologies being developed and in use at SSC and GRC, including new technologies in integrated health management involving sensors, components, processes, and vehicles.

Figueroa, Fernando; Mercer, Carolyn R.

2002-01-01

202

Technology readiness for advanced ducted engines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Advanced Ducted Engines (ADEs) currently undergoing development for next-generation passenger aircraft typically possess bypass ratios of the order of 12-25 and specific fuel consumption figures 12-17 percent lower than current advanced turbofans. An extensive technology-readiness program has been mounted on behalf of ADE design definition over the last two years, encompassing among its concerns aircraft\\/engine-installation interference, low pressure-ratio fan

D. Eckardt; G. L. Brines

1989-01-01

203

The Advanced Technology Operations System: ATOS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mission control systems supporting new space missions face ever-increasing requirements in terms of functionality, performance, reliability and efficiency. Modern data processing technology is providing the means to meet these requirements in new systems under development. During the past few years the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) of the European Space Agency (ESA) has carried out a number of projects to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced software technology, in particular, knowledge based systems, to support mission operations. A number of advances must be achieved before these techniques can be moved towards operational use in future missions, namely, integration of the applications into a single system framework and generalization of the applications so that they are mission independent. In order to achieve this goal, ESA initiated the Advanced Technology Operations System (ATOS) program, which will develop the infrastructure to support advanced software technology in mission operations, and provide applications modules to initially support: Mission Preparation, Mission Planning, Computer Assisted Operations, and Advanced Training. The first phase of the ATOS program is tasked with the goal of designing and prototyping the necessary system infrastructure to support the rest of the program. The major components of the ATOS architecture is presented. This architecture relies on the concept of a Mission Information Base (MIB) as the repository for all information and knowledge which will be used by the advanced application modules in future mission control systems. The MIB is being designed to exploit the latest in database and knowledge representation technology in an open and distributed system. In conclusion the technological and implementation challenges expected to be encountered, as well as the future plans and time scale of the project, are presented.

Kaufeler, J.-F.; Laue, H. A.; Poulter, K.; Smith, H.

1993-01-01

204

Advanced optical disk storage technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is a growing need within the Air Force for more and better data storage solutions. Rome Laboratory, the Air Force's Center of Excellence for C3I technology, has sponsored the development of a number of operational prototypes to deal with this growing problem. This paper will briefly summarize the various prototype developments with examples of full mil-spec and best commercial practice. These prototypes have successfully operated under severe space, airborne and tactical field environments. From a technical perspective these prototypes have included rewritable optical media ranging from a 5.25-inch diameter format up to the 14-inch diameter disk format. Implementations include an airborne sensor recorder, a deployable optical jukebox and a parallel array of optical disk drives. They include stand-alone peripheral devices to centralized, hierarchical storage management systems for distributed data processing applications.

Haritatos, Fred N.

1996-01-01

205

Research on advanced photovoltaic manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines opportunities for significantly advancing the scale and economy of high-volume manufacturing of high-efficiency photovoltaic (PV) modules. We propose to pursue a concurrent effort to advance existing crystalline silicon module manufacturing technology and to implement thin film CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) module manufacturing. This combination of commercial-scale manufacturing of high-efficiency crystalline silicon modules and of pilot-scale manufacturing of low-cost thin film CIS technology will support continued, rapid growth of the US PV industry.

Jester, T.; Eberspacher, C. (Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States))

1991-11-01

206

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence - Organization & Gerald Steinbauer 5 Advanced Topics of AI - Organization Technology A 8010 GrazA-8010 Graz Austria Alexander Felferning & Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Topics of AI

207

78 FR 18287 - Passenger Screening Using Advanced Imaging Technology  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...asserted that while more advanced screening technology is being...nation's commercial airports. Advanced technologies, such as the...that TSA responded to this directive through the development and...hidden objects. \\33\\ ``Advanced Imaging...

2013-03-26

208

Electrochromic Windows: Advanced Processing Technology  

SciTech Connect

This project addresses the development of advanced fabrication capabilities for energy saving electrochromic (EC) windows. SAGE EC windows consist of an inorganic stack of thin films deposited onto a glass substrate. The window tint can be reversibly changed by the application of a low power dc voltage. This property can be used to modulate the amount of light and heat entering buildings (or vehicles) through the glazings. By judicious management of this so-called solar heat gain, it is possible to derive significant energy savings due to reductions in heating lighting, and air conditioning (HVAC). Several areas of SAGE’s production were targeted during this project to allow significant improvements to processing throughput, yield and overall quality of the processing, in an effort to reduce the cost and thereby improve the market penetration. First, the overall thin film process was optimized to allow a more robust set of operating points to be used, thereby maximizing the yield due to the thin film deposition themselves. Other significant efforts aimed at improving yield were relating to implementing new procedures and processes for the manufacturing process, to improve the quality of the substrate preparation, and the quality of the IGU fabrication. Furthermore, methods for reworking defective devices were developed, to enable devices which would otherwise be scrapped to be made into useful product. This involved the in-house development of some customized equipment. Finally, the improvements made during this project were validated to ensure that they did not impact the exceptional durability of the SageGlass® products. Given conservative estimates for cost and market penetration, energy savings due to EC windows in residences in the US are calculated to be of the order 0.026 quad (0.026×1015BTU/yr) by the year 2017.

SAGE Electrochromics, Inc

2006-12-13

209

Applications in the Advanced Transportation System and Impact on Superconductivity Industry of Htsm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the information technology grows up and its application penetrates into every area of this world, how to faster and more efficiently transport people and goods is becoming the new social demand, which indicates a new revolution on advanced transportation technology being brewed. High-temperature Superconductivity Maglev (HTSM) is one with the best development potential among most transportation technologies. It could be used in many advanced transportation fields, overcoming the key contradiction and shortcoming of the current transportation patterns such as train, automobile and airplane. On the other hand, HTSM will promote theoretical study and technology exploitation on superconductivity. HTSM's applications in a large scale will bring up profound effect on the forming and development of the superconductivity industry.

Zhang, Y. P.; Zhao, Y.

210

Terminal area considerations for an advanced CTOL transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Projected future conditions at large urban airports were used to identify design objectives for a long-haul, advanced transport airplane introduced for operation in the mid-1980s. Operating constraints associated with airport congestion and aircraft noise and emissions were of central interest. In addition, some of the interaction of these constraints with aircraft fuel usage were identified. The study allowed for advanced aircraft design features consistent with the future operating period. A baseline 200 passenger airplane design was modified to comply with design requirements imposed by terminal area constraints. Specific design changes included: (1) modification of engine arrangement; wing planform; (2) drag and spoiler surfaces; (3) secondary power systems; (4) brake and landing gear characteristics; and (5) the aircraft avionics. These changes, based on exploratory design estimates and allowing for technology advance, were judged to enable the airplane to: reduce wake turbulence; handle steeper descent paths with fewer limitation due to engine characteristics; reduce runway occupancy times; improve community noise contours; and reduce the total engine emittants deposited in the terminal area. The penalties to airplane performance and operating cost associated with improving the terminal area characteristics of the airplane were assessed. Finally, key research problems requiring solution in order to validate the assumed advanced airplane technology were identified.

Sussman, M. B.

1975-01-01

211

Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Developing credible mass and cost estimates for space exploration and development architectures require multidisciplinary analysis based on physics calculations, and parametric estimates derived from historical systems. Within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), concurrent engineering environment (CEE) activities integrate discipline oriented analysis tools through a computer network and accumulate the results of a multidisciplinary analysis team via a centralized database or spreadsheet Each minute of a design and analysis study within a concurrent engineering environment is expensive due the size of the team and supporting equipment The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) reduces the cost of architecture analysis by capturing the knowledge of discipline experts into system oriented spreadsheet models. A framework with a user interface presents a library of system models to an architecture analyst. The analyst selects models of launchers, in-space transportation systems, and excursion vehicles, as well as space and surface infrastructure such as propellant depots, habitats, and solar power satellites. After assembling the architecture from the selected models, the analyst can create a campaign comprised of missions spanning several years. The ATLAS controller passes analyst specified parameters to the models and data among the models. An integrator workbook calls a history based parametric analysis cost model to determine the costs. Also, the integrator estimates the flight rates, launched masses, and architecture benefits over the years of the campaign. An accumulator workbook presents the analytical results in a series of bar graphs. In no way does ATLAS compete with a CEE; instead, ATLAS complements a CEE by ensuring that the time of the experts is well spent Using ATLAS, an architecture analyst can perform technology sensitivity analysis, study many scenarios, and see the impact of design decisions. When the analyst is satisfied with the system configurations, technology portfolios, and deployment strategies, he or she can present the concepts to a team, which will conduct a detailed, discipline-oriented analysis within a CEE. An analog to this approach is the music industry where a songwriter creates the lyrics and music before entering a recording studio.

O'Neil, Daniel A.; Mankins, John C.

2004-01-01

212

Advancing Autonomous Operations Technologies for NASA Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses the importance of implementing advanced autonomous technologies supporting operations of future NASA missions. The ability for crewed, uncrewed and even ground support systems to be capable of mission support without external interaction or control has become essential as space exploration moves further out into the solar system. The push to develop and utilize autonomous technologies for NASA mission operations stems in part from the need to reduce operations cost while improving and increasing capability and safety. This paper will provide examples of autonomous technologies currently in use at NASA and will identify opportunities to advance existing autonomous technologies that will enhance mission success by reducing operations cost, ameliorating inefficiencies, and mitigating catastrophic anomalies.

Cruzen, Craig; Thompson, Jerry Todd

2013-01-01

213

Advancing Autonomous Operations Technologies for NASA Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses the importance of implementing advanced autonomous technologies supporting operations of future NASA missions. The ability for crewed, uncrewed and even ground support systems to be capable of mission support without external interaction or control has become essential as space exploration moves further out into the solar system. The push to develop and utilize autonomous technologies for NASA mission operations stems in part from the need to reduce cost while improving and increasing capability and safety. This paper will provide examples of autonomous technologies currently in use at NASA and will identify opportunities to advance existing autonomous technologies that will enhance mission success by reducing cost, ameliorating inefficiencies, and mitigating catastrophic anomalies

Cruzen, Craig; Thompson, Jerry T.

2013-01-01

214

Transportation Beyond 2000: Technologies Needed for Engineering Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of the workshop was to acquaint the staff of the NASA Langley Research Center with the broad spectrum of transportation challenges and concepts foreseen within the next 20 years. The hope is that material presented at the workshop and contained in this document will stimulate innovative high-payoff research directed towards the efficiency of future transportation systems. The workshop included five sessions designed to stress the factors that will lead to a revolution in the way we will travel in the 21st century. The first session provides the historical background and a general perspective for future transportation, including emerging transportation alternatives such as working at a distance. Personal travel is the subject of Session Two. The third session looks at mass transportation, including advanced rail vehicles, advanced commuter aircraft, and advanced transport aircraft. The fourth session addresses some of the technologies required for the above revolutionary transportation systems to evolve. The workshop concluded with a wrap-up panel discussion, Session Five. The topics presented herein all have viable technical components and are at a stage in their development that, with sufficient engineering research, one or more of these could make a significant impact on transportation and our social structure.

Huebner, Lawrence D. (Compiler); Asbury, Scott C. (Compiler); Lamar, John E. (Compiler); McKinley, Robert E., Jr. (Compiler); Scott, Robert C. (Compiler); Small, William J. (Compiler); Torres, Abel O. (Compiler)

1996-01-01

215

Centers for Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Technology Pre-Application Workshop Attendee List  

E-print Network

. Clements Clean Air / Alternative Fuel / School Transportation Experience 559-356-1334 johndclements56@gmailPON-13-605 Centers for Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Technology Pre-Application Workshop

216

The AC-120: The advanced commercial transport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of this design was to fulfill a need for a new airplane to replace the aging 100 to 150 passenger, 1500 nautical mile range aircraft such as the Douglas DC9 and Boeing 737-100 airplanes. After researching the future aircraft market, conducting extensive trade studies, and analysis on different configurations, the AC-120 Advanced Commercial Transport final design was achieved. The AC-120's main design features include the incorporation of a three lifting surface configuration which is powered by two turboprop engines. The AC-120 is an economically sensitive aircraft which meets the new FM Stage Three noise requirements, and has lower NO(x) emissions than current turbofan powered airplanes. The AC-120 also improves on its contemporaries in passenger comfort, manufacturing, and operating cost.

Duran, David; Griffin, Ernest; Mendoza, Saul; Nguyen, Son; Pickett, Tim; Noernberg, Clemm

1993-01-01

217

FIEA Advancing Wood Technology Forest Industry Engineering Scholarship  

E-print Network

FIEA ­ Advancing Wood Technology Forest Industry Engineering Scholarship Forest Industry Privacy Declaration. NO LATE APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED #12; FIEA ­ Advancing Wood Technology's the principal vehicle for technology transfer for forestry and wood products companies. Through a range

Hickman, Mark

218

TECHcitement: Advances in Technological Education, 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication includes 13 articles: (1) ATE [Advanced Technological Education] Attuned to Global Competition; (2) Materials Science Center Supplies Information on Often-Overlooked Field; (3) CSEC [Cyber Security Education Consortium] Builds Corps of Cyber Technicians; (4) KCTCS [Kentucky Community and Technical College System] Is U.S. Partner…

American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2006

2006-01-01

219

Advanced routing in changing technology landscape  

Microsoft Academic Search

As process technology continue to advance, the operating environment for routing tools has changed significantly. While the general concept of routing and techniques employed remain the same,the complexities and challenges that modern-day routers face are not well understood or addressed by the research community. In this paper, we will examine a handful of interesting nanometer effects that have significant impact

Hardy Kwok-Shing Leung

2003-01-01

220

Advanced technologies for encryption of satellite links  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of encryption on satellite links is discussed. Advanced technology exists to provide transmission security for large earth station with data rates up to 50 megabits per second. One of the major concerns in the use of encryption equipment with very small aperture terminals (VSAT) is the key management issue and the related operational costs. The low cost requirement

Sherry S. McMahan

1989-01-01

221

Smart sensor technology for advanced launch vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Next-generation advanced launch vehicles will require improved use of sensor data and the management of multisensor resources to achieve automated preflight checkout, prelaunch readiness assessment and vehicle inflight condition monitoring. Smart sensor technology is a key component in meeting these needs. This paper describes the development of a smart sensor-based condition monitoring system concept referred to as the Distributed Sensor

Jeff Schoess

1989-01-01

222

Advancing Technological Education: Keeping America Competitive  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication profiles the strategies and best practices of Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Centers in developing faculty skills, cultivating partnerships, implementing new curricula, recruiting students, preparing for change, utilizing advisors, managing organizations, and nurturing leaders. In this report, ATE center leaders share with…

Patton, Madeline

2005-01-01

223

Technology for advanced high-performance microprocessors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development of logic technologies that meet the density, performance, power, and manufacturing requirements for advanced high-performance microprocessors. Aggressive scaling of MOS transistor dimensions along with reduced power supply provide devices with high performance, low power, and good reliability. Multiple layers of planarized aluminum interconnect with high aspect ratios are used to address the increasing importance of

Mark T. Bohr; Youssef A. El-Mansy

1998-01-01

224

Antenna arrays technologies for advanced wireless systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phased array antennas have and will continue to be a critically important component in the development of future wireless systems with applications in communications, radar, and satellite technologies. In spite of the significant advances in the design of modern phased array antennas, there continue to be significant and growing need for developing high performance systems that are also low cost

Magdy F. Iskander; Wayne Kim; Jodie Bell; Nuri Celik; Zhengqing Yun; Hyoung-sun Youn

2009-01-01

225

Advanced Technological Education Survey 2012 Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet summarizes data gathered in the 2012 survey of National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grant recipients. Conducted by EvaluATE, the evaluation resource center for the ATE program located at The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, this was the thirteenth annual survey of ATE projects…

Wingate, Lori; Smith, Corey; Westine, Carl; Gullickson, Arlen

2012-01-01

226

Advanced Technological Education Survey 2011 Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet summarizes data gathered in the 2011 survey of National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grant recipients. Conducted by EvaluATE, the evaluation resource center for the ATE program located at The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, this was the twelfth annual survey of ATE projects and…

Wingate, Lori; Westine, Carl; Gullickson, Arlen

2011-01-01

227

Advanced Technological Education Survey 2010 Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet summarizes data gathered in the 2010 survey of National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grant recipients. Conducted by EvaluATE, the evaluation resource center for the ATE program located at The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, this was the eleventh annual survey of ATE projects and…

Wingate, Lori; Westine, Carl; Gullickson, Arlen

2010-01-01

228

Advanced Technological Education Survey 2009 Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet summarizes data gathered in the 2009 survey of National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grant recipients. Conducted by The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, this was the tenth annual survey of ATE projects and centers. Included here are statistics about the program's grantees and…

Wingate, Lori; Gullickson, Arlen

2009-01-01

229

TECHcitement: Advances in Technological Education, 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This edition of "TECHcitement" contains the following articles: (1) ATE Program Leads to Student Success; (2) Doing Whatever It Takes for Aquaculture; (3) The Bridge to Biotech; (4) Girls See What They Can Do With Technology at Camp; (5) Students Advancing Solutions to Business Problems; (6) CREATE Recreates Technical Education in California; (7)…

American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2004

2004-01-01

230

Satellite Communications technological advancements in Latin America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although rightly associated as a region historically fraught with change and turmoil, Latin America has been able to radically transform itself over the past two decades and increasingly become a leader in technological development. One key area of growth has been the rapid advance of satellite communications. It seems that at the current pace, the region will quickly reach the

Abdulrahman Yarali; Sebastian Coe

2009-01-01

231

Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: a progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The four-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world's leading resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun's output. Development of a four-meter solar telescope presents many technical challenges, which include: thermal control of optics and telescope structure; contamination control of

T. R. Rimmele; S. Keil; J. Wagner; N. Dalrymple; B. Goodrich; E. Hansen; F. Hill; R. Hubbard; L. Phelps; K. Richards; M. Warner

2005-01-01

232

Advanced-technology fuel-cell program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Descriptions of fuel cell power plants used for utility application are presented. The suitability of initial power plant technology was examined. Developments in molten carbonate and advanced phosphoric acid fuel cells are reported. Improved fuel capabilities and power conditioning investigations are summarized.

Bett, J. A. S.; Bushnell, C. A.; Buswell, R. F.

1981-03-01

233

Advanced Fossil Energy Technologies: Current reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced Fossil Energy Technologies (FET) is designed to keep fossil energy researchers informed of the latest scientific and technical reports in their area. The publication announces all DOE-sponsored reports and patent applications in the subject scope of fossil energy that have been received and processed into the Energy Data Base (EDB) in a two-week period prior to the publication date

Tamura

1988-01-01

234

NASA/industry advanced turboprop technology program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental and analytical effort shows that use of advanced turboprop (propfan) propulsion instead of conventional turbofans in the older narrow-body airline fleet could reduce fuel consumption for this type of aircraft by up to 50 percent. The NASA Advanced Turboprop (ATP) program was formulated to address the key technologies required for these thin, swept-blade propeller concepts. A NASA, industry, and university team was assembled to develop and validate applicable design codes and prove by ground and flight test the viability of these propeller concepts. Some of the history of the ATP project, an overview of some of the issues, and a summary of the technology developed to make advanced propellers viable in the high-subsonic cruise speed application are presented. The ATP program was awarded the prestigious Robert J. Collier Trophy for the greatest achievement in aeronautics and astronautics in America in 1987.

Ziemianski, Joseph A.; Whitlow, John B., Jr.

1988-01-01

235

Advanced technologies for perimeter intrusion detection sensors  

SciTech Connect

The development of integrated circuit fabrication techniques and the resulting devices have contributed more to the advancement of exterior intrusion detectors and alarm assessment devices than any other technology. The availability of this technology has led to the improvements in and further development of smaller more powerful computers, microprocessors, solid state memories, solid state cameras, thermal imagers, low-power lasers, and shorter pulse width and higher frequency electronic circuitry. This paper presents information on planning a perimeter intrusion detection system, identifies the site characteristics that affect its performance, and describes improvements to perimeter intrusion detection sensors and assessment devices that have been achieved by using integrated circuit technology.

Williams, J.D.

1995-03-01

236

Technology advancement of an oxygen generation subsystem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An oxygen generation subsystem based on water electrolysis was developed and tested to further advance the concept and technology of the spacecraft air revitalization system. Emphasis was placed on demonstrating the subsystem integration concept and hardware maturity at a subsystem level. The integration concept of the air revitalization system was found to be feasible. Hardware and technology of the oxygen generation subsystem was demonstrated to be close to the preprototype level. Continued development of the oxygen generation technology is recommended to further reduce the total weight penalties of the oxygen generation subsystem through optimization.

Lee, M. K.; Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

1979-01-01

237

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work to develop and demonstrate the technology of structural ceramics for automotive engines and similar applications is described. Long-range technology is being sought to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption and reduced environmental impact. The Advanced Turbine Technology Application Project (ATTAP) test bed engine is designed such that, when installed in a 3,000 pound inertia weight automobile, it will provide low emissions, 42 miles per gallon fuel economy on diesel fuel, multifuel capability, costs competitive with current spark ignition engines, and noise and safety characteristics that meet Federal standards.

1989-01-01

238

NASA's advanced space transportation system launch vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some insight is provided into the advanced transportation planning and systems that will evolve to support long term mission requirements. The general requirements include: launch and lift capacity to low earth orbit (LEO); space based transfer systems for orbital operations between LEO and geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), the Moon, and Mars; and Transfer vehicle systems for long duration deep space probes. These mission requirements are incorporated in the NASA Civil Needs Data Base. To accomplish these mission goals, adequate lift capacity to LEO must be available: to support science and application missions; to provide for construction of the Space Station Freedom; and to support resupply of personnel and supplies for its operations. Growth in lift capacity must be time phased to support an expanding mission model that includes Freedom Station, the Mission to Planet Earth, and an expanded robotic planetary program. The near term increase in cargo lift capacity associated with development of the Shuttle-C is addressed. The joint DOD/NASA Advanced Launch System studies are focused on a longer term new cargo capability that will significantly reduce costs of placing payloads in space.

Branscome, Darrell R.

1991-01-01

239

Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry  

PubMed Central

Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools, specially imaging methods, have become mandatory. From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation (brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry. PMID:25349663

Shah, Naseem; Bansal, Nikhil; Logani, Ajay

2014-01-01

240

Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry.  

PubMed

Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools, specially imaging methods, have become mandatory. From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation (brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry. PMID:25349663

Shah, Naseem; Bansal, Nikhil; Logani, Ajay

2014-10-28

241

Overview of advanced law enforcement electronic technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Law enforcement and security management are using advanced electronic equipment to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the budget restricted police officer force. Currently there is also significant national attention concerning the possible utilization of 'military' electronic hardware to implement the much sought after 'force multiplier' which can help to alleviate each jurisdictions economic restrictions. However, as we are now finding, the transfer of 'military' hardware for utilization by law enforcement personnel is not as economically viable as hoped. This paper will address some of the recent advances in electronic technology that are being derived from the military technology base. Additionally, comments are given concerning the economic impact as the technology is transferred to the law enforcement community.

Harden, W. R.

1995-05-01

242

ESA's advanced relay and technology mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Relay and Technology Mission is discussed. The objective of the mission is to develop, launch, and operate a single geostationary satellite. The proposed satellite includes advanced communications payloads with data-relay, mobile, and fixed-service applications. The semiconductor laser intersatellite link experiment (Silex), which is aimed at developing an optical communications data-relay system, is described. The Silex configuration is designed for LEO or GEO applications and has a 65 Mbit/s data rate over the optical return link. Consideration is given to the phased-array technology utilized in the S-band data-relay payload; the L-band land mobile payload; diagnostics and propagation packages; and technology experiments for improving the platform.

Lechte, H.; Bird, A. G.; van Holtz, L.; Oppenhauser, G.

1990-05-01

243

CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An  

E-print Network

PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Updated Analysis of Advanced/2003) #12;PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Analysis of Advanced Technology of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 parts per million by volume (ppmv) and 550 ppmv in MiniCAM. Each

244

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence - Advanced Planning ­ Advance Planning #12;Institute for Software Technology Shakey, the Robot developed 1966-1972 at Stanford ­ Advance Planning #12;Institute for Software Technology Motivation Planning is ... ­ a very old problem

245

Advanced computer technology - An aspect of the Terminal Configured Vehicle program. [air transportation capacity, productivity, all-weather reliability and noise reduction improvements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is conducting a Terminal Configured Vehicle program to provide improvements in the air transportation system such as increased system capacity and productivity, increased all-weather reliability, and reduced noise. A typical jet transport has been equipped with highly flexible digital display and automatic control equipment to study operational techniques for conventional takeoff and landing aircraft. The present airborne computer capability of this aircraft employs a multiple computer simple redundancy concept. The next step is to proceed from this concept to a reconfigurable computer system which can degrade gracefully in the event of a failure, adjust critical computations to remaining capacity, and reorder itself, in the case of transients, to the highest order of redundancy and reliability.

Berkstresser, B. K.

1975-01-01

246

Aeronautical technology 2000 - A projection of advanced vehicle concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the request of NASA and under the aegis of the National Research Council, representatives from industry, academic institutions and government have participated in a workshop to consider opportunities for the exploitation of aircraft technology in such fields as aerodynamics, materials, structures, guidance, navigation and control, human factors, propulsion, computers and data processing, and systems integration. Attention is given to the advanced vehicle concepts that have emerged for possible year-2000 implementation, which encompass such diverse aircraft types as supersonic transports, hypersonic airliners, missiles, and interceptors, transatmospheric vehicles, next-generation space shuttles, subsonic transports and attack aircraft, advanced helicopter, tilt-rotor VTOL configurations, and solar- and microwave beam-powered extremely high altitude aircraft.

Rosen, C. C., III; Burger, R. J.; Sigalla, A.

1984-01-01

247

Implementing New Advanced Learning Scenarios Through GRID Technologies Implementing New Advanced Learning  

E-print Network

Implementing New Advanced Learning Scenarios Through GRID Technologies Implementing New Advanced Learning Scenarios Through GRID Technologies Matteo Gaeta * , Pierluigi Ritrovato * , Saverio Salerno Salerno Via Ponte don Melillo ­ 84084 Fisciano ­ ITALY Keywords: analysing the economic, technological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

Space transportation propulsion USSR launcher technology, 1990  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space transportation propulsion U.S.S.R. launcher technology is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: Energia background (launch vehicle summary, Soviet launcher family) and Energia propulsion characteristics (booster propulsion, core propulsion, and growth capability).

1991-01-01

249

Smart sensor technology for advanced launch vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Next-generation advanced launch vehicles will require improved use of sensor data and the management of multisensor resources to achieve automated preflight checkout, prelaunch readiness assessment and vehicle inflight condition monitoring. Smart sensor technology is a key component in meeting these needs. This paper describes the development of a smart sensor-based condition monitoring system concept referred to as the Distributed Sensor Architecture. A significant event and anomaly detection scheme that provides real-time condition assessment and fault diagnosis of advanced launch system rocket engines is described. The design and flight test of a smart autonomous sensor for Space Shuttle structural integrity health monitoring is presented.

Schoess, Jeff

1989-07-01

250

Maneuvering technology for advanced fighter aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The need for increased maneuverability has its genesis from the first aerial combat engagement when two adversaries entangled themselves in a deadly aerial dance trying to gain the advantage over the other. It has only been in the past two decades that technologies have been investigated to increase aircraft control at maneuver attitudes that are typically dominated by highly separated flows. These separated flow regions are aggravated by advanced fighter aircraft shapes required to defeat an electronic enemy. This paper discusses passive and active devices that can be used to enhance the maneuverability of advanced fighter aircraft through vortex flow control, boundary layer control, and innovative flow manipulation.

Alexander, Michael G.; Harris, Scott H.; Byers, Richard H.

1992-01-01

251

State of the Art and Practice: Cellular Probe Technology Applied in Advanced Traveler Information System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS) is one of the important components of Intelligent Transportation System Architecture, and cellular probe technology is regarded as a promising detection technology for the next generation traffic data collection system. Within the recent years cellular location technology develops very fast. The accuracy of mobile location has been remarkably improved, which provides the possibility of using

Zhijun Qiu; Peng Cheng

252

Advances in Thin Film Sensor Technologies for Engine Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced thin film sensor techniques that can provide accurate surface strain and temperature measurements are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. These sensors are needed to provide minimally intrusive characterization of advanced materials (such as ceramics and composites) and structures (such as components for Space Shuttle Main Engine, High Speed Civil Transport, Advanced Subsonic Transports and General Aviation Aircraft) in hostile, high-temperature environments and for validation of design codes. This paper presents two advanced thin film sensor technologies: strain gauges and thermocouples. These sensors are sputter deposited directly onto the test articles and are only a few micrometers thick; the surface of the test article is not structurally altered and there is minimal disturbance of the gas flow over the surface. The strain gauges are palladium-13% chromium based and the thermocouples are platinum-13% rhodium vs. platinum. The fabrication techniques of these thin film sensors in a class 1000 cleanroom at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. Their demonstration on a variety of engine materials, including superalloys, ceramics and advanced ceramic matrix composites, in several hostile, high-temperature test environments are discussed.

Lei, Jih-Fen; Martin, Lisa C.; Will, Herbert A.

1997-01-01

253

Robotics Technology Development Program Cross Cutting and Advanced Technology  

SciTech Connect

Need-based cross cutting technology is being developed which is broadly applicable to the clean up of hazardous and radioactive waste within the US Department of Energy`s complex. Highly modular, reusable technologies which plug into integrated system architectures to meet specific robotic needs result from this research. In addition, advanced technologies which significantly extend current capabilities such as automated planning and sensor-based control in unstructured environments for remote system operation are also being developed and rapidly integrated into operating systems.

Harrigan, R.W.; Horschel, D.S.

1994-04-01

254

Leaf Evolution and Development: Advancing Technologies, Advancing Understanding  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Classical morphological studies of plant development have provided a sound basis for recent advances in molecular and computational tools for understanding how leaves become leaves. Research on mutants in model organisms has identified networks of genes that are involved in the development of leaves. Mutant analyses and gene expression studies have also revealed epigenetic phenomena that regulate leaf development. Such techniques are still invaluable to developmental biology, and these techniques are continuing to be enhanced. Each new technique or species studied appears to reveal further levels of complexity in the regulation of leaf development. Only by drawing together evidence from numerous techniques and comparative studies of a wide array of species will we understand how such diversity of plant form has arisen. In this article we do not provide a comprehensive review of our current understanding of leaf development, but rather a glimpse at how advances in technologies facilitated that understanding.

Sarah Wyatt (Ohio University;)

2009-01-01

255

On the Pulse of Technological Advances  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The ATETV project delivers web-based videos to connect students to careers in advanced technology. In this episode of ATETV, industry partnerships, architectural technology, and underwater robotics are discussed. Community colleges provide hands-on education with a direct link to what is going on in industry. Such technical programs tailor their curriculum so that students gain an understanding of what is involved in working in the field. These programs are also at the forefront in emerging technologies such as remotely operated vehicles, and provide the employees of the future with a strong educational foundation. The episode can be watched in full or through the three segments: âÂÂPioneering in the Fuel Cell Industry,â âÂÂAdvances in Architectural Technology Add Up to Green Buildings,â and âÂÂThe Many Applications of Underwater Robotics.â Running time for the full episode of this streaming video is 9:26.

2010-07-28

256

Advances and trends in computational structures technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major goals of computational structures technology (CST) are outlined, and recent advances in CST are examined. These include computational material modeling, stochastic-based modeling, computational methods for articulated structural dynamics, strategies and numerical algorithms for new computing systems, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. The role of CST in the future development of structures technology and the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles is addressed, and the future directions of CST research in the prediction of failures of structural components, the solution of large-scale structural problems, and quality assessment and control of numerical simulations are discussed.

Noor, A. K.; Venneri, S. L.

1990-01-01

257

Advanced rotorcraft technology: Task force report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technological needs and opportunities related to future civil and military rotorcraft were determined and a program plan for NASA research which was responsive to the needs and opportunities was prepared. In general, the program plan places the primary emphasis on design methodology where the development and verification of analytical methods is built upon a sound data base. The four advanced rotorcraft technology elements identified are aerodynamics and structures, flight control and avionic systems, propulsion, and vehicle configurations. Estimates of the total funding levels that would be required to support the proposed program plan are included.

1978-01-01

258

Advanced imaging technology in surgical innovation.  

PubMed

Advanced imaging technologies including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have immensely expanded possibilities in imaging and surgery. The accurate visualization of bones and soft tissue has transformed the surgical management of numerous diseases, including middle ear disease, orthopedic and reconstructive cases, and cancer. In fact, in surgical subspecialties such as neurosurgery, CT and MRI are the diagnostic modalities of choice for preoperative evaluation of patients. Furthermore, the ongoing development of the newer imaging technologies continues to expand image-guided surgical treatments. The development of new radiological modalities combined with the modern training of surgeons will provide an exciting landscape for future practicing physicians. PMID:22047196

Kotecha, Rupesh; Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

2011-01-01

259

Advances in computed tomography imaging technology.  

PubMed

Computed tomography (CT) is an essential tool in diagnostic imaging for evaluating many clinical conditions. In recent years, there have been several notable advances in CT technology that already have had or are expected to have a significant clinical impact, including extreme multidetector CT, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dual-energy CT, cone-beam CT, portable CT, and phase-contrast CT. These techniques and their clinical applications are reviewed and illustrated in this article. In addition, emerging technologies that address deficiencies in these modalities are discussed. PMID:25014788

Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Gupta, Rajiv

2014-07-11

260

Advances in HTGR spent fuel treatment technology  

SciTech Connect

GA Technologies, Inc. has been investigating the burning of spent reactor graphite under Department of Energy sponsorship since 1969. Several deep fluidized bed burners have been used at the GA pilot plant to develop graphite burning techniques for both spent fuel recovery and volume reduction for waste disposal. Since 1982 this technology has been extended to include more efficient circulating bed burners. This paper includes updates on high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel cycle options and current results of spent fuel treatment testing for fluidized and advanced circulating bed burners.

Holder, N.D.; Lessig, W.S.

1984-08-01

261

Second NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The conference papers are presented. The Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. These papers will also be included in the Ninth Conference Proceedings to be published by the Federal Aviation Administration as a separate document.

Davis, John G., Jr. (compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (compiler)

1992-01-01

262

Advanced manufacturing: Technology and international competitiveness  

SciTech Connect

Dramatic changes in the competitiveness of German and Japanese manufacturing have been most evident since 1988. All three countries are now facing similar challenges, and these challenges are clearly observed in human capital issues. Our comparison of human capital issues in German, Japanese, and US manufacturing leads us to the following key judgments: Manufacturing workforces are undergoing significant changes due to advanced manufacturing technologies. As companies are forced to develop and apply these technologies, the constituency of the manufacturing workforce (especially educational requirements, contingent labor, job content, and continuing knowledge development) is being dramatically and irreversibly altered. The new workforce requirements which result due to advanced manufacturing require a higher level of worker sophistication and responsibility.

Tesar, A.

1995-02-01

263

ARIES-AT: AN ADVANCED TOKAMAK, ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FUSION POWER PLANT  

E-print Network

ARIES-AT: AN ADVANCED TOKAMAK, ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FUSION POWER PLANT F. Najmabadi, S. C. Jardin*,6 of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant. Several to ARIES-RS that led to plasmas with higher N and . Advanced technologies that are examined in detail

California at San Diego, University of

264

Medical technology advances from space research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Details of medical research and development programs, particularly an integrated medical laboratory, as derived from space technology are given. The program covers digital biotelemetry systems, automatic visual field mapping equipment, sponge electrode caps for clinical electroencephalograms, and advanced respiratory analysis equipment. The possibility of using the medical laboratory in ground based remote areas and regional health care facilities, as well as long duration space missions is discussed.

Pool, S. L.

1972-01-01

265

Advanced Oxidation Technology for Pulp Mill Effluent  

E-print Network

is often required. Advanced oxidation is one technology which has application to bleached Kraft pulp effluent, principally for color reduction. INTRODUCTION The composition of wood (bone dry) is approximately 50% cellulose, 30% hemicelluloses... process for Kraft pulp using chlorine and chlorine dioxide chemicals, making them unacceptable for evaporation and eventual incineration. These two separate streams were at pH values of 1.5 and 11.0. A third effluent stream came from a...

Hart, J. R.

266

Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: a progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The four-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world's leading resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun's output. Development of a four-meter solar telescope presents many technical challenges (e.g., thermal control of the enclosure, telescope structure and optics). We give

J. Wagner; T. R. Rimmele; S. Keil; R. Hubbard; E. Hansen; L. Phelps; M. Warner; B. Goodrich; K. Richards; S. Hegwer; R. Kneale; J. Ditsler

2008-01-01

267

Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: a progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The four-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world's leading resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun's output. Development of a four-meter solar telescope presents many technical challenges (e.g., thermal control of the enclosure, telescope structure and optics). We give

J. Wagner; T. R. Rimmele; S. Keil; J. Barr; N. Dalrymple; J. Ditsler; B. Goodrich; E. Hansen; S. Hegwer; F. Hill; R. Hubbard; L. Phelps; R. Price; K. Richards; M. Warner

2006-01-01

268

Man-machine interface requirements - advanced technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research issues and areas are identified where increased understanding of the human operator and the interaction between the operator and the avionics could lead to improvements in the performance of current and proposed helicopters. Both current and advanced helicopter systems and avionics are considered. Areas critical to man-machine interface requirements include: (1) artificial intelligence; (2) visual displays; (3) voice technology; (4) cockpit integration; and (5) pilot work loads and performance.

Remington, R. W.; Wiener, E. L.

1984-01-01

269

Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and air/coal ratios. Testing with a higher-ash, high-moisture, low-rank coal from the Red Hills Mine of the Mississippi Lignite Mining Company has recently been completed. Testing with the lignite coal generated a fuel gas with acceptable heating value and a high carbon conversion, although some drying of the high-moisture lignite was required before coal-feeding problems were resolved. No ash deposition or bed material agglomeration issues were encountered with this fuel. In order to better understand the coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry occurring in the riser of the transport reactor, gas and solid sampling directly from the riser and the filter outlet has been accomplished. This was done using a baseline Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming.

Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

2008-03-31

270

Advanced core technology: Key to subsonic propulsion benefits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted to identify the potential performance benefits and key technology drivers associated with advanced cores for subsonic high bypass turbofan engines. Investigated first were the individual sensitivities of varying compressor efficiency, pressure ratio and bleed (turbine cooling); combustor pressure recovery; and turbine efficiency and inlet temperature on thermal efficiency and core specific power output. Then, engine cycle and mission performance benefits were determined for systems incorporating all potentially achievable technology advancements. The individual thermodynamic sensitivities are shown over a range of turbine temperatures (at cruise) from 2900 to 3500 R and for both constant (current technology) and optimum (maximum thermal efficiency) overall pressure ratios. It is seen that no single parameter alone will provide a large increase in core thermal efficiency, which is the thermodynamic parameter of most concern for transport propulsion. However, when all potentially achievable advancements are considered, there occurs a synergism that produces significant cycle and mission performance benefits. The nature of these benefits are presented along with the technology challenges.

Glassman, Arthur J.; Snyder, Christopher A.; Knip, Gerald, Jr.

1989-01-01

271

Advanced core technology - Key to subsonic propulsion benefits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted to identify the potential performance benefits and key technology drivers associated with advanced cores for subsonic high bypass turbofan engines. Investigated first were the individual sensitivities of varying compressor efficiency, pressure ratio and bleed (turbine cooling); combustor pressure recovery; and turbine efficiency and inlet temperature on thermal efficiency and core specific power output. Then, engine cycle and mission performance benefits were determined for systems incorporating all potentially achievable technology advancements. The individual thermodynamic sensitivities are shown over a range of turbine temperatures (at cruise) from 2900 to 3500 R and for both constant (current technology) and optimum (maximum thermal efficiency) overall pressure ratios. It is seen that no single parameter alone will provide a large increase in core thermal efficiency, which is the thermodynamic parameter of most concern for transport propulsion. However, when all potentially achievable advancements are considered, there occurs a synergism that produces significant cycle and mission performance benefits. The nature of these benefits are presented along with the technology challenges.

Glassman, Arthur J.; Snyder, Christopher A.; Knip, Gerald, Jr.

1989-01-01

272

Further advances in autostereoscopic technology at Dimension Technologies Inc.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dimension Technologies is currently one of three companies offering autostereoscopic displays for sale and one of several which are actively pursuing advances to the technology. We have devised a new autostereoscopic imaging technique which possesses several advantages over previously explored methods. We are currently manufacturing autostereoscopic displays based on this technology, as well as vigorously pursuing research and development toward more advanced displays. During the past year, DTI has made major strides in advancing its LCD based autostereoscopic display technology. DTI has developed a color product -- a stand alone 640 X 480 flat panel LCD based 3-D display capable of accepting input from IBM PC and Apple MAC computers or TV cameras, and capable of changing from 3-D mode to 2-D mode with the flip of a switch. DTI is working on development of a prototype second generation color product that will provide autostereoscopic 3-D while allowing each eye to see the full resolution of the liquid crystal display. And development is also underway on a proof-of-concept display which produces hologram-like look-around images visible from a wide viewing angle, again while allowing the observer to see the full resolution of the display from all locations. Development of a high resolution prototype display of this type has begun.

Eichenlaub, Jesse B.

1992-06-01

273

RUBIN Microsatellites for Advanced Space Technology Demonstration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first new space technology demonstration payload BIRD-RUBIN was developed by OHB- System in co-operation with students from the University of Applied Sciences, Bremen, and was successfully launched July 15th, 2000 together with the scientific satellites CHAMP and MITA onboard a COSMOS 3M launcher. The BIRD-RUBIN mission has tested the telematics technology in space via ORBCOMM network. Small data packages were sent by the hatbox sized system to the ORBCOMM satellite net, then transmitted further on to the ground stations and from that point entered into the internet. The payload user could retrieve the data direct via email account and was able to send commands back to payload in orbit. The next micro satellite RUBIN-2 for advanced space technology demonstration will be launched at the end of 2002 as "secondary" payload on the Russian launcher DNEPR. The RUBIN-2 micro satellite platform will use again the inter-satellite communication mode via Orbcomm network and offers an orbital testbed with low cost, bi-directional and near real-time Internet access. In parallel to the further inter satellite link experiments using Orbcomm, several additional leading edge technology experiments will be done onboard Rubin-2 (electrical propulsion, two loop miniaturized thermal control system, GPS navigation, LI-Ion Battery, etc.). This paper provides an overview of RUBIN micro satellites for advanced space technology demonstrations. The main results of the first BIRD-RUBIN experiment and the goals of the second Rubin-2 mission are described. The potential of low cost technology demonstration missions using Internet and inter satellite communication technology via commercial satellite systems and the piggyback flight opportunities on Russian launchers are discussed.

Kalnins, Indulis

274

Ris-M-2728 I Advanced Mormation Technology  

E-print Network

Risø-M-2728 I Advanced Mormation Technology Infonnation Technology for Accident and Emergency ADVANCED INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Information Technology for Accident and Emergency Management V. Andersen work properly. Modern Information technology may be used in order to develop more reliable pre

275

Advanced Technology Vehicle Modeling in PERE (Physical Emission Rate Estimator).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study proposes a modeling methodology for light duty advanced technology vehicles including those powered by: Advanced gasoline internal combustion engine; Advanced diesel internal combustion engines; Hybrid electric and gasoline/diesel powertrains; ...

E. Nam

2004-01-01

276

JPL Advanced Thermal Control Technology Roadmap - 2008  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the status of thermal control technology at JPL and NASA.It shows the active spacecraft that are in vairous positions in the solar syatem, and beyond the solar system and the future missions that are under development. It then describes the challenges that the past missions posed with the thermal control systems. The various solutions that were implemented duirng the decades prior to 1990 are outlined. A review of hte thermal challenges of the future misions is also included. The exploration plan for Mars is then reviewed. The thermal challenges of the Mars Rovers are then outlined. Also the challenges of systems that would be able to be used in to explore Venus, and Titan are described. The future space telescope missions will also need thermal control technological advances. Included is a review of the thermal requirements for manned missions to the Moon. Both Active and passive technologies that have been used and will be used are reviewed. Those that are described are Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loops (MPFL), Loop Heat Pipes, an M3 Passive Cooler, Heat Siwtch for Space and Mars surface applications, phase change material (PCM) technology, a Gas Gap Actuateor using ZrNiH(x), the Planck Sorption Cooler (PCS), vapor compression -- Hybrid two phase loops, advanced pumps for two phase cooling loops, and heat pumps that are lightweight and energy efficient.

Birur, Gaj

2008-01-01

277

National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program  

SciTech Connect

The second meeting of Federal agency representatives interested in the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program took place on June 15, 1993. The Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted the meeting at the Washington, D.C., offices of DOE. Representatives from the National Science Foundation, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Bureau of Mines, National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and various offices within the Department of Energy attended. For a complete list of attendees see Attachment A. The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to cover the status of efforts to gain formal approval for NADET, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, especially two recent workshops that explored research needs in drilling and excavation, (3) to review some recent technological advances, and (4) to solicit statements of the importance of improving drilling and excavation technologies to the missions of the various agencies. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

None

1993-06-15

278

Transportation technology quick reference file  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a collection of items written by different authors on subjects relating to the transportation of radioactive materials. The purpose of the document is to meet the continuing need for information on specific subjects for dissemination to the public at their request. The subjects included were selected on the basis of the questions most often asked about radioactive materials and their transportation. Additional subjects are being considered and will be included in the future. The loose-leaf notebook format is used to facilitate the updating of this material. The data used in many of the papers represent the best available at time of publication and will be updated as more current information becomes available.

Shepherd, E.W. (ed.)

1981-05-01

279

Advanced transport protocols for space communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Satellite IP networks are characterized by high bit error rates, long propagation delays, low bandwidth feedback links, and persistent fades resulting from varying weather patterns. A new unicast transport protocol is designed to address all the above challenges. Two new algorithms, Jump Start and Quick Recovery, are presented to replace the traditional Slow Start algorithm and to recover rapidly from multiple segment losses within one window of data. The characteristics of satellite IP networks also distinguish satellite multicasting from multicasting in terrestrial wirelined networks. A reliable data multicast transport protocol, TCP-Peachtree, is proposed to solve the acknowledgment implosion and scalability problems in satellite IP networks. Developments in space technology are enabling the realization of deep space missions. The scientific data from these missions need to be delivered to the Earth successfully. To achieve this goal, the InterPlaNetary Internet is proposed as the Internet of the deep space planetary networks, which is characterized by extremely high propagation delays, high link errors, asymmetrical bandwidth, and blackouts. A reliable transport protocol, TP-Planet, is proposed for data traffic in the InterPlaNetary Internet. TP-Planet deploys rate-based additive-increase multiplicative-decrease (AIMD) congestion control and replaces the inefficient slow start algorithm with a novel Initial State algorithm that allows the capture of link resources in a very fast and controlled manner. A new congestion detection and control mechanism is developed and a Blackout State is incorporated into the protocol operation. Multimedia traffic is also one part of the aggregate traffic over InterPlaNetary Internet backbone links and it has additional requirements such as minimum bandwidth, smooth traffic, and error control. To address all the above challenges, RCP-Planet is proposed. RCP-Planet consists of two novel algorithms, i.e., Begin State and Operational State. The protocol is based on a novel rate probing mechanism and a new rate control scheme to update the media rate smoothly based on the observed rate for the probing sequence.

Fang, Jian

280

Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC) is a consortium of humanists, artists, scientists, social scientists, and engineers from universities across the country, committed to new forms of cross-collaboration in order to promote creative uses of technology. It is a network of networks, located at the intersection of technology, engineering, and computing on one hand, and the humanities, arts and social sciences on the other. The HASTAC web site features information on the consortium's projects, including tools for multimedia archiving and social interaction, gaming environments for teaching, educational programs in information science and information studies, virtual museums, and many others. There are also news items, event announcements, and information for organizations who wish to join the consortium.

2006-05-18

281

Advanced high-bandwidth optical fuzing technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A robust and compact photonic proximity sensor is developed for optical fuze in munitions applications. The design of the optical fuze employed advanced optoelectronic technologies including high-power vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), the p-i-n or metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors, SiGe ASIC driver, and miniature optics. The development combines pioneering work and unique expertise at ARDEC, ARL, and Sandia National Laboratories and synergizes the key optoelectronic technologies in components and system designs. This compact sensor will replace conventional costly assemblies based on discrete lasers, photodetectors, and bulky optics and provide a new capability for direct fire applications. It will be mass manufacturable in low cost and simplicity. In addition to the specific applications for gun-fired munitions, numerous civilian uses can be realized by this proximity sensor in automotive, robotics, and aerospace applications. This technology is also applicable to robotic ladar and short-range 3-D imaging.

Liu, Jony J.; von der Lippe, Christian M.

2005-10-01

282

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the seventeen subprojects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of project activity only. The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium--Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno--that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation (2) Solid-liquid separation (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction (4) Modeling and Control, and (5) Environmental Control.

Hugh W. Rimmer

2004-05-12

283

Space Station technology testbed: 2010 deep space transport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A space station in a crew-tended or permanently crewed configuration will provide major R&D opportunities for innovative, technology and materials development and advanced space systems testing. A space station should be designed with the basic infrastructure elements required to grow into a major systems technology testbed. This space-based technology testbed can and should be used to support the development of technologies required to expand our utilization of near-Earth space, the Moon and the Earth-to-Jupiter region of the Solar System. Space station support of advanced technology and materials development will result in new techniques for high priority scientific research and the knowledge and R&D base needed for the development of major, new commercial product thrusts. To illustrate the technology testbed potential of a space station and to point the way to a bold, innovative approach to advanced space systems' development, a hypothetical deep space transport development and test plan is described. Key deep space transport R&D activities are described would lead to the readiness certification of an advanced, reusable interplanetary transport capable of supporting eight crewmembers or more. With the support of a focused and highly motivated, multi-agency ground R&D program, a deep space transport of this type could be assembled and tested by 2010. Key R&D activities on a space station would include: (1) experimental research investigating the microgravity assisted, restructuring of micro-engineered, materials (to develop and verify the in-space and in-situ 'tuning' of materials for use in debris and radiation shielding and other protective systems), (2) exposure of microengineered materials to the space environment for passive and operational performance tests (to develop in-situ maintenance and repair techniques and to support the development, enhancement, and implementation of protective systems, data and bio-processing systems, and virtual reality and telepresence/kinetic processes), (3) subsystem tests of advanced nuclear power, nuclear propulsion and communication systems (using boom extensions, remote station-keeping platforms and mobile EVA crew and robots), and (4) logistics support (crew and equipment) and command and control of deep space transport assembly, maintenance, and refueling (using a station-keeping platform).

Holt, Alan C.

1993-01-01

284

Technological change and productivity growth in the air transport industry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The progress of the civil air transport industry in the United States was examined in the light of a proposal of Enos who, after examining the growth of the petroleum industry, divided that phenomenon into two phases, the alpha and the beta; that is, the invention, first development and production, and the improvement phase. The civil air transport industry developed along similar lines with the technological progress coming in waves; each wave encompassing several new technological advances while retaining the best of the old ones. At the same time the productivity of the transport aircraft as expressed by the product of the aircraft velocity and the passenger capacity increased sufficiently to allow the direct operating cost in cents per passenger mile to continually decrease with each successive aircraft development.

Rosenberg, N.; Thompson, A.; Belsley, S. E.

1978-01-01

285

Aeronautical technology 2000: A projection of advanced vehicle concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council conducted a Workshop on Aeronautical Technology: a Projection to the Year 2000 (Aerotech 2000 Workshop). The panels were asked to project advances in aeronautical technologies that could be available by the year 2000. As the workshop was drawing to a close, it became evident that a more comprehensive investigation of advanced air vehicle concepts than was possible in the limited time available at the workshop would be valuable. Thus, a special panel on vehicle applications was organized. In the course of two meetings, the panel identified and described representative types of aircraft judged possible with the workshop's technology projections. These representative aircraft types include: military aircraft; transport aircraft; rotorcraft; extremely high altitude aircraft; and transatmospheric aircraft. Improvements in performance, efficiency, and operational characteristics possible through the application of the workshop's year 2000 technology projections were discussed. The subgroups also identified the technologies considered essential and enhancing or supporting to achieve the projected aircraft improvements.

1985-01-01

286

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence - Introduction Advanced Topics of AI - Introduction #12;Institute for Software Technology Motivating Example "t t th t b f the advance of particular methods and tools #12;Institute for Software Technology Problem Solving i t ll t l d

287

Technological Advancement and Long-Term Economic Growth in Asia  

E-print Network

4 Technological Advancement and Long-Term Economic Growth in Asia Jeffrey D. Sachs and John W. Mc technological advance, the Soviet Union, as well as to Latin America, a region that has also generally paid insufficient heed to the importance of technological advance. Section 4.3 dis- cusses the distinct processes

288

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence - Common Sense & Gerald Steinbauer 2 Advanced Topics of AI ­ Common Sense Reasoning #12;Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of AI ­ Common Sense Reasoning #12;Institute for Software Technology How to Deal

289

Key Technologies for IMT-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems  

E-print Network

Key Technologies for IMT-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems Carl WIJTING1 , Klaus DOPPLER1 and assessment of key technologies for IMT-Advanced mobile communication systems. WINNER has devised an OFDMA- Advanced technology proposals has been issued by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) [2

290

Faculty Advancement Support Technology (FAST) Final Project Report  

E-print Network

1/53 Faculty Advancement Support Technology (FAST) Final Project Report Presented by Rich Meyer Braunstein Date May 3, 2007 #12;2/53 Faculty Advancement Support Technology (FAST The Faculty Advancement Support Technology (FAST) project seeks to increase faculty satisfaction of completing

Militzer, Burkhard

291

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics Dependability/Robustness Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Robotics ­ Dependability Steinbauer 2 Advanced Robotics ­ Dependability/Robustness © NASA/JPL #12;Institute for Software Technology

292

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics Assignment 2 Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Robotics-Assignment 1 #12;Institute Gerald Steinbauer 2 Advanced Robotics-Assignment 1 #12;Institute for Software Technology Assignment

293

Engine Concept Study for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which mission fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. The results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael; Thurman, Douglas R.

2009-01-01

294

The advanced technology development center (ATDC)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA is building the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) to provide a ``national resource'' for the research, development, demonstration, testing, and qualification of Spaceport and Range Technologies. The ATDC will be located at Space Launch Complex 20 (SLC-20) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. SLC-20 currently provides a processing and launch capability for small-scale rockets: this capability will be augmented with additional ATDC facilities to provide a comprehensive and integrated in situ environment. Examples of Spaceport Technologies that will be supported by ATDC infrastructure include densified cryogenic systems, intelligent automated umbilicals, integrated vehicle health management systems, next-generation safety systems, and advanced range systems. The ATDC can be thought of as a prototype spaceport where industry, government, and academia, in partnership, can work together to improve safety of future space initiatives. The ATDC is being deployed in five separate phases. Major ATDC facilities will include a Liquid Oxygen Area (Phase 1); a Liquid Hydrogen Area, a Liquid Nitrogen Area, and a multipurpose Launch Mount (Phase 2); ``Iron Rocket'' Test Demonstrator (Phase 3); a Processing Facility with a Checkout and Control System (Phase 4); and Future Infrastructure Developments (Phase 5). Initial ATDC development will be completed in 2006. .

Clements, Gregory R.

2002-01-01

295

IPIRG programs - advances in pipe fracture technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the advances made in fracture control technology as a result of the research performed in the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The findings from numerous experiments and supporting analyses conducted to investigate the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping and pipe systems subjected to high-rate loading typical of seismic events are summarized. Topics to be discussed include; (1) Seismic loading effects on material properties, (2) Piping system behavior under seismic loads, (3) Advances in elbow fracture evaluations, and (4) {open_quotes}Real{close_quotes} piping system response. The presentation for each topic will be illustrated with data and analytical results. In each case, the state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics prior to the first IPIRG program will be contrasted with the state-of-the-art at the completion of the IPIRG-2 program.

Wilkowski, G.; Olson, R.; Scott, P. [Batelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1997-04-01

296

Advanced propfan engine characteristics and technology needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comparative study is presented for two of the advanced gas turbine engine designs developed in the course of a proprietary research effort for the NASA Advanced Propfan Engine Technology research program. In these engines, a cycle pressure ratio of 32.5:1 and a 2500 F maximum turbine temperature provide fuel efficient operation in the 32,000-ft altitude, Mach 0.72 cruise speed regime stipulated. Both of the engine configurations incorporate three spools, of which the compressors are dual-spool and the power turbines are free. A major design challenge for axial compressors in the 10,000-shp class was the maintenance of adequate blade heights in the later stages.

Anderson, R. D.; Gill, J. C.; Novick, A. S.

1983-01-01

297

Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

Wallace, J. F.

1993-01-01

298

A methodology for boost-glide transport technology planning  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A systematic procedure is presented by which the relative economic value of technology factors affecting design, configuration, and operation of boost-glide transport can be evaluated. Use of the methodology results in identification of first-order economic gains potentially achievable by projected advances in each of the definable, hypersonic technologies. Starting with a baseline vehicle, the formulas, procedures and forms which are integral parts of this methodology are developed. A demonstration of the methodology is presented for one specific boost-glide system.

Repic, E. M.; Olson, G. A.; Milliken, R. J.

1974-01-01

299

Physics and Advanced Technologies 2001 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Physics and Advanced Technologies (PAT) Directorate was created in July 2000 by Bruce Tarter, Director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Director called for the new organization to execute and support programs that apply cutting-edge physics and advanced technology to develop integrated solutions to problems in national security, fusion energy, information science, health care, and other national grand challenges. When I was appointed a year later as the PAT Directorate's first Associate Director, I initiated a strategic planning project to develop a vision, mission, and long-term goals for the Directorate. We adopted the goal of becoming a leader in frontier physics and technology for twenty-first-century national security missions: Stockpile Stewardship, homeland security, energy independence, and the exploration of space. Our mission is to: (1) Help ensure the scientific excellence and vitality of the major LLNL programs through its leadership role in performing basic and applied multidisciplinary research and development with programmatic impact, and by recruiting and retaining science and technology leaders; (2) Create future opportunities and directions for LLNL and its major programs by growing new program areas and cutting-edge capabilities that are synergistic with, and supportive of, its national security mission; (3) Provide a direct conduit to the academic and high-tech industrial sectors for LLNL and its national security programs, through which the Laboratory gains access to frontier science and technology, and can impact the science and technology communities; (4) Leverage unique Laboratory capabilities, to advance the state universe. This inaugural PAT Annual Report begins a series that will chronicle our progress towards fulfilling this mission. I believe the report demonstrates that the PAT Directorate has a strong base of capabilities and accomplishments on which to build in meeting its goals. Some of the highlights include: (1) Leadership of the Laboratory's Physical Data Research Program that provides fundamental physics information for the Stockpile Stewardship Program. (2) Development of the handheld Microbead Immunoassay Dipstick System that will allow relatively untrained first-responders to run sophisticated onsite diagnostics for pathogens, including those associated with biowarfare agents, by using a simple, one-step measurement. (3) Major advances in target design for inertial fusion energy research using both laser and ion-beam drivers. (4) Development of the Advanced Technology Kill Vehicle concept for use as a high-performance interceptor in a broad range of missile defense programs. Over the course of the past decade, the Laboratory has seen its major program evolve from weapons research, development, and testing, to Stockpile Stewardship. Today, the country's national security priorities are changing rapidly: nuclear security is becoming a broader set of missions, and the Laboratory is being asked to contribute to a range of new mission areas from countering bioterrorism to ensuring information security. As we embark on the twenty-first century, the new PAT Directorate is poised to help lead the Laboratory's response to the country's changing national security needs.

Jacobs, R

2002-05-09

300

The Marine Advanced Technology Education Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Working together with a range of partners, including a number of community colleges, the Marine Advanced Technology Education Center (MATE), has created a number of valuable resources that will be useful for those with an interest in this field. The instructional resources are primarily related to those interested in careers in hydrographic surveying, aquaculture technicians, and several other fields. Visitors will appreciate the "Careers, Jobs, Internships" area which features profiles of these fields, current job listings, and other items. The education center is a real find, as it includes learning modules, worksheets, and other informative pedagogical tools for instructors.

301

Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer. The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches, based on recent technological advances, is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning), reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy), and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning target volume (intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy). Reduction of radiotherapy-related toxicity is fundamental to the improvement of clinical results in esophageal cancer, although the dose escalation concept is controversial. PMID:21105188

Vosmik, Milan; Petera, Jiri; Sirak, Igor; Hodek, Miroslav; Paluska, Petr; Dolezal, Jiri; Kopacova, Marcela

2010-01-01

302

Advanced Modulation and Coding Technology Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives, approach, and status of all current LeRC-sponsored industry contracts and university grants are presented. The following topics are covered: (1) the LeRC Space Communications Program, and Advanced Modulation and Coding Projects; (2) the status of four contracts for development of proof-of-concept modems; (3) modulation and coding work done under three university grants, two small business innovation research contracts, and two demonstration model hardware development contracts; and (4) technology needs and opportunities for future missions.

1992-01-01

303

Advanced 3-V semiconductor technology assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Components required for extensions of currently planned space communications systems are discussed for large antennas, crosslink systems, single sideband systems, Aerostat systems, and digital signal processing. Systems using advanced modulation concepts and new concepts in communications satellites are included. The current status and trends in materials technology are examined with emphasis on bulk growth of semi-insulating GaAs and InP, epitaxial growth, and ion implantation. Microwave solid state discrete active devices, multigigabit rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, microwave integrated circuits, and the exploratory development of GaInAs devices, heterojunction devices, and quasi-ballistic devices is considered. Competing technologies such as RF power generation, filter structures, and microwave circuit fabrication are discussed. The fundamental limits of semiconductor devices and problems in implementation are explored.

Nowogrodzki, M.

1983-01-01

304

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect

As part of Task 1 in the Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has partnered with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy (formerly Range Resources) and Belden and Blake Corporation, to develop methodologies for the identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided data for over 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently in the final stages of developing and testing our new Access/Excel based software and processing this well data to generate a list of potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies.

C.M. Boyer II; N.R. Fairchild, Jr.; R.J. MacDonald P.G.

2000-10-01

305

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect

As part of Task 1 in the Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has partnered with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy (formerly Range Resources) and Belden and Blake Corporation, to develop methodologies for the identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided data for over 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently in the final stages of developing and testing our new Access/Excel based software and processing this well data to generate a list of potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies. Preparation of the Final Technical report has begun.

C.M. Boyer II; N.R. Fairchild, Jr.; R.J. MacDonald P.G.

2001-01-01

306

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect

As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently in the final stages of developing and testing our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We will be processing this well data and identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies. Preparation of the final technical report is underway.

Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

2001-04-01

307

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect

As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process this well data and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway.

Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

2001-10-01

308

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect

As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process this well data and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway.

Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G

2001-07-01

309

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect

As part of Phase 1 in the Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has partnered with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy (formerly Range Resources) and Belden & Blake Corporation, to develop methodologies for the identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided data for over 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently processing the production and well data and developing our new Access/Excel based software that incorporates our identification methodologies. Upon completion we will generate a list of potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies.

C.M. Boyer II; N.,R. Fairchild, Jr.; R.J. MacDonald P.G.

2000-10-01

310

Technologies Advance UAVs for Science, Military  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Space Act Agreement with Goddard Space Flight Center and West Virginia University enabled Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, of Manassas, Virginia, to develop cost-effective composite manufacturing capabilities and open a facility in West Virginia. The company now employs 160 workers at the plant, tasked with crafting airframe components for the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) program. While one third of the company's workforce focuses on Global Hawk production, the rest of the company develops advanced UAV technologies that are redefining traditional approaches to unmanned aviation. Since the company's founding, Aurora s cutting-edge work has been supported with funding from NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs.

2010-01-01

311

Advanced MIR/ECEI Imaging Technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advanced passive and active millimeter-wave imaging technology is being developed at UC Davis in support of Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI). Foremost among these new technologies is a beam shaping phased antenna array (PAA) proposed for use in MIR. To account for the rapid changes of the cutoff layer with plasma density variation, a true time delay controlled PAA is being developed as an artificial lens with voltage-controllable focal length for launching the MIR illumination beam. Design and measurement results from a proof-of-principle PAA system will be presented, along with preliminary designs for use on NSTX and TEXTOR. Other ongoing developments to be discussed include quasioptical notch filters (to shield imaging arrays from ECRH pickup) and wide bandwidth imaging antenna arrays.

Liang, Y.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, J. R.; Shen, Z.; Wu, H.-C.; Xia, Z. G.; Yang, L.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

2004-11-01

312

Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

1985-01-01

313

Advanced research and technology program for advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

1985-01-01

314

Abstract--Rapid advances in wireless communications and networking technologies, linked with advances in computing  

E-print Network

Abstract-- Rapid advances in wireless communications and networking technologies, linked with advances in computing and medical technologies facilitate the development and offering of emerging mobile was made possible due to the recent advances in wireless and network technologies, linked with recent

Pitsillides, Andreas

315

Advanced subsonic aircraft concepts for passenger transportation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses the potential for new subsonic transport aircraft designs that may evolve in the relatively near future, taking into account the added requirements for improved environmental compatibility and the potential constraints due to system congestion, substantial financial risk, and higher fuel costs or limited availability. Reflecting these additional requirements, potential aircraft developments are presented for new CTOL transports with significantly improved fuel economy, new STOL transports with improved short field capability, and new VTOL transports that could provide direct city-center service.

Waters, M. H.; Williams, L. J.

1975-01-01

316

Advances in wearable technology for rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Assessing the impact of rehabilitation interventions on the real life of individuals is a key element of the decision-making process required to choose a rehabilitation strategy. In the past, therapists and physicians inferred the effectiveness of a given rehabilitation approach from observations performed in a clinical setting and self-reports by patients. Recent developments in wearable technology have provided tools to complement the information gathered by rehabilitation personnel via patient's direct observation and via interviews and questionnaires. A new generation of wearable sensors and systems has emerged that allows clinicians to gather measures in the home and community settings that capture patients' activity level and exercise compliance, the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions, and the ability of patients to perform efficiently specific motor tasks. Available unobtrusive sensors allow clinical personnel to monitor patients' movement and physiological data such as heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation. Cell phone technology and the widespread access to the Internet provide means to implement systems designed to remotely monitor patients' status and optimize interventions based on individual responses to different rehabilitation approaches. This chapter summarizes recent advances in the field of wearable technology and presents examples of application of this technology in rehabilitation. PMID:19592792

Bonato, Paolo

2009-01-01

317

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report is the fourth in a series of Annual Technical Summary Reports for the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). This report covers plans and progress on ceramics development for commercial automotive applications over the period 1 Jan. - 31 Dec. 1991. Project effort conducted under this contract is part of the DOE Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle System program. This program is directed to provide the U.S. automotive industry the high-risk, long-range technology necessary to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption, reduced environmental impact, and a decreased reliance on scarce materials and resources. The program is oriented toward developing the high-risk technology of ceramic structural component design and fabrication, such that industry can carry this technology forward to production in the 1990s. The ATTAP test bed engine, carried over from the previous AGT101 project, is being used for verification testing of the durability of next-generation ceramic components, and their suitability for service at Reference Powertrain Design conditions. This document reports the technical effort conducted by GAPD and the ATTAP subcontractors during the fourth year of the project. Topics covered include ceramic processing definition and refinement, design improvements to the ATTAP test bed engine and test rigs and the methodology development of ceramic impact and fracture mechanisms. Appendices include reports by ATTAP subcontractors in the development of silicon nitride and silicon carbide families of materials and processes.

1992-01-01

318

Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) technology development project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report is the final in a series of Technical Summary Reports for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, authorizrd under NASA Contract DEN3-167 and sponsored by the DOE. The project was administered by NASA-Lewis Research Center of Cleveland, Ohio. Plans and progress are summarized for the period October 1979 through June 1987. This program aims to provide the US automotive industry the high risk, long range technology necessary to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption and reduce environmental impact. The intent is that this technology will reach the marketplace by the 1990s. The Garrett/Ford automotive AGT was designated AGT101. The AGT101 is a 74.5 kW (100 shp) engine, capable of speeds to 100,000 rpm, and operates at turbine inlet temperatures to 1370 C (2500 F) with a specific fuel consumption level of 0.18 kg/kW-hr (0.3 lbs/hp-hr) over most of the operating range. This final report summarizes the powertrain design, power section development and component/ceramic technology development.

1987-01-01

319

Advanced Mechanical Heat Pump Technologies for Industrial Applications  

E-print Network

, advanced chemical and mechanical heat pump technologies are being developed for industrial application. Determining which technologies are appropriate for particular industrial applications and then developing those technologies is a stepped process which...

Mills, J. I.; Chappell, R. N.

320

Energy efficient transport technology: Program summary and bibliography  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Program began in 1976 as an element of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program. The EET Program and the results of various applications of advanced aerodynamics and active controls technology (ACT) as applicable to future subsonic transport aircraft are discussed. Advanced aerodynamics research areas included high aspect ratio supercritical wings, winglets, advanced high lift devices, natural laminar flow airfoils, hybrid laminar flow control, nacelle aerodynamic and inertial loads, propulsion/airframe integration (e.g., long duct nacelles) and wing and empennage surface coatings. In depth analytical/trade studies, numerous wind tunnel tests, and several flight tests were conducted. Improved computational methodology was also developed. The active control functions considered were maneuver load control, gust load alleviation, flutter mode control, angle of attack limiting, and pitch augmented stability. Current and advanced active control laws were synthesized and alternative control system architectures were developed and analyzed. Integrated application and fly by wire implementation of the active control functions were design requirements in one major subprogram. Additional EET research included interdisciplinary technology applications, integrated energy management, handling qualities investigations, reliability calculations, and economic evaluations related to fuel savings and cost of ownership of the selected improvements.

Middleton, D. B.; Bartlett, D. W.; Hood, R. V.

1985-01-01

321

Composites technology for transport primary structure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ACT contract activity being performed by the McDonnell Douglas Corporation is divided into two separate activities: one effort by Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach, California with a focus on Transport Primary Wing and Fuselage Structure, and the other effort by McDonnell Aircraft in St. Louis, Missouri with a focus on Advanced Combat Aircraft Center Wing-Fuselage Structure. This presentation is on the Douglas Aircraft Transport Structure portion of the ACT program called ICAPS - Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structure.

Chen, Victor; Hawley, Arthur; Klotzsche, Max; Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

1991-01-01

322

National Institute for Advanced Transportation Technology  

E-print Network

and Control Ahmed Abdel-Rahim Michael Dixon Brian Johnson Axel Krings Michael Kyte Paul Oman Richard Wall), was retrofited with catalytic igniters and can run on either gas or an ethanol-water fuel. Catalytic ignition assisted combustion of ethanol-water mixtures represents a possible alternative to conventional ignition

Kyte, Michael

323

Nanocomposites for advanced fuel cell technology.  

PubMed

NANOCOFC (Nanocomposites for advanced fuel cell technology) is a research platform/network established based on the FP6 EC-China project www.nanocofc.org. This paper reviews major achievements on two-phase nanocomposites for advanced low temperature (300-600 degrees C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), where the ceria-salt and ceria-oxide composites are common. A typical functional nanocomposite structure is a core-shell type, in which the ceria forms a core and the salt or another oxide form the shell layer. Both of them are in the nano-scale and the functional components. The high resolution TEM analysis has proven a clear interface in the ceria-based two-phase nanocomposites. Such interface and interfacial function has resulted in superionic conductivity, above 0.1 S/cm at around 300 degrees C, being comparable to that of conventional SOFC YSZ at 1000 degrees C. Against conventional material design from the structure the advanced nanocomposites are designed by non-structure factors, i.e., the interfaces, and by creating interfacial functionalities between the two constituent phases. These new functional materials show indeed a breakthrough in the SOFC materials with great potential. PMID:22400274

Zhu, Bin

2011-10-01

324

Advances in biomaterials and surface technologies.  

PubMed

Tremendous advances in quality, reliability, performance, and versatility of surgical instrumentation and devices have been achieved over the past 50 years using biomaterials. The global orthopaedic implant industry is expected to grow to $41.8 billion by 2016, driven primarily by advancements in implant designs, including materials that provide improved biocompatibility, durability, and expanded clinical applications. Biomaterials have evolved through 3 clinical "generations": (1) "bio-inert materials," (2) materials with intrinsic bioactivity and degradability, and (3) biomaterials that stimulate specific biological host responses. In all cases, surface modifications, including coatings, represent a key strategy for improvements in tissue-contacting properties. Surfaces continue to be a focus for many device improvements and for tissue interfacing, especially for many orthopaedic structural implants comprising metal and metal alloys. Progress in implant materials processing, coating technologies, and coating combinations with therapeutic agents provide new properties and functionalities to improve device-tissue integration and reduce foreign body reactions and infections. Performance criteria for these surface modifications success in clinical practice are daunting, and translation of several technologies from in vitro proof-of-concept to in vivo applications has proven challenging. PMID:22913967

Richards, R Geoff; Moriarty, T Fintan; Miclau, Theodore; McClellan, Robert T; Grainger, David W

2012-12-01

325

Workshop on advanced technologies for planetary instruments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's robotic solar system exploration program requires a new generation of science instruments. Design concepts are now judged against stringent mass, power, and size constraints--yet future instruments must be highly capable, reliable, and, in some applications, they must operate for many years. The most important single constraint, however, is cost: new instruments must be developed in a tightly controlled design-to-cost environment. Technical innovation is the key to success and will enable the sophisticated measurements needed for future scientific exploration. As a fundamental benefit, the incorporation of breakthrough technologies in planetary flight hardware will contribute to U.S. industrial competitiveness and will strengthen the U.S. technology base. The Workshop on Advanced Technologies for Planetary Instruments was conceived to address these challenges, to provide an open forum in which the NASA and DoD space communities could become better acquainted at the working level, and to assess future collaborative efforts. Over 300 space scientists and engineers participated in the two-and-a-half-day meeting held April 28-30, 1993, in Fairfax, Virginia. It was jointly sponsored by NASA's Solar System Exploration Division (SSED), within the Office of Space Science (OSS); NASA's Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology (OACT); DoD's Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO), now called the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO); and the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI). The meeting included invited oral and contributed poster presentations, working group sessions in four sub-disciplines, and a wrap-up panel discussion. On the first day, the planetary science community described instrumentation needed for missions that may go into development during the next 5 to 10 years. Most of the second day was set aside for the DoD community to inform their counterparts in planetary science about their interests and capabilities, and to describe the BMDO technology base, flight programs, and future directions. The working group sessions and the panel discussion synthesized technical and programmatic issues from all the presentations, with a specific goal of assessing the applicability of BMDO technologies to science instrumentation for planetary exploration.

Appleby, J. (editor)

1993-01-01

326

Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

As a subcontractor to General Motors (GM), Ames Laboratory provided the technical expertise and supplied experimental materials needed to assess the technology of high energy bonded permanent magnets that are injection or compression molded for use in the Advanced Electric Traction System motor. This support was a sustained (Phase 1: 6/07 to 3/08) engineering effort that builds on the research achievements of the primary FreedomCAR project at Ames Laboratory on development of high temperature magnet alloy particulate in both flake and spherical powder forms. Ames Lab also provide guidance and direction in selection of magnet materials and supported the fabrication of experimental magnet materials for development of injection molding and magnetization processes by Arnold Magnetics, another project partner. The work with Arnold Magnetics involved a close collaboration on particulate material design and processing to achieve enhanced particulate properties and magnetic performance in the resulting bonded magnets. The overall project direction was provided by GM Program Management and two design reviews were held at GM-ATC in Torrance, CA. Ames Lab utilized current expertise in magnet powder alloy design and processing, along with on-going research advances being achieved under the existing FreedomCAR Program project to help guide and direct work during Phase 1 for the Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development Program. The technical tasks included review of previous GM and Arnold Magnets work and identification of improvements to the benchmark magnet material, Magnequench MQP-14-12. Other benchmark characteristics of the desired magnet material include 64% volumetric loading with PPS polymer and a recommended maximum use temperature of 200C. A collaborative relationship was maintained with Arnold Magnets on the specification and processing of the bonded magnet material required by GM-ATC.

Anderson, Iver

2011-01-14

327

VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology  

E-print Network

VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology FY 2006 Annual Report U.S. Department of Commerce Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology #12;VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology

328

Advanced Vehicle system concepts. [nonpetroleum passenger transportation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various nonpetroleum vehicle system concepts for passenger vehicles in the 1990's are being considered as part of the Advanced Vehicle (AV) Assessment at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The vehicle system and subsystem performance requirements, the projected characteristics of mature subsystem candidates, and promising systems are presented. The system candidates include electric and hybrid vehicles powered by electricity with or without a nonpetroleum power source. The subsystem candidates include batteries (aqueous-mobile, flow, high-temperature, and metal-air), fuel cells (phosphoric acid, advanced acids, and solid polymer electrolyte), nonpetroleum heat engines, advanced dc and ac propulsion components, power-peaking devices, and transmissions.

Hardy, K. S.; Langendoen, J. M.

1983-01-01

329

Advanced methods of structural and trajectory analysis for transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the efforts in two areas: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of trajectory optimization. The majority of the effort was spent in the structural weight area. A draft of 'Analytical Fuselage and Wing Weight Estimation of Transport Aircraft', resulting from this research, is included as an appendix.

Ardema, Mark D.

1995-01-01

330

VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology  

E-print Network

VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology 2008 Annual Report Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology of the National Institute of Standards and Technology U.S. Department of Commerce February 24, 2009 #12;VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED

331

An assessment of advanced transport telematics evaluation procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews and critically assesses procedures which have been adopted to evaluate Advanced Transport Telematics (ATT) projects. The importance of such a review at this juncture stems from the changing position of ATT in transport planning. ATT is no longer simply a field for experimentation, where technical feasibility and user acceptance are dominant concerns. Rather it is a potential

A. L. Bristow; A. D. Pearman; J. D. Shires

1997-01-01

332

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics of Artificial Intelligence - Description Logic Advanced Topics of AI ­ Description Logic #12;Institute for Software Technology Important Questions E i P f/2 A 8010 GrazA-8010 Graz Austria Alexander Felferning & Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Topics of AI

333

Advanced secondary batteries: Their applications, technological status, market and opportunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Program planning for advanced battery energy storage technology is supported within the NEMO Program. Specifically this study had focused on the review of advanced battery applications; the development and demonstration status of leading battery technologies; and potential marketing opportunity. Advanced secondary (or rechargeable) batteries have been under development for the past two decades in the U.S., Japan, and parts of

M. Yao

1989-01-01

334

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics Knowledge Representation and Decision Making Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Robotics Making · An Example in ROS Gerald Steinbauer 2 Advanced Robotics - Knowledge Representation and Decision

335

NASA's Advanced Cryocooler Technology Development Program (ACTDP)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the years, NASA has developed a wide variety of new cryocooler technologies, as they represent a significant enabling capability for both Earth and space-science missions. Recent achievements include 50-80 K Stirling, pulse tube, and Brayton flight cryocoolers, and multistage development-model coolers at temperatures down to 10K. The largest technology push within NASA right now is in the temperature range of 4 to 6K. Missions such as the James Web Space Telescope, Terrestrial Planet Finder, and future generations of space telescopes, plan to use infrared detectors operating between 4 and 6K. Similarly, future x-ray and microwave missions plan to use microcalorimeters and bolometers operating at milli-Kelvin temperatures and will require 4-6 K cooling to precool their sub-Kelvin refrigerators. To address cryocooler development for these next-generation missions, NASA initiated the Advanced Cryocooler Technology Development Program (ACTDP) in 2001. Since that time, the program has completed detailed designs and development-model hardware of three hybrid pulse tube and Stirling cryocooler concepts for cooling to 4-18 K. This paper presents an overview of the ACTDP program including programmatic objectives and timelines, and summarizes the excellent progress of the three design concepts being fabricated and tested at this time.

Ross, R. G.; Johnson, D. L.

2006-04-01

336

Coal extraction, transport, and logistics technology for underground mining  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines is sponsoring a variety of long-term, high-risk research to advance state-of-the-art technology in U.S. underground coal mining. This report reviews the status of many Bureau projects that support fundamental underground coal mining operations; the project areas include cutting coal from the solid (extraction), hauling coal from the face (transport), and activities that sustain daily operations (logistics). Innovative equipment and technology have been developed, with these major objectives: to significantly improve coal mine productivity, to further advance coal recovery and personal safety within the mining industry, and to reduce the time needed to develop longwall panels. The majority of the prototype equipment covered in this report either has undergone or will undergo comprehensive evaluation at Bureau surface test facilities so that performance and reliability can be improved before the equipment is tested and evaluated in a working section underground.

Evans, R.J.; Mayercheck, W.D.

1988-01-01

337

Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium -- Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/biological extraction; (4) Modeling and control; and (5) Environmental control. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

Christopher Hull

2009-10-31

338

Advanced Earth-to-orbit propulsion technology program overview: Impact of civil space technology initiative  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) Propulsion Technology Program is dedicated to advancing rocket engine technologies for the development of fully reusable engine systems that will enable space transportation systems to achieve low cost, routine access to space. The program addresses technology advancements in the areas of engine life extension/prediction, performance enhancements, reduced ground operations costs, and in-flight fault tolerant engine operations. The primary objective is to acquire increased knowledge and understanding of rocket engine chemical and physical processes in order to evolve more realistic analytical simulations of engine internal environments, to derive more accurate predictions of steady and unsteady loads, and using improved structural analyses, to more accurately predict component life and performance, and finally to identify and verify more durable advanced design concepts. In addition, efforts were focused on engine diagnostic needs and advances that would allow integrated health monitoring systems to be developed for enhanced maintainability, automated servicing, inspection, and checkout, and ultimately, in-flight fault tolerant engine operations.

Stephenson, Frank W., Jr.

1988-01-01

339

Hazard alerting and situational awareness in advanced air transport cockpits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advances in avionics and display technology have significantly changed the cockpit environment in current 'glass cockpit' aircraft. Recent developments in display technology, on-board processing, data storage, and datalinked communications are likely to further alter the environment in second and third generation 'glass cockpit' aircraft. The interaction of advanced cockpit technology with human cognitive performance has been a major area of activity within the MIT Aeronautical Systems Laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the MIT Advanced Cockpit Simulation Facility. Several recent research projects are briefly reviewed and the most important results are summarized.

Hansman, R. John; Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Mykityshyn, Mark; Hahn, Edward; Midkiff, Alan

1993-01-01

340

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes work performed in support of the development and demonstration of a structural ceramic technology for automotive gas turbine engines. The AGT101 regenerated gas turbine engine developed under the previous DOE/NASA Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) program is being utilized for verification testing of the durability of next-generation ceramic components and their suitability for service at reference powertrain design conditions. Topics covered in this report include ceramic processing definition and refinement, design improvements to the test bed engine and test rigs, and design methodologies related to ceramic impact and fracture mechanisms. Appendices include reports by ATTAP subcontractors addressing the development of silicon nitride and silicon carbide families of materials and processes.

1991-01-01

341

Applications technology satellites advanced mission study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three spacecraft configurations were designed for operation as a high powered synchronous communications satellite. Each spacecraft includes a 1 kw TWT and a 2 kw Klystron power amplifier feeding an antenna with multiple shaped beams. One of the spacecraft is designed to be boosted by a Thor-Delta launch vehicle and raised to synchronous orbit with electric propulsion. The other two are inserted into a elliptical transfer orbit with an Atlas Centaur and injected into final orbit with an apogee kick motor. Advanced technologies employed in the several configurations include tubes with multiple stage collectors radiating directly to space, multiple-contoured beam antennas, high voltage rollout solar cell arrays with integral power conditioning, electric propulsion for orbit raising and on-station attitude control and station-keeping, and liquid metal slip rings.

Gould, L. M.

1972-01-01

342

Integrated Airframe Technology: The Future of Advanced Composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The challenge for advanced composites in integrated airframe technology is that: airframes must provide ever increasing performance at an affordable cost; reduce costs as compared to current airframe technology; and integration of design and manufacturing. The trend in technology is that a gap exists between the potential of advanced composites and our ability to effectively utilize them (cost/weight).

Taggart, David F.

1996-01-01

343

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics Human Robot Interaction Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Robotics ­ Human Robot Interaction #12;Institute for Software Technology Motivation lik t h b t th t· we like to have robots

344

NMFS Advanced Sampling Technology Working Group Terms of Reference  

E-print Network

NMFS Advanced Sampling Technology Working Group Terms of Reference Revised: July 2004 Agency Needs the Advanced Sampling Technology Working Group (ASTWG), the NMFS Science Board recognizes the need to the development, evaluation, and implementation of promising innovations in sampling technology. By establishing

345

Recent Advances in Java Technology Theory, Application, Implementation  

E-print Network

Recent Advances in Java Technology Theory, Application, Implementation James F. Power John T. Waldron (Eds.) Computer Science Press Trinity College Dublin #12;Recent Advances in Java Technology quickly established itself as a backbone technology in many areas of computer science and information sys

Power, James

346

Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART): An alternative manned spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Although the current U.S. Space Transportation System (STS) has proven successful in many applications, the truth remains that the space shuttle is not as reliable or economical as was once hoped. In fact, the Augustine Commission on the future of the U.S. Space Program has recommended that the space shuttle only be used on missions directly requiring human capabilities on-orbit and that the shuttle program should eventually be phased out. This poses a great dilemma since the shuttle provides the only current or planned U.S. means for human access to space at the same time that NASA is building toward a permanent manned presence. As a possible solution to this dilemma, it is proposed that the U.S. begin development of an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS). This spacecraft would not only provide follow-on capability for maintaining human space flight, but would also provide redundancy and enhanced capability in the near future. Design requirements for the AMS studied include: (1) capability of launching on one of the current or planned U.S. expendable launch vehicles (baseline McDonnell Douglas Delta II model 7920 expendable booster); (2) application to a wide variety of missions including autonomous operations, space station support, and access to orbits and inclinations beyond those of the space shuttle; (3) low enough costing to fly regularly in augmentation of space shuttle capabilities; (4) production surge capabilities to replace the shuttle if events require it; (5) intact abort capability in all flight regimes since the planned launch vehicles are not man-rated; (6) technology cut-off date of 1990; and (7) initial operational capability in 1995. In addition, the design of the AMS would take advantage of scientific advances made in the 20 years since the space shuttle was first conceived. These advances are in such technologies as composite materials, propulsion systems, avionics, and hypersonics.

Lewerenz, T.; Kosha, M.; Magazu, H.

1991-01-01

347

Potential Technological Advances and their Impact on Anticipated Water Requirements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report evaluates potential technological advances and their effect on water supply and demand in the future. These advances are considered in terms of possibilities, rather than as predictions of events most likely to happen. It presents a directory o...

1971-01-01

348

The Complete Picture: "Standards for Technological Literacy" and "Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an overview of the "Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology" (STL) and "Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy: Student Assessment, Professional Development, and Program Standards" (AETL). Shows how the documents work together to advance the technological literacy of technology educators and K-12…

Technology Teacher, 2003

2003-01-01

349

CCSDS - Advancing Spaceflight Technology for International Collaboration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) has been developing data and communications standards since 1982, with the objective of providing interoperability for enabling international collaboration for spaceflight missions. As data and communications technology has advanced, CCSDS has progressed to capitalize on existing products when available and suitable for spaceflight, and to develop innovative new approaches when available products fail. The current scope of the CCSDS architecture spans the end-to-end data architecture of a spaceflight mission, with ongoing efforts to develop and standardize cutting-edge technology. This manuscript describes the overall architecture, the position of CCSDS in the standards and international mission community, and some CCSDS processes. It then highlights in detail several of the most interesting and critical technical areas in work right now, and how they support collaborative missions. Special topics include: Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN), Asynchronous Message Service (AMS), Multispectral/Hyperspectral Data Compression (MHDC), Coding and Synchronization, Onboard Wireless, Spacecraft Monitor and Control, Navigation, Security, and Time Synchronization/Correlation. Broad international participation in development of CCSDS standards is encouraged.

Kearney, Mike; Kiely, Aaron; Yeh, Penshu; Gerner, Jean-Luc; Calzolari, Gian-Paolo; Gifford, Kevin; Merri, Mario; Weiss, Howard

2010-01-01

350

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Turbine Technologies Application Project (ATTAP) is in the fifth year of a multiyear development program to bring the automotive gas turbine engine to a state at which industry can make commercialization decisions. Activities during the past year included reference powertrain design updates, test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Engine design and development included mechanical design, combustion system development, alternate aerodynamic flow testing, and controls development. Design activities included development of the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier rotor, and the ceramic power turbine rotor. Material characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of five candidate high temperature ceramic materials. Ceramic component process development and fabrication, with the objective of approaching automotive volumes and costs, continued for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine scroll, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Engine and rig fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology. Total test time in 1992 amounted to 599 hours, of which 147 hours were engine testing and 452 were hot rig testing.

1993-01-01

351

Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While a number of web-based initiatives in the sciences were quick to put their proverbial flag in the sand of the Internet, the humanities took a bit longer in adopting these new technologies. One of the leaders in this field has been the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities at the University of Virginia. Established in 1992, the Institute has created a number of research projects over its history, and many of these fine projects are available here for the consideration of the web-browsing public. Visitors will find interactive projects on the lives of the saints, Leonardo da VinciâÂÂs treatise on painting, and a history of the circus in America. As one might suspect, all of this fine work has also resulted in a number of publications that deal with the process and challenges that are involved in creating such collaborative online projects. Visitors can also browse some of these valuable musings in their publications area.

352

Advanced multiple scattering algorithms for electron transport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new multiple scattering or Condensed History algorithms are developed to enhance the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport problems. These algorithms overcome the computational burdens of single collision models by ``condensing'' multiple collisions into large steps. Thus, these methods describe the cumulative effect of many electron interactions that occur in a given step. Although current Condensed History schemes are

Danny Ray Tolar Jr.

1999-01-01

353

Advanced propulsion systems for large subsonic transports  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will examine the parameters that influence the design of new engines for large transport aircraft. The search for the lowest installed specific fuel consumption has produced a variety of proposals under the label of Ultra High Bypass engines. A number of these designs are examined and the factors controlling their installed performance are reviewed. Weight and cost effects

N. J. Peacock; J. H. R. Sadler

1989-01-01

354

Technology Advancement of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The critical high contrast imaging technology for the Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) mission concept is the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC). EPIC would be capable of imaging jovian planets, dust/debris disks, and potentially super-Earths and contribute to answering how bright the debris disks are for candidate stars. The contrast requirement for EPIC is 10(exp 9) contrast at 125 milli-arseconds inner working angle. To advance the VNC technology NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin, previously developed a vacuum VNC testbed, and achieved narrowband and broadband suppression of the core of the Airy disk. Recently our group was awarded a NASA Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions to achieve two milestones: (i) 10(exp 8) contrast in narrowband light, and, (ii) 10(ecp 9) contrast in broader band light; one milestone per year, and both at 2 Lambda/D inner working angle. These will be achieved with our 2nd generation testbed known as the visible nulling testbed (VNT). It contains a MEMS based hex-packed segmented deformable mirror known as the multiple mirror array (MMA) and coherent fiber bundle, i.e. a spatial filter array (SFA). The MMA is in one interferometric arm and works to set the wavefront differences between the arms to zero. Each of the MMA segments is optically mapped to a single mode fiber of the SFA, and the SFA passively cleans the sub-aperture wavefront error leaving only piston, tip and tilt error to be controlled. The piston degree of freedom on each segment is used to correct the wavefront errors, while the tip/tilt is used to simultaneously correct the amplitude errors. Thus the VNT controls both amplitude and wavefront errors with a single MMA in closed-loop in a vacuum tank at approx.20 Hz. Herein we will discuss our ongoing progress with the VNT.

Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Thompson, Patrick; Bolcar, Matt; Madison, Timothy; Woodruff, Robert; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve

2010-01-01

355

Science drivers and requirements for an Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Implications for technology  

E-print Network

Science drivers and requirements for an Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST, MS SD70 SOMTC, Huntsville, AL USA 35812-0262 ABSTRACT The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space

Sirianni, Marco

356

Results of advanced batter technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-01-01

357

Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies [Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-09-01

358

ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper presents information on two pilot-field applications of advanced oxidation technologies for contaminated groundwater with organics. he two UV/oxidation technologies were developed by Ultrox International of Santa Ana, California and Peroxidation Systems, Inc. of Tucson...

359

ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper presents information on two pilot-field appliations of advanced oxidation technologies for contaminated groundwater with organis. The two UV/oxidation technologies were developed by Ultrox International of Santa Ana, California and Peroxidatrion Systems, Inc. of Tucso...

360

75 FR 52472 - Spectrum Requirements for Advanced Medical Technologies  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Spectrum Requirements for Advanced Medical Technologies, Amendment of Parts 2 and 95 of the...devices using wireless telecommunication technologies. Thus, building upon the legacy Medical...antennas, cable television equipment, GPS equipment, pagers, cellular...

2010-08-26

361

Applications of advanced upper surface blowing propulsive-lift technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The success of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft led to studies of this technology for a business jet and a Short-Haul Transport. The studies showed that the Short-Haul Transport could operate from a 762.0-m runway with 95 passengers at low noise levels. Design range was 500 n. mi. but with maximum fuel load the runway length is only increased to 883.9 m while the range is increased to more than 1000 n. mi. Two business jet designs were studied; one design was based on a 457.2-m field length and the other was designed for a 760.0-m field length. The business jet designed for a 457.2-m field length can also be loaded to maximum fuel capacity. In this case the range increases from 500 n. mi. to 1400 n. mi. while the runway length increases from 457.2 m to 632.5 m. The business jet studies showed that the application of advanced propulsive-lift technology to this class aircraft can result in payload-range-speed performance comparable to current aircraft with about one-half the runway length requirement.

Cochrane, J. A.; Riddle, D. W.; Youth, S.

1982-01-01

362

New navigation technology to advance utilization of passenger cars  

SciTech Connect

In a system of ''man-car-road environment'', the automotive traffic needs to recover the functional balance of these three elements in order to advance its utilization. In a broad sense, the navigation technology is a future, key technology for that interest, relieving the driver load and assisting him to easily move to the destination. Particularly, the inertial navigation technology has high possibilities as technology capable of advancing the future automotive utilization.

Tagami, K.; Takahashi, F.; Takahashi, T.

1983-11-01

363

Analytical and simulator study of advanced transport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytic methodology, based on the optimal-control pilot model, was demonstrated for assessing longitidunal-axis handling qualities of transport aircraft in final approach. Calibration of the methodology is largely in terms of closed-loop performance requirements, rather than specific vehicle response characteristics, and is based on a combination of published criteria, pilot preferences, physical limitations, and engineering judgment. Six longitudinal-axis approach configurations were studied covering a range of handling qualities problems, including the presence of flexible aircraft modes. The analytical procedure was used to obtain predictions of Cooper-Harper ratings, a solar quadratic performance index, and rms excursions of important system variables.

Levison, W. H.; Rickard, W. W.

1982-01-01

364

Sensitive oil industry: users of advanced technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The oil industry exemplifies mankind's search for resource sin a harsh environment here on the earth. Traditionally, the oil industry has created technological solutions to increasingly difficult exploration, drilling, and production activities as the need has arisen. The depths to which a well must be drilled to produce the finite hydrocarbon resources are increasing and the surface environments during oil and gas activities is the key to success, not information that is hours old or incomplete; but 'real-time' data that responds to the variable environment downhole and allows prediction and prevention. The difference that information makes can be the difference between a successfully drilled well and a blowout that causes permanent damage to the reservoir and may reduce the value of the reserves downhole. The difference that information makes can make the difference between recovering 22 percent of the hydrocarbon reserves in a profitable field and recovering none of the reserves because of an uneconomic bottom line. Sensors of every type are essential in the new oil and gas industry and they must be rugged, accurate, affordable, and long lived. It is not just for the sophisticated majors exploring the very deep waters of the world but for the thousands of independent producers who provide a lion's share of the oil and gas produced in the US domestic market. The Department of Energy has been instrumental in keeping reserves from being lost by funding advancements in sensor technology. Due to sponsorship by the Federal Government, the combined efforts of researchers in the National Laboratories, academic institutions, and industry research centers are producing increasingly accurate tools capable of functioning in extreme conditions with economics acceptable to the accountants of the industry. Three examples of such senors developed with Federal funding are given.

Lindsey, Rhonda P.; Barnes, James L.

1999-01-01

365

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced Turbine Technology Application Project (ATTAP) activities during the past year were highlighted by test-bed engine design and development activities; ceramic component design; materials and component characterization; ceramic component process development and fabrication; component rig testing; and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Although substantial technical challenges remain, all areas exhibited progress. Test-bed engine design and development activity included engine mechanical design, power turbine flow-path design and mechanical layout, and engine system integration aimed at upgrading the AGT-5 from a 1038 C metal engine to a durable 1371 C structural ceramic component test-bed engine. ATTAP-defined ceramic and associated ceramic/metal component design activities include: the ceramic combustor body, the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier turbine rotor, the ceramic/metal power turbine static structure, and the ceramic power turbine rotors. The materials and component characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of several candidate ceramic materials and components being developed for use in the ATTAP. Ceramic component process development and fabrication activities are being conducted for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine vanes, gasifier turbine scroll, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Component rig testing activities include the development of the necessary test procedures and conduction of rig testing of the ceramic components and assemblies. Four-hundred hours of hot gasifier rig test time were accumulated with turbine inlet temperatures exceeding 1204 C at 100 percent design gasifier speed. A total of 348.6 test hours were achieved on a single ceramic rotor without failure and a second ceramic rotor was retired in engine-ready condition at 364.9 test hours. Test-bed engine fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology that will permit the achievement of program performance and durability goals. The designated durability engine accumulated 359.3 hour of test time, 226.9 of which were on the General Motors gas turbine durability schedule.

1990-01-01

366

Research on Intelligent Transportation System Technologies and Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

ITS (intelligent transportation system) has been developed since the beginning of 1970s, which makes human, vehicles, roads united and harmonic and establishes a wider range, fully efficient, real-time and accurate information manage system. In the paper, intelligent transportation technologies such as wireless communications, computational technologies, and Sensing technologies have been proposed. Intelligent transportation applications are also introduced. This is a

Luo Qi

2008-01-01

367

Advanced data services over optical transport networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Work on optical network control plane protocols has enabled faster and more efficient provisioning and management of carrier core optical networks, thereby reducing operational costs and capital expenditure. Many potential data applications for such capabilities, however, require Ethernet as the physical interface into the network, rather than SONET/SDH or OTN (Optical Transport Network) interfaces. Support of such services over an optical network becomes a multi-layer networking problem, wherein the client layer is packet based (e.g., Ethernet) and the server layer is optical (SONET/SDH or OTN). This paper discusses the enhancements that have been created in SONET/SDH and OTN networks (e.g., GFP, VCAT, LCAS) for the efficient transport of Ethernet and other data networking protocols, and the related extensions to control plane protocols that are necessary to allow for the support of multi-layer networking. Different control-plane models are being pursued in standards bodies such as ITU-T and IETF, and prototyping is being carried out and tested in the OIF. These various approaches are discussed in detail here, with focus placed on the prototyping work that has been done in the OIF, especially for the OIF 2005 Interoperability Demonstration.

Ong, Lyndon; Razdan, Rajender; Wang, Yalin

2005-11-01

368

How technology advances influence business research and marketing strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology has a profound impact on business research, and especially on marketing, because (1) technology changes the way marketing managers do their job, (2) these changes lead to major changes in the topics that are important to study, and (3) technology provides new ways of doing research. The most important result of technological advance is the increasing impact of information

Roland T. Rust; Francine Espinoza

2006-01-01

369

Two on Advances in Educational Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Advances in technology can help children play and compose music. The first site describes a project of the Centre for Research in IT in Education, which draws from the field of cognitive development, learning styles theory and educational best practice to develop DrumSteps. This tool, available for downloading, enables children to create, manipulate, edit and save original pieces of percussion music. A user-tracking feature allows the teacher or researcher to follow along with student files click-by-click, giving valuable insights into the students' thinking. The Centre is also examining pedagogical issues surrounding a parallel project, which is described on the second site. Toy Symphony is a project of the MIT Media Lab and Media Lab Europe and offers software, which enables children to compose-by-drawing. The bulk of the project, however, develops specially designed Music Toys, which enable children to engage in sophisticated listening, performing and composing activities normally accessible only after years of study. Videos of the workshops, as well as live concerts in which children play alongside some of the world's most accomplished musicians, are also available to download. [VF

370

Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

1998-11-01

371

Advanced technologies for encryption of satellite links  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of encryption on satellite links is discussed. Advanced technology exists to provide transmission security for large earth station with data rates up to 50 megabits per second. One of the major concerns in the use of encryption equipment with very small aperture terminals (VSAT) is the key management issue and the related operational costs. The low cost requirement and the lack of physical protection of remote VSATs place severe constraints on the design of encryption equipment. Encryption may be accomplished by embedding a tamper proof encryption module into the baseband unit of each VSAT. VSAT networks are usually star networks where there is a single large earth station that serves as a hub and all satellite communications takes place between each VSAT and the hub earth station. The hub earth station has the secret master key of each VSAT. These master keys are used to downline load encrypted session keys to each VSAT. A more secure alternative is to use public key techniques where each embedded VSAT encryption module internally generates its own secret and public numbers. The secret number never leaves the module while the public number is sent to the hub at the time of initialization of the encryption module into the VSAT. Physical access control to encryption modules of VSAT systems can be implemented using passwords, smart cards or biometrics.

McMahan, Sherry S.

372

Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V  

SciTech Connect

Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

2004-04-29

373

Recent advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code  

SciTech Connect

We review recent physics and computational science advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We describe recent efforts to enable a nuclear resonance fluorescence capability in the Mercury photon transport. We also describe recent work to implement a probability of extinction capability into Mercury. We review the results of current parallel scaling and threading efforts that enable the code to run on millions of MPI processes. (authors)

Brantley, P. S.; Dawson, S. A.; McKinley, M. S.; O'Brien, M. J.; Stevens, D. E.; Beck, B. R.; Jurgenson, E. D.; Ebbers, C. A.; Hall, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

2013-07-01

374

VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology  

E-print Network

VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology 1 2009 Annual Report Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology U.S. Department of Commerce March 3, 2010 #12;VISITING COMMITTEE

375

Why Does Technology Advance in Cycles?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-run technological progress is cyclical because drastic innovations that introduce new technological opportunity are only profitable at times when repeated incremental innovation has nearly exhausted existing technological opportunity and driven entrepreneurial profit and income growth towards zero. The article presents a ’technological opportunity model’ where endogenous drastic and incremental innovations interact with exogenous discoveries in an idealized metric technology space.

Ola Olsson

2001-01-01

376

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics in AI  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Advanced Topics in AI - Multi-Agent Cooperation -Multi Agent Cooperation Alexander Felfernig and Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology Inffeldgasse 16b/2 A 8010 GrazA-8010 Graz Austria Alexander Felferning & Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Topics of AI ­ Multi

377

Advanced Technological Education Program: 1995 Awards and Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program promotes exemplary improvement in advanced technological education at the national and regional level through support of curriculum development and program improvement at the undergraduate and secondary school levels, especially for technicians being educated for the high performance workplace of…

National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

378

Application of Advanced Technology to Undergraduate Medical Education. Memorandum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advanced technology will have a great effect on medical education because it can speed up medical education and boost the quality of instruction without straining the capacity of medical schools to expand or driving costs to unreasonable levels. Six examples of an application of advanced technology to medical education are described in this…

Farquhar, J. A.; And Others

379

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics  

E-print Network

Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics Organization Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Robotics - Organization #12;Institute/Grasping 11. 01.6. Human Robot Interaction/Dialog 12 08 6 A li ti12. 08.6. Applications 13. 15

380

Sec. Chu Announces the First Auto Loans for Advanced Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced $8 billion in conditional loan commitments for the development of innovative, advanced vehicle technologies that will create thousands of green jobs while helping reduce the nation’s dangerous dependence on foreign oil. The first three auto loans for advanced technologies were awarded to Ford Motor Company, Nissan Motors and Tesla Motors.

Secretary Chu

2009-07-16

381

Sec. Chu Announces the First Auto Loans for Advanced Technologies  

ScienceCinema

Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced $8 billion in conditional loan commitments for the development of innovative, advanced vehicle technologies that will create thousands of green jobs while helping reduce the nation?s dangerous dependence on foreign oil. The first three auto loans for advanced technologies were awarded to Ford Motor Company, Nissan Motors and Tesla Motors.

Secretary Chu

2010-09-01

382

Advanced technology's impact on compressor design and development - A perspective  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A historical perspective of the impact of advanced technologies on compression system design and development for aircraft gas turbine applications is presented. A bright view of the future is projected in which further advancements in compression system technologies will be made. These advancements will have a significant impact on the ability to meet the ever-more-demanding requirements being imposed on the propulsion system for advanced aircraft. Examples are presented of advanced compression system concepts now being studied. The status and potential impact of transitioning from an empirically derived design system to a computationally oriented system are highlighted. A current NASA Lewis Research Center program to enhance this transitioning is described.

Ball, Calvin L.

1989-01-01

383

Advanced technologies impact on compressor design and development: A perspective  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A historical perspective of the impact of advanced technologies on compression system design and development for aircraft gas turbine applications is presented. A bright view of the future is projected in which further advancements in compression system technologies will be made. These advancements will have a significant impact on the ability to meet the ever-more-demanding requirements being imposed on the propulsion system for advanced aircraft. Examples are presented of advanced compression system concepts now being studied. The status and potential impact of transitioning from an empirically derived design system to a computationally oriented system are highlighted. A current NASA Lewis Research Center program to enhance this transitioning is described.

Ball, Calvin L.

1989-01-01

384

Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 2: Structural design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structural design for a half-scale fan vehicle, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec (1,650 ft/sec). This mechanical design report describes the fan rotor design and the design of various structures of the vehicle; eg, stators, casings, splitters, seals, adapters, etc.

Schoener, J. L.; Black, G. R.; Roth, R. H.

1976-01-01

385

Technological Support for Logistics Transportation Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The modern world is changing introducing robots, remotely controlled vehicles and other crewless means of transportation to reduce people's mistakes, as the main cause of incidents and crashes during traffic. New technologies are supporting operators and drivers, and according to some studies they can even replace them. Such programs as: AHS, UAH, IVBSS or MTVR are under development to improve traffic flow and its safety, to reduce traffic hazards and crashes. It is necessary to analyze such concepts and implement them boldly, including Polish logistics' companies, new programs, highways' system etc., as they will be applied in the future, so it is necessary to prepare logistics infrastructure ahead of time in order to capitalize on these improvements. The problem is quite urgent as transportation in the country must not be outdated to meet clients' expectations and to keep pace with competing foreign companies.

Bujak, Andrzej; ?liwa, Zdzis?aw; G?bczy?ska, Alicja

386

Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Study (ATSS) task area 1 study effort is to examine manned launch vehicle booster concepts and two-way cargo transfer and return vehicle concepts to determine which of the many proposed concepts best meets NASA's needs for two-way transportation to low earth orbit. The study identified specific configurations of the normally unmanned, expendable launch

James B. Duffy

1993-01-01

387

Introduction to special section: Coastal Advances in Shelf Transport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Coastal Ocean Advances in Shelf Transport (COAST) program conducted an interdisciplinary study of coastal upwelling off central Oregon during summer 2001. Two intensive field efforts during May–June and August 2001 were coordinated with ocean circulation, ecosystem, and atmospheric modeling of the region. A primary goal was to contrast the coastal ocean response to wind forcing in a region of

J. A. Barth; P. A. Wheeler

2005-01-01

388

Neutral particle transport based on the advanced method of characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a complete understanding of the behavior of a nuclear reactor, a detailed description of its neutron population is required. The general integro-differential form of the Boltzmann transport equation, written in terms of neutron density in seven-dimensional phasespace, describes a balance between various nuclear processes affecting the neutron population. During the last decade, the development of advanced reactor designs required,

Todd Allan Postma

1999-01-01

389

Construction of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 4m Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world's leading ground-based resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun's output. The project has entered its construction phase. Major subsystems have been contracted. As its highest priority science driver ATST shall provide high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the dynamic solar magnetic fields throughout the solar atmosphere, including the corona at infrared wavelengths. With its 4m aperture, ATST will resolve features at 0.?03 at visible wavelengths and obtain 0.?1 resolution at the magnetically highly sensitive near infrared wavelengths. A high order adaptive optics system delivers a corrected beam to the initial set of state-of-the-art, facility class instrumentation located in the Coudé laboratory facility. The initial set of first generation instruments consists of five facility class instruments, including imagers and spectro-polarimeters. The high polarimetric sensitivity and accuracy required for measurements of the illusive solar magnetic fields place strong constraints on the polarization analysis and calibration. Development and construction of a four-meter solar telescope presents many technical challenges, including thermal control of the enclosure, telescope structure and optics and wavefront control. A brief overview of the science goals and observational requirements of the ATST will be given, followed by a summary of the design status of the telescope and its instrumentation, including design status of major subsystems, such as the telescope mount assembly, enclosure, mirror assemblies, and wavefront correction

Rimmele, T. R.; Keil, S.; McMullin, J.; Knölker, M.; Kuhn, J. R.; Goode, P. R.; Rosner, R.; Casini, R.; Lin, H.; Tritschler, A.; Wöger, F.; ATST Team

2012-12-01

390

Plan for advanced microelectronics processing technology application  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of the tasks described in the research agreement was to identify resources primarily, but not exclusively, within New York State that are available for the development of a Center for Advanced Microelectronics Processing (CAMP). Identification of those resources would enable Brookhaven National Laboratory to prepare a program plan for the CAMP. In order to achieve the stated goal, the principal investigators undertook to meet the key personnel in relevant NYS industrial and academic organizations to discuss the potential for economic development that could accompany such a Center and to gauge the extent of participation that could be expected from each interested party. Integrated of these discussions was to be achieved through a workshop convened in the summer of 1990. The culmination of this workshop was to be a report (the final report) outlining a plan for implementing a Center in the state. As events unfolded, it became possible to identify the elements of a major center for x-ray lithography on Lone Island at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The principal investigators were than advised to substitute a working document based upon that concept in place of a report based upon the more general CAMP workshop originally envisioned. Following that suggestion from the New York State Science and Technology Foundation, the principals established a working group consisting of representatives of the Grumman Corporation, Columbia University, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Regular meetings and additional communications between these collaborators have produced a preproposal that constitutes the main body of the final report required by the contract. Other components of this final report include the interim report and a brief description of the activities which followed the establishment of the X-ray Lithography Center working group.

Goland, A.N.

1990-10-01

391

Advanced component technologies for energy-efficient turbofan engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper reviews NASA's Energy Efficient Engine Project which was initiated to provide the advanced technology base for a new generation of fuel-conservative engines for introduction into airline service by the late 1980s. Efforts in this project are directed at advancing engine component and systems technologies to a point of demonstrating technology-readiness by 1984. Early results indicate high promise in achieving most of the goals established in the project.

Saunders, N. T.

1980-01-01

392

Studies on advanced overseas energy technologies, volume 1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A final evaluation is presented covering investigations over the past 5 years to perceive energy conversion technology and covering over 100 advanced energy technologies which saw many new developments in energy conversion in the countries studied. Specifically, the state-of-the-art for specified technologies and the development of energy technologies overseas are discussed. The development of combustion technology in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Japan, Norway, and the Federal Republic of Germany is summarized.

Straus, R. W.; Carsey, J. N.

1981-03-01

393

Advanced copper interconnections for silicon CMOS technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interconnects for advanced semiconductor devices are facing increasingly difficult challenges. Several material alternatives are being investigated in order to meet very strict requirements. Currently, copper is the most widely accepted material for advanced metallization. This article gives a general overview of the world-wide R&D effort underway to develop both manufacturable processes and their integration at each level of the interconnect

J. Torres

1995-01-01

394

Advancing Professionalism in Technology Education. 48th Yearbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This yearbook contains 14 chapters, each by different authors, collected to assist in advancing professionalism within technology education. The 14 chapters are organized in five sections. Section 1: The Need for Professionalism in Technology Education contains "The Need for Professionalism in Technology Education: Challenges for the Future"…

Gilberti, Anthony F., Ed.; Rouch, David L., Ed.

395

Advanced Technology Training Program for the Apparel Industry. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project developed rapid response, advanced technology courses that met the apparel market labor needs of the El Paso (Texas) community. Courses were designed for four options: computerized marker making and pattern grading, computerized front office systems, high technology machinery operation, and high technology machinery mechanics. The…

El Paso Community Coll., TX.

396

TACCOL: Technology Advancing a Continuous Community of Learners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The TACCOL project (Technology Advancing A Continuous Community of Learners) at Clarion University of Pennsylvania involves a collaboration between the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Education and Human Services. The purpose of TACCOL is to infuse technology into teacher preparation by integrating technology with an…

Carbone, R. Elaine

397

ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ADVANCED SILICON SOLAR CELL TECHNOLOGIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

An environmental Life Cycle Assessment has been conducted for standard and advanced produc- tion technologies for multicrystalline silicon module production and new BOS concepts. It was found that the production route based on Solsilc silicon feedstock and RGS wafer technology can yield a 50% reduction of the environmental impacts in comparison with present-day standard technology. Similar results were obtained for

E. A. Alsema; M. J. de Wild-Scholten

398

DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY OFFICE ADVANCED QUESTION ANSWERING FOR INTELLIGENCE  

E-print Network

DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY OFFICE ADVANCED QUESTION ANSWERING FOR INTELLIGENCE (AQUAINT) PROGRAM 1 Bringsjord (PI) Summary Current QA technology aims at the very early, pre-reasoning stages of IA where, the analyst's questions will require knowledge-based technology, if these questions are to be answered

399

TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

SAMS TL; MENDOZA RE

2010-08-11

400

Advanced High Pressure O2/H2 Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Activities in the development of advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen stage combustion rocket engines are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the Space Shuttle main engine. The areas of engine technology discussed include fracture and fatigue in engine components, manufacturing and producibility engineering, materials, bearing technology, structure dynamics, fluid dynamics, and instrumentation technology.

Morea, S. F. (editor); Wu, S. T. (editor)

1985-01-01

401

TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETREIVAL AND PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

SAMS TL

2010-07-07

402

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (a) Solid-solid separation (b) Solid-liquid separation (c) Chemical/Biological Extraction (d) Modeling and Control, and (e) Environmental Control. Distribution of funds is being handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. The first of these solicitations, referred to as the CAST II-Round 1 RFP, was issued on October 28, 2002. Thirty-eight proposals were received by the December 10, 2002 deadline for this RFP-eleven (11) Solid-Solid Separation, seven (7) Solid-Liquid Separation, ten (10) Chemical/Biological Extraction, six (6) Modeling & Control and four (4) Environmental Control. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. This process took some 7 months to complete but 17 projects (one joint) were in place at the constituent universities (three at Virginia Tech, two at West Virginia University, three at University of Kentucky, three at University of Utah, three at Montana Tech, three at New Mexico Tech, and one at the University of Nevada, Reno) by May 17, 2003. These projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

Hugh W. Rimmer

2003-11-15

403

New perspectives for ATMS: Advanced technologies in traffic detection  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for advanced traffic management systems (ATMS) on a local and network level to effectively utilize today`s transportation system. An automated operating system, with round the clock incident detection, would help to initiate the required action on time in case of an accident and would minimize the effect of the incident. One of the key elements of ATMS is the vehicle detection unit. The most commonly used inductive loop detectors have a relatively short life span and frequently malfunction. Any maintenance of loop detectors requires road closures. Also, safety of the crew is an issue. An overview of currently available technologies for traffic control and monitoring is presented, with special emphasis on systems that can be installed and maintained without significantly interfering with the traffic. The paper presents the available technologies, provides comparative information about them, and discusses the technical and conceptual problems typically arising during the deployment. The paper describes video detection systems that currently seem to be the most attractive alternative to the traditional intrusive methods. The new perspectives for traffic monitoring and management not available so far are drawn. The typical architecture of these systems is described, and a few popular video systems are presented in some detail. The most critical deployment issues, such as the choice of the equipment, are described, the location of the sensors is discussed, and data transmission problems are considered.

Berka, S.; Lall, B.K. [Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-01-01

404

SEC. 3012. TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION PROGRAM. (a) REPEAL OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM.--Section 28  

E-print Network

SEC. 3012. TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION PROGRAM. (a) REPEAL OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM.--Section 28 of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Act (15 U.S.C. 278n) is repealed. (b) ESTABLISHMENT OF TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION PROGRAM.-- The National Institute of Standards and Technology Act (15 U.S.C. 271 et seq

Magee, Joseph W.

405

Advanced technology for America's future in space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In response to Recommendation 8 of the Augustine Committee Report, NASA's Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) developed a proposed 'Integrated Technology Plan for the Civil Space Program' that entails substantial changes in the processes, structure and the content of NASA's space research and technology program. The Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC, a subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Committee) and several other senior, expert, informed advisory groups conducted a review of NASA's proposed Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). This review was in response to the specific request in Recommendation 8 that 'NASA utilize an expert, outside review process, managed from headquarters, to assist in the allocation of technology funds'. This document, the final report from that review, addresses: (1) summary recommendations; (2) mission needs; (3) the integrated technology plan; (4) summary reports of the technical panels; and (5) conclusions and observations.

1990-01-01

406

Advanced-technology fuel-cell program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of molten carbonate fuel cells and advanced phosphoric acid fuel cells is summarized. Increased liquid fuels and coal fuel capabilities are discussed. Various power conditioning systems are described.

Bett, J. A. S.; Bushnell, C. A.; Buswell, R. F.

1981-03-01

407

Design analysis of advanced photovoltaic technologies  

SciTech Connect

This document combines two interrelated reports that address design and optimization methodologies for advanced photovoltaic cells and devices as related to module and system application designs. Four advanced photovoltaic material cells - polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, CdS/CuInSe/sub 2/, and gallium arsenide - were evaluated for conceptual modeling and analysis in regard to residential and central station system design applications. A module optimization methodology is described along with the computer code PVMOC (Photovoltaic Module Optimization Code), to assist PV module designers using advanced PV material cells in evaluating the performance and cost of alternative designs. As advances in cell research evolve, the parameters used here are likely to change; therefore, current assumptions should be obtained before employing the design techniques provided in this document.

Lambarski, T.J.; Irby, C.A.; Collaros, G.J.; Anderson, E.R.; Sowa, P.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Resnik, W.M.

1983-08-01

408

Advanced technology thermal energy storage and heat exchange systems for solar applications: a survey of current research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey is presented of the advanced research and development projects underway in the U.S. in all of the known media and methods for storing and transferring thermal energy in solar applications. The technologies reviewed include innovative heat exchange and heat transport methods, advanced sensible heat storage in water, rocks, earth and combinations of these for both short term and

Michaels

1978-01-01

409

Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

1985-01-01

410

Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

1992-01-01

411

A review of advanced manufacturing technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Joining techniques, hot forming technology, forging technology, investment casting, small cooling hole manufacturing, combustor technology, quality assurance, and chip forming machining of gas turbine engine components are discussed. Electron and laser beam welding; laser hard facing techniques; automatic TIG and plasma welding; diffusion brazing of titanium and nickel alloys; heated die forming: blow forming; superplastic forming; fan and compressor blade forging; and wheel and disk forging from powder superalloys are described.

Broughton, T.

1981-03-01

412

Solder jet technology for advanced packaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lowering optical packaging costs requires developments in new technologies. In this paper, solder ink-jet process is presented for flip-chip component assembly on planar, 3D, flex and stacked submounts and substrates. Applications for this technology are presented and include linear array in-vivo dosimeters, integrated GaN LED displays, telecomm submounts and wearable ambient systems. An important aspect of developing this technology is

C. Gallagher; P. J. Hughes; P. Tassie; K. Rodgers; J. Barton; J. Justice; D. P. Casey

2005-01-01

413

Advanced microelectronics technologies for future small satellite systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjoint markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

Alkalai, Leon

2000-03-01

414

Advanced Microelectronics Technologies for Future Small Satellite Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjointed markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

Alkalai, Leon

1999-01-01

415

Advanced Technology Display House. Volume 2: Energy system design concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The preliminary design concept for the energy systems in the Advanced Technology Display House is analyzed. Residential energy demand, energy conservation, and energy concepts are included. Photovoltaic arrays and REDOX (reduction oxidation) sizes are discussed.

Maund, D. H.

1981-01-01

416

Advances in Joining Technology--The '60s and Beyond.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes what the author believes are the most significant advancements in welding technology that have occurred since 1960. New processes that have been introduced plus significant improvements in relatively old processes are covered. The tex...

R. M. Evans

1973-01-01

417

Portfolio evaluation of advanced coal technology : research, development, and demonstration  

E-print Network

This paper evaluates the advanced coal technology research, development and demonstration programs at the U.S. Department of Energy since the 1970s. The evaluation is conducted from a portfolio point of view and derives ...

Naga-Jones, Ayaka

2005-01-01

418

Advanced Platform Systems Technology study. Volume 3: Supporting data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The overall study effort proceeded from the identification of 106 technology topics to the selection of 5 for detail trade studies. The technical issues and options were evaluated through the trade process. Finally, individual consideration was given to costs and benefits for the technologies identified for advancement. Eight priority technology items were identified for advancement. Supporting data generated during the trade selection and trade study process were presented. Space platform requirements, trade study and cost benefits analysis, and technology advancement planning are advanced. The structured approach used took advantage of a number of forms developed to ensure that a consistent approach was employed by each of the diverse specialists that participated. These forms were an intrinsic part of the study protocol.

1983-01-01

419

Enraf Series 854 advanced technology gauge (ATG) acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the Enraf Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies that the gauge is functional.

Huber, J.H.

1996-09-11

420

Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program Implementation  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this activity was to carry out program implementation and technical projects in support of the ARRA-funded Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program of the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) (formerly the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)). The work was organized into eight projects in four materials areas: strategic materials, structural materials, energy storage and production materials, and advanced/field/transient processing. Strategic materials included work on titanium, magnesium and carbon fiber. Structural materials included work on alumina forming austentic (AFA) and CF8C-Plus steels. The advanced batteries and production materials projects included work on advanced batteries and photovoltaic devices. Advanced/field/transient processing included work on magnetic field processing. Details of the work in the eight projects are available in the project final reports which have been previously submitted.

Liby, Alan L [ORNL] [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-10-01

421

Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on

S. J. Marsik; S. F. Morea

1985-01-01

422

77 FR 38859 - Governors' Designees Receiving Advance Notification of Transportation of Certain Shipments of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Transportation of Certain Shipments of Nuclear Waste and Spent Fuel On January 6...transportation of certain shipments of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The advance notification...Receive Advance Notification of Nuclear Waste...

2012-06-29

423

76 FR 67229 - Governors' Designees Receiving Advance Notification of Transportation of Certain Shipments of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Transportation of Certain Shipments of Nuclear Waste and Spent Fuel On January 6...transportation of certain shipments of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The advance notification...Receive Advance Notification of Nuclear Waste...

2011-10-31

424

Advanced composite airframe program: Today's technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Composite Airframe Program (ACAP) was undertaken to demonstrate the advantages of the application of advanced composite materials and structural design concepts to the airframe structure on helicopters designed to stringent military requirements. The primary goals of the program were the reduction of airframe production costs and airframe weight by 17 and 22 percent respectively. The ACAP effort consisted of a preliminary design phase, detail design, and design support testing, full-scale fabrication, laboratory testing, and a ground/flight test demonstration. Since the completion of the flight test demonstration programs follow-on efforts were initiated to more fully evaluate a variety of military characteristics of the composite airframe structures developed under the original ACAP advanced development contracts. An overview of the ACAP program is provided and some of the design features, design support testing, manufacturing approaches, and the results of the flight test evaluation, as well as, an overview of Militarization Test and Evaluation efforts are described.

Good, Danny E.; Mazza, L. Thomas

1988-01-01

425

Organizational Considerations for Advanced Manufacturing Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the last several decades, the United States has experienced a decline in productivity, while the world has seen a maturation of the global marketplace. Nations have moved manufacturing strategy and process technology issues to the top of management priority lists. The issues surrounding manufacturing technologies and their implementations have…

DeRuntz, Bruce D.; Turner, Roger M.

2003-01-01

426

Future technology for advanced MOS devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes some of the future technologies for next generation metal–oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices, focusing on development of new materials. After a brief presentation of the future evolution of lithography tools, results on the development of high ? thin films, metal gates for the gate stack, low ? materials for Cu interconnects and on the new technologies currently investigated to

C. Wyon

2002-01-01

427

Evolution Of DVD By Advanced Semiconductor Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

semiconductor technology. LSI technology to realize signal processing and decoding\\/encoding as well as the laser diode requirement are described. The next generation DVD with the capacity of 15Gbytes per one side of the disc is discussed The impact of DVD to the world of multimedia is also discussed focusing on the home applications such as information home server. The specification

Haruo Nakatsuka; Komukai Toshiba-chou

1997-01-01

428

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

Nigle N. Clark

2006-12-31

429

Advanced technology nodes, a foundry perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Leading edge foundries need to fulfill a wide range of customer needs and have to deliver state-of-the-art performance processes. Therefore, an innovative but flexible modular technology set up is essential. This paper will show after a brief introduction of foundry challenges in general Global Foundries path towards the 28nm technology. Here, two key elements like high k metal gate process and embedded stressors are discussed. The article is concluded with an outlook on future device scaling from a leading edge foundry's perspective. This look ahead includes recent transistor architecture and process technology trends. More specifically, some challenges of the 20nm technology are discussed. This node will push planar transistor technology to its physical limits. Due to this, subsequent nodes will require substantial innovations in process architecture and device concepts. Two potential device paths are foreseen and compared, i.e. FinFet and ET-SOI-UTBB devices.

Faul, Jürgen; Hoentschel, Jan; Wiatr, Maciej; Horstmann, Manfred

2012-11-01

430

Cultural Hitchhiking on the Wave of Advance of Beneficial Technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wave-of-advance model was introduced to describe the spread of advantageous genes in a population. It can be adapted to model the uptake of any advantageous technology through a population, such as the arrival of neolithic farmers in Europe, the domestication of the horse, and the development of the wheel, iron tools, political organization, or advanced weaponry. Any trait that

Graeme J. Ackland; Markus Signitzer; Kevin Stratford; Morrel H. Cohen

2007-01-01

431

The ECLSS Advanced Automation Project Evolution and Technology Assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) advanced automation project evolution and technology assessment are presented. Topics covered include: the ECLSS advanced automation project; automatic fault diagnosis of ECLSS subsystems descriptions; in-line, real-time chemical and microbial fluid analysis; and object-oriented, distributed chemical and microbial modeling of regenerative environmental control systems description.

Dewberry, Brandon S.; Carnes, James R.; Lukefahr, Brenda D.; Rogers, John S.; Rochowiak, Daniel M.; Mckee, James W.; Benson, Brian L.

1990-01-01

432

Membrane technology for advanced wastewater reclamation for sustainable agriculture production  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treated domestic secondary effluent is a valuable water source that can be reused for diverse purposes. However, in order to minimize health and environmental risks and to maintain adequate levels of sustainable agriculture production on a long range time scale, advanced treatment is required. Advanced effluent quality maintaining minimal risks can be primarily attained by implementing the membrane technology. Field

Gideon Oron; Leonid Gillerman; Nissan Buriakovsky; Amos Bick; Moti Gargir; Yonthan Dolan; Yossi Manor; Ludmilla Katz; Josef Hagin

2008-01-01

433

Advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Continuing research has resulted in significant advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology which extend and enhance its potential for broad range of uses in chemical processing, materials development and testing, and development of large illumination sources. Summaries of these advances are briefly described.

Poole, J. W.; Vogel, C. E.

1972-01-01

434

The Fox Project: Advanced Language Technology for Extensible Systems  

E-print Network

The Fox Project: Advanced Language Technology for Extensible Systems Robert Harper, Peter Lee of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Also published as Fox Memorandum CMU-CS-FOX Fox Project: Advanced Languages for Systems Software", ARPA Order No. C533, issued by ESC/ENS under

Goldstein, Seth Copen

435

The Fox Project: Advanced Language Technology for Extensible Systems  

E-print Network

The Fox Project: Advanced Language Technology for Extensible Systems Robert Harper, Peter Lee of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Also published as Fox Memorandum CMU­CS­FOX Fox Project: Advanced Languages for Systems Software'', ARPA Order No. C533, issued by ESC/ENS under

436

Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) utility library software description  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The individual software processes used in the flight computers on-board the Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) aircraft have many common functional elements. A library of commonly used software modules was created for general uses among the processes. The library includes modules for mathematical computations, data formatting, system database interfacing, and condition handling. The modules available in the library and their associated calling requirements are described.

Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Dickson, Richard W.; Wolverton, David A.

1993-01-01

437

Recent Advances in Solar Cell Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advances in solar cell efficiency, radiation tolerance, and cost over the last decade are reviewed. Potential performance of thin-film solar cells in space are discussed, and the cost and the historical trends in production capability of the photovoltaics industry are considered with respect to the requirements of space power systems. Concentrator cells with conversion efficiency over 30%, and nonconcentrating solar cells with efficiency over 25% are now available, and advanced radiation-tolerant cells and lightweight, thin-film arrays are both being developed. Nonsolar applications of solar cells, including thermophotovoltaics, alpha- and betavoltaics, and laser power receivers, are also discussed.

Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

1996-01-01

438

Advance Standing Reference Guide AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY VELLORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (VIT)  

E-print Network

Advance Standing Reference Guide AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY ­ VELLORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY;Advance Standing Reference Guide AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY ­ VELLORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (VIT Reference Guide AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY ­ VELLORE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (VIT) Advance Standing

Zhou, Xiangyun "Sean"

439

The Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model  

E-print Network

The Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model Research Brief Oak Ridge: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive T simulates market demand for advanced vehicle technologies by representing relevant attributes

440

47 CFR 51.230 - Presumption of acceptability for deployment of an advanced services loop technology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...deployment of an advanced services loop technology. 51.230 Section 51.230 Telecommunication...deployment of an advanced services loop technology. (a) An advanced services loop technology is presumed acceptable for...

2011-10-01

441

10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...Funding Awards § 611.202 Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

2011-01-01

442

47 CFR 51.230 - Presumption of acceptability for deployment of an advanced services loop technology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...deployment of an advanced services loop technology. 51.230 Section 51.230 Telecommunication...deployment of an advanced services loop technology. (a) An advanced services loop technology is presumed acceptable for...

2013-10-01

443

47 CFR 51.230 - Presumption of acceptability for deployment of an advanced services loop technology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...deployment of an advanced services loop technology. 51.230 Section 51.230 Telecommunication...deployment of an advanced services loop technology. (a) An advanced services loop technology is presumed acceptable for...

2012-10-01

444

10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.  

... 2014-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...Funding Awards § 611.202 Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

2014-01-01

445

10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...Funding Awards § 611.202 Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

2013-01-01

446

10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...Funding Awards § 611.202 Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

2012-01-01

447

Redesigning Engineering Technology Education. The New Jersey Center for Advanced Technological Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The holistic approach to restructuring engineering technology education at the New Jersey Center for Advanced Technological Education includes partnerships for articulated programs, recruitment and retention of underrepresented groups, involvement of industrial personal, and faculty development in innovative instructional methods. (SK)

Waintraub, Jack L.

1997-01-01

448

CDMA Technology for Intelligent Transportation Systems  

E-print Network

Scientists and Technologists involved in the development of radar and remote sensing systems all over the world are now trying to involve themselves in saving of manpower in the form of developing a new application of their ideas in Intelligent Transport system(ITS). The world statistics shows that by incorporating such wireless radar system in the car would decrease the world road accident by 8-10% yearly. The wireless technology has to be chosen properly which is capable of tackling the severe interferences present in the open road. A combined digital technology like Spread spectrum along with diversity reception will help a lot in this regard. Accordingly, the choice is for FHSS based space diversity system which will utilize carrier frequency around 5.8 GHz ISM band with available bandwidth of 80 MHz and no license. For efficient design, the radio channel is characterized on which the design is based. Out of two available modes e.g. Communication and Radar modes, the radar mode is providing the conditiona...

Bera, Rabindranath; Sil, Sanjib; Mondal, Dipak; Dhar, Sourav; Kandar, Debdatta

2007-01-01

449

Data Privacy, Emergency Response, Weather Prediction to Benefit from Information Technology Advances  

NSF Publications Database

... Benefit from Information Technology Advances NSF Information Technology Research program announces ... s information technology knowledge base and strengthening the information technology workforce, the ...

450

ERDA/NASA advanced thermionic technology program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research progress is outlined in the areas of surface studies (basic experiments and direct beam chamber), plasma studies (converter theory and advanced mode conversion experiments), component development (low-temperature and high-temperature converter experiments), and component hardware (hot shell development).

1977-01-01

451

ADVANCED HIGH FLUX RESEARCH REACTOR TECHNOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of high-flux research reactors is discussed. The major ; factor limiting further advance, restricted power density, is described. One ; method of improvement considered is designing for specific experimental use. ; Limitations were investigated in a comparative study of HâO, DâO, and ; Na cooled reactors of annularcore type. It is shown that power densities can be ;

C. N. Kelber; B. I. Spinrad; L. J. Templin

1962-01-01

452

Advanced thermal control technology for commercial applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A number of the technologies previously developed for the thermal control of spacecraft have found their way into commercial application. Specialized coatings and heat pipes are but two examples. The thermal control of current and future spacecraft is becoming increasingly more demanding, and a variety of new technologies are being developed to meet these needs. Closed two-phase loops are perceived to be the answer to many of the new requirements. All of these technologies are discussed, and their spacecraft and current terrestrial applications are summarized.

Swanson, Theodore D.

1991-01-01

453