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Sample records for adverse pulmonary physiology

  1. Mechanistic and dose considerations for supporting adverse pulmonary physiology in response to formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Chad M. Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Grafstroem, Roland C.

    2008-12-15

    Induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and asthma from formaldehyde inhalation exposure remains a debated and controversial issue. Yet, recent evidences on pulmonary biology and the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of formaldehyde lend support for such adverse effects. Specifically, altered thiol biology from accelerated enzymatic reduction of the endogenous bronchodilator S-nitrosoglutathione and pulmonary inflammation from involvement of Th2-mediated immune responses might serve as key events and cooperate in airway pathophysiology. Understanding what role these mechanisms play in various species and lifestages (e.g., child vs. adult) could be crucial for making more meaningful inter- and intra-species dosimetric extrapolations in human health risk assessment.

  2. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: clinical integrative physiology.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Webb, Katherine; Neder, J Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral airway dysfunction, inhomogeneous ventilation distribution, gas trapping, and impaired pulmonary gas exchange are variably present in all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article provides a cogent physiologic explanation for the relentless progression of activity-related dyspnea and exercise intolerance that all too commonly characterizes COPD. The spectrum of physiologic derangements that exist in smokers with mild airway obstruction and a history compatible with COPD is examined. Also explored are the perceptual and physiologic consequences of progressive erosion of the resting inspiratory capacity. Finally, emerging information on the role of cardiocirculatory impairment in contributing to exercise intolerance in patients with varying degrees of airway obstruction is reviewed. PMID:24507837

  4. Refractory Pulmonary Edema Caused by Late Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis After Lung Transplantation: A Rare Adverse Event.

    PubMed

    Denton, Eve J; Rischin, Adam; McGiffin, David; Williams, Trevor J; Paraskeva, Miranda A; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Greg

    2016-09-01

    After lung transplantation, pulmonary vein thrombosis is a rare, potentially life-threatening adverse event arising at the pulmonary venous anastomosis that typically occurs early and presents as graft failure and hemodynamic compromise with an associated mortality of up to 40%. The incidence, presentation, outcomes, and treatment of late pulmonary vein thrombosis remain poorly defined. Management options include anticoagulant agents for asymptomatic clots, and thrombolytic agents or surgical thrombectomy for hemodynamically significant clots. We present a rare case highlighting a delayed presentation of pulmonary vein thrombosis occurring longer than 2 weeks after lung transplantation and manifesting clinically as graft failure secondary to refractory pulmonary edema. The patient was treated successfully with surgical thrombectomy and remains well. We recommend a high index of suspicion of pulmonary vein thrombosis when graft failure after lung transplantation occurs and is not responsive to conventional therapy, and consideration of investigation with transesophageal echocardiography or computed tomography with venous phase contrast in such patients even more than 2 weeks after lung transplantation. PMID:27549541

  5. Epidemiology and Pulmonary Physiology of Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Jacqueline; Mikulic, Lucas; Kaminsky, David A

    2016-08-01

    The epidemiology and physiology of severe asthma are inherently linked because of varying phenotypes and expressions of asthma throughout the population. To understand how to better treat severe asthma, we must use both population data and physiologic principles to individualize therapies among groups with similar expressions of this disease. PMID:27401616

  6. An Earth-Based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grothberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving micro G for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in micro G. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of micro G by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary physiology, including cardiac output, central venous pressures, lung volumes, and pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of micro G on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventilation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching, and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of micro G will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  7. An Earth-based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grotberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving microgravity for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in microgravity. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of microgravity by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of microgravity on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventillation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of microgravity will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  8. Pulmonary adverse effects of welding fume in automobile assembly welders.

    PubMed

    Sharifian, Seyed Akbar; Loukzadeh, Ziba; Shojaoddiny-Ardekani, Ahmad; Aminian, Omid

    2011-01-01

    Welding is one of the key components of numerous manufacturing industries, which has potential physical and chemical health hazards. Many components of welding fumes can potentially affect the lung function. This study investigates the effects of welding fumes on lung function and respiratory symptoms among welders of an automobile manufacturing plant in Iran. This historical cohort study assesses 43 male welders and 129 office workers by a questionnaire to record demographic data, smoking habits, work history and respiratory symptoms as well as lung function status by spirometry. The average pulmonary function values of welders were lower relative to controls with dose-effect relationship between work duration and pulmonary function impairment. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was higher in welders than controls. Our findings suggest that welders are at risk for pulmonary disease. PMID:21598218

  9. V/Q SPECT: utility for investigation of pulmonary physiology.

    PubMed

    King, Gregory G; Harris, Benjamin; Mahadev, Sriram

    2010-11-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is being increasingly used as a tool in respiratory research, in particular ventilation SPECT. Much of the basic understanding of pulmonary physiology has been derived from inhaled radioactive inert gases because, as the lung behaves in an asymmetric manner, the nature of regional differences in ventilation is ideally studied with the use of imaging. It is well known to clinicians that ventilation is patchy in patients who have airways disease. However, the relevance to the disease mechanisms itself only started to be studied with the use of 3-dimensional imaging and with advances in quantitative image analysis. The measurements of both ventilation distribution and nonventilation (airway closure) have become very topical in the study of asthma, and accurate quantification of those parameters is of relevance to disease mechanisms. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the drive is towards better characterization of disease groups ("phenotypes") and, again, description of ventilation patterns may prove to be useful. This is a review, therefore, on pulmonary SPECT imaging in respiratory research which includes a focus on methodology in relation to respiratory physiology. There has been relatively little published in this area but there is great potential for advances in the understanding of airways disease to be gained from SPECT imaging. PMID:20920636

  10. Reduction in adverse effect on pulmonary function after exposure to filtered diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Ulfvarson, U.; Alexandersson, R. )

    1990-01-01

    A statistically significant temporary reduction on pulmonary function was measured with spirometry in stevedores on a roll-on-roll-off ro-ro ship who were exposed to diesel exhausts from trucks during a work shift. When all trucks were equipped with specially designed microfilters mounted on the exhaust pipes, this impairment in pulmonary function was reduced. Removal of the particulate fraction of the exhausts by filtering is an important factor in reducing the adverse effect of diesel exhaust on pulmonary function. The particle fraction should be considered when designing an indicator of the biological effects of diesel exhausts.

  11. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Kamath, Sunil; Wong, Kenneth; Malvar, Jemily; Sposto, Richard; Goodarzian, Fariba; Freyer, David R.; Keens, Thomas G.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ≥22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ≥30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed

  12. Pulmonary Physiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stockley, James A; Stockley, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is predominantly an airway disease with marked bronchiectatic changes associated with inflammation, chronic colonization, and progressive airflow obstruction. The condition can be identified in childhood and monitored with detectable airway changes early in life while conventional spirometry remains in the normal range. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can also be detected early in life through blood spot and genetic testing and leads (in some) to the development of airflow obstruction and a predominant emphysema phenotype with bronchiectatic changes in about 30%. Early detection also allows the natural history of the pulmonary physiological changes to be determined. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is usually detected late in the disease process when significant damage has occurred. The condition consists of varying combinations of airway disease, bronchiectasis, colonization, and emphysema. Lessons learned from the physiological evolution of airway disease in cystic fibrosis and the emphysema of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency provide strategies to enable early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general and its phenotypes. PMID:27115945

  13. Adverse effects of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes on human pulmonary cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabet, Lyes; Bussy, Cyrill; Amara, Nadia; Setyan, Ari; Grodet, Alain; Rossi, Michel J.; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Boczkowski, Jorge; Lanone, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) produced for industrial purposes, on the human epithelial cell line A549. MWCNT were dispersed in dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL), a component of pulmonary surfactant, and the effects of dispersion in DPL were compared to those in 2 other media: ethanol (EtOH) and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Effects of MWCNT were also compared to those of 2 asbestos fibers (chrysotile and crocidolite) and carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, not only in A549 cells, but also on mesothelial cells (MeT5A human cell line), used as an asbestos-sensitive cell type. MWCNT formed agglomerates on top of both cell lines (surface area 15–35 μm2), that were significantly larger and more numerous in PBS than in EtOH and DPL. Whatever the dispersion media, incubation with 100 μg/ml MWCNT induced a similar decrease in metabolic activity without changing cell membrane permeability or apoptosis. Neither MWCNT cellular internalization nor oxidative stress were observed. In contrast, asbestos fibers penetrated into the cells, decreased metabolic activity but not cell membrane permeability and increased apoptosis, without decreasing cell number. CB was internalized without any adverse effects. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that MWCNT produced for industrial purposes exert adverse effects without being internalized by human epithelial and mesothelial pulmonary cell lines. PMID:19034795

  14. Adverse ventricular-ventricular interactions in right ventricular pressure load: Insights from pediatric pulmonary hypertension versus pulmonary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Hui, Wei; Bijnens, Bart H; Dragulescu, Andreea; Mertens, Luc; Meijboom, Folkert J; Friedberg, Mark K

    2016-06-01

    Right ventricular (RV) pressure overload has a vastly different clinical course in children with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH) than in children with pulmonary stenosis (PS). While RV function is well recognized as a key prognostic factor in iPAH, adverse ventricular-ventricular interactions and LV dysfunction are less well characterized and the pathophysiology is incompletely understood. We compared ventricular-ventricular interactions as hypothesized drivers of biventricular dysfunction in pediatric iPAH versus PS Eighteen iPAH, 16 PS patients and 18 age- and size-matched controls were retrospectively studied. Cardiac cycle events were measured by M-mode and Doppler echocardiography. Measurements were compared between groups using ANOVA with post hoc Dunnet's or ANCOVA including RV systolic pressure (RVSP; iPAH 96.8 ± 25.4 mmHg vs. PS 75.4 ± 18.9 mmHg; P = 0.011) as a covariate. RV-free wall thickening was prolonged in iPAH versus PS, extending beyond pulmonary valve closure (638 ± 76 msec vs. 562 ± 76 msec vs. 473 ± 59 msec controls). LV and RV isovolumetric relaxation were prolonged in iPAH (P < 0.001; LV 102.8 ± 24.1 msec vs. 63.1 ± 13.7 msec; RV 95 [61-165] vs. 28 [0-43]), associated with adverse septal kinetics; characterized by rightward displacement in early systole and leftward displacement in late RV systole (i.e., early LV diastole). Early LV diastolic filling was decreased in iPAH (73 ± 15.9 vs. PS 87.4 ± 14.4 vs. controls 95.8 ± 12.5 cm/sec; P = 0.004). Prolonged RVFW thickening, prolonged RVFW isovolumetric times, and profound septal dyskinesia are associated with interventricular mechanical discoordination and decreased early LV filling in pediatric iPAH much more than PS These adverse mechanics affect systolic and diastolic biventricular efficiency in iPAH and may form the basis for worse clinical outcomes. We used clinically derived data to study the pathophysiology of ventricular

  15. Intraoperative Monitoring of Pulmonary Artery Physiology With Transesophageal Echocardiography in a Patient With an Extensive Pulmonary Aneurysm Undergoing Partial Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Plakke, Michael J; Maxwell, Cory D; Bottiger, Brandi A

    2016-09-01

    Surgical patients with pulmonary hypertension present a significant challenge to the anesthesiologist. Continuous perioperative monitoring of pulmonary artery (PA) pressure is recommended and most often accomplished with a PA catheter. Placement of a PA catheter may be difficult or contraindicated, and in these cases, transesophageal echocardiography is a useful alternative to monitor dynamic PA physiology. In this case, we used intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography to detect changes in peak PA pressure and guide clinical treatment in a patient with pulmonary hypertension and an extensive PA aneurysm undergoing partial nephrectomy. PMID:27580409

  16. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Samantha J.; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B.; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P.; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P.; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E.; Elmore, Susan A.; Morrison, James P.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  17. Inhaled diesel emissions generated with cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additive induce adverse pulmonary and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C; Thomas, Ronald F; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E; Elmore, Susan A; Morrison, James P; Johnson, Crystal L; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  18. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11–17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68–14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics. The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. PMID:26166105

  19. Physiology in medicine: acute altitude exposure in patients with pulmonary and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Seccombe, Leigh M; Peters, Matthew J

    2014-03-01

    Travel is more affordable and improved high-altitude airports, railways, and roads allow rapid access to altitude destinations without acclimatization. The physiology of exposure to altitude has been extensively described in healthy individuals; however, there is a paucity of data pertaining to those who have reduced reserve. This Physiology in Medicine article discusses the physiological considerations relevant to the safe travel to altitude and by commercial aircraft in patients with pulmonary and/or cardiac disease. PMID:24371015

  20. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification. PMID:26740396

  1. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification. PMID:26740396

  2. Teaching Pulmonary Gas Exchange Physiology Using Computer Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapitan, Kent S.

    2008-01-01

    Students often have difficulty understanding the relationship of O[subscript 2] consumption, CO[subscript 2] production, cardiac output, and distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios in the lung to the final arterial blood gas composition. To overcome this difficulty, I have developed an interactive computer simulation of pulmonary gas exchange…

  3. Pulmonary physiology and the anesthetist--part II.

    PubMed

    Geelhoed, G W

    1980-04-01

    In part 1 of this three-part series, the author discussed the maintenance of cellular respiration and the function of the alveolar-capillary membrane. Part 2 deals with post-operative pulmonary problems, with a stress on the need to recognize and prevent these complications before their onset. PMID:7386135

  4. Pulmonary venous hypertension may allow delayed palliation of single ventricle physiology with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kalantre, Atul; Sunil, Gopalraj S; Kumar, Raman Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease develops early in untreated single ventricle patients with increased pulmonary flow. Pulmonary artery (PA) banding is done at a young age in these patients in order to protect the lung vasculature and maintain low pulmonary artery pressures (PAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). This also enables future completion of the single ventricle palliation. Pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) secondary to left sided obstruction if present in addition in this setting contributes to the pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but involves an element of reversibility of the PAH if the obstruction is relieved. We present two cases of single ventricle both of who re-presented late with PAH and PVH (secondary to mitral valve obstruction) and underwent delayed PA banding at 9.5 and 4.5 years of age respectively. Both patients however had different outcomes. The patient undergoing PA banding at 9.5 years successfully underwent a cavo-pulmonary shunt at the age of 12 years. The patient with PA banding at 4.5 years however, has residual PAH that presently precludes a cavo-pulmonary shunt. PMID:27212849

  5. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data. Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure. The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52–0.62). Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases. PMID:27196497

  6. Impact of residual stretch and remodeling on collagen engagement in healthy and pulmonary hypertensive calf pulmonary arteries at physiological pressures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Lammers, Steven R; Kao, Philip H; Albietz, Joseph A; Stenmark, Kurt R; Qi, H Jerry; Shandas, Robin; Hunter, Kendall S

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the mechanical behavior of proximal pulmonary arteries (PAs) is crucial to evaluating pulmonary vascular function and right ventricular afterload. Early and current efforts focus on these arteries' histological changes, in vivo pressure-diameter behavior and mechanical properties under in vitro mechanical testing. However, the in vivo stretch and stress states remain poorly characterized. To further understand the mechanical behavior of the proximal PAs under physiological conditions, this study computed the residual stretch and the in vivo circumferential stretch state in the main pulmonary arteries in both control and hypertensive calves by using in vitro and in vivo artery geometry data, and modeled the impact of residual stretch and arterial remodeling on the in vivo circumferential stretch distribution and collagen engagement in the main pulmonary artery. We found that the in vivo circumferential stretch distribution in both groups was nonuniform across the vessel wall with the largest stretch at the outer wall, suggesting that collagen at the outer wall would engage first. It was also found that the circumferential stretch was more uniform in the hypertensive group, partially due to arterial remodeling that occurred during their hypoxic treatment, and that their onset of collagen engagement occurred at a higher pressure. It is concluded that the residual stretch and arterial remodeling have strong impact on the in vivo stretch state and the collagen engagement and thus the mechanical behavior of the main pulmonary artery in calves. PMID:22237861

  7. Physiological functions of transient receptor potential channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Lin, Mo-Jun; Sham, James S K

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) gene superfamily, which consists of 7 subfamilies with at least 28 mammalian homologues, is known to encode a wide variety of cation channels with diverse biophysical properties, activation mechanisms, and physiological functions. Recent studies have identified multiple TRP channel subtypes, belonging to the canonical (TRPC), melastatin-related (TRPM), and vanilloid-related (TRPV) subfamilies, in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). They operate as specific Ca(2+) pathways responsive to stimuli, including Ca(2+) store depletion, receptor activation, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and mechanical stress. Increasing evidence suggests that these channels play crucial roles in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular remodeling, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. This chapter highlighted and discussed these putative physiological functions of TRP channels in pulmonary vasculatures. Since Ca(2+) ions regulate many cellular processes via specific Ca(2+) signals, future investigations of these novel channels will likely uncover more important regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary vascular functions in health and in disease states. PMID:20204726

  8. Low-field MRI for studies of human pulmonary physiology and traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alyssa; Devience, Stephen; Rosen, Matthew; Walsworth, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    We describe recent progress on the development of an open-access low-magnetic-field MRI system for studies of human pulmonary physiology and traumatic brain injury. Low-field MRI benefits from reduced magnetic susceptibility effects and can provide high-resolution images of the human body when used with hyperpolarized media such as 3He and 129Xe.

  9. Pulmonary physiology: future directions for lung function testing in COPD.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Barisione, Giovanni; Crimi, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a term that encompasses different pathological conditions having excessive airflow limitation in common. A wide body of knowledge has been accumulated over the last century explaining the mechanisms by which airway (chronic bronchitis) and parenchymal (emphysema) diseases lead to an indistinguishable spirometric abnormality. Although the definition of emphysema is anatomical, early studies showed that its presence can be inferred with good approximation from measurements of lung mechanics and gas exchange, in addition to simple spirometry. Studies using tests of ventilation distribution showed that abnormalities are present in smokers with normal spirometry, although these tests were not predictive of development of COPD. At the beginning of the third millennium, new documents and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of COPD were developed, in which the functional diagnosis of COPD was restricted, for the sake of simplicity, to simple spirometry. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in separating bronchitic from emphysematous phenotype of COPD. For this purpose, high-resolution computed tomography scanning has been added to diagnostic work-up. At the same time, methods for lung function testing have been refined and seem promising for detection of early small airways abnormalities. Among them are the forced oscillation technique and the nitrogen phase III slope analysis of the multiple-breath washout test, which may provide information on ventilation inhomogeneity. Moreover, the combined assessment of diffusing capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide may be more sensitive than the latter alone for partitioning diffusive components at parenchymal level. PMID:25257934

  10. Adverse Events in Connective Tissue Disease–Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Rennie L.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Praestgaard, Amy; Merkel, Peter A.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have a poorer prognosis compared to those with idiopathic PAH, but little is known about the differences in treatment-related adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) between these groups. This study was undertaken to characterize these differences. Methods Individual patient-level data from 10 randomized controlled trials of therapies for PAH were obtained from the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients diagnosed as having either CTD-associated PAH or idiopathic PAH were included. A treatment-by-diagnosis interaction term was used to examine whether the effect of treatment on occurrence of AEs differed between patients with CTD-associated PAH and those with idiopathic PAH. Studies were pooled using fixed-effect models. Results The study sample included 2,370 participants: 716 with CTD-associated PAH and 1,654 with idiopathic PAH. In the active treatment group compared to the placebo group, the risk of AEs was higher among patients with CTD-associated PAH than among those with idiopathic PAH (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.00–2.47 versus OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.69–1.26; P for interaction = 0.061), but there was no difference in the risk of SAEs in analyses adjusted for age, race, sex, hemodynamic findings, and laboratory values. Despite the higher occurrence of AEs in patients with CTD-associated PAH assigned to active therapy compared to those receiving placebo, the risk of drug discontinuation due to an AE was similar to that in patients with idiopathic PAH assigned to active therapy (P for interaction = 0.27). Conclusion Patients with CTD-associated PAH experienced more treatment-related AEs compared to those with idiopathic PAH in therapeutic clinical trials. These findings suggest that the overall benefit of advanced therapies for PAH may be attenuated by the greater frequency of AEs. PMID:26016953

  11. Adverse Outcomes after Non-Chest Surgeries in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-Shun; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chung, Chi-Li; Hung, Chih-Jen; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and postoperative outcomes remains unknown. This study investigated outcomes following non-chest surgeries in patients with previous pulmonary TB. Methods Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we analyzed 6911 patients (aged ≥ 20 years) with preoperative diagnosis of pulmonary TB and 6911 propensity score-matched controls receiving non-chest surgeries in 2008–2010. Postoperative outcomes were compared between patients with or without pulmonary TB by calculating adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the multivariate logistic regressions. Results Surgical patients with pulmonary TB had a significantly higher postoperative complication rates than controls, including septicemia, pneumonia, acute renal failure, deep wound infection, overall complications, and 30-day postoperative mortality (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.07–1.86). The ORs of patients with low-income status were as high as 2.27 (95% CI 1.03–5.03). Preoperative use of TB drugs and TB-related medical expenditure also associated with higher postoperative mortality among surgical patients with pulmonary TB. Conclusions Surgical patients with pulmonary TB have significantly increased risks of postoperative complications and mortality after non-chest surgeries. This study suggests the need to improve postoperative care for surgical patients with pulmonary TB. PMID:26172153

  12. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Timothy J; Ford, Earl S; Croft, Janet B; Merrick, Melissa T; Rolle, Italia V; Giles, Wayne H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population. Materials and methods Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Results Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61), sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10), living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81), witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72), and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80) during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs. Reporting ≥5 ACEs (PR =2.08, 95% CI: 1.55, 2.80) compared to none was associated with a higher likelihood of COPD among women only. Conclusion ACEs are related to COPD, especially among women. These findings underscore the need for further research that examines sex-specific differences and the possible mechanisms linking ACEs and COPD. This work adds to a growing body of research suggesting that ACEs may contribute to health problems later in life and suggesting a need for program and policy solutions. PMID:25298732

  13. Simulations reveal adverse hemodynamics in patients with multiple systemic to pulmonary shunts.

    PubMed

    Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Murtuza, Bari; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison

    2015-03-01

    For newborns diagnosed with pulmonary atresia or severe pulmonary stenosis leading to insufficient pulmonary blood flow, cyanosis can be mitigated with placement of a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (MBTS) between the innominate and pulmonary arteries. In some clinical scenarios, patients receive two systemic-to-pulmonary connections, either by leaving the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) open or by adding an additional central shunt (CS) in conjunction with the MBTS. This practice has been motivated by the thinking that an additional source of pulmonary blood flow could beneficially increase pulmonary flow and provide the security of an alternate pathway in case of thrombosis. However, there have been clinical reports of premature shunt occlusion when more than one shunt is employed, leading to speculation that multiple shunts may in fact lead to unfavorable hemodynamics and increased mortality. In this study, we hypothesize that multiple shunts may lead to undesirable flow competition, resulting in increased residence time (RT) and elevated risk of thrombosis, as well as pulmonary overcirculation. Computational fluid dynamics-based multiscale simulations were performed to compare a range of shunt configurations and systematically quantify flow competition, pulmonary circulation, and other clinically relevant parameters. In total, 23 cases were evaluated by systematically changing the PDA/CS diameter, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), and MBTS position and compared by quantifying oxygen delivery (OD) to the systemic and coronary beds, wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), WSS gradient (WSSG), and RT in the pulmonary artery (PA), and MBTS. Results showed that smaller PDA/CS diameters can lead to flow conditions consistent with increased thrombus formation due to flow competition in the PA, and larger PDA/CS diameters can lead to insufficient OD due to pulmonary hyperfusion. In the worst case scenario, it was found that multiple shunts can lead to

  14. Lung Perfusion Measured Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging: New Tools for Physiological Insights Into the Pulmonary Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Susan R.; Prisk, G. Kim

    2012-01-01

    Since the lung receives the entire cardiac output, sophisticated imaging techniques are not required in order to measure total organ perfusion. However, for many years studying lung function has required physiologists to consider the lung as a single entity: in imaging terms as a single voxel. Since imaging, and in particular functional imaging, allows the acquisition of spatial information important for studying lung function, these techniques provide considerable promise and are of great interest for pulmonary physiologists. In particular, despite the challenges of low proton density and short T2* in the lung, noncontrast MRI techniques to measure pulmonary perfusion have several advantages including high reliability and the ability to make repeated measurements under a number of physiologic conditions. This brief review focuses on the application of a particular arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique, ASL-FAIRER (flow sensitive inversion recovery with an extra radiofrequency pulse), to answer physiologic questions related to pulmonary function in health and disease. The associated measurement of regional proton density to correct for gravitational-based lung deformation (the “Slinky” effect (Slinky is a registered trademark of PaufSlinky incorporated)) and issues related to absolute quantification are also discussed. PMID:21105135

  15. Effect of cholesterol on the biophysical and physiological properties of a clinical pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Keating, Eleonora; Rahman, Luna; Francis, James; Petersen, Anne; Possmayer, Fred; Veldhuizen, Ruud; Petersen, Nils O

    2007-08-15

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that forms a surface-active film at the air-water interface of alveoli capable of reducing surface tension to near 0 mN/m. The role of cholesterol, the major neutral lipid component of pulmonary surfactant, remains uncertain. We studied the physiological effect of cholesterol by monitoring blood oxygenation levels of surfactant-deficient rats treated or not treated with bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) containing zero or physiological amounts of cholesterol. Our results indicate no significant difference between BLES and BLES containing cholesterol immediately after treatment; however, during ventilation, BLES-treated animals maintained higher PaO2 values compared to BLES+cholesterol-treated animals. We used a captive bubble tensiometer to show that physiological amounts of cholesterol do not have a detrimental effect on the surface activity of BLES at 37 degrees C. The effect of cholesterol on topography and lateral organization of BLES Langmuir-Blodgett films was also investigated using atomic force microscopy. Our data indicate that cholesterol induces the formation of domains within liquid-ordered domains (Lo). We used time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry and principal component analysis to show that cholesterol is concentrated in the Lo phase, where it induces structural changes. PMID:17526587

  16. Clinical characteristics associated with adverse events in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stiell, Ian G.; Clement, Catherine M.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Rowe, Brian H.; Perry, Jeffrey J.; Brison, Robert J.; Calder, Lisa A.; Lang, Eddy; Borgundvaag, Bjug; Forster, Alan J.; Wells, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To assist physicians with difficult decisions about hospital admission for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presenting in the emergency department, we sought to identify clinical characteristics associated with serious adverse events. Methods: We conducted this prospective cohort study in 6 large Canadian academic emergency departments. Patients were assessed for standardized clinical variables and then followed for serious adverse events, defined as death, intubation, admission to a monitored unit or new visit to the emergency department requiring admission. Results: We enrolled 945 patients, of whom 354 (37.5%) were admitted to hospital. Of 74 (7.8%) patients with a subsequent serious adverse event, 36 (49%) had not been admitted after the initial emergency visit. Multivariable modelling identified 5 variables that were independently associated with adverse events: prior intubation, initial heart rate ≥ 110/minute, being too ill to do a walk test, hemoglobin < 100 g/L and urea ≥ 12 mmol/L. A preliminary risk scale incorporating these and 5 other clinical variables produced risk categories ranging from 2.2% for a score of 0 to 91.4% for a score of 10. Using a risk score of 2 or higher as a threshold for admission would capture all patients with a predicted risk of adverse events of 7.2% or higher, while only slightly increasing admission rates, from 37.5% to 43.2%. Interpretation: In Canada, many patients with COPD suffer a serious adverse event or death after being discharged home from the emergency department. We identified high-risk characteristics and developed a preliminary risk scale that, once validated, could be used to stratify the likelihood of poor outcomes and to enable rational and safe admission decisions. PMID:24549125

  17. Evaluation of ethyl acetate on three dimensions: investigation of behavioral, physiological and psychological indicators of adverse chemosensory effects.

    PubMed

    Kleinbeck, Stefan; Juran, Stephanie A; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Schäper, Michael; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Brüning, Thomas; van Thriel, Christoph

    2008-11-10

    A variety of national occupational exposure limits for ethyl acetate exist based on different studies, mostly relying on subjective evaluations of ethyl acetate as an irritant. Only one study also used physiological methods with inconsistent results in subjective and objective data. The present study was designed to investigate ethyl acetate on three different dimensions: behavioral, physiological and psychological indicators of adverse chemosensory effects were investigated during acute exposures to different concentrations of ethyl acetate. Twenty-four subjects were challenged with ethyl acetate in three exposure patterns (2 ppm, 400 ppm, 400 ppm including peaks of 800 ppm). While the odor intensity is rated "strong", trigeminal perceptions were rated less than "moderate". The absence of substantial trigeminal ratings was supported by physiological data. There was neither an effect of concentration on blinking frequency nor on nasal resistance which both are indicators of irritation. Furthermore, there are no effects of ethyl acetate concentration on behavioral measures indicating no olfactory or trigeminally mediated disturbance of cognitive processing. In conclusion, the results of this multilevel approach revealed no adverse chemosensory effects at ethyl acetate concentrations as recommended by the German MAK-value. PMID:18812215

  18. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe res...

  19. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction. PMID:25583659

  20. The physiological basis of pulmonary gas exchange: implications for clinical interpretation of arterial blood gases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    The field of pulmonary gas exchange is mature, with the basic principles developed more than 60 years ago. Arterial blood gas measurements (tensions and concentrations of O₂ and CO₂) constitute a mainstay of clinical care to assess the degree of pulmonary gas exchange abnormality. However, the factors that dictate arterial blood gas values are often multifactorial and complex, with six different causes of hypoxaemia (inspiratory hypoxia, hypoventilation, ventilation/perfusion inequality, diffusion limitation, shunting and reduced mixed venous oxygenation) contributing variably to the arterial O₂ and CO₂ tension in any given patient. Blood gas values are then usually further affected by the body's abilities to compensate for gas exchange disturbances by three tactics (greater O₂ extraction, increasing ventilation and increasing cardiac output). This article explains the basic principles of gas exchange in health, mechanisms of altered gas exchange in disease, how the body compensates for abnormal gas exchange, and based on these principles, the tools available to interpret blood gas data and, quantitatively, to best understand the physiological state of each patient. This understanding is important because therapeutic intervention to improve abnormal gas exchange in any given patient needs to be based on the particular physiological mechanisms affecting gas exchange in that patient. PMID:25323225

  1. When obesity and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease collide. Physiological and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Ciavaglia, Casey E; Neder, J Alberto

    2014-05-01

    In many parts of the world, the prevalence of both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obesity is increasing at an alarming rate. Such patients tend to have greater respiratory symptoms, more severe restriction of daily activities, poorer health-related quality of life, and greater health care use than their nonobese counterparts. Physiologically, increasing weight gain is associated with lung volume reduction effects in both health and disease, and this should be considered when interpreting common pulmonary function tests where lung volume is the denominator, such as FEV1/FVC and the ratio of diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide to alveolar volume, or indeed when evaluating the physiological consequences of emphysema in obese individuals. Contrary to expectation, the presence of mild to moderate obesity in COPD appears to have little deleterious effect on respiratory mechanics and muscle function, exertional dyspnea, and peak symptom-limited oxygen uptake during cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Thus, in evaluating obese patients with COPD reporting activity restriction, additional nonpulmonary factors, such as increased metabolic loading, cardiocirculatory impairment, and musculoskeletal abnormalities, should be considered. Care should be taken to recognize the presence of obstructive sleep apnea in obese patients with COPD, as effective treatment of the former condition likely conveys an important survival advantage. Finally, morbid obesity in COPD presents significant challenges to effective management, given the combined effects of erosion of the ventilatory reserve and serious metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities that collectively predispose to an increased risk of death from respiratory failure. PMID:24625243

  2. Epithelium damage and protection during reopening of occluded airways in a physiologic microfluidic pulmonary airway model.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Hossein; Zamankhan, Parsa; Christensen, Paul J; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-08-01

    Airways of the peripheral lung are prone to closure at low lung volumes. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant during various lung diseases compounds this event by destabilizing the liquid lining of small airways and giving rise to occluding liquid plugs in airways. Propagation of liquid plugs in airways during inflation of the lung exerts large mechanical forces on airway cells. We describe a microfluidic model of small airways of the lung that mimics airway architecture, recreates physiologic levels of pulmonary pressures, and allows studying cellular response to repeated liquid plug propagation events. Substantial cellular injury happens due to the propagation of liquid plugs devoid of surfactant. We show that addition of a physiologic concentration of a clinical surfactant, Survanta, to propagating liquid plugs protects the epithelium and significantly reduces cell death. Although the protective role of surfactants has been demonstrated in models of a propagating air finger in liquid-filled airways, this is the first time to study the protective role of surfactants in liquid plugs where fluid mechanical stresses are expected to be higher than in air fingers. Our parallel computational simulations revealed a significant decrease in mechanical forces in the presence of surfactant, confirming the experimental observations. The results support the practice of providing exogenous surfactant to patients in certain clinical settings as a protective mechanism against pathologic flows. More importantly, this platform provides a useful model to investigate various surface tension-mediated lung diseases at the cellular level. PMID:21487664

  3. Cardiovascular and pulmonary adverse events in patients treated with BCR-ABL inhibitors: Data from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Jorge; Mauro, Michael; Steegmann, Juan Luis; Saglio, Giuseppe; Malhotra, Rachpal; Ukropec, Jon A; Wallis, Nicola T

    2015-04-01

    Rare but serious cardiovascular and pulmonary adverse events (AEs) have been reported in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia treated with BCR-ABL inhibitors. Clinical trial data may not reflect the full AE profile of BCR-ABL inhibitors because of stringent study entry criteria, relatively small sample size, and limited duration of follow-up. To determine the utility of the FDA AE Reporting System (FAERS) surveillance database for identifying AEs possibly associated with the BCR-ABL inhibitors imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib in the postmarketing patient population, we conducted Multi-Item Gamma Poisson Shrinker disproportionality analyses of FAERS reports on AEs in relevant system organ classes. Signals consistent with the known safety profiles of these agents as well as signals for less well-described AEs were detected. Bone marrow necrosis, conjunctival hemorrhage, and peritoneal fluid retention events were uniquely associated with imatinib. AEs that most commonly reached the threshold for dasatinib consisted of terms relating to hemorrhage and fluid retention, including pleural effusion and pericardial effusion. Most terms that reached the threshold solely with nilotinib were related to peripheral and cardiac vascular events. Although this type of analysis cannot determine AE incidence or establish causality, these findings elucidate the AEs reported in patients treated with BCR-ABL inhibitors across multiple clinical trials and in the community setting for all approved and nonapproved indications, suggesting drug-AE associations warrant further investigation. These findings emphasize the need to consider patient comorbidities when selecting amongst BCR-ABL inhibitors. PMID:25580915

  4. Clinical, physiological, and radiological features of asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshio; Tada, Yuji; Kawata, Naoko; Matsuura, Yukiko; Ikari, Jun; Kasahara, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) is associated with rapid decline in lung function, poorer health-related quality-of-life outcomes, and frequent exacerbations, compared to COPD alone. Although the numbers of patients with ACOS have increased, there is little established evidence regarding diagnostic criteria and treatment options. Thus, the aim of our study was to clarify the clinical, physiological, and radiological features of patients with ACOS. Methods We examined a total of 100 patients with COPD and 40 patients with ACOS, who were selected based on clinical criteria. All patients underwent baseline testing, including a COPD assessment test, pulmonary function tests, and multidetector row computed tomography imaging. Percentage of low attenuation volume, percentage of wall area, and percentage of total cross-sectional area of pulmonary vessels less than 5 mm2 (%CSA <5) were determined using multidetector row computed tomography. ACOS patients were administered a fixed dose of budesonide/formoterol (160/4.5 μg, two inhalations; twice daily) for 12 weeks, after which the ACOS patients underwent multidetector row computed tomography to measure the same parameters. Results At baseline, the ACOS patients and COPD patients had a similar degree of airflow limitation, vital capacity, and residual volume. ACOS patients had higher COPD assessment test scores, percentage of wall area, and %CSA <5 than COPD patients. Compared to baseline, budesonide/formoterol treatment significantly increased the forced expiratory volume in 1 second and decreased the degree of airway wall thickness (percentage of wall area) as well as pulmonary microvascular density (%CSA <5) in ACOS patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that ACOS is characterized by an airway lesion–dominant phenotype, in contrast to COPD. Higher %CSA <5 might be a characteristic feature of ACOS. PMID:26028967

  5. A prognostic model for short term adverse events in normotensive patients with pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Agterof, Mariette J; Schutgens, Roger E G; Moumli, Noureddine; Eijkemans, M J C; van der Griend, René; Tromp, Ellen A M; Biesma, Douwe H

    2011-08-01

    Risk stratification of patients with PE has gained interest in terms of the identification of patients in whom treatment on an outpatient base can be considered. Previous studies are of limited value due to their focus on adverse clinical events within several months after diagnosis of PE. We developed a prognostic model, based on easily accessible, clinical, and laboratory parameters, to predict adverse events during the first 10 days after the diagnosis of acute PE. We have analyzed the data of 210 outpatients with confirmed PE. Collected data included medical history, pulse rate, blood pressure, NT-proBNP, and D-dimer concentrations. The primary outcome was the occurrence of adverse clinical events in a 10 day follow-up period. Our final prognostic model to predict short-term adverse events consists of NT-proBNP levels, D-dimer concentrations, pulse rate, and the occurrence of active malignancy; the total score ranges from 0 to 37 points. Patients with a low score (no active malignancy, pulse rate <90 bpm, NT-proBNP <500 pg/ml, and D-dimer <3,000 μg/l FEU) have a 10-day adverse event risk <1.5%. This risk increases to over 30% in patients with a maximum score, based on high pulse rate, D-dimer concentrations, and NT-proBNP levels. Our prognostic model, once prospectively validated in an independent sample of patients, can be used in the early risk stratification of PE to estimate the risk of adverse events and to differentiate between candidates for in- or out- hospital treatment. PMID:21630313

  6. Selective pulmonary vasodilation improves ventriculovascular coupling and gas exchange in a patient with unrepaired single-ventricle physiology.

    PubMed

    Rischard, F; Vanderpool, R; Jenkins, I; Dalabih, M; Colombo, J; Lax, D; Seckeler, M

    2015-06-01

    We describe a 63-year-old patient with unrepaired tricuspid valve atresia and a hypoplastic right ventricle (single-ventricle physiology) who presented with progressive symptomatic hypoxia. Her anatomy resulted in parallel pulmonary and systemic circulations, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and uncoupling of the ventricle/pulmonary artery. Hemodynamic and coupling data were obtained before and after pulmonary vasoactive treatment, first inhaled nitric oxide and later inhaled treprostinil. The coupling ratio (ratio of ventricular to vascular elastance) shunt fractions and dead space ventilation were calculated before and after treatment. Treatment resulted in improvement of the coupling ratio between the ventricle and the vasculature with optimization of stroke work, equalization of pulmonary and systolic flows, a decrease in dead space ventilation from 75% to 55%, and a significant increase in 6-minute walk distance and improved hypoxia. Inhaled treprostinil significantly increased 6-minute walk distance and improved hypoxia. This is the first report to show that pulmonary vasoactive treatment can be used in a patient with unrepaired single-ventricle anatomy and describes the hemodynamic effects of inhaled therapy on ventriculovascular coupling and gas exchange in the pulmonary circulation in this unique physiology. PMID:26064468

  7. A systems engineering approach to validation of a pulmonary physiology simulator for clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Das, A.; Gao, Z.; Menon, P. P.; Hardman, J. G.; Bates, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological simulators which are intended for use in clinical environments face harsh expectations from medical practitioners; they must cope with significant levels of uncertainty arising from non-measurable parameters, population heterogeneity and disease heterogeneity, and their validation must provide watertight proof of their applicability and reliability in the clinical arena. This paper describes a systems engineering framework for the validation of an in silico simulation model of pulmonary physiology. We combine explicit modelling of uncertainty/variability with advanced global optimization methods to demonstrate that the model predictions never deviate from physiologically plausible values for realistic levels of parametric uncertainty. The simulation model considered here has been designed to represent a dynamic in vivo cardiopulmonary state iterating through a mass-conserving set of equations based on established physiological principles and has been developed for a direct clinical application in an intensive-care environment. The approach to uncertainty modelling is adapted from the current best practice in the field of systems and control engineering, and a range of advanced optimization methods are employed to check the robustness of the model, including sequential quadratic programming, mesh-adaptive direct search and genetic algorithms. An overview of these methods and a comparison of their reliability and computational efficiency in comparison to statistical approaches such as Monte Carlo simulation are provided. The results of our study indicate that the simulator provides robust predictions of arterial gas pressures for all realistic ranges of model parameters, and also demonstrate the general applicability of the proposed approach to model validation for physiological simulation. PMID:20538754

  8. New physiological insights into dyspnea and exercise intolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Guenette, Jordan A; Webb, Katherine A; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2012-12-01

    Dyspnea and reduced exercise tolerance are common consequences of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and contribute importantly to poor perceived health status. While the origins of dyspnea and reduced exercise tolerance are complex and multifactorial, there is increasing evidence that lung hyperinflation is an important contributory factor that can be targeted for treatment. In this review, the authors summarize current concepts of the origin and clinical and physiological consequences of both static and dynamic lung hyperinflation in COPD. In particular, they review recent studies that have examined the role of lung hyperinflation in dyspnea causation during exacerbations and physical activity in COPD. Finally, current concepts of the mechanisms of symptom relief and improved exercise tolerance following pharmacological lung volume reduction are reviewed. PMID:23234451

  9. Physiological impact of patent foramen ovale on pulmonary gas exchange, ventilatory acclimatization, and thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Andrew T; Elliott, Jonathan E; Davis, James T

    2016-08-01

    The foramen ovale, which is part of the normal fetal cardiopulmonary circulation, fails to close after birth in ∼35% of the population and represents a potential source of right-to-left shunt. Despite the prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in the general population, cardiopulmonary, exercise, thermoregulatory, and altitude physiologists may have underestimated the potential effect of this shunted blood flow on normal physiological processes in otherwise healthy humans. Because this shunted blood bypasses the respiratory system, it would not participate in either gas exchange or respiratory system cooling and may have impacts on other physiological processes that remain undetermined. The consequences of this shunted blood flow in PFO-positive (PFO+) subjects can potentially have a significant, and negative, impact on the alveolar-to-arterial oxygen difference (AaDO2), ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude and respiratory system cooling with PFO+ subjects having a wider AaDO2 at rest, during exercise after acclimatization, blunted ventilatory acclimatization, and a higher core body temperature (∼0.4(°)C) at rest and during exercise. There is also an association of PFO with high-altitude pulmonary edema and acute mountain sickness. These effects on physiological processes are likely dependent on both the presence and size of the PFO, with small PFOs not likely to have significant/measureable effects. The PFO can be an important determinant of normal physiological processes and should be considered a potential confounder to the interpretation of former and future data, particularly in small data sets where a significant number of PFO+ subjects could be present and significantly impact the measured outcomes. PMID:27418686

  10. Abnormal lung gallium-67 uptake preceding pulmonary physiologic impairment in an asymptomatic patient with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, T.F.; Golden, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was suggested by a diffuse, bilateral pulmonary uptake of gallium-67 in an asymptomatic, homosexual male with the antibody to the immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who was undergoing staging evaluation for lymphoma clinically localized to a left inguinal lymph node. Chest radiograph and pulmonary function evaluation, including lung volumes, diffusing capacity and arterial blood gases, were within normal limits. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed Pneumocystis carinii organisms. In this asymptomatic, HIV-positive patient, active alveolar infection, evidenced by abnormal gallium-67 scanning, predated pulmonary physiologic abnormalities. This observation raises questions concerning the natural history of this disease process and the specificity of physiologic tests for excluding disease. It also has implications for the treatment of neoplasia in the HIV-positive patient population.

  11. Prenatal Diagnosis and Evaluation of Sonographic Predictors for Intervention and Adverse Outcome in Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hellmund, Astrid; Berg, Christoph; Geipel, Annegret; Bludau, Meike; Heydweiller, Andreas; Bachour, Haitham; Müller, Andreas; Müller, Annette; Gembruch, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe antenatal findings and evaluate prenatal risk parameters for adverse outcome or need for intervention in fetuses with congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM). Methods In our retrospective study all fetuses with a prenatal diagnosis of CPAM detected in our tertiary referral center between 2002 and 2013 were analyzed. Sonographic findings were noted and measurements of mass-to-thorax-ratio (MTR), congenital pulmonary airway malformation volume-ratio (CVR) and observed to expected lung-to head-ratio (o/e LHR) were conducted and correlated to fetal or neonatal morbidity and mortality and/or need for prenatal intervention. Results 67 fetuses with CPAM were included in the study. Hydropic fetuses were observed in 16.4% (11/67) of cases, prenatal intervention was undertaken in 9 cases; 7 pregnancies were terminated. The survival rate of non-hydropic fetuses with conservatively managed CPAM was 98.0% (50/51), the survival rate for hydropic fetuses with intention to treat was 42.9% (3/7). 10 (18.2%) children needed respiratory assistance. Fetuses with a CVR of <0.91 were significantly less likely to experience adverse outcome or need for prenatal intervention with sensitivity, specificity and positive/negative predictive value of 0.89, 0.71, 0.62 and 0.93, respectively. A MTR (mass-to-thorax-ratio) of < 0.51 had a positive predictive value of 0.54 and a negative predictive value of 0.96 of adverse events with a sensitivity of 0.95 and a specificity of 0.63. The negative predictive value for o/e LHR of 45% was 0.84 with sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 0.73, 0.68 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions The majority of cases with CPAM have a favorable outcome. MTR and CVR are able to identify fetuses at risk, the o/e LHR is less sensitive. PMID:26978067

  12. Assessment of multislice CT to quantify pulmonary emphysema function and physiology in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minsong; Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Presson, Robert G., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate multi-slice computed tomography technology to quantify functional and physiologic changes in rats with pulmonary emphysema. Method: Seven rats were scanned using a 16-slice CT (Philips MX8000 IDT) before and after artificial inducement of emphysema. Functional parameters i.e. lung volumes were measured by non-contrast spiral scan during forced breath-hold at inspiration and expiration followed by image segmentation based on attenuation threshold. Dynamic CT imaging was performed immediately following the contrast injection to estimate physiology changes. Pulmonary perfusion, fractional blood volume, and mean transit times (MTTs) were estimated by fitting the time-density curves of contrast material using a compartmental model. Results: The preliminary results indicated that the lung volumes of emphysema rats increased by 3.52+/-1.70mL (p<0.002) at expiration and 4.77+/-3.34mL (p<0.03) at inspiration. The mean lung densities of emphysema rats decreased by 91.76+/-68.11HU (p<0.01) at expiration and low attenuation areas increased by 5.21+/-3.88% (p<0.04) at inspiration compared with normal rats. The perfusion for normal and emphysema rats were 0.25+/-0.04ml/s/ml and 0.32+/-0.09ml/s/ml respectively. The fractional blood volumes for normal and emphysema rats were 0.21+/-0.04 and 0.15+/-0.02. There was a trend toward faster MTTs for emphysema rats (0.42+/-0.08s) than normal rats (0.89+/-0.19s) with p<0.006, suggesting that blood flow crossing the capillaries increases as the capillary volume decreases and which may cause the red blood cells to leave the capillaries incompletely saturated with oxygen if the MTTs become too short. Conclusion: Quantitative measurement using CT of structural and functional changes in pulmonary emphysema appears promising for small animals.

  13. Physiological variables affecting surface film formation by native lamellar body-like pulmonary surfactant particles.

    PubMed

    Hobi, Nina; Siber, Gerlinde; Bouzas, Virginia; Ravasio, Andrea; Pérez-Gil, Jesus; Haller, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is a surface active complex of lipids and proteins that prevents the alveolar structures from collapsing and reduces the work of breathing by lowering the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface (ALI). Surfactant is synthesized by the alveolar type II (AT II) cells, and it is stored in specialized organelles, the lamellar bodies (LBs), as tightly packed lipid bilayers. Upon secretion into the alveolar lining fluid, a large fraction of these particles retain most of their packed lamellar structure, giving rise to the term lamellar body like-particles (LBPs). Due to their stability in aqueous media, freshly secreted LBPs can be harvested from AT II cell preparations. However, when LBPs get in contact with an ALI, they quickly and spontaneously adsorb into a highly organized surface film. In the present study we investigated the adsorptive capacity of LBPs at an ALI under relevant physiological parameters that characterize the alveolar environment in homeostatic or in pathological conditions. Adsorption of LBPs at an ALI is highly sensitive to pH, temperature and albumin concentration and to a relatively lesser extent to changes in osmolarity or Ca(2+) concentrations in the physiological range. Furthermore, proteolysis of LBPs significantly decreases their adsorptive capacity confirming the important role of surfactant proteins in the formation of surface active films. PMID:24582711

  14. Pulmonary sequelae of neonatal respiratory distress in very low birthweight infants: a clinical and physiological study.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Y C; Beardsmore, C S; Silverman, M

    1982-01-01

    Twenty infants, mechanically ventilated in the neonatal period for respiratory distress syndrome, were compared with 15 healthy controls, matched for birthweight(less than 1501 g) but greater in mean gestational age. Clinical features and lung mechanics (by whole body plethysmography) were recorded at 6-monthly intervals until about one year. THe neonatal course of the mechanically ventilated infants was commonly complicated by tracheobronchial hypersecretion and the later course by a fairly high incidence of lower respiratory tract illness. In this group, thoracic gas volume, dynamic compliance, pulmonary and airways conductance were all abnormal during the middle 4 months of the first year and reverted towards normal towards the end of the first year. The control group had normal lung mechanics. Early lung function tests were of limited value in predicting later lower respiratory tract illness, which was more common in boys, after neonatal mechanical ventilation for longer than 24 hours or raised ambient oxygen for longer than 5 days. There were few predictive physical signs. In this group of very low birthweight infants, respiratory distress syndrome of sufficient severity to require mechanical ventilation led to significant physiological and clinical disturbances of lung function which lasted into the second 6 months of life and which were particularly severe in those who had recurrent lower respiratory tract illness. PMID:7092305

  15. Adverse childhood experiences and physiological wear-and-tear in midlife: Findings from the 1958 British birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barboza Solís, Cristina; Kelly-Irving, Michelle; Fantin, Romain; Darnaudéry, Muriel; Torrisani, Jérôme; Lang, Thierry; Delpierre, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    Allostatic load (AL) is a measure of overall physiological wear-and-tear over the life course, which could partially be the consequence of early life exposures. AL could allow a better understanding of the potential biological pathways playing a role in the construction of the social gradient in adult health. To explore the biological embedding hypothesis, we examined whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with elevated AL in midlife. We used imputed data on 3,782 women and 3,753 men of the National Child Development Study in Britain followed up seven times. ACEs were measured using prospective data collected at ages 7, 11, and 16. AL was operationalized using data from the biomedical survey collected at age 44 on 14 parameters representing four biological systems. We examined the role of adult health behaviors, body mass index (BMI), and socioeconomic status as potential mediators using a path analysis. ACEs were associated with higher AL for both men and women after adjustment for early life factors and childhood pathologies. The path analysis showed that the association between ACEs and AL was largely explained by early adult factors at age 23 and 33. For men, the total mediated effect was 59% (for two or more ACEs) via health behaviors, education level, and wealth. For women, the mediated effect represented 76% (for two or more ACEs) via smoking, BMI, education level, and wealth. Our results indicate that early psychosocial stress has an indirect lasting impact on physiological wear-and-tear via health behaviors, BMI, and socioeconomic factors in adulthood. PMID:25646470

  16. A combined application of biochar and phosphorus alleviates heat-induced adversities on physiological, agronomical and quality attributes of rice.

    PubMed

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Tanveer, Mohsin; Ihsan, Muhammad Zahid; Shah, Adnan Noor; Ullah, Abid; Nasrullah; Khan, Fahad; Ullah, Sami; Alharby, Hesham; Nasim, Wajid; Wu, Chao; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-06-01

    Present study examined the influence of high-temperature stress and different biochar and phosphorus (P) fertilization treatments on the growth, grain yield and quality of two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan). Plants were subjected to high day temperature-HDT (35 °C ± 2), high night temperature-HNT (32 °C ± 2), and control temperature-CT (28 °C ± 2) in controlled growth chambers. The different fertilization treatments were control, biochar alone, phosphorous (P) alone and biochar + P. High-temperature stress severely reduced the photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, water use efficiency, and increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except for number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more destructive for grain yield. High temperature stress also hampered the grain appearance and milling quality traits in both rice cultivars. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high-temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Different soil fertilization treatments were helpful in ameliorating the detrimental effects of high temperature. Addition of biochar alone improved some growth and yield parameters but such positive effects were lower when compared with the combined application of biochar and P. The biochar+P application recorded 7% higher grain yield (plant(-1)) of rice compared with control averaged across different temperature treatments and cultivars. The highest grain production and better grain quality in biochar+P treatments might be due to enhanced photosynthesis, water use efficiency, and grain size, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. PMID:26995314

  17. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  18. [Pulmonary CO/NO transfer: physiological basis, technical aspects and clinical impact].

    PubMed

    Degano, B; Perrin, F; Soumagne, T; Agard, C; Chambellan, A

    2014-05-01

    Diseases affecting the alveolar-capillary membrane or the capillary blood vessels can impair pulmonary gas exchanges and lung diffusion. The single-breath transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TL,CO) is the classical technique for measuring gas transfer from the alveolus to the pulmonary capillary blood. Pulmonary gas exchanges can also be explored by the transfer factor of the lung for nitric oxide (TL,NO). TL,NO represents a better index for the diffusing capacity of the alveolar-capillary membrane whereas TL,CO is more influenced by red blood cell resistance. Membrane diffusing capacity (DM) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) derivated from TL,CO and TL,NO by the Roughton-Forster equation can give additional insights into pulmonary pathologies. The clinical impact of the CO/NO transfer has still to be precised even if this measurement seems to provide an alternative way of investigating the alveolar membrane and the blood reacting with the gas. PMID:24314829

  19. Integrating Omics Technologies to Study Pulmonary Physiology and Pathology at the Systems Level

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ravi Ramesh; Davé, Vrushank

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation and integration of “omics” technologies, including genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics has readily altered the landscape of medical research in the last decade. The vast and complex nature of omics data can only be interpreted by linking molecular information at the organismic level, forming the foundation of systems biology. Research in pulmonary biology/medicine has necessitated integration of omics, network, systems and computational biology data to differentially diagnose, interpret, and prognosticate pulmonary diseases, facilitating improvement in therapy and treatment modalities. This review describes how to leverage this emerging technology in understanding pulmonary diseases at the systems level –called a “systomic” approach. Considering the operational wholeness of cellular and organ systems, diseased genome, proteome, and the metabolome needs to be conceptualized at the systems level to understand disease pathogenesis and progression. Currently available omics technology and resources require a certain degree of training and proficiency in addition to dedicated hardware and applications, making them relatively less user friendly for the pulmonary biologist and clinicians. Herein, we discuss the various strategies, computational tools and approaches required to study pulmonary diseases at the systems level for biomedical scientists and clinical researchers. PMID:24802001

  20. Correlation of gene expression with physiological functions: Examples of pulmonary blood vessel rheology, hypoxic hypertension, and tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Sher, Y P; Peck, K; Fung, Y C

    2001-01-01

    Microarray gene chip technology is a powerful invention looking for applications. A general principle is proposed here to direct the power of the technology toward physiology, medicine, and pharmacology. Our principle is to match quantitative measures of gene expression with the trend of mathematical parameters that describe biological functions. Mathematical parameterization is the heart. The procedure is illustrated by lung physiology, including the hypoxic hypertension, rheological properties of the tissues, and the remodeling of the pulmonary arterial wall under hypertensive stress. We show first how to reduce the experimental results on these physiological functions into mathematical formulas, and how the parameters of these formulas describe the functional trends precisely. Then under the assumption that the microarray reveals gene activities quantitatively, we match the trends of the gene activity with the trends of the functional parameters. Genes whose trends do match are interpreted as relevant to the functions. Those that do not match are considered irrelevant to the functions. The more functions we consider, the fewer will be the number of genes that are relevant to all functions. Thus we learn about the generality and specificity of the influence of genes on physiology. PMID:11381166

  1. Physiologic assessment before video thoracoscopic resection for lung cancer in patients with abnormal pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Benattia, Amira; Debeaumont, David; Guyader, Vincent; Tardif, Catherine; Peillon, Christophe; Cuvelier, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired respiratory function may prevent curative surgery for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) reduces postoperative morbility-mortality and could change preoperative assessment practices and therapeutic decisions. We evaluated the relation between preoperative pulmonary function tests and the occurrence of postoperative complications after VATS pulmonary resection in patients with abnormal pulmonary function. Methods We included 106 consecutive patients with ≤80% predicted value of presurgical expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) and who underwent VATS pulmonary resection for NSCLC from a prospective surgical database. Results Patients (64±9.5 years) had lobectomy (n=91), segmentectomy (n=7), bilobectomy (n=4), or pneumonectomy (n=4). FEV1 and DLCO preoperative averages were 68%±21% and 60%±18%. Operative mortality was 1.89%. Only FEV1 was predictive of postoperative complications [odds ratio (OR), 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.926–0.991, P=0.016], but there was no determinable threshold. Twenty-five patients underwent incremental exercise testing. Desaturations during exercise (OR, 0.462; 95% CI, 0.191–0.878, P=0.039) and heart rate (HR) response (OR, 0.953; 95% CI, 0.895–0.993, P=0.05) were associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions FEV1 but not DLCO was a significant predictor of pulmonary complications after VATS pulmonary resection despite a low rate of severe morbidity. Incremental exercise testing seems more discriminating. Further investigation is required in a larger patient population to change current pre-operative threshold in a new era of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:27293834

  2. Adverse Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment commonly used for depression and other major psychiatric disorders. We discuss potential adverse effects (AEs) associated with ECT and strategies for their prevention and management. Common acute AEs include headache, nausea, myalgia, and confusion; these are self-limiting and are managed symptomatically. Serious but uncommon AEs include cardiovascular, pulmonary, and cerebrovascular events; these may be minimized with screening for risk factors and by physiologic monitoring. Although most cognitive AEs of ECT are short-lasting, troublesome retrograde amnesia may rarely persist. Modifications of and improvements in treatment techniques minimize cognitive and other AEs. PMID:27514303

  3. Exercise performance and differences in physiological response to pulmonary rehabilitation in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with hyperinflation

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; Quaranta, Marco; Chakrabarti, Biswajit; Aliverti, Andrea; Calverley, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves exercise capacity in most but not all COPD patients. The factors associated with treatment success and the role of chest wall mechanics remain unclear. We investigated the impact of PR on exercise performance in COPD with severe hyperinflation. Methods: We evaluated 22 COPD patients (age, 66 ± 7 years; FEV1 = 37.1 ± 11.8% of predicted) who underwent eight weeks of aerobic exercise and strength training. Before and after PR, each patient also performed a six-minute walk test and an incremental cycle ergometer test. During the latter, we measured chest wall volumes (total and compartmental, by optoelectronic plethysmography) and determined maximal workloads. Results: We observed significant differences between the pre- and post-PR means for six-minute walk distance (305 ± 78 vs. 330 ± 96 m, p < 0.001) and maximal workload (33 ± 21 vs. 39 ± 20 W; p = 0.02). At equivalent workload settings, PR led to lower oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production (VCO2), and minute ventilation. The inspiratory (operating) rib cage volume decreased significantly after PR. There were 6 patients in whom PR did not increase the maximal workload. After PR, those patients showed no significant decrease in VCO2 during exercise, had higher end-expiratory chest wall volumes with a more rapid shallow breathing pattern, and continued to experience symptomatic leg fatigue. Conclusions: In severe COPD, PR appears to improve oxygen consumption and reduce VCO2, with a commensurate decrease in respiratory drive, changes reflected in the operating chest wall volumes. Patients with severe post-exercise hyperinflation and leg fatigue might be unable to improve their maximal performance despite completing a PR program. PMID:27167433

  4. Exercise physiological responses to drug treatments in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Charalampopoulos, Athanasios; Gibbs, J Simon R; Davies, Rachel J; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Murphy, Kevin; Sheares, Karen K; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Jenkins, David P; Howard, Luke S

    2016-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) that was deemed to be inoperable were more likely to respond to drugs for treating pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by using cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing than those with CTEPH that was deemed to be operable. We analyzed CPX testing data of all patients with CTEPH who were treated with PAH drugs and had undergone CPX testing before and after treatment at a single pulmonary hypertension center between February 2009 and March 2013. Suitability for pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) was decided by experts in PEA who were associated with a treatment center. The group with inoperable CTEPH included 16 patients, the operable group included 26 patients. There were no differences in demographics and baseline hemodynamic data between the groups. Unlike patients in the operable group, after drug treatment patients with inoperable CTEPH had a significantly higher peak V̇o2 (P < 0.001), work load (P = 0.002), and oxygen pulse (P < 0.001). In terms of gas exchange, there was an overall net trend toward improved V̇e/V̇co2 in the group with inoperable CTEPH, with an increased PaCO2 (P = 0.01), suggesting reduced hyperventilation. No changes were observed in patients with operable CTEPH. In conclusion, treatment with PAH drug therapy reveals important pathophysiological differences between inoperable and operable CTEPH, with significant pulmonary vascular and cardiac responses in inoperable disease. Drug effects on exercise function observed in inoperable CTEPH cannot be translated to all forms of CTEPH. PMID:27418685

  5. Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic(PBPK) Models Application to Screen Environmental Hazards Related to Adverse Outcome Pathways(AOPs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK models are useful in estimating exposure levels based on in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) calculations. Linkage of large sets of chemically screened vitro signature effects to in vivo adverse outcomes using IVIVE is central to the concepts of toxicology in the 21st ...

  6. Cardiovascular recovery from psychological and physiological challenge and risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality

    PubMed Central

    Panaite, Vanessa; Salomon, Kristen; Jin, Alvin; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exaggerated cardiovascular (CV) reactivity to laboratory challenge has been shown to predict future CV morbidity and mortality. CV recovery, has been less studied, and has yielded inconsistent findings, possibly due to presence of moderators. Reviews on the relationship between CV recovery and CV outcomes have been limited to cross-sectional studies and have not considered methodological factors. We performed a comprehensive meta-analytic review of the prospective literature investigating CV recovery to physical and psychological challenge and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Methods We searched PsycINFO and PubMed for prospective studies investigating the relationship between CV recovery and adverse CV outcomes. Studies were coded for variables of interest and for effect sizes (ES). We conducted a random effects weighted meta-analysis. Moderators were examined with ANOVA-analog and meta-regression analyses. Results Thirty seven studies met inclusion criteria (N=125386). Impaired recovery from challenge predicted adverse cardiovascular outcomes (summary effect, r = .17, p < .001). Physical challenge was associated with larger predictive effects than psychological challenge. Moderator analyses revealed that recovery measured at 1 minute post-exercise, passive recovery, use of mortality as an outcome measure, and older sample age were associated with larger effects. Conclusions Poor recovery from laboratory challenges predicts adverse CV outcomes, with recovery from exercise serving as a particularly strong predictor of CV outcomes. The overall ES for recovery and CV outcomes is similar to that observed for CV reactivity and suggests that the study of recovery may have incremental value for understanding adverse CV outcomes. PMID:25829236

  7. Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage in a nonathlete: case report and review of physiology.

    PubMed

    Diwakar, Amit; Schmidt, Gregory A

    2014-04-01

    The integrity of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier is vulnerable to intense exercise in elite athletes, similar to the phenomenon of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage in thoroughbred racehorses. A 50-year-old previously healthy man presented with acute onset shortness of breath, dry cough, and hypoxemia after engaging in an extremely vigorous game of handball. CT scan of the chest showed diffuse patchy air-space disease. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Infectious etiologies and bleeding diatheses were excluded by laboratory testing. Serological tests for ANCA-associated vasculitis, lupus, and Goodpasture's disease also were negative. A transthoracic echocardiogram was normal. The patient recovered completely on supportive therapy in less than 72 h. This case demonstrates strenuous exercise as a cause of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a previously healthy male with no apparent underlying cardiopulmonary disease. PMID:24532148

  8. Comparative physiology of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier: the unique avian solution

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Two opposing selective pressures have shaped the evolution of the structure of the blood-gas barrier in air breathing vertebrates. The first pressure, which has been recognized for 100 years, is to facilitate diffusive gas exchange. This requires the barrier to be extremely thin and have a large area. The second pressure, which has only recently been appreciated, is to maintain the mechanical integrity of the barrier in the face of its extreme thinness. The most important tensile stress comes from the pressure within the pulmonary capillaries, which results in a hoop stress. The strength of the barrier can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. In addition, the stress is minimized in mammals and birds by complete separation of the pulmonary and systemic circulations. Remarkably, the avian barrier is about 2.5 times thinner than that in mammals and also is much more uniform in thickness. These advantages for gas exchange come about because the avian pulmonary capillaries are unique among air breathers in being mechanically supported externally in addition to the strength that comes from the structure of their walls. This external support comes from epithelial plates that are part of the air capillaries, and the support is available because the terminal air spaces in the avian lung are extremely small due to the flow-through nature of ventilation in contrast to the reciprocating pattern in mammals. PMID:19793953

  9. Inspiratory muscle training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: structural adaptation and physiologic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Sarmiento, Alba; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Guell, Rosa; Barreiro, Esther; Hernandez, Nuria; Mota, Susana; Sangenis, Merce; Broquetas, Joan M; Casan, Pere; Gea, Joaquim

    2002-12-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of a specific inspiratory muscle training protocol on the structure of inspiratory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Fourteen patients (males, FEV1, 24 +/- 7% predicted) were randomized to either inspiratory muscle or sham training groups. Supervised breathing using a threshold inspiratory device was performed 30 minutes per day, five times a week, for 5 consecutive weeks. The inspiratory training group was subjected to inspiratory loading equivalent to 40 to 50% of their maximal inspiratory pressure. Biopsies from external intercostal muscles and vastus lateralis (control muscle) were taken before and after the training period. Muscle samples were processed for morphometric analyses using monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain isoforms I and II. Increases in both the strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles were observed in the inspiratory training group. This improvement was associated with increases in the proportion of type I fibers (by approximately 38%, p < 0.05) and in the size of type II fibers (by approximately 21%, p < 0.05) in the external intercostal muscles. No changes were observed in the control muscle. The study demonstrates that inspiratory training induces a specific functional improvement of the inspiratory muscles and adaptive changes in the structure of external intercostal muscles. PMID:12406842

  10. Physiological responses during downhill walking: A new exercise modality for subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Burtin, Chris; Hornikx, Miek; Demeyer, Heleen; De Bent, Kristien; van Remoortel, Hans; Osadnik, Christian R; Janssens, Wim; Troosters, Thierry

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle quadriceps low-frequency fatigue (LFF) during exercise promotes improvements in exercise capacity with exercise training. In healthy subjects, eccentric muscle work induced by downhill walking (DW) generates higher muscular stress, whilst metabolic cost is lower compared to level walking (LW). We investigated quadriceps LFF and metabolic cost of DW in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ten participants (67 ± 7 years, FEV1 51 ± 15% predicted) performed DW, DW carrying a load (DWL) of 10% body weight via vest and LW, in random order. Quadriceps potentiated twitch force (TWqpot) was assessed before and after each walk, and muscle damage was assessed before and 24 hours after each walk via serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Ventilation (VE) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured via breath-by-breath analysis during each walk. DW and DWL resulted in a greater decrease in TWqpot (-30 ± 14 N in DW, p < 0.05; and -22 ± 16 N in DWL, p < 0.05) compared to LW (-3 ± 21 N, p > 0.05). CK levels only increased 24 hours following DW and DWL (p < 0.05). DW and DWL showed lower VE and VO2 than LW (p < 0.05). DW is associated with enhanced quadriceps LFF and lower cardiorespiratory costs than LW. The addition of a chest load to DW does not seem to enhance these effects. PMID:25758676

  11. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy in Adults: Physiological Benefits, Indication, Clinical Benefits, and Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masaji

    2016-04-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is carried out using an air/oxygen blender, active humidifier, single heated tube, and nasal cannula. Able to deliver adequately heated and humidified medical gas at flows up to 60 L/min, it is considered to have a number of physiological advantages compared with other standard oxygen therapies, including reduced anatomical dead space, PEEP, constant FIO2 , and good humidification. Although few large randomized clinical trials have been performed, HFNC has been gaining attention as an alternative respiratory support for critically ill patients. Published data are mostly available for neonates. For critically ill adults, however, evidence is uneven because the reports cover various subjects with diverse underlying conditions, such as hypoxemic respiratory failure, exacerbation of COPD, postextubation, preintubation oxygenation, sleep apnea, acute heart failure, and conditions entailing do-not-intubate orders. Even so, across the diversity, many published reports suggest that HFNC decreases breathing frequency and work of breathing and reduces the need for respiratory support escalation. Some important issues remain to be resolved, such as definitive indications for HFNC and criteria for timing the starting and stopping of HFNC and for escalating treatment. Despite these issues, HFNC has emerged as an innovative and effective modality for early treatment of adults with respiratory failure with diverse underlying diseases. PMID:27016353

  12. Repetitive TASER X26 discharge resulted in adverse physiologic events with a dose-response relationship related to the duration of discharge in anesthetized swine model.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Ahn, Jung-Hwan; Min, Young-Gi

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of our study were to investigate the dose-response relationship of the TASER X26 discharge duration in an anesthetized swine model. Fourteen swines were anesthetized and then exposed to TASER X26 discharge for 5 sec (n = 5) or for 10 sec (n = 6). The sham control group (n = 3) was anesthetized and studied using the same protocol except TASER X26 discharges during the experiments. Hemodynamic parameters were obtained. Blood pressure and total peripheral resistance decreased significantly after TASER discharge and returned to baseline value at 15 min after 5 sec of TASER discharge but did not return to baseline values during the 30-min observation period after 10 sec of TASER discharge. Repetitive TASER X26 discharge resulted in adverse physiologic events with a dose-response relationship related to the duration of TASER X26 discharge in an anesthetized swine model. PMID:23066880

  13. [Is obesity an adverse prognostic factor for pulmonary manifestations of influenza? Lesson from complicated disease course H1N1].

    PubMed

    Zoubková, Renata; Máca, Jan; Handlos, Petr; Rudinská, Lenka; Nytra, Ivana; Chýlek, Václav; Vavrošová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual epidemics that occur at different times in both the northern and southern hemisphere. In cases of seasonal influenza these are usually mild forms of the disease, which rarely lead to death of the patient. Vulnerable groups include the elderly, the young or those with comorbidities, where the virus affects tens of thousands of victims around the world. Occasionally, however, large epidemics appear caused by a dangerous variant of a new virus, which is usually characterized by high contagiousness and pathogenicity (virulence). Consequently, it is often accompanied by a complicated disease course and associated with high mortality. In 2009, a viral pandemic disease marked pH1N1 2009 Influenza A appeared. Even though the initial predictions were far worse, the course of influenza caused by this virus was often complicated by acute respiratory failure in the form of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This formed part of the wider multiple organ failure syndrome (MODS). This type of virus often infects younger age groups and is more contagious compared to the seasonal flu. In order to illustrate the complicated forms of viral infections pH1N1 2009 Influenza A we present three case studies which demonstrate complicated pulmonary manifestation, which take the primary form of ARDS. PMID:25561242

  14. Physiological responses of mild pulmonary impaired subjects while using a demand respirator during rest and work

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Jackson, A.W.; Page, K.; Moss, R.F.; Bradley, O.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-04-01

    This investigation determined the cardiorespiratory responses of subjects with normal lung function and exercise tolerance and compared them with subjects with moderate and severe impairment of lung function and exercise tolerance. Comparisons were made during work while wearing an industrial respirator. Physiologically and subjectively the response of the normal and moderately impaired subjects to respirator wear during rest, 35%, 50% and 63% of their maximal workloads were not different. However, when the moderately impaired worked at 63% of their maximum the workload was equivalent to 50% of maximum of the normal subject. Significant differences in the peak flow/pressure ratio of the severely impaired compred to the normals and moderately impaired were found. By relating work performance to the dyspnea index it was suggested that the relationship between maximal lung function and maximal work performance needs to be identified both with and without respirators. This relationship may prove suitable in predicting performance during respirator wear.

  15. Estimating human-equivalent no observed adverse-effect levels for VOCs (volatile organic compounds) based on minimal knowledge of physiological parameters. Technical paper

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Jarabek, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. EPA advocates the assessment of health-effects data and calculation of inhaled reference doses as benchmark values for gauging systemic toxicity to inhaled gases. The assessment often requires an inter- or intra-species dose extrapolation from no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) exposure concentrations in animals to human equivalent NOAEL exposure concentrations. To achieve this, a dosimetric extrapolation procedure was developed based on the form or type of equations that describe the uptake and disposition of inhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) models. The procedure assumes allometric scaling of most physiological parameters and that the value of the time-integrated human arterial-blood concentration must be limited to no more than to that of experimental animals. The scaling assumption replaces the need for most parameter values and allows the derivation of a simple formula for dose extrapolation of VOCs that gives equivalent or more-conservative exposure concentrations values than those that would be obtained using a PB-PK model in which scaling was assumed.

  16. Physiological properties of human diaphragm muscle fibres and the effect of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Stubbings, Alison K; Moore, Alastair J; Dusmet, Michael; Goldstraw, Peter; West, Timothy G; Polkey, Michael I; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The contractile and actomyosin ATPase properties of single fibres were examined in human diaphragm muscle obtained from patients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Costal diaphragm biopsies were taken from five patients without evidence of COPD and from 11 age-matched individuals with varying degrees of the disease. Our aim was to establish whether changes in contractile properties of COPD diaphragm could be fully explained by the previously documented shift towards a greater proportion of type I myosin heavy chain isoform in COPD. The relative proportion of type I diaphragm fibres from non-COPD and COPD patients was measured by gel electrophoresis, and was negatively correlated with FEV1 over the full range of values investigated. There was also significant atrophy of the type I fibre population in COPD diaphragms. Isometric tension was similar among the fibre types and between the COPD and non-COPD patients. The intrinsic energetic properties of diaphragm fibres were examined by monitoring the time-resolved actomyosin ATPase activity in COPD and non-COPD fibres that produced similar isometric forces. The isometric ATPase rate in COPD fibres was reduced to 50% of the rate in non-COPD fibres; hence, the cost of isometric contraction in type I and type IIA COPD fibres was reduced to between one-third and one-half of the tension cost calculated for non-COPD fibres. The rate of force development in type I COPD fibres was reduced to 50% of the rate seen in non-COPD type-I fibres. No difference in the rate of ATP consumption between COPD and non-COPD fibres was evident during isovelocity shortening. These data extend previous findings showing that aspects of breathing mechanics during progressive COPD are associated with remodelling of the diaphragm fibre-type distribution; on top of the increase in type I fibres there are fibre-specific reductions in force development rate (type I fibres) and ATPase rate that are consistent with the

  17. Systems physiology of the airways in health and obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T

    2016-09-01

    Fresh air entering the mouth and nose is brought to the blood-gas barrier in the lungs by a repetitively branching network of airways. Provided the individual airway branches remain patent, this airway tree achieves an enormous amplification in cross-sectional area from the trachea to the terminal bronchioles. Obstructive lung diseases such as asthma occur when airway patency becomes compromised. Understanding the pathophysiology of these obstructive diseases thus begins with a consideration of the factors that determine the caliber of an individual airway, which include the force balance between the inward elastic recoil of the airway wall, the outward tethering forces of its parenchymal attachments, and any additional forces due to contraction of airway smooth muscle. Other factors may also contribute significantly to airway narrowing, such as thickening of the airway wall and accumulation of secretions in the lumen. Airway obstruction becomes particularly severe when these various factors occur in concert. However, the effect of airway abnormalities on lung function cannot be fully understood only in terms of what happens to a single airway because narrowing throughout the airway tree is invariably heterogeneous and interdependent. Obstructive lung pathologies thus manifest as emergent phenomena arising from the way in which the airway tree behaves a system. These emergent phenomena are studied with clinical measurements of lung function made by spirometry and by mechanical impedance measured with the forced oscillation technique. Anatomically based computational models are linking these measurements to underlying anatomic structure in systems physiology terms. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:423-437. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27340818

  18. A Prospective, Observational Study of Adverse Reactions to Drug Regimen for Multi-Drug Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Hire, Rohan; Kale, A. S.; Dakhale, G. N.; Gaikwad, Nilesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective 1) To assess the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of second-line anti-tubercular drugs used to treat Multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in central India on the basis of causality, severity and avoidability scales. 2) To investigate the relationship of MDR-TB (primary or secondary) and the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) with mean smear conversion time. Material and Methods: A prospective, observational study was carried out on diagnosed multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients enrolled for DOTS-Plus regimen at TB and Chest Disease Department from January 2012 to December 2012 with a follow-up of nine months. Encountered ADRs were noted along with the time of sputum conversion. Results Total 64 ADRs were reported in 55 patients out of total 110 patients (n=110). As per the Naranjo causality assessment of ADRs, seven patients had definite, 45 had probable, and 3 had possible causal relation with drugs of DOTS-Plus regimen. As per the Hartwig’s severity assessment scale, there were total 7 ADRs in Level 1, 6 in Level 2, 33 in Level 3 and 9 in Level 4. Hallas avoidability assessment scale divided the ADRs as 3 being definitely avoidable, 26 possibly avoidable, 23 not avoidable and three not evaluable. Mean sputum smear conversion time was significantly higher in patients with a secondary type than that of primary type of MDR TB and in patients with DM than those without DM. Conclusion ADRs were common in patients of MDR-TB on DOTs-Plus drug regimen. It was due to lack of availability of safer and equally potent drugs in DOTs-Plus drug regimen compared to DOTS regimen in non-resistant TB. The frequency and severity of ADRs can be reduced by strict vigilance about known and unknown ADRs, monitoring their laboratory and clinical parameters and instituting appropriate measures. PMID:25237474

  19. Central Versus Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism: Analysis of the Impact on the Physiological Parameters and Long-term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Alonso Martinez, José Luis; Anniccherico Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Urbieta Echezarreta, Miren Aranzazu; García, Ione Villar; Álvaro, Jorge Rojo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies aimed at assessing whether the emboli lodged in the central pulmonary arteries carry a worse prognosis than more peripheral emboli have yielded controversial results. Aims: To explore the impact on survival and long-term prognosis of central pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods: Consecutive patients diagnosed with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism by means of computed tomography (CT) angiography were evaluated at episode index and traced through the computed system of clinical recording and following-up. Central pulmonary embolism was diagnosed when thrombi were seen in the trunk or in the main pulmonary arteries and peripheral pulmonary embolism when segmental or subsegmental arteries were affected. Results: A total of 530 consecutive patients diagnosed with pulmonary embolism were evaluated; 255 patients had central pulmonary embolism and 275 patients had segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism. Patients with central pulmonary embolism were older, had higher plasma levels of N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), troponin I, D-dimer, alveolar-arterial gradient, and shock index (P < .001 for each one). Patients with central pulmonary embolism had an all-cause mortality of 40% while patients with segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE) had an overall mortality of 27% and odds ratio of 1.81 [confidence interval (CI) 95% 1.16-1.9]. Survival was lower in patients with central PE than in patients with segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism, even after avoiding confounders (P = .018). Conclusions: Apart from a greater impact on hemodynamics, gas exchange, and right ventricular dysfunction, central pulmonary embolism associates a shorter survival and an increased long-term mortality. PMID:27114970

  20. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  1. A novel bioreactor for mechanobiological studies of engineered heart valve tissue formation under pulmonary arterial physiological flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Boronyak, Steven M; Le, Trung; Holmes, Andrew; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Sacks, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    The ability to replicate physiological hemodynamic conditions during in vitro tissue development has been recognized as an important aspect in the development and in vitro assessment of engineered heart valve tissues. Moreover, we have demonstrated that studies aiming to understand mechanical conditioning require separation of the major heart valve deformation loading modes: flow, stretch, and flexure (FSF) (Sacks et al., 2009, "Bioengineering Challenges for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering," Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng., 11(1), pp. 289-313). To achieve these goals in a novel bioreactor design, we utilized a cylindrical conduit configuration for the conditioning chamber to allow for higher fluid velocities, translating to higher shear stresses on the in situ tissue specimens while retaining laminar flow conditions. Moving boundary computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed to predict the flow field under combined cyclic flexure and steady flow (cyclic-flex-flow) states using various combinations of flow rate, and media viscosity. The device was successfully constructed and tested for incubator housing, gas exchange, and sterility. In addition, we performed a pilot experiment using biodegradable polymer scaffolds seeded with bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSCs) at a seeding density of 5 × 10(6) cells/cm(2). The constructs were subjected to combined cyclic flexure (1 Hz frequency) and steady flow (Re = 1376; flow rate of 1.06 l/min (LPM); shear stress in the range of 0-9 dynes/cm(2) for 2 weeks to permit physiological shear stress conditions. Assays revealed significantly (P < 0.05) higher amounts of collagen (2051 ± 256 μg/g) at the end of 2 weeks in comparison to similar experiments previously conducted in our laboratory but performed at subphysiological levels of shear stress (<2 dynes/cm(2); Engelmayr et al., 2006, "Cyclic Flexure and Laminar Flow Synergistically Accelerate Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Engineered Tissue Formation: Implications

  2. Association of haematocrit and red blood cell transfusion with outcomes in infants with shunt-dependent pulmonary blood flow and univentricular physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Rahul; Parsons, Andrew; McClelland, Sarenthia; Morgan, Elizabeth; Robertson, Michael J.; Noel, Tommy R.; Schmitz, Michael L.; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gupta, Punkaj

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and haematocrit values with outcomes in infants with univentricular physiology undergoing surgery for a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. Material and methods This study included infants ≤ 2 months of age who underwent modified Blalock-Taussig shunt surgery at the Arkansas Children’s Hospital (2006–2012). Infants undergoing a Norwood operation or Damus-Kaye-Stansel operation with modified Blalock-Taussig shunt were excluded. Demographics, pre-operative, operative, daily laboratory data, and post-operative variables were collected. We studied the association between haematocrit and blood transfusion with a composite clinical outcome. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to study the probability of study outcomes as a function of haematocrit values and RBC transfusions after operation. Results Seventy-three patients qualified for inclusion. All study patients received blood transfusion within the first 48 hours after heart surgery. The median haematocrit was 44.3 (interquartile range [IQR] 42.5–46.2), and the median volume of RBC transfused was 28 mL/kg (IQR, 10–125) in the first 14 days after surgery. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 13.6% (10 patients). A multivariable analysis adjusted for risk factors, including weight, prematurity, cardiopulmonary bypass and postoperative need for nitric oxide and dialysis, revealed no association between haematocrit values and RBC transfusion with the composite clinical outcome. Discussion We did not find an association between higher haematocrit values and increasing RBC transfusions with improved outcomes in infants with shunt-dependent pulmonary blood flow and univentricular physiology. The power of our study was small, which prevents any strong statement on this lack of association. Future multi-centre, randomised controlled trials are needed to investigate this topic in further

  3. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  4. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  5. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  6. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood clot; Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... x-ray CT angiogram of the chest Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan, also called a V/Q scan ...

  7. Nitrogen chemistry and lung physiology.

    PubMed

    Marozkina, Nadzeya V; Gaston, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The versatile chemistry of nitrogen is important to pulmonary physiology. Indeed, almost all redox forms of nitrogen are relevant to pulmonary physiology and to pathophysiology. Here we review the relevance to pulmonary biology of (a) elemental nitrogen; (b) reduced forms of nitrogen such as amines, ammonia, and hydroxylamine; and (c) oxidized forms of nitrogen such as the nitroxyl anion, the nitric oxide free radical, and S-nitrosothiols. Our focus is on oxidized nitrogen in the form of S-nitrosothiol bond-containing species, which are now appreciated to be important to every type of cell-signaling process in the lung. We also review potential clinical applications of nitrogen oxide biochemistry. These principles are being translated into clinical practice as diagnostic techniques and therapies for a range of pulmonary diseases including asthma, cystic fibrosis, adult respiratory distress syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia, and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25668023

  8. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-08-15

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600-4,100 m) residents aged 18-25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  9. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600–4,100 m) residents aged 18–25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  10. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... area). This type of clot is called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) . The blood clot breaks off and travels ...

  11. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  12. Computer-Aided Tomographic Analysis of Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Correlation with Pulmonary Physiologic Tests and Patient-Centred Measures of Perceived Dyspnea and Functional Disability

    PubMed Central

    Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Di Donato, Eleonora; Di Carlo, Marco; Ceccarelli, Luca; Giuseppetti, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed (a) to evaluate an improved quantitative lung fibrosis score based on a computer-aided diagnosis (CaM) system in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc),—related interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD), (b) to investigate the relationship between physiologic parameters (forced vital capacity [FVC] and single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide [DLCO]), patient-centred measures of dyspnea and functional disability and CaM and visual reader-based (CoVR) methods, and (c) to identify potential surrogate measures from quantitative and visual HRCT measurement. Methods 126 patients with SSc underwent chest radiography, HRCT and PFTs. The following patient-centred measures were obtained: modified Borg Dyspnea Index (Borg score), VAS for breathing, and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI). HRCT abnormalities were scored according to the conventional visual reader-based score (CoVR) and by a CaM. The relationships among the HRCT scores, physiologic parameters (FVC and DLCO, % predicted) results and patient-centred measures, were calculated using linear regression analysis and Pearson’s correlation. Multivariate regression models were performed to identify the predictor variables on severity of pulmonary fibrosis. Results Subjects with limited cutaneous SSc had lower HAQ-DI scores than subjects with diffuse cutaneous SSc (p <0.001). CaM and CoVR scores were similar in the 2 groups. In univariate analysis, a strong correlation between CaM and CoVR was observed (p <0.0001). In multivariate analysis the CaM and CoVR scores were predicted by DLco, FVC, Borg score and HAQ-DI. Age, sex, disease duration, anti-topoisomerase antibodies and mRSS were not significantly associated with severity of pulmonary fibrosis on CaM- and CoVR methods. Conclusions Although a close correlation between CaM score results and CoVR total score was found, CaM analysis showed a more significant correlation with DLco (more so than the FVC

  13. Long-term therapy with oral treprostinil in pulmonary arterial hypertension failed to lead to improvement in important physiologic measures: results from a single center.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kelly Marie; Ruggiero, Rosechelle; Bartolome, Sonja; Velez-Martinez, Mariella; Darsaklis, Konstantina; Kingman, Martha; Harden, Scarlet; Torres, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Sustained-release oral treprostinil, an oral prostacyclin, led to significant improvement in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) versus placebo in treatment-naive patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but failed to lead to significant improvement in two 16-week trials in patients receiving background PAH therapies (FREEDOM studies). Long-term studies are lacking. Our objective was to evaluate 6MWD, functional class, hemodynamics, and other long-term outcomes during oral treprostinil administration in PAH. Patients receiving oral treprostinil through the FREEDOM studies at our institution were included and were followed for up to 7 years. The primary end point was change in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at first follow-up catheterization. Other end points included 6MWD, functional class, and other hemodynamic results. Thirty-seven patients received oral treprostinil for a median of 948 days, with 81%, 61%, and 47% continuing therapy at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Mean treprostinil dose at 3, 12, and 24 months was 4.3 ± 2.3, 8.6 ± 3.2, and 11.7 ± 5.8 mg/24 h, respectively. Compared with pretreatment values, there was no significant change in 6MWD at 3 or 12 months, no improvement in functional class at 12 months, and no significant change in hemodynamics at the first follow-up catheterization (N = 34). Oral treprostinil dose was inversely associated with change in PVR (r = -0.42, P < 0.05), and change in PVR was numerically better among patients in the highest dosing quartile. No significant improvement in 6MWD, functional class, or hemodynamics versus pretreatment values was seen with long-term oral treprostinil therapy, potentially because of inability to achieve a clinically effective dose. PMID:26401252

  14. Long-term therapy with oral treprostinil in pulmonary arterial hypertension failed to lead to improvement in important physiologic measures: results from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Rosechelle; Bartolome, Sonja; Velez-Martinez, Mariella; Darsaklis, Konstantina; Kingman, Martha; Harden, Scarlet; Torres, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sustained-release oral treprostinil, an oral prostacyclin, led to significant improvement in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) versus placebo in treatment-naive patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but failed to lead to significant improvement in two 16-week trials in patients receiving background PAH therapies (FREEDOM studies). Long-term studies are lacking. Our objective was to evaluate 6MWD, functional class, hemodynamics, and other long-term outcomes during oral treprostinil administration in PAH. Patients receiving oral treprostinil through the FREEDOM studies at our institution were included and were followed for up to 7 years. The primary end point was change in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at first follow-up catheterization. Other end points included 6MWD, functional class, and other hemodynamic results. Thirty-seven patients received oral treprostinil for a median of 948 days, with 81%, 61%, and 47% continuing therapy at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Mean treprostinil dose at 3, 12, and 24 months was 4.3 ± 2.3, 8.6 ± 3.2, and 11.7 ± 5.8 mg/24 h, respectively. Compared with pretreatment values, there was no significant change in 6MWD at 3 or 12 months, no improvement in functional class at 12 months, and no significant change in hemodynamics at the first follow-up catheterization (N = 34). Oral treprostinil dose was inversely associated with change in PVR (r = −0.42, P < 0.05), and change in PVR was numerically better among patients in the highest dosing quartile. No significant improvement in 6MWD, functional class, or hemodynamics versus pretreatment values was seen with long-term oral treprostinil therapy, potentially because of inability to achieve a clinically effective dose. PMID:26401252

  15. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve pulmonary stenosis; Pulmonary stenosis; Stenosis - pulmonary valve; Balloon valvuloplasty - pulmonary ... water pills) Treat abnormal heartbeats and rhythms Percutaneous balloon pulmonary dilation (valvuloplasty) may be performed when no ...

  16. Space physiology within an exercise physiology curriculum.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason R; West, John B

    2013-09-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of chronic terrestrial exercise (TEx) and microgravity (μG). We used a series of peer-reviewed publications to demonstrate that many of the physiological adaptations to TEx and μG are opposite. For example, TEx typically improves cardiovascular function and orthostatic tolerance, whereas μG can lead to declines in both. TEx leads to muscle hypertrophy, and μG elicits muscle atrophy. TEx increases bone mineral density and red blood cell mass, whereas μG decreases bone mineral density and red blood cell mass. Importantly, exercise during spaceflight remains a crucial countermeasure to limit some of these adverse physiological adaptations to μG. This curriculum develops critical thinking skills by dissecting peer-reviewed articles and discussing the strengths and weaknesses associated with simulated and actual μG studies. Moreover, the curriculum includes studies on both animals and humans, providing a strong translational component to the curriculum. In summary, we have developed a novel space physiology curriculum delivered during the final weeks of an exercise physiology course in which students gain critical new knowledge that reinforces key concepts presented throughout the semester. PMID:24022767

  17. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity mimicking acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Iacopo; Tacconi, Danilo; Grotti, Simone; Brandini, Rossella; Salvadori, Claudia; Caremani, Marcello; Bolognese, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic drug. Its long-term use may, however, lead to several adverse effects, with pulmonary toxicity being the most serious. The article presents the case of a 78-year-old woman with a history of cardiac surgery, who after 2 years of amiodarone therapy for prophylactic treatment of atrial fibrillation developed amiodarone pneumonitis mimicking an acute pulmonary edema. The patient failed to respond to diuretic therapy and several courses of anti-infective therapy. Differential diagnosis of different causes of pulmonary infiltrates did not demonstrate any other abnormality. Lung biopsy findings were consistent with the diagnosis of amiodarone pneumonitis. Given the widespread use of amiodarone as an antiarrhythmic agent, pneumologists and cardiologists should consider this important adverse effect as a differential diagnosis of pulmonary distress refractory to therapy in all patients treated with amiodarone who present with respiratory symptoms and pneumonia-like illness. PMID:19924000

  18. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Elshama, Said Said; El-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  19. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  20. Applied physiology of amateur wrestling.

    PubMed

    Horswill, C A

    1992-08-01

    The general physiological profile of the successful wrestler is of one having high anaerobic power (mean range of 6.1 to 7.5 W/kg for arms; mean range of 11.5 to 19.9 W/kg for legs); high anaerobic capacity (range for arms 4.8 to 5.2 W/kg; range for legs 7.4 to 8.2 W/kg); high muscular endurance; average to above average aerobic power (range 52 to 63 ml/kg/min); average pulmonary function (range 1.90 to 2.02 L/kg/min for VEmax); normal flexibility; a high degree of leanness (range 3.7 to 13.0% fat) excluding heavyweights; and a somatotype that emphasises mesomorphy. Training methods include wrestling, and nonwrestling activities for increasing strength and power (i.e. resistance training), and to improve cardiovascular fitness (i.e. endurance training). Unfortunately, data on the isolated effects of wrestling on fitness and the type of training programme most effective for success in wrestling are scarce. The practice of weight loss is commonly used by wrestlers to enhance performance. Rapid weight loss has profound adverse effects on the wrestler's physiology but little effect on strength or anaerobic power performance as measured in the laboratory. In contrast, muscular endurance appears to be impaired by the rapid weight loss. Current research on weight loss and performance in wrestlers has taken 2 directions: (a) towards nutritional treatments to prevent suboptimal muscular endurance, and (b) towards the development of programmes to estimate minimal weight based on body composition techniques and thereby prevent weight reductions. PMID:1509226

  1. [Pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses].

    PubMed

    Onodera, S

    1992-12-01

    Alterations in the physiological balance to maintain the pulmonary circulation at a normal low pressure level result in an elevation in pulmonary vascular tone. Pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses were analyzed under some experimental conditions, which included microembolism, administration of vasoactive agents, hypoxia, and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. It is widely accepted that these responses are highly localized and complex. In the present study, excised canine lung lobes, rat lungs, and pulmonary arterial rings from the rat were employed according to the particular experimental design. The mechanism of the initial rapid elevation followed by a gradual decline in perfusion pressure in microembolism was considered to be related not only to the size of the emboli, but to the degree of mechanical injury of the endothelium. The main sites of constriction of the pulmonary vasculature by several drugs were determined in the pulsatile perfused canine lung lobes, according to the degree of decrease in inflow wave amplitude during antegrade or retrograde perfusion. Further, by applying the same method it was confirmed that the site of hypoxic vasoconstriction is located in the peripheral pulmonary vascular bed between the muscular arteries and veins, which are constricted mainly by serotonin and histamine, respectively. A cross perfusion system was set up, employing two lobes from the same dog, in which normoxic blood was perfused into the hypoxic ventilated lobe and vice versa. As a result, the pulmonary vessels showed a response to ventilation hypoxia that was far more sensitive than that to perfusion hypoxia. The effects of a beta-agonist (isoproterenol) and beta-antagonists (propranolol, pindolol) on hypoxic vasoconstriction were observed. Although pindolol (a vasodilatory beta-blocker) abolished hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, which was similar to the effect of isoproterenol, the mechanism of action of pindolol was suggested to be different

  2. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  3. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  4. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  5. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  6. Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Rali, Parth; Gandhi, Viral; Malik, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism covers a wide spectrum of presentation from an asymptomatic individual to a life-threatening medical emergency. It is of paramount importance to appropriately risk stratify patients with pulmonary embolism, particularly with those who present without hypotension. Right ventricular dysfunction can evolve after a patient has received a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, necessitating aggressive measures rather than simple anticoagulation. In this review, we discuss definition, risk stratification, pathogenesis, diagnostic approach, and management, with particular focus on massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:26919674

  7. Pulmonary Impedance and Pulmonary Doppler Trace in the Perioperative Period.

    PubMed

    Tousignant, Claude; Van Orman, Jordan R

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension and associated vascular changes may frequently accompany left-sided heart disease in the adult cardiac surgical population. Perioperative assessment of right ventricular function using echocardiography is well established. In general, understanding the constraints upon which the right ventricle must work is mostly limited to invasive monitoring consisting of pulmonary artery pressures, cardiac output, and pulmonary vascular resistance. The latter 2 measurements assume constant (mean) flows and pressures. The systolic and diastolic pressures offer a limited understanding of the pulsatile constraints, which may become significant in disease. In normal physiology, pressure and flow waves display near-similar contours. When left atrial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance are increased, changes in pulmonary arterial compliance will result in elevated impedance to right ventricular ejection. Pressure reflections, the result of strong reflectors, return more quickly in a noncompliant system. They augment pulmonary artery pressure causing a premature reduction in flow. As a result, pressure and flow waves will now be dissimilar. The impact of vascular changes on right ventricular ejection can be assessed using pulmonary artery Doppler spectral imaging. The normal flow velocity profile is rounded at its peak. Earlier peaks and premature reductions in flow will make it appear more triangular. In some cases, the flow pattern may appear notched. The measurement of acceleration time, the time from onset to peak flow velocity is an indicator of constraint to ejection; shortened times have been associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance and pressure. Understanding the changes in the pulmonary arterial system in disease and the physics of the hemodynamic alterations are essential in interpreting pulmonary artery Doppler data. Analyzing pulmonary artery Doppler flow signals may assist in the evaluation of right ventricular function in

  8. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  9. Diseases of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  10. Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oudiz, Ronald J

    2016-08-01

    The classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an attempt to define subtypes of PH based on clinical presentation, underlying physiology, and treatment implications. Five groups of PH have been defined, and the classification scheme has been refined over the years to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of PH. Understanding the classification of PH is paramount before embarking on a work-up of patients with PH or suspected PH because treatment and outcome can vary greatly. PMID:27443133

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  12. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications on Sleep.

    PubMed

    Doghramji, Karl; Jangro, William C

    2016-09-01

    Psychotropic medications such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, stimulants, and benzodiazepines are widely prescribed. Most of these medications are thought to exert their effects through modulation of various monoamines as well as interactions with receptors such as histamine and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Through these interactions, psychotropics can also have a significant impact on sleep physiology, resulting in both beneficial and adverse effects on sleep. PMID:27514301

  13. Physiology Of Drowning: A Review.

    PubMed

    Bierens, Joost J L M; Lunetta, Philippe; Tipton, Mike; Warner, David S

    2016-03-01

    Drowning physiology relates to two different events: immersion (upper airway above water) and submersion (upper airway under water). Immersion involves integrated cardiorespiratory responses to skin and deep body temperature, including cold shock, physical incapacitation, and hypovolemia, as precursors of collapse and submersion. The physiology of submersion includes fear of drowning, diving response, autonomic conflict, upper airway reflexes, water aspiration and swallowing, emesis, and electrolyte disorders. Submersion outcome is determined by cardiac, pulmonary, and neurological injury. Knowledge of drowning physiology is scarce. Better understanding may identify methods to improve survival, particularly related to hot-water immersion, cold shock, cold-induced physical incapacitation, and fear of drowning. PMID:26889019

  14. Pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Troosters, Thierry; Demeyer, Heleen; Hornikx, Miek; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Janssens, Wim

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a therapy that offers benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that are complementary to those obtained by pharmacotherapy. The main objective of pulmonary rehabilitation is to restore muscle function and exercise tolerance, reverse other nonrespiratory consequences of the disease, and help patients to self-manage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its exacerbations and symptoms. To do so, a multidisciplinary program tailored to the patient in terms of program content, exercise prescription, and setting must be offered. Several settings and programs have shown to spin off in significant immediate results. The challenge lies in maintaining the benefits outside the program. PMID:24507849

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Mathier, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension occurs as the result of disease processes increasing pressure within the pulmonary circulation, eventually leading to right ventricular failure. Patients may become critically ill from complications of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure or may develop pulmonary hypertension as the result of critical illness. Diagnostic testing should evaluate for common causes such as left heart failure, hypoxemic lung disease and pulmonary embolism. Relatively few patients with pulmonary hypertension encountered in clinical practice require specific pharmacologic treatment of pulmonary hypertension targeting the pulmonary vasculature. Management of right ventricular failure involves optimization of preload, maintenance of systemic blood pressure and augmentation of inotropy to restore systemic perfusion. Selected patients may require pharmacologic therapy to reduce right ventricular afterload by directly targeting the pulmonary vasculature, but only after excluding elevated left heart filling pressures and confirming increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Critically-ill patients with pulmonary hypertension remain at high risk of adverse outcomes, requiring a diligent and thoughtful approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25944777

  16. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J A; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E B

    2009-12-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  17. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, D. D.; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T.; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  18. Intimate Partner Violence, PTSD, and Adverse Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Mary Ann; Green, Bonnie L.; Kaltman, Stacey I.; Roesch, Darren M.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Krause, Elizabeth D.

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of adverse health outcomes related to intimate partner violence (IPV) is well documented. Yet we know little about the pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Research concerning the psychological, biological, neurological, behavioral, and physiological alterations following exposure to IPV--many of which are associated…

  19. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. PMID:26471823

  1. The Impact of Immunosenescence on Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Michelle A.; Chotirmall, Sanjay H.

    2015-01-01

    The global population is aging with significant gains in life expectancy particularly in the developed world. Consequently, greater focus on understanding the processes that underlie physiological aging has occurred. Key facets of advancing age include genomic instability, telomere shortening, epigenetic changes, and declines in immune function termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence and its associated chronic low grade systemic “inflamm-aging” contribute to the development and progression of pulmonary disease in older individuals. These physiological processes predispose to pulmonary infection and confer specific and unique clinical phenotypes observed in chronic respiratory disease including late-onset asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. Emerging concepts of the gut and airway microbiome further complicate the interrelationship between host and microorganism particularly from an immunological perspective and especially so in the setting of immunosenescence. This review focuses on our current understanding of the aging process, immunosenescence, and how it can potentially impact on various pulmonary diseases and the human microbiome. PMID:26199462

  2. Central and peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance: Implications for who should undergo pulmonary thromboendarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Poullis, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy remains a technically challenging procedure with variable outcomes with regard to improvement in pulmonary function. Reducing the resistance to flow between the pulmonary valve and the pulmonary capillary bed is the key aim of surgery. The resistance to flow is due to the combination of resistance due to the central clot and distal capillary resistance. We hypothesise that the use of fluid mechanics in combination with modern radiology and electronic circuit theory can potentially predict who should or should not undergo a thromboendarterectomy. Electronic circuit theory of two resistors in series was utilised to demonstrate the concept of a model of a central clot and the peripheral pulmonary capillary bed. A simplified 2D model of the lungs utilising finite element analysis and Poiseuille's law was constructed for proof of principle. Modelling predicts that cardiac output and anatomical obstruction interplay and can have profound effects on the outcomes after thromboendarterectomy. Identical pulmonary artery pressures, due to differing cardiac outputs and identical anatomical obstructions due to thrombus can have very different physiological outcomes with regard to changes in pulmonary artery pressure. Modelling the pulmonary vasculature to determine central and peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance may help in predicting who should undergo pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Mathematical modelling can potentially predict which patients have haemodynamically significant clots in their pulmonary arteries that thromboendarterectomy may potentially help in the setting of pulmonary capillary disease. PMID:25997984

  3. Physiological Waterfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, David E.

    1976-01-01

    Provides background information, defining areas within organ systems where physiological waterfalls exist. Describes pressure-flow relationships of elastic tubes (blood vessels, airways, renal tubules, various ducts). (CS)

  4. Physiology in microgravity.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    2000-07-01

    Studies of physiology in microgravity are remarkably recent, with almost all the data being obtained in the past 40 years. The first human spaceflight did not take place until 1961. Physiological measurements in connection with the early flights were crude, but, in the past 10 years, an enormous amount of new information has been obtained from experiments on Spacelab. The United States and Soviet/Russian programs have pursued different routes. The US has mainly concentrated on relatively short flights but with highly sophisticated equipment such as is available in Spacelab. In contrast, the Soviet/Russian program concentrated on first the Salyut and then the Mir space stations. These had the advantage of providing information about long-term exposure to microgravity, but the degree of sophistication of the measurements in space was less. It is hoped that the International Space Station will combine the best of both approaches. The most important physiological changes caused by microgravity include bone demineralization, skeletal muscle atrophy, vestibular problems causing space motion sickness, cardiovascular problems resulting in postflight orthostatic intolerance, and reductions in plasma volume and red cell mass. Pulmonary function is greatly altered but apparently not seriously impaired. Space exploration is a new frontier with long-term missions to the moon and Mars not far away. Understanding the physiological changes caused by long-duration microgravity remains a daunting challenge. PMID:10904075

  5. Adverse Events of Monoclonal Antibodies Used for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  6. Adverse events of monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  7. Pulmonary Atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to repair the defect. Return to main topic: Congenital Heart Disease See on other sites: MedlinePlus https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001091.htm Pulmonary atresia American Heart Association www. ...

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  9. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis See also: Aspergillosis Symptoms You may not have ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Update Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin ...

  10. [Pulmonary rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Senjyu, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation commenced in Japan in 1957. However, the development of pulmonary rehabilitation took a long time due to the lack of the necessary health and medical services. Pulmonary rehabilitation is a comprehensive intervention based on a thorough patient assessment followed by patient-tailored therapies that include, but are not limited to, exercise training, education, and behavior change, designed to improve the physical and psychological condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote the long-term adherence to health-enhancing behaviors. The benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation include a decrease in breathlessness and an improvement in exercise tolerance. It is important that the gains in exercise tolerance lead to an increase in daily physical activity. PMID:27254948

  11. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in the leg called a deep vein thrombosis that breaks loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a ...

  12. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow from the right ventricle (right side pumping chamber) to the lungs. In pulmonary atresia, a ... Reconstructing the heart as a single ventricle (1 pumping chamber instead of 2) Heart transplant

  13. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of heart disease that occurs from birth (congenital heart disease), in which the pulmonary valve does not form ... As with most congenital heart diseases, there is no known cause of ... is associated with another type of congenital heart defect ...

  14. Rowing Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  15. Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Tanser, Paul H.

    1980-01-01

    The physician who deals with pulmonary edema from a pathophysiologic basis will seldom make a diagnostic or therapeutic error. Recent additions to preload and afterload therapy have greatly helped in the emergency and ambulatory treatment of pulmonary edema due to left heart failure. Careful follow-up and patient self-monitoring are the most effective means of reducing hospitalization of chronic heart failure patients. PMID:21293700

  16. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  17. Long term combination treatment for severe idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Affuso, Flora; Cirillo, Plinio; Ruvolo, Antonio; Carlomagno, Guido; Fazio, Serafino

    2010-01-01

    We report the long-term follow-up of 3 cases of severe idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, in whom tadalafil plus sitaxentan combination therapy improved the clinical condition and exercise performance without any relevant adverse event. PMID:21160759

  18. [Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Ringshausen, F C; Rademacher, J

    2016-02-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of biologically diverse, ubiquitous and naturally multi-drug resistant bacteria with facultative pathogenicity. Recent data suggest that their clinical significance is increasing worldwide and that susceptible individuals may be at risk for infection via contaminated surfaces and aerosols. These individuals often have a predisposition for chronic respiratory diseases, e. g. bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis and these conditions frequently share the same unspecific signs and symptoms with NTM pulmonary disease (NTM-PD). As a consequence, the diagnosis of NTM-PD, which is established based on clinical, radiological and microbiological criteria, is often delayed. Treating NTM-PD is more demanding than treating pulmonary tuberculosis as therapy is generally more tedious, toxic and expensive as well as being prone to failure. Patient and pathogen-specific factors guide the choice of an appropriate antimicrobial combination regimen, which should comply with national and international recommendations. Adverse events are common, should be anticipated and closely monitored. If infections with infrequently encountered mycobacterial species and severe or refractory disease occur, an interdisciplinary approach should be used, involving infectious disease specialists, experienced thoracic surgeons and referral to an NTM specialist center. PMID:26810111

  19. Severe amiodarone induced pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Nicholas; Yuhico, Luke S; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Szombathy, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    A known complication of Amiodarone therapy is Amiodarone induced Pulmonary Toxicity (APT). Several features of this adverse effect make it difficult to diagnosis and treat. The case of a 63-year-old male with classic radiographic and histologic findings of APT is discussed. Clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnostic findings, and treatment strategies are reviewed. The patient was successfully managed with pulse high dose steroid therapy. PMID:23205299

  20. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  1. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  2. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  3. Ambrisentan: new drug. Too risky in mildly symptomatic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    2009-04-01

    (1) In patients with mildly symptomatic pulmonary hypertension (stage III), there is no firm evidence that ambrisentan reduces mortality or slows disease progression. In contrast, ambrisentan has frequent and sometimes serious adverse effects; (2) In patients whose physical activity is markedly restricted by pulmonary hypertension, it is better to continue using bosentan, with which we have far more experience. PMID:19585715

  4. IMMUNOSUPPRESSION OF PULMONARY NATURAL KILLER ACTIVITY BY EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. ulmonary atural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity...

  5. An integrated physiology model to study regional lung damage effects and the physiologic response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This work expands upon a previously developed exercise dynamic physiology model (DPM) with the addition of an anatomic pulmonary system in order to quantify the impact of lung damage on oxygen transport and physical performance decrement. Methods A pulmonary model is derived with an anatomic structure based on morphometric measurements, accounting for heterogeneous ventilation and perfusion observed experimentally. The model is incorporated into an existing exercise physiology model; the combined system is validated using human exercise data. Pulmonary damage from blast, blunt trauma, and chemical injury is quantified in the model based on lung fluid infiltration (edema) which reduces oxygen delivery to the blood. The pulmonary damage component is derived and calibrated based on published animal experiments; scaling laws are used to predict the human response to lung injury in terms of physical performance decrement. Results The augmented dynamic physiology model (DPM) accurately predicted the human response to hypoxia, altitude, and exercise observed experimentally. The pulmonary damage parameters (shunt and diffusing capacity reduction) were fit to experimental animal data obtained in blast, blunt trauma, and chemical damage studies which link lung damage to lung weight change; the model is able to predict the reduced oxygen delivery in damage conditions. The model accurately estimates physical performance reduction with pulmonary damage. Conclusions We have developed a physiologically-based mathematical model to predict performance decrement endpoints in the presence of thoracic damage; simulations can be extended to estimate human performance and escape in extreme situations. PMID:25044032

  6. Anatomy & Physiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  7. Evaluation of Physiological Control Systems for Rotary Left Ventricular Assist Devices: An In-Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Jo P; Stevens, Michael C; Bartnikowski, Nicole; Fraser, John F; Gregory, Shaun D; Tansley, Geoff

    2016-08-01

    Rotary left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) show weaker response to preload and greater response to afterload than the native heart. This may lead to ventricular suction or pulmonary congestion, which can be deleterious to the patient's recovery. A physiological control system which optimizes responsiveness of LVADs may reduce adverse events. This study compared eight physiological control systems for LVAD support against constant speed mode. Pulmonary (PVR) and systemic (SVR) vascular resistance changes, a passive postural change and exercise were simulated in a mock circulation loop to evaluate the controller's ability to prevent suction and congestion and to increase exercise capacity. Three active and one passive control systems prevented ventricular suction at high PVR (500 dyne s cm(-5)) and low SVR (600 dyne s cm(-5)) by decreasing LVAD speed (by 200-515 rpm) and by increasing LVAD inflow cannula resistance (up to 1000 dyne s cm(-5)) respectively. These controllers increased LVAD preload sensitivity (to 0.196-2.415 L min(-1) mmHg(-1)) compared to the other control systems and constant speed mode (0.039-0.069 L min(-1) mmHg(-1)). The same three active controllers increased pump speed (600-800 rpm) and thus LVAD flow by 4.5 L min(-1) during exercise which increased exercise capacity. Physiological control systems that prevent adverse events and/or increase exercise capacity may help improve LVAD patient conditions. PMID:26833037

  8. Biophysical influence of airborne carbon nanomaterials on natural pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Valle, Russell P; Wu, Tony; Zuo, Yi Y

    2015-05-26

    Inhalation of nanoparticles (NP), including lightweight airborne carbonaceous nanomaterials (CNM), poses a direct and systemic health threat to those who handle them. Inhaled NP penetrate deep pulmonary structures in which they first interact with the pulmonary surfactant (PS) lining at the alveolar air-water interface. In spite of many research efforts, there is a gap of knowledge between in vitro biophysical study and in vivo inhalation toxicology since all existing biophysical models handle NP-PS interactions in the liquid phase. This technical limitation, inherent in current in vitro methodologies, makes it impossible to simulate how airborne NP deposit at the PS film and interact with it. Existing in vitro NP-PS studies using liquid-suspended particles have been shown to artificially inflate the no-observed adverse effect level of NP exposure when compared to in vivo inhalation studies and international occupational exposure limits (OELs). Here, we developed an in vitro methodology called the constrained drop surfactometer (CDS) to quantitatively study PS inhibition by airborne CNM. We show that airborne multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets induce a concentration-dependent PS inhibition under physiologically relevant conditions. The CNM aerosol concentrations controlled in the CDS are comparable to those defined in international OELs. Development of the CDS has the potential to advance our understanding of how submicron airborne nanomaterials affect the PS lining of the lung. PMID:25929264

  9. Treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Amy; Tulloh, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension was once thought to be a rare condition and only managed in specialized centers. Now however, with the advent of echocardiography, it is found in many clinical scenarios, in the neonate with chronic lung disease, in the acute setting in the intensive care unit, in connective tissue disease and in cardiology pre- and postoperatively. We have a better understanding of the pathological process and have a range of medication which is starting to be able to palliate this previously fatal condition. This review describes the areas that are known in this condition and those that are less familiar. The basic physiology behind pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular disease is explained. The histopathologic process and the various diagnostic tools are described and are followed by the current and future therapy at our disposal. PMID:19554091

  10. Moderate altitude is not associated with adverse postoperative outcomes for patients undergoing bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and Fontan operation: A comparative study among Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi; Malhotra, Sunil P.; Yu, Xiaoyang; Rutledge, Jennifer; Rebeyka, Ivan M.; Ross, David B.; Rausch, Christopher; Gu, Hong; McCrindle, Brian; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Ivy, Dunbar; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Objective Outcomes of patients with single ventricle physiology undergoing cavopulmonary palliations depend on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and have been suggested to be adversely affected by living at elevated altitude. We compared the pulmonary hemodynamic data in correlation with postoperative outcomes at the 3 centers of Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto at altitudes of 1604, 668, and 103 meters, respectively. Methods Hemodynamic data at pre-bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis (BCPA) and pre-Fontan catheterization between 1995 and 2007 were collected. Death from cardiac failure or heart transplantation in the same period was used to define palliation failure. Results There was no significant correlation between altitude (ranged from 1 to 2572 meters) and PVR, pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) or transpulmonary gradient (TPG) at pre-BCPA and pre-Fontan catheterization. BCPA failure occurred in 11 (9.2%) patients in Denver, 3 (2.9%) in Edmonton, and 34 (11.9%) in Toronto. Fontan failure occurred in 3 (6.1%) patients in Denver, 5 (7.2%) in Edmonton, and 11 (7.0%) in Toronto. There was no significant difference in BCPA and Fontan failure among the 3 centers. BCPA failure positively correlated with PVR and the presence of a right ventricle as the systemic ventricle. Fontan failure positively correlated with PAP and TPG. Conclusions Moderate altitude is not associated with an increased PVR or adverse outcomes in patients with a functional single ventricle undergoing BCPA and the Fontan operation. The risk factors for palliation failure are higher PVR, PAP, and TPG and a systemic right ventricle, but not altitude. Our study reemphasizes the importance of cardiac catheterization assessments of pulmonary hemodynamics before BCPA and Fontan operations. PMID:23353110

  11. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease. PMID:26886381

  12. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  13. Physiological breeding.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew; Langridge, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Physiological breeding crosses parents with different complex but complementary traits to achieve cumulative gene action for yield, while selecting progeny using remote sensing, possibly in combination with genomic selection. Physiological approaches have already demonstrated significant genetic gains in Australia and several developing countries of the International Wheat Improvement Network. The techniques involved (see Graphical Abstract) also provide platforms for research and refinement of breeding methodologies. Recent examples of these include screening genetic resources for novel expression of Calvin cycle enzymes, identification of common genetic bases for heat and drought adaptation, and genetic dissection of trade-offs among yield components. Such information, combined with results from physiological crosses designed to test novel trait combinations, lead to more precise breeding strategies, and feed models of genotype-by-environment interaction to help build new plant types and experimental environments for future climates. PMID:27161822

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anticoagulants (blood-thinning medicine) Calcium channel blockers Diuretics (water pills) Digoxin Your doctor will decide what type of medicine is right for you. In some cases, people who have pulmonary hypertension need surgical treatment. Surgical treatment options include a lung transplant and ...

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood ... heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and ... of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  16. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  17. Pulmonary nocardiosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection from returning. Alternative Names Nocardiosis - pulmonary Images Respiratory system References Limper AH. Overview of pneumonia. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010: ...

  18. Pulmonary ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, C M; Thompson, J E

    1979-07-28

    A case of pulmonary ascariasis is reported for the first time in Australia. Because of increasing immigration from countries which have a high incidence of ascariasis (especially those of South-East Asia), and increasing travel to Asian countries, the awareness of this infestation as a cause of respiratory disease may be of great importance. PMID:40103

  19. Two case reports of Castleman disease with pulmonary involvement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Zhang, J-Q; Zhong, X-N; Liu, G-N; Li, M-H; Bai, J; He, Z-Y; Deng, J-M

    2015-03-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare reactive lymphoproliferative disorder, first identified in 1954. We recently had the opportunity to analyse the characteristics of two variations of CD with pulmonary involvement. Case 1 had localised retroperitoneal hyaline vascular type CD, while Case 2 was diagnosed as multicentric plasma cell type CD. Both patients had pulmonary symptoms and signs, including cough, dyspnoea, hypoxaemia and ventilatory dysfunction; however, they had different physiological manifestations of their pulmonary abnormalities. PMID:25686148

  20. [Adverse reaction of pseudoephedrine].

    PubMed

    López Lois, G; Gómez Carrasco, J A; García de Frías, E

    2005-04-01

    We present a case of a 7 years old girl who developed an episode of myoclonic movements and tremors after being medicated with a not well quantified amount of a pseudoephedrine/antihistamine combination. We want to highlight the potential toxicity of pseudoephedrine, usually administered as part of cold-syrup preparations which are used for symptomatic treatment of upper respiratory tract cough and congestion associated with the common cold and allergic rhinitis. Although these products are generally considered to be safe either by physicians and parents, we can't underestimate the potential adverse events and toxic effects that can occur when administering these medications. PMID:15826569

  1. Acute pulmonary edema caused by quinine.

    PubMed

    Everts, Richard J; Hayhurst, Michael D; Nona, Basim P

    2004-09-01

    A 57-year-old man who had been intermittently taking one 300-mg tablet of quinine sulfate orally for leg cramps experienced transient acute pulmonary edema and hypotension 30-40 minutes after ingestion on two consecutive occasions. He was not taking any concomitant drugs, and there was no alternative explanation for either event. Serial troponin T tests and electrocardiograms, obtained on admission to the hospital, followed by an outpatient echocardiogram and a coronary angiogram, were essentially normal. We compared this case with one previously published and nine previously unpublished reports of quinine-associated pulmonary edema and conclude that some cases of pulmonary edema or adult respiratory distress syndrome in patients with malaria may be caused by an adverse reaction to quinine. Although infrequent, clinicians should be aware of this potentially serious and costly adverse reaction. PMID:15460183

  2. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence. PMID:23850228

  3. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Park, Kyounghoon; Yang, Bo Ram; Lee, Joongyub; Jin, Xue Mei; Park, Byung Joo

    2016-09-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  4. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  5. Screening for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Karson, A S; Bates, D W

    1999-02-01

    Adverse events (AEs) in medical patients are common, costly, and often preventable. Development of quality improvement programs to decrease the number and impact of AEs demands effective methods for screening for AEs on a routine basis. Here we describe the impact, types, and potential causes of AEs and review various techniques for identifying AEs. We evaluate the use of generic screening criteria in detail and describe a recent study of the sensitivity and specificity of individual generic screening criteria and combinations of these criteria. In general, the most sensitive screens were the least specific and no small sub-set of screens identified a large percentage of adverse events. Combinations of screens that were limited to administrative data were the least expensive, but none were particularly sensitive, although in practice they might be effective since routine screening is currently rarely done. As computer systems increase in sophistication sensitivity will improve. We also discuss recent studies that suggest that programs that screen for and identify AEs can be useful in reducing AE rates. While tools for identifying AEs have strengths and weaknesses, they can play an important role in organizations' quality improvement portfolios. PMID:10468381

  6. TRP channels and traffic-related environmental pollution-induced pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Akopian, Armen N; Fanick, E Robert; Brooks, Edward G

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollutant exposures are major risk factors for adverse health outcomes, with increased morbidity and mortality in humans. Diesel exhaust (DE) is one of the major harmful components of traffic-related air pollution. Exposure to DE affects several physiological systems, including the airways, and pulmonary diseases are increased in highly populated urban areas. Hence, there are urgent needs to (1) create newer and lesser polluting fuels, (2) improve exhaust aftertreatments and reduce emissions, and (3) understand mechanisms of actions for toxic effects of both conventional and cleaner diesel fuels on the lungs. These steps could aid the development of diagnostics and interventions to prevent the negative impact of traffic-related air pollution on the pulmonary system. Exhaust from conventional, and to a lesser extent, clean fuels, contains particulate matter (PM) and more than 400 additional chemical constituents. The major toxic constituents are nitrogen oxides (NOx) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PM and PAHs could potentially act via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. In this review, we will first discuss the associations between DE from conventional as well as clean fuel technologies and acute and chronic airway inflammation. We will then review possible activation and/or potentiation of TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels by PM and PAHs. Finally, we will discuss and summarize recent findings on the mechanisms whereby TRPs could control the link between DE and airway inflammation, which is a primary determinant leading to pulmonary disease. PMID:26837756

  7. TRP channels and traffic-related environmental pollution-induced pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Akopian, Armen N.; Fanick, E. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutant exposures are major risk factors for adverse health outcomes, with increased morbidity and mortality in humans. Diesel exhaust (DE) is one of the major harmful components of traffic-related air pollution. Exposure to DE affects several physiological systems, including the airways, and pulmonary diseases are increased in highly populated urban areas. Hence, there are urgent needs to (1) create newer and lesser polluting fuels, (2) improve exhaust aftertreatments and reduce emissions, and (3) understand mechanisms of actions for toxic effects of both conventional and cleaner diesel fuels on the lungs. These steps could aid the development of diagnostics and interventions to prevent the negative impact of traffic-related air pollution on the pulmonary system. Exhaust from conventional, and to a lesser extent, clean fuels, contains particulate matter (PM) and more than 400 additional chemical constituents. The major toxic constituents are nitrogen oxides (NOx) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PM and PAHs could potentially act via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. In this review, we will first discuss the associations between DE from conventional as well as clean fuel technologies and acute and chronic airway inflammation. We will then review possible activation and/or potentiation of TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels by PM and PAHs. Finally, we will discuss and summarize recent findings on the mechanisms whereby TRPs could control the link between DE and airway inflammation, which is a primary determinant leading to pulmonary disease. PMID:26837756

  8. Acute pulmonary oedema in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T; Solnordal, C B

    2012-06-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema in pregnant women is an uncommon but life-threatening event. The aims of this review are to address why pulmonary oedema occurs in pregnant women and to discuss immediate management. We performed a systematic literature search of electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library, using the key words obstetrics, pregnancy, acute pulmonary oedema, pregnancy complications, maternal, cardiac function and haemodynamics. We present a simple clinical classification of acute pulmonary oedema in pregnancy into pulmonary oedema occurring in normotensive or hypotensive women (i.e. without hypertension), and acute pulmonary oedema occurring in hypertensive women, which allows focused management. Pre-eclampsia remains an important cause of hypertensive acute pulmonary oedema in pregnancy and preventive strategies include close clinical monitoring and restricted fluid administration. Immediate management of acute pulmonary oedema includes oxygenation, ventilation and circulation control with venodilators. Pregnancy-specific issues include consideration of the physiological changes of pregnancy, the risk of aspiration and difficult airway, reduced respiratory and metabolic reserve, avoidance of aortocaval compression and delivery of the fetus. PMID:22420683

  9. Submassive pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The US Surgeon General estimates that 100,000 to 180,000 deaths occur annually from acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in the United States. The case of Ms A, a 60-year-old woman with acute PE and right ventricular dysfunction (submassive PE), illustrates the clinical challenge of identifying this high-risk patient population and determining when more aggressive immediate therapy should be pursued in addition to standard anticoagulation. The clinical examination, electrocardiogram, cardiac biomarkers, chest computed tomography, and echocardiography can be used to risk stratify patients with acute PE. Current options for more aggressive intervention in the treatment of patients with acute PE who are at increased risk of an adverse clinical course include systemic fibrinolysis, pharmacomechanical catheter-directed therapy, surgical pulmonary embolectomy, and inferior vena cava filter insertion. Determination of the optimal duration of anticoagulation and lifestyle modification to reduce overall cardiovascular risk are critical components of the long-term therapy of patients with acute PE. PMID:23299609

  10. Rare and very rare adverse effects of clozapine

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Gaetano, Raffaele; Caroleo, Mariarita; Cerminara, Gregorio; Maida, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria; Moreno, Maria Jose Jaén; Russo, Emilio; Segura-García, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the drug of choice for the treatment of resistant schizophrenia; however, its suitable use is limited by the complex adverse effects’ profile. The best-described adverse effects in the literature are represented by agranulocytosis, myocarditis, sedation, weight gain, hypotension, and drooling; nevertheless, there are other known adverse effects that psychiatrists should readily recognize and manage. This review covers the “rare” and “very rare” known adverse effects of CLZ, which have been accurately described in literature. An extensive search on the basis of predefined criteria was made using CLZ and its combination with adverse effects as keywords in electronic databases. Data show the association between the use of CLZ and uncommon adverse effects, including ischemic colitis, paralytic ileus, hematemesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, priapism, urinary incontinence, pityriasis rosea, intertriginous erythema, pulmonary thromboembolism, pseudo-pheochromocytoma, periorbital edema, and parotitis, which are influenced by other variables including age, early diagnosis, and previous/current pharmacological therapies. Some of these adverse effects, although unpredictable, are often manageable if promptly recognized and treated. Others are serious and potentially life-threatening. However, an adequate knowledge of the drug, clinical vigilance, and rapid intervention can drastically reduce the morbidity and mortality related to CLZ treatment. PMID:26273202

  11. [Pulmonary melioidosis].

    PubMed

    Perret, J L; Vidal, D; Thibault, F

    1998-12-01

    Melioidosis is most frequently encountered in pulmonary localization. Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei first described by Whitmore in 1912 in Burma. B. pseudomallei is a Gram negative rod belonging to the Pseudomonadaceae family. Soil and water are the natural reservoirs for the germ which is a specific pathogen for several mammal species. Long endemic in Southeast Asia and several tropical zones, B. pseudomallei has recently been found in temperate zones, including France. Human contamination occurs via the transcutaneous route and often leads to dormant inapparent infection. Many conditions, such as diabetes, renal lithiasis, various circumstances of immunodepression or stress, facilitate clinical manifestations which vary greatly. Pulmonary manifestations may be acute and extensive, producing a torpid pseudo-tuberculous condition or a variety of clinical and radiological features mimicking other diseases. Bacteriological and serological tests may be negative. Exposure in an endemic zone, the notion of a favorable context, weight loss, cavitary images on successive chest x-rays and the presence of extra-pulmonary localizations may be suggestive. Ceftazidime or the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination are indicated, but mortality in acute forms still reaches 40%. Relapse can be expected if the treatment duration is too short. PMID:10100350

  12. Conservation physiology

    PubMed Central

    Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2014-01-01

    Global change presents a huge and exciting challenge to the study of thermal physiology. The implication of thermoregulatory strategies and abilities for the survival of individuals and species, are of high importance for predicting species response to global change challenges and ways to mitigate them, and for conservation acts. A good example of such a study is the paper by Cooper and Withers in this issue.1

  13. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  14. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  15. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  16. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  17. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  18. Studying the pulmonary circulation with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, D.P.; Mintun, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Positron emission tomography and appropriately labeled, short-lived radiopharmaceuticals can be used to study a variety of physiologic processes within the lung. Recently, methods have been developed to measure regional pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary vascular permeability to protein macromolecules. The advantages of these techniques include accurate quantitation, regional data available in an image format, noninvasiveness, and repeatability. These methods have recently been applied to studies of hypoxic vasoconstriction, pulmonary edema, and chronic obstructive lung disease in man and large experimental animals. Although the technology is complex and requires the integration of people from a variety of disciplines, these methods offer a unique opportunity to study in vivo lung physiology.

  19. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  20. Partial anomalous venous drainage of the left upper lobe during a robot-assisted pulmonary resection

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Curtis; Katz, Sharyn; Singhal, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Anomalies in pulmonary vasculature are rare; however, the knowledge of the anomal and potential physiological implications for a patient undergoing a thoracic surgery must be understood. We report a case of a 64-year-old female who had a robotic left upper lobectomy for an incidental pulmonary nodule and was found to have a partial anomalous pulmonary vein. We discuss the incidence of pulmonary vein anomalies, associated conditions, and surgical management in patients requiring thoracic surgery.

  1. Partial anomalous venous drainage of the left upper lobe during a robot-assisted pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Gaffey, Ann C; Ball, Curtis; Katz, Sharyn; Singhal, Sunil

    2016-07-01

    Anomalies in pulmonary vasculature are rare; however, the knowledge of the anomal and potential physiological implications for a patient undergoing a thoracic surgery must be understood. We report a case of a 64-year-old female who had a robotic left upper lobectomy for an incidental pulmonary nodule and was found to have a partial anomalous pulmonary vein. We discuss the incidence of pulmonary vein anomalies, associated conditions, and surgical management in patients requiring thoracic surgery. PMID:27499986

  2. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection to the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Wyttenbach, Marina; Carrel, Thierry; Schuepbach, Peter; Tschaeppeler, Heinz; Triller, Juergen

    1996-03-15

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return represents a rare congenital anomaly with wide anatomic and physiologic variability. We report a case of a newborn with a rare form of total infracardiac anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). The pulmonary veins draining both lungs formed two vertical veins, which joined to a common pulmonary trunk below the diaphragm. This venous channel connected to the portal vein through the esophageal hiatus. The diagnosis was suggested by color Doppler sonography and confirmed by intravenous digital subtraction angiography, which allowed definition of the anatomy.

  3. [The satisfaction of personal needs in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sukhova, E V

    2005-01-01

    The founder of humanistic psychology A. Maslow divided the needs of a personality into several levels--from the lowest to the highest ones. Higher-leveled needs rise when the lower-leveled needs are satisfied. A great deal of factors affect the origination and satisfaction of needs, but they are always interrelated with social values. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis has not been studied. A special questionnaire has been drawn up to study the extent to which personality needs are met. Its suitability has been determined, by using a group of patients with bronchial asthma. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis was studied in 178 patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis and 253 patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis. The results have shown that the extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with tuberculosis is lower than that in apparently healthy individuals of the same social status. In females with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the needs for safety are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, and self-realization needs is decreased. In males with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the physiological, noetic, and self-realization needs are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, group decision-making, noetic and self-realization needs is decreased. PMID:15801639

  4. Adverse antibiotic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bint, A J; Burtt, I

    1980-07-01

    There is enormous potential for drug interactions in patients who, today, often receive many drugs. Antibiotics are prominent amongst the groups of drugs commonly prescribed. Many interactions take place at the absorption stage. Antacids and antidiarrhoeal preparations, in particular, can delay and reduce the absorption of antibiotics such as tetracyclines and clindamycin, by combining with them in the gastrointestinal tract to form chelates or complexes. Other drugs can affect gastric motility, which in turn often controls the rate at which antibiotics are absorbed. Some broad spectrum antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora of the gut which may be related to malabsorption states. The potentiation of toxic side effects of one drug by another is a common type of interaction. Antibiotics which are implicated in this type of interaction are those which themselves possess some toxicity such as aminoglycosides, some cephalosporins, tetracyclines and colistin. Some of the most important adverse interactions with antibiotics are those which involve other drugs which have a low toxicity/efficacy ratio. These include anticoagulants such as warfarin, anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and phenobarbitone and oral antidiabetic drugs like tolbutamide. Risk of interaction arises when the metabolism of these drugs is inhibited by liver microsomal enzyme inhibitors such as some sulphonamides and chloramphenicol, or is enhanced by enzyme inducers such as rifampicin. PMID:6995091

  5. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  6. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke.

    PubMed

    Pierson, W E; Koenig, J Q; Bardana, E J

    1989-09-01

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo[a]pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal. PMID:2686171

  7. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke.

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, W E; Koenig, J Q; Bardana, E J

    1989-01-01

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo[a]pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal. PMID:2686171

  8. Pulmonary kinematics from image data: a review.

    PubMed

    Tustison, Nicholas J; Cook, Tessa S; Song, Gang; Gee, James C

    2011-04-01

    The effects of certain lung pathologies include alterations in lung physiology negatively affecting pulmonary compliance. Current approaches to diagnosis and treatment assessment of lung disease commonly rely on pulmonary function testing. Such testing is limited to global measures of lung function, neglecting regional measurements, which are critical for early diagnosis and localization of disease. Increased accessibility to medical image acquisition strategies with high spatiotemporal resolution coupled with the development of sophisticated intensity-based and geometric registration techniques has resulted in the recent exploration of modeling pulmonary motion for calculating local measures of deformation. In this review, the authors provide a broad overview of such research efforts for the estimation of pulmonary deformation. This includes discussion of various techniques, current trends in validation approaches, and the public availability of software and data resources. PMID:21377592

  9. [Pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Söffker, Gerold; Kluge, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is an important differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. The clinical signs are often non-specific. However, diagnosis and therapy must be done quickly in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. The new (2014) European guidelines for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) focus on risk-adapted diagnostic algorithms and prognosis adapted therapy concepts. According to the hemodynamic presentation the division in a high-risk group (unstable patient with persistent hypotension or shock) or in non-high-risk groups (hemodynamically stable) was proposed. In the high-risk group the immediate diagnosis is usually done by multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) and primarily the medical therapy of right ventricular dysfunction and thrombolysis is recommended.In the non-high-risk group, this is subdivided into an intermediate-risk group and low-risk group, the diagnosis algorithm based on the PE-pretest probability--determined by validated scores. Moreover, the diagnosis is usually secured by MDCT--the new gold standard in the PE-diagnosis, scores, or it can be primarily ruled out due to the high negative predictive value of D-dimer determination. To improve the prognostic risk stratification in non-high-risk group patients the additional detection of right ventricular dysfunction (MDCT, echocardiography), cardiac biomarkers (troponin, NT proBNP) and validated scores (e.g. Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index) is recommended. Therefore, the intermediate-risk group can be further subdivided. For treatment of non-high-risk group patients, the initial anticoagulation (except those with severe renal insufficiency) using low molecular weight heparin/fondaparinux and conversion to vitamin-K antagonists or alternatively with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAK) is recommended. Hemodynamically stable patients with right ventricular dysfunction and myocardial ischemia (Intermediate-high-risk group patients) but with clinically progressive hemodynamic

  10. They can't bury you while you're still moving: A review of the European Respiratory Society statement on physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nici, Linda; ZuWallack, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise are interrelated but separate concepts. PA refers to bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure. Exercise is a subset of PA, in which generally higher levels of muscular activity are performed for a purpose, such as achieving physical fitness or winning a sporting contest. Higher exercise capacity is considered to be permissive of greater PA in the home and community settings. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are physically inactive when compared with healthy age-matched control subjects. Furthermore, physical inactivity is independently associated with adverse outcome in patients with COPD, including more rapid disease progression, impaired health status, and increased health care utilization and mortality risk. While there are several methods to objectively measure PA, recent scientific studies have commonly utilized questionnaires and activity monitors. The latter include simple pedometers and complex accelerometers, which can measure and record movement in up to 3 planes. In COPD, multiple patient characteristics and disease severity markers are related to activity level, including pulmonary physiological abnormalities such as airway obstruction and hyperinflation; exercise capacity such as the 6-minute walking distance; exacerbations of respiratory disease; and comorbid conditions. Clinical trials of bronchodilators, supplemental oxygen therapy, exercise training or pulmonary rehabilitation, or PA counseling have provided inconsistent results in demonstrating increased PA from the interaction. This is probably because the phenomenon of physical inactivity is complex, resulting not only from physiological impairments, but symptoms, cultural, motivational, and environmental factors. PMID:26307102

  11. Physiological response to aerosol propellants.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, R D; Newton, P E; Baretta, E D; Herrmann, A A; Forster, H V; Soto, R J

    1978-01-01

    Acute exposures to isobutane, propane, F-12, and F-11 in concentrations of 250, 500, or 1000 ppm for periods of 1 min to 8 hr did not produce any untoward physiological effects as determined by the methods employed which included serial EKG's and continuous monitoring of modified V5 by telemetry during exposure. Repetitive exposures to these four propellants were also without measurable untoward physiological effect with the exception of the eight male subjects repetitively exposed to 1000 ppm, F-11, who did show minor decrements in several of the cognitive tests. Of particular importance is the observation that none of the subjects showed any decrement in pulmonary function or alteration in cardiac rhythm as the result of exposure to concentrations of the gases or vapors far greater than encountered in the normal use of aerosol products in the home. PMID:214300

  12. Inhaled Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas S; Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E

    2015-06-01

    The inhaled route has a number of attractive features for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, including delivery of drug directly to the target organ, thus enhancing pulmonary specificity and reducing systemic adverse effects. It can also improve ventilation/perfusion matching by dilating vessels supplying ventilated regions, thus improving gas exchange. Furthermore, it can achieve higher local drug concentrations at a lower overall dose, potentially reducing drug cost. Accordingly, a number of inhaled agents have been developed to treat pulmonary hypertension. Most in current use are prostacyclins, including epoprostenol, which has been cleared for intravenous applications but is used off-label in acute care settings as a continuously nebulized medication. Aerosolized iloprost and treprostinil are both prostacyclins that have been cleared by the FDA to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both require frequent administration (6 and 4 times daily, respectively), and both have a tendency to cause airway symptoms, including cough and wheeze, which can lead to intolerance. These agents cannot be used to substitute for the infused routes of prostacyclin because they do not permit delivery of medication at high doses. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is cleared for the treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is also used off-label to test acute vasoreactivity in PAH during right-heart catheterization and to treat acute right-heart failure in hospitalized patients. In addition, some studies on long-term application of INO either have been recently completed with results pending or are under consideration. In the future, because of its inherent advantages in targeting the lung, the inhaled route is likely to be tested using a variety of small molecules that show promise as PAH therapies. PMID:26070575

  13. Physiological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  14. Right ventricle-pulmonary circulation dysfunction: a review of energy-based approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patients with repaired or palliated right heart congenital heart disease (CHD) are often left with residual lesions that progress and can result in significant morbidity. However, right ventricular-pulmonary arterial evaluation and the timing of reintvervention is still subjective. Currently, it relies on symptomology, or RV imaging-based metrics from echocardiography or MR derived parameters including right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction (EF), end-systolic pressure (ESP), and end-diastolic volume (EDV). However, the RV is coupled to the pulmonary vasculature, and they are not typically evaluated together. For example, the dysfunctional right ventricular-pulmonary circulation (RV-PC) adversely affects the RV myocardial performance resulting in decreased efficiency. Therefore, comprehensive hemodynamic assessment should incorporate changes in RV-PC and energy efficiency for CHD patients. The ventricular pressure-volume relationship (PVR) and other energy-based endpoints derived from PVR, such as stroke work (SW) and ventricular elastance (Ees), can provide a measure of RV performance. However, a detailed explanation of the relationship between RV performance and pulmonary arterial hemodynamics is lacking. More importantly, PVR is impractical for routine longitudinal evaluation in a clinical setting, because it requires invasive catheterization. As an alternative, analytical methods and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to compute energy endpoints, such as power loss or energy dissipation, in abnormal physiologies. In this review, we review the causes of RV-PA failure and the limitation of current clinical parameters to quantify RV-PC dysfunction. Then, we describe the advantage of currently available energy-based endpoints and emerging energy endpoints, such as energy loss in the Pas or kinetic energy, obtained from a new non-invasive imaging technique, i.e. 4D phase contrast MRI. PMID:25602641

  15. [Pulmonary circulation in embolic pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Sanotskaia, N V; Polikarpov, V V; Matsievskiĭ, D D

    1989-02-01

    The ultrasonic method was used in acute experiments on cats with open chest under artificial lung ventilation to obtain blood flow in low-lobar pulmonary artery and vein, the blood pressure in pulmonary artery, as well as the left atrial pressure in fat (olive oil) and mechanical (Lycopodium spores) pulmonary embolism. It is shown that pulmonary embolism produces the decrease in the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein, the increase of the pressure in pulmonary artery and left atria, the increase of lung vessels resistance. The decrease is observed of systemic arterial pressure, bradycardia, and extrasystole. After 5-10 min the restoration of arterial pressure and heart rhythm occur and partial restoration of blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. In many experiments the blood flow in vein outdoes that in the artery--it allows to suppose the increase of the blood flow in bronchial artery. After 60-90 min there occur sudden decrease of systemic arterial pressure, the decrease of the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. The pressure in pulmonary artery and resistance of pulmonary vessels remain high. Pulmonary edema developed in all animals. The death occurs in 60-100 min after the beginning of embolism. PMID:2923969

  16. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on the toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Mauderly, J L; Bice, D E; Cheng, Y S; Gillett, N A; Henderson, R F; Pickrell, J A; Wolff, R K

    1989-10-01

    This project examined the influence of preexisting, experimentally induced pulmonary emphysema on the adverse health effects in rats of chronic inhalation exposure to either nitrogen dioxide or automotive diesel-engine exhaust. Previous reports indicated that humans with chronic lung disease were among those most severely affected by episodic exposures to high concentrations of airborne toxicants. There were no previous reports comparing the effects of chronic inhalation exposure to components of automotive emissions in emphysematous and normal animals. The hypothesis tested in this project was that rats with preexisting pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of the toxicant exposures. Young adult rats were housed continuously in inhalation exposure chambers and exposed seven hours per day, five days per week, for 24 months to nitrogen dioxide at 9.5 parts per million (ppm)2, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/m3, or to clean air as control animals. These concentrations were selected to produce mild, but distinct, effects in rats with normal lungs. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of the proteolytic enzyme elastase six weeks before the toxicant exposures began. Health effects were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. The measurements included respiratory function, clearance of inhaled radiolabeled particles, pulmonary immune responses to instilled antigen, biochemistry and cytology of airway fluid, total lung collagen, histopathology, lung morphometry, and lung burdens of diesel soot. The significance of influences of emphysema and toxicant exposure, and interactions between influences of the two treatments, were evaluated by analysis of variance. The elastase treatment resulted in pulmonary emphysema that was manifested by enlarged alveoli and alveolar ducts, and by ruptured alveolar septa. There was no accompanying inflammation and no

  17. Everest Physiology Pre-2008.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-01-01

    When Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay reached the summit of Mt. Everest in 1953, it was the culmination of many attempts beginning in 1921. Alexander Kellas had actually predicted as early as 1920 that the mountain could be climbed, but the extreme altitude of 8848 m with the consequent oxygen deprivation had foiled previous attempts. One reason for the success of the 1953 expedition was the work done by the British physiologist Griffith Pugh in 1952 when he studied many of the physiological factors at high altitude including the oxygen requirements. Seven years later, Pugh and Hillary teamed up again for the Silver Hut Expedition in 1960-1961 that elucidated many of the problems of very high altitude. A group of physiologists spent several months at an altitude of 5800 m in a prefabricated hut and studied many aspects of exercise, pulmonary gas exchange, control of ventilation, and blood changes. Maximal exercise was measured as high as 7440 m and raised anew the question of whether Everest could ever be climbed without supplementary oxygen. The answer was shown to be yes in 1978 by Messner and Habeler, and 3 years later the American Medical Research Expedition to Everest clarified the physiological adaptations that allow humans to reach the highest point on earth. Five people reached the summit, the barometric pressure there was measured for the first time, and alveolar gas samples from the summit showed the critical importance of the extreme hyperventilation. However, the maximal oxygen consumption for the summit inspired PO2 of 43 mmHg was shown to be only about 1 l min(-1). In other words, the highest point on earth is very close to the limit of human tolerance to oxygen deprivation. As we celebrate the anniversary of Charles Darwin, it would be nice to have an evolutionary explanation for this, but in fact it is a cosmic coincidence. PMID:27343114

  18. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  19. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  20. Pulmonary actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Solmaz; Sevinir, Betul; Saraydaroglu, Ozlem; Gurpinar, Arif; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary actinomycosis is rarely reported in pediatric age. An 11-year-old girl with history of two-month back pain was admitted to our hospital. On physical examination respiratory sounds were diminished on the left upper lung. Chest radiograph revealed a mass in the left upper lobe. Computed tomography showed solitary lesion (5.6 x 4.5 cm in size) in the left upper lobe. We could not rule out the possibility of malignant thoracic tumor. The patient underwent surgery. Histological examination of the resected tissue revealed, numerous sulfur granules, characteristic of Actinomyces, surrounded by purulent exudates, which are consistent with actinomycosis. She was treated with penicillin G. The patient responded well to penicillin therapy and the lesions regressed completely. She remained well throughout the three-year follow-up. PMID:19129990

  1. Pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tarbox, Abigail K.; Swaroop, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is responsible for approximately 100,000 to 200,000 deaths in the United States each year. With a diverse range of clinical presentations from asymptomatic to death, diagnosing PE can be challenging. Various resources are available, such as clinical scoring systems, laboratory data, and imaging studies which help guide clinicians in their work-up of PE. Prompt recognition and treatment are essential for minimizing the mortality and morbidity associated with PE. Advances in recognition and treatment have also enabled treatment of some patients in the home setting and limited the amount of time spent in the hospital. This article will review the risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of PE. PMID:23724389

  2. Breathable Medicine: Pulmonary Mode of Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Tay, Samuel Sam Wah; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kumar, Srinivasan Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds require different modes of drug delivery systems to accomplish therapeutic activity without loss of its activity and lead to exhibit no adverse effects. Originating from ancient days, pulmonary mode of drug delivery is gaining much importance compared to other modes of drug delivery systems with respect to specific diseases. Pulmonary drug delivery is a non-invasive route for local and systemic therapies together with more patient convenience, compliance and is a needleless system. In this review, we addressed the vaccine delivery via non- or minimally invasive routes. Polymeric nanoparticles are preferred for use in the pulmonary delivery devices owing to a prolonged retention in lungs. Small site for absorption, mucociliary clearance, short residence time and low bioavailability are some of the limitations in pulmonary drug delivery have been resolved by generating micro- and nano-sized aerosol particles. We have classified the breathable medicine on the basis of available devices for inhalation and also prominent diseases treated through pulmonary mode of drug delivery. Owing to increasing toxicity of pharmacological drugs, the use of natural medicines has been rapidly gaining importance recently. The review article describes breathability of medicines or the pulmonary mode of drug delivery system and their drug release profile, absorption, distribution and efficacy to cure asthma and diabetes. PMID:26353470

  3. Pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Saey, D; Bernard, S; Gagnon, P; Laviolette, L; Soicher, J; Maltais, F; Esgagne, P; Coats, V; Devost, A-A

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and an important worldwide cause of disability and handicap. Centered around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation is a global, multidisciplinary, individualized and comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now well recognized as an effective and key intervention in the management of several respiratory diseases particularly in COPD. Modern and effective pulmonary rehabilitation programs are global, multidisciplinary, individualized and use comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. In the last two decades interest for pulmonary rehabilitation is on the rise and a growing literature including several guidelines is now available. This review addresses the recent developments in the broad area of pulmonary rehabilitation as well as new methods to consider in the development of future and better programs. Modern literature for rationale, physiopathological basis, structure, exercise training as well challenges for pulmonary rehabilitation programs are addressed. Among the main challenges of pulmonary rehabilitation, efforts have to be devoted to improve accessibility to early rehabilitation strategies, not only to patients with COPD but to those with other chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:19776711

  4. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should therefore be determined by a multidisciplinary expert team in a specialised centre. It is still a major challenge to identify sarcoidosis patients at risk for developing PH. There is no validated algorithm when to refer a patient suspected for PH, and PH analysis itself is difficult. Until present, there is no established therapy for PH in sarcoidosis. Besides optimal treatment for sarcoidosis, case series evaluating new therapeutic options involving PH-targeted therapy are arising for a subgroup of patients. This review summarises the current knowledge regarding the aetiology, diagnosis and possible treatment options for PH in sarcoidosis. PMID:27194118

  5. Thermal physiology in a changing thermal world

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Michal; Kenny, Glen P; McAllen, Robin M; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2015-01-01

    This editorial focuses on articles submitted to the Temperature call “Thermal Physiology in a Changing Thermal World.” It highlights an array of topics related to thermoregulatory and metabolic functions in adverse environments, and the complexity and adaptability of the systems to changing climatic conditions, at various levels of body organization. PMID:27226998

  6. [Idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Uehara, Mayuko; Kuroda, Yosuke; Ohori, Syunsuke; Mawatari, Toru; Morishita, Kiyofumi

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary trunk aneurysm is generally associated with congenital cardiac defects, pulmonary hypertension, or infection. Idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm without any associated diseases is a rare lesion and has seldom been reported. Here, we report a case of a 68-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm. The maximum diameter of the aneurysm was 53 mm while she was 142 cm in height. We successfully performed aneurysmorrhaphy and her postoperative course was uneventful. Aneurysmorrhaphy was an effective technique for idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm without pulmonary hypertention. PMID:20662238

  7. Immunosuppression of pulmonary natural killer activity by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.; Keyes, L.L.; Stutzman, J.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity of continuous ozone exposure. Continuous ozone exposures at 1.0 ppm were performed for 23.5 hours per day for either 1, 5, 7, or 10 consecutive days. Pulmonary immune function was assessed by measuring natural killer (NK) activity from whole-lung homogenates of male Fischer-344 rats. Results of this study indicated that continuous ozone exposure for 1, 5, or 7 days resulted in a significant decrease in pulmonary NK activity. This suppressed pulmonary NK activity returned to control levels after continuous exposure to ozone for 10 days. The suppressed pulmonary NK response was thus attenuated and returned to normal values in the continued presence of ozone gas. This attenuation process is dynamic, complex, and doubtless involves several cell types and/or products of these cells. Pulmonary NK activity was also suppressed at 0.5 ppm ozone, but not at 0.1 ppm ozone, following 23.5 hours of exposure. NK activity is important for defense against viral, bacterial, and neoplastic disease. The depressed NK activity resulting from continuous ozone exposure could therefore result in a compromised ability to defend against pulmonary diseases.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2013-01-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature. PMID:24083892

  9. Pulmonary endarterectomy after pulmonary infectious embolisms

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Johan; Ilkjær, Lars B.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a well-established procedure in the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). The procedure is known to increase functional outcome and to raise the 5-year survival rate. We report 2 cases of pulmonary valve endocarditis and secondary embolisms causing sustained pulmonary hypertension. Both were treated with PEA. In none of the cases, a cleavage between the thrombotic masses and the vessel wall was obtainable, and both attempts were therefore inadequate. Based on our reports, we recommend not attempting PEA in cases of CTPH after infectious embolisms. PMID:23248168

  10. Pulmonary cachexia.

    PubMed

    Schols, Annemie M W J

    2002-09-01

    Weight loss is a frequent complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is a determining factor of functional capacity, health status, and mortality. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of increased energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Both metabolic and mechanical inefficiency contribute to the elevated energy expenditure during physical activity, while systemic inflammation is a determinant of hypermetabolism at rest. A disbalance between protein synthesis and protein breakdown may cause a disproportionate depletion of fat-free mass in some patients. Nutritional support is indicated for depleted patients with COPD because it provides not only supportive care, but direct intervention through improvement in respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle function and in exercise performance. A combination of oral nutritional supplements and exercise or anabolic stimulus appears to be the best treatment approach to obtaining significant functional improvement. Patients responding to this treatment even demonstrated a decreased mortality. Poor response was related to the effects of systemic inflammation on dietary intake and catabolism. The effectiveness of anticatabolic modulation requires further investigation. PMID:12163214

  11. Adverse possession of subsurface minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, P.N.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts applicable to adverse possession of subsurface minerals are generally the same as those that apply to adverse possession of all real estate. However, special requirements must be satisfied in order to perfect title to subsurface minerals by adverse possession, particularly when there has been a severance of the true title between surface and subsurface minerals. In those jurisdictions where senior and junior grants came from the state or commonwealth covering the same or some of the same land and in those areas where descriptions of land were vague or not carefully drawn, adverse possession serves to solidify land and mineral ownership. There may be some public, social, and economic justification in rewarding, with good title, those who take possession and use real estate for its intended use, including the extraction of subsurface minerals. 96 refernces.

  12. [Roflumilast: a new approach to therapy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Kreutzkamp, Barbara

    2010-07-01

    Roflumilast, a new inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, showed moderate efficacy in clinical trials with patients suffering from chonic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Improvement of pulmonary function is predominantly attributed to antiinflammatory effects with decrease in mucus secretion and less exacerbations. Diarrhoea, headache and nausea are typical adverse events. PMID:20687460

  13. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  14. Successful thrombo-embolectomy in long-standing thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension 1

    PubMed Central

    Nash, E. S.; Shapiro, S.; Landau, A.; Barnard, C. N.

    1968-01-01

    The operative removal of thrombo-emboli from the pulmonary arteries in acute pulmonary embolism is an accepted method of treatment. The removal of thrombi that have been present for many months has been attempted less often. This case report covers the operative treatment and the pre- and post-operative physiological studies in a patient with long-standing thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension, in whom a large thrombus was removed under cardiopulmonary bypass from the left pulmonary artery. Dramatic clinical improvement resulted. A plea is made for a more radical approach to thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension when a local obstruction can be demonstrated. Images PMID:5654068

  15. Physiological cardiac pacing: Current status.

    PubMed

    Das, Asit; Kahali, Dhiman

    2016-01-01

    Adverse hemodynamics of right ventricular (RV) pacing is a well-known fact. It was believed to be the result of atrio-ventricular (AV) dyssynchrony and sequential pacing of the atrium and ventricle may solve these problems. However, despite maintenance of AV synchrony, the dual chamber pacemakers in different trials have failed to show its superiority over single chamber RV apical pacing in terms of death, progression of heart failure, and atrial fibrillation (AF). As a consequence, investigators searched for alternate pacing sites with a more physiological activation pattern and better hemodynamics. Direct His bundle pacing and Para-Hisian pacing are the most physiological ventricular pacing sites. But, this is technically difficult. Ventricular septal pacing compared to apical pacing results in a shorter electrical activation delay and consequently less mechanical dyssynchrony. But, the study results are heterogeneous. Selective site atria pacing (atrial septal) is useful for patients with atrial conduction disorders in prevention of AF. PMID:27543481

  16. Absent pulmonary valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... absent pulmonary valve syndrome associated with bronchial obstruction. Ann Thoracic Surg. 2006;82:2221-2226. PMID: 17126138 ... of airway compression in absent pulmonary valve syndrome. Ann Thorac Surg . 2006;81:1802-1807. PMID: 16631676 ...

  17. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... Associate Professor View full profile More Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Information Forms Causes Genetic Counseling Print Page Email ...

  18. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  19. Absent pulmonary valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur with absent pulmonary valve include: Abnormal tricuspid valve Atrial septal defect Double outlet right ventricle Ductus arteriosis Endocardial cushion defect Marfan syndrome Tricuspid atresia Heart problems that occur with absent pulmonary ...

  20. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  1. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and vein in the lungs. As a result, blood passes ... Pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas are usually the result of abnormal development of the blood vessels of the lung. Most occur in ...

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000091.htm Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease. Having COPD ...

  3. Who Needs Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... other symptoms. Examples of interstitial lung diseases include sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis . Cystic fibrosis (CF). CF ...

  4. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001090.htm Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and ...

  5. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the

  6. [Treatments with immunoglobulin and thrombotic adverse events].

    PubMed

    Darnige, L; Lillo-Le Louët, A

    2014-01-01

    Treatments with intravenous or subcutaneous immunoglobulin (Ig) are used in a broad variety of disorders. Tolerance of Ig is usually good but adverse events, including some serious ones, have been reported and may differ among different Ig preparations. Thrombotic complications occur in 0.6 to 13% of cases and can involve arterial or venous circulation, rarely both. Deep venous thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism, stroke or myocardial infarction remained the most frequent thrombotic complications. Some risk factors have been identified, mainly old age, multiple cardiovascular risk factors, and past history of thrombo-embolic manifestations. Several mechanisms are suggested to explain this increased risk of thrombotic complications. Indeed, Ig treatments increase the plasma viscosity, increase and activate platelets, can trigger the coagulation cascade through the presence of activated factor XI in some Ig preparations, and release vasoactive molecules responsible for vasospasm. Patients have to be carefully monitored and risk factors to be identified as soon as possible. The role of antiplatelets or anticoagulation is not well determined but should probably be proposed to patients with high risk. PMID:24011913

  7. "End-stage" pulmonary fibrosis in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Teirstein, Alvin T; Morgenthau, Adam S

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is an unusual "end stage" in patients with sarcoidosis. Fibrosis occurs in a minority of patients, and presents with a unique physiologic combination of airways dysfunction (obstruction) superimposed on the more common restrictive dysfunction. Imagin techniques are essential to the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Standard chest radiographs and CT scans may reveal streaks, bullae, cephalad retraction of the hilar areas, deviation of the trachea and tented diaphragm. Positive gallium and PET scans indicate residual reversible granulomatous disease and are important guides to therapy decisions. Treatment, usually with corticosteroids, is effective in those patients with positive scans, but fibrosis does not improve with any treatment. With severe functional impariment and patient disability, pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure may supervene for which the patient will require treatment. Oxygen, careful diuresis, sildenafil and bosentan may be salutary. These patients are candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:19170216

  8. Amiodarone: review of pulmonary effects and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Papiris, Spyros A; Triantafillidou, Christina; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Markoulaki, Despoina; Manali, Effrosyni D

    2010-07-01

    Amiodarone, a bi-iodinated benzofuran derivative, is, because of its high effectiveness, one of the most widely used antiarrhythmic agents. However, adverse effects, especially potentially fatal and non-reversible acute and chronic pulmonary toxicity, continue to be observed. This review provides an update of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of amiodarone pulmonary effects and toxicity. Lung adverse effects occur in approximately 5% of treated patients. The development of lung complications appears to be associated with older age, duration of treatment and cumulative dosage, high levels of its desethyl metabolite, history of cardiothoracic surgery and/or use of high oxygen mixtures, use of iodinated contrast media, and probably pre-existing lung disease as well as co-existing respiratory infections. Amiodarone-related adverse pulmonary effects may develop as early as from the first few days of treatment to several years later. The onset of pulmonary toxicity may be either insidious or rapidly progressive. Cough, new chest infiltrates in imaging studies and reduced lung diffusing capacity in the appropriate clinical setting of amiodarone use, after the meticulous exclusion of infection, malignancy and pulmonary oedema, are the cardinal clinical and laboratory elements for diagnosis. Pulmonary involvement falls into two categories of different grades of clinical significance: (i) the ubiquitous 'lipoid pneumonia', the so-called 'amiodarone effect', which is usually asymptomatic; and (ii) the more appropriately named 'amiodarone toxicity', which includes several distinct clinical entities related to the differing patterns of lung inflammatory reaction, such as eosinophilic pneumonia, chronic organizing pneumonia, acute fibrinous organizing pneumonia, nodules or mass-like lesions, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia-like and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-like interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia

  9. Gemcitabine-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity: A Case Report of Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Célia; Jary, Marine; Kim, Stefano; Moltenis, Mélanie; Degano, Bruno; Manzoni, Philippe; Nguyen, Thierry; Genet, Bruno; Rabier, Marie-Blanche Valnet; Heyd, Bruno; Borg, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gemcitabine is a chemotherapeutic agent frequently used by for the treatment of several malignancies both in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. Although myelosuppression is the most adverse event of this therapy, gemcitabine might induce severe pulmonary toxicities. We describe a case of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) related to gemcitabine. CASE PRESENTATION The patient was an 83-year-old man with a metastatic pancreatic cancer who was treated by gemcitabine as first-line therapy. He was in good health and received no other chemotherapy. A dose of 1000 mg/m2 of gemcitabine was administered over a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. After a period of 6 months, a complete response was observed. Nevertheless, the patient developed a severe dyspnea, with arterial hypoxemia and very low lung diffusion for carbon monoxide. A CT scan showed diffuse ground glass opacities with septal lines, bilateral pleural effusion, and lymph node enlargement. On echocardiography, there was a suspicion of pulmonary hypertension with elevated systolic pulmonary artery pressure and normal left ventricular pressures. Right heart catheterization confirmed pulmonary hypertension and normal pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. Diagnosis of PVOD was made, and a gemcitabine-induced toxicity was suspected. A symptomatic treatment was started. At last follow-up, patient was in functional class I with near-normal of CT scan, arterial blood gases, and echocardiography. A gemcitabine-induced PVOD is the more likely diagnosis. PMID:26380562

  10. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandeep M; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Reynolds, Jordan P; Krowka, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a disease of alveolar accumulation of phospholipoproteinaceous material that results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. There are three forms of PAP: congenital, acquired and idiopathic; of which the latter two are predominant in the adult population. Previous case studies have found that the acquired form can be secondary to various autoimmune, infectious, malignant and environmental etiologies. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PAP demonstrate that the idiopathic form is due to antigranulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor antibodies. Therapeutic targets that replace granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor or remove these antibodies are being actively developed. The current standard of care is to perform whole lung lavage on these patients to clear the alveolar space to help improve respiratory physiology. A case of PAP is reported, followed by a literature review on the diagnosis and management of this rare condition with the aim of increasing awareness among physicians when treating patients who present with alveolar infiltrates. PMID:22891182

  11. [Postpartum pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Escalante, Juan Pablo; Diez, Ana; Figueroa Casas, Marcelo; Lasave, Alejandro; Cursack, Guillermo; Poy, Carlos; Rodríguez, María Soledad; Galuppo, Marcela; Zapata, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in pregnancy is a rare disorder that carries a high risk to mother and child, and as such, it is considered a contraindication to becoming pregnant. However, there are few published reports related to the diagnosis of this condition after delivery. We describe three PH cases diagnosed after their normal pregnancies and deliveries. Although the causes are unknown, several mechanisms such as hypercoagulation, placental hypoxia or amniotic fluid embolism have been considered as possible causes. It is difficult to define whether a PH diagnosed in the postpartum period, relates to an earlier asymptomatic PH period that was triggered by the physiological stress of labor or if it is a recently acquired condition. Despite the lack of data to support the absence of PH previous to pregnancy in our three patients, lack of events during this period, asymptomatic and normal deliveries, lead us to believe that they did not suffer this disease prior to pregnancy; considering that high hemodynamic demands impair a ventricle with little reserve, and its subsequent appearance at time of delivery. PMID:25637900

  12. Implantable Ultralow Pulmonary Pressure Monitoring System for Fetal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Mozziyar; Heller, J. Alex; Schecter, Samuel C.; Shue, Eveline H.; Miniati, Doug; Roy, Shuvo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary hypoplasia is a devastating condition affecting fetal and newborn pulmonary physiology, resulting in great morbidity and mortality. The fetal lung develops in a fluid-filled environment. In this paper, we describe a novel, implantable pressure sensing and recording device which we use to study the pressures present in the fetal pulmonary tree throughout gestation. The system achieves 0.18 cm H2O resolution and can record for 21 days continuously at 256 Hz. Sample tracings of in vivo fetal lamb recordings are shown. PMID:22801521

  13. HIF2α–arginase axis is essential for the development of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cowburn, Andrew S.; Crosby, Alexi; Macias, David; Branco, Cristina; Colaço, Renato D. D. R.; Southwood, Mark; Toshner, Mark; Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Johnson, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is correlated with pulmonary vascular remodeling. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) HIF-1α and HIF-2α are known to contribute to the process of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling; however, the specific role of pulmonary endothelial HIF expression in this process, and in the physiological process of vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia, remains unclear. Here we show that pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α is a critical regulator of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. The rise in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) normally observed following chronic hypoxic exposure was absent in mice with pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α deletion. The RVSP of mice lacking HIF-2α in pulmonary endothelium after exposure to hypoxia was not significantly different from normoxic WT mice and much lower than the RVSP values seen in WT littermate controls and mice with pulmonary endothelial deletion of HIF-1α exposed to hypoxia. Endothelial HIF-2α deletion also protected mice from hypoxia remodeling. Pulmonary endothelial deletion of arginase-1, a downstream target of HIF-2α, likewise attenuated many of the pathophysiological symptoms associated with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. We propose a mechanism whereby chronic hypoxia enhances HIF-2α stability, which causes increased arginase expression and dysregulates normal vascular NO homeostasis. These data offer new insight into the role of pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α in regulating the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia. PMID:27432976

  14. Biologics in dermatology: adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2015-12-01

    Biologics are a group of drugs that precisely affect certain specific steps in the immune response and are an extremely useful group when used in an appropriate setting. However, their use can often be a double-edged sword. Careful patient selection and thorough knowledge of adverse effects is a key to their successful use in various disorders. The initial enthusiasm has gradually given way to a more cautious approach wherein a balance is sought between clinical usefulness and expected side effects. The adverse effects of the biologics most commonly used in dermatology have been carefully listed for ready reference. The plausible causes of the adverse reactions are succinctly outlined along with their incriminating factor(s). Besides, in brief, the attention has been focused on their management. The content should provide an essential didactic content for educating the practitioner. PMID:26147909

  15. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  16. A translational preclinical model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension: mechanistic pathways driving disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R.; Khambata, Valerie S.; Yun Ye, Li; Cheung, Kenneth; Thomas, Matthew; Duggan, Nicholas; Jarai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease, in which a decline in patient prognosis is frequently associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Animal models exhibiting principle pathophysiological features of IPF and PH could provide greater insight into mechanistic pathways underlying disease progression and a means for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches for intervention. Here, we describe an in vivo disease model, in which animals develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and associated PH, as defined by the presence of fibrotic foci adjacent to areas of alveolar injury and remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Associated changes in physiological parameters included a decline in lung function and increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg. The early fibrotic pathology is associated with a profibrogenic microenvironment, elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteases, MMP‐2, MMP‐7, and MMP‐12, TIMP‐1, the chemoattractant and mitogen, PDGF‐β, and the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12, that are associated with the recruitment of macrophages, mast cells, and fibrocytes. Principle mechanistic pathways associated with disease pathogenesis are upregulated in the lungs and pulmonary arteries, with sustained increases in gene transcripts for the profibrotic mediator TGF‐β1 and components of the TGF‐β signaling pathway; PAI‐1, Nox‐4, and HIF‐1α. Therapeutic treatment with the ALK‐5/TGF‐β RI inhibitor SB‐525334 reversed established pulmonary fibrosis and associated vascular remodeling, leading to normalization in clinically translatable physiological parameters including lung function and hemodynamic measurements of mPAP. These studies highlight the application of this model in validating potential approaches for targeting common mechanistic pathways driving disease pathogenesis. PMID:25214520

  17. Management of a child with pulmonary arterial hypertension presenting with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Flores, Saul; Daily, Joshua; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Cash, Michelle C; Hirsch, Russel

    2016-02-01

    We describe the course and management of a 12-year-old girl with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension who initially presented with severe systemic hypertension. Successful therapy included pulmonary vasodilators and an atrial septostomy, while ensuring adequate maintenance of her systemic vascular resistance to maintain cardiac output. Clear understanding of the physiology and judicious medical management in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension using extreme compensatory mechanisms is vitally important. PMID:26082002

  18. Therapeutic applications of sildenafil citrate in the management of paediatric pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Leah; Matok, Ilan; Paret, Gideon

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and a poor prognosis. The exact underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood; however, it is hypothesised that pulmonary medial hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction lead to impaired production of vasodilators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin, and increased expression of vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1. The current treatment modalities for pulmonary hypertension include conventional supportive therapies and more specific pharmacological therapies that are targeted at abnormalities of endothelial function. NO and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors induce pulmonary vasodilation by increasing intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) concentrations. Sildenafil citrate is a highly selective inhibitor of PDE5. Investigations in animal models and recent clinical case reports with some studies in the paediatric population suggest that sildenafil may be a promising agent in treating pulmonary hypertension. The effect of sildenafil on pulmonary vasculature appears to be independent of the underlying cause, thereby providing a role in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PAH associated with congenital heart disease, pulmonary hypertension secondary to lung disease or persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. It may also be beneficial in postoperative pulmonary hypertension and in neonates who are difficult to wean from inhaled NO. It is easily administered and effective, and has minimal systemic adverse effects. Although the reported results in children with pulmonary hypertension are promising, it is an experimental drug and large-scale randomised controlled studies are required to validate the safety, efficacy and dosage in the paediatric population. PMID:17209664

  19. Physiologic effects of intramedullary reaming.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Karunakar, Madhav A

    2006-01-01

    Reaming has a significant biologic and mechanical impact on the physiology of fracture healing. A review of the thermal, pulmonary, and osteogenic effects of reaming can provide evidence-based guidelines to assist the clinician in improving patient outcomes. Thermal necrosis is a rare but commonly referenced complication of reaming. The risks of heat-induced cortical damage can be minimized by sequential reaming with sharp instruments and by reaming with instruments that are sized appropriately to fit the intramedullary canal. The use of a tourniquet while reaming does not increase the risk of thermal necrosis. Reaming results in increased intramedullary pressure and secondary embolization of marrow elements to the pulmonary system. The clinical significance of these embolic events remains controversial. Potential complications can be reduced by using reamer designs and techniques that minimize the increases in intramedullary pressure. Outcome studies consistently show that reaming potentiates the healing response with intramedullary fixation of long-bone fractures. Recent laboratory studies implicate alterations in cortical blood flow patterns and the osteogenic potential of reaming debris as critical components of this process. PMID:16958471

  20. Pulmonary manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S.

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may cause, trigger or exacerbate many pulmonary diseases. The physiological link between GERD and pulmonary disease has been extensively studied in chronic cough and asthma. A primary care physician often encounters patients with extra esophageal manifestations of GERD in the absence of heartburn. Patients may present with symptoms involving the pulmonary system; noncardiac chest pain; and ear, nose and throat disorders. Local irritation in the esophagus can cause symptoms that vary from indigestion, like chest discomfort and abdominal pain, to coughing and wheezing. If the gastric acid reaches the back of the throat, it may cause a bitter taste in the mouth and/or aspiration of the gastric acid into the lungs. The acid can cause throat irritation, postnasal drip and hoarseness, as well as recurrent cough, chest congestion and lung inflammation leading to asthma and/or bronchitis/ pneumonia. This clinical review examines the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary manifestations of GERD. It also reviews relevant clinical information concerning GERD-related chronic cough and asthma. Finally, a potential management strategy for GERD in pulmonary patients is discussed. PMID:19641641

  1. Increasing pulmonary artery pulsatile flow improves hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in piglets.

    PubMed

    Courboulin, Audrey; Kang, Chantal; Baillard, Olivier; Bonnet, Sebastien; Bonnet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease affecting distal pulmonary arteries (PA). These arteries are deformed, leading to right ventricular failure. Current treatments are limited. Physiologically, pulsatile blood flow is detrimental to the vasculature. In response to sustained pulsatile stress, vessels release nitric oxide (NO) to induce vasodilation for self-protection. Based on this observation, this study developed a protocol to assess whether an artificial pulmonary pulsatile blood flow could induce an NO-dependent decrease in pulmonary artery pressure. One group of piglets was exposed to chronic hypoxia for 3 weeks and compared to a control group of piglets. Once a week, the piglets underwent echocardiography to assess PAH severity. At the end of hypoxia exposure, the piglets were subjected to a pulsatile protocol using a pulsatile catheter. After being anesthetized and prepared for surgery, the jugular vein of the piglet was isolated and the catheter was introduced through the right atrium, the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery, under radioscopic control. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was measured before (T0), immediately after (T1) and 30 min after (T2) the pulsatile protocol. It was demonstrated that this pulsatile protocol is a safe and efficient method of inducing a significant reduction in mean PAP via an NO-dependent mechanism. These data open up new avenues for the clinical management of PAH. PMID:25993379

  2. Modulation of the LKB1-AMPK Signalling Pathway Underpins Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Evans, A Mark; Lewis, Sophronia A; Ogunbayo, Oluseye A; Moral-Sanz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the defining characteristic of pulmonary arteries is the process of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) which, under physiological conditions, supports ventilation-perfusion matching in the lung by diverting blood flow away from oxygen deprived areas of the lung to oxygen rich regions. However, when alveolar hypoxia is more widespread, either at altitude or with disease (e.g., cystic fibrosis), HPV may lead to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. HPV is driven by the intrinsic response to hypoxia of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, which are acutely sensitive to relatively small changes in pO2 and have evolved to monitor oxygen supply and thus address ventilation-perfusion mismatch. There is now a consensus that the inhibition by hypoxia of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation represents a key step towards the induction of HPV, but the precise nature of the signalling pathway(s) engaged thereafter remains open to debate. We will consider the role of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and liver kinase B1 (LKB1), an upstream kinase through which AMPK is intimately coupled to changes in oxygen supply via mitochondrial metabolism. A growing body of evidence, from our laboratory and others, suggests that modulation of the LKB1-AMPK signalling pathway underpins both hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and the development of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26303471

  3. Adversity and advancing nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Reed, Pamela G

    2008-04-01

    This column reports the theme of adversity addressed in reference to theoretical and metatheoretical considerations for advancing nursing knowledge. The development and content of three classic nursing theories are presented by Neuman representatives, and by theorists King and Roy. Topics for continued dialogue are identified as derived from the interface between philosophy of science issues and these theories. PMID:18378823

  4. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  5. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  6. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  7. Physiology Laboratories Quantifying Gas Exchange in Health and Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two quantitatively-oriented physiology laboratories for veterinary students. The laboratory exercises incorporate the procedures of radiology and physical examination with measurement of pulmonary function. Specific laboratory objectives, procedures and equipment needed for diagnoses of the pathologies are listed. (ML)

  8. Pulmonary function and fuel use: A population survey

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Asim; Mohan Rao, N; Kulkarni, PK; Majumdar, PK; Saiyed, HN

    2005-01-01

    Background In the backdrop of conflicting reports (some studies reported adverse outcomes of biomass fuel use whereas few studies reported absence of any association between adverse health effect and fuel use, may be due to presence of large number of confounding variables) on the respiratory health effects of biomass fuel use, this cross sectional survey was undertaken to understand the role of fuel use on pulmonary function. Method This study was conducted in a village of western India involving 369 randomly selected adult subjects (165 male and 204 female). All the subjects were interviewed and were subjected to pulmonary function test. Analysis of covariance was performed to compare the levels of different pulmonary function test parameters in relation to different fuel use taking care of the role of possible confounding factors. Results This study showed that biomass fuel use (especially wood) is an important factor for deterioration of pulmonary function (particularly in female). FEV1 (p < .05), FEV1 % (p < .01), PEFR (p < .05) and FEF25–75 (p < .01) values were significantly lower in biomass fuel using females than nonusers. Comparison of only biomass fuel use vs. only LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) use and only wood vs. only LPG use has showed that LPG is a safer fuel so far as deterioration of pulmonary function is concerned. This study observes some deterioration of pulmonary function in the male subjects also, who came from biomass fuel using families. Conclusion This study concluded that traditional biomass fuels like wood have adverse effects on pulmonary function. PMID:16255784

  9. Pulmonary hypertension caused by pulmonary venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) on the pulmonary circulation is extraordinarily variable, ranging from no impact on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) to a marked increase. The reasons for this are unknown. Both acutely reversible pulmonary vasoconstriction and pathological remodeling (especially medial hypertrophy and intimal hyperplasia) account for increased PVR when present. The mechanisms involved in vasoconstriction and remodeling are not clearly defined, but increased wall stress, especially in small pulmonary arteries, presumably plays an important role. Myogenic contraction may account for increased vascular tone and also indirectly stimulate remodeling of the vessel wall. Increased wall stress may also directly cause smooth muscle growth, migration, and intimal hyperplasia. Even long-standing and severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) usually abates with elimination of PVH, but PVH-PH is an important clinical problem, especially because PVH due to left ventricular noncompliance lacks definitive therapy. The role of targeted PH therapy in patients with PVH-PH is unclear at this time. Most prospective studies indicate that these medications are not helpful or worse, but there is ample reason to think that a subset of patients with PVH-PH may benefit from phosphodiesterase inhibitors or other agents. A different approach to evaluating possible pharmacologic therapy for PVH-PH may be required to better define its possible utility. PMID:25610595

  10. MR and CT imaging of the structural and functional changes of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Runo, James; Jarjour, Nizar; Roldan, Alejandro; Chesler, Naomi; François, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The current Dana Point classification system (2009) divides elevation of pulmonary artery pressure into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Fortunately, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not a common disease. However, with the aging of the first world’s population, heart failure is now an important cause of pulmonary hypertension with up to 9% of the population involved. PAH is usually asymptomatic until late in the disease process. While there are indirect features of PAH found on noninvasive imaging studies, the diagnosis and management still requires right heart catheterization. Imaging features of PAH include: 1. Enlargement of the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries, 2. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance, 3. Tapering of the peripheral pulmonary arteries, 4. Enlargement of the inferior vena cava, and 5. Increased mean transit time. The chronic requirement to generate high pulmonary arterial pressures measurably affects the right heart and main pulmonary artery. This change in physiology causes the following structural and functional alterations that have been shown to have prognostic significance: Relative area change of the pulmonary trunk, RVSVindex, RVSV, RVEDVindex, LVEDVindex, and baseline RVEF <35%. All of these variables can be quantified non-invasively and followed longitudinally in each patient using MRI to modify the treatment regimen. Untreated PAH frequently results in a rapid clinical decline and death within 3 years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, less than 1/2 of these patients are alive at four years. PMID:23612440