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Sample records for advice improves patient

  1. A pilot study to improve adherence among MS patients who discontinue treatment against medical advice.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared; Bruce, Amanda; Lynch, Sharon; Strober, Lauren; O'Bryan, Sean; Sobotka, Deborah; Thelen, Joan; Ness, Abigail; Glusman, Morgan; Goggin, Kathy; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Catley, Delwyn

    2016-04-01

    Between 30 and 50% of MS patients may prematurely discontinue disease modifying therapies. Little research has examined how to best talk with patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether telephone counseling increases disease modifying therapy (DMT) re-initiation among nonadherent patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants were eligible if they had relapsing-remitting disease, had stopped taking a DMT, and had no plan to re-initiate treatment despite a provider recommendation. Following a baseline assessment, 81 patients were randomly assigned to either five 20 min, weekly sessions of Motivational Interviewing/Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MI-CBT) or Treatment as Usual (TAU) with brief education. At 10 weeks, patients initially assigned to TAU switched over to MI-CBT. Compared to patients in the TAU group, patients undergoing MI-CBT were significantly more likely to indicate they were re-initiating DMT (41.7 vs. 14.3%). These significant results were replicated among patients crossing over from TAU to MI-CBT. Treatment satisfaction was high, with 97% of participants reporting that they would recommend MI-CBT to other patients with MS. Results of this pilot study provide initial support for the use of MI-CBT among MS patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice.Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01925690. PMID:26563147

  2. Does Expert Advice Improve Educational Choice?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports evidence that an individual meeting with a study counselor at high school significantly improves the quality of choice of tertiary educational field, as self-assessed 18 months after graduation from college. To address endogeneity, we explore the variation in study counseling practices between schools as an instrumental variable (IV). Following careful scrutiny of the validity of the IV, our results indicate a significant and positive influence of study counseling on the quality of educational choice, foremost among males and those with low educated parents. The overall result is stable across a number of robustness checks. PMID:26692388

  3. Nutritional advice for community patients: insights from a panel discussion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Linda V; Jenkins, Gill; Belton, Julie; Clements, Suzie; Jacob, Ciara; Johnson, Naomi; Joy, Deirdre; Low, Jennifer; Munson, Eileen; Sheppard, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    This article describes the conclusions of an expert panel that discussed four case studies; these were examples of patients typically encountered by nurses working in the community. The panel considered the nutritional and lifestyle advice that could be given by nurses relating to conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, vulnerability to common infections, elderly care, recurrent urinary tract infection, antibiotic use, and risk of type 2 diabetes. A general conclusion was the importance of motivational interviewing techniques in achieving full understanding of patients' concerns and to determine the best health strategy. As well as specific guidance appropriate for each disorder, a range of information sources for both health professionals and patients are listed in the paper. The panel noted that, although general nutritional advice can be given by nurses working at GP surgeries and in the community, patients should always be referred to registered dietitians or nutritionists if significant dietary changes are considered. PMID:26940615

  4. Beginning a School Literacy Improvement Project: Some Words of Advice. Literacy Improvement Series for Elementary Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yatvin, Joanne

    In response to the need for attention and support perceived by participants in a summer institute for building equity in early literacy, this booklet offers 12 pieces of advice for teachers and administrators trying to implement school literacy improvement plans. The advice presented in the booklet is: (1) do not be intimidated by other people's…

  5. Using Advice from Multiple Sources to Revise and Improve Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaniv, Ilan; Milyavsky, Maxim

    2007-01-01

    How might people revise their opinions on the basis of multiple pieces of advice? What sort of gains could be obtained from rules for using advice? In the present studies judges first provided their initial estimates for a series of questions; next they were presented with several (2, 4, or 8) opinions from an ecological pool of advisory estimates…

  6. Improving smoking cessation advice in Australian general practice: what do GPs suggest is needed?

    PubMed

    Young, J M; Ward, J E

    1998-12-01

    Smoking cessation advice from a general practitioner (GP) significantly increases quit rates among patients who smoke. However, smoking is not discussed during most routine consultations with smokers. This study describes GPs' own views about strategies to support their cessation advice. In 1997, a random sample of 311 GPs in NSW (73% response rate) completed a self-administered questionnaire about smoking cessation. Most respondents were 'very confident' about discussing the health effects of smoking (81.7%). Fewer were as confident about negotiating a quit date (21.5%) or using evidence-based smoking cessation techniques (19.3%). The top three preferred strategies to support smoking cessation advice were all resources for patients: subsidised nicotine replacement therapy (rated as 'quite useful' by 60.5%), pamphlets (55.0%) and free access to smoking cessation clinics (50.8%). Skills training (39.7%) was the preferred resource to improve practitioner effectiveness. Interventions combining skills training with patient resources are likely to be well received by GPs. PMID:9889442

  7. Improving the safety of prescriptions of domperidone in primary care: implementing MHRA advice.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, William

    2016-01-01

    Domperidone is a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist acting on the chemoreceptor trigger zone in the medulla and also in the gut, causing antiemetic and gastrokinetic effects respectively. In the past, domperidone was considered largely safe, with many indications and few contraindications listed in the product literature. In 2014, Domperidone became indicated only for the prevention of nausea and vomiting and the duration of treatment was limited to seven days. Furthermore, the maximum daily dose was limited to thirty milligrams. A quality improvement project was undertaken at Holland Park Surgery to improve compliance with MHRA guidelines. Prescriptions of domperidone in the previous nine months were assessed for compliance with the MHRA advice. Domperidone was prescribed for 23 patients; of these 4 were single acute prescriptions, 3 were repeats which had been stopped and 16 were on active repeat at the time of the search. All patients who had active repeat prescriptions had exceeded the recommended duration of treatment. MHRA contraindications were found in 6 (37%) of active repeat prescriptions. The strategy for improvement involved three PDSA cycles and involved engaging with patients for medication reviews and staff to improve prescribing practices. After the third PDSA cycle we demonstrated that all repeat prescriptions had been stopped and that new prescriptions were compliant with MHRA advice. PMID:27239307

  8. Patients Discharged Against Medical Advice from a Psychiatric Hospital in Iran: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhmoonesi, Fatemeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Pazhuheshgar, Samaneh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Self- discharged patients are at high risk for readmission and ultimately higher cost for care. We intended to find the proportion of patients who leave hospital against medical advice and explore some of their characteristics. Methods: This prospective study of discharge against medical advice was conducted in psychiatric wards of Zare hospital in Iran, 2011. A psychologist recorded some information on a checklist based on the documented information about the patient who wanted to leave against medical advice. The psychologist interviewed these patients and recorded the reasons for discharge against medical advice. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the variables. Results: The rate of premature discharge was 34.4%. Compared to patients with regular discharges, patients with premature discharge were significantly more likely to be male, self-employed, to have co morbid substance abuse and first admission and positive family history of psychiatric disorder. Disappearance of symptoms was the most frequent reason for premature discharge. Conclusion: The 34.4% rate of premature discharge observed in our study is higher than rate reported in other studies. One possible explanation is our teaching hospital serves a low-income urban area and most patients had low socioeconomic status. Further studies are needed to compare teaching and non-teaching hospital about the rate of premature discharge and the reasons of patients who want to leave against medical advice. PMID:24762365

  9. Factors associated with patient-recalled smoking cessation advice in a low-income clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Kathryn I.; Yarnall, Kimberly S. H.; Rimer, Barbara K.; Lipkus, Isaac; Lyna, Pauline R.

    2002-01-01

    It is recommended that providers advise cessation to their patients who smoke. However, patients' reports of cessation advice indicate disparities based on patients' race, gender, age, and smoking level. Providers' reports do not corroborate these disparities. We investigated whether smokers who receive their care in a community health center recalled their providers advising them to quit smoking when their providers documented such advice. We examined 219 patient-provider dyads to assess factors associated with lack of agreement between providers' documentation and patient recall. Patients were asked to recall any provider advice to quit smoking in the post 2 years. After every visit, providers completed a form to record the content of the visit. Most of the patients were African American, married, and uninsured. Sixty-eight percent of the dyads agreed in their documentation/recall. Patient race was the only factor associated with lack of agreement; African-American patients were more likely than white patients to provide discrepant reports. Although this study can not disentangle the racial difference in patient-provider recall/documentation, results may indicate an important area in which health disparities exist. Future studies should address the dynamics of patient-provider communication about smoking cessation, especially in populations that include ethnically diverse patients. PMID:12069216

  10. Bronchial asthma: advice for patients traveling to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Cogo, Annalisa; Fiorenzano, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the possibility of traveling to altitude for patients suffering from bronchial asthma. The mountain environment, the adaptations of the respiratory system to high altitude, the underlying patho-physiologies of asthma, and the recommendations for patients, according to altitude, are discussed. In summary, staying at low altitude has a significant beneficial effect for asthmatic patients, due to the reduction of airway inflammation and the lower response to bronchoconstrictor stimuli; for staying at moderate altitude, there is conflicting information and no clinical data; at high altitude, the environment seems beneficial for well-controlled asthmatics, but intense exercise and upper airway infections (frequent during trekking) can be additional risks and should be avoided. Further, in remote areas health facilities are often difficult to reach. PMID:19519226

  11. Belief Revision and Delusions: How Do Patients with Schizophrenia Take Advice?

    PubMed Central

    Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Chambon, Valérian; Franck, Nicolas; Testud, Bérangère; Van der Henst, Jean-Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    The dominant cognitive model that accounts for the persistence of delusional beliefs in schizophrenia postulates that patients suffer from a general deficit in belief revision. It is generally assumed that this deficit is a consequence of impaired reasoning skills. However, the possibility that such inflexibility affects the entire system of a patient's beliefs has rarely been empirically tested. Using delusion-neutral material in a well-documented advice-taking task, the present study reports that patients with schizophrenia: 1) revise their beliefs, 2) take into account socially provided information to do so, 3) are not overconfident about their judgments, and 4) show less egocentric advice-discounting than controls. This study thus shows that delusional patients' difficulty in revising beliefs is more selective than had been previously assumed. The specificities of the task and the implications for a theory of delusion formation are discussed. PMID:22536329

  12. Nutrition Advice and Recipes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Information > Nutrition Advice & Recipes test Nutrition Advice & Recipes This is a very important section for us ... the schedule given to you by your doctor. Recipes from the NPF Chronic Pancreatitis Cookbook The NPF ...

  13. Optimal management of Alzheimer’s disease patients: Clinical guidelines and family advice

    PubMed Central

    Haberstroh, Julia; Hampel, Harald; Pantel, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Family members provide most of the patient care and administer most of the treatments to patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Family caregivers have an important impact on clinical outcomes, such as quality of life (QoL). As a consequence of this service, family caregivers suffer high rates of psychological and physical illness as well as social and financial burdens. Hence, it is important to involve family caregivers in multimodal treatment settings and provide interventions that are both suitable and specifically tailored to their needs. In recent years, several clinical guidelines have been presented worldwide for evidence-based treatment of AD and other forms of dementia. Most of these guidelines have considered family advice as integral to the optimal clinical management of AD. This article reviews current and internationally relevant guidelines with emphasis on recommendations concerning family advice. PMID:20520788

  14. Prevalence of and Reasons for Patients Leaving Against Medical Advice from Paediatric Wards in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghafri, Mohamed; Al-Bulushi, Abdullah; Al-Qasmi, Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of and reasons for patients leaving against medical advice (LAMA) in a paediatric setting in Oman. This retrospective study was carried out between January 2007 and December 2009 and assessed patients who left the paediatric wards at the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, against medical advice. Of 11,482 regular discharges, there were 183 cases of LAMA (prevalence: 1.6%). Dissatisfaction with treatment and a desire to seek a second opinion were collectively the most cited reasons for LAMA according to data from the hospital's electronic system (27.9%) and telephone conversations with patients' parents (55.0%). No reasons for LAMA were documented in the hospital's electronic system for 109 patients (59.6%). The low observed prevalence of LAMA suggests good medical practice at the Royal Hospital. This study indicates the need for thorough documentation of all LAMA cases to ensure the availability of high-quality data for healthcare workers involved in preventing LAMA. PMID:26909217

  15. Patient use and compliance with medical advice delivered by a web-based triage system in primary care.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Nicol; Cranen, Karlijn; Boer, Henk; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C; Seydel, Erwin R

    2010-01-01

    We studied a web-based triage system which was accessible to the general public in the Netherlands. In a retrospective analysis we investigated the type of complaints that were submitted and the kind of advice provided. Over a period of 15 months, 13,133 different people began using the web-based triage system and 3812 patients went right through the triage process to the end. The most frequent complaints were common cold symptoms, such as cough and a sore throat (22%), itch problems (13%), urinary complaints (12%), diarrhoea (10%), headache (8%) and lower back pain (8%). Most commonly, the system generated the advice to contact a doctor (85%) and in 15% of the cases the system provided fully automated, problem-tailored, self-care advice. A total of 192 patients participated in a prospective study and completed an online survey immediately after the delivery of advice. A follow-up questionnaire on actual compliance was completed by 35 patients. Among these, 20 (57%) had actually complied with the advice provided by the system. A regression analysis revealed that intention to comply was strongly related to actual compliance. In turn, intention to comply was strongly related to attitude towards the advice (P < 0.001). Web-based triage can contribute to a more efficient primary care system, because it facilitates the gatekeeper function. PMID:20086260

  16. Hypertensive patients’ readiness to use of mobile phones and other information technological modes for improving their compliance to doctors’ advice in Karachi

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mirza Izhar; S. Naqvi, Baqir; Ahmed, Iqbal; Ali, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the use of information technology (IT) & electronic media for improving compliance rate to doctors’ advice in hypertensive patients in Karachi. Methods: Total 400 persons (200 males & 200 females) were randomly selected in six districts of Karachi. Data was collected through a pretested questionnaire. Following was sample criteria: age above 15 years, living in Karachi and ambulatory. Persons admitted in a hospital, individuals who were doing some physical activity during survey e.g. exercise, labor work etc., individual in stressed condition, non-cooperative individuals – not willing to get BP checked and fill questionnaire, and pregnant women were excluded. Those who did not sign the consent form were also excluded. SPSS was used for data analysis and descriptive statistics was employed for sensitivity analysis. Results: For healthcare awareness, people look for health programs on radio and TV channels. Short Message Service (SMS) and phone are highly appreciated by patients for reminders. To increase compliance to doctors’ advice, less educated people prefer phone calls over SMS whereas educated individuals favor SMS. Although price of medicine has not emerged as a major contributing factor for non-compliance, discount on medicinal products is highly appreciated by the patients. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is a widespread awareness of high blood pressure in the sample population of Karachi e.g. 72.5%. People consider reminder message system i.e. Calls and Short Messaging Service (SMS) would help them in improving compliance to doctors’ advice. PMID:25878606

  17. Patients' expectations of the health advice conversation with the diabetes nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Grund, Jeanette; Stomberg, Margareta Warrén

    2012-10-01

    Type 2-diabetes usually makes its first appearance in adult age. In order for patients to feel in control of the disease, they need support and information that can easily be understood and which is relevant for the individual. By educating and supporting them, patients can conduct self-care and take control. The aim of this study was to highlight the expectations that patients with type 2-diabetes have of the health advice conversation with the nurse practitioner. A qualitative method using interviews was conducted and the data material was analysed according to manifest and latent content analysis. Three categories emerged in the results. Firstly, providing good accessibility to the diabetes nurse practitioner is of importance. Secondly, there is a demand for group activities in which patients have the opportunity to talk with other individuals who have diabetes. Finally, knowledge about self-care means that the patients themselves are able to change the intake of medication, their eating habits, and exercise according to need, as this leads to increased independence and self-management. The latent content demonstrates that the patient is striving towards competence and self-confidence in order to achieve a balance between lifestyle and the normalisation of blood sugar levels, which means empowerment. In addition, the informants expressed a demand for group activities where they can discuss the disease with others in the same situation. A combination of knowledge about the disease, receiving individual advice, and participation in groups can be beneficial in order to motivate the informants about lifestyle changes and to gain the ability to manage the disease. PMID:23804165

  18. Does nurse counseling or offer of nicotine gum improve the effectiveness of physician smoking-cessation advice?

    PubMed

    Nebot, M; Cabezas, C

    1992-09-01

    Medical advice and use of nicotine gum have recently received increased attention as effective tools to encourage smokers to quit, yet the relative value of nurse vs physician counseling has not been explored in depth. In this study, 425 smokers attending three urban primary care centers in Barcelona were systematically allocated to one of three groups: group A patients received a brief counseling session to quit from their family physician; group B patients were given the same brief counseling along with a free supply of nicotine gum; group C received a brief health-education session from the primary care nurse. Three hundred forty-nine patients (82%) could be reached by telephone at the two-month follow up. By that time, after correcting for the estimated validity of the phone report of smoking status, the proportion declaring themselves to be nonsmokers was 10.9%, 11.1%, and 10.8%, respectively, without significant differences between them. At one-year follow up the proportions were 4.4%, 5.3%, and 6.0%. In the logistic regression analysis, only the expected difficulty of quitting was predictive of one-year abstention, OR = 3.1 (95% CI: 1.3-7.3). The present study shows no difference between physician versus nurse counseling and no improvement in the proportion of quitters with the addition of nicotine gum in the physician-counseled group. PMID:1414430

  19. Making the Best Match: Improving the Quality of Pre-Course Information, Advice and Guidance. LSDA Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Jackie

    Ways of improving the quality of precourse information, advice, and guidance available to students entering further education and sixth form colleges in the United Kingdom were explored. Data were collected from the following sources: (1) the 3-year Raising Quality and Achievement Programme; (2) seminars on sharing good practice in delivering…

  20. Genetics: what advice for patients who present with a family history of melanoma?

    PubMed

    Newton Bishop, Julia A; Gruis, Nelleke A

    2007-12-01

    A significantly increased susceptibility to melanoma may manifest as a family history of melanoma (plus or minus pancreatic cancer), the development of multiple primary tumors, or melanoma in the context of numerous and clinically atypical moles (the atypical mole syndrome). In families, increased susceptibility may occur as a result of the inheritance of mutations at the CDKN2A locus or in the CDK4 gene. We describe what is known about these genes and discuss the implications for genetic counseling and gene testing. Lower levels of risk are associated with genetically determined pigmentary variation within populations. This variation is attributable to inheritance of variants in the MC1R gene and putatively other genes such as OCA2, which is discussed. Melanoma is causally related to sun exposure in the majority of patients, although the patterns of sun exposure, which are most important, remain controversial. The role of risk estimation for individuals in giving advice about sun exposure is considered. PMID:18083368

  1. Pediatrician’s perspectives on discharge against medical advice (DAMA) among pediatric patients: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of discharge against medical advice (DAMA) among pediatric patients places pediatricians in a dilemma between respect for the parent’s decision and the desire to provide complete care for the vulnerable child-patient. Little has been written about factors that affect a pediatrician’s decision to allow a parent to discharge his child against medical advice. This qualitative study aims to answer the question of how pediatric residents in a tertiary government hospital perceive and decide on a DAMA request from a parent or primary caregiver. Methods Using a focus group discussion approach, 11 pediatric residents from a government-run tertiary hospital were recruited for the study. The session was digitally recorded and dominant themes were coded and identified. Results There were three prominent themes that arose in the discussion: variability of definitions of DAMA, factors considered before “allowing” the patient to be DAMA, and the implications of a DAMA request on their performance as pediatricians. Definitions vary from one resident to another based on the main reason for DAMA (terminal, cultural, or financial). A conflict was noted in the definition of Home per Request (HPR) versus DAMA. Factors that influence a pediatrician to sign out a case as DAMA include: their ability to do something about the reason given for the DAMA request, the condition of the patient when the DAMA request was given, their impression of the kind of care that the parents provide, and their legal liabilities. Pediatric residents generally maintain a positive attitude towards the parents who request for DAMA and in the event of readmission, accept the patient into their care again. The occurrence of a variety of definitions and subcategories for DAMA may cause confusion among the pediatricians and should be clarified. The familiarity with cultural traditions contributes to their ability to handle situations that may lead to DAMA but this should always be

  2. Disease-centred advice for patients with superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Dearing, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Urologists tend to regard superficial tumours (e.g. pTa or pT1 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder) as being of low pathogenicity. There is a clearly established link between cigarette smoking and bladder cancer, with incidence, recurrence and mortality being positively associated with duration of smoking and number of cigarettes smoked. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A questionnaire-based audit was undertaken to determine the amount of information being provided by urologists for patients who had been diagnosed with pTa or pT1 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder about both their disease, its aetiology and appropriate advice regarding life-style change. RESULTS: A total of 78 patients adequately completed the questionnaire. Of these, 55 (71%) had been smokers at some time, and 24 (31%) continued to smoke at the time of follow-up. Only 26 of these 55 (47%) were aware of their underlying diagnosis. This level of knowledge was similar in non-smokers, of whom only 12 (52%) were aware of their disease. Of the ever-smokers, only 12 (22%) were aware that smoking was a risk factor for the development of bladder cancer, and 7 (13%) were aware that continued smoking could worsen the prognosis. Only 18 (33%) of the 55 smoking patients had been told to stop smoking, for any reason, by their general medical practitioner, and only 4 (7%) had been told to stop by a urologist. CONCLUSION: In the urology department in which the audit was performed, patients with bladder cancer were not being provided with adequate information about their disease. PMID:15826413

  3. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    PubMed Central

    Beto, Judith A; Schury, Katherine A; Bansal, Vinod K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coordinates multiple diet components including calories, protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and fluid. Dietary intake studies have shown difficulty in adhering to the scope and complexity of the CKD diet parameters. No single educational or clinical strategy has been shown to be consistently effective across CKD populations. Highest adherence has been observed when both diet and education efforts are individualized to each patient and adapted over time to changing lifestyle and CKD variables. This narrative review and commentary summarizes nutrition education literature and published strategies for providing nutritional advice in CKD. A cohort of practical and effective strategies for increasing dietary adherence to nutritional advice are provided that include communicating with “talking control” principles, integrating patient-owned technology, acknowledging the typical food pattern may be snacking rather than formal meals, focusing on a single goal rather than multiple goals, creating active learning and coping strategies (frozen sandwiches, visual hands-on activities, planting herb gardens), and involving the total patient food environment. PMID:26893578

  4. [How to handle the dilemma of driving for patients with Alzheimer's disease? A survey of advices provided by French caregivers guides].

    PubMed

    Mietkiewicz, Marie-Claude; Ostrowski, Madeleine

    2015-09-01

    For many old people, driving takes an important place in the daily living activities and contributes to carry on their autonomy and self-esteem. However, many studies showed a link between car accidents and Alzheimer's disease, even in the early stages of dementia, and people caring for these patients inevitably ask the question: "Is my patient with Alzheimer's disease still able to drive his car?" Guides devoted to caregivers can play an important role to improve the knowledge of Alzheimer's disease and to afford advices for patients managing. To assess how these guides handle the question of patients driving, we made a survey of the 46 French caregiver guides (re)published between 1988 and 2013. The question of driving is raised with more or less details in 31 guides. All state that driving should be discontinued but that the consequences of this decision on the patient autonomy should be taken into account. A few guides provide clues to assess driving competence for the patients, and many propose advices to support the implementation of the driving discontinuity decision, such as to discuss with the patient to persuade him to stop driving, to ask for assistance by the family physician, to hide the car's keys or to disconnect its battery... In France, physicians are not allowed to prohibit driving or to report dangerous driving to authorities. Ultimately, the caregivers remain faced with the ethical dilemma to choose between safety and the patient's autonomy preservation. Therefore the responsibility for the patient to persist or give up driving only falls to them. PMID:26395306

  5. [Advice for allergic travellers].

    PubMed

    Sonneville, A

    1999-09-01

    Business and tourist journeys by air contribute to exposure of the body to multiple environments. The allergic patient, considered rightly to be a sentry of the environment, has many reasons to care about his journeys and to take precautions that are adapted to his case under the impetus of advice and information from his physician and his specialist. Some advice falls within a simple logic that is enough to remember when planning the journey while the others measures must follow a correct preventative strategy for allergy risks as much as those that concern the modalities before leaving as a drive taken on the ground. It is important therefore to know how to give advice and information on the different risks linked to the allergic condition and to the field of allergy and help the patient to orientate his choice of place of the journey, the methods of lodging, of transport and the programme of the journey. The advice should also include the preventative measures as a function of the known pathology under the form of medical equipment before, during the stay and on return. Finally some advice relative to medical equipment for prevention and cure would appear to be judicious. PMID:10524269

  6. The role of patient-provider interactions: Using an accounts framework to explain hospital discharges against medical advice.

    PubMed

    Lekas, Helen-Maria; Alfandre, David; Gordon, Peter; Harwood, Katherine; Yin, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    The phenomenon of leaving the hospital against medical advice (AMA) despite being quite common and associated with significant deleterious health outcomes remains inadequately understood and addressed. Researchers have identified certain patient characteristics as predictors of AMA discharges, but the patients' reasons for these events have not been comprehensively explored. Moreover, because the medical authority model dominates this research area, providers' experiences of AMA discharges remain unstudied. We examined the AMA discharge from a patient-centered perspective by analyzing the content of notes providers generate to record such events. We analyzed providers' notes for all inpatients with a primary HIV diagnosis (N = 33) that, in 2012, left an urban hospital AMA. Applying the Scott and Lyman accounts framework, we identified that the notes constituted records of providers' and patients' excuses and justifications for failing to meet the expectations of a provider offering patient-centered care and a compliant patient receiving care. Alongside the patients' reasons for leaving AMA, the notes also revealed the providers' reasons for honoring or discrediting the patients' accounts. The style of the accounts and the professional status of the notes' authors enabled us to contextualize the production and sharing of AMA notes in the hospital hierarchy. Conceptualizing AMA notes as dyadic accounts elicited specific factors that challenge the patient-provider relationship, and generated insights on how to strengthen it, and thus decrease the rates of AMA discharges and their associated health effects. PMID:27023920

  7. Advice for improving memory: exercising, strengthening, and cultivating natural memory, 1860-1910.

    PubMed

    Collins, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    The idea that human memory can be improved appears to be as ancient as the concept of memory itself. For centuries, authors have promised that using artificial mnemonical systems can improve remembering. However, in the late nineteenth century many authors of memory improvement texts emphasized the importance of enhancing natural memory as opposed to developing artificial memory systems. In doing so, they portrayed natural memory as something analogous to other body functions and parts, such as muscles, and promoted a metaphorical view of memory that did not rely wholly on the more familiar root metaphors of storage and inscription. At the same time, they stressed that natural memory could be reconciled with moral purposes, especially through notions of exercise, training, and discipline. This article explores these ideas and how they chimed with Victorian concerns about free will, the education of the young, moral imperatives around self-improvement, and the increasing interest in science and especially a science of the mind. PMID:24272820

  8. Racial Differences in Length of Stay for Patients Who Leave Against Medical Advice from U.S. General Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Rima; Dutton, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of published literature on the length of hospital stays (LOS) for patients who leave against medical advice (AMA) and on the factors that predict their LOS. The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between race and the LOS for AMA patients after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data were used to describe LOS for AMA patients aged 18 years or older. Patient characteristics included age, sex, race, marital status, insurance, and diagnosis (ICD-9-CM). Hospital characteristics consisted of ownership, region and bed size. LOS was the major outcome measure. Using data from all years 1988-2006, the expected time to AMA discharge was first examined as a function of race, then adjusting for year terms, patient and hospital characteristics, and major medical diagnoses and mental illness. The unadjusted effect of race on the expected time of leaving AMA was about twice the adjusted effect. After controlling for the other covariates, the expected time to AMA discharge is 20% shorter for Blacks than Whites. The most significant predictors included age, insurance coverage, mental illness, gender, and region. Factors identified in this study offer insights into directions for evidence based- health policy to reduce AMA discharges. PMID:26729149

  9. Racial Differences in Length of Stay for Patients Who Leave Against Medical Advice from U.S. General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tawk, Rima; Dutton, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of published literature on the length of hospital stays (LOS) for patients who leave against medical advice (AMA) and on the factors that predict their LOS. The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between race and the LOS for AMA patients after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data were used to describe LOS for AMA patients aged 18 years or older. Patient characteristics included age, sex, race, marital status, insurance, and diagnosis (ICD-9-CM). Hospital characteristics consisted of ownership, region and bed size. LOS was the major outcome measure. Using data from all years 1988–2006, the expected time to AMA discharge was first examined as a function of race, then adjusting for year terms, patient and hospital characteristics, and major medical diagnoses and mental illness. The unadjusted effect of race on the expected time of leaving AMA was about twice the adjusted effect. After controlling for the other covariates, the expected time to AMA discharge is 20% shorter for Blacks than Whites. The most significant predictors included age, insurance coverage, mental illness, gender, and region. Factors identified in this study offer insights into directions for evidence based- health policy to reduce AMA discharges. PMID:26729149

  10. Measuring improved patient choice.

    PubMed

    Holmes-Rovner, M; Rovner, D R

    2000-08-01

    Patient decision support (PDS) tools or decision aids have been developed as adjuncts to the clinical encounter. Their aim is to support evidence-based patient choice. Clinical trials of PDS tools have used an array of outcome measures to determine efficacy, including knowledge, satisfaction, health status and consistency between patient choice and values. This paper proposes that the correlation between 'subjective expected utility' (SEU) and decision may be the best primary endpoint for trials. SEU is a measure usually used in behavioural decision theory. The paper first describes how decision support tools may use decision analysis to structure the presentation of evidence and guide patient decision-making. Uses of expected utility (EU) are suggested for evaluating PDS tools when improving population health status is the objective. SEU is the theoretically better measure when internal consistency of patient choices is the objective. PMID:11083037

  11. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients' assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  12. Self-monitoring of blood glucose: Advice for providers and patients.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Shannon; Manroa, Pooja; Doshi, Krupa

    2016-05-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose is a critical element in diabetes management. Providers must determine if and when patients are to perform glucose self-monitoring, set blood glucose targets, and help patients to interpret the results. Patients have a variety of continually evolving meters, supplies, and technology from which to choose. Making sense of these expectations and options is perhaps the greatest challenge for providers and patients. Working together, healthcare providers and certified diabetes educators can ensure that people with diabetes get the most out of self-monitoring of blood glucose. PMID:27168511

  13. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  14. Quality improvement techniques to improve patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Torres, E Joseph; Guo, Kristina L

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes several approaches for implementing quality improvement initiatives to improve patient satisfaction, which enables health-care organizations to position themselves for success in today's global and increasingly competitive environment. Specifically, measuring the views of patients, improving patient satisfaction through a community-wide effort, and using a Six Sigma program are discussed. Each of these programs can be an effective mechanism for quality improvement. A key component to quality improvement techniques involves collaborative efforts by all health-care professionals and managers as they seek to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:15552388

  15. Auditing a court assessment and advice service for defendants with mental health difficulties: utilizing electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Gough, Karen; Magness, Laura; Winstanley, Julia

    2012-07-01

    This study is an audit of the Somerset Court Advice and Assessment Service (CAAS) throughout its first year of implementation. It reports that the service successfully met the six desired objectives as set out in its Service Level Agreement. Further to this, it reports that the use of National Health Service electronic patient records within a court setting facilitated the provision of apposite and timely information to the court. Specific findings were that deliberate self-harm/suicidal ideation and mood disorders were the primary reasons for a person requiring CAAS involvement. Violence against the person, breach of orders and theft were the most prevalent categories of offending within this referred group. The prevalence of previous psychiatric history was significantly higher than found in comparable audits. It is likely that this is due to the efficacy of proactive and in vivo utilization of electronic patient records. Conclusions include the need to work in partnership with drug and alcohol agencies and the importance of recognizing that these services have significant clinical benefits for defendants with mental health problems, and the court system in terms of financial savings. We suggest ongoing audit is necessary to guide the development of other schemes in this pioneering service area. PMID:22833486

  16. Health Care Plan's Nurse Advice System.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, D. E.; Reinhardt, M. T.; Lyons, J. P.; Sullivan, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    Staff model HMO's expend great effort in handling member phone calls. Health Care Plan, Inc. has developed a computer program to aid phone room nurses in their documentation and decision making processes. The Nurse Advice system has been successfully implemented in six of eight medical centers. By providing real-time access to patient clinical data, the quality of care and service is improved. PMID:1482969

  17. Disparities in Receipt of Advice to Quit Smoking From Health Care Providers: 2010 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, David; Paskett, Electra D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Not all smokers receive tobacco cessation advice from health care providers (HCPs) and, although factors associated with receiving HCP advice to quit smoking and the effectiveness of such advice have been examined, no recent study has explored differences between types of HCPs (eg, physicians vs dentists). Our objective was to determine the prevalence of HCP-delivered advice and the characteristics of patients who receive advice to quit smoking from any HCP and, separately, from a physician or a dentist. Methods This study used data from the Sample Adult Core questionnaire, Sample Family Core questionnaire, and Sample Adult Cancer Control Module of the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. The sample for the analysis was limited to current smokers who saw an HCP in the previous 12 months. The characteristics of smokers who received advice to quit were compared with those who did not receive advice and further analyzed by which type of HCP delivered the advice. Results Half of current smokers reported receiving advice to quit smoking from any HCP, but only 1 in 10 smokers who visited a dentist received advice to quit. Receipt of advice was associated with sex, age, race, marital status, region, type of health insurance, quit attempts in the previous 12 months, and extent of tobacco use. Conclusion Only half of all smokers receive advice to quit from any HCP and even fewer from dentists. Changes in professional organizations’ policies, health profession education curriculum, and continuing education requirements are needed to improve compliance with the Clinical Practice Guideline. PMID:25078568

  18. Simulation: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abi; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Crofts, Joanna; Draycott, Tim

    2013-06-01

    Effective training has been shown to improve perinatal care and outcome, decrease litigation claims and reduce midwifery sick leave. To be effective, training should be incentivised, in a realistic context, and delivered to inter-professional teams similar to those delivering actual care. Teamwork training is a useful addition, but it should be based on the characteristics of effective teamwork as derived from the study of frontline teams. Implementation of simulation and teamwork training is challenging, with constraints on staff time, facilities and finances. Local adoption and adaptation of effective programmes can help keep costs down, and make them locally relevant whilst maintaining effectiveness. Training programmes need to evolve continually in line with new evidence. To do this, it is vital to monitor outcomes and robustly evaluate programmes for their impact on patient care and outcome, not just on participants. PMID:23721770

  19. [Behaviour concerning smoking among the patients making use of advice in women health centres].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Alina; Szymański, Przemysław; Rzeźnicki, Adam; Stelmach, Włodzimierz

    2007-01-01

    The level of knowledge in the society about the harmful influence of smoking is increasing systematically. But there are still many people ignoring the warnings and prohibitions concerning smoking. The results of the research show that it is highly worrying that there are people for whom smoking is incredibly dangerous, e.g. children, youth, women, especially pregnant women. The aim of the work was to establish the percentage of smoking women among the patients of the women health centre, with the special focus on pregnant women. There were 120 women encompassed in this study in the health centre in Opoczno and 120 women using a similar health centre in Lodz between the 1st and the 15th March 2007, using a auditoria survey questionnaire. The collected data was worked out statistically. In the group of 240 tested people, 87 admitted to smoking, which is 36.3% of the respondents. Among the 185 women who were not pregnant, but were smoking, there were 75 (40.5%) and in the group of 55 pregnant women, there were 12 who smoked (f=0.22). Over 22% of the smoking women smoked over 10 cigarettes a day. From among 87 of the surveyed, 35.6% claimed they smoked everywhere they wanted. Majority of the respondents that is 52.9% lived with at least one other smoking person. Over 70% of them would like to quit smoking. Almost 48% stated their doctor has never talked with them about the influence of smoking on their health and almost 42% stated that no nurse or midwife has ever talked to them about this subject. Frequency of smoking among the tested people who were using the women health centre was high. Especially worrying was the percentage of the smoking pregnant women--every fifth of them smoked. PMID:18409321

  20. A patient who refused medical advice: the doctor and the patient should look for a common ground.

    PubMed

    Tong, Sf; Robert, Chen

    2007-01-01

    Treatment refusal is a common encounter in clinical practice. The process of deciding to refuse treatment is often complex. It is our responsibility to try and understand this process of decision making and the underlying reasons for treatment refusal. Many of these reasons are often rational in the context where the decision is made. The patients could be making the best decision for themselves even if these decisions are not necessarily the best in our mind. We should at all times discuss our treatment options and assess their ability to make decisions in achieving common goals. These goals should balance our best treatment strategies and the patients' best interest. This article discusses the reasons underlying treatment refusal and how we can achieve a common goal with our patients. PMID:25606096

  1. Patients Provide Recommendations for Improving Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Angelo D; Hamilton, Jill B; Krusel, Jessica L; Moore, LeeAntoinette G; Pierre-Louis, Bosny J

    2016-04-01

    National Committee for Quality Assurance recommends patient-centered medical homes incorporate input from patient populations; however, many health care organizations do not. This qualitative study used two open-ended questions from 148 active duty Army Soldiers and their family members to illicit recommendations for primary care providers and clinic leadership that would improve their health care experiences. Content analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses. Participant responses were related to four major themes: Access to Care, Interpersonal Interaction, Satisfaction of Care, and Quality of Care. Participants were overall satisfied with their care; however, spending less time waiting for appointments and to see the provider or specialist were the most frequently requested improvements related to Access to Care. For Interpersonal Interaction, 82% of the responses recommended that providers be more attentive listeners, courteous, patient, caring, and respectful. Decreasing wait times and improving interpersonal skills would improve health care experiences and patient satisfaction. PMID:27046182

  2. Post-brushing rinsing for the control of dental caries: exploration of the available evidence to establish what advice we should give our patients.

    PubMed

    Pitts, N; Duckworth, R M; Marsh, P; Mutti, B; Parnell, C; Zero, D

    2012-04-01

    Post-tooth brushing rinsing behaviours have the potential to either reduce or enhance the effectiveness of fluoride toothpaste and show wide variation in the general population. There is a lack of high-quality evidence to support definitive guidance in this area. However, the currently available international guidelines provide consistent recommendations despite the limited evidence. To explore the available evidence base and recommendations on optimal post-brushing rinsing behaviour relating to the use of both water and mouth rinses, a meeting was held between the authors and other experts. This paper reports the consensus views of those present at the meeting concerning what advice we should give our patients. A full list of meeting attendees is provided at the end of this article. PMID:22498529

  3. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  4. Discharges Against Medical Advice

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Peter; Meldrum, Sean; Fiscella, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prior literature suggests that blacks are more likely to be discharged against medical advice (DAMA). OBJECTIVE We examined whether DAMA from general hospitals varies by race/ethnicity and whether this variation is explained by individual and hospital factors. DESIGN, SUBJECTS, AND MEASUREMENTS We conducted cross-sectional analyses of 1998 to 2000 hospital discharge data, linked to the American Hospital Association data, on adults admitted for acute general hospital care in California, Florida, and New York. A series of hierarchical logistic regression analyses explored factors associated with DAMA, initially adjusting for age and gender, then sequentially adding adjustment for comorbidities, individual socio-economic factors, and finally hospital characteristics. RESULTS Compared with whites, blacks had a 2-fold higher age-gender adjusted odds of DAMA, a risk that progressively diminished with increasing adjustment (final adjusted odds ratio [OR]=0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.91, 1.00). While Hispanics had an increased risk of DAMA in age-gender-adjusted analyses, the final model revealed a protective effect (adjusted OR=0.66, 95% CI=0.62, 0.70), similar to that observed for Asians. CONCLUSIONS Disparities in DAMA affecting minority patients in general hospitals are largely accounted for by individual and hospital socio-economic factors. The absence of any adjusted disparity affecting blacks, and the protective effect observed for Hispanics and other minorities suggest that individual discrimination and poor communication are not primary determinants of DAMA, but where patients are admitted does contribute to disparities in DAMA. PMID:16918741

  5. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  6. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking.

    PubMed

    Häusser, Jan Alexander; Leder, Johannes; Ketturat, Charlene; Dresler, Martin; Faber, Nadira Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by - more or less qualified - advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We conducted a 2 (sleep deprivation: yes vs. no) ×2 (competency of advisor: medium vs. high) experimental study to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on advice taking in an estimation task. We compared participants with one night of total sleep deprivation to participants with a night of regular sleep. Competency of advisor was manipulated within subjects. We found that sleep deprived participants show increased advice taking. An interaction of condition and competency of advisor and further post-hoc analyses revealed that this effect was more pronounced for the medium competency advisor compared to the high competency advisor. Furthermore, sleep deprived participants benefited more from an advisor of high competency in terms of stronger improvement in judgmental accuracy than well-rested participants. PMID:27109507

  7. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Jan Alexander; Leder, Johannes; Ketturat, Charlene; Dresler, Martin; Faber, Nadira Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by – more or less qualified – advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We conducted a 2 (sleep deprivation: yes vs. no) ×2 (competency of advisor: medium vs. high) experimental study to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on advice taking in an estimation task. We compared participants with one night of total sleep deprivation to participants with a night of regular sleep. Competency of advisor was manipulated within subjects. We found that sleep deprived participants show increased advice taking. An interaction of condition and competency of advisor and further post-hoc analyses revealed that this effect was more pronounced for the medium competency advisor compared to the high competency advisor. Furthermore, sleep deprived participants benefited more from an advisor of high competency in terms of stronger improvement in judgmental accuracy than well-rested participants. PMID:27109507

  8. Systematic reviews of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, G; Feder, G; Lewis, M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the United Kingdom (UK), 9% of adults consult their doctor annually with back pain. The treatment recommendations are based on orthopaedic teaching, but the current management is causing increasing dissatisfaction. Many general practitioners (GPs) are confused about what constitutes effective advice. AIM: To review all randomized controlled trials of bed rest and of medical advice to stay active for acute back pain. METHOD: A systematic review based on a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to April 1996 with complete citation tracking for randomized controlled trials of bed rest or medical advice to stay active and continue ordinary daily activities. The inclusion criteria were: primary care setting, patients with low back pain of up to 3 months duration, and patient-centred outcomes (rate of recovery from the acute attack, relief of pain, restoration of function, satisfaction with treatment, days off work and return to work, development of chronic pain and disability, recurrent attacks, and further health care use). RESULTS: Ten trials of bed rest and eight trials of advice to stay active were identified. Consistent findings showed that bed rest is not an effective treatment for acute low back pain but may delay recovery. Advice to stay active and to continue ordinary activities results in a faster return to work, less chronic disability, and fewer recurrent problems. CONCLUSION: A simple but fundamental change from the traditional prescription of bed rest to positive advice about staying active could improve clinical outcomes and reduce the personal and social impact of back pain. PMID:9474831

  9. Financial Advice: Who Pays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finke, Michael S.; Huston, Sandra J.; Winchester, Danielle D.

    2011-01-01

    Using a cost-benefit framework for financial planning services and proprietary data collected in the summer of 2008, the client characteristics that are associated with the likelihood of paying for professional financial advice, as well as the type of financial services purchased, are identified. Results indicate that respondents who pay for…

  10. Strategic Communication During Whole-System Change: Advice and Guidance for School District Leaders and PR Specialists. Leading Systemic School Improvement #9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Francis M.; Chance, Patti L.

    2006-01-01

    Times of great change in school districts require strategic communication with internal and external stakeholders including the use of school public relations tools and techniques. This book provides theoretical and practical advice and guidance to district-based change leaders and school public relations specialists on how they can support their…

  11. Improving patient safety in haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Benjamin D.; Metcalfe, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Thomas Inman (1820–76) wrote ‘Practice two things in your dealings with disease: either help or do not harm the patient’, echoing writings from the Hippocratic school. The challenge of practicing safely with the avoidance of complications or harm is perhaps only heightened in the context of modern medical settings such as the haemodialysis unit where complex interventions and treatment are routine. The current issue of CKJ reports two studies aimed at improving the care of haemodialysis patients targeting early use of arteriovenous grafts as access for haemodialysis and the implementation of a dialysis checklist to ensure the prescribed dialysis treatment is delivered. The further challenge of ensuring that such evidence-based tools are used appropriately and consistently falls to all members of the clinical team. PMID:26034585

  12. Cluster randomized trial in smoking cessation with intensive advice in diabetic patients in primary care. ITADI Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is a priority to achieve smoking cessation in diabetic smokers, given that this is a group of patients with elevated cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, tobacco has a multiplying effect on micro and macro vascular complications. Smoking abstinence rates increase as the intensity of the intervention, length of the intervention and number and diversity of contacts with the healthcare professional during the intervention increases. However, there are few published studies about smoking cessation in diabetics in primary care, a level of healthcare that plays an essential role in these patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive smoking cessation intervention in diabetic patients in primary care. Methods/Design Cluster randomized trial, controlled and multicentric. Randomization unit: Primary Care Team. Study population: 546 diabetic smokers older than 14 years of age whose disease is controlled by one of the primary care teams in the study. Outcome Measures: Continuous tobacco abstinence (a person who has not smoked for at least six months and with a CO level of less than 6 ppm measured by a cooximeter) , evolution in the Prochaska and DiClemente's Transtheoretical Model of Change, number of cigarettes/day, length of the visit. Point of assessment: one- year post- inclusion in the study. Intervention: Brief motivational interview for diabetic smokers at the pre-contemplation and contemplation stage, intensive motivational interview with pharmacotherapy for diabetic smokers in the preparation-action stage and reinforcing intevention in the maintenance stage. Statistical Analysis: A descriptive analysis of all variables will be done, as well as a multilevel logistic regression and a Poisson regression. All analyses will be done with an intention to treatment basis and will be fitted for potential confounding factors and variables of clinical importance. Statistical packages: SPSS15, STATA10 y HLM6

  13. Perceived Threat and Corroboration: Key Factors That Improve a Predictive Model of Trust in Internet-based Health Information and Advice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Peter R; Briggs, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Background How do people decide which sites to use when seeking health advice online? We can assume, from related work in e-commerce, that general design factors known to affect trust in the site are important, but in this paper we also address the impact of factors specific to the health domain. Objective The current study aimed to (1) assess the factorial structure of a general measure of Web trust, (2) model how the resultant factors predicted trust in, and readiness to act on, the advice found on health-related websites, and (3) test whether adding variables from social cognition models to capture elements of the response to threatening, online health-risk information enhanced the prediction of these outcomes. Methods Participants were asked to recall a site they had used to search for health-related information and to think of that site when answering an online questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of a general Web trust questionnaire plus items assessing appraisals of the site, including threat appraisals, information checking, and corroboration. It was promoted on the hungersite.com website. The URL was distributed via Yahoo and local print media. We assessed the factorial structure of the measures using principal components analysis and modeled how well they predicted the outcome measures using structural equation modeling (SEM) with EQS software. Results We report an analysis of the responses of participants who searched for health advice for themselves (N = 561). Analysis of the general Web trust questionnaire revealed 4 factors: information quality, personalization, impartiality, and credible design. In the final SEM model, information quality and impartiality were direct predictors of trust. However, variables specific to eHealth (perceived threat, coping, and corroboration) added substantially to the ability of the model to predict variance in trust and readiness to act on advice on the site. The final model achieved a satisfactory fit: χ2 5 = 10

  14. [Systematizing support in cessation smoking to improve care for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gaillot-de-Saintignon, Julie; Deutsch, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 20% of cancer patients smoke at diagnosis (all localizations included), and over two thirds continue despite the therapeutic management of their cancer, especially when cancer is not associated with tobacco. The impact of smoking on quality of care for patients is actually not enough considered. A literature review conducted by the French National Cancer Institute emphasizes the importance of tobacco cessation to improve the prognosis (decreased mortality from all causes and specific); to reduce the risk of second primary cancers; to reduce per- and post-surgical risks as long as some toxicities related to treatments and to improve the quality of physical and mental life of patients. It is important that a communication with the patient takes place at the beginning of the treatment to impact the smoking behavior. All oncology health professionals should deliver a clearly and personalized cessation advice in the light of scientific data and ensure that smoking cessation help will be offered to the patient. PMID:27233368

  15. Bedside Reporting: Protocols for Improving Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Teresa D; Howell, Teresa L

    2015-12-01

    Bedside reporting continues to gain much attention and is being investigated to support the premise that "hand-off" communications enhance efficacy in delivery of patient care. Patient inclusion in shift reports enhances good patient outcomes, increased satisfaction with care delivery, enhanced accountability for nursing professionals, and improved communications between patients and their direct care providers. This article discusses the multiple benefits of dynamic dialogue between patients and the health care team, challenges often associated with bedside reporting, and protocols for managing bedside reporting with the major aim of improving patient care. Nursing research supporting the concept of bedside reporting is examined. PMID:26596661

  16. Rationale, design and methods of the Study of Work and Pain (SWAP): a cluster randomised controlled trial testing the addition of a vocational advice service to best current primary care for patients with musculoskeletal pain (ISRCTN 52269669)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain is a major contributor to short and long term work absence. Patients seek care from their general practitioner (GP) and yet GPs often feel ill-equipped to deal with work issues. Providing a vocational case management service in primary care, to support patients with musculoskeletal problems to remain at or return to work, is one potential solution but requires robust evaluation to test clinical and cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design This protocol describes a cluster randomised controlled trial, with linked qualitative interviews, to investigate the effect of introducing a vocational advice service into general practice, to provide a structured approach to managing work related issues in primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain who are absent from work or struggling to remain in work. General practices (n = 6) will be randomised to offer best current care or best current care plus a vocational advice service. Adults of working age who are absent from or struggling to remain in work due to a musculoskeletal pain problem will be invited to participate and 330 participants will be recruited. Data collection will be through patient completed questionnaires at baseline, 4 and 12 months. The primary outcome is self-reported work absence at 4 months. Incremental cost-utility analysis will be undertaken to calculate the cost per additional QALY gained and incremental net benefits. A linked interview study will explore the experiences of the vocational advice service from the perspectives of GPs, nurse practitioners (NPs), patients and vocational advisors. Discussion This paper presents the rationale, design, and methods of the Study of Work And Pain (SWAP) trial. The results of this trial will provide evidence to inform primary care practice and guide the development of services to provide support for musculoskeletal pain patients with work-related issues. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN52269669. PMID:25012813

  17. Nutrition advice in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Diane; Butterfield, Gillian; Palethorpe, Rebeca; Jones, Vicky; Syson, Jenny

    2013-10-01

    Being overweight or obese in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes and long-term ill health for both mother and infant. Midwives, obstetricians and healthcare support workers providing care in pregnancy are ideally placed to provide women with nutritional advice and to facilitate the acquisition of a healthy diet. This survey was undertaken to assess the provision of training in nutrition for providers of maternity care at the Bradford Women's and Newborn unit, to evaluate what nutrition information is given and to find out if care providers were satisfied with the knowledge they had. All relevant staff were approached and asked to complete a questionnaire developed by members of the unit's research team. Findings from this survey highlight the wide range of nutrition information provided by care providers at the unit. Education and training needs are being addressed by managers and a dedicated service is being developed for obese women. PMID:24358595

  18. Kosmo's Farewell Advice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joe; Ross, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Joe Kosmo shared some final words and advice for his teammates in the Spacesuit and Crew Survival Systems Branch (EC5) and the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD (EC)) upon his retirement. He knew nothing about spacesuits when he started working for NASA in 1961, but neither did anyone else. He summed up the best lessons learned during his 50 years of developing U.S. spacesuits and encouraged the next generation s space industry workers to challenge what they hear and decide what is right. Topics include and oral history of early NASA manned flights by Richard S. Johnston, U.S. human spaceflight chronology, a history of advanced EVA project funding, and a discussion of NASA's innovative spirit.

  19. Instructional Advice, Time Advice and Learning Questions in Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate students (N = 97) used an introductory text and a computer simulation to learn fundamental concepts about statistical analyses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression analysis and General Linear Model). Each learner was randomly assigned to one cell of a 2 (with or without instructional advice) x 2 (with or without time advice) x 2…

  20. Patient Portals: An Underused Resource for Improving Patient Engagement.

    PubMed

    Tulu, Bengisu; Trudel, John; Strong, Diane M; Johnson, Sharon A; Sundaresan, Devi; Garber, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    The potential of patient portals to improve patient engagement and health outcomes has been discussed for more than a decade. The slow growth in patient portal adoption rates among patients and providers in the United States, despite external incentives, indicates that this is a complex issue. We examined evidence of patient portal use and effects with a focus on the pulmonary domain. We found a paucity of studies of patient portal use in pulmonary practice, and highlight gaps for future research. We also report on the experience of a pulmonary department using a patient portal to highlight the potential of these systems. PMID:26066707

  1. ADVICE IN THE TEEN MAGAZINES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SIMPSON, ELIZABETH J.

    THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO DETERMINE (1) WHAT PROBLEMS THE ADVICE COLUMNS AND ARTICLES IN THE TEEN MAGAZINES PRESENT, (2) THE NATURE OF THE ADVICE GIVEN, (3) WHETHER THEY WERE DIRECTED PRIMARILY TOWARD GIRLS, BOYS, OR BOTH, AND (4) WHO THE AUTHORS ARE. OVER A 10-MONTH PERIOD, 84 ISSUES OF DIFFERENT TEEN MAGAZINES WERE EXAMINED BY USING A…

  2. Improving Diabetes Care for Hospice Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei J; Jacobson, Margaret A; Johnston, C Bree

    2016-07-01

    Although type 2 diabetes guidelines recommend less aggressive glycemic control for patients with limited life expectancy, many hospice patients continue their glucose-lowering medications, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. Three common reasons for overly tight glycemic control in hospice patients include (1) discussions about reducing or stopping chronic medications are uncomfortable; (2) many patients and families believe that mild hyperglycemia can cause symptoms; and (3) until 2014, Healthcare Information and Data Information Set (HEDIS) quality indicators for glycemic control included hospice patients. To address these issues, we recommend (1) providers discuss with patients and families upon hospice enrollment that diabetes medications can be reduced or discontinued as their life-limiting disease progresses; (2) keeping blood glucose levels between 200 and 300 mg/dL; and (3) educate providers that HEDIS measures now exclude hospice patients. Implementing these recommendations should decrease the risk of hypoglycemia in hospice patients and improve their quality of life. PMID:25852204

  3. Discharged Against Medical Advice: Causes and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Deirdre

    1990-01-01

    Patients discharged against medical advice in a rural general hospital in Alberta were studied retrospectively. The rate of discharge against medical advice (AMA) was 1.4% and was found to be comparable to the rates for other rural and urban general hospitals in central Alberta. Fifty consecutive discharges AMA were compared with 50 randomly selected adult discharges by physician during the same period. Demographic, diagnostic, and therapeutic variables were compared, and the fate of patients discharged AMA after departure was studied. A diagnosis of substance abuse or psychiatric illness discriminated significantly between the groups and accounted for apparent differences in the demographic variables. Those discharged AMA stayed for a shorter time in hospital and were noncompliant while there. PMID:21233917

  4. Presidential address, 2001. Advice to young surgeons

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, John K.

    2002-01-01

    In his 2001 presidential address to the Canadian Association of General Surgeons, the author offers advice to young surgeons, based on his lifetime experience as a surgical educator, researcher and practitioner. He offers the following samples of wisdom for young surgeons: they should be prepared for a lifetime of learning and be willing and able to adapt to new advances; they should listen to their patients as they describe their presenting complaints and not be tempted to interrupt; they should take time in an emergency situation and remember that split-second decisions can affect the patient for a lifetime; they should be willing to take advice from fellow professionals; they should take time to maintain a quality family life and take adequate time away from the workplace; they should be active be a role model in their community; and, finally, they should get involved and adopt an advocacy role in their profession. PMID:11939654

  5. Potential for advice from doctors to reduce the number of patients referred to emergency departments by NHS 111 call handlers: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Andrew; Roland, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of using experienced general practitioners (GPs) to review the advice given by call handlers in NHS 111, a national service giving telephone advice to people seeking medical care. Design Observational study following the introduction of GPs to review call handlers’ decisions which had been made using decision support software. Setting NHS 111 call centre covering Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. Intervention When a call handler using standard NHS 111 decision support software would have advised the caller to attend the hospital accident and emergency (A&E) department, the decision was reviewed by an experienced GP. Main outcome measures Percentage of calls where an outcome other than A&E attendance was recommended by the GP. Results Of 1474 cases reviewed, the GP recommended A&E attendance in 400 cases (27.1%). In the remainder of cases, the GP recommended attendance at a primary care out-of-hours centre or minor injury unit in 665 cases (45.2%) and self-management or some alternative strategy in 409 (27.8%). Conclusions Fewer callers to NHS 111 would be sent to emergency departments if the decision was reviewed by an experienced GP. Telephone triage services need to consider whether using relatively unskilled call handlers supported by computer software is the most cost-effective way to handle requests for medical care. PMID:26614624

  6. Advice on healthy eating for older people.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Karen

    As part of its Food and Health Action Plan, the Department of Health is working with the food industry, and with other stakeholders, to establish a coherent national plan to help people in England improve their diets. Maintaining a healthy diet is important for all age groups, but healthy older people have particular needs. Karen Fisher describes the specific nutritional issues affecting healthy older people and suggests advice that nurses can offer people during opportunistic consultations in primary care. PMID:16350521

  7. Hip osteoarthritis: patients with complex comorbidities can make exceptional improvements following intensive exercise and education.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Thomas William; Immins, Tikki; Middleton, Robert Gordon

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presenting with hip osteoarthritis, with a complex range of comorbidities was referred by his general practitioner to CHAIN (Cycling against Hip PAIN), a 6 week programme developed to aid self-management of hip osteoarthritis through exercise, education and advice, as defined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Significant improvements were seen in Oxford hip score, the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) - function score, sit-to-stand test, timed up and go test, pain scores and hip flexion. There was also a weight loss of 2.1 kg. The man reported 'an amazing difference' in his affected hip and leg, and improved fitness. Many clinicians would have questioned the man's suitability for the programme due to his coexisting medical conditions. This case study shows that patients may be much more able than we think to achieve significant improvement with exercise. PMID:25678618

  8. CEOs say patient deposits improve cash flow.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H J

    1991-02-20

    CEOs say it makes good business sense to require patients to make cash deposits toward their bills prior to admission, because improved cash flow is vital to financially strapped hospitals. But hospitals that require cash deposits should also be aware of the sensitive public relations issues involved, experts caution. PMID:1993531

  9. Medical Interpreting: Improving Communication with Your Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebble, Helen

    The guide is designed for physicians and other medical practitioners who need to work with medical interpreters to improve communication with patients. Special attention is given to the Australian context. An introductory section discusses the need for medical interpreters and explains the guide's organization. Subsequent sections address these…

  10. How expert advice influences decision making.

    PubMed

    Meshi, Dar; Biele, Guido; Korn, Christoph W; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2012-01-01

    People often use expert advice when making decisions in our society, but how we are influenced by this advice has yet to be understood. To address this, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we provided expert and novice advice to participants during an estimation task. Participants reported that they valued expert advice more than novice advice, and activity in the ventral striatum correlated with this valuation, even before decisions with the advice were made. When using advice, participants compared their initial opinion to their advisor's opinion. This comparison, termed the "opinion difference", influenced advice utilization and was represented in reward-sensitive brain regions. Finally, the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex integrated both the size of the opinion difference and the advisor's level of expertise, and average activity in this area correlated with mean advice utilization across participants. Taken together, these findings provide neural evidence for how advice engenders behavioral change during the decision-making process. PMID:23185425

  11. How Expert Advice Influences Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Meshi, Dar; Biele, Guido; Korn, Christoph W.; Heekeren, Hauke R.

    2012-01-01

    People often use expert advice when making decisions in our society, but how we are influenced by this advice has yet to be understood. To address this, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we provided expert and novice advice to participants during an estimation task. Participants reported that they valued expert advice more than novice advice, and activity in the ventral striatum correlated with this valuation, even before decisions with the advice were made. When using advice, participants compared their initial opinion to their advisor’s opinion. This comparison, termed the “opinion difference”, influenced advice utilization and was represented in reward-sensitive brain regions. Finally, the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex integrated both the size of the opinion difference and the advisor’s level of expertise, and average activity in this area correlated with mean advice utilization across participants. Taken together, these findings provide neural evidence for how advice engenders behavioral change during the decision-making process. PMID:23185425

  12. MMR vaccination advice over the Internet.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katja; Ernst, Edzard

    2003-03-01

    We wanted to investigate what advice UK homeopaths, chiropractors and general practitioners give on measles, mumps and rubella vaccination programme (MMR) vaccination via the Internet. Online referral directories listing e-mail addresses of UK homeopaths, chiropractors and general practitioners and private websites were visited. All addresses thus located received a letter of a (fictitious) patient asking for advice about the MMR vaccination. After sending a follow-up letter explaining the nature and aim of this project and offering the option of withdrawal, 26% of all respondents withdrew their answers. Homeopaths yielded a final response rate (53%, n = 77) compared to chiropractors (32%, n = 16). GPs unanimously refused to give advice over the Internet. No homeopath and only one chiropractor advised in favour of the MMR vaccination. Two homeopaths and three chiropractors indirectly advised in favour of MMR. More chiropractors than homeopaths displayed a positive attitude towards the MMR vaccination. Some complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers have a negative attitude towards immunisation and means of changing this should be considered. PMID:12559777

  13. Using a Non-Fit Message Helps to De-Intensify Negative Reactions to Tough Advice.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Ilona; Scherr, Karen A; Glare, Paul A; Higgins, E Tory

    2016-08-01

    Sometimes physicians need to provide patients with potentially upsetting advice. For example, physicians may recommend hospice for a terminally ill patient because it best meets their needs, but the patient and their family dislike this advised option. We explore whether regulatory non-fit could be used to improve these types of situations. Across five studies in which participants imagined receiving upsetting advice from a physician, we demonstrate that regulatory non-fit between the form of the physician's advice (emphasizing gains vs. avoiding losses) and the participants' motivational orientation (promotion vs. prevention) improves participants' evaluation of an initially disliked option. Regulatory non-fit de-intensifies participants' initial attitudes by making them less confident in their initial judgments and motivating them to think more thoroughly about the arguments presented. Furthermore, consistent with previous research on regulatory fit, we showed that the mechanism of regulatory non-fit differs as a function of participants' cognitive involvement in the evaluation of the option. PMID:27341845

  14. Understanding of and adherence to advice after telephone counselling by nurse: a survey among callers to a primary emergency out-of-hours service in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate how callers understand the information given by telephone by registered nurses in a casualty clinic, to what degree the advice was followed, and the final outcome of the condition for the patients. Methods The study was conducted at a large out-of-hours inter-municipality casualty clinic in Norway during April and May 2010. Telephone interviews were performed with 100 callers/patients who had received information and advice by a nurse as a sole response. Six topics from the interview guide were compared with the telephone record files to check whether the caller had understood the advice. In addition, questions were asked about how the caller followed the advice provided and the patient's outcome. Results 99 out of 100 interviewed callers stated that they had understood the nurse's advice, but interpreted from the telephone records, the total agreement for all six topics was 82.6%. 93 callers/patients stated that they followed the advice and 11 re-contacted the casualty clinic. 22 contacted their GP for the same complaints the same week, of whom five patients received medical treatment and one was hospitalised. There were significant difference between the native-Norwegian and the non-native Norwegian regarding whether they trusted the nurse (p = 0.017), and if they got relevant answers to their questions (p = 0.005). Conclusion Callers to the out-of-hours service seem to understand the advice given by the registered nurses, and a large majority of the patients did not contact their GP or other health services again with the same complaints. Practice Implication Medical and communicative training must be an important part of the continuous improvement strategy within the out-of-hour services. PMID:21892945

  15. Ancient advice for modern mariners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David A.

    Some unusual preparations may be advised for persons anticipating voyages in sailing research vessels. For example, cooking facilities on sailing ships tend to be of modest means, and a scientist embarking on such a vessel may wonder whether he should bring his own essential provisions. Casting about for ideas, I happened on some relevant advice from Benjamin Franklin, who was seldom reluctant to sermonize on matters at hand. In spite of his numerous Atlantic crossings, Franklin was humble about offering advice to mariners, who he realized were generally suspicious of landlubbers.

  16. Dysphonia: medical treatment and a medical voice hygiene advice approach. A prospective randomised pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, M; Beranova, A; Møller, S

    2004-07-01

    on a comparison of ten dysphonic patients with stroboscopic non- organic (functional) voice disorders, where a micro-organic diagnosis was searched for and treated systematically in a medical regime (for infections, allergies, gastrooesophageal reflux and environmental irritants such as dust, noise, etc.) versus ten dysphonic patients with stroboscopically confirmed non-organic (functional) voice disorders, having only the traditional but optimal voice advice, which we can call medical voice-hygiene advice, including the use of the Accent method. A retrospective group of ten patients treated medically was included, too. A demand cannot be made that the functional group being treated by randomisation with voice advice should also be medically treated at once, the medical approach being the new one. On the other hand, it is strange that no evidence-based research was made before. All patients were measured two times with stored videostroboscopy, a quality-of-life questionnaire and phonetograms with 1-month intervals. All patient groups improved. There was no statistical improvement in favour of the medical group with the voice-related quality-of-life score, also not for the group who received voice-hygiene advice. The geometrical mean values of the phonetogram areas in decibels times semitones were better in all groups, but a statistical difference was not found between the medically treated group and the voice-hygiene advice group. The pilot study showed that both medical treatment and medical voice-hygiene advice had a positive effect on dysphonia in non-organic (functional) voice disorders. There is need of an extensive prospective randomised trial on dysphonia including vocal cord nodules to find out which treatment should be used for this group of patients. It is suggested that an eventual randomisation for microsurgical treatment or regular voice therapy should be made after a period of systematic medical diagnosis and treatment including medical voice

  17. Old Advice for New Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I offer advice to new researchers on how to conduct a successful research project in educational psychology. I break the research task into three parts: creating a research question, creating a research methodology, and creating a dissemination plan. The criteria for creating a research question include personal interest,…

  18. Purchasing a cycle helmet: are retailers providing adequate advice?

    PubMed Central

    Plumridge, E.; McCool, J.; Chetwynd, J.; Langley, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the selling of cycle helmets in retail stores with particular reference to the adequacy of advice offered about the fit and securing of helmets. METHODS: All 55 retail outlets selling cycle helmets in Christchurch, New Zealand were studied by participant observation. A research entered each store as a prospective customer and requested assistance to purchase a helmet. She took detailed field notes of the ensuing encounter and these were subsequently transcribed, coded, and analysed. RESULTS: Adequate advice for helmet purchase was given in less than half of the stores. In general the sales assistants in specialist cycle shops were better informed and gave more adequate advice than those in department stores. Those who have good advice also tended to be more good advice also tended to be more active in helping with fitting the helmet. Knowledge about safety standards was apparent in one third of sales assistants. Few stores displayed information for customers about the correct fit of cycle helmets. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the advice and assistance being given to ensure that cycle helmets fit properly is often inadequate and thus the helmets may fail to fulfil their purpose in preventing injury. Consultation between retailers and policy makers is a necessary first step to improving this situation. PMID:9346053

  19. Relatives’ Advice and Health Care-Seeking Behaviour in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mandhari, Ahmed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed; Eloul, Liyam

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: It has been well established that pathways to care are considerably modified by local, social and psychological characteristics as well as the doctor-patient relationship. Scant attention has been paid to the role of family advice in care-seeking. In Omani society, traditional family values and a collective mindset are the norm rather than the exception. This paper examines how family advice affects the trajectory of care seeking. Methodology: During 2006–2007, data was collected through face-to-face interviews among a randomised sample of patients seeking medical consultation in various primary health care centres in the northern region of Oman. This study enrolled a total of 493 patients. The association between the advice of family members as a reason to seek health care and other predictors was analysed using multivariable logistic regression. Results: The data suggest that the advice of family members in care-seeking is strongly associated with gender, education, history of chronic illness, previous exposure to traditional medicine, and health education, as well as the history of immunisation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the advice of family members remains a strong catalyst for care-seeking in Oman. The psychosocial factors affecting care-seeking leading to underutilisation of services or otherwise are discussed. PMID:21509309

  20. A double-blind, randomized trial, including frequent patient–physician contacts and Ramadan-focused advice, assessing vildagliptin and gliclazide in patients with type 2 diabetes fasting during Ramadan: the STEADFAST study

    PubMed Central

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Abdallah, Khalifa; Schweizer, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Background Several observational studies were conducted with vildagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) fasting during Ramadan, showing significantly lower incidences of hypoglycemia with vildagliptin versus sulfonylureas, including gliclazide. It was of interest to complement the existing real-life evidence with data from a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial. Clinical Trials Identifier NCT01758380. Methods This multiregional, double-blind study randomized 557 patients with T2DM (mean glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c], 6.9%), previously treated with metformin and any sulfonylurea to receive either vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily) or gliclazide plus metformin. The study included four office visits (three pre-Ramadan) and multiple telephone contacts, as well as Ramadan-focused advice. Hypoglycemic events were assessed during Ramadan; HbA1c and weight were analyzed before and after Ramadan. Results The proportion of patients reporting confirmed (<3.9 mmol/L and/or severe) hypoglycemic events during Ramadan was 3.0% with vildagliptin and 7.0% with gliclazide (P=0.039; one-sided test), and this was 6.0% and 8.7%, respectively, for any hypoglycemic events (P=0.173). The adjusted mean change pre- to post-Ramadan in HbA1c was 0.05%±0.04% with vildagliptin and −0.03%±0.04% with gliclazide, from baselines of 6.84% and 6.79%, respectively (P=0.165). In both groups, the adjusted mean decrease in weight was −1.1±0.2 kg (P=0.987). Overall safety was similar between the treatments. Conclusion In line with the results from previous observational studies, vildagliptin was shown in this interventional study to be an effective, safe, and well-tolerated treatment in patients with T2DM fasting during Ramadan, with a consistently low incidence of hypoglycemia across studies, accompanied by good glycemic and weight control. In contrast, gliclazide showed a lower incidence of hypoglycemia in the present interventional than the previous observational studies. This

  1. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient's perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient's recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  2. Improving outcomes in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Tidman, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a heterogeneous inflammatory disorder that targets the skin and joints. It affects 1.3-2% of the population. The diagnosis of plaque psoriasis is usually straightforward, a helpful diagnostic clue is the tendency for silver scales to appear after gentle scratching of a lesion. Stress, streptococcal infection and drugs including beta-blockers, antimalarials and lithium may precipitate or exacerbate psoriasis. Psoriasis, especially when severe, predisposes to metabolic syndrome, and patients with psoriasis are at increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidaemia. Additionally, psoriasis sufferers appear at increased risk of uveitis, inflammatory boweldisease, lymphoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, COPD and venous thromboembolism. Psoriasis should be assessed on the basis of: severity, impact on physical, psychological and social wellbeing, symptoms of arthritis and the presence of comorbidities. Poor response to topical therapy may be as much to do with lack of compliance as with lack of efficacy. The number of treatments each day should be kept to a minimum, and patients should be reviewed after four weeks when initiating or changing topical therapy to improve adherence to treatment and assess response. The majority of patients with psoriasis can be managed in primary care, although specialist care may be necessary at some point in up to 60% of cases. Patients with erythrodermic or generalised pustular psoriasis should be referred for a same day dermatological opinion, and if psoriatic arthritis is suspected, early referral for a rheumatological opinion is recommended. PMID:23469725

  3. Protocol for SAMS (Support and Advice for Medication Study): A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to support patients with type 2 diabetes with adherence to medication

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Andrew J; Prevost, A Toby; Hardeman, Wendy; Craven, Anthea; Sutton, Stephen; Griffin, Simon J; Kinmonth, Ann-Louise

    2008-01-01

    Background Although some interventions have been shown to improve adherence to medication for diabetes, results are not consistent. We have developed a theory-based intervention which we will evaluate in a well characterised population to test efficacy and guide future intervention development and trial design. Methods and Design The SAMS (Supported Adherence to Medication Study) trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial among 200 patients with type 2 diabetes and an HbA1c of 7.5% or above. It is designed to evaluate the efficacy of a two-component motivational intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and volitional action planning to support medication adherence compared with standard care. The intervention is delivered by practice nurses. Nurses were trained using a workshop approach with role play and supervised using assessment of tape-recorded consultations. The trial has a two parallel groups design with an unbalanced three-to-two individual randomisation eight weeks after recruitment with twelve week follow-up. The primary outcome is medication adherence measured using an electronic medication monitor over 12 weeks and expressed as the difference between intervention and control in mean percentage of days on which the correct number of medication doses is taken. Subgroup analyses will explore impact of number of medications taken, age, HbA1c, and self-reported adherence at baseline on outcomes. The study also measures the effect of dispensing medication to trial participants packaged in the electronic medication-monitoring device compared with conventional medication packaging. This will be achieved through one-to-one randomisation at recruitment to these conditions with assessment of the difference between groups in self-report of medication adherence and change in mean HbA1c from baseline to eight weeks. Anonymised demographic data are collected on non-respondents. Central randomisation is carried out independently

  4. Improving acute care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate

    People with dementia are more likely to experience a decline in function, fall or fracture when admitted to hospital than the general hospital population. Informal carers' views were sought on the care their relative with dementia received in hospital. Participants were concerned about a lack of essential nursing care, harmful incidents, a decline in patient function, poor staff communication and carers' needs not being acknowledged. Care can be improved through further training, more effective communication, consideration of the appropriate place to care for people and more use of carers' knowledge. PMID:27017677

  5. Improving communication among nurses and patients.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S; Ozcanhan, Mehmet H; Dalkilic, Gokhan

    2015-07-01

    Patients use nurse call systems to signal nurses for medical help. Traditional push button-flashing lamp call systems are not integrated with other hospital automation systems. Therefore, nurse response time becomes a matter of personal discretion. The improvement obtained by integrating a pager system into the nurse call systems does not increase care efficiency, because unnecessary visits are still not eliminated. To obtain an immediate response and a purposeful visit by a nurse; regardless of the location of nurse in hospital, traditional systems have to be improved by intelligent telephone system integration. The results of the developed Nurse Call System Software (NCSS), the Wireless Phone System Software (WPSS), the Location System Software (LSS) and the communication protocol are provided, together with detailed XML message structures. The benefits of the proposed system are also discussed and the direction of future work is presented. PMID:25935361

  6. Health innovation for patient safety improvement.

    PubMed

    Sellappans, Renukha; Chua, Siew Siang; Tajuddin, Nur Amani Ahmad; Mei Lai, Pauline Siew

    2013-01-01

    Medication error has been identified as a major factor affecting patient safety. Many innovative efforts such as Computerised Physician Order Entry (CPOE), a Pharmacy Information System, automated dispensing machines and Point of Administration Systems have been carried out with the aim of improving medication safety. However, areas remain that require urgent attention. One main area will be the lack of continuity of care due to the breakdown of communication between multiple healthcare providers. Solutions may include consideration of "health smart cards" that carry vital patient medical information in the form of a "credit card" or use of the Malaysian identification card. However, costs and technical aspects associated with the implementation of this health smart card will be a significant barrier. Security and confidentiality, on the other hand, are expected to be of primary concern to patients. Challenges associated with the implementation of a health smart card might include physician buy-in for use in his or her everyday practice. Training and technical support should also be available to ensure the smooth implementation of this system. Despite these challenges, implementation of a health smart card moves us closer to seamless care in our country, thereby increasing the productivity and quality of healthcare. PMID:23423150

  7. Telephone advice in the accident and emergency department: a survey of current practice.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R J; McCabe, M; Allen, H; Rainer, T; Richmond, P W

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the standard of advice given by telephone by accident and emergency (A&E) departments following patients' enquiries. In order to do this patient enquiries were simulated and a telephone questionnaire was carried out. The study was carried out in 18 major and 16 minor A&E departments in Wales. Results achieved were that overall, correct telephone advice was given to 72 of 97 simulated patients (74%). Sixty calls were dealt with by the nursing staff (62%) who gave correct advice on 41 (68%) occasions. No A&E department had a formal policy nor provided staff training for handling patients' enquiries by telephone. It is concluded that A&E departments should train designated members of staff, preferably the triage nurse, who would formally deal with telephone enquiries requiring medical advice. There should be formal documentation of the enquiry and advice proffered as part of a departmental policy. PMID:8216598

  8. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  9. IQuaD dental trial; improving the quality of dentistry: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease affecting adults, and although it is largely preventable it remains the major cause of poor oral health worldwide. Accumulation of microbial dental plaque is the primary aetiological factor for both periodontal disease and caries. Effective self-care (tooth brushing and interdental aids) for plaque control and removal of risk factors such as calculus, which can only be removed by periodontal instrumentation (PI), are considered necessary to prevent and treat periodontal disease thereby maintaining periodontal health. Despite evidence of an association between sustained, good oral hygiene and a low incidence of periodontal disease and caries in adults there is a lack of strong and reliable evidence to inform clinicians of the relative effectiveness (if any) of different types of Oral Hygiene Advice (OHA). The evidence to inform clinicians of the effectiveness and optimal frequency of PI is also mixed. There is therefore an urgent need to assess the relative effectiveness of OHA and PI in a robust, sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) in primary dental care. Methods/Design This is a 5 year multi-centre, randomised, open trial with blinded outcome evaluation based in dental primary care in Scotland and the North East of England. Practitioners will recruit 1860 adult patients, with periodontal health, gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (Basic Periodontal Examination Score 0–3). Dental practices will be cluster randomised to provide routine OHA or Personalised OHA. To test the effects of PI each individual patient participant will be randomised to one of three groups: no PI, 6 monthly PI (current practice), or 12 monthly PI. Baseline measures and outcome data (during a three year follow-up) will be assessed through clinical examination, patient questionnaires and NHS databases. The primary outcome measures at 3 year follow up are gingival inflammation/bleeding on probing at the

  10. Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160885.html Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life Also increases chances of having end- ... incurable cancer helps patients cope and improves their quality of life, a new study shows. It also ...

  11. Watchful Waiting for Cases of Pediatric Otitis Media: Modeling Parental Response to Physician Advice.

    PubMed

    MacGeorge, Erina L; Smith, Rachel A; Caldes, Emily P; Hackman, Nicole M

    2016-08-01

    Watchful waiting (WW) can reduce unnecessary antibiotic use in the treatment of pediatric otitis media (ear infection), but its utility is impaired by underutilization and noncompliance. Guided by advice response theory, the current study proposes advantage and capacity as factors that predict how caregivers evaluate and respond affectively to WW. Parents (N = 373) of at least 1 child age 5 years or younger completed questionnaires that assessed responses to hypothetical WW advice for their youngest child. Perceptions of advantage from WW and the capacity to monitor and manage symptoms predicted advice quality, physician trust, and future compliance both directly and indirectly through negative affect. The findings suggest the elaboration of advice response theory to include more aspects of advice content evaluation (e.g., advantage) and the influence of negative affect. The study also provides practical guidance for physicians seeking to improve caregiver reception of WW advice. PMID:27409041

  12. The Advice Taker/Inquirer, a system for high-level acquisition of expert knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromp, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    The Advice Taker/Inquirer (AT/I) is a domain-independent program that is used to construct, monitor, and improve an expert system. In the learning phase, an expert teaches a strategy to the AT/I by providing it with declarative and procedural knowledge, expressed in the expert's domain-specific vocabulary. The expert can modify any advice given to the system earlier, and any advice dependent on the altered advice is reviewed automatically for syntactic and sematic soundness. Knowledge acquisition and methods for ensuring the integrity of the knowledge base in an expert system is discussed.

  13. The advice taker/inquirer: A system for high-level acquisition of expert knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromp, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    The Advice Taker/Inquirer (AT/I) is a domain-independent program that is used to construct, monitor, and improve an expert system. In the learning phase, an expert teaches a strategy to the AT/I by providing it with declarative and procedural knowledge, expressed in the expert's domain-specific vocabulary. The expert can modify any advice given to the system earlier, and any advice dependent on the altered advice is reviewed automatically for syntatic and sematic soundness. Knowledge acquisition and methods for ensuring the integrity of the knowledge base in an expert system is discussed.

  14. Improving patient safety by examining pathology errors.

    PubMed

    Raab, Stephen S

    2004-12-01

    A considerable void exists in the information available regarding anatomic pathology diagnostic errors and their impact on clinical outcomes. To fill this void and improve patient safety, four institutional pathology departments (University of Pittsburgh, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and Henry Ford Hospital System) have proposed the development of a voluntary, Web-based, multi-institutional database for the collection and analysis of diagnostic errors. These institutions intend to use these data proactively to implement internal changes in pathology practice and to measure the effect of such changes on errors and clinical outcomes. They believe that the successful implementation of this project will result in the study of other types of diagnostic pathology error and the expansion to national participation. The project will involve the collection of multi-institutional anatomic pathology diagnostic errors in a large database that will facilitate a more detailed analysis of these errors, including their effect on patient outcomes. Participating institutions will perform root cause analysis for diagnostic errors and plan and execute appropriate process changes aimed at error reduction. The success of these interventions will be tracked through analysis of postintervention error data collected in the database. Based on their preliminary studies, these institutions proposed the following specific aims: Specific aim #1: To use a Web-based database to collect diagnostic errors detected by cytologic histologic correlation and by second-pathologist review of conference cases. Specific aim #2: To analyze the collected error data quantitatively and generate quality performance reports that are useful for institutional quality improvement programs. Specific aim #3: To plan and implement interventions to reduce errors and improve clinical outcomes, based on information derived from root cause analysis of diagnostic errors. Specific

  15. Science and Technology Advice to the President, Congress, and Judiciary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, William T., Ed.

    The purposes of this book are to attract attention to the necessity for quality advice on science and technology issues to the President of the United States, Congress, and to the Judiciary; provoke thought regarding the reconsideration and improvement of the existing mechanisms and organizations; and to provide a compendium of facts and opinions…

  16. Dear Doc: advice for collaborators.

    PubMed

    Gadlin, Howard; Bennett, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Years ago, when Doc was a junior faculty member she became aware of a situation that changed her life. An extremely well-known senior scientist in her department took the data of a graduate student and published it in a very significant, oft-cited paper without crediting the student in any way. That this action had the tacit approval of the department chair was confusing. Dismayed by this violation of trust and feeling powerless to intervene, she decided to become the Dear Abby of Science. Working in the lab during the day she was becoming a world-renowned researcher as well as a highly revered mentor to younger scientists. At night, disguised as Dr. Doc she began advising other researchers who were looking for help with their sticky situations. As word of mouth spread about Doc more and more researchers sought out her advice about a wide range of problems in their labs and in their collaborations. She is currently entertaining a proposal from a collaborative group of editors from high-impact journals to develop a web presence that would offer insightful advice to struggling scientific collaborators around the world. The following is a selection of letters from Doc's files focused on collaboration. The names and details in the letters have been changed to protect confidentiality. PMID:24073149

  17. Young People's Use of Friends and Family for Sex and Relationships Information and Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Eryl

    2008-01-01

    With the recognition that improving access to advice and support on sex and relationships is vital in helping young people make positive healthy choices, the present paper explores how young people gain such information and advice. Drawing on the analysis of questionnaire and interview data collected for a local study of 401 young people from…

  18. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners. PMID:26933760

  19. A comparison of mebeverine with high-fibre dietary advice and mebeverine plus ispaghula in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an open, prospectively randomised, parallel group study.

    PubMed

    Chapman, N D; Grillage, M G; Mazumder, R; Atkinson, S N

    1990-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the efficacy and acceptability of mebeverine and high-fibre dietary advice versus mebeverine and ispaghula in fixed combination in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in adults. DESIGN Open, prospectively randomised, parallel group comparison of mebeverine/dietary advice and mebeverine/ispaghula during an eight-week study period. SETTING General practices in the UK. PATIENTS One hundred and eleven patients with irritable bowel syndrome diagnosed by symptom profile or negative investigations between the ages of 18 and 75 years were entered. All patients had a history of abdominal pain occurring at least once a week for a period of three months or more. INTERVENTION Dosage was 135 mg of mebeverine hydrochloride, three times daily before meals, together with advice on high-fibre dietary intake, or 135 mg of mebeverine hydrochloride plus 3.5 g of ispaghula husk twice or three times daily before meals. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS Details of abdominal pain severity and frequency, bowel frequency and stool consistency were recorded by means of clinicians' assessments and patient diaries. Pre-treatment assessments revealed no significant differences between the two groups with respect to any of the parameters. Both treatment groups demonstrated highly significant improvements in the numbers of pain attacks and their severity; no statistically significant differences between the two groups were demonstrated. Five patients in the mebeverine/dietary advice group reported five concurrent effects and nine patients in the mebeverine/ispaghula group reported 13 concurrent effects. All of the mebeverine/dietary advice group found their treatment acceptable but up to 28% of the mebeverine/ispaghula group found their treatment unpalatable. CONCLUSION Both treatments are effective in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in adults. The fixed combination of mebeverine/ispaghula, however, was found to be unpalatable by up to 28% of the patients in that group

  20. Improving the revenue cycle by taking the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Langford, April; Dye, Lyda; Moresco, Jessica; Riefner, Donald C

    2010-09-01

    UPMC revenue cycle operations analyzed front-end processes to improve them, thereby also improving the patient experience. UPMC focused on scheduling, eligibility/insurance verification, and financial counseling to develop an integrated work flow ensuring data integrity and expediting account resolution. Automating the processes increased efficiency and reduced errors, while improving patient satisfaction. PMID:20831000

  1. Patient-centered medicine and patient-oriented research: improving health outcomes for individual patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient-centered medicine is developing alongside the concepts of personalized medicine and tailored therapeutics. The main objective of patient-centered medicine is to improve health outcomes of individual patients in everyday clinical practice, taking into account the patient’s objectives, preferences, values as well as the available economic resources. Discussion Patient-centered medicine implies a paradigm shift in the relationship between doctors and patients, but also requires the development of patient-oriented research. Patient-oriented research should not be based on the evaluation of medical interventions in the average patient, but on the identification of the best intervention for every individual patient, the study of heterogeneity and the assignment of greater value to observations and exceptions. The development of information-based technologies can help to close the gap between clinical research and clinical practice, a fundamental step for any advance in this field. Summary Evidence-based medicine and patient centered medicine are not contradictory but complementary movements. It is not possible to practice patient-centered medicine that is not based on evidence, nor is it possible to practice evidence-based medicine at a distance from the individual patient. PMID:23294526

  2. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  3. Improving patient-centered care through advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Motley, Molly

    2013-06-01

    Advance care planning is crucial for patients confronting incurable, debilitating, or terminal disease. Discussing end-of-life issues can reduce overtreatment and undertreatment as defined by the patient, and improve satisfaction with care. PMID:23805592

  4. 16 CFR 1.3 - Advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advice. 1.3 Section 1.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Industry Guidance Advisory Opinions § 1.3 Advice. (a) On the basis of the materials submitted, as well as any...

  5. Young Children's Trust in Overtly Misleading Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Gail D.; Sritanyaratana, Lalida; Vanderbilt, Kimberly E.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of 3- and 4-year-old children to disregard advice from an overtly misleading informant was investigated across five studies (total "n" =212). Previous studies have documented limitations in young children's ability to reject misleading advice. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that these limitations are primarily due to an…

  6. Diatextual Analysis of the Advice Column.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mininni, Giuseppe

    1991-01-01

    Examined rhetorical and argumentative aspects of the "communication contract" stipulated in asking for and providing psychological advice in a mass media setting such as an advice column were examined. Letters from two Italian and two British magazines were used for the study. (14 references) (LB)

  7. 5 CFR 2635.107 - Ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ethics advice. 2635.107 Section 2635.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH General Provisions § 2635.107 Ethics advice. (a) As required by §§...

  8. 5 CFR 2635.107 - Ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ethics advice. 2635.107 Section 2635.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH General Provisions § 2635.107 Ethics advice. (a) As required by §§...

  9. 5 CFR 2635.107 - Ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ethics advice. 2635.107 Section 2635.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH General Provisions § 2635.107 Ethics advice. (a) As required by §§...

  10. 5 CFR 2635.107 - Ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ethics advice. 2635.107 Section 2635.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH General Provisions § 2635.107 Ethics advice. (a) As required by §§...

  11. 5 CFR 2635.107 - Ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ethics advice. 2635.107 Section 2635.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH General Provisions § 2635.107 Ethics advice. (a) As required by §§...

  12. 16 CFR 1.3 - Advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advice. 1.3 Section 1.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Industry Guidance Advisory Opinions § 1.3 Advice. (a) On the basis of the materials submitted, as well as any...

  13. 16 CFR 1.3 - Advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advice. 1.3 Section 1.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Industry Guidance Advisory Opinions § 1.3 Advice. (a) On the basis of the materials submitted, as well as any...

  14. 16 CFR 1.3 - Advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advice. 1.3 Section 1.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Industry Guidance Advisory Opinions § 1.3 Advice. (a) On the basis of the materials submitted, as well as any...

  15. 16 CFR 1.3 - Advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advice. 1.3 Section 1.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Industry Guidance Advisory Opinions § 1.3 Advice. (a) On the basis of the materials submitted, as well as any...

  16. Look Through Patients' Eyes to Improve the Delivery of Care.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    By developing and implementing a method for seeing the healthcare experience from the standpoint of patients and family members, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has improved care delivery, lowered costs, and improved patient satisfaction. Cross-functional, multidisciplinary teams use a six-step patient and family-centered care methodology to identify gaps and develop changes that will improve the patient experience and clinical outcomes. Committee members shadow patients and family members to get firsthand knowledge about what they are going through and what goes wrong and what goes right. The teams proposed minor and major changes, but none involve adding more staff and few involve more expenditures. PMID:27434940

  17. Improved patient pathways can prevent overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Emeny, Russell; Vincent, Connolly

    2013-03-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is a common problem throughout the western world. Not only does crowding create a miserable environment for patients, and to considerable stress and poor job satisfaction among staff, it can also lead EDs to breach the four-hour standard and other care quality indicators. In addition, crowding in EDs correlates with increases in patient mortality, rates of admission, lengths of inpatient stay and costs. This article argues that crowding is best tackled by the consistent application of eight principles, derived from various guidance, to emergency patient pathways, particularly those in acute settings. PMID:23586168

  18. Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Label, Phase III Trial of Decitabine Versus Patient Choice, With Physician Advice, of Either Supportive Care or Low-Dose Cytarabine for the Treatment of Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Thomas, Xavier G.; Dmoszynska, Anna; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka; Mazur, Grzegorz; Mayer, Jiri; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Chou, Wen-Chien; Buckstein, Rena; Cermak, Jaroslav; Kuo, Ching-Yuan; Oriol, Albert; Ravandi, Farhad; Faderl, Stefan; Delaunay, Jacques; Lysák, Daniel; Minden, Mark; Arthur, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase III trial compared the efficacy and safety of decitabine with treatment choice (TC) in older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and poor- or intermediate-risk cytogenetics. Patients and Methods Patients (N = 485) age ≥ 65 years were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive decitabine 20 mg/m2 per day as a 1-hour intravenous infusion for five consecutive days every 4 weeks or TC (supportive care or cytarabine 20 mg/m2 per day as a subcutaneous injection for 10 consecutive days every 4 weeks). The primary end point was overall survival (OS); the secondary end point was the complete remission (CR) rate plus the CR rate without platelet recovery (CRp). Adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Results The primary analysis with 396 deaths (81.6%) showed a nonsignificant increase in median OS with decitabine (7.7 months; 95% CI, 6.2 to 9.2) versus TC (5.0 months; 95% CI, 4.3 to 6.3; P = .108; hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.04). An unplanned analysis with 446 deaths (92%) indicated the same median OS (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.99; nominal P = .037). The CR rate plus CRp was 17.8% with decitabine versus 7.8% with TC (odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.8; P = .001). AEs were similar for decitabine and cytarabine, although patients received a median of four cycles of decitabine versus two cycles of TC. The most common drug-related AEs with decitabine were thrombocytopenia (27%) and neutropenia (24%). Conclusion In older patients with AML, decitabine improved response rates compared with standard therapies without major differences in safety. An unplanned survival analysis showed a benefit for decitabine, which was not observed at the time of the primary analysis. PMID:22689805

  19. Leadership: improving the quality of patient care.

    PubMed

    Clegg, A

    The satisfaction staff achieve from their work is in part determined by the style of management they work under. This article analyses the impact of a proactive leadership style on team performance and the quality of patient care. PMID:11973895

  20. 3D Visualization as a Communicative Aid in Pharmaceutical Advice-Giving over Distance

    PubMed Central

    Dahlbäck, Nils; Petersson, Göran Ingemar

    2011-01-01

    Background Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information. Objective To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker. Methods We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies’ call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features. Results In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In

  1. Interventions to enhance adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Sophie; Lapointe, Annie; Ratté, Stéphane; Gravel, Karine; Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients, and greater adherence to dietary advice is a critical component in preventing and managing chronic diseases. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions for enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Search methods We searched the following electronic databases up to 29 September 2010: The Cochrane Library (issue 9 2010), PubMed, EMBASE (Embase.com), CINAHL (Ebsco) and PsycINFO (PsycNET) with no language restrictions. We also reviewed: a) recent years of relevant conferences, symposium and colloquium proceedings and abstracts; b) web-based registries of clinical trials; and c) the bibliographies of included studies. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated interventions enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Studies were eligible if the primary outcome was the client’s adherence to dietary advice. We defined ‘client’ as an adult participating in a chronic disease prevention or chronic disease management study involving dietary advice. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of the studies. They also assessed the risk of bias and extracted data using a modified version of the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group data extraction template. Any discrepancies in judgement were resolved by discussion and consensus, or with a third review author. Because the studies differed widely with respect to interventions, measures of diet adherence, dietary advice, nature of the chronic diseases and duration of interventions and follow-up, we conducted a qualitative analysis. We classified included studies according to the function of the intervention and present results in a narrative table using vote counting for each category of intervention. Main results

  2. Improving patient safety: lessons from other disciplines.

    PubMed

    Golemboski, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Other industries and certain healthcare specialties have employed a variety of methods to improve safety and quality of services. Techniques such as industry-wide standardized collection and reporting of error data, standardization of practice through checklists, application of electronic health records, and simulator-based interdisciplinary training have improved outcomes in aviation, anesthesiology, and surgery. Although traditionally the clinical laboratory has concentrated on analytical performance, pre- and post-analytical aspects of laboratory services may also be improved through the application of these methods. PMID:21657145

  3. Pharmacist advice to asthmatics regarding antihistamine use.

    PubMed

    Lantner, R; Tobin, M C

    1991-05-01

    Due to the frequency of asthmatics having concurrent allergic symptoms, patients may seek relief from antihistamines, which are currently labeled with warnings against their use in asthmatics. A survey was conducted in the Chicago area to evaluate the advice rendered by pharmacists regarding the use of antihistamines in asthmatics and their opinions about the current product labeling. Thirty percent of the surveys were returned. Nearly half (48%) of the surveyed pharmacists advise their asthmatic customers to avoid antihistamines and 75% of this group recommend avoidance because they believe antihistamines worsen asthmatic symptoms, despite the lack of sufficient clinical data to support this concern. Only 17% of pharmacists advise that antihistamines pose no problems for asthmatics. The latter group is the most aware that there is controversy surrounding the current labeling. Overall, half the pharmacists surveyed believe the current labeling is not appropriate for patients with asthma. Until the labeling is revised, physicians should be aware that pharmacists may advise their asthmatics against using antihistamines even though antihistamines should be only contraindicated in cases of proven adverse reactions. PMID:2035904

  4. Improving patient safety incident reporting systems by focusing upon feedback - lessons from English and Welsh trusts.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Louise M; Spurgeon, Peter; Benn, Jonathan; Koutantji, Maria; Vincent, Charles

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes practical implications and learning from a multi-method study of feedback from patient safety incident reporting systems. The study was performed using the Safety Action and Information Feedback from Incident Reporting model, a model of the requirements of the feedback element of a patient safety incident reporting and learning system, derived from a scoping review of research and expert advice from world leaders in safety in high-risk industries. We present the key findings of the studies conducted in the National Health Services (NHS) trusts in England and Wales in 2006. These were a survey completed by risk managers for 351 trusts in England and Wales, three case studies including interviews with staff concerning an example of good practice feedback and an audit of 90 trusts clinical risk staff newsletters. We draw on an Expert Workshop that included 71 experts from the NHS, from regulatory bodies in health care, Royal Colleges, Health and Safety Executive and safety agencies in health care and high-risk industries (commercial aviation, rail and maritime industries). We draw recommendations of enduring relevance to the UK NHS that can be used by trust staff to improve their systems. The recommendations will be of relevance in general terms to health services worldwide. PMID:19633181

  5. Resources available to help family physicians provide advice to travellers.

    PubMed Central

    Lechky, O

    1995-01-01

    Because many Canadians are travelling to exotic destinations, family physicians may be asked for advice on immunization and health tips to prevent illnesses such as malaria, altitude disease, meningitis and schistosomiasis. A Toronto family physician who is on staff at a travel clinic says a few guiding principles and good resources can help family physicians ensure that their patients are healthy when they return from a trip. PMID:7553504

  6. Treatment of Forefoot Problems in Older People: A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Podiatric Treatment With Standardized Shoe Advice

    PubMed Central

    van der Zwaard, Babette C.; van der Horst, Henriëtte E.; Knol, Dirk L.; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Elders, Petra J. M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Consultations for forefoot pain are frequent in primary care, but scientific support of treatment options is scarce. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of podiatric treatment vs standardized advice on proper shoe characteristics and fit of shoes by means of an information leaflet for people aged 50 years and older with forefoot pain in primary care. METHODS In this randomized controlled trial, 205 participants aged 50 years and older with hindering nontraumatic forefoot pain have been recruited at their general practitioner’s office. Exclusion criteria were treatment of forefoot problem of less than 6 months’ duration before inclusion, rheumatoid arthritis, and diabetic neuropathy or having pain considered not to be musculoskeletal (eg, warts). Participants received shoe advice by means of an information leaflet or podiatric care. Foot pain, foot-related dysfunction, general health, and social participation were assessed by means of questionnaires every 3 months for 1 year. Using multilevel analysis, we analyzed results at the level of (1) outcome measures, (2) the individual, and (3) the general practitioner. RESULTS No differences were found between the 2 treatment groups. Both intervention groups showed an improvement over time in foot pain and foot-related dysfunction. CONCLUSION This study found that shoe advice provided to patients consulting their general practitioner for forefoot pain and symptom relief resulted in outcomes similar to treatment outcomes in patients consulting a podiatrist. Based on these results, primary care physicians should be cautious when referring a patient to a podiatrist; instead, they should start by providing advice on proper characteristics and fit of shoes. PMID:25354407

  7. Improving patient flow: role of the orthopaedic discharge sister.

    PubMed

    Tytler, Beverley

    2016-03-01

    Timely and well-planned discharge improves the patient's experience, contributes to patient safety and reduces the length of hospital stays. The role of orthopaedic discharge sister was developed at James Cook University Hospital in 2007 to provide safe, timely and efficient discharge for patients from the trauma and theatre centre, and to improve patient experience and flow. This article gives an overview of the role and describes how the sister works with colleagues to plan patient discharges from pre-assessment and emergency department admission through their hospital stay until their departure. PMID:26948225

  8. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff; Warlick, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional analgesia confers excellent site-specific pain relief that is free from major side effects, reduces opioid requirement in trauma patients, and is safe and easy to perform. Specific populations that have shown benefits (including morbidity and mortality advantages) with regional analgesic techniques include those with fractured ribs, femur and hip fractures, and patients undergoing digital replantation. Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating sequela of soft-tissue injury that complicates high-energy injuries such as proximal tibia fractures. The use of regional anesthesia in patients at risk for compartment syndrome is controversial; although the data is sparse, there is no evidence that peripheral nerve blocks delay the diagnosis, and these techniques may in fact facilitate the recognition of pathologic breakthrough pain. The benefits of regional analgesia are likely most influential when it is initiated as early as possible, and the performance of nerve blocks both in the emergency room and in the field has been shown to provide quality pain relief with an excellent safety profile. PMID:26316813

  9. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gadsden, Jeff; Warlick, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional analgesia confers excellent site-specific pain relief that is free from major side effects, reduces opioid requirement in trauma patients, and is safe and easy to perform. Specific populations that have shown benefits (including morbidity and mortality advantages) with regional analgesic techniques include those with fractured ribs, femur and hip fractures, and patients undergoing digital replantation. Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating sequela of soft-tissue injury that complicates high-energy injuries such as proximal tibia fractures. The use of regional anesthesia in patients at risk for compartment syndrome is controversial; although the data is sparse, there is no evidence that peripheral nerve blocks delay the diagnosis, and these techniques may in fact facilitate the recognition of pathologic breakthrough pain. The benefits of regional analgesia are likely most influential when it is initiated as early as possible, and the performance of nerve blocks both in the emergency room and in the field has been shown to provide quality pain relief with an excellent safety profile. PMID:26316813

  10. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities. PMID:26252725

  11. Accelerating patient-care improvement in the ED.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Nancy E

    2003-08-01

    Quality improvement is always in the best interest of healthcare providers. One hospital examined the patient-care delivery process used in its emergency department to determine ways to improve patient satisfaction while increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare delivery. The hospital used activity-based costing (ABC) plus additional data related to rework, information opportunity costs, and other effectiveness measures to create a process map that helped it accelerate diagnosis and improve redesign of the care process. PMID:12938618

  12. Range of Motion Improvement in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patient with Persian Traditional Medicine; Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gorji, Narjes; Moeini, Reihaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skeletal system without definitive treatment. Nowadays, the aim of therapeutic interventions is preventing disease progression, but eventually many patients have different degrees of decreased range of motion, especially in the spine accompanied by pain and fatigue. Methods: A 44-year-old man with AS from 22 years ago was treated with NSAIDs and sulfasalazine. He visited for developed pain and stiffness in spine from 7 years ago. He did not confer with the rheumatologist from 2012 due to the lack of treatment satisfaction and maintained his treatment with 75 mg indomethacin daily. The patient was assessed in the Iranian traditional medicine clinic and other problems were chronic fatigue, interrupted sleep, and extreme dry skin. Diagnosis was general dryness and treatment started with oral and tropical moisture and nutritional advice. Results: In the third month of treatment, joint pain, morning stiffness and sleep disturbance improved. After 8 months, in addition to complete improvement of skin dryness, sleep disturbance and joint pain, range of motion in cervical and lumbar spine were increased. In cervical rotation, distance from the chin to acromion decreased from 24 to 15 cm in right rotation and 20 to 13 cm in left rotation. Additionally, in cervical flexion distance from the chin to sternal notch decreased from 16 to 8 cm after treatment. In the lumbar spine, an increased Schober’s index was seen. Conclusion: The use of Persian traditional medicine’s viewpoints and treatment strategies can be effective in improving Ankylosing spondylitis prognosis and proposed for future clinical research.

  13. Policy assessments to enhance EU scientific advice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowarsch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The European Commission needs to amend its new Scientific Advice Mechanism. Highly integrated, participatory assessments of policy alternatives are required for multidimensional, value-laden policy issues such as the European Union's climate and energy policies.

  14. Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martei, Yehoda M; Matro, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence has important implications not only for enabling the ability to provide accurate information to patients but also the potential to improve patient outcomes. Patients at high recurrence risk can be offered appropriate treatment to improve the overall survival. However, the major challenge is identifying patients with early-stage breast cancer at lower risk who may be spared potentially toxic therapy. The successful integration of molecular assays into clinical practice may address the problem of overtreatment and improve overall patient outcomes. PMID:26504408

  15. Is this the right patient? An educational initiative to improve compliance with two patient identifiers.

    PubMed

    Mollon, Deene' L; Fields, Willa L

    2009-05-01

    A rehabilitation nursing unit implemented an educational initiative to improve compliance with two patient identifiers. The education consisted of a poster presentation and then, 2 months later, a mandatory in-service education program. Compliance with two patient identifiers improved, although more improvement was demonstrated after the mandatory in-service. The results of this performance improvement project suggest that investing time and money in safety initiatives improves staff practice patterns. PMID:19489521

  16. Zika Virus Advice for Mountaineers: A UIAA Medcom Consensus Advice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Hillebrandt, David; Richards, Paul; Clark, Andy; Jean, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Hillebrandt, David, Paul Richards, Andy Clark, and Dominique Jean. Zika virus advice for mountaineers: A UIAA Medcom consensus advice sheet. High Alt Med Biol. 17:70-71, 2016.-With the current media coverage of the spread of Zika virus from Africa and Asia to Central and South America and its possible relationship with fetal abnormalities, UIAA Medcom has produced an advice sheet for mountaineers visiting risk areas. PMID:27081746

  17. Improving Patient Flow Utilizing a Collaborative Learning Model.

    PubMed

    Tibor, Laura C; Schultz, Stacy R; Cravath, Julie L; Rein, Russell R; Krecke, Karl N

    2016-01-01

    This initiative utilized a collaborative learning approach to increase knowledge and experience in process improvement and systems thinking while targeting improved patient flow in seven radiology modalities. Teams showed improvements in their project metrics and collectively streamlined the flow for 530 patients per day by improving patient lead time, wait time, and first case on-time start rates. In a post-project survey of 50 project team members, 82% stated they had more effective solutions as a result of the process improvement methodology, 84% stated they will be able to utilize the process improvement tools again in the future, and 98% would recommend participating in another project to a colleague. PMID:27514106

  18. RFIDs can improve the patient care supply chain.

    PubMed

    Revere, Lee; Black, Ken; Zalila, Faiza

    2010-01-01

    Technologies that increase efficiency, enhance quality, and improve patient safety are essential for all healthcare organizations. Radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs) seem to be right for this challenge. RFIDs can be integrated into all areas of the internal patient supply chain, serving as clearinghouses of information. By providing timely information on patients, processes, and equipment, RFIDs can save time and reduce costs while simultaneously improving quality and patient safety. Healthcare leaders owe it to all constituencies to take a serious look at what RFIDs can offer. PMID:20194108

  19. Partnering With a Patient and Family Advisory Council to Improve Patient Care Experiences With Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Bookout, Michelle L; Staffileno, Beth A; Budzinsky, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered care is a key driver for the nation's health system, yet patient experience surveys indicate that hospitals are far from achieving favorable outcomes. Partnering with patients and families through a patient and family advisory council (PFAC) advances the practice of patient-centered care to improve outcomes and experiences. This article describes the process of implementing a PFAC and presents outcomes related to patients' perception of pain management in the acute care hospital setting. PMID:26963442

  20. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management: Using Human-Centered Design.

    PubMed

    Trail-Mahan, Tracy; Heisler, Scott; Katica, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this quality improvement project, our health system developed a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving inpatient pain management and assessed its impact on patient satisfaction across 21 medical centers. Using human-centered design principles, a bundle of 6 individual and team nursing practices was developed. Patient satisfaction with pain management, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain composite score, increased from the 25th to just under the 75th national percentile. PMID:26447343

  1. Database construction for improving patient safety by examining pathology errors.

    PubMed

    Grzybicki, Dana Marie; Turcsanyi, Brian; Becich, Michael J; Gupta, Dilip; Gilbertson, John R; Raab, Stephen S

    2005-10-01

    A critical component of improving patient safety is reducing medical errors. "Improving Patient Safety by Examining Pathology Errors" is a project designed to collect data about and analyze diagnostic errors voluntarily reported by 4 academic anatomic pathology laboratories and to develop and implement interventions to reduce errors and improve patient outcomes. The study database is Web-mediated and Oracle-based, and it houses de-identified error data detected by cytologic-histologic correlation and interdepartmental conference review. We describe the basic design of the database with a focus on challenges faced as a consequence of the absence of standardized and detailed laboratory workload and quality assurance data sets in widely used laboratory information systems and the lack of efficient and comprehensive electronic de-identification of unlinked institutional laboratory information systems and clinical data. Development of these electronic data abstraction capabilities is critical for efforts to improve patient safety through the examination of pathology diagnostic errors. PMID:16146808

  2. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  3. Improving the efficacy of elderly patients' hospital discharge through multi-professional safety briefings and behavioural change.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Joanna; Topley, Kathryn; Cracknell, Alison

    2015-01-01

    At Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust doctors type an electronic discharge advice note (eDAN) which includes a prescription for discharge medication, before a patient can be discharged from hospital. In 2014 staff on the Medical Admissions Unit for Older People identified significant delays in the completion of this document, with an average completion time of 138 minutes. This caused patient harm and exacerbated bed management problems as patients remained in hospital longer than necessary to obtain their discharge medication. Ward staff wanted to improve the efficacy of older peoples' discharge by speeding up this process in as safe a manner as possible. A number of interventions were tested, led by junior doctors in a 'bottom-up' leadership strategy. Interventions included a daily discharge briefing to recap discharges and help junior doctors prioritise workload. After several months of sustained effort, the average time to complete eDANs fell by over an hour resulting in discharge medication dispensed earlier in the day and improved patient safety. PMID:26734435

  4. Exposing the impact of Citizens Advice Bureau services on health: a realist evaluation protocol

    PubMed Central

    Forster, N; Dalkin, S M; Lhussier, M; Hodgson, P; Carr, S M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Welfare advice services can be used to address health inequalities, for example, through Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB). Recent reviews highlight evidence for the impact of advice services in improving people's financial position and improving mental health and well-being, daily living and social relationships. There is also some evidence for the impact of advice services in increasing accessibility of health services, and reducing general practitioner appointments and prescriptions. However, direct evidence for the impact of advice services on lifestyle behaviour and physical health is currently much less well established. There is a need for greater empirical testing of theories around the specific mechanisms through which advice services and associated financial or non-financial benefits may generate health improvements. Methods and analysis A realist evaluation will be conducted, operationalised in 5 phases: building the explanatory framework; refining the explanatory framework; testing the explanatory framework through empirical data (mixed methods); development of a bespoke data recording template to capture longer term impact; and verification of findings with a range of CAB services. This research will therefore aim to build, refine and test an explanatory framework about how CAB services can be optimally implemented to achieve health improvement. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the ethics committee at Northumbria University, UK. Project-related ethical issues are described and quality control aspects of the study are considered. A stakeholder mapping exercise will inform the dissemination of results in order to ensure all relevant institutions and organisations are targeted. PMID:26792219

  5. Practice improvement, part II: update on patient communication technologies.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Coleman, Mary Thoesen

    2013-11-01

    Patient portals (ie, secure web-based services for patient health record access) and secure messaging to health care professionals are gaining popularity slowly. Advantages of web portals include timely communication and instruction, access to appointments and other services, and high patient satisfaction. Limitations include inappropriate use, security considerations, organizational costs, and exclusion of patients who are uncomfortable with or unable to use computers. Attention to the organization's strategic plan and office policies, patient and staff expectations, workflow and communication integration, training, marketing, and enrollment can facilitate optimal use of this technology. Other communication technologies that can enhance patient care include automated voice or text reminders and brief electronic communications. Social media provide another method of patient outreach, but privacy and access are concerns. Incorporating telehealthcare (health care provided via telephone or Internet), providing health coaching, and using interactive health communication applications can improve patient knowledge and clinical outcomes and provide social support. PMID:24261435

  6. Enhancing Nurses' Pain Assessment to Improve Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Diana L; Hoffman, Leslie A; Fioravanti, Marie; Medley, Deborah Poskus; Zullo, Thomas G; Tuite, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with pain management has increasing importance with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores tied to reimbursement. Previous studies indicate patient satisfaction is influenced by staff interactions. This single-group pre/post design study aimed to improve satisfaction with pain management in older adults undergoing total joint replacement. This was a single-group pre-/posttest design. Nurse (knowledge assessment) and patient (American Pain Society Patient Outcomes Questionnaire Revised [APS-POQ-R], HCAHPS) responses evaluated pre- and postimplementation of the online educational program. Nurse focus group followed intervention. Nurses' knowledge improved significantly (p < .006) postintervention. HCAHPS scores (3-month average) for items reflecting patient satisfaction improved from 70.2 ± 9.5 to 73.9 ± 6.0. APS-POQ-R scores did not change. Focus group comments indicated need for education regarding linkages between pain management and patient satisfaction. Education on linkages between patient satisfaction and pain management can improve outcomes; education on strategies to further improve practice may enhance ability to achieve benchmarks. PMID:27028687

  7. Understanding barriers to following advice: Evaluation of an advisory service from dairy farmers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Katharina Charlotte; Scheu, Theresa; Duc, Phuong Do; Gundling, Frieder; Wichern, Anika; Hemmel, Malin; Hoedemaker, Martina; Wellbrock, Wiebke; Campe, Amely

    2016-01-01

    In dairy herd health medicine, the success of consultation is sometimes limited as farmers do not always implement given advice. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate a consultation performed during a study in the northwest of Germany and thereby to detect barriers that hinder farmers with long lasting problems in herd health from implementing veterinary advice. Six to twelve months after a non-recurring extensive herd health analysis and consultation, 38 farmers were interviewed by phone. Nearly all farmers were content with the farm visit, and 79% of the farmers stated that they had implemented at least some of the advice. This shows that farmers appreciated this service in general and were willing to follow advice. Even though the results cannot be generalized, factors that could be considered by advisors to improve the success of consultation were detected: Reasons as to why the advice was rejected were mostly related to farmers' expectations. Implementing only some of the advice was caused by a lack of time, self-discipline, money, and a lacking farm successor. Factors that pleased farmers were friendliness of the study veterinarians, in-depth examinations, handling of cows, good advice and how well organized the farm visit was. Factors that displeased the farmers were usually indicated only by one farmer each. Other factors influencing the success of consultation were the teamwork with the practising veterinarian, the self-evaluation of the farmers and the desire of the farmers for a single reason for the herd health problems. PMID:26904900

  8. [Improvement of QOL in osteoporotic patients by calcitonin treatment].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Yoshizawa, Minako; Yoh, Kousei

    2005-03-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is impaired in patients with osteoporosis, to which bodily pain greatly contributes. The presence of vertebral fractures detrimentally affects the patients' QOL in a dose-dependent manner. Calcitonin, with its potent analgesic action, markedly improves the various aspects of patients' QOL. Efficacy for the treatment of osteoporosis should be evaluated in terms of QOL also, in addition to the increase in bone mineral density and fracture prevention. PMID:15741699

  9. Smoking cessation strategies for patients with asthma: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Jennifer L; Bonevski, Billie; McDonald, Christine F; Abramson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is common in adults with asthma, yet a paucity of literature exists on smoking cessation strategies specifically targeting this subgroup. Adverse respiratory effects from personal smoking include worse asthma control and a predisposition to lower lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some data suggest that individuals with asthma are more likely than their non-asthmatic peers to smoke regularly at an earlier age. While quit attempts can be more frequent in smokers with asthma, they are also of shorter duration than in non-asthmatics. Considering these asthma-specific characteristics is important in order to individualize smoking cessation strategies. In particular, asthma-specific information such as “lung age” should be provided and longer-term follow-up is advised. Promising emerging strategies include reminders by cellular phone and web-based interventions using consumer health informatics. For adolescents, training older peers to deliver asthma education is another promising strategy. For smokers who are hospitalized for asthma, inpatient nicotine replacement therapy and counseling are a priority. Overall, improving smoking cessation rates in smokers with asthma may rely on a more personalized approach, with the potential for substantial health benefits to individuals and the population at large. PMID:27445499

  10. The implementation of nutritional advice for people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Connor, H; Annan, F; Bunn, E; Frost, G; McGough, N; Sarwar, T; Thomas, B

    2003-10-01

    These consensus-based recommendations emphasize the practical implementation of nutritional advice for people with diabetes, and describe the provision of services required to provide the information. Important changes from previous recommendations include greater flexibility in the proportions of energy derived from carbohydrate and monounsaturated fat, further liberalization in the consumption of sucrose, more active promotion of foods with a low glycaemic index, and greater emphasis on the provision of nutritional advice in the context of wider lifestyle changes, particularly physical activity. Monounsaturated fats are now promoted as the main source of dietary fat because of their lower susceptibility to lipid peroxidation and consequent lower atherogenic potential. Consumption of sucrose for patients who are not overweight can be increased up to 10% of daily energy provided that this is eaten in the context of a healthy diet and distributed throughout the day [corrected]. Evidence is presented for the effectiveness of advice provided by trained dieticians. The increasing evidence for the importance of good metabolic control and the growing requirement for measures to prevent Type 2 diabetes in an increasingly obese population will require major expansion of dietetic services if the standards in National Service Frameworks are to be successfully implemented. PMID:14510859

  11. How Patients Can Improve the Accuracy of their Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dullabh, Prashila M.; Sondheimer, Norman K.; Katsh, Ethan; Evans, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Assess (1) if patients can improve their medical records’ accuracy if effectively engaged using a networked Personal Health Record; (2) workflow efficiency and reliability for receiving and processing patient feedback; and (3) patient feedback’s impact on medical record accuracy. Background: Improving medical record’ accuracy and associated challenges have been documented extensively. Providing patients with useful access to their records through information technology gives them new opportunities to improve their records’ accuracy and completeness. A new approach supporting online contributions to their medication lists by patients of Geisinger Health Systems, an online patient-engagement advocate, revealed this can be done successfully. In late 2011, Geisinger launched an online process for patients to provide electronic feedback on their medication lists’ accuracy before a doctor visit. Patient feedback was routed to a Geisinger pharmacist, who reviewed it and followed up with the patient before changing the medication list shared by the patient and the clinicians. Methods: The evaluation employed mixed methods and consisted of patient focus groups (users, nonusers, and partial users of the feedback form), semi structured interviews with providers and pharmacists, user observations with patients, and quantitative analysis of patient feedback data and pharmacists’ medication reconciliation logs. Findings/Discussion: (1) Patients were eager to provide feedback on their medications and saw numerous advantages. Thirty percent of patient feedback forms (457 of 1,500) were completed and submitted to Geisinger. Patients requested changes to the shared medication lists in 89 percent of cases (369 of 414 forms). These included frequency—or dosage changes to existing prescriptions and requests for new medications (prescriptions and over-the counter). (2) Patients provided useful and accurate online feedback. In a subsample of 107 forms

  12. Effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing in improving lipid level in patients with dyslipidemia assisted by general practitioners: Dislip-EM study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The non-pharmacological approach to cholesterol control in patients with hyperlipidemia is based on the promotion of a healthy diet and physical activity. Thus, to help patients change their habits, it is essential to identify the most effective approach. Many efforts have been devoted to explain changes in or adherence to specific health behaviors. Such efforts have resulted in the development of theories that have been applied in prevention campaigns, and that include brief advice and counseling services. Within this context, Motivational Interviewing has proven to be effective in changing health behaviors in specific cases. However, more robust evidence is needed on the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing in treating chronic pathologies -such as dyslipidemia- in patients assisted by general practitioners. This article describes a protocol to assess the effectiveness of MI as compared with general practice (brief advice), with the aim of improving lipid level control in patients with dyslipidemia assisted by a general practitioner. Methods/Design An open, two-arm parallel, multicentre, cluster, controlled, randomized, clinical trial will be performed. A total of 48-50 general practitioners from 35 public primary care centers in Spain will be randomized and will recruit 436 patients with dyslipidemia. They will perform an intervention based either on Motivational Interviewing or on the usual brief advice. After an initial assessment, follow-ups will be performed at 2, 4, 8 and 12 months. Primary outcomes are lipid levels (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides) and cardiovascular risk. The study will assess the degree of dietary and physical activity improvement, weight loss in overweight patients, and adherence to treatment guidelines. Discussion Motivational interview skills constitute the primary strategies GPs use to treat their patients. Having economical, simple, effective and applicable techniques is essential

  13. Improving patients' and staff's experiences of acute care.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Rob; Crawshaw, Jacob; Hood, Chloe

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this audit was to assess the effect of the Quality Mark programme on the quality of acute care received by older patients by comparing the experiences of staff and older adults before and after the programme. Data from 31 wards in 12 acute hospitals were collected over two stages. Patients and staff completed questionnaires on the perceived quality of care on the ward. Patients rated improved experiences of nutrition, staff availability and dignity. Staff received an increase in training and reported better access to support, increased time and skill to deliver care and improved morale, leadership and teamwork. Problems remained with ward comfort and mealtimes. Overall, results indicated an improvement in ratings of care quality in most domains during Quality Mark data collection. Further audits need to explore ways of improving ward comfort and mealtime experience. PMID:25727634

  14. Cross-Functional Team Processes and Patient Functional Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Lichtenstein, Richard; Jinnett, Kimberly; Wells, Rebecca; Zazzali, James; Liu, Dawei

    2005-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that higher levels of participation and functioning in cross-functional psychiatric treatment teams will be related to improved patient outcomes. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data were collected during the period 1992–1999. The study was conducted in 40 teams within units treating seriously mentally ill patients in 16 Veterans Affairs hospitals across the U.S. Study Design A longitudinal, multilevel analysis assessed the relationship between individual- and team-level variables and patients' ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) over time. Team data were collected in 1992, 1994, and 1995. The number of times patient data were collected was dependent on the length of time the patient was treated and varied from 1 to 14 between 1992 and 1999. Key variables included: patients' ADL scores (the dependent variable); measures of team participation and team functioning; the number of days from baseline on which a patient's ADLs were assessed; and several control variables. Data Collection Methods Team data were obtained via self-administered questionnaires distributed to staff on the study teams. Additional team data were obtained via questionnaires completed by unit directors contemporaneously with the staff survey. Patient data were collected by trained clinicians at regular intervals using a standard assessment instrument. Principal Findings Results indicated that patients treated in teams with higher levels of staff participation experienced greater improvement in ADL over time. No differences in ADL change were noted for patients treated in teams with higher levels of team functioning. Conclusions Findings support our premise that team process has important implications for patient outcomes. The results suggest that the level of participation by the team as a whole may be a more important process attribute, in terms of patient improvements in ADLs, than the team's smooth functioning. These findings indicate the

  15. Doctor Who? A Quality Improvement Project to Assess and Improve Patients' Knowledge of Their Inpatient Physicians.

    PubMed

    Broderick-Forsgren, Kathleen; Hunter, Wynn G; Schulteis, Ryan D; Liu, Wen-Wei; Boggan, Joel C; Sharma, Poonam; Thomas, Steven; Zaas, Aimee; Bae, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Background Patient-physician communication is an integral part of high-quality patient care and an expectation of the Clinical Learning Environment Review program. Objective This quality improvement initiative evaluated the impact of an educational audit and feedback intervention on the frequency of use of 2 tools-business cards and white boards-to improve provider identification. Methods This before-after study utilized patient surveys to determine the ability of those patients to name and recognize their physicians. The before phase began in July 2013. From September 2013 to May 2014, physicians received education on business card and white board use. Results We surveyed 378 patients. Our intervention improved white board utilization (72.2% postintervention versus 54.5% preintervention, P < .01) and slightly improved business card use (44.4% versus 33.7%, P = .07), but did not improve physician recognition. Only 20.3% (14 of 69) of patients could name their physician without use of the business card or white board. Data from all study phases showed the use of both tools improved patients' ability to name physicians (OR = 1.72 and OR = 2.12, respectively; OR = 3.68 for both; P < .05 for all), but had no effect on photograph recognition. Conclusions Our educational intervention improved white board use, but did not result in improved patient ability to recognize physicians. Pooled data of business cards and white boards, alone or combined, improved name recognition, suggesting better use of these tools may increase identification. Future initiatives should target other barriers to usage of these types of tools. PMID:27168887

  16. Sound source information to improve cardiothoracic patients' comfort.

    PubMed

    Mackrill, Jamie; Cain, Rebecca; Jennings, Paul; England, Michelle

    Hospital sound has been well documented through acoustic measurement and the classification of its adverse effects on patients and nurses. However, little consideration has been given to how the perception of these unavoidable soundscapes can be improved. For instance, does a better understanding of the variety of sounds improve patients' feeling? This paper begins to answer this and documents a pilot questionnaire-based study looking at the effects and potential benefits of sound source information (SSI) on patients' subjective reactions to a ward soundscape. The study was carried out from July to September 2011 with 31 patients in a cardiothoracic ward. Although strong inferences were not made, it was found that this simple intervention created a 21-26% positive change perception (p<0.05). The paper discusses the results in relation to nursing practice, concluding that SSI could be beneficial in helping patients to feel more comfortable. PMID:23588015

  17. Process Improvements to Reform Patient Flow in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Whatley, Shawn D; Leung, Alexander K; Duic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) function to diagnose, stabilize, manage and dispose patients as efficiently as possible. Although problems may be suspected at triage, ED physician input is required at each step of the patient journey through the ED, from diagnosis to disposition. If we want timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment and great outcomes, then ED processes should connect patients and physicians as quickly as possible. This article discusses the key concepts of ED patient flow, value and efficiency. Based on these fundamentals, it describes the significant impact of ED process improvements implemented on measures of ED efficiency at a large community ED in Ontario, Canada. PMID:27133605

  18. Rationalizing radio medical advice for maritime emergencies.

    PubMed

    Aujla, K; Nag, R; Ferguson, J; Howell, M; Cahill, C

    2003-01-01

    The provision of radio medical advice by the National Health Service for British coastal waters has developed in an ad hoc fashion. In 1999, the closure of one of the two centres providing such advice led to unexpected problems. The demographic characteristics of the offshore population covered by each centre were markedly different and this resulted in a different spectrum of medical emergencies presenting to the sole remaining centre. Subsequent data collection of the details of medical emergencies presenting from offshore allowed an audit to inform the development of training packages for both base and remote practitioners. This has led to an ongoing national rationalization of ship-to-shore radio medical advice for the UK. PMID:12952706

  19. The best advice I ever got.

    PubMed

    Wademan, Daisy

    2005-01-01

    A young manager faces an impasse in his career. He goes to see his mentor at the company, who closes the office door, offers the young man a chair, recounts a few war stories, and serves up a few specific pointers about the problem at hand. Then, just as the young manager is getting up to leave, the elder executive adds one small kernel of avuncular wisdom--which the junior manager carries with him through the rest of his career. Such is the nature of business advice. Or is it? The six essays in this article suggest otherwise. Few of the leaders who tell their stories here got their best advice in stereotypical form, as an aphorism or a platitude. For Ogilvy & Mather chief Shelly Lazarus, profound insight came from a remark aimed at relieving the tension of the moment. For Novartis CEO Daniel Vasella, it was an apt comment, made on a snowy day, back when he was a medical resident. For publishing magnate Earl Graves and Starwood Hotels' Barry Sternlicht, advice they received about trust from early bosses took on ever deeper and more practical meaning as their careers progressed. For Goldman Sachs chairman Henry Paulson, Jr., it was as much his father's example as it was a specific piece of advice his father handed down to him. And fashion designer Liz Lange rejects the very notion that there's inherent wisdom in accepting other people's advice. As these stories demonstrate, people find wisdom when they least expect to, and they never really know what piece of advice will transcend the moment, profoundly affecting how they later make decisions, evaluate people, and examine--and reexamine--their own actions. PMID:15697111

  20. A Web Site to Improve Management of Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders in the Emergency Department: Results at 2 Years.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferri, Annarita; Di Perna, Caterina; Biasoli, Chiara; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Quintavalle, Gabriele; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Barozzi, Marco; Benedettini, Laura; Pattacini, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of patients with inherited bleeding disorders (PWIBD) in the emergency department (ED) is challenging. In 2010, a project was started involving all eight hemophilia centers (HC) and all 44 EDs of the Region of Emilia-Romagna (Italy) to improve emergency care for PWIBD. The project incorporates guidelines for emergency treatment, education for ED staff, and a dedicated Web site providing extensive information, proposing treatments, and sharing data with patients' electronic clinical records. A Web algorithm, accessible to PWIBD as well as ED and HC staff, suggests the first dose of concentrate for each type and severity of bleed or trauma. Following training courses in each ED, the network was activated. During 2012 and 2013, the site was visited 14,000 times, the EDs accessed the Web site 1,739 times, and used the algorithms 206 times. In two reference EDs, triage-assessment and triage-treatment times were reduced in 2013 and 2012 (27/20 and 110/71.5 minutes, respectively) and medical advice from the HC increased (54 vs. 24% cases). The main advantages of this system are better management of patients in ED (shorter triage-to-treatment times) and improved collaboration between HCs and EDs. The most critical point remaining is staff turnover in EDs, necessitating continual training. PMID:27071049

  1. Business Advice Meets Academic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    The University of North Texas at Dallas (UNT-Dallas) was conceived 10 years ago as a public institution along tried-and-true lines--a comprehensive metropolitan university meant to serve a diverse student population and to improve the economic outlook of a part of the city that prosperity has left behind. But that was before management consultants…

  2. [The Health Council of the Netherlands' advice on Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Verbon, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions about Lyme disease. At the initiative of the Dutch Association for Lyme Patients, the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament requested a report on Lyme disease. The Health Council of the Netherlands advised standardization of Lyme serology in all Dutch laboratories as soon as possible. Standardization of diagnostic serological tests was strongly recommended. Studies into new tests which discriminate between active disease and past infection were recommended. Patients with Lyme disease were divided in those with Lyme specific and non-specific symptoms and duration of symptoms. Treatment advice was given for each of these 6 patient categories with a prominent role for the decision of the attending physician. Additionally it was advised to set up specialized treatment centers with a multidisciplinary approach. The report clearly shows the problems in care for Lyme patients from the perspective of both patients and physicians, but is cautious in the solutions offered. PMID:23859114

  3. Improving haemophilia patient care through sharing best practice.

    PubMed

    de Moerloose, Philippe; Arnberg, Daniel; O'Mahony, Brian; Colvin, Brian

    2015-10-01

    At the 2014 Annual Congress of the European Haemophilia Consortium (EHC) held in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Pfizer initiated and funded a satellite symposium entitled: 'Improving Patient Care Through Sharing Best Practice'. Co-chaired by Brian Colvin (Pfizer Global Innovative Pharma Business, Rome, Italy) and Brian O'Mahony [President of the EHC, Brussels, Belgium], the symposium provided an opportunity to consider patient care across borders, to review how patient advocacy groups can successfully engage with policymakers in healthcare decision-making and to discuss the importance of patient involvement in data collection to help shape the future environment for people with haemophilia. Professor Philippe de Moerloose (University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine of Geneva, Switzerland) opened the session by discussing the gap between the haemophilia management guidelines and the reality of care for many patients living in Europe, highlighting the importance of sharing of best practice and building a network of treaters and patient organisations to support the improvement of care across Europe. Daniel Arnberg (SCISS AB, Hägersten, Sweden) reviewed the health technology assessment process conducted in Sweden, the first for haemophilia products, as a case study, focusing on the role of the patient organisation. Finally, Brian O'Mahony reflected on the central role of patients as individuals and also within patient organisations in shaping the future of haemophilia care. PMID:26338268

  4. Improving wait times and patient satisfaction in primary care.

    PubMed

    Michael, Melanie; Schaffer, Susan D; Egan, Patricia L; Little, Barbara B; Pritchard, Patrick Scott

    2013-01-01

    A strong and inverse relationship between patient satisfaction and wait times in ambulatory care settings has been demonstrated. Despite its relevance to key medical practice outcomes, timeliness of care in primary care settings has not been widely studied. The goal of the quality improvement project described here was to increase patient satisfaction by minimizing wait times using the Dartmouth Microsystem Improvement Curriculum (DMIC) framework and the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) improvement process. Following completion of an initial PDSA cycle, significant reductions in mean waiting room and exam room wait times (p = .001 and p = .047, respectively) were observed along with a significant increase in patient satisfaction with waiting room wait time (p = .029). The results support the hypothesis that the DMIC framework and the PDSA method can be applied to improve wait times and patient satisfaction among primary care patients. Furthermore, the pretest-posttest preexperimental study design employed provides a model for sequential repetitive tests of change that can lead to meaningful improvements in the delivery of care and practice performance in a variety of ambulatory care settings over time. PMID:23480405

  5. Leveraging information technology to drive improvement in patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Nash, Mary; Pestrue, Justin; Geier, Peter; Sharp, Karen; Helder, Amy; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2010-01-01

    A healthcare organization's commitment to quality and the patient experience requires senior leader involvement in improvement strategies, and accountability for goals. Further, improvement strategies are most effective when driven by data, and in the world of patient satisfaction, evidence is growing that nurse leader rounding and discharge calls are strategic tactics that can improve patient satisfaction. This article describes how The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) leveraged health information technology (IT) to apply a data-driven strategy execution to improve the patient experience. Specifically, two IT-driven approaches were used: (1) business intelligence reporting tools were used to create a meaningful reporting system including dashboards, scorecards, and tracking reports and (2) an improvement plan was implemented that focused on two high-impact tactics and data to hardwire accountability. Targeted information from the IT systems enabled clinicians and administrators to execute these strategic tactics, and senior leaders to monitor achievement of strategic goals. As a result, OSUMC's inpatient satisfaction scores on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey improved from 56% nines and tens in 2006 to 71% in 2009. PMID:20854357

  6. Randomized controlled trial of primary care physician motivational interviewing versus brief advice to engage adolescents with an Internet-based depression prevention intervention: 6-month outcomes and predictors of improvement.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Willemijn; Marko, Monika; Fogel, Joshua; Schuurmans, Josien; Gladstone, Tracy; Bradford, Nathan; Domanico, Rocco; Fagan, Blake; Bell, Carl; Reinecke, Mark A; Van Voorhees, Benjamin W

    2011-12-01

    We believe that primary care physicians could play a key role in engaging youth with a depression prevention intervention. We developed CATCH-IT (Competent Adulthood Transition with Cognitive Behavioral and Interpersonal Training), which is an adolescent Internet-based behavior change model. We conducted a randomized comparison of two approaches in engaging adolescents with the Internet intervention: primary care physician (PCP) motivational interview + CATCH-IT Internet program (MI) vs PCP brief advice + CATCH-IT Internet program (BA). The participants (N = 84) were recruited by screening for risk of depression in 13 primary care practices. We compared depressive disorder outcomes between groups and within groups over 6 months and examined the potential predictors and moderators of outcomes across both study arms. Depressive symptom scores declined from baseline to 6 weeks with these statistically significant reductions sustained at the 6 months follow-up in both groups. No significant interactions with treatment condition were found. However, by 6 months, the MI group demonstrated significantly fewer depressive episodes and reported less hopelessness as compared with the BA group. Hierarchical linear modeling regressions showed higher ratings of ease of use of the Internet program predicting lower depressive symptom levels over 6 months. In conclusion, a primary care/Internet-based intervention model among adolescents demonstrated reductions in depressed mood over 6 months and may result in fewer depressive episodes. PMID:22061038

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging: improving patients tolerance and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Weinreb, J.C.; Maravilla, K.R.; Peshock, R.; Payne, J.

    1984-12-01

    Some physicians have expressed the opinion that patients may not tolerate MR scans as well as they do computed tomographic (CT) scans for several reasons: (1) longer examination time, (2) the confined space in which a patient is placed for scanning, and (3) difficulties in communicating with the patient during scanning because of noise from the gradient coils and the necessity of eliminating all extraneous radiofrequency (RF) sources from the examination room. Furthermore, the presence of a powerful magnet as the heart of an MRI unit introduces management problems in the event of patient emergencies. With these potential difficulties in mind, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas Southwestern Medical School NMR Imaging Center has implemented a program to improve patient tolerance and safety. The anticipated imminent proliferation of MRI units in many radiology departments indicates that it is an opportune time to share our experience with 450 patients and a commerically available 0.35-T superconducting imager.

  8. Patient and clinician's ratings of improvement in methadone-maintained patients: Differing perspectives?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the last few years there seems to be an emerging interest for including the patients' perspective in assessing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), with treatment satisfaction surveys being the most commonly-used method of incorporating this point of view. The present study considers the perspective of patients on MMT when assessing the outcomes of this treatment, acknowledging the validity of this approach as an indicator. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the concordance between improvement assessment performed by two members of the clinical staff (a psychiatrist and a nurse) and assessment carried out by MMT patients themselves. Method Patients (n = 110) and their respective psychiatrist (n = 5) and nurse (n = 1) completed a scale for assessing how the patient's condition had changed from the beginning of MMT, using the Patient Global Impression of Improvement scale (PGI-I) and the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement scale (CGI-I), respectively. Results The global improvement assessed by patients showed weak concordance with the assessments made by nurses (Quadratic-weighted kappa = 0.13, p > 0.05) and by psychiatrists (Quadratic-weighted kappa = 0.19, p = 0.0086), although in the latter, concordance was statistically significant. The percentage of improved patients was significantly higher in the case of the assessments made by patients, compared with those made by nurses (90.9% vs. 80%, Z-statistic = 2.10, p = 0.0354) and by psychiatrists (90.9% vs. 50%, Z-statistic = 6.48, p < 0.0001). Conclusions MMT patients' perception of improvement shows low concordance with the clinical staff's perspective. Assessment of MMT effectiveness should also focus on patient's evaluation of the outcomes or changes achieved, thus including indicators based on the patient's experiences, provided that MMT aim is to be more patient centred and to cover different needs of patients themselves. PMID:21871064

  9. Consider the Source: Adolescents and Adults Similarly Follow Older Adult Advice More than Peer Advice

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Gloria A.; Dellarco, Danielle V.; Casey, B. J.; Hartley, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals learn which of their actions are likely to be rewarded through trial and error. This form of learning is critical for adapting to new situations, which adolescents frequently encounter. Adolescents are also greatly influenced by their peers. The current study tested the extent to which adolescents rely on peer advice to guide their actions. Adolescent and young adult participants completed a probabilistic learning task in which they chose between four pairs of stimuli with different reinforcement probabilities, with one stimulus in each pair more frequently rewarded. Participants received advice about two of these pairs, once from a similarly aged peer and once from an older adult. Crucially, this advice was inaccurate, enabling the dissociation between experience-based and instruction-based learning. Adolescents and adults learned equally well from experience and no age group difference was evident in the overall influence of advice on choices. Surprisingly, when considering the source of advice, there was no evident influence of peer advice on adolescent choices. However, both adolescents and adults were biased toward choosing the stimulus recommended by the older adult. Contrary to conventional wisdom, these data suggest that adolescents may prioritize the advice of older adults over that of peers in certain decision-making contexts. PMID:26030134

  10. Advice-giving styles by finnish nurses in dietary counseling concerning type 2 diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Päivi; Poskiparta, Marita; Kettunen, Tarja; Saltevo, Juha; Liimatainen, Leena

    2004-01-01

    Dietary advice-giving is an important part of dietary counseling in diabetes care and prevention. The strategies of advice-giving, however, have not been explicated and the qualitative characteristics of conversations in diabetes counseling have remained mainly unstudied. This article describes the styles in which nurses responsible for diabetes counseling in Finnish primary care practices offer dietary advice for patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. The data consisted of 55 videotaped naturally occurring counseling sessions between 18 patients and five nurses and were analyzed using typology as an analyzing method. Four different styles of dietary advice-giving were recognized from the speech episodes concerning dietary behavior: recommending, persuasive, supportive, and permitting styles. Recommending style of advice-giving is recognized to be the dominant style that has arisen from the data and, actually, it seems to be the starting point in advice-giving practices. The other styles were used rarely, which suggest that the nurses rely upon quite a narrow selection of communication strategies that helps them to control the topics and the situation, although patient-centered counseling is strongly demanded nowadays. On the basis of our results we suggest that health professionals may need to become more aware of their advice-giving practices in routine situations through conscious effort of self-evaluation. A more detailed analysis of interpersonal conversations during counseling sessions is also needed as it may offer valuable information to promote patients' self-management skills by facilitating observation of conversational elements recognized to be successful in diabetes counseling. PMID:15371086

  11. Improving Patient Outcomes With Oral Heart Failure Medications.

    PubMed

    Sherrod, Melissa M; Cheek, Dennis J; Seale, Ashlie

    2016-05-01

    Hospitals are under immense pressure to reduce heart failure readmissions that occur within 30 days of discharge, and to improve the quality of care for these patients. Penalties mandated by the Affordable Care Act decrease hospital reimbursement and ultimately the overall cost of caring for these patients increases if they are not well managed. Approximately 25% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are at high risk for readmission and these rates have not changed over the past decade. As a result of an aging population, the incidence of heart failure is expected to increase to one in five Americans over the age of 65. Pharmacologic management can reduce the risk of death and help prevent unnecessary hospitalizations. Healthcare providers who have knowledge of heart failure medications and drug interactions and share this information with their patients contribute to improved long-term survival and physical functioning as well as fewer hospitalizations and a delay of progressive worsening of heart failure. PMID:27145405

  12. The personal shopper--a pilot randomized trial of grocery store-based dietary advice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K H; Roblin, D W; Leo, M; Block, J P

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a store-based dietary education intervention against traditional clinic-based advice. Patients with obesity (n = 55, mean [standard deviation, SD] age 44.3[9.2] years, 64% women, 87% non-Hispanic Black) were randomized to receive dietary counselling either in a grocery store or a clinic. Change between groups (analysis of covariance) was assessed for outcomes including: dietary quality (Healthy Eating Index--2005 [0-100 points]), and nutritional knowledge (0-65-point knowledge scale). Both groups reported improved diet quality at the end of the study. Grocery participants had greater increases in knowledge (mean [SD] change = 5.7 [6.1] points) than clinic participants (mean [SD] change = 3.2 [4.0] points) (P = 0.04). Participants enjoyed the store-based sessions. Grocery store-based visits offer a promising approach for dietary counselling. PMID:25873139

  13. A communication tool to improve the patient journey modeling process.

    PubMed

    Curry, Joanne; McGregor, Carolyn; Tracy, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Quality improvement is high on the agenda of Health Care Organisations (HCO) worldwide. Patient journey modeling is a relatively recent innovation in healthcare quality improvement that models the patient's movement through the HCO by viewing it from a patient centric perspective. Critical to the success of the redesigning care process is the involvement of all stakeholders and their commitment to actively participate in the process. Tools which promote this type of communication are a critical enabler that can significantly affect the overall process redesign outcomes. Such a tool must also be able to incorporate additional factors such as relevant policies and procedures, staff roles, system usage and measurements such as process time and cost. This paper presents a graphically based communication tool that can be used as part of the patient journey modeling process to promote stakeholder involvement, commitment and ownership as well highlighting the relationship of other relevant variables that contribute to the patient's journey. Examples of how the tool has been used and the framework employed are demonstrated via a midwife-led primary care case study. A key contribution of this research is the provision of a graphical communication framework that is simple to use, is easily understood by a diverse range of stakeholders and enables ready recognition of patient journey issues. Results include strong stakeholder buy-in and significant enhancement to the overall design of the future patient journey. Initial results indicate that the use of such a communication tool can improve the patient journey modeling process and the overall quality improvement outcomes. PMID:17945852

  14. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance. PMID:23903945

  15. Decision Making and Confidence Given Uncertain Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Michael D.; Dry, Matthew J.

    2006-01-01

    We study human decision making in a simple forced-choice task that manipulates the frequency and accuracy of available information. Empirically, we find that people make decisions consistent with the advice provided, but that their subjective confidence in their decisions shows 2 interesting properties. First, people's confidence does not depend…

  16. 5 CFR 2641.105 - Advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... subpart C of 5 CFR part 2638, the DOJ will not prosecute an individual who acted in good faith in accordance with that opinion. See 5 CFR 2638.309. (d) Contacts to seek advice.A former employee will not...

  17. Learners Need Face-to-Face Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedgmore, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    In January the 157 Group launched a policy paper making the case for professional careers guidance. With the launch of the National Careers Service in April, information, advice and guidance is a hot topic within the education and skills sector and one that is regularly debated. The combination of policy changes, including the introduction of…

  18. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs. PMID:26422517

  19. Collaborating With Music Therapists to Improve Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jaclyn Bradley; Lane, Deforia; Mayo, Diane

    2016-09-01

    Collaboration between perioperative nurses and music therapists can be beneficial in providing a safe, cost-effective means of managing patients' anxiety and pain and reducing the need for pharmacologic intervention in the perioperative setting. The use of a board-certified music therapist may help to improve patient outcomes, ease nurse workload, and serve as an adjunct therapeutic modality that is enjoyable for both patients and staff members. We conducted a two-year, randomized controlled trial to determine how to best implement a music therapy program, navigate its challenges, and collaborate with nurse colleagues to bring its benefits to surgical patients. This article offers suggestions for alliances between perioperative nursing and music therapy staff members and describes the potential of music therapists to help provide optimal patient care. PMID:27568531

  20. Interventions to Improve Care for Patients with Limited Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Sudore, Rebecca L.; Schillinger, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Objective To propose a framework and describe best practices for improving care for patients with limited health literacy (LHL). Methods Review of the literature. Results Approximately half of the U.S. adult population has LHL. Because LHL is associated with poor health outcomes and contributes to health disparities, the adoption of evidence-based best practices is imperative. Feasible interventions at the clinician-patient level (eg, patient-centered communication, clear communication techniques, teach-to-goal methods, and reinforcement), at the system-patient level (eg, clear health education materials, visual aids, clear medication labeling, self-management support programs, and shame-free clinical environments), and at the community-patient level (eg, adult education referrals, lay health educators, and harnessing the mass media) can improve health outcomes for patients with LHL. Conclusion Because LHL is prevalent, and because the recommended communication strategies can benefit patients of all literacy levels, clinicians, health system planners, and health policy leaders should promote the uptake of these strategies into routine care. PMID:20046798

  1. Hearing the patient's voice? Factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E; Cleary, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a framework for understanding factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement. Design: Qualitative interviews with senior health professionals and managers and a review of the literature. Setting: A quality improvement collaborative in Minnesota, USA involving teams from eight medical groups, focusing on how to use patient survey data to improve patient centred care. Participants: Eight team leaders (medical, clinical improvement or service quality directors) and six team members (clinical improvement coordinators and managers). Results: Respondents reported three types of barriers before the collaborative: organisational, professional and data related. Organisational barriers included lack of supporting values for patient centred care, competing priorities, and lack of an effective quality improvement infrastructure. Professional barriers included clinicians and staff not being used to focusing on patient interaction as a quality issue, individuals not necessarily having been selected, trained or supported to provide patient centred care, and scepticism, defensiveness or resistance to change following feedback. Data related barriers included lack of expertise with survey data, lack of timely and specific results, uncertainty over the effective interventions or time frames for improvement, and consequent risk of perceived low cost effectiveness of data collection. Factors that appeared to have promoted data use included board led strategies to change culture and create quality improvement forums, leadership from senior physicians and managers, and the persistence of quality improvement staff over several years in demonstrating change in other areas. Conclusion: Using patient survey data may require a more concerted effort than for other clinical data. Organisations may need to develop cultures that support patient centred care, quality improvement capacity, and to align professional receptiveness and leadership with

  2. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Improves Survival in Patients With Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paximadis, Peter; Yoo, George; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Jacobs, John; Sukari, Ammar; Dyson, Greg; Christensen, Michael; Kim, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively review our institutional experience with hypopharyngeal carcinoma with respect to treatment modality. Methods and Materials A total of 70 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer treated between 1999 and 2009 were analyzed for functional and survival outcomes. The treatments included surgery alone (n = 5), surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) (n = 3), surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 13), RT alone (n = 2), CRT alone (n = 22), induction chemotherapy followed by RT (n = 3), and induction chemotherapy followed by CRT (n = 22). Results The median follow-up was 18 months. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients was 28.3 and 17.6 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year local control rate for all patients was 87.1% and 80%. CRT, given either as primary therapy or in the adjuvant setting, improved overall survival and disease-free survival compared with patients not receiving CRT. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for patients treated with CRT was 36.7 and 17.6 months vs. 14.0 and 8.0 months, respectively (p <.01). Of the patients initially treated with an organ-preserving approach, 4 (8.2%) required salvage laryngectomy for local recurrence or persistent disease; 8 (16.3%) and 12 (24.5%) patients were dependent on a percutaneous gastrostomy and tracheostomy tube, respectively. The 2-year laryngoesophageal dysfunction-free survival rate for patients treated with an organ-preserving approach was estimated at 31.7%. Conclusions Concurrent CRT improves survival in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. CRT given with conventional radiation techniques yields poor functional outcomes, and future efforts should be directed at determining the feasibility of pharyngeal-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with hypopharyngeal tumors. PMID:21658855

  3. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Improves Survival in Patients With Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Paximadis, Peter; Yoo, George; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Jacobs, John; Sukari, Ammar; Dyson, Greg; Christensen, Michael; Kim, Harold

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review our institutional experience with hypopharyngeal carcinoma with respect to treatment modality. Methods and Materials: A total of 70 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer treated between 1999 and 2009 were analyzed for functional and survival outcomes. The treatments included surgery alone (n = 5), surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) (n = 3), surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 13), RT alone (n = 2), CRT alone (n = 22), induction chemotherapy followed by RT (n = 3), and induction chemotherapy followed by CRT (n = 22). Results: The median follow-up was 18 months. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients was 28.3 and 17.6 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year local control rate for all patients was 87.1% and 80%. CRT, given either as primary therapy or in the adjuvant setting, improved overall survival and disease-free survival compared with patients not receiving CRT. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for patients treated with CRT was 36.7 and 17.6 months vs. 14.0 and 8.0 months, respectively (p < .01). Of the patients initially treated with an organ-preserving approach, 4 (8.2%) required salvage laryngectomy for local recurrence or persistent disease; 8 (16.3%) and 12 (24.5%) patients were dependent on a percutaneous gastrostomy and tracheostomy tube, respectively. The 2-year laryngoesophageal dysfunction-free survival rate for patients treated with an organ-preserving approach was estimated at 31.7%. Conclusions: Concurrent CRT improves survival in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. CRT given with conventional radiation techniques yields poor functional outcomes, and future efforts should be directed at determining the feasibility of pharyngeal-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with hypopharyngeal tumors.

  4. EXACT: EXercise or Advice after ankle fraCTure. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ankle fractures are common. Management of ankle fractures generally involves a period of immobilisation followed by rehabilitation to reduce pain, stiffness, weakness and swelling. The effects of a rehabilitation program are still unclear. However, it has been shown that important components of rehabilitation programs may not confer additional benefits over exercise alone. The primary aim of this trial is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an exercise-based rehabilitation program after ankle fracture, compared to advice alone. Methods/Design A pragmatic randomised trial will be conducted. Participants will be 342 adults with stiff, painful ankles after ankle fracture treated with immobilisation. They will be randomly allocated using a concealed randomisation procedure to either an Advice or Rehabilitation group. Participants in the Advice group will receive verbal and written advice about exercise at the time of removal of immobilisation. Participants in the Rehabilitation group will be provided with a 4-week rehabilitation program that is designed, monitored and progressed by a physiotherapist, in addition to verbal and written advice. Outcomes will be measured by a blinded assessor at 1, 3 and 6 months. The primary outcomes will be activity limitation and quality-adjusted life years. Discussion This pragmatic trial will determine if a rehabilitation program reduces activity limitation and improves quality of life, compared to advice alone, after immobilisation for ankle fracture. PMID:21726463

  5. Galantamine improves sleep quality in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Naharci, Mehmet Ilkin; Ozturk, Ahmet; Yasar, Halit; Cintosun, Umit; Kocak, Necmettin; Bozoglu, Ergun; Tasci, Ilker; Doruk, Huseyin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influences of cholinesterase inhibitors on sleep pattern and sleep disturbance. A total of 87 mild to moderate stage dementia patients who were not on cholinesterase enzyme inhibitor and memantine treatment were included in the study. The dementia patients were treated with donepezil, galantamine or rivastigmine, depending on the preference of the clinician. Fifty-five dementia patients (63.2 %) completed the study. Twenty-three elderly subjects, who had normal cognitive functions, were included in the study as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used for evaluating the sleep quality at the beginning and at the final assessment. The improvement in sleep quality was better with regard to changes in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores with galantamine treatment compared to the donepezil and the control groups. A significant decrease in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores was detected in the galantamine group after treatment. Although statistically not significant, rivastigmine decreased and donepezil increased the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores after treatment. Dementia patients who had a poor sleep quality (n: 36), the rate of improvement in sleep disturbance was 81.8 % in the galantamine group, 75 % in the rivastigmine, and 50 % in the donepezil group. Galantamine may be the first choice of cholinesterase inhibitor in mild to moderate dementia patients in terms of improving sleep quality. PMID:25777522

  6. [Preliminarily analysis on traditional Chinese medicine advices in Treatise on Febrile Diseases].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Zhai, Hua-qiang; Zhang, Tian; Jin, Shi-yuan

    2015-02-01

    To make a systematic analysis on literatures concerning traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) advices in Treatise on Febrile Diseases, and summarize the main connotations of traditional Chinese medicine advices, relevant TCM advices in Treatise on Febrile Diseases were collected, screened, compared, summarized and analyzed according to TCM dosage form preparation methods, TCM administration methods, medication contraindications and nursing after TCM administration. The literatures concerning medications in Treatise on Febrile Diseases were consulted, summarized and compared to standardize medicine advices and facilitate rational clinical application of TCMs. The standard medicine advices were as follows. The boiling water for TCMs shall be tap water and well water. The decoctions that have effects in promoting blood and meridians can be boiled with wine. The decoctions containing toxic components can be boiled with honey. Some TCMs shall be boiled with special methods, e. g. Herba Ephedra that could be boiled before other medicine and skimmed. Japonica rice could be added in decoctions to measure the duration of decoctions. Different dosages were required for different forms (litre, pill, medicine spoon). Administration times, temperature and frequency shall be adjusted according to target positions, functions and stage of illness. As for dietary contraindications during medication, thick porridges are recommended, where foods impacting medicine efficacy are prohibited. Regarding nursing after medication is important to recover physical functions, particularly warm porridges can go with diaphoretic recipes, while thick porridges can go with purgative recipes. And drug efficacies shall be defined by observing urine and excrements, and blood form. In conclusion, Treatise on Febrile Diseases is the first book that discusses TCM advices and records them in details. In this study, new standard medicine advices were proposed to provide important basis for improving clinical

  7. Improving the acute care of COPD patients across Gloucestershire: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig; Cushley, Claire; Redler, Kasey; Mitchell, Claire; Aynsley Day, Elizabeth; Mansfield, Helen; Nye, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Admissions for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present a significant proportion of patients in the acute medical take. The British Thoracic Society (BTS) provides guidelines for time specific interventions, that should be delivered to those with an acute exacerbation of COPD through the admission care bundle. These include correct diagnosis, correct assessment of oxygenation, early administration of treatment, recognition of respiratory failure, and specialist review. Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (GHNHSFT) chose improvement in acute COPD care to be a local Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) scheme, which enables commissioners to reward excellence by linking a proportion of English healthcare providers' income to the achievement of local quality improvement goals. The effects of initiatives put in place by senior clinicians had waned, and further improvements were required to meet the CQUIN target. The aim of the scheme was to improve compliance with the BTS guidelines and CQUIN scheme for patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Specific bundle paperwork to be used for all patients admitted to the Trust with an exacerbation of COPD was introduced to the Trust in June 2014, with training and education of medical staff at that time. This had improved compliance rates from 10% to 63% by September 2014. Compliance with each intervention was audited through the examination of notes of patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Compliance rates had plateaued over the last three months, and so a focus group involving junior medical staff met in September 2014 to try to increase awareness further, in order to drive greater improvements in care, and meet the CQUIN requirements. Their strategies were implemented, and then compliance with the CQUIN requirements was reaudited as described above. The December 2014 audit results showed a further improvement in overall COPD care, with 73% of patients

  8. The Role of Practical Advice in Bioterrorism News Coverage.

    PubMed

    Swain, Kristen Alley

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of crisis advice appearing in US news coverage of the 2001 anthrax attacks. Coverage of any crisis can spark public outrage, including fear, speculation, and contradictory or confusing evidence, especially when the stories do not contain practical advice. Five coders analyzed 833 news stories from 272 major US newspapers, the Associated Press, National Public Radio, and 4 major US television networks. Practical advice appeared in only a quarter of the stories, even though practical advice for self-protection was mentioned 3 times more often than the vague advice that simply advised people not to panic. Public health officials provided the most practical advice, while scientists provided the least practical advice. Stories containing practical advice also provided more elucidating information, explaining why the threat was low, reducible, treatable, and detectable. Over the 3 phases of the anthrax crisis, an inverse relationship appeared between the amount of news coverage containing practical advice compared to "outrage rhetoric." Stories mentioned practical advice more often during the post-impact phase than earlier in the crisis. Elucidating, explanatory advice emphasized actions, risk comparisons, and tradeoffs. The findings indicate that when journalists use credible sources to provide practical advice and avoid speculation, their coverage can prevent the spread of misinformation and confusion during a bioterror attack. Also, journalists should provide context and sourcing when discussing advice during the outbreak and impact phases of the crisis, because these explanations could counteract outrage and threat distortion. PMID:26381372

  9. Improving Patients Experience in Peadiatric Emergency Waiting Room.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frederic; Siebert, Johan; Wipfli, Rolf; Duret, Cyrille; Gervaix, Alain; Lovis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    When visiting the emergency department, the perception of the time spent in the waiting room before the beginning of the care, may influence patients' experience. Based on models of service evaluation, highlighting the importance of informing people about their waiting process and their place in the queue, we have developed an innovative information screen aiming at improving perception of time by patients. Following an iterative process, a group of experts including computer scientists, ergonomists and caregivers designed a solution adapted to the pediatric context. The solution includes a screen displaying five lanes representing triage levels. Patients are represented by individual avatars, drawn sequentially in the appropriate line. The interface has been designed using gamification principle, aiming at increasing acceptance, lowering learning curve and improving satisfaction. Questionnaire based evaluation results revealed high satisfaction from the 278 respondents even if the informative content was not always completely clear. PMID:27332258

  10. Does L-carnitine improve endothelial function in hemodialysis patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Mohammad Reza; Fahimi, Farnaz; Hajialiasgar, Soheila; Etminan, Abbas; Nazemi, Sarir; Salehi, Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients. These patients are also very prone to L-carnitine deficiency due to kidney disease. In this clinical trial, we investigated the effect of oral L-carnitine on endothelial function of these patients. Materials ans Methods: We studied 31 adult chronic hemodialysis patients in our center and divided them into two groups. The first group (n = 20) received 1500 mg/dialysis interval (every other day) oral L-carnitine. The control group (n = 11) received placebo for one month. Ultrasonographic measurements of flow mediated dilation and carotid intima-media thickness were performed before and after one month of L-carnitine and placebo therapy. Results: This study showed that after one month of L-carnitine or placebo therapy there was no significant improvement in flow mediated dilation (p = 0.80 and p = 0.59, respectively) or decrease in carotid intima-media thickness (p = 0.12 and p = 0.50, respectively). Conclusions: Our study revealed that one month of oral L-carnitine therapy did not improve endothelial function in hemodialysis patients. Long-term studies with large sample size using intravenous form and higher doses of the drug are required to clarify the questionable role of L-carnitine in hemodialysis patients. PMID:23626603

  11. Improved survival after liver transplantation in patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Castel, H; Rao, R V; Picard, M; Lilly, L; Faughnan, M E; Pomier-Layrargues, G

    2010-02-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is present in 10-32% of chronic liver disease patients, carries a poor prognosis and is treatable by liver transplantation (LT). Previous reports have shown high LT mortality in HPS and severe HPS (arterial oxygen (PaO(2)) < or =50 mmHg). We reviewed outcomes in HPS patients who received LT between 2002 and 2008 at two transplant centers supported by a dedicated HPS clinic. We assessed mortality, complications and gas exchange in 21 HPS patients (mean age 51 years, MELD score 14), including 11/21 (52%) with severe HPS and 5/21 (24%) with living donor LT (median follow-up 20.2 months after LT). Overall mortality was 1/21 (5%); mortality in severe HPS was 1/11 (9%). Peritransplant hypoxemic respiratory failure occurred in 5/21 (24%), biliary complications in 8/21 (38%) and bleeding or vascular complications in 6/21 (29%). Oxygenation improved in all 19 patients in whom PaO(2) or SaO(2) were recorded. PaO(2) increased from 52.2 +/- 13.2 to 90.3 +/- 11.5 mmHg (room air) (p < 0.0001) (12 patients); a higher baseline macroaggregated albumin shunt fraction predicted a lower rate of postoperative improvement (p = 0.045) (7 patients). Liver transplant survival in HPS and severe HPS was higher than previously demonstrated. Severity of HPS should not be the basis for transplant refusal. PMID:19775311

  12. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27074696

  13. Caring for LGBTQ patients: Methods for improving physician cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elizabeth W; Nakhai, Maliheh

    2016-05-01

    This article summarizes the components of a curriculum used to teach family medicine residents and faculty about LGBTQ patients' needs in a family medicine residency program in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. This curriculum was developed to provide primary care physicians and physicians-in-training with skills to provide better health care for LGBTQ-identified patients. The curriculum covers topics that range from implicit and explicit bias and appropriate terminology to techniques for crafting patient-centered treatment plans. Additionally, focus is placed on improving the understanding of specific and unique barriers to competent health care encountered by LGBTQ patients. Through facilitated discussion, learners explore the health disparities that disproportionately affect LGBTQ individuals and develop skills that will improve their ability to care for LGBTQ patients. The goal of the curriculum is to teach family medicine faculty and physicians in training how to more effectively communicate with and treat LGBTQ patients in a safe, non-judgmental, and welcoming primary care environment. PMID:27497452

  14. Teen Moms May Ignore Advice for Helping Babies Sleep Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teen Moms May Ignore Advice for Helping Babies Sleep Safely Awareness of SIDS risk didn't spur ... their instincts directly contradicted expert advice and safe sleep recommendations, the study found. The study was published ...

  15. Defining lactation acuity to improve patient safety and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mannel, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    While substantial evidence exists identifying risks factors associated with premature weaning from breastfeeding, there are no previously published definitions of patient acuity in the lactation field. This article defines evidence-based levels of lactation acuity based on maternal and infant characteristics. Patient acuity, matching severity of illness to intensity of care required, is an important determinant of patient safety and outcomes. It is often used as part of a patient classification system to determine staffing needs and acceptable workloads in health care settings. As acuity increases, more resources, including more skilled clinicians, are needed to provide optimal care. Developing an evidence-based definition of lactation acuity can help to standardize terminology, more effectively distribute health care staff resources, encourage research to verify the validity and reliability of lactation acuity, and potentially improve breastfeeding initiation and duration rates. PMID:21527797

  16. Smoking Cessation Related to Improved Patient-Reported Pain Scores Following Spinal Care in Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Behrend, Caleb; Coombs, Andre; Coyne, Ellen; Prasarn, Mark; Rechtine, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We examined rates of smoking cessation and the effect of smoking cessation on pain and disability scores in a geriatric patient population. Methods: Prospectively maintained database records of 6779 patients treated for painful spinal disorders were examined. The mean duration of care was 8 months. Multivariate statistical analysis was performed with independent variables including smoking status, secondary gain status, gender, treatment type, depression, and age. Results: Of the patients seeking care for painful spinal disorders, 8.9% over the age of 55 smoked compared with 23.9% of those under 55 years of age. Rates of smoking cessation did not differ for those older than 55 years (25.1%) and younger patients (26.1%). Current smokers in both age-groups reported greater pain than those who had never smoked in all pain ratings (P < .001). Mean improvement in reported pain over the course of treatment was significantly different in nonsmokers and current smokers in both age-groups (P < .001). Those who quit smoking during the course of care reported greater improvement in pain than those who continued to smoke. The mean improvement in pain ratings was clinically significant in patients in all 3 groups of nonsmokers whereas those who continued to smoke had no clinically significant improvement in reported pain. Conclusion: The results support the need for smoking cessation programs, given a strong association between improved patient-reported pain and smoking cessation. Fewer older patients smoke but they are equally likely to quit. PMID:26246941

  17. Parathyroidectomy Improves Restless Leg Syndrome in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Roberto Sávio Silva; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho Santos; da Silva, Bruno Caldin; Graciolli, Fabiana Giorgeti; Dominguez, Wagner Velasquez; de Menezes Montenegro, Fabio Luiz; Jorgetti, Vanda; Moysés, Rosa Maria Affonso; Elias, Rosilene Motta

    2016-01-01

    Background Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a sleep disorder with high prevalence among patients on hemodialysis. It has been postulated that high phosphate and high parathyroid hormone may be implicated in its pathogenesis. Standard international criteria and face-to-face interview are not always applied. Methods this was an interventional prospective study in which 19 patients (6 men, aged 48±11 years) with severe hyperparathyroidism were evaluated. RLS diagnosis and rating scale were accessed based on the International RLS Study Group pre- and post-parathyroidectomy. Patients also underwent standard polysomnography. Results At baseline, RLS was present in 10 patients (52.6%), and pain was the most reported symptom associated with the diagnosis. Patients with RLS had higher serum phosphate (p = 0.008) that remained independently associated with RLS in a logistic regression model, adjusted for hemoglobin, age and gender (HR = 7.28;CI = 1.14–46.3, p = 0.035). After parathyroidectomy, there was a reduction of serum parathyroid hormone, phosphate, calcium and alkaline phosphatase, and an increase of 25(OH)-vitamin D, and Fetuin-A. Parathyroidectomy alleviated RLS (from 52% to 21%; p = 0.04), which was accompanied by a decrease in severity scale, in association with relief of pain and pruritus. Polysomnography in these patients showed an improvement of sleep parameters as measured by sleep efficiency, sleep latency and percentage of REM sleep. Conclusion RLS is associated with high levels of phosphate in patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism on hemodialysis. Pain is most reported complain in these patients. Parathyroidectomy provided an opportunity to relief RLS. Whether the reduction of serum phosphorus or parathyroid hormone contributed to this improvement merits further investigation. PMID:27196740

  18. Approaches to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shuler, Kimberly M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In patients with schizophrenia, nonadherence to prescribed medications increases the risk of patient relapse and hospitalization, key contributors to the costs associated with treatment. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the impact of nonadherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia as it relates to health care professionals, particularly social workers, and to identify effective team approaches to supporting patients based on studies assessing implementation of assertive community treatment teams. Materials and methods A systematic review of the medical literature was conducted by searching the Scopus database to identify articles associated with treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia. Articles included were published from January 1, 2003, through July 15, 2013, were written in English, and reported findings concerning any and all aspects of nonadherence to prescribed treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Results Of 92 unique articles identified and formally screened, 47 met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. The burden of nonadherence in schizophrenia is significant. Factors with the potential to affect adherence include antipsychotic drug class and formulation, patient-specific factors, and family/social support system. There is inconclusive evidence suggesting superior adherence with an atypical versus typical antipsychotic or with a long-acting injectable versus an oral formulation. Patient-specific factors that contribute to adherence include awareness/denial of illness, cognitive issues, stigma associated with taking medication, substance abuse, access to health care, employment/poverty, and insurance status. Lack of social or family support may adversely affect adherence, necessitating the assistance of health care professionals, such as social workers. Evidence supports the concept that an enhanced team-oriented approach to managing patients with schizophrenia improves adherence and supports

  19. Improving Compliance with Statins in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Quality Improvement Study

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Riaz A.; Camm, Christian F.; Edison, Eric; Browning, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease affecting medium sized arteries. The prevalence, health, and financial impact of the disease has made it a key target for public health and large scale intervention. The statin class of drugs improve morbidity and mortality for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) through polymodal actions. This quality improvement study aimed to determine, and subsequently reduce, the percentage of patients with PAD discharged without statins. According to the Vascular Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and draft National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence guidance, all patients undergoing major vascular procedures should be prescribed a statin. A baseline audit of patients with PAD under the care of the vascular team at our instituted was undertaken for the period Dec 2009–July 2010. Electronic discharge letters (EDLs) were analysed and compliance with statin prescription were recorded. A number of interventions aimed at improving compliance were then enacted and monitored through weekly PDSA cycles. Junior doctor leadership was key to identifying the problem and conceiving, implementing, and measuring changes. A second cycle was run, using similar data collection methods to the first, for the period August-October 2010. In the first cycle, EDLs pertaining to 113 patient admissions, involving 96 patients with PAD, were examined. Statins were not prescribed in 30.1%. In the second cycle, 86 patient admissions, involving 76 patients, were examined. Statins were not prescribed in 24.4%, representing an 18.9% decrease. Poorly compliant sub-groups included patients presenting with embolism or those for elective angioplasty. PMID:26257905

  20. Optimizing hemodialysis practices in Canada could improve patient survival.

    PubMed

    Yeates, Karen E; Mendelssohn, David C; Ethier, Jean; Trpeski, Lilyanna; Na, Jingbo; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Eichleay, Margaret A; Pisoni, Ronald L; Port, Fritz K

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Canadian Organ Replacement Registry (CORR) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) were used to determine whether practice patterns have changed in Canada since the introduction of the Canadian Society of Nephrology (CSN) Guidelines in 1999. DOPPS data were then used to calculate the impact of not meeting the proposed guideline targets and to estimate the potential life years gained if all Canadian hemodialysis patients achieved guideline targets. For dialysis dose and hemoglobin targets, Canadian facility performance has significantly improved over time. The vascular access use patterns show trends toward a worse pattern with increased catheter use. A calculation of the percentage of attributable risk suggests that 49% of deaths could possibly be averted if all patients currently outside the guidelines achieved them over the next five years. This corresponds to a decrease in the annual death rate from 18 to 10.1 per hundred patient years. These data support the need for improved adherence to guidelines. If Canadian caregivers were to optimize practice patterns, patient outcomes could be improved. PMID:17691708

  1. Maternal Report of Advice Received for Infant Care

    PubMed Central

    Bair-Merritt, Megan H.; Colson, Eve R.; Heeren, Timothy C.; Geller, Nicole L.; Corwin, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advice has been associated with increased adherence to recommended infant care practices, and may represent a modifiable factor to promote infant health. METHODS: A stratified, 2-stage, clustered design, with oversampling of black and Hispanic mothers, was used to survey a nationally representative sample of 1031 mothers of infants aged 2 to 6 months. Survey questions assessed advice received from doctors, birth hospital nurses, family, and media regarding immunization, breastfeeding, sleep position, sleep location, and pacifier use. Weighted frequencies of no advice and advice consistent with recommendations were calculated to obtain prevalence estimates. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess factors associated with receipt of recommendation consistent advice. RESULTS: Although doctors were the most prevalent source of reported advice, ∼20% of mothers reported no doctor advice for breastfeeding or sleep position, and more than 50% reported no advice regarding sleep location or pacifier use. Reported advice from nurses was generally similar to doctors. The prevalence of any advice from family or media was 20% to 56% for nearly all care practices, and advice given was often inconsistent with recommendations. The only factors that were consistently associated with receipt of recommendation consistent advice were race/ethnicity and parity; black and Hispanic mothers and first-time mothers were more likely to report recommendation consistent advice. CONCLUSIONS: Mothers commonly report receiving either no advice or recommendation inconsistent advice from each of the 4 sources we studied. By identifying care practices with low prevalence of recommendation consistent advice from potentially important advisors, our findings highlight opportunities for future intervention. PMID:26216322

  2. Improving Door to Needle time in Patients for Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Darren; Umasankar, Udayaraj

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke can result in approximately 2 million brain neurones being damaged for each minute that it is left untreated. Various trials and studies such as the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders (NINDS) trial, the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS), ECASS II, and the Alteplase Thrombolysis for Acute Noninterventional Therapy in Ischemic Stroke (ATLANTIS) study have clearly demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for treatment of acute stroke. Therefore to minimise damage and improve clinical outcome, we need to identify patients who present within 4.5 hours of symptom onset and reduce the time taken to adminster a thrombolytic agent. This time is commonly referred to as the ‘door to needle’ (DTN) time. Our standard, set by the Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is to achieve a median time of scanning and thrombolysis within 55 minutes from the time that the patient enters the hospital. The aim of our QIP was to collect data on what the DTN time was during November 2015, December 2015, and January 2016 and to evaluate how this can be improved after each month. This Quality Improvement Project in the DTN time in patients for thrombolysis has identified areas in the pathway that leads to delays. One major contributing factor is the time for a doctor to come and assess and administer the thrombolytic agent to the patient. Change was implemented by ensuring that the core medical trainee on call is allocated to respond as a priority to all possible thrombolysis calls. This has resulted in a reduction of mean DTN time, from 74 minutes in November to 43 minutes in January. As well as improving patient outcomes, it is proposed that the implementation of change has benefitted the training experience and development of key skills of the core medical trainees. PMID:27559475

  3. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

  4. Continuous Quality Improvement for Patients with Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A; Schall, Marie; Berwick, Donald M; Nolan, Tom; Carver, Penny

    2000-01-01

    Recent evidence has changed traditional approaches to low back pain, suggesting minimal bed rest, highly selective imaging, and early return to normal activities. However, there are wide geographical variations in care, and substantial gaps between practice and evidence. This project sought to merge scientific evidence about back pain and knowledge about behavior change to help organizations improve care for back pain. Participating insurance plans, HMOs, and group practices focused on problems they themselves identified. The year-long program included quarterly meetings, coaching for rapid cycles of change, a menu of potential interventions, and recommendations for monitoring outcomes. Participants interacted through meetings, e-mail, and conference calls. Of the 22 participating organizations, 6 (27%) made major progress. Typical changes were reduced imaging, bed rest, and work loss, and increased patient education and satisfaction. Specific examples were a 30% decrease in plain x-rays, a 100% increase in use of patient education materials, and an 81% drop in prescribed bed rest. Despite the complexity of care for back pain, rapid improvements appear feasible. Several organizations had major improvements, and most experienced at least modest improvements. Key elements of successful programs included focus on a small number of clinical goals, frequent measurement of outcomes among small samples of patients, vigilance in maintaining gains; involvement of office staffs as well as physicians, and changes in standard protocols for imaging, physical therapy, and referral. PMID:11029679

  5. Traditional Japanese Medicine Daikenchuto Improves Functional Constipation in Poststroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Takehiro; Takayama, Shin; Tobita, Muneshige; Ishida, Shuichi; Katayose, Dai; Shinkawa, Mitsutoshi; Oikawa, Takashi; Aonuma, Takanori; Kaneko, Soichiro; Tanaka, Junichi; Kanemura, Seiki; Iwasaki, Koh; Ishii, Tadashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    Poststroke patients with functional constipation, assessed by the Rome III criteria, from 6 hospitals were recruited in a study on the effects of the traditional Japanese medicine Daikenchuto (DKT) on constipation. Thirty-four patients (17 men and 17 women; mean age: 78.1 ± 11.6 years) were randomly assigned to 2 groups; all patients received conventional therapy for constipation, and patients in the DKT group received 15 g/day of DKT for 4 weeks. Constipation scoring system (CSS) points and the gas volume score (GVS) (the measure of the intestinal gas volume calculated from plain abdominal radiographs) were recorded before and after a 4-week observation period. The total score on the CSS improved significantly in the DKT group compared to the control (P < 0.01). In addition, scores for some CSS subcategories (frequency of bowel movements, feeling of incomplete evacuation, and need for enema/disimpaction) significantly improved in the DKT group (P < 0.01, P = 0.049, and P = 0.03, resp.). The GVS was also significantly reduced in the DKT group compared to the control (P = 0.03). DKT in addition to conventional therapy is effective in treating functional constipation in poststroke patients. This study was a randomized controlled trial and was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (no. UMIN000007393). PMID:25089144

  6. Research and Advice Giving: A Functional View of Evidence-Informed Policy Advice in a Canadian Ministry of Health

    PubMed Central

    Lomas, Jonathan; Brown, Adalsteinn D

    2009-01-01

    Context: As evidence-based medicine grows in influence and scope, its applicability to health policy prompts two questions: Can the principles and, more specifically, the tools used to bring research into the clinical world apply to civil servants offering advice to politicians? If not, what approach should the evidence-oriented health policy organization take to improve the use of research? Methods: This article reviews evidence-based medicine and models of research use in policy. Then it reports the results of interviews with civil servants in the Ontario Ministry of Health, which recently adopted a stewardship rather than an operational role, incorporating many evidence-oriented strategies. The interviews focused on functional roles for research-based evidence in policy advice. Findings: The clinical context and tools for evidence-based medicine can rarely be generalized to policy. Most current models of research use offer lessons to researchers wishing to apply their work to policy but little help for civil servants wishing to become more evidence oriented. The interviews revealed functional roles for research in setting agendas (noting upcoming issues and screening interest groups’ claims), developing new policies (reducing uncertainty, helping speak truth to power, and preventing repetition and duplication), and monitoring or modifying existing policies (continuously improving programs and creating a culture of inquiry). Each area requires different tools to help filter the push of evidence from researchers and set agendas, to facilitate the urgent pull on relevant research by civil servants developing new policy, and to support ongoing linkage and exchange between civil servants and researchers for monitoring and modifying existing policy. Conclusions: A functional framework for evidence-informed policy advice is useful for distinguishing the activity from evidence-based medicine and “auditing” the balance of efforts across the different functional

  7. Content and Style of Advice in Iran and Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavakoli, Mahin

    2013-01-01

    The content and nature of nonprofessional advice in Iran, a hierarchical and collectivist culture, was compared to the same type of advice in Canada, an egalitarian and individualist culture. A researcher developed a questionnaire that consisted of 10 letters, each describing a writer's problem and asking for advice. The responses of…

  8. Stepwise Advice Negotiation in Writing Center Peer Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Innhwa

    2014-01-01

    While the delivery and reception of advice is a practice integral to a wide range of settings, little attention has been given to the detailed practices of advice resistance and how it leads to advice negotiation. Based on 7 hours of videotaped tutoring interactions among 6 tutors and 11 tutees, this conversation analytic study examines the…

  9. 32 CFR 776.10 - Informal ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Informal ethics advice. 776.10 Section 776.10... § 776.10 Informal ethics advice. (a) Advisors. Covered attorneys may seek informal ethics advice either... of Director, JA Division, HQMC; and (5) Head, Standards of Conduct/Government Ethics...

  10. 32 CFR 776.10 - Informal ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Informal ethics advice. 776.10 Section 776.10... § 776.10 Informal ethics advice. (a) Advisors. Covered attorneys may seek informal ethics advice either... of Director, JA Division, HQMC; and (5) Head, Standards of Conduct/Government Ethics...

  11. 32 CFR 776.10 - Informal ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Informal ethics advice. 776.10 Section 776.10... § 776.10 Informal ethics advice. (a) Advisors. Covered attorneys may seek informal ethics advice either... of Director, JA Division, HQMC; and (5) Head, Standards of Conduct/Government Ethics...

  12. 32 CFR 776.10 - Informal ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Informal ethics advice. 776.10 Section 776.10... § 776.10 Informal ethics advice. (a) Advisors. Covered attorneys may seek informal ethics advice either... of Director, JA Division, HQMC; and (5) Head, Standards of Conduct/Government Ethics...

  13. 32 CFR 776.10 - Informal ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Informal ethics advice. 776.10 Section 776.10... § 776.10 Informal ethics advice. (a) Advisors. Covered attorneys may seek informal ethics advice either... of Director, JA Division, HQMC; and (5) Head, Standards of Conduct/Government Ethics...

  14. Talk to each other to improve patient care, reduce readmissions.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Lack of communication prevents clinicians from delivering coordinated care, which often results in adverse effects on the patient and the hospital's bottom line. Healthcare providers need to move from a fragmented system to an integrated one where entities across the continuum communicate and work together to improve patient care. Case managers should develop strong working relationships with post-acute providers, case managers at community organizations, and their counterparts at health plans. Multidisciplinary rounds are essential for breaking down organizational silos and ensuring that all clinicians are on the same page. PMID:26688997

  15. A Practical Approach to Improving Pain Control in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Malcolm L.; Barnett, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    Despite a wealth of recent articles, many patients with cancer pain continue to suffer needlessly. The satisfactory treatment of cancer pain requires a variety of practical management strategies. Practicing physicians need a wider understanding of both the basic principles of analgesic therapy and the pharmacologic features of analgesics. Certain analgesics are best not used in cancer care. The use of pharmacologic adjuncts may lessen overall narcotic requirements and side effects. The appropriate use of alternative therapies can dramatically improve the quality of patients' overall survival. PMID:2884781

  16. Does hands-free drinking improve patient hydration?

    PubMed

    Sutton, Debbie; Stroud, Mike

    Hospital patients are at risk of dehydration, especially if they cannot drink unaided due to physical or mental incapacity. Dehydration may lead to complications and result in costly interventions. A sports-style bottle has been developed into a hands-free drinking system by fitting a drinking tube into the screw top. We trialled the bottle on acute wards and in the community to test claims that it improves hydration and reduces infection risks and length of hospital stays. The Hydrant is useful and even transformative for some patients. However, it is less suitable for older people, especially those in rehabilitation programmes. PMID:23980460

  17. Following celebrities’ medical advice: meta-narrative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Objective To synthesise what is known about how celebrities influence people’s decisions on health. Design Meta-narrative analysis of economics, marketing, psychology, and sociology literatures. Data sources Systematic searches of electronic databases: BusinessSource Complete (1886-), Communication & Mass Media Complete (1915-), Humanities Abstracts (1984-), ProQuest Political Science (1985-), PsycINFO (1806-), PubMed (1966-), and Sociology Abstracts (1952-). Inclusion criteria Studies discussing mechanisms of celebrities’ influence on people in any context. Results Economics literature shows that celebrity endorsements act as signals of credibility that differentiate products or ideas from competitors and can catalyse herd behaviour. Marketing studies show that celebrities transfer their desirable attributes to products and use their success to boost their perceived credibility. Psychology shows that people are classically conditioned to react positively to the advice of celebrities, experience cognitive dissonance if they do not, and are influenced by congruencies with their self conceptions. Sociology helps explain the spread of celebrity medical advice as a contagion that diffuses through social networks and people’s desire to acquire celebrities’ social capital. Conclusions The influence of celebrity status is a deeply rooted process that can be harnessed for good or abused for harm. A better understanding of celebrity can empower health professionals to take this phenomenon seriously and use patient encounters to educate the public about sources of health information and their trustworthiness. Public health authorities can use these insights to implement regulations and restrictions on celebrity endorsements and design counter marketing initiatives—perhaps even partnering with celebrities—to discredit bogus medical advice while promoting evidence based practices.

  18. Improving self-management for patients with long-term conditions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Nicola J

    An increasing number of people are living with long-term conditions. These conditions cannot be cured, but can be managed through education, health promotion, medication, therapy and self-management. Self-management involves people taking responsibility for their own health and wellbeing, as well as learning to manage any long-term illnesses. Nurses play a pivotal role in providing advice, guidance, education and support to people living with long-term conditions. Self-management is important as it not only benefits the patient, but also provides wider opportunities for community and specialist nurses to use and develop their clinical and interpersonal skills. PMID:20306844

  19. Triheptanoin improves brain energy metabolism in patients with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Adanyeguh, Isaac Mawusi; Rinaldi, Daisy; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Caillet, Samantha; Valabregue, Romain; Durr, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Based on our previous work in Huntington disease (HD) showing improved energy metabolism in muscle by providing substrates to the Krebs cycle, we wished to obtain a proof-of-concept of the therapeutic benefit of triheptanoin using a functional biomarker of brain energy metabolism validated in HD. Methods: We performed an open-label study using 31P brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure the levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) before (rest), during (activation), and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. We performed 31P brain MRS in 10 patients at an early stage of HD and 13 controls. Patients with HD were then treated for 1 month with triheptanoin after which they returned for follow-up including 31P brain MRS scan. Results: At baseline, we confirmed an increase in Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation in controls—reflecting increased adenosine triphosphate synthesis—followed by a return to baseline levels during recovery (p = 0.013). In patients with HD, we validated the existence of an abnormal brain energy profile as previously reported. After 1 month, this profile remained abnormal in patients with HD who did not receive treatment. Conversely, the MRS profile was improved in patients with HD treated with triheptanoin for 1 month with the restoration of an increased Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation (p = 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests that triheptanoin is able to correct the bioenergetic profile in the brain of patients with HD at an early stage of the disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that, for patients with HD, treatment with triheptanoin for 1 month restores an increased MRS Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation. PMID:25568297

  20. Improving Patient Understanding of Prescription Drug Label Instructions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Terry C.; Federman, Alex D.; Bass, Pat F.; Jackson, Robert H.; Middlebrooks, Mark; Parker, Ruth M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Patient misunderstanding of instructions on prescription drug labels is common and a likely cause of medication error and less effective treatment. Objective To test whether the use of more explicit language to describe dose and frequency of use for prescribed drugs could improve comprehension, especially among patients with limited literacy. Design Cross-sectional study using in-person, structured interviews. Patients Three hundred and fifty-nine adults waiting for an appointment in two hospital-based primary care clinics and one federally qualified health center in Shreveport, Louisiana; Chicago, Illinois; and New York, New York, respectively. Measurement Correct understanding of each of ten label instructions as determined by a blinded panel review of patients’ verbatim responses. Results Patient understanding of prescription label instructions ranged from 53% for the least understood to 89% for the most commonly understood label. Patients were significantly more likely to understand instructions with explicit times periods (i.e., morning) or precise times of day compared to instructions stating times per day (i.e., twice) or hourly intervals (89%, 77%, 61%, and 53%, respectively,  < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, dosage instructions with specific times or time periods were significantly more likely to be understood compared to instructions stating times per day (time periods — adjusted relative risk ratio (ARR) 0.42, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.34–0.52; specific times — ARR 0.60, 95% CI 0.49–0.74). Low and marginal literacy remained statistically significant independent predictors of misinterpreting instructions (low - ARR 2.70, 95% CI 1.81–4.03; marginal -ARR 1.66, 95% CI 1.18–2.32). Conclusions Use of precise wording on prescription drug label instructions can improve patient comprehension. However, patients with limited literacy were more likely to misinterpret instructions despite use of more explicit language. PMID

  1. Performance indicators--a quest to improve patient care.

    PubMed

    Morris, Clare; Pritchard, Barbara

    Nurses working in the field of tissue viability constantly strive to improve pressure ulcer prevention and management in their clinical areas, knowing that pressure ulcers cause pain and suffering to patients while costing the NHS millions of pounds to treat. The aim of this initiative was for the tissue viability team to develop an audit tool based on recently devised performance indicators. The purpose of the audit was to provide the mechanism for reviewing the quality of everyday care. The tool utilizes the 'traffic light' system to categorize the results. The initiative has improved clinical outcomes for patients and increased the awareness, education, knowledge and confidence of nurses in pressure ulcer prevention and management across a combined primary and secondary care Trust. PMID:18073696

  2. Improving Patient Safety in Anesthesia: A Success Story?

    SciTech Connect

    Botney, Richard

    2008-05-01

    Anesthesia is necessary for surgery; however, it does not deliver any direct therapeutic benefit. The risks of anesthesia must therefore be as low as possible. Anesthesiology has been identified as a leader in improving patient safety. Anesthetic mortality has decreased, and in healthy patients can be as low as 1:250,000. Trends in anesthetic morbidity have not been as well defined, but it appears that the risk of injury is decreasing. Studies of error during anesthesia and Closed Claims studies have identified sources of risk and methods to reduce the risks associated with anesthesia. These include changes in technology, such as anesthetic delivery systems and monitors, the application of human factors, the use of simulation, and the establishment of reporting systems. A review of the important events in the past 50 years illustrates the many steps that have contributed to the improvements in anesthesia safety.

  3. [Geriatric fracture centers. Improved patient care and economic benefits].

    PubMed

    Kates, S L

    2016-01-01

    The world's population is aging resulting in changes in the way we manage geriatric care. Furthermore, this population has a considerable risk of fragility fractures, most notably hip fractures. Hip fractures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and have large economic consequences. It is due to these factors that the concept of an elderly trauma center was developed. These trauma centers utilize the expertise in orthopedic and geriatric disciplines to provide coordinated care to the elderly hip fracture patient. As a result, studies have demonstrated improvements in clinical outcomes within the hospital stay, a reduction in iatrogenic complications, and improvements in 1-year mortality rates compared to the usual care given at a similar facility. Furthermore, economic models have demonstrated that there is a role for regionalized hip fracture centers that can be both profitable and provide more efficient care to these patients. PMID:26658903

  4. Improving illiterate patients understanding and adherence to discharge medications

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Matthew; Syed, Faizan; Rashid, Amjid; Fayyaz, Umer

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adherence to a hospital discharge medication regime is crucial for successful treatment and to avoid increasing rates of drug resistance. A patient's success in adhering to their medication regime is dependent on many social, cultural, economic, illness and therapy-related factors, and these are often more pronounced in the developing world. Anecdotal evidence in Services Hospital, Lahore (Pakistan) suggested that the relatively high levels of illiteracy in the patient population was a major factor in poor adherence. Baseline measurement revealed that 48% of all the hospital's patients were illiterate with just 5%–12% of illiterate patients being able to interpret their handwritten discharge prescription after leaving hospital. Unsurprisingly follow-up clinics reported very poor adherence. This quality improvement project intervened by designing a new discharge prescription proforma which used pictures and symbols rather than words to convey the necessary information. Repeated surveys demonstrated large relative increases in comprehension of the new proformas amongst illiterate patients with between 23%–35% of illiterate patients understanding the new proformas. PMID:26734151

  5. Improving pain management in orthopedic surgical patients with opioid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kathleen; Shimoda, Rosanne; Gibbons, Gregory

    2014-09-01

    As increasing numbers of the baby boomer generation seek health care, nursing staff educated in the evidence-based practice process can make significant contributions to successful patient outcomes. Health care providers who anticipate the approaching perfect storm in health care and thoughtfully plan, collaborate, and incorporate evidence-based practice methods will be well prepared to improve the quality of care, realize cost savings, and meet the challenges ahead. PMID:25155539

  6. Music as intervention: a notable endeavor to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    White, J M

    2001-03-01

    Music interventions have been used in medicine and nursing throughout history. Music therapy is an easy-to-administer, relatively inexpensive, noninvasive intervention that has been used to reduce heart rate, blood pressure, myocardial oxygen consumption, gastrointestinal function, anxiety, and pain. A review of theoretic and empirical base for the use of music therapy to improve patient outcomes in a variety of areas of clinical practice is presented. Implications for practice and future research are suggested. PMID:11342404

  7. Reconstructive Osteotomy for Ankle Malunion Improves Patient Satisfaction and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tohyama, Masahiko; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Sadahiko; Waseda, Akeo

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of chronic symptoms caused by a malunion is a difficult problem in orthopedic surgery. We encountered a case of ankle malunion at our hospital about 1 year after the first operation. The patient had been unable to walk with weight-bearing but regained the ability to walk after reconstructive osteotomy of the fibula. Functional scores for the foot and ankle were significantly improved after intervention. Reconstructive osteotomy appears to represent a good option for ankle malunion. PMID:26064743

  8. Real time patient safety audits: improving safety every day

    PubMed Central

    Ursprung, R; Gray, J; Edwards, W; Horbar, J; Nickerson, J; Plsek, P; Shiono, P; Suresh, G; Goldmann, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Timely error detection including feedback to clinical staff is a prerequisite for focused improvement in patient safety. Real time auditing, the efficacy of which has been repeatedly demonstrated in industry, has not been used previously to evaluate patient safety. Methods successful at improving quality and safety in industry may provide avenues for improvement in patient safety. Objective: Pilot study to determine the feasibility and utility of real time safety auditing during routine clinical work in an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: A 36 item patient safety checklist was developed via a modified Delphi technique. The checklist focused on errors associated with delays in care, equipment failure, diagnostic studies, information transfer and non-compliance with hospital policy. Safety audits were performed using the checklist during and after morning work rounds thrice weekly during the 5 week study period from January to March 2003. Results: A total of 338 errors were detected; 27 (75%) of the 36 items on the checklist detected ⩾1 error. Diverse error types were found including unlabeled medication at the bedside (n = 31), ID band missing or in an inappropriate location (n = 70), inappropriate pulse oximeter alarm setting (n = 22), and delay in communication/information transfer that led to a delay in appropriate care (n = 4). Conclusions: Real time safety audits performed during routine work can detect a broad range of errors. Significant safety problems were detected promptly, leading to rapid changes in policy and practice. Staff acceptance was facilitated by fostering a blame free "culture of patient safety" involving clinical personnel in detection of remediable gaps in performance, and limiting the burden of data collection. PMID:16076794

  9. Use of process mapping in service improvement.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joanna; Simmonds, Lorraine

    This article, the last of our three-part series on change management tools, analyses how process mapping can be used to show how processes are currently carried out and identify any changes that may improve the patient experience. The tool takes into account patient opinions so staff are able to see the pathway from patients' perspectives. It offers advice on how to write up the results and how they can be analysed to identify where changes can be made. PMID:23741910

  10. Assessment of producers' response to Salmonella biosecurity issues and uptake of advice on laying hen farms in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Gosling, R J; Martelli, F; Wintrip, A; Sayers, A R; Wheeler, K; Davies, R H

    2014-01-01

    High standards of biosecurity are known to reduce the risk of disease outbreaks; however, uptake of advice and implementation of biosecurity measures are dependent on many factors. This study assessed the uptake of targeted biosecurity advice by 60 laying hen farms provided during biosecurity audit visits. Advice was provided as bullet point cards focusing on specific areas identified as benefitting from improvement. These covered site entrance, site tidiness, vaccination, boot hygiene, hand hygiene, house tidiness, rodent control, fly control, red mite control and cleaning and disinfection between flocks. Background knowledge of Salmonella and biosecurity and farmers' willingness and intent to implement additional measures were assessed. About 50% of the principal decision-makers had basic background knowledge of Salmonella, with 22% considered well informed; almost all agreed that biosecurity could impact on Salmonella control and many appeared willing to implement additional biosecurity measures. Sixty-three per cent of study farms were categorised using the Defra Farmer Segmentation Model as Modern Family Businesses (MFBs), with 7-11% of farms being categorised as Custodian, Lifestyle Choice, Pragmatist or Challenged Enterprise; however, categorisation, did not determine uptake of advice. The most frequently used advice cards were boot hygiene, red mite control, hand hygiene, site entrance and cleaning and disinfection; uptake of advice ranged from 54 to 80% depending on the advice card. Uptake of advice by the farmers was encouraging, especially considering it was being provided by people other than their usual source of biosecurity information. Those who did not implement the recommended measures cited cost, difficulty of enforcement and practicality as the main reasons. However, the positive uptake of advice and implementation of recommended measures by many farmers demonstrates that targeted advice, discussed face to face with farmers, on a small number of

  11. Improving patient flow in pre-operative assessment

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Cameron; Gent, Anne; Kirkland, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Annual patient attendances at a pre-operative assessment department increased by 24.8% from 5659 in 2009, to 7062 in 2012. The unit was staffed by administrative staff, nurses, and health care assistants (HCA). Medical review was accessed via on call medical staff, or notes were sent to anaesthetists for further review. With rising demand, patient waits increased. The average lead time for a patient (time from entering the department to leaving) was 79 minutes. 9.3% of patients attended within two weeks of their scheduled surgery date. 10% of patients were asked to return on a later day, as there was not sufficient capacity to undertake their assessment. There were nine routes of referral in to the department. Patients moved between different clinic rooms and the waiting area several times. Work patterns were uneven, as many attendances were from out-patient clinics which meant peak attendance times were linked to clinic times. There were substantial differences in the approaches of different nurses, making the HCA role difficult. Patients reported dissatisfaction with waits. Using a Lean quality improvement process with rapid PDSA cycles, the service changed to one in which patients were placed in a room, and remained there for the duration of their assessment. Standard work was developed for HCWs and nurses. Rooms were standardised using 5S processes, and set up improved to reduce time spent looking for supplies. A co-ordinator role was introduced using existing staff to monitor flow and to organise the required medical assessments and ECGs. Timing of booked appointments were altered to take account of clinic times. Routes in to the department were reduced from nine to one. Ten months after the work began, the average lead time had reduced to 59 minutes. The proportion of people attending within two weeks of their surgery decreased from 9.3% to 5.3%. Referrals for an anaesthetic opinion decreased from 30% to 20%, and in the month reviewed no one had to return to

  12. Improving patient flow in pre-operative assessment.

    PubMed

    Stark, Cameron; Gent, Anne; Kirkland, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Annual patient attendances at a pre-operative assessment department increased by 24.8% from 5659 in 2009, to 7062 in 2012. The unit was staffed by administrative staff, nurses, and health care assistants (HCA). Medical review was accessed via on call medical staff, or notes were sent to anaesthetists for further review. With rising demand, patient waits increased. The average lead time for a patient (time from entering the department to leaving) was 79 minutes. 9.3% of patients attended within two weeks of their scheduled surgery date. 10% of patients were asked to return on a later day, as there was not sufficient capacity to undertake their assessment. There were nine routes of referral in to the department. Patients moved between different clinic rooms and the waiting area several times. Work patterns were uneven, as many attendances were from out-patient clinics which meant peak attendance times were linked to clinic times. There were substantial differences in the approaches of different nurses, making the HCA role difficult. Patients reported dissatisfaction with waits. Using a Lean quality improvement process with rapid PDSA cycles, the service changed to one in which patients were placed in a room, and remained there for the duration of their assessment. Standard work was developed for HCWs and nurses. Rooms were standardised using 5S processes, and set up improved to reduce time spent looking for supplies. A co-ordinator role was introduced using existing staff to monitor flow and to organise the required medical assessments and ECGs. Timing of booked appointments were altered to take account of clinic times. Routes in to the department were reduced from nine to one. Ten months after the work began, the average lead time had reduced to 59 minutes. The proportion of people attending within two weeks of their surgery decreased from 9.3% to 5.3%. Referrals for an anaesthetic opinion decreased from 30% to 20%, and in the month reviewed no one had to return to

  13. Predicting disease progression from short biomarker series using expert advice algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, Kai; Hirata, Yoshito; Tomioka, Ryota; Kashima, Hisashi; Yamanishi, Kenji; Hayashi, Norihiro; Egawa, Shin; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2015-05-01

    Well-trained clinicians may be able to provide diagnosis and prognosis from very short biomarker series using information and experience gained from previous patients. Although mathematical methods can potentially help clinicians to predict the progression of diseases, there is no method so far that estimates the patient state from very short time-series of a biomarker for making diagnosis and/or prognosis by employing the information of previous patients. Here, we propose a mathematical framework for integrating other patients' datasets to infer and predict the state of the disease in the current patient based on their short history. We extend a machine-learning framework of ``prediction with expert advice'' to deal with unstable dynamics. We construct this mathematical framework by combining expert advice with a mathematical model of prostate cancer. Our model predicted well the individual biomarker series of patients with prostate cancer that are used as clinical samples.

  14. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Amberg, Norbert; Woltmann, Rainer; Walther, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various health-care service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia has implemented a networked care concept in the German federal state of Lower Saxony that integrates various stakeholders of the health care system. In this initiative, office-based psychiatrists, specialized nursing staff, psychologists, social workers, hospitals, psychiatric institutional outpatient’s departments, and other community-based mental health services work together in an interdisciplinary approach. Much emphasis is placed on psychoeducation. Additional efforts cover socio-therapy, visiting care, and family support. During the period from October 2010 (start of the initiative) to December 2012, first experiences and results of quality indicators were collected of 713 registered patients and summarized in a quality monitoring report. In addition, standardized patient interviews were conducted, and duration of hospital days was recorded in 2013. By the end of 2012, patients had been enrolled for an average of 18.7 months. The overall patient satisfaction measured in a patient survey in June 2013 was high and the duration of hospital days measured in a pre–post analysis in July 2013 was reduced by 44%. Two years earlier than planned, the insurance fund will continue the successfully implemented Integrated Care Initiative and adopt it in the regular care setting. This initiative can serve as a learning case for how to set up and measure integrated care systems that may improve outcomes for patients suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:26779043

  15. Donepezil Improved Cognitive Deficits in a Patient With Neurosyphilis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Shan; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Chieh-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients with neurosyphilis present dementia with a progressive course and psychiatric symptoms such as depression, mania, and psychosis. Despite prompt and proper antibiotic treatment, the recovery is often incomplete, especially when tissue damage has occurred. We reported a patient with persisted cognitive decline associated with neurosyphilis that improved substantially after donepezil therapy. A 43-year-old man manifested significant psychiatric symptoms such as mania, psychosis, and cognitive impairment due to neurosyphilis. Subsequently, the patient was treated with antipsychotics and donepezil concurrent with an adequate antibiotic treatment for neurosyphilis. During the 1-year follow-up, his rapid plasma reagin titer approached from 1:256 to 1:64. His Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores improved from 12 to 25 and 42.3 to 6.3, respectively, after a 6-month donepezil treatment. Donepezil was discontinued. Three months later, worsening of cognitive impairment (MMSE score, 23) was noted. After donepezil was started again for 3 months, his MMSE score improved to 26. Persistent cognitive impairment is commonly associated with neurosyphilis despite adequate penicillin treatment. Treatment of the cognitive impairment is important but difficult. Cholinergic pathways are considered as involving in the cognitive deficit induced by neurosyphilis and donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, which may be useful for the improvement of cognition. In this case report, we described for the first time the successful use of donepezil in treating cognitive impairment associated with neurosyphilis. The role of cholinesterase inhibitors in the treatment of cognitive impairments caused by neurosyphilis needs further studies. PMID:26166240

  16. Evaluating and improving patient-specific QA for IMRT delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guanghua

    2009-12-01

    Modern radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and newly-emerging volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) aim to deliver highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume while sparing nearby critical organs as much as possible with the complex motion of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves. Pre-treatment patient specific quality assurance (QA) has become an essential part of IMRT in making sure the delivered dose distributions agree with the planned ones. This dissertation evaluates the performance of current patient-specific QA process and proposes solutions to improve its sensitivity, accuracy and efficiency. In step and shoot IMRT, the study on the sensitivity of patient-specific QA to minor MLC errors reveals tighter criterion such as 2%/2mm must be employed to detect systematic MLC positioning errors of 2 mm. However, such criterion results in low average passing rate which leads to excessive false alarms, mainly due to inadequate treatment planning system (TPS) beam modeling on beam penumbra. An analytical deconvolution approach is proposed to recover true photon beam profiles to obtain a true beam model which significantly improves agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions. Thus a tighter criterion could be employed to enhance the sensitivity of patient-specific QA to minor errors in the delivery system. Measurement based patient-specific IMRT QA is a time-consuming process. A fast and accurate independent planar dose calculation algorithm is proposed to replace measurement based QA. The algorithm analytically models photons coming out from the accelerator and computes dose distribution from first principles. Accuracy of the algorithm is validated against 2D diode array measurements. The algorithm is found to be fast and accurate enough to replace time consuming measurement based QA. Patient-specific QA for VMAT differs significantly from step and shoot IMRT due to the increased use of dynamic

  17. Model-based advice for mechanical ventilation: From research (INVENT) to product (Beacon Caresystem).

    PubMed

    Rees, Stephen E; Karbing, Dan S

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the structure and functionality of a physiological model-based system for providing advice on the settings of mechanical ventilation. Use of the system is presented with examples of patients on support and control modes of mechanical ventilation. PMID:26737495

  18. Patient-Reported Use of Personalized Video Recordings to Improve Neurosurgical Patient-Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing patients with a video recording of their visit with a medical professional is a common-sense method for improving patient-provider communication. Objective: To describe the patient and provider experiences to video recording clinical medical encounters and providing the patient with a copy of the video for informational purposes. Methods: Since 2009, over 2,800 patients of eight different neurosurgeons chose to be video recorded during their encounter with the doctor and were provided access to the recording to watch over again as a way to recall what the doctor had said. The video system was set up as a handheld video camera, and video files were downloaded and made accessible to patients via a secure Internet patient portal. Between 2012 and 2014, patients who participated were surveyed regarding their use of the video and what was recorded on the video. The experience of the providers from a clinical and medico-legal standpoint was also reviewed. Results: Three hundred and thirty-three responses to the survey were received (39.2% response rate). More than half of patients (N=333; 56.2%) watched their video more than once, and over two-thirds (N=333; 68.6%) shared their video with a family member, friend, or another physician. Patients self-reported improved memory after watching their videos (N=299; 73.6% could remember more) and 50.2% responded that having the video made them feel more “at ease” with their medical problem (N=299). Overall, 88.0% of respondents indicated that their video had been helpful to them, and 98.5% would recommend having future visits video recorded. No patient made a comment that the video was intrusive or had prevented them from being open with their doctor. Finally, in the high-risk specialty of neurosurgery, none of the 2,807 patients who have been recorded since 2009 have used a video in a medico-legal action. Conclusions: Patient responses to the recording system and having a copy of their video

  19. [Patient education and treatment documentation - Law to Improve the Rights of Patients].

    PubMed

    Meltendorf, G; Meltendorf, C

    2013-07-01

    The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the (German) Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should themselves acquaint with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation. PMID:23824480

  20. [Patient education and treatment documentation - law to improve the rights of patients].

    PubMed

    Meltendorf, Gerhard; Meltendorf, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the German Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should acquaint themselves with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation. PMID:23888409

  1. Rare disease policies to improve care for patients in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, Charlotte; Aymé, Ségolène

    2015-10-01

    Rare diseases are those with a particularly low prevalence; in Europe, diseases are considered to be rare when they affect not more than 5 in 10000 persons in the European Union. The specificities of rare diseases make the area a veritable public health challenge: the limited number of patients and scarcity of knowledge and expertise single rare diseases out as a distinctive domain of high European added-value. The Orphan Medicinal Product Regulation of 1999 was the first European legislative text concerning rare diseases, followed by many initiatives, including recommendations by the Council of Ministers of the European Union in 2009. These initiatives contributed to the development of rare diseases policies at European and national level aimed at improving care for patients with rare diseases. A review of the political framework at European level and in European countries is provided to demonstrate how legislation has created a dynamic that is progressively improving care for patients with rare diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)". PMID:25725454

  2. Improving the likelihood of neurology patients being examined using patient feedback

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, Jason Philip; Ilinca, Andreea; Lindgren, Arne; Puschmann, Andreas; Hbahbih, Majed; A. Siddiqui, Khurram; de Silva, Rajith; Jones, Matthew; Butterworth, Richard; willmot, mark; Hayton, Tom; Lunn, Michael; Nicholl, David

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to establish whether recall of elements of the neurological examination can be improved by use of a simple patient assessment score. In a previous study we demonstrated that in-patients referred to neurology at two United Kingdom (UK) hospitals were not fully examined prior to referral; we therefore designed a larger quality improvement report with 80% power to detect a 10% increase in tendon hammer or ophthalmoscope use following an educational intervention. In-patients referred to neurology over a four month period (in hospitals in the UK (10), Jordan (1), Sweden (2), and the United Arab Emirates (1)) were asked whether they recalled being examined with a tendon hammer (T), ophthalmoscope (O), and stethoscope (S) since admission. The results were disseminated to local medical teams using various techniques (including Grand Round presentations, email, posters, discounted equipment). Data were then collected for a further four month period post-intervention. Pre-intervention and post-intervention data were available for 11 centres with 407 & 391 patients in each arm respectively. Median age of patients was 51 (range 13-100) and 49 (range 16-95) years respectively, with 44.72% and 44.76% being male in each group. 264 patients (64.86%) recalled being examined with a tendon hammer in the pre-intervention arm, which significantly improved to 298 (76.21%) (p<0.001). Only 119 patients (29.24%) recollected examination with an ophthalmoscope pre-intervention, which significantly improved to 149 (38.11%)(p=0.009). The majority of patients (321 (78.87%)) pre-intervention recalled examination with a stethoscope, which significantly improved to 330 (84.4%) to a lesser extent (p=0.045). Results indicate that most patients are not fully examined prior to neurology referral yet a simple assessment score and educational intervention can improve recall of elements of the neurological examination and thus the likelihood of patients being examined neurologically. This is the

  3. The remittance advice, auditing for compliance.

    PubMed

    Mesaros, F

    2000-01-01

    Resubmitting claims can be costly in terms of both time and lost revenue. The remittance advice and return to provider reports received by laboratories from carriers/intermediaries are an excellent source for investigating compliance matters. The Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General, has estimated that laboratories account for 4.38% of the total improper payments paid by the Medicare program for fiscal year 1998 (1). This article will illustrate how the information in these reports can be used to assist your laboratory in capturing the reimbursement it is entitled to. PMID:11793526

  4. Computerized systems to provide materials selection advice

    SciTech Connect

    Krisher, A.S.

    1996-07-01

    The rapid advance of computer science has increased the ability to store and retrieve information. These new capabilities are beginning to be applied to the problem of providing sound advice to non-specialist engineers who make materials selection decisions. This paper presents an overview of the large scale systems which exist in finished or near finished form and are (or may soon be) available for use by the public. The paper focuses on systems which transfer knowledge taking into account the many qualifications which enter into the reasoning processes of materials/corrosion specialists. The paper discusses both the strengths and limitations of each system.

  5. Advice on Writing a Scientific Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2006-04-01

    What makes one author a good communicator and another a poor one? What turns out one manuscript a swift editorial task, and another an editorial nightmare? Based on direct experience from the manuscripts of the lectures and papers presented during this school, advice is given on what to do and on what to avoid when writing a scientific paper. Some feedback recommendation is also provided on how to prepare manuscripts, handle copyright and permissions to reproduce, how to anticipate plagiarism, how to deal with editors and referees, and how to avoid common errors. A few illustrations of English grammar and style for the foreign author are given.

  6. A Narrative of Fear: Advice to Mothers.

    PubMed

    Åström, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Taking present-day research into so-called new momism and intense mothering as a starting point, this article argues that the current mothering discourse, rather than articulating a new phenomenon, perpetuates a regulative discourse developed in the nineteenth century, in advice books written by medical doctors for pregnant women and new mothers. Both the Victorian and the present-day texts play on feelings of guilt and inadequacy in order to control the actions and emotions of mothers, although the threatened outcome differs: present-day mothers are warned that their children may become obese or develop neuropsychological disorders, whereas Victorian mothers are warned that their children might die. PMID:26095843

  7. Improving patient flow at a family health clinic.

    PubMed

    Bard, Jonathan F; Shu, Zhichao; Morrice, Douglas J; Wang, Dongyang Ester; Poursani, Ramin; Leykum, Luci

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a residency primary care clinic whose majority of patients are underserved. The clinic is operated by the health system for Bexar County and staffed primarily with physicians in a three-year Family Medicine residency program at The University of Texas School of Medicine in San Antonio. The objective of the study was to obtain a better understanding of patient flow through the clinic and to investigate changes to current scheduling rules and operating procedures. Discrete event simulation was used to establish a baseline and to evaluate a variety of scenarios associated with appointment scheduling and managing early and late arrivals. The first steps in developing the model were to map the administrative and diagnostic processes and to collect time-stamped data and fit probability distributions to each. In conjunction with the initialization and validation steps, various regressions were performed to determine if any relationships existed between individual providers and patient types, length of stay, and the difference between discharge time and appointment time. The latter two statistics along with resource utilization and closing time were the primary metrics used to evaluate system performance.The results showed that up to an 8.5 % reduction in patient length of stay is achievable without noticeably affecting the other metrics by carefully adjusting appointment times. Reducing the no-show rate from its current value of 21.8 % or overbooking, however, is likely to overwhelm the system's resources and lead to excessive congestion and overtime. Another major finding was that the providers are the limiting factor in improving patient flow. With an average utilization rate above 90 % there is little prospect in shortening the total patient time in the clinic without reducing the providers' average assessment time. Finally, several suggestions are offered to ensure fairness when dealing with out-of-order arrivals. PMID:25155098

  8. Nasal highflow improves ventilation in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bräunlich, Jens; Köhler, Marcus; Wirtz, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasal highflow (NHF) provides a warmed and humidified air stream up to 60 L/min. Recent data demonstrated a positive effect in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, especially when caused by pneumonia. Preliminary data show a decrease in hypercapnia in patients with COPD. Therefore, NHF should be evaluated as a new ventilatory support device. This study was conducted to assess the impact of different flow rates on ventilatory parameters in patients with COPD. Materials and methods This interventional clinical study was performed with patients suffering from severe COPD. The aim was to characterize flow-dependent changes in mean airway pressure, breathing volumes, breathing frequency, and decrease in partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Mean airway pressure was measured in the nasopharyngeal space (19 patients). To evaluate breathing volumes, we used a polysomnographic device (18 patients). All patients received 20 L/min, 30 L/min, 40 L/min, and 50 L/min and – to illustrate the effects – nasal continuous positive airway pressure and nasal bilevel positive airway pressure. Capillary blood gas analyses were performed in 54 patients with hypercapnic COPD before and two hours after the use of NHF. We compared the extent of decrease in pCO2 when using 20 L/min and 30 L/min. Additionally, comfort and dyspnea during the use of NHF were surveyed. Results NHF resulted in a minor flow dependent increase in mean airway pressure. Tidal volume increased, and breathing rate decreased. The calculated minute volume decreased under NHF breathing. In spite of this fact, hypercapnia decreased with increasing flow (20 L/min vs 30 L/min). Additionally, an improvement in dyspnea was observed. The rapid shallow breathing index shows a decrease when using NHF. Conclusion NHF leads to a flow-dependent reduction in pCO2. This is most likely achieved by a washout of the respiratory tract and a functional reduction in dead space. In summary, NHF enhances effectiveness of

  9. [Orthodontic treatment failure: the advice of a forensic expert].

    PubMed

    Tricot-Blestel, Marie-Claude

    2016-03-01

    If patients consider that their orthodontic treatment is a failure, they can claim compensation from their practitioner. Most often, discontented patients call on their third-party liability insurance when they are covered for "legal expenses protection". The patient's insurance company will then get in touch with the practitioner's insurance firm. Three-quarters of all claims are dealt with by the insurance companies. However, if an agreement cannot be reached or if the practitioner's insurance company manages to establish that he/she is not at fault, the patient can apply to the Tribunal de Grande Instance, the French Regional Court. The judge appoints a forensic expert who will examine the patient and follow a very precise procedure involving a dozen different questions. The advice of the forensic expert is therefore very valuable to orthodontists, in particular regarding their duty to inform patients and the importance of the medical file in order to avoid being held accountable following a course of treatment. PMID:27083226

  10. Preparing the patient for surgery to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levett, Denny Z H; Edwards, Mark; Grocott, Mike; Mythen, Monty

    2016-06-01

    The time between contemplation of surgery and the procedure offers a window of opportunity to optimize patients' nutritional, functional and psychological state prior to surgery. Traditionally, preoperative pathways have focused on the underlying disease process and 'fitness for surgery' with physical pre-assessment and risk counselling late in the pathway when little time is available to intervene. With an increasingly elderly and co-morbid surgical population, early physiological assessment and multidisciplinary collaborative decision-making is increasingly important. Multimodal prehabilitation programmes may improve surgical outcome, facilitating rapid recovery from surgery and limiting post-operative functional dependence. Patient education and engagement is important if compliance with behavioural change is to be achieved and maintained. To date, there has been evidence supporting preoperative exercise training, smoking cessation, reduction in alcohol intake, anaemia management and psychosocial support. Further research is needed to identify the most effective elements of these complex preoperative interventions, as well as their optimum timing and duration. PMID:27396803

  11. Dietary Advice and Collaborative Working: Do Pharmacists and Allied Health Professionals Other Than Dietitians Have a Role?

    PubMed Central

    McClinchy, Jane; Williams, Julia; Gordon, Lynne; Cairns, Mindy; Fairey, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Long term health conditions either wholly or partly diet-related continue to increase. Although pharmacists and allied health professionals (AHPs) have a role in the management of patients with long term conditions, there is limited research exploring whether pharmacists and AHPs other than dietitians have a role in the delivery of dietary advice. This research aimed to explore their views regarding the provision of dietary advice to patients. The research involved a qualitative methodology utilising five uni-professional focus groups with a total of 23 participants. All groups considered the provision of dietary advice in the context of their own professional roles, discussed issues relating to referral to the dietitian for specialist advice and most discussed the need for written information. Interprofessional and collaborative working is needed to maximise the role in the delivery of dietary advice, access to evidence based nutritional information and utlisation of referral pathways across pharmacists and AHPs to ensure the timely provision of nutritional advice to patients. There is a potential role for dietitians to take the lead and further research should focus on this area.

  12. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual's competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been

  13. 41 CFR 105-50.202-7 - Technical information and advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information, personnel management systems services, and technical advice on improving logistical and... Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 50-PROVISION OF SPECIAL... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Technical...

  14. The Added Value of Advice when Learners Can Control Their Tool Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandewaetere, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    Providing learners with control over their learning does not always result in improved learning. For instance, research on tool-use in computer-based learning environments has demonstrated that tool-use behavior of learners is often suboptimal and does not fully support learning. Advice, or guided instruction, has been recognized as an…

  15. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  16. Smoking cessation advice: the self-reported attitudes and practice of primary health care physicians in a military community, central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    AlAteeq, Mohammed; Alrashoud, Abdulaziz M; Khair, Mohammed; Salam, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    to the less experienced (adj. P=0.012) and physicians with a negative attitude (adj. P=0.008). Conclusion Provision of smoking cessation advice by primary health care physicians serving a military community is significantly associated with their attitude and years of experience. Patients who are seeking smoking cessation advice should be referred to physicians with higher levels of education. Routinely scheduled training on proper delivery of smoking cessation advice may increase physicians’ confidence; improve their attitude, and subsequently, their practice. PMID:27175065

  17. Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

  18. Improving the provision of meals in hospital. The patients' viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Johns, Nick; Hartwell, Heather; Morgan, Michael

    2010-02-01

    This study examines the provision of hospital meals from the patients' viewpoint, with the aim of improving hospital food service. Patients were approached in early 2008 in a National Health Service hospital in the South of England and invited to comment on the good and bad aspects of eating in hospital. Comments were collected in an abbreviated "key word" format which incurred the minimum of bias and allowed emergent themes to be analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Seven main themes emerged, of which "food" and "choice" were mentioned most frequently, but had a low ratio (1.8 and 1.7, respectively) of approving over disapproving comments. The next most mentioned theme, "service staff", showed the highest approving/disapproving ratio (4.8) overall. Less frequent themes were: "meals and lifestyle", "timing and routine", "service quality" and "food quantity". These data, together with qualitative analysis of the responses showed patients' views of hospital food to be positive, on the whole meeting or surpassing their expectations. However, these expectations were low, the experience of eating in hospital contrasted unfavourably with home, and the meals were at best a distraction from the rigours of hospital treatment. Service staff were positively regarded because they offered an important opportunity for "normal" discourse with a non-medical person. On the basis of the findings, changes are recommended in the management of service staff, menus, food presentation, nutritional intake and patients' lifestyle. Of these, the first is likely to have most impact on the experience and viewpoint of hospital patients. PMID:19857535

  19. Success of patient training in improving proficiency of eyedrop administration among various ophthalmic patient populations

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Alexander; O’Neill, John; Holt, Mitchell; Georgiadis, Catherine; Wright, Martha M; Montezuma, Sandra R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the success and usefulness of patient education in eyedrop self-administration technique via an educational handout and a short instructional video. Patients and methods We conducted a prospective study that included 34 patients who were self-administering ophthalmic drops. Of the total patients included, 12% had used drops for <12 months, and 88% had used drops for >12 months. Average age of patients in the study was 67 years, with an age range of 19–91 years. Of the total patients included, 82% had glaucoma, 6% had dry eyes, and 12% did not have a specific diagnosis. Subjects were video recorded and assessed by a trained observer on two occasions: at baseline and after they viewed a demonstrational video and handout. A maximum score of 15 points was awarded based on 15 criteria. A written self-assessment was administered at the end of each study. Results Pre- and post-teaching assessment scores improved significantly with education. Patients initially scored an average 2.53 points compared to a post-education score of 6.15 out of 15 points, demonstrating a 2.43 (P=0.008) factor of improvement. After education, 94% of patients versus 47% pre-teaching (P=0.0001) pulled down their lower eyelids. A total of 91% pre-teaching versus 59% post-teaching (P=0.0042) patients squeezed one drop into the lower fornix, 74% pre-teaching versus 26% post-teaching (P=0.0002) patients released the eyelid and closed the eye for 1 minute, and 56% pre-teaching versus 3% post-teaching (P=0.0001) patients applied nasal digital pressure on each eye. We found no significant difference in score changes between those who previously received education and those who had not (P=0.37). A total of 91% patients responded in a postassessment survey that they now feel more confident of their ability to self-administer eyedrops as their doctor prescribed and that the educational materials were responsible. Conclusion Participants demonstrated an

  20. Patient-powered research networks aim to improve patient care and health research.

    PubMed

    Fleurence, Rachael L; Beal, Anne C; Sheridan, Susan E; Johnson, Lorraine B; Selby, Joe V

    2014-07-01

    The era of big data, loosely defined as the development and analysis of large or complex data sets, brings new opportunities to empower patients and their families to generate, collect, and use their health information for both clinical and research purposes. In 2013 the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute launched a large national research network, PCORnet, that includes both clinical and patient-powered research networks. This article describes these networks, their potential uses, and the challenges they face. The networks are engaging patients, family members, and caregivers in four key ways: contributing data securely, with privacy protected; including diverse and representative groups of patients in research; prioritizing research questions, participating in research, and disseminating results; and participating in the leadership and governance of patient-powered research networks. If technical, regulatory, and organizational challenges can be overcome, PCORnet will allow research to be conducted more efficiently and cost-effectively and results to be disseminated quickly back to patients, clinicians, and delivery systems to improve patient health. PMID:25006148

  1. Improving patient safety in radiology: concepts for a comprehensive patient safety program.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Lane F; Dickerson, Julie M; Goodfriend, Martha A; Muething, Stephen E

    2010-04-01

    A comprehensive safety program can have a positive influence on safety performance and safety culture within a department of radiology. The program should include both vertical interventions aimed at specific areas of potential safety errors as well as horizontal interventions aimed at improving safety culture and decreasing the baseline rate of human error. In our opinion, the key cultural transformations that must occur to improve safety culture include recognition that safety is an issue, emphasis that everyone is accountable for patient safety, and creating a culture where people are expected and encouraged to speak up in the face of uncertainty. The article describes the horizontal interventions to improve patient safety used in our department. PMID:20304316

  2. A Real-Time Screening Alert Improves Patient Recruitment Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua; Batres, Candido; Borda, Tomas; Weiskopf, Nicole G.; Wilcox, Adam B.; Bigger, J Thomas; Davidson, Karina W.

    2011-01-01

    The scarcity of cost-effective patient identification methods represents a significant barrier to clinical research. Research recruitment alerts have been designed to facilitate physician referrals but limited support is available to clinical researchers. We conducted a retrospective data analysis to evaluate the efficacy of a real-time patient identification alert delivered to clinical research coordinators recruiting for a clinical prospective cohort study. Data from log analysis and informal interviews with coordinators were triangulated. Over a 12-month period, 11,295 were screened electronically, 1,449 were interviewed, and 282 were enrolled. The enrollment rates for the alert and two other conventional methods were 4.65%, 2.01%, and 1.34% respectively. A taxonomy of eligibility status was proposed to precisely categorize research patients. Practical ineligibility factors were identified and their correlation with age and gender were analyzed. We conclude that the automatic prescreening alert improves screening efficiency and is an effective aid to clinical research coordinators. PMID:22195213

  3. QT variability improves risk stratification in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fischer, C; Seeck, A; Schroeder, R; Goernig, M; Schirdewan, A; Figulla, H R; Baumert, M; Voss, A

    2015-04-01

    Recently it could be demonstrated that systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability (BPV) as well as segmented Poincare plot analysis (SPPA) contribute to risk stratification in patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The aim of this study was to improve the risk stratification applying a multivariate technique including QT variability (QTV). We enrolled and significantly separated 56 low risk and 13 high risk DCM patients by nearly all applied BPV and QTV methods, but not with traditional heart rate variability analysis. The optimum set of two indices calculating the multivariate discriminate analysis (DA) included one BPV index calculated by symbolic dynamics method (DBP(Shannon)) and one index calculated from QTV (QTV(log)) achieving an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) of 92%, sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 89.3%. Performing only electrocardiogram analysis, the optimum multivariate approach including indices from segmented Poincaré plot analysis and QTV still achieved a remarkable AUC of 88.3%. Increasing the number of indices for multivariate DA up to three, we achieved an AUC of 95.7%, sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85.7% including one clinical, one BPV and one QTV index. Summarizing, we identified DCM patients with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death applying QTV analysis in a multivariate approach. PMID:25799313

  4. Mini incision open pyeloplasty - Improvement in patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Garg, Manish; Sharma, Pradeep; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the subjective and objective outcomes of mini-incision dismembered Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty in the treatment of primary ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Materials and Methods: Between January 2008 to January 2013, Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty was performed in 71 patients diagnosed with primary UPJO. Small subcostal muscle splitting incision was used in all cases. Sixteen patients with renal calculi underwent concomitant pyelolithotomy. Subjective outcome was assessed using visual pain analogue score (VAS). For objective assessment, the improvement in differential renal function (DRF) and radio-tracer wash out time (T1/2) on Tc-99m DTPA scan and decrease in hydronephrosis (HDN) on renal ultrasound (USG) and urography (IVU) were assessed. Results: Mean incision length was 5.2 cm. The average operating time and postoperative hospital stay was 63 (52-124) minutes and 2.5 (2–6) days respectively. Concomitant renal calculi were successfully removed in all the patients. Overall complication rates were 8.4% and overall success rate was 98.6% at median follow-up of 16 months. There was significant improvement in pain score (p=0.0001) and significant decrease in HDN after the procedure. While preoperative mean T1/2 was 26.7±6.4 minutes, postoperative half-time decreased to 7.8±4.2 minutes at 6 months and to 6.7±3.3 minutes at 1 year. Mean pre-operative DRF was 26.45% and it was 31.38% and 33.19% at 6 months and 1 year respectively. Conclusions: Mini-incision pyeloplasty is a safe and effective technique with combined advantage of high success rates of standard open pyeloplasty with decreased morbidity of laparoscopic approach. Excellent functional and objective outcomes can be achieved without extra technical difficulty. PMID:26689518

  5. Provider and patient directed financial incentives to improve care and outcomes for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Ilona S; Lawson, Brittany C T; Long, Judith A

    2013-04-01

    Incentive programs directed at both providers and patients have become increasingly widespread. Pay-for-performance (P4P) where providers receive financial incentives to carry out specific care or improve clinical outcomes has been widely implemented. The existing literature indicates they probably spur initial gains which then level off or partially revert if incentives are withdrawn. The literature also indicates that process measures are easier to influence through P4P programs but that intermediate outcomes such as glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol control are harder to influence, and the long-term impact of P4P programs on health is largely unknown. Programs directed at patients show greater promise as a means to influence patient behavior and intermediate outcomes such as weight loss; however, the evidence for long-term effects are lacking. In combination, both patient and provider incentives are potentially powerful tools but whether they are cost-effective has yet to be determined. PMID:23225214

  6. Improving Bariatric Patient Transport and Care with Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gable, Brad D.; Gardner, Aimee K.; Celik, Dan H.; Bhalla, Mary Colleen; Ahmed, Rami A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is prevalent in the United States. Obese patients have physiologic differences from non-obese individuals. Not only does transport and maintenance of these patients require use of specialized equipment, but it also requires a distinct skill set and knowledge base. To date, there is no literature investigating simulation as a model for educating pre-hospital providers in the care of bariatric patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 3-hour educational course with simulation could improve paramedics’ knowledge and confidence of bariatric procedures and transport. This study also examined if prior experience with bariatric transport affected training outcomes. Methods Our study took place in August 2012 during paramedic training sessions. Paramedics completed a pre- and post-test that assessed confidence and knowledge and provided information on previous experience. They had a 30-minute didactic and participated in 2 20-minute hands-on skills portions that reviewed procedural issues in bariatric patients, including airway procedures, peripheral venous and intraosseous access, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Study participants took part in one of two simulated patient encounters. Paramedics were challenged with treating emergent traumatic and/or medical conditions, as well as extricating and transporting bariatric patients. Each group underwent a debriefing of the scenario immediately following their case. We measured confidence using a 5-point Likert-type response scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree) on a 7-item questionnaire. We assessed knowledge with 12 multiple choice questions. Paired-sample t-tests were used to compare pre- and post-simulation confidence and knowledge with a significance level of p≤0.05. We used analysis of covariance to examine the effect of previous experiences on pre-and post-educational activity confidence and knowledge with a significance level of p ≤0.05. Proportions

  7. Discharge Against Medical Advice From the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Mazen El; Jabbour, Elsy; Maatouk, Ali; Bachir, Rana; Dagher, Gilbert Abou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients who leave the emergency department against medical advice are at high risk for complications. Against medical advice (AMA) discharges are also considered high-risk events potentially leading to malpractice litigation. Our aim was to characterize patients who leave AMA in a payment prior to service emergency department (ED) model and to identify predictors for return visits to ED after leaving AMA. We conducted a retrospective review study of charts of ED patients who were discharged AMA between January 1, 2012 and January 1, 2013 at a tertiary care center in Beirut Lebanon. We carried out a descriptive analysis and a bivariate analysis comparing AMA patients without and with return visit within 72 hours. This was followed by a Logistic regression to identify predictors of return visits after leaving AMA. A total of 1213 ED patients were discharged AMA during the study period. Mean age was 46.9 years (±20.9). There were 654 men (53.9%), 737 married (60.8%). The majority (1059 patients (87.3%)) had an emergency severity index of 3 or less (1 or 2). ED average length of stay was 3.8 hours (±6.8). Self payers accounted for 53.9%. Reasons for leaving AMA were: no reason mentioned (44.1%), incomplete workup (30.5%), refusing admission (12.4%), financial reasons (7.9%), long wait times (2.9%), and others (2.2%). Discharge diagnoses were mainly cardiac (23.4%), gastrointestinal (16.4%), infectious (10.1%), and trauma (9.8%). One hundred nineteen returned to ED within 72 hours (9.8%). Predictors of returning to ED after leaving AMA were: older age (OR 1.02 95% CI (1.01–1.03)), private insurance status (OR 4.64 95% (CI 2.89–7.47) within network insurance status (OR 7.20 95% CI (3.86–13.44), longer ED length of stay during the first visit (OR 1.03 95% CI (1.01–1.05). In our setting, the rate of return visit to ED after leaving AMA was 9.8%. Reasons for leaving AMA, high-risk discharge diagnoses and predictors of return visit were identified

  8. Improving cancer patient care: development of a generic cancer consumer quality index questionnaire for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To develop a Consumer Quality Index (CQI) Cancer Care questionnaire for measuring experiences with hospital care of patients with different types of cancer. Methods We derived quality aspects from focus group discussions, existing questionnaires and literature. We developed an experience questionnaire and sent it to 1,498 Dutch cancer patients. Another questionnaire measuring the importance of the quality aspects was sent to 600 cancer patients. Data were psychometrically analysed. Results The response to the experience questionnaire was 50 percent. Psychometric analysis revealed 12 reliable scales. Patients rated rapid and adequate referral, rapid start of the treatment after diagnosis, enough information and confidence in the healthcare professionals as most important themes. Hospitals received high scores for skills and cooperation of healthcare professionals and a patient-centered approach by doctors; and low scores for psychosocial guidance and information at completion of the treatment. Conclusions The CQI Cancer Care questionnaire is a valuable tool for the evaluation of the quality of cancer care from the patient’s perspective. Large scale implementation is necessary to determine the discriminatory powers of the questionnaire and may enable healthcare providers to improve the quality of cancer care. Preliminary results indicate that hospitals could improve their psychosocial guidance and information provision. PMID:23617741

  9. Cross-validating factors associated with discharges against medical advice.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, A J; Fata, M

    1993-05-01

    Between six percent and 35% of psychiatric patients discharge themselves from hospital against medical advice (AMA). The discharges may prevent patients from deriving the full benefit of hospitalization and may result in rapid rehospitalization. We examined sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of 195 irregular discharges from a 237 bed psychiatric hospital over a five year period and found that AMA discharges increased over the study period to a peak of 25% in 1986. There was a strong negative correlation between AMA discharge rates and the willingness of physicians to commit patients involuntarily. Multiple discriminant analysis revealed a set of nine variables that accurately classified 78% of cases into regular or irregular discharge categories. Further analysis revealed that there are two distinct subgroups of patients who discharge themselves AMA: those who repeatedly left the hospital AMA in a regular "revolving back door" pattern and those who left AMA only once. The repeat group exceeded the one-time group in terms of prior admissions, appearances before review boards, and percentage of Natives. The repeat group also spent twice as long in hospital, and 27% were readmitted within one-week of the index AMA discharge. Less than three percent of the one-time AMA group was readmitted within a week. These results were cross-validated on a new sample of irregular discharges and matched controls. PMID:8518982

  10. [Dietary advice in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Rigalleau, Vincent; Gonzalez, Concepcion; Raffaitin, Christelle; Gin, Henri

    2010-04-20

    The dietary advice is a part of the global care for type 2 diabetes. First, overweight implies a caloric restriction. When poor glucose control is associated with weight gain, important errors are obvious (excess fat and sugar), providing more pills or insulin without correcting them is poorly effective, but promotes further weight gain. Normal body weight, or poor glucose control despite loss of weight, needs to reappraise the diagnosis: diabetes type, intercurrent disease. The cofactors of the "metabolic syndrom" are usually present, so saturated fat has to be reduced, while maintaining fish, fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals. Blood pressure and dyslipidemia may need further counselling about dietary sodium, carbohydrates, cholesterol. When insulin, sulfonylurea or glinids are indicated, the dietary intake of carbohydrates has to be regular to avoid hypoglycemia. PMID:20465121

  11. Advice about Work-Related Issues to Peers and Employers from Head and Neck Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Trojanowski, Lucy; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Ringash, Jolie; McQuestion, Maurene; Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this exploratory and descriptive study is to contribute to the sparse return-to-work literature on head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Interview participants were asked to reflect upon their work-related experience with cancer by answering two specific questions: (1) What advice would you give someone who has been newly diagnosed with head and neck cancer? (2) What advice would you give to employers of these people? Methods Data were gathered through 10 individual semi-structured in-depth interviews with HNC clinic patients at a regional cancer center’s head and neck clinic in Ontario, Canada. A constant comparative method of theme development was used. Codes identified in and derived from the data were discussed by research team members until consensus was reached. Codes with similar characteristics were grouped together and used to develop overarching themes. Results Work-related advice for peers focused on personal self-care and interactions within workplaces. Work-related advice to employers focused on demonstrating basic human values as well as the importance of communication. Discussion The study results suggest HNC clinic patients should be proactive with employers and help to set reasonable expectations and provide a realistic plan for work to be successfully completed. HNC clinic patients should develop communication skills to effectively disclose their cancer and treatment to employers. Conclusions In this exploratory study, HNC clinic patients’ advice was solution-focused underscoring the importance of self-care and pro-active communication and planning with employers. Employers were advised to demonstrate core human values throughout all phases of the work disability episode beginning at diagnosis. PMID:27070654

  12. [Errors in medicine. Causes, impact and improvement measures to improve patient safety].

    PubMed

    Waeschle, R M; Bauer, M; Schmidt, C E

    2015-09-01

    The guarantee of quality of care and patient safety is of major importance in hospitals even though increased economic pressure and work intensification are ubiquitously present. Nevertheless, adverse events still occur in 3-4 % of hospital stays and of these 25-50 % are estimated to be avoidable. The identification of possible causes of error and the development of measures for the prevention of medical errors are essential for patient safety. The implementation and continuous development of a constructive culture of error tolerance are fundamental.The origins of errors can be differentiated into systemic latent and individual active causes and components of both categories are typically involved when an error occurs. Systemic causes are, for example out of date structural environments, lack of clinical standards and low personnel density. These causes arise far away from the patient, e.g. management decisions and can remain unrecognized for a long time. Individual causes involve, e.g. confirmation bias, error of fixation and prospective memory failure. These causes have a direct impact on patient care and can result in immediate injury to patients. Stress, unclear information, complex systems and a lack of professional experience can promote individual causes. Awareness of possible causes of error is a fundamental precondition to establishing appropriate countermeasures.Error prevention should include actions directly affecting the causes of error and includes checklists and standard operating procedures (SOP) to avoid fixation and prospective memory failure and team resource management to improve communication and the generation of collective mental models. Critical incident reporting systems (CIRS) provide the opportunity to learn from previous incidents without resulting in injury to patients. Information technology (IT) support systems, such as the computerized physician order entry system, assist in the prevention of medication errors by providing

  13. Application of Bow-tie methodology to improve patient safety.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Zhaleh; Ravaghi, Hamid; Abbasi, Mohsen; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Esfandiari, Somayeh

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to apply Bow-tie methodology, a proactive risk assessment technique based on systemic approach, for prospective analysis of the risks threatening patient safety in intensive care unit (ICU). Design/methodology/approach - Bow-tie methodology was used to manage clinical risks threatening patient safety by a multidisciplinary team in the ICU. The Bow-tie analysis was conducted on incidents related to high-alert medications, ventilator associated pneumonia, catheter-related blood stream infection, urinary tract infection, and unwanted extubation. Findings - In total, 48 potential adverse events were analysed. The causal factors were identified and classified into relevant categories. The number and effectiveness of existing preventive and protective barriers were examined for each potential adverse event. The adverse events were evaluated according to the risk criteria and a set of interventions were proposed with the aim of improving the existing barriers or implementing new barriers. A number of recommendations were implemented in the ICU, while considering their feasibility. Originality/value - The application of Bow-tie methodology led to practical recommendations to eliminate or control the hazards identified. It also contributed to better understanding of hazard prevention and protection required for safe operations in clinical settings. PMID:27142951

  14. Driving improvement in patient care: lessons from Toyota.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Debra N; Wolf, Gail A; Spear, Steven J

    2003-11-01

    Nurses today are attempting to do more with less while grappling with faulty error-prone systems that do not focus on patients at the point of care. This struggle occurs against a backdrop of rising national concern over the incidence of medical errors in healthcare. In an effort to create greater value with scarce resources and fix broken systems that compromise quality care, UPMC Health System is beginning to master and implement the Toyota Production System (TPS)--a method of managing people engaged in work that emphasizes frequent rapid problem solving and work redesign that has become the global archetype for productivity and performance. The authors discuss the rationale for applying TPS to healthcare and implementation of the system through the development of "learning unit" model lines and initial outcomes, such as dramatic reductions in the number of missing medications and thousands of hours and dollars saved as a result of TPS-driven changes. Tracking data further suggest that TPS, with sufficient staff preparation and involvement, has the potential for continuous, lasting, and accelerated improvement in patient care. PMID:14608217

  15. Travel advice: a study among Swiss and German general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Hatz, C; Krause, E; Grundmann, H

    1997-01-01

    Travelling to tropical and subtropical destinations is common among European citizens. Many of them consult their general practitioners (GPs) for pre-travel advice. Little is known about the knowledge, the sources of information and the needs of physicians. One hundred and fifty Swiss and I50 German GPs giving travel advice were interviewed using pretested telephone interviews and questionnaires to assess their knowledge about travel advice to be given for 2 frequent holiday destinations (Kenya and Thailand), and to ask which information sources were available to them. Ninety-six per cent and 89%, respectively, of GPs in 2 neighbouring areas of Switzerland and Germany gave travel advice to their clients. In telephone interviews, standard recommendations on malaria medication, as approved by the national travel advice committees, were stated by 45 and 25% of Swiss GPs, and 22 and 9% of German GPs for Kenya and Thailand. The figures for correct advice on vaccination requirements were 23 and 47% for the Swiss GPs, and 2 and 25% for the German GPs. Half of the GPs wanted to consult their documents before giving advice. The main source of information used by Swiss GPs was the monthly updated Bulletin of the Federal Office of Public Health (BFOPH). A variety of different sources was recorded among German practitioners. Regular, concise information on travel advice tops the list of requested information material in both countries. The extent of correct pre-travel advice is unsatisfactory in both study groups. Use of standardized, regularly updated and readily available sources of information on travel advice for the GP could avoid uncertainties of both the provider and the recipient of advice. PMID:9018297

  16. Applied Strategies for Improving Patient Safety: A Comprehensive Process To Improve Care in Rural and Frontier Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall, John M.; Fernald, Douglas H.; Staton, Elizabeth W.; VanVorst, Rebecca; West, David; Pace, Wilson D.

    2004-01-01

    Medical errors and patient safety have gained increasing attention throughout all areas of medical care. Understanding patient safety in rural settings is crucial for improving care in rural communities. To describe a system to decrease medical errors and improve care in rural and frontier primary care offices. Applied Strategies for Improving…

  17. Effective colonoscopy training techniques: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Karatzas, Pantelis S; Varytimiadis, Lazaros T; Tsigaridas, Athanasios; Galanopoulos, Michail; Viazis, Nikos; Karamanolis, Dimitrios G

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy has substantially evolved during the last 20 years and many different training techniques have been developed in order to improve the performance of endoscopists. The most known are mechanical simulators, virtual reality simulators, computer-simulating endoscopy, magnetic endoscopic imaging, and composite and explanted animal organ simulators. Current literature generally indicates that the use of simulators improves performance of endoscopists and enhances safety of patients, especially during the initial phase of training. Moreover, newer endoscopes and imaging techniques such as high-definition colonoscopes, chromocolonoscopy with dyes spraying, and third-eye retroscope have been incorporated in everyday practice, offering better visualization of the colon and detection of polyps. Despite the abundance of these different technological features, training devices are not widely used and no official guideline or specified training algorithm or technique for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy has been evolved. In this review, we present the most important training methods currently available and evaluate these using existing literature. We also try to propose a training algorithm for novice endoscopists. PMID:27099542

  18. Goal-Driven Development of a Patient Surveillance Application for Improving Patient Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnam, Saeed Ahmadi; Amyot, Daniel; Forster, Alan J.; Peyton, Liam; Shamsaei, Azalia

    Hospitals strive to improve the safety of their patients. Yet, every year, thousands of patients suffer from adverse events, which are defined as undesirable outcomes caused by health care business processes. There are few tools supporting adverse event detection and these are ineffective. There is hence some urgency in developing such a tool in a way that complies with the organizations goals and privacy legislation. In addition, governments will soon require hospitals to report on adverse events. In this paper, we will show how a pilot application we developed contributes to the patient safety goals of a major teaching hospital and how our goal-driven approach supported the collaboration between the university researchers and hospital decision makers involved. Benefits and challenges related to the modeling of requirements, goals, and processes, and to the development of the application itself, are also discussed.

  19. Equipment Standards: History, Litigation, and Advice

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R.

    1999-01-01

    Summary The authors present a concise history of the development of national and international standards for surgical equipment. Standards-writing organizations, surgical and other specialty societies, universities, test houses, and the U.S. government have influenced this process, which is now manifested in complex interactions between national and international standards-writing organizations, and in CE (Conformité Europeene) marks being placed on surgical equipment in the United States and elsewhere. The history of litigation in standards development is also reviewed. Recommendations to maximize patient safety and to help ensure successful, cost-effective defense in litigation for surgeons who use equipment and may suffer its malfunctions are given. Overall, the complicated oversight of surgical equipment standards and the approval process appears to be contributing to the improving and outstanding results of U.S. surgery reported by the U.S. government. PMID:10400045

  20. The FDA's new advice on fish: it's complicated.

    PubMed

    Wenstrom, Katharine D

    2014-11-01

    The Food and Drug Administration and Environmental Protection Agency recently issued an updated draft of advice on fish consumption for pregnant and breastfeeding women, after survey data indicated that the majority of pregnant women do not eat much fish and thus may have inadequate intake of the omega 3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and ducosahexaenoic acid [DHA]. Omega 3 fatty acids are essential components of membranes in all cells of the body and are vitally important for normal development of the brain and retinal tissues (especially myelin and retinal photoreceptors) and for maintenance of normal neurotransmission and connectivity. They also serve as substrates for the synthesis of a variety of antiinflammatory and inflammation-resolving mediators, favorably alter the production of thromboxane and prostaglandin E2, and improve cardiovascular health by preventing fatal arrhythmias and reducing triglyceride and C-reactive protein levels. Maternal ingestion of adequate quantities of fish (defined in many studies as at least 340 g of oily fish each week) has been associated with better childhood IQ scores, fine motor coordination, and communication and social skills, along with other benefits. Although the FDA did not clarify which fish to eat, it specifically advised against eating fish with the highest mercury levels and implied that fish with high levels of EPA and DHA and low levels of mercury are ideal. The FDA draft did not recommend taking omega 3 fatty acid or fish oil supplements instead of eating fish, which is advice that may reflect the fact that randomized controlled trials of DHA and EPA or fish oil supplementation generally have been disappointing and that the ideal daily dose of DHA and EPA is unknown. It seems safe to conclude that pregnant and nursing women should be advised to eat fish to benefit from naturally occurring omega 3 fatty acids, to avoid fish with high levels of mercury and other contaminants, and, if possible, to choose

  1. 29 CFR 1912a.5 - Advice and recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advice and recommendations. 1912a.5 Section 1912a.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH § 1912a.5 Advice...

  2. 40 CFR 121.30 - Review and advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Review and advice. 121.30 Section 121.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS STATE CERTIFICATION OF ACTIVITIES REQUIRING A FEDERAL LICENSE OR PERMIT Consultations § 121.30 Review and advice. The Regional Administrator may, and upon...

  3. 14 CFR 1209.305 - Legal advice and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Legal advice and assistance. 1209.305 Section 1209.305 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION BOARDS AND COMMITTEES Contract Adjustment Board § 1209.305 Legal advice and assistance. The General Counsel of NASA shall...

  4. 14 CFR § 1209.305 - Legal advice and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Legal advice and assistance. § 1209.305 Section § 1209.305 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION BOARDS AND COMMITTEES Contract Adjustment Board § 1209.305 Legal advice and assistance. The General Counsel of...

  5. 14 CFR 1209.305 - Legal advice and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Legal advice and assistance. 1209.305 Section 1209.305 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION BOARDS AND COMMITTEES Contract Adjustment Board § 1209.305 Legal advice and assistance. The General Counsel of NASA shall...

  6. 14 CFR 1209.305 - Legal advice and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Legal advice and assistance. 1209.305 Section 1209.305 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION BOARDS AND COMMITTEES Contract Adjustment Board § 1209.305 Legal advice and assistance. The General Counsel of NASA shall...

  7. 14 CFR 1209.305 - Legal advice and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Legal advice and assistance. 1209.305 Section 1209.305 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION BOARDS AND COMMITTEES Contract Adjustment Board § 1209.305 Legal advice and assistance. The General Counsel of NASA shall...

  8. Listen to Your Heart? Calling and Receptivity to Career Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrow, Shoshana R.; Tosti-Kharas, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This study explores calling in the context of career decision making. Specifically, the authors examine receptivity to advice that discourages individuals from pursuing a professional path in their calling's domain. The authors hypothesize that people with a strong calling will be more likely to ignore negative career advice. In Study 1, a…

  9. Low Income Women and Physician Breastfeeding Advice: A Regional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolzer, J; Zeece, Pauline

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of the pilot study presented here were to determine whether low income women were receiving compendious breastfeeding advice from their attending physicians. Design: This study assessed low income women's reports of physician breastfeeding advice using a newly designed Likert scaled survey based on the American Surgeon…

  10. 5 CFR 1304.4607 - Advice to former Government employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advice to former Government employees. 1304.4607 Section 1304.4607 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST § 1304.4607 Advice to former Government employees. The...

  11. 29 CFR 1400.735-3 - Advice and counseling service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advice and counseling service. 1400.735-3 Section 1400.735-3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE STANDARDS OF CONDUCT, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DISCIPLINE General § 1400.735-3 Advice and counseling...

  12. ADVICE--Educational System for Teaching Database Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cvetanovic, M.; Radivojevic, Z.; Blagojevic, V.; Bojovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a Web-based educational system, ADVICE, that helps students to bridge the gap between database management system (DBMS) theory and practice. The usage of ADVICE is presented through a set of laboratory exercises developed to teach students conceptual and logical modeling, SQL, formal query languages, and normalization. While…

  13. "What Advice Would You Give to Students Starting Your Course?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meedin, Aneeqa

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, the author, a Biomedical Sciences student at the University of Sheffield, presents an atypical way of addressing the question "What advice would you give to students starting your course?" by transcribing the much-evoked and revered Ten Commandments, the original guide to life, into advice for new and bewildered Biomedical…

  14. 45 CFR 73a.735-104 - Advice and guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advice and guidance. 73a.735-104 Section 73a.735-104 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT: FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENT General Provisions § 73a.735-104 Advice and guidance. (a)...

  15. Improving Publication: Advice for Busy Higher Education Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge for higher education academics is to research and publish when faced with substantial teaching responsibilities, higher student numbers, and higher output expectations. The focus of this piece is to encourage publication more generally by educators, and to build publication capacity, which academic developers can facilitate. The…

  16. Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Carey, ML; Clinton-McHarg, T; Sanson-Fisher, RW; Campbell, S; Douglas, HE

    2011-01-01

    The psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients may be influenced by individual-level, social and treatment centre predictors. This paper aimed to examine the extent to which individual, social and treatment centre variables have been examined as predictors or targets of intervention for psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients. Medline was searched to find studies in which the psychological outcomes of cancer patient were primary variables. Papers published in English between 1999 and 2009 that reported primary data relevant to psychosocial outcomes for cancer patients were included, with 20% randomly selected for further coding. Descriptive studies were coded for inclusion of individual, social or treatment centre variables. Intervention studies were coded to determine if the unit of intervention was the individual patient, social unit or treatment centre. After random sampling, 412 publications meeting the inclusion criteria were identified, 169 were descriptive and 243 interventions. Of the descriptive papers 95.0% included individual predictors, and 5.0% social predictors. None of the descriptive papers examined treatment centre variables as predictors of psychosocial outcomes. Similarly, none of the interventions evaluated the effectiveness of treatment centre interventions for improving psychosocial outcomes. Potential reasons for the overwhelming dominance of individual predictors and individual-focused interventions in psychosocial literature are discussed. PMID:20646035

  17. Developing a patient information leaflet to improve information offered to patients undergoing appendicectomy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Radford; cross, Katie

    2016-01-01

    An appendicectomy is one of the most common operations performed in North Devon District Hospital (NDDH) with over 200 carried out between 2013 to 2014. Despite this, a patient information leaflet (PIL) about appendicectomy is unavailable, which is compromising standards of care and uncompliant with Trust policy. This project aimed to establish levels of written information offered to patients undergoing an appendicectomy, develop a PIL, and assess its impact on the provision of written information using Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology. Case notes of patients operated on between January 2013 to October 2014 were randomly sampled at baseline. The primary outcome measure was whether written information was offered, retrospectively determined by reviewing the medical record. A PIL was then designed following a standard protocol, published on NDDH's website and distributed onto surgical wards. Posters were displayed in staff rooms to encourage use of the PIL for PDSA cycle 1. An article further promoting the PIL was written for the wards monthly newsletter and a local presentation was delivered for PDSA cycle 2. Patients views about the PIL were assessed prospectively using a questionnaire. The primary outcome was measured at 10 weeks following PDSA cycle 1 and at 5 months following PDSA cycle 2. 17% (5/30) of patients were offered written information at baseline. Following PDSA cycle 1, this rose substantially to 53% (8/15) but rates fell to 46% (7/15) following PDSA cycle 2. 89% of patients (8/9) surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that the PIL was helpful. This project indicates that provision of written information is poor despite it being highly valued by patients. The first ever Trust appendicectomy PIL has been established which substantially improved provision of written information after 10 weeks. However, continued education of staff is essential to embed good practice over the long term. PMID:27158496

  18. Developing a patient information leaflet to improve information offered to patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Radford; Cross, Katie

    2016-01-01

    An appendicectomy is one of the most common operations performed in North Devon District Hospital (NDDH) with over 200 carried out between 2013 to 2014. Despite this, a patient information leaflet (PIL) about appendicectomy is unavailable, which is compromising standards of care and uncompliant with Trust policy. This project aimed to establish levels of written information offered to patients undergoing an appendicectomy, develop a PIL, and assess its impact on the provision of written information using Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology. Case notes of patients operated on between January 2013 to October 2014 were randomly sampled at baseline. The primary outcome measure was whether written information was offered, retrospectively determined by reviewing the medical record. A PIL was then designed following a standard protocol, published on NDDH's website and distributed onto surgical wards. Posters were displayed in staff rooms to encourage use of the PIL for PDSA cycle 1. An article further promoting the PIL was written for the wards monthly newsletter and a local presentation was delivered for PDSA cycle 2. Patients views about the PIL were assessed prospectively using a questionnaire. The primary outcome was measured at 10 weeks following PDSA cycle 1 and at 5 months following PDSA cycle 2. 17% (5/30) of patients were offered written information at baseline. Following PDSA cycle 1, this rose substantially to 53% (8/15) but rates fell to 46% (7/15) following PDSA cycle 2. 89% of patients (8/9) surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that the PIL was helpful. This project indicates that provision of written information is poor despite it being highly valued by patients. The first ever Trust appendicectomy PIL has been established which substantially improved provision of written information after 10 weeks. However, continued education of staff is essential to embed good practice over the long term. PMID:27158496

  19. Improving Physician-Patient Communication through Coaching of Simulated Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravitz, Paula; Lancee, William J.; Lawson, Andrea; Maunder, Robert; Hunter, Jonathan J.; Leszcz, Molyn; McNaughton, Nancy; Pain, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Effective communication between physicians and their patients is important in optimizing patient care. This project tested a brief, intensive, interactive medical education intervention using coaching and standardized psychiatric patients to teach physician-patient communication to family medicine trainees. Methods: Twenty-six family…

  20. Translating improved quality of care into an improved quality of life for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Corey A; Allen, John I; Melmed, Gil Y

    2013-08-01

    The term quality of care has been interpreted in different ways in medicine. Skeptics of the quality movement insist that checkboxes and government and payer oversight will not lead to better patient outcomes. Supporters refer to areas in medicine in which quality improvement efforts have led to improved survival, such as in cystic fibrosis and cardiovascular disease. For quality improvement to be effective, the process demands rigorous documentation, analysis, feedback, and behavioral change. This requires valid metrics and mechanisms to provide dynamic point-of-care (or close to point of care) feedback in a manner that drives improvement. For inflammatory bowel disease, work has been performed in Europe and the United States to develop a framework for how practitioners can improve quality of care. Improve Care Now has created a sophisticated quality improvement program for pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The American Gastroenterology Association has worked within the National Quality Strategy framework to develop quality measures for patients with inflammatory bowel disease that have been incorporated into Federal programs that are moving Medicare reimbursement from a volume-based to a value-based structure. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America is initiating a quality intervention program that can be implemented in community and academic practices to stimulate continual improvement processes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. All of this work is intended to make quality improvement programs both feasible and useful, with the ultimate goal of improving quality of life for our patients. PMID:23747710

  1. Adherence to Calcium and Vitamin D supplementations: results from the ADVICE Survey

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Francesco; Piscitelli, Prisco; Italiano, Giovanni; Parma, Alessandro; Caffetti, Maria Cristina; Giolli, Lorenzo; Di Tanna, Gian Luca; Guazzini, Andrea; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective The ADVICE (ADherence in VItamin-D and Calcium Embedded or not) survey was aimed to evaluate the effect of a patient-focused motivation strategy on the adherence to calcium and vitamin D supplementation. The survey also intended to identify possible factors being able to influence the compliance (i.e. the existence of individual preferences towards different dosages or regimens of supplementation). Methods We planned to involve consecutive patients visited between 2010 and 2011 at 35 centres specialized in diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in different Italian regions. Each patient has been requested to declare if he/she was already assuming any supplementation with calcium and vitamin D (naïve or not naïve). All patients underwent a first visit (T0) and two follow up visits at 6 and 12 months (T6 e T12). The assessment of the adherence was measured through the Morinsky Medication Adherence Scale, a score based on 8 different questions, specifically validated to determine therapeutical compliance (0–5: not acceptable; 6–7: acceptable; 8: ideal). Results 732 women (mean age: 66.9; average BMI: 25.3) and 30 men (mean age: 71.9; average BMI: 24.5) were enrolled; 34% of female patients (n=245) and 66% of males (n=20) reported previous fractures. Not naïve patients were 385 (54%). A total of 309 patients (43%) were concurrently assuming an antifracture drug; 229 subjects were osteoporotic (45%), while 224 were osteopenic (44%). The mean Morinsky score in not naïve patients was 5.72, 6.19 and 6.18 at T0, T6, and T12, respectively. Thus, no differences in the Morinsky score were observed between T6 and T12. Naïve patients showed an average Morinsky score of 5.78 at T6 and 6.39 at T12. Older age was not significantly associated with the observed changes in the scores. The onset of AEs related to the supplementation with calcium and vitamin D was able to negatively influence the adherence at the subsequent control point. Bone mineral density

  2. Neurologic improvement without angiographic improvement after antithyroid therapy in a patient with Moyamoya syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Akiko; Toyoda, Kazunori; Suzuki, Rieko; Miyashita, Fumio; Iihara, Koji; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease with special complications, including Graves' disease, is called as moyamoya syndrome. A 22-year-old Japanese woman had left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarction complicated with Graves' disease. She had right-sided hemiparesis that deteriorated on day 8 with the infarct growth and thyrotoxicosis. On angiogram, the left MCA was occluded at the origin without moyamoya vessels. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed misery-perfusion phenomenon in the left MCA territory. After initiation of the antithyroid therapy, her hemiparesis became milder. Seventeen months later, her thyroid function was normalized and net-like collateral moyamoya vessels proliferated in the left MCA territory. Misery-perfusion phenomenon persisted on PET. This report is unique in the point of neurologic recovery of the moyamoya patient right after initiation of antithyroid medication without radiological improvement. PMID:24119625

  3. MedMinify: An Advice-giving System for Simplifying the Schedules of Daily Home Medication Regimens Used to Treat Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Allen J; Klasnja, Predrag; Friedman, Charles P

    2014-01-01

    For those with high blood pressure, diabetes, or high cholesterol, adherence to a home medication regimen is important for health. Reductions in the number of daily medication-taking events or daily pill burden improve adherence. A novel advice-giving computer application was developed using the SMART platform to generate advice on how to potentially simplify home medication regimens. MedMinify generated advice for 41.3% of 1,500 home medication regimens for adults age 60 years and older with chronic medical conditions. If the advice given by MedMinify were implemented, 320 regimen changes would have reduced daily medication-taking events while an additional 295 changes would have decreased the daily pill burden. The application identified four serious drug-drug interactions and so advised against taking two pairs of medications simultaneously. MedMinify can give advice to change home medication regimens that could result in simpler home medication-taking schedules. PMID:25954445

  4. MedMinify: An Advice-giving System for Simplifying the Schedules of Daily Home Medication Regimens Used to Treat Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Allen J.; Klasnja, Predrag; Friedman, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    For those with high blood pressure, diabetes, or high cholesterol, adherence to a home medication regimen is important for health. Reductions in the number of daily medication-taking events or daily pill burden improve adherence. A novel advice-giving computer application was developed using the SMART platform to generate advice on how to potentially simplify home medication regimens. MedMinify generated advice for 41.3% of 1,500 home medication regimens for adults age 60 years and older with chronic medical conditions. If the advice given by MedMinify were implemented, 320 regimen changes would have reduced daily medication-taking events while an additional 295 changes would have decreased the daily pill burden. The application identified four serious drug-drug interactions and so advised against taking two pairs of medications simultaneously. MedMinify can give advice to change home medication regimens that could result in simpler home medication-taking schedules. PMID:25954445

  5. Walking improvements with nabiximols in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coghe, G; Pau, M; Corona, F; Frau, J; Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Spinicci, G; Mamusa, E; Musu, L; Massole, S; Massa, R; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-11-01

    Recently, nabiximols was approved as a treatment in MS spasticity. Data leading to approval and clinical use of nabiximols, although widely recognised, are based on subjective scales. Movement analysis procedures would obtain more detailed data about the impact on mobility. The aim of the study was to quantitatively assess the functional modification of gait patterns induced by nabiximols in MS. We evaluated three-dimensional gait analysis (spatial-temporal and kinematic) variation by means of one-way ANOVA. Twenty patients were enrolled-9 male and 11 female-with mean EDSS of 5.3 (SD ± 0.81) and mean reduction of numerical rating scale during nabiximols treatment of 1.88. The spatial-temporal parameters of gait revealed an increased speed (+15 %, p < 0.001), cadence (+6 %, p < 0.001) and stride length (+10 %, p < 0.001) after treatment. Regarding the kinematics data, the Gait Profile Score after treatment was reduced by 10 % (p < 0.001): Significant changes involved the pelvic area, hip rotation and knee flexion-extension. We found that nabiximols is able to improve the speed, cadence and stride length. Furthermore, the dynamics of the proximal segment of the legs and the knee movement results after treatment are closer to the physiologic values. PMID:26239223

  6. Eating behaviors among low-income obese adults in the United States: Does health care provider's advice carry any weight.

    PubMed

    Lorts, Cori; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam

    2016-06-01

    The U.S. Preventive Task Force recommends that all patients be screened for obesity and given appropriate weight loss advice, if needed, as nutrition counseling by primary care physicians is a key objective for Healthy People 2020. This study assesses the association between health care provider's (HCP) advice to lose weight and eating behaviors among obese individuals. Data were collected using a household survey of adults in five New Jersey cities in 2009-10. Analyses presented are limited to 548 obese participants. Negative-binomial regression analysis determined the association of participants' eating behaviors and HCP's advice to lose weight, after adjusting for the participant's attempt to lose weight and demographic variables. Despite being obese, only 48% of the participants received weight loss advice from their HCP while 68% stated they were attempting to lose weight. HCP's advice to lose weight was associated with increased salad and fruit consumption (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.06-1.61; PR 1.23, 95% CI 1.02-1.48). Attempting to lose weight was positively associated with a higher consumption of fruit (PR 1.39, 95% CI 1.13-1.72), vegetables (PR 1.22, 95% CI 1.07-1.39), and with eating fruits and vegetables as snacks (PR 1.62, 95% CI 1.28-2.05). Attempting to lose weight was negatively associated with consumption of sweet snacks (PR 0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.94), sugar sweetened beverages (PR 0.71, 95% CI 0.58-0.87) and fast food (PR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62-0.97). There were no significant interactions between HCP's advice and attempts to lose weight. Obese adult's attempt to lose weight, and not HCP's advice to lose weight, was a predictor for healthy eating behaviors. Interventions in medical practices should train HCPs on effective strategies for motivating obese patients to adopt healthier lifestyles. PMID:26876632

  7. Acute care of older patients in the emergency department: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, John J; Kennelly, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Older patients in the emergency department (ED) are a vulnerable population who are at a higher risk of functional decline and hospital reattendance subsequent to an ED visit, and have a high mortality rate in the months following an ED attendance. The delivery of acute care in a busy environment to this population presents its own unique challenge. The purpose of this review is to detail the common geriatric syndromes encountered in the ED as well as the appropriate strategies and instruments, which can be utilized to support the clinical decision matrix and improve outcomes. PMID:27147890

  8. The personal shopper – a pilot randomized trial of grocery store-based dietary advice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, K H; Roblin, D W; Leo, M; Block, J P

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a store-based dietary education intervention against traditional clinic-based advice. Patients with obesity (n = 55, mean [standard deviation, SD] age 44.3[9.2] years, 64% women, 87% non-Hispanic Black) were randomized to receive dietary counselling either in a grocery store or a clinic. Change between groups (analysis of covariance) was assessed for outcomes including: dietary quality (Healthy Eating Index – 2005 [0–100 points] ), and nutritional knowledge (0–65-point knowledge scale). Both groups reported improved diet quality at the end of the study. Grocery participants had greater increases in knowledge (mean [SD] change = 5.7 [6.1] points) than clinic participants (mean [SD] change = 3.2 [4.0] points) (P = 0.04). Participants enjoyed the store-based sessions. Grocery store-based visits offer a promising approach for dietary counselling. PMID:25873139

  9. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  10. Beneficent persuasion: techniques and ethical guidelines to improve patients' decisions.

    PubMed

    Swindell, J S; McGuire, Amy L; Halpern, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    Physicians frequently encounter patients who make decisions that contravene their long-term goals. Behavioral economists have shown that irrationalities and self-thwarting tendencies pervade human decision making, and they have identified a number of specific heuristics (rules of thumb) and biases that help explain why patients sometimes make such counterproductive decisions. In this essay, we use clinical examples to describe the many ways in which these heuristics and biases influence patients' decisions. We argue that physicians should develop their understanding of these potentially counterproductive decisional biases and, in many cases, use this knowledge to rebias their patients in ways that promote patients' health or other values. Using knowledge of decision-making psychology to persuade patients to engage in healthy behaviors or to make treatment decisions that foster their long-term goals is ethically justified by physicians' duties to promote their patients' interests and will often enhance, rather than limit, their patients' autonomy. We describe techniques that physicians may use to frame health decisions to patients in ways that are more likely to motivate patients to make choices that are less biased and more conducive to their long-term goals. Marketers have been using these methods for decades to get patients to engage in unhealthy behaviors; employers and policy makers are beginning to consider the use of similar approaches to influence healthy choices. It is time for clinicians also to make use of behavioral psychology in their interactions with patients. PMID:20458111

  11. Using patient passports to improve A&E asthma care.

    PubMed

    Newell, Karen; Bunce, Rebecca; Hume, Shenagh

    The asthma patient passport (APP) is a patient-specific asthma plan that details what to do when asthma is out of control. It helps patients who have severe, difficult-to-manage asthma, and health professionals when these patients present at accident and emergency. This article shows that, while the APP acts as a patient's advocate, it also facilitates accessing emergency care by making it more streamlined. Case studies explore why people with asthma have avoided going to A&E, putting their lives at risk, and provide an insight into how difficult it can be for people to navigate the healthcare system when they are at their most vulnerable. PMID:26021030

  12. Survey of general practitioners' advice for travellers to Turkey.

    PubMed Central

    Usherwood, V; Usherwood, T P

    1989-01-01

    Fifty general practitioners replied to a survey of the advice that they would offer to a tourist planning a package holiday in western Turkey. The range of prophylactic immunizations and other medication recommended by the respondents was wide, suggesting that some tourists travel without adequate protection, while some receive unnecessary injections. Most of the doctors would offer little other health advice to the traveller. General practitioners receive conflicting guidance on prophylactics for travellers, and it is suggested that the disagreements should be resolved. Wider availability of written advice for the traveller would also be valuable. PMID:2559989

  13. Survey of general practitioners' advice for travellers to Turkey.

    PubMed

    Usherwood, V; Usherwood, T P

    1989-04-01

    Fifty general practitioners replied to a survey of the advice that they would offer to a tourist planning a package holiday in western Turkey. The range of prophylactic immunizations and other medication recommended by the respondents was wide, suggesting that some tourists travel without adequate protection, while some receive unnecessary injections. Most of the doctors would offer little other health advice to the traveller. General practitioners receive conflicting guidance on prophylactics for travellers, and it is suggested that the disagreements should be resolved. Wider availability of written advice for the traveller would also be valuable. PMID:2559989

  14. 3D printing of patient-specific anatomy: A tool to improve patient consent and enhance imaging interpretation by trainees.

    PubMed

    Liew, Yaoren; Beveridge, Erin; Demetriades, Andreas K; Hughes, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of three-dimensional or 3D printed, patient-specific anatomy as a tool to improve informed patient consent and patient understanding in a case of posterior lumbar fixation. Next, we discuss its utility as an educational tool to enhance imaging interpretation by neurosurgery trainees. PMID:25822093

  15. Expanding patient engagement in quality improvement and health system redesign: Three Canadian case studies.

    PubMed

    Baker, G Ross; Fancott, Carol; Judd, Maria; O'Connor, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare organizations face growing pressures to increase patient-centred care and to involve patients more in organizational decisions. Yet many providers worry that such involvement requires additional time and resources and do not see patients as capable of contributing meaningfully to decisions. This article discusses three efforts in four organizations to engage patients in quality improvement efforts. McGill University Health Centre, Saskatoon Health Region, and Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Health Regions all engaged patients in quality improvement and system redesign initiatives that were successful in improving care processes, outcomes, and patient experience measures. Patient involvement in redesigning care may provide a way to demonstrate the value of patients' experiences and inputs into problem-solving, building support for their involvement in other areas. Further study of these cases and a broader survey of organizational experiences with patient involvement may help elucidate the factors that support greater patient engagement. PMID:27576853

  16. Effect of Sertraline on Uremic Pruritus Improvement in ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Mansor; Sanadgol, Hoshang; Azmoude, Hamid Reza; Mashhadi, Mohamad Ali; Sharifi, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although uremic pruritus is a common and upsetting problem of chronic kidney disease, there is no approved treatment for it. This study was undertaken to find the efficiency of sertraline as a possible treatment for uremic pruritus. Methods. 19 ESRD patients under hemodialysis with severe chronic pruritus were randomly selected to participate in this before-after clinical trial. Before and after starting treatment with sertraline, a detailed pruritus history was obtained and pruritus graded by the 30-item inventory of pruritus that patients based on priorities grade allocated to 3 classes. Subjects were treated with sertraline 50 mg oral daily for four months, with monthly assessments of pruritus symptoms. Results. Before treatment with sertraline, the grade of pruritus in 9 (47.4%) patients was moderate and severe in 10 (52.6%) patients. After treatment, grade of pruritus in 11 (57.8%) patients was weak, 6 (31.5%) have moderate and only 2 (10.7%) patients have severe pruritus. Of 10 patients with severe pruritus, 5 (50%) patients experiencing weak pruritus, and 4 (40%) patients have moderate pruritus after treatment. Based on Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the difference between the grade of pruritus before and after treatment with sertraline was significant (P = 0.001). Conclusions. Although no definitive recommendation can be made regarding treatment of uremic pruritus, we found an increased antipruritic effect of sertraline in ESRD patients. PMID:22973512

  17. Effect of magnet recognition on provision of smoking cessation advice to inpatients with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Mary Y

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the effect of Magnet recognition on hospital-reported rates of smoking cessation advice (SCA) provided to inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia. Logistic and propensity score regression models estimated the magnet effect on the SCA rate. Predictors were hospital characteristics, socioeconomic factors affecting smoking, and baseline and mid-study SCA rates as variations in hospital-improvement systems. Magnet recognized hospitals reporting higher mid-study SCA rates had higher outcome SCA rates. PMID:24434895

  18. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm. PMID:25723367

  19. The patient is the teacher: ambulatory patient-centred student-based interprofessional education where the patient is the teacher who improves patient care outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fiddes, P J; Brooks, P M; Komesaroff, P

    2013-07-01

    The patient's role as the key to medical student education was enunciated by Osler in 1903 and remains central to the broader imperative of interprofessional education. Interprofessional education needs to progress from the patient's passive bedside or office role to assume a more active and primary role by his/her participation as the teacher, immersed in student education. To date, the achievements in interprofessional education have been limited, but ambulatory patient-centred learning opportunities involving direct student to patient dialogues and mixed health professional student engagement with patients as teachers are emerging within various interprofessional student clinic formats. There is good evidence that such approaches lead to actual improvements in patient outcomes. PMID:23841759

  20. An Expert's Advice: What To Do If You Have Psoriasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Living with Psoriasis An Expert's Advice: What To Do If You Have Psoriasis Past Issues / ... the Dermatology Foundation, and the American Skin Association. What is psoriasis? Psoriasis is a chronic (long-term) ...

  1. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  2. Improving the service for patients receiving extracorporeal photopheresis using Lean principles.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Cherie; Robertson, Leeah; Taylor, Tracie; Taylor, Peter; Button, Paul; Alfred, Arun

    2016-09-01

    The photopheresis unit where the authors work has seen an increased demand both locally and as an outreach service. A Lean assessment of the unit was undertaken to improve processing time and productivity, which in turn would improve the availability of treatment and improve patient care. The assessment indicated that there were excellent nursing standards and patient care; however, patient waiting times and treatment times were prolonged in comparison with other units. The unit reviewed the patient pathway and identified where delays occurred and consequently changed patient scheduling. PMID:27615528

  3. Influence of Antiflatulent Dietary Advice on Intrafraction Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene M.; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Gils, Carla H. van; Leerdam, Monique E. van; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an antiflatulent dietary advice on the intrafraction prostate motion in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, 977 patients received five-beam IMRT for prostate cancer to a dose of 76 Gy in 35 fractions combined with fiducial markers for position verification. In July 2008, the diet, consisting of dietary guidelines to obtain regular bowel movements and to reduce intestinal gas by avoiding certain foods and air swallowing, was introduced to reduce the prostate motion. The intrafraction prostate movement was determined from the portal images of the first segment of all five beams. Clinically relevant intrafraction motion was defined as {>=}50% of the fractions with an intrafraction motion outside a range of 3 mm. Results: A total of 739 patients were treated without the diet and 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy after introduction of the diet. The median and interquartile range of the average intrafraction motion per patient was 2.53 mm (interquartile range, 2.2-3.0) without the diet and 3.00 mm (interquartile range, 2.4-3.5) with the diet (p < .0001). The percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion increased statistically significant from 19.1% without diet to 42.9% with a diet (odds ratio, 3.18; 95% confidence interval, 2.07-4.88; p < .0001). Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that antiflatulent dietary advice for patients undergoing IMRT for prostate cancer does not reduce the intrafraction movement of the prostate. Therefore, antiflatulent dietary advice is not recommended in clinical practice for this purpose.

  4. Inspiration from role models and advice for moving forward.

    PubMed

    Newman, Michelle G; McGinn, Lata K

    2012-12-01

    This Behavior Therapy series on overcoming the glass ceiling followed from a highly attended panel at ABCT on the same topic. The current paper summarizes the common themes across the various papers in this series with respect to obstacles prominent women have faced, and how we can learn from their stories to help inform the future. These themes include the importance of role models, messages from a supportive environment, difficulties balancing careers with children, coordinating careers with family, importance of taking charge of one's career, moving forward despite negative internal and external messages, and questions about whether things have changed substantially. In addition, this paper contains a summary of the helpful advice from accomplished women in academia for navigating the academic waters. It is our aspiration that going forward this series will stimulate other conversations as well as increase thought, behavior, solidarity, and awareness about this topic so that we can continue to work toward a future when things will continue to improve for women. PMID:23046775

  5. Giving Advice: Enough Is Enough After Three Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael

    2009-09-01

    On 1 July 2008, I concluded my 6-year term of service as president-elect, president, and past-president of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) section. I truly appreciated the trust and confidence placed in me by the SPA electorate, and I greatly enjoyed this unique period of professional service. To have sufficient time to be fully engaged in SPA and AGU matters, I had taken a 6-year leave of service from advisory committees at NASA, the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Space Studies Board of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS), Department of Defense laboratories, and grant panels at all U.S. federal agencies. When my SPA duties were winding down about a year ago, I resumed my service on committees and panels. I was surprised to find that not only have things not improved, but they are far worse. The occurrence of self-serving advice, subdiscipline protection, and the shameless promotion of projects linked to one’s home institution is now out of control. If these patterns of professional conduct are not addressed seriously, SPA will survive into the 21st century as nothing more than a disjointed series of isolated fads based on bias and hype.

  6. Exploring the intersectoral partnerships guiding Australia's dietary advice.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jane; Sindall, Colin; Banwell, Cathy

    2004-03-01

    In 1986, the Ottawa Charter alerted a new generation of health promotion practitioners to the benefits of working with the non-health sectors, including the commercial sector. Since then, the establishment of partnerships with government and non-government bodies has been advanced as a positive way of fostering policies that enhance health and well-being. The food and nutrition field has enthusiastically adopted partnerships between government, non-government and industry. In this article, we focus on the tactics employed by industry bodies to further their cause in a range of fields that are characterized by risk and contestation. We describe the nature of the alliances and interactions between commercial, scientific and government groups whose stated aim is to improve Australia's diet. Our analysis shows that these partnerships have been guided less by the ethos of the Ottawa Charter and more by the interests of the various parties: namely the food industry's need for credibility in making health claims, the financial imperatives of professional bodies and scientists whose public funding is inadequate, and government endorsement of public-private partnerships as the preferred mechanism for service delivery. The symbiotic relationship that is emerging between segments of the food industry and the nutrition professions raises questions about the independence of the dietary advice being given to consumers. We conclude by arguing for a research programme to investigate the consequences of intersectoral partnerships on the nutritional status of the population. PMID:14976167

  7. Studying the Rate and Causes of Discharge Against Medical Advice in Hospitals Affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirzad Asadollah Pour; Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Farahabbadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Zamanfar, Daniel; Fallah, Mohammad; Abokheily, Mohammad Asadi

    2014-01-01

    affecting patient illness (54.3%), 2-environmental issues as well as patients’ accompanying (37.6%) and 3-managerial and medical reasons(7.9%), respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed the same results for Discharge against medical advice rate as the others. From the view point of treatment management, its causes should be considered and practices should be done to improve the conditions. Meanwhile, the current self-discharge form doesn’t reflect the causes of the problem and it should be revised. PMID:25126018

  8. How nurses can use social enterprise to improve services in health care.

    PubMed

    Dawes, David

    This article describes the concept of social enterprise in nursing, and outlines how this model can help to improve care delivered to patients. It provides advice for nurses interested in pursuing this entrepreneurial route and also offers case studies demonstrating how the social enterprise model has been implemented in practice. PMID:19330985

  9. Managing medical comorbidities in patients with depression to improve prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2016-02-01

    Medical comorbidities contribute to poor antidepressant response, treatment resistance, and poor outcomes in many patients with depression. Depression can co-occur with thyroid conditions, chronic pain conditions, central nervous system disorders, and more. Inflammatory conditions such as diabetes and obesity are also associated with depression, and the connection between inflammation and depression may lead to testing that could better match patients to specific antidepressant treatment. Interventions for patients with depression and a comorbid medical condition include careful selection of antidepressant therapy as well as psychotherapy and adjunctive agents. PMID:26829434

  10. Customer focus: patient, organization and EQuIP in collaboration. Evaluation and Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, M

    1999-09-01

    The Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS) Evaluation and Quality Improvement Program (EQuIP) calls on healthcare organizations to increase their focus on patients by using leadership to coordinate, and continuous improvement to guide, care delivery. At a large acute care private facility in Melbourne, a program has been developed to create a 'care partnership', characterized by shared decision making, collaboration and conciliation. This program enhances patient care through the coordination of three strategies, a patient communication strategy, an evaluation strategy and a quality improvement strategy. The program has resulted in patient guided reforms such as redesign of a patient information booklet, a hospital-wide discharge planning improvement initiative and a hospital-wide strategy to improve pain management. Through the creation of a care partnership, this program helps an acute care hospital focus its services and processes on one of its key customer groups, patients. PMID:10482321

  11. Involving patients to improve service quality in primary care.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Keith; Sinfield, Paul; Ion, Vince; Merry, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    A sample of 92 UK patients volunteered to take part in focus groups to discuss what elements of local primary care provision were important to them. Issues raised were prioritised by the patients and then fashioned into 18 quality indicators which nine local practices were invited to assess themselves against. At the assessment meeting three months later over 40 changes in service provision were noted in the nine participating practices. A patient questionnaire carried out in each practice, however, indicated a tendency for practices to overestimate the services they felt they provided. Patients rated the experience of generating standards as very worthwhile and enjoyed being asked. Further research needs to be carried out to assess the effectiveness of this methodology in different settings. PMID:15481696

  12. [Implementation of the Dutch vitamin D supplementation advice: report of an expert meeting].

    PubMed

    Sohl, Evelien; van Schoor, Natasja M

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the Dutch Health Council published updated advice on vitamin D supplementation in the population of the Netherlands. Although implementation of the advice has commenced, progress is slow. The bottlenecks in implementation were highlighted at a national expert meeting and ideas formulated for improvements. Implementation is rendered more difficult because of the complex mix of lack of awareness of the advice, the reimbursement system of the health insurance companies and a lack of clarity regarding price and dosage differences of the supplements. Existing contact opportunities with healthcare professionals, such as when the flu vaccination is given, need to be used to provide information so as to improve the implementation. The children's health clinic can be used to inform the whole family about supplementation. In nursing and care homes, vitamin D supplementation should be instituted as standard and seen as an indicator of responsible care. It is important to prioritize target groups. The initial focus must be on the most vulnerable group, the inhabitants of nursing and care homes. The second priority must be given to the elderly living independently and to non-western immigrants. PMID:25898864

  13. Improvement of tactile roughness discrimination acuity correlates with perception of improved hand function in patients after hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Shuhei; Kon, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate how well patients' perceptions related to the improvements in their hand function during hospitalization. [Subjects] Sixteen patients who were hospitalized after hand surgery. [Methods] Using the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand edition of the Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire; tactile roughness discrimination acuity, motor imagery, motor function, sensory function, and pain of the upper limb were assessed at admission and discharge. Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients were calculated using the differences in all assessment items at admission and discharge. A multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) was performed to investigate factors that correlated with improvements in Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores. [Results] The improvement of tactile roughness discrimination acuity was significantly associated with patient perception of improved hand function. [Conclusion] The results suggest that an improvement in tactile roughness discrimination acuity was most strongly correlated with patient perception of improved hand function. PMID:27190473

  14. Antidepressant medication can improve hypertension in elderly patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wenjing; Ma, Lina; Zhao, Xiaoling; Li, Yun; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Wei; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Han, Rui; Liu, Huizhen

    2015-12-01

    We explored the influence of antidepressant therapy on blood pressure and quality of life in elderly patients with hypertension. Depression occurs at a higher rate in patients with hypertension than in the normal population. It has been reported that depressive symptoms lead to poorer hypertension control, resulting in the development of complications. We conducted a randomized, parallel group study. A total of 70 elderly patients with hypertension in the period of August 2008 to March 2011 were divided into two groups based on their antihypertensive therapy, a control group (amlodipine, 5 mg daily; n=35) and a therapy group (amlodipine, 5mg daily; citalopram, 20 mg daily; n=35). We compared 24 hour, daytime, and nighttime measurements of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in addition to quality of life, assessed using the Hamilton rating scale for depression, and a 36 item Short Form quality of life questionnaire (SF-36). Both groups were followed for 3 months. At the end of 3 months, all blood pressure levels were significantly lower in the therapy group than in the control group. The other scores (with the exception of the physical function subcategory of the SF-36 quality of life scale) were significantly higher. Our study indicates that clinicians should be aware of depressive symptoms in elderly patients with hypertension, and should consider antidepressant therapy in these patients. PMID:26256065

  15. Health Care Improvement and Continuing Interprofessional Education: Continuing Interprofessional Development to Improve Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcock, Peter M.; Janes, Gillian; Chambers, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Health care improvement and continuing professional education must be better understood if we are to promote continuous service improvement through interprofessional learning in the workplace. We propose that situating interprofessional working, interprofessional learning, work-based learning, and service improvement within a framework of social…

  16. Patient safety and quality improvement: an overview of QI.

    PubMed

    Schriefer, Jan; Leonard, Michael S

    2012-08-01

    It is important for pediatric providers to be involved in quality improvement (QI) activities to improve children’s health outcomes.• The Model for Improvement asks several key questions related to a process, then uses Plan-Do-Study-Act(PDSA) cycles to implement, test, and spread changes.• Lean and Six Sigma methodologies can improve quality by increasing workflow efficiency and decreasing variation.• Root cause analysis (RCA) is a retrospective quality tool that helps determine factors contributing to errors and adverse events, so that improvements can be implemented.• Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) isa prospective quality tool that anticipates system vulnerabilities and helps develop risk reduction strategies.• Evidence-based interventions, such as best-practice guidelines, promote standardization and reduce errors and adverse events, especially in high-risk health-care settings.• Team training can improve communication and situational awareness to create a safer health-care environment. PMID:22855927

  17. Investigating the use of patient involvement and patient experience in quality improvement in Norway: rhetoric or reality?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient involvement in health care decision making is part of a wider trend towards a more bottom-up approach to service planning and provision, and patient experience is increasingly conceptualized as a core dimension of health care quality. The aim of this multi-level study is two-fold: 1) to describe and analyze how governmental organizations expect acute hospitals to incorporate patient involvement and patient experiences into their quality improvement (QI) efforts and 2) to analyze how patient involvement and patient experiences are used by hospitals to try to improve the quality of care they provide. Methods This multi-level case study combines analysis of national policy documents and regulations at the macro level with semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation of key meetings and shadowing of staff at the meso and micro levels in two purposively sampled Norwegian hospitals. Fieldwork at the meso and micro levels was undertaken over a 12-month period (2011–2012). Results Governmental documents and regulations at the macro level demonstrated wide-ranging expectations for the integration of patient involvement and patient experiences in QI work in hospitals. The expectations span from systematic collection of patients’ and family members’ experiences for the purpose of improving service quality through establishing patient-oriented arenas for ongoing collaboration with staff to the support of individual involvement in decision making. However, the extent of involvement of patients and application of patient experiences in QI work was limited at both hospitals. Even though patient involvement was gaining prominence at the meso level − and to a lesser extent at the micro level − relevant tools for measuring and using patient experiences in QI work were lacking, and available measures of patient experience were not being used meaningfully or systematically. Conclusions The relative lack of expertise in Norwegian hospitals of

  18. Improving the management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Hayes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major cause of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. The most common source of bleeding is from gastroesophageal varices but non-variceal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease also carries a significant risk in patients with liver disease. The prognosis is related to the severity of the underlying liver disease, and deaths often occur due to liver failure, infection or renal failure. Optimal management should therefore not only achieve haemostasis but address these complications as well. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis includes a range of medical, endoscopic and radiological interventions. This article updates the recent developments in this area and highlights topics where further research is still required. PMID:26581713

  19. Bar code technology improves positive patient identification and transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G; Langeberg, A; Dohnalek, L

    2005-01-01

    As a result of human error, an estimated 1 in 12,000 blood transfusions is given to the wrong patient. The cause of nearly all of these errors is failure of hospital personnel to identify positively intended transfusion recipients, their blood samples for cross-matching, or their correct blood components. We describe our experience using a point-of-care bar code transfusion safety system that links patients' bar-coded wristbands, with bar-coded labels on blood sample tubes, blood component bags, and nurses' identification badges. The result was 100 % accuracy of matching patients, their blood samples, and components for transfusions. For verifying information before starting blood transfusions, nurses preferred bar code "double checks" to conventional visual "double checks" by a second nurse. Methods are needed to reinforce nurses' proficiency with technological approaches to transfusion safety, such as software-driven bar code scanning, in situations where transfusions are administered infrequently. PMID:16050151

  20. Techniques to improve patient safety in hospitals: what nurse administrators need to know.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Mary J

    2014-10-01

    Nurse administrators are challenged to determine the best use of limited resources to support organizational patient safety improvement efforts. This article reviews the literature on techniques to reduce errors and improve patient safety in hospitals with a focus on team training initiatives. Implications for nurse administrators are discussed. PMID:25279512

  1. 78 FR 55257 - Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Civil Money Penalty Inflation Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Civil Money Penalty Inflation Adjustment AGENCY... Title IX of the Public Health Service Act, 42 U.S.C. 299 et seq., the authorizing statute for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Rule, 73 FR 70732...

  2. Design and implementation of a patient navigation system in rural Nepal: Improving patient experience in resource-constrained settings.

    PubMed

    Raut, Anant; Thapa, Poshan; Citrin, David; Schwarz, Ryan; Gauchan, Bikash; Bista, Deepak; Tamrakar, Bibhu; Halliday, Scott; Maru, Duncan; Schwarz, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Patient navigation programs have shown to be effective across multiple settings in guiding patients through the care delivery process. Limited experience and literature exist, however, for such programs in rural and resource-constrained environments. Patients living in such settings frequently have low health literacy and substantially lower social status than their providers. They typically have limited experiences interfacing with formalized healthcare systems, and, when they do, their experience can be unpleasant and confusing. At a district hospital in rural far-western Nepal, we designed and implemented a patient navigation system that aimed to improve patients' subjective care experience. First, we hired and trained a team of patient navigators who we recruited from the local area. Their responsibility is exclusively to demonstrate compassion and to guide patients through their care process. Second, we designed visual cues throughout our hospital complex to assist in navigating patients through the buildings. Third, we incorporated the patient navigators within the management and communications systems of the hospital care team, and established standard operating procedures. We describe here our experiences and challenges in designing and implementing a patient navigator program. Such patient-centered systems may be relevant at other facilities in Nepal and globally where patient health literacy is low, patients come from backgrounds of substantial marginalization and disempowerment, and patient experience with healthcare facilities is limited. PMID:26699353

  3. The Effects of Portfolio-Based Advice on the Development of Self-Directed Learning Skills in Secondary Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kicken, Wendy; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Slot, Wim

    2009-01-01

    This experimental study was designed to investigate whether supervision meetings, in which students receive specific advice on how to use a development portfolio to monitor their progress and plan their future learning, helps them to develop self-directed learning skills and improve their learning in the domain. In the first year of a hairdressing…

  4. Using Focus Groups, Expert Advice, and Cognitive Interviews to Establish the Validity of a College Student Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouimet, Judith A.; Bunnage, JoAnne C.; Carini, Robert M.; Kuh, George D.; Kennedy, John

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on how the design of a national student survey instrument was informed and improved through the combined use of student focus groups, cognitive interviews, and expert survey design advice. We were specifically interested in determining (a) how students interpret the items and response options, (b) the frequency of behaviors or…

  5. 45 CFR 162.1602 - Standards for health care payment and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... advice transaction. 162.1602 Section 162.1602 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Remittance Advice § 162.1602 Standards for health care payment and remittance advice transaction. The Secretary adopts the following standards for the health care payment and remittance advice transaction:...

  6. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy…

  7. Role of clinical nurse leadership in improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jill; Quillinan, Bernie; Carolan, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Leadership in nursing plays a crucial part in the provision of good patient care. However, the terms 'nursing leadership' and 'nursing management' are often confused. This article discusses the difficulties in defining 'clinical leadership', outlines its development in the Republic of Ireland, and identifies issues that must be addressed if clinical nurse leaders are to be effective. PMID:20050482

  8. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  9. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  10. Updating patient histories every five years may improve screening

    Cancer.gov

    In order to maintain accurate family histories from their patients, physicians should get a comprehensive family history by age 30, and then update it every five to 10 years because histories change significantly between ages 30 and 50 years. According t

  11. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service.

  12. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service. PMID:27559474

  13. OPTIMIZED FLUID MANAGEMENT IMPROVES OUTCOMES OF PEDIATRIC BURN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Leonard, Katrina R; Jeschke, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the major determinants for survival of severely burned patients is appropriate fluid resuscitation. At present, fluid resuscitation is calculated based on bodyweight or body surface area, burn size, and urinary output. However, recent evidence suggests that fluid calculation is inadequate and that over- and under-resuscitation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We hypothesize that optimizing fluid administration during the critical initial phase using a transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution monitoring device (PiCCO) would have beneficial effects on the outcome of burned patients. Methods A cohort of seventy-six severely burned pediatric patients with burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA) who received adjusted fluid resuscitation using the PiCCO (P) system were compared to 76 conventionally monitored patients (C). Clinical hemodynamic measurements, organ function (DENVER2 score), and biomarkers were recorded prospectively for the first 20 days after burn injury. Results Both cohorts were similar in demographic and injury characteristics. Patients in the PiCCO group received significantly less fluids (p<0.05) with similar urinary output, resulting in a significantly lower positive fluid balance (p<0.05). The central venous pressure (CVP) in the P group was maintained in a more controlled range (p<0.05), associated with a significantly lower heart rate and significantly lower incidence of cardiac and renal failure, p<0.05. Conclusions Fluid resuscitation guided by transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution during hospitalization represents an effective adjunct and is associated with beneficial effects on post-burn morbidity. PMID:22703982

  14. A human-centered design of a dental discharge summary (DDS) for patients.

    PubMed

    Walji, Muhammad; Loeffelholz, John; Valenza, John A

    2007-01-01

    Patients are often provided with sub-optimal information regarding their clinic visits. Patients sometimes forget post-discharge instructions provided verbally, and infrequently follow preventative advice to improve health. In this research we propose to develop and evaluate a dental discharge summary (DDS) for patients through a human-centered design process. Our long term goals are to automatically generate a personalized discharge summary after each clinic encounter to educate and motivate patients to maintain excellent oral health. PMID:18694242

  15. Orthognathic surgery improves quality of life and depression, but not anxiety, and patients with higher preoperative depression scores improve less.

    PubMed

    Brunault, P; Battini, J; Potard, C; Jonas, C; Zagala-Bouquillon, B; Chabut, A; Mercier, J-M; Bedhet, N; Réveillère, C; Goga, D; Courtois, R

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed quality of life (QoL), depression, and anxiety before and after orthognathic surgery and identified risk factors for poorer postoperative outcome. This multicentre prospective study included 140 patients from five French medical centres. We assessed patients before surgery (T1), 3 months after surgery (T2), and 12 months after surgery (T3). We assessed the severity of the orofacial deformity, physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL (WHOQOL-BREF), and depression and anxiety (GHQ-28). Risk factors for poorer outcome were identified using linear mixed models. Between baseline and 12 months, there was significant improvement in psychological and social QoL and in depression (although below the norms reported in the general population), but not in anxiety. Physical QoL was poorer in patients who were younger, who had a mild orofacial deformity, and who were depressed. Psychological QoL was poorer in younger patients and in depressed patients. Social QoL was poorer in patients who were single, who had a mild orofacial deformity, and who were depressed. Although orthognathic surgery provides a moderate improvement in psychological and social QoL, the systematic screening and treatment of depression could further improve QoL after surgery because it is a major predictor of poor QoL in this population. PMID:26359548

  16. Social network advice during pregnancy: myths, misinformation, and sound counsel.

    PubMed

    St Clair, P A; Anderson, N A

    1989-09-01

    One hundred eighty-five low-income, inner-city women were interviewed after they gave birth. They were allowed to report on up to 30 members of their social networks, including household members, relatives, and friends. Questions were asked regarding the types and nature of health advice given to them by these individuals, the relationship of each advisor, and his or her age and sex. Respondents received between 0 and 211 (median 20) pieces of advice related to pregnancy health from 0 to 19 (median 5) members of their social networks. Both folk beliefs and information aligned with accepted medical views of health promotion were communicated to individual women. Most advice rendered was sound, but often the rationale for the recommended health action was poorly understood. Some respondents received advice that, if followed, could be harmful to health. This suggests that for some low-income, inner-city women, social networks serve as important resources for health information. However, the advice they convey may cause unnecessary worry or come into conflict with recommendations of health care providers. Therefore, new educational strategies are required to address the informational needs not just of individual women, but of their social networks as well. PMID:2789557

  17. Ahead of its time: 40 years after the advice versus treatment family study.

    PubMed

    Orford, Jim

    2015-07-01

    Griffith Edwards' proposal for the alcohol 'treatment versus advice' study--also known as 'the family study'--illustrates how ahead of his time he was. The sample consisted of 100 married men who attended with their wives for a comprehensive assessment. Those randomized to 'advice' were told that the responsibility for attaining the goal of abstinence lay in the patient's hands, supported by his wife, that no further intervention was indicated, but that the research social worker would 'keep a watching brief' by visiting the home every 4 weeks for 12 months. Across multiple outcome measures there was no evidence that 'treatment'--considerable in amount by modern standards--was better than advice. Conversely, marital variables such as wives' alcohol-related hardship were significantly predictive of the outcome of the drinking problem. The study was arguably one of the principal sources of the whole 'brief treatments'/'brief interventions' movement which gathered momentum from then on and which, arguably, has itself become the conventional wisdom. The findings questioned the very nature of the addiction change process, suggesting that non-specific factors might be the more important, an issue that still remains unresolved. It is less clear that the study has left such a mark in terms of the development of a family and social model of addiction treatment and change. For example, it continues to be a struggle to help treatment organizations to become more family-inclusive. PMID:26042559

  18. Dietitians’ Perspectives on Interventions to Enhance Adherence to Dietary Advice for Chronic Diseases in Adults

    PubMed Central

    DESROCHES, SOPHIE; LAPOINTE, ANNIE; DESCHÊNES, SARAH-MAUDE; BISSONNETTE-MAHEUX, VÉRONIQUE; GRAVEL, KARINE; THIRSK, JAYNE; LÉGARÉ, FRANCE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess dietitians’ perspectives on the importance and applicability of interventions to enhance adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults in the Canadian context. Methods Based on a Cochrane systematic review, we identified 8 promising interventions for enhancing adherence to dietary advice: behavioural contracts, exchange lists, feedback based on self-monitoring, individualized menu suggestions, multiple interventions, portion size awareness, telephone follow-up, and videos. Thirty-two dietitians then completed a 3-round Delphi study by responding to an electronic questionnaire asking them to rate the importance and applicability in their practice of the 8 interventions on a 7-point Likert scale. Results Using a ≥75% level of agreement, 4 interventions showed strong consensus: multiple interventions, feedback based on self-monitoring, portion size awareness, and videos. Among these, the most significant were (means ± SD for importance and applicability, respectively) feedback based on self-monitoring (6.97 ± 0.18 and 6.72 ± 0.46), portion size awareness (6.69 ± 0.54 and 6.75 ± 0.51), and multiple interventions (6.94 ± 0.25 and 6.81 ± 0.40). Conclusions These findings can guide the development of educational training sessions for dietitians to help them provide practice-relevant interventions that will increase the likelihood that patients adhere to their advice regarding prevention and management of chronic diseases. PMID:26280789

  19. Sperm Count Improvement in a Cancer-Surviving Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Maria Conceição; Vieira, Margarida M.; Pereira, Joana Simões

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the case of a cancer-surviving patient who was treated with an aromatase inhibitor for fertility reasons with successful results. Clinical Case A 30-year-old patient from our institute who had been submitted to bone marrow transplantation in the past as part of treatment for Hodgkin's disease had revealed oligospermia several times. His sperm count mean value was 33,500 cells/ml. He was treated with an aromatase inhibitor (letrozole, 2 mg/day) for 8 months. After this period, his sperm count had increased significantly to 1,000,000 cells/ml. Conclusion A large number of cancer survivors express a wish for having babies. After their cure, a lot of them have a low count of spermatozoids, and we think that our results show an easy way of helping them. PMID:26351438

  20. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates. PMID:27580282

  1. Blood pressure control. Improving medication compliance among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Krevolin, Larry; Ilagan, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Medication compliance among individuals with hypertension symbolizes a growing concern within the medical community. It is said that roughly 50% of hypertensive patients in the United States do not comply with their medication regimen. Uncontrolled hypertension in turn can lead to kidney failure and other complications. Because compliance to medication regimens is complex and difficult to ascertain, solutions to this problem must be multifactorial. PMID:26454916

  2. Exome Sequencing Can Improve Diagnosis and Alter Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Salazar, Tracy J.; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Udpa, Nitin; Schroth, Jana; Bielas, Stephanie; Schaffer, Ashleigh E.; Olvera, Jesus; Bafna, Vineet; Zaki, Maha S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada H.; Mansour, Lobna A.; Selim, Laila; Abdel-Hadi, Sawsan; Marzouki, Naima; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Al-Saana, Nouriya A.; Sonmez, F. Müjgan; Celep, Figen; Azam, Matloob; Hill, Kiley J.; Collazo, Adrienne; Fenstermaker, Ali G.; Novarino, Gaia; Akizu, Naiara; Garimella, Kiran V.; Sougnez, Carrie; Russ, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    The translation of “next-generation” sequencing directly to the clinic is still being assessed but has the potential for genetic diseases to reduce costs, advance accuracy, and point to unsuspected yet treatable conditions. To study its capability in the clinic, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 118 probands with a diagnosis of a pediatric-onset neurodevelopmental disease in which most known causes had been excluded. Twenty-two genes not previously identified as disease-causing were identified in this study (19% of cohort), further establishing exome sequencing as a useful tool for gene discovery. New genes identified included EXOC8 in Joubert syndrome and GFM2 in a patient with microcephaly, simplified gyral pattern, and insulin-dependent diabetes. Exome sequencing uncovered 10 probands (8% of cohort) with mutations in genes known to cause a disease different from the initial diagnosis. Upon further medical evaluation, these mutations were found to account for each pro-band's disease, leading to a change in diagnosis, some of which led to changes in patient management. Our data provide proof of principle that genomic strategies are useful in clarifying diagnosis in a proportion of patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:22700954

  3. A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Koetser, Inge C. J.; Vries, Eefje N. de; Delden, Otto M. van; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-04-15

    To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

  4. Geographic Localization of Housestaff Inpatients Improves Patient-Provider Communication, Satisfaction, and Culture of Safety.

    PubMed

    Olson, Douglas P; Fields, Barry G; Windish, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses whether geographic localization of housestaff patients contributes to improved patient knowledge of diagnosis, patient satisfaction, provider satisfaction, and workplace culture of safety. Due to national changes to graduate medical education, housestaff patients were localized to a single general medicine ward. Ninety-three patients prelocalization, 64 patients postlocalization, 26 localized physicians, and 10 localized nurses were surveyed. Validated questionnaires assessed patients' experiences during hospitalization, and physician and nurse job satisfaction. Fifty-seven percent of patients knew their diagnosis prior to localization, compared to 80% postlocalization (p < .0001). Prior to localization, 39% of patients who reported experiencing anxieties or fears during hospitalization felt physicians frequently discussed these emotions with them compared to 85% after localization (p < .0001). Before localization, 51% of patients stated that doctors spent 4 min or more daily with them discussing care, compared to 91% after localization (p < .0001). Both physician and nurse opinion significantly improved regarding some but not all aspects of collaboration, teamwork, patient safety, appropriate handling of errors, and culture of safety. The average length of stay was unchanged and the change in 30-day readmission rate was not statistically significant. Localization of patients to a single inpatient ward improved patient knowledge and satisfaction, and some aspects of interprofessional communication and workplace culture of safety. PMID:26042748

  5. Improvement of tactile roughness discrimination acuity correlates with perception of improved hand function in patients after hand surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Shuhei; Kon, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate how well patients’ perceptions related to the improvements in their hand function during hospitalization. [Subjects] Sixteen patients who were hospitalized after hand surgery. [Methods] Using the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand edition of the Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire; tactile roughness discrimination acuity, motor imagery, motor function, sensory function, and pain of the upper limb were assessed at admission and discharge. Spearman’s rank-order correlation coefficients were calculated using the differences in all assessment items at admission and discharge. A multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) was performed to investigate factors that correlated with improvements in Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores. [Results] The improvement of tactile roughness discrimination acuity was significantly associated with patient perception of improved hand function. [Conclusion] The results suggest that an improvement in tactile roughness discrimination acuity was most strongly correlated with patient perception of improved hand function. PMID:27190473

  6. Effects of mailed advice on stress reduction among employees in Japan: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, N; Haratani, T; Iwata, N; Imanaka, Y; Murata, K; Araki, S

    1999-04-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to examine the effects of mailed advice on reducing psychological distress, blood pressure, serum lipids, and sick leave of workers employed in a manufacturing plant in Japan. Those who indicated higher psychological distress (defined as having GHQ scores of three or greater) in the baseline questionnaire survey (n = 226) were randomly assigned to an intervention group or a control group. Individualized letters were sent to the subjects of the intervention group, informing them of their stress levels and recommending an improvement in daily habits and other behaviors to reduce stress. Eighty-one and 77 subjects in the intervention and control groups, respectively, responded to the one-year follow-up survey. No significant intervention effect was observed for the GHQ scores, blood pressure, serum lipids, or sick leave (p > 0.05). The intervention effect was marginally significant for changes in regular breakfasts and daily alcohol consumption (p = 0.09). The intervention effect was marginally significant for the GHQ scores among those who initially did not eat breakfast regularly (p = 0.06). The study suggests that only sending mailed advice is not an effective measure for worksite stress reduction. Mailed advice which focuses on a particular subgroup (e.g., those who do not eat breakfast regularly) may be more effective. PMID:10319572

  7. Pearls of Publishing: Advice for Increasing Your Acceptance Odds.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C; Rossi, Michael J; Provencher, Matthew T; Lubowitz, James H

    2016-07-01

    Pearls of wisdom can be a convenient and efficient strategy to improve performance. As Editors, we employ pearls to standardize the review and editorial process, and we offer our own pearls to you to help facilitate acceptance of submitted research manuscripts with the ultimate goal of strengthening scientific conclusions that can affect patient care, and ultimately, improve outcome. PMID:27373169

  8. Against professional advice: treatment attrition among pregnant methamphetamine users

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Brianna; Albrecht, Jennifer; Terplan, Mishka

    2011-01-01

    Pregnant methamphetamine users who leave substance use treatment against professional advice may be at risk of poorer health outcomes. To examine the hypothesis that methamphetamine use during pregnancy may be associated with leaving substance use treatment against professional advice, the 2006 Treatment Episode Data Set was analyzed. A logistic regression adjusting for age, race, service setting, prior substance abuse treatment, criminal justice referral, and education was conducted. Inclusion criteria were met by 18,688 pregnant admissions; 26.4% identified methamphetamines as their primary substance of use. Frequency of use was identified as an effect modifier, therefore results were stratified by less than weekly use and weekly or more use. Methamphetamine use was significantly associated with leaving treatment against professional advice regardless of usage level. However, the odds of leaving treatment were greater among women using methamphetamine less than weekly. Further investigation into this association may be warranted due to the complications that may result from methamphetamine use during pregnancy. PMID:24474856

  9. Prenatal lactation advice and intention to breastfeed: selected maternal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sable, M R; Patton, C B

    1998-03-01

    This study uses data from the NICHD/MMIHS to examine the relationship among maternal characteristics and (a) whether mothers were asked by their prenatal providers to consider breastfeeding and (b) mothers' prenatal plans on how to feed their infants. Only 37% of the study population reported that their providers advised them to consider breastfeeding. Proportions of women who received prenatal advice to breastfeed and who intended to breastfeed were higher among married, Caucasian non-Hispanic, primiparous mothers, and women who were not enrolled in WIC. Women who received advice to breastfeed had significantly higher rates of planning to breastfeed (61.1%) than women who did not receive this advice (34.7%; p < 0.005). Efforts to meet the DHHS Healthy People 2000 objective for 75% of women to breastfeed in the early postpartum period will require a concentrated effort by prenatal providers to help women overcome their resistance to breastfeeding by offering support and encouragement. PMID:9543957

  10. Patient-reported areas for quality improvement in general practice: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Amy; Carey, Mariko; Mazza, Danielle; Yoong, Serene; Grady, Alice; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Background GPs are often a patient’s first point of contact with the health system. The increasing demands imposed on GPs may have an impact on the quality of care delivered. Patients are well placed to make judgements about aspects of care that need to be improved. Aim To determine whether general practice patients perceive that the care they receive is ‘patient-centred’ across eight domains of care, and to determine the association between sociodemographic, GP and practice characteristics, detection of preventive health risks, and receipt of patient-centred care. Design and setting Cross-sectional survey of patients attending Australian general practice clinics. Method Patients completed a touchscreen survey in the waiting room to rate the care received from their GP across eight domains of patient-centred care. Patients also completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and self-reported health risk factors. GPs completed a checklist for each patient asking about the presence of health risk factors. Results In total 1486 patients and 51 GPs participated. Overall, 83% of patients perceived that the care they received was patient-centred across all eight domains. Patients most frequently perceived the ‘access to health care when needed’ domain as requiring improvement (8.3%). Not having private health insurance and attending a practice located in a disadvantaged area were significantly associated with perceived need for improvements in care (P<0.05). Conclusion Patients in general practice report that accessibility is an aspect of care that could be improved. Further investigation of how indicators of lower socioeconomic status interact with the provision of patient-centred care and health outcomes is required. PMID:25918336

  11. Informed consent: towards improved lay-friendliness of patient information sheets.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Morten; Ravn, Hanne Berg

    2013-01-01

    Regional research ethics committee (REC) members have voiced a need for the linguistic improvement of informed consent documents to ensure duly informed consent and to ease committee deliberation. We have little knowledge of what elements of language use hamper comprehension, or of the extent of medical researchers' appreciation of this problem and their willingness to accept intervention. This qualitative, explorative study proposes an intervention design and tests its feasibility and acceptability. Semi-structured interviews with potential REC applicants informed a linguistic intervention benchmarked against existing guidelines, mandated locally and nationally, and then evaluated quantitatively in a semi-controlled set-up and qualitatively via questionnaires. Potential applicants professed the psychological acceptability of linguistic intervention. The intervention comprised a downloadable Microsoft Word template outlining information structure, a detailed guideline offering advice for each move and self-selected linguistic screening. It was used by 14 applicants and had a measurable effect on REC deliberation time and approval rates. The intervention instruments overall made it easier for applicants to produce informed consent documents meeting prescribed ethical standards concerning lay-friendliness. In conclusion, it was found that linguistic intervention is relevant, feasible and psychologically acceptable to REC applicants; it aids their text production process and seems to enhance the lay-friendliness of these texts. PMID:25233558

  12. Improving Access to Longitudinal Patient Health Information within an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, A.B.; Shen, S.; Dorr, D.A.; Hripcsak, G.; Heermann, L; Narus, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    We designed and implemented an electronic patient tracking system with improved user authentication and patient selection. We then measured access to clinical information from previous clinical encounters before and after implementation of the system. Clinicians accessed longitudinal information for 16% of patient encounters before, and 40% of patient encounters after the intervention, indicating such a system can improve clinician access to information. We also attempted to evaluate the impact of providing this access on inpatient admissions from the emergency department, by comparing the odds of inpatient admission from an emergency department before and after the improved access was made available. Patients were 24% less likely to be admitted after the implementation of improved access. However, there were many potential confounders, based on the inherent pre-post design of the evaluation. Our experience has strong implications for current health information exchange initiatives. PMID:23646076

  13. Growing into My White Coat: Improving the Patient-Provider Relationship Through Diverse Patient Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    The “Patient Diversity” assignment is an integral component for all medical and other health care professional students rotating through the Surgery clerkship at the Yale School of Medicine. Students are instructed to interview a surgical patient who is of a varied social or cultural background to identify how psychosocial factors impact patient coping strategies. In the process, students often appreciate how health care providers’ own social and cultural backgrounds similarly shape their sentiments and reactions in patient care. In this interview with a 26-year-old surgical patient, one student strives to come to terms with her personal insecurities in patient interactions and seeks to overcome them through open conversation and honest introspection. By working to acknowledge and understand patient diversity, health care providers can enhance understanding of their patients’ conditions and form more trustful and empathic relationships with both their patients and colleagues. PMID:24058314

  14. The Armstrong Institute: An Academic Institute for Patient Safety and Quality Improvement, Research, Training, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Molello, Nancy E; Paine, Lori; Winner, Laura; Marsteller, Jill A; Berenholtz, Sean M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Demski, Renee; Armstrong, C Michael

    2015-10-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) could advance the science of health care delivery, improve patient safety and quality improvement, and enhance value, but many centers have fragmented efforts with little accountability. Johns Hopkins Medicine, the AMC under which the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Health System are organized, experienced similar challenges, with operational patient safety and quality leadership separate from safety and quality-related research efforts. To unite efforts and establish accountability, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality was created in 2011.The authors describe the development, purpose, governance, function, and challenges of the institute to help other AMCs replicate it and accelerate safety and quality improvement. The purpose is to partner with patients, their loved ones, and all interested parties to end preventable harm, continuously improve patient outcomes and experience, and eliminate waste in health care. A governance structure was created, with care mapped into seven categories, to oversee the quality and safety of all patients treated at a Johns Hopkins Medicine entity. The governance has a Patient Safety and Quality Board Committee that sets strategic goals, and the institute communicates these goals throughout the health system and supports personnel in meeting these goals. The institute is organized into 13 functional councils reflecting their behaviors and purpose. The institute works daily to build the capacity of clinicians trained in safety and quality through established programs, advance improvement science, and implement and evaluate interventions to improve the quality of care and safety of patients. PMID:25993278

  15. Ursodeoxycholic acid improves gastrointestinal motility defects in gallstone patients

    PubMed Central

    Colecchia, A; Mazzella, G; Sandri, L; Azzaroli, F; Magliuolo, M; Simoni, P; Bacchi-Reggiani, ML; Roda, E; Festi, D

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To simultaneously evaluate the presence of defects in gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as in intestinal transit in gallstone patients (GS) and the effect of chronic ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) administration on these parameters and on serum bile acids and clinical outcome in GS and controls (CTR). METHODS: After a standard liquid test meal, gallbla-dder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound), oroileal transit time (OITT) (by an immunoenzymatic technique) and serum bile acids (by HPLC) were evaluated before and after 3 mo of UDCA (12 mg/kg bw/d) or placebo administration in 10 symptomatic GS and 10 matched healthy CTR. RESULTS: OITT was longer in GS than in CTR (P < 0.0001); UDCA significantly reduced OITT in GS (P < 0.0001), but not in CTR. GS had longer gastric half-emptying time (t1/2) than CTR (P < 0.0044) at baseline; after UDCA, t1/2 significantly decreased (P < 0.006) in GS but not in CTR. Placebo administration had no effect on gastric emptying and intestinal transit in both GS and CTR. CONCLUSION: The gallstone patient has simultaneous multiple impairments of gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as of intestinal transit. UDCA administration restores these defects in GS, without any effect in CTR. These results confirm the pathogenetic role of gastrointestinal motility in gallstone disease and suggest an additional mechanism of action for UDCA in reducing bile cholesterol supersaturation. PMID:16981264

  16. Patient Safety and End-of-Life Care: Common Issues, Perspectives, and Strategies for Improving Care.

    PubMed

    Dy, Sydney Morss

    2016-09-01

    The current state of the science in the fields of patient safety and palliative and end-of-life care have many issues in common. This article synthesizes recent systematic reviews and additional research on improving patient safety and end-of-life care and compares each field's perspective on common issues, both in traditional patient safety frameworks and in other areas, and how current approaches in each field can inform the other. The article then applies these overlapping concepts to a key example area: improving documentation of patient preferences for life-sustaining treatment. The synthesis demonstrates how end-of-life issues should be incorporated into patient safety initiatives. In addition, evaluating overlap and comparable issues between patient safety and end-of-life care and comparing different perspectives and improvement strategies can benefit both fields. PMID:25877945

  17. Unexpected Advice for Beginning Graduate Students in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2012-08-01

    My experience is that beginning graduate students in astrophysics have unrealistic views of how to negotiate the complexities of graduate school and to prepare themselves for a professional career in astrophysics or some other field. This chapter describes my unexpected advice to students beginning with why they should not plan to write a thesis. Other advice concerns how to find and work with a research supervisor, writing and other skills needed for their research, and the need to be creative and when necessary controversial.

  18. Developmental disabilities: improving competence in care using virtual patients.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Carla L; Kleinert, Harold L; Free, Teresa; King, Pam; Slusher, Ida; Boyd, Sara

    2008-02-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have an increasingly important role in health care provision in the United States. However, most nurses report that they receive little or no clinical training in the area of developmental disabilities. A core development team consisting of NP faculty members from three universities, one physician assistant faculty member, the parents of children with developmental disabilities, and educational specialists developed two multimedia interactive pediatric instructional modules in CD-ROM format: one involving a child with Down syndrome and the other, an infant born at 26 weeks gestation. Participants were required to make decisions about proper clinical interaction throughout the cases. The modules on CD were piloted with NP students at three universities. Effectiveness study results demonstrated significant gains in both knowledge and comfort level regarding the care of patients with developmental disabilities. PMID:18320957

  19. [New pediatric drug dosage aids : Improving patient safety].

    PubMed

    Strauß, J M

    2016-03-01

    Dosing errors when administering medicine to children occur often and are due, e.g., to the commonly required dilution of the drugs, misjudgment of the patient's weight, confusion between drugs with similar names, and inadequate communication. Various aids (e.g., measuring tapes and dilution tables) have been designed to avoid mistakes to the greatest extent possible. In daily clinical practice, books and pocket cards are still used for rapid orientation. Use of smartphone-based apps continues to increase, whereby the user is ultimately responsible for their validity. In clinical practice, the simplest possible strategies should be used. A culture that encourages disclosure of errors is useful in order to optimize processes and avoid future errors. PMID:26459455

  20. Rapidfilm: an innovative pharmaceutical form designed to improve patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Valentina; Giarratana, Nadia; Monti, Nunzia Ceppi; Breitenbach, Armin; Klaffenbach, Peter

    2010-06-30

    The aim of the research was to assess the bioequivalence between Rapidfilm, a new patented delivery system, versus the traditional orodispersible tablet (ODT). A randomized, two-way, single dose, crossover, bioequivalence study was conducted in 24 fasting, healthy volunteers with two formulations of ondansetron (Ondansetron Rapidfilm vs. Zofran Zydis Lingual ODT by GlaxoSmithKline GmbH & Co. KG). Plasma samples were analysed by a validated LC-MS/MS method during a collection period of 24 h post-dosing. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) on the targeted pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any significant difference between the two formulations and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) fell within the common acceptance range of 80-125%, satisfying the bioequivalence criteria. These results allow Rapidfilm to claim the same panel of indications of the conventional immediate release oral solid dosage forms, but offering several advantages also over the ODT: it can result in higher patient convenience for several applications. PMID:20363308

  1. Medication management at home: enhancing nurse's skills and improving patient satisfaction--a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Mager, Diana R; Morrissey Ross, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal study was to improve nurse medication management skills during home care (HC) visits, and thus improve care quality and the related patient ratings of nurse performance. Nurses completed presurveys asking how often they asked to see, taught about, and explained side effects of patient medications. Two focus groups were held with HC nurses to determine barriers to provision of such medication interventions, followed by presentation of a series of 5 medication-related educational sessions. HC nurse's surveys 6 months later reveal an increased frequency of medication skill performance, and patient ratings in these same areas improved statistically significantly, nearing or surpassing national benchmarks. PMID:23659219

  2. Improved neurologic prognosis for a patient with propionic acidemia who received early living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Toju; Morii, Mayuko; Wakai, Shuji; Horikawa, Reiko; Kasahara, Mureo

    2013-01-01

    Despite medical therapy, patients with propionic academia (PA) still display a tendency to develop epilepsy. Patients with neonatal-onset PA who have received early living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) are limited in number, and the effect on neurologic prognosis, including epilepsy, is not clear. We report a patient with PA whose EEG findings improved dramatically after undergoing LDLT at age 7 months. The patient's neurologic development and brain MRI findings were quite satisfactory at age 2 years and 3 months. LDLT is effective not only in preventing metabolic decompensation, but also in improving neurologic function to ensure better quality of life. PMID:23151386

  3. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice. PMID:20134280

  4. Patients With Isolated PCL Injuries Improve From Surgery as Much as Patients With ACL Injuries After 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Owesen, Christian; Sivertsen, Einar Andreas; Engebretsen, Lars; Granan, Lars-Petter; Årøen, Asbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reports on outcome after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction often contain both isolated PCL and combined knee ligament injuries. This makes it difficult to conclude on the outcome after reconstruction of isolated PCL injuries. Purpose: To investigate the outcome after PCL reconstruction in patients with an isolated PCL injury and to compare this with the outcome of patients treated with reconstruction after isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Seventy-one patients with an isolated PCL injury that was reconstructed surgically and who had registered in the Norwegian Knee Ligament Registry between 2004 and 2010 were included in this study. Patients with isolated ACL reconstructions (n = 9661) who had registered in the same period were included for comparison. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was used as the patient-reported outcome measure. Preoperative and 2-year postoperative KOOS scores were compared. Changes in KOOS score reported by the PCL patients were compared with changes reported by the ACL patients. Results: At the 2-year postoperative follow-up of the PCL-reconstructed patients, the patient-reported outcome was improved, measured by KOOS as follows: pain, 15.1 (95% CI, 8.5-21.8; P < .001); symptoms, 0.9 (95% CI, –6.6 to 8.3; P = .82); activities of daily living, 13.2 (95% CI, 6.6-13.9; P < .001); sports, 20.7 (95% CI, 11.8-29.4; P < .001); and quality of life, 26.6 (95% CI, 18.9-34.2; P < .001). According to the KOOS, the incremental improvements were similar for PCL and ACL patients. Time from injury to surgery was longer for the PCL patients compared with ACL patients (median, 21.5 vs 8.0 months; P < .001). Conclusion: Patients undergoing PCL reconstruction can expect the same improvements in KOOS score as patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. However, PCL patients start out with an inferior score on average and consequently end up

  5. A web-based interactive tool to improve breast cancer patient centredness.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Kondylakis, Haridimos; McVie, Gordon; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The uniqueness of a patient as determined by the integration of clinical data and psychological aspects should be the aspired aim of a personalized medicine approach. Nevertheless, given the time constraints usually imposed by the clinical setting, it is not easy for physicians to collect information about the patient's unique mental dimensions and needs related to her illness. Such information may be useful in tailoring patient-physician communication, improving the patient's understanding of provided information, her involvement in the treatment process, and in general her empowerment during and after the therapeutic journey. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of an interactive empowerment tool (IEm) on enhancing the breast cancer patient-physician experience, in terms of increasing empowerment, i.e. by providing physicians with a personalised patient's profile, accompanied by specific recommendations to advise them how to interact with each individual patient on the basis of her personal profile. The study will be implemented as a two-arm randomised controlled trial with 100 adult breast cancer patients who fill in the ALGA-BC questionnaire, a computerised validated instrument to evaluate the patient's physical and psychological characteristics following a breast cancer diagnosis. The IEm tool will collect and analyse the patient's answers in real time and send them, together with specific recommendations to the physician's computer immediately before physician's first encounter with the patient. Patients will be randomised to either the intervention group using the IEm tool or to a control group who will only fill in the questionnaire without taking advantage of the tool (physicians will not receive the patient's profile). The proposed approach is supposed to improve the patient-physician communication leading to increased patient participation in the therapeutic process as a consequence leading to improvement in patient empowerment

  6. Factors associated with prevalence and types of ‘may be fit’ advice on fit notes: a cross-sectional primary care analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Chris; Gabbay, Mark; Hillage, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Background The ‘fit note’, with the opportunity for the GP to advise that a patient ‘may be fit’ to do some work, was introduced in April 2010. Aim To estimate numbers of fit notes with ‘may be fit’ advice, the types of advice, and factors associated with any inclusion of such advice in the fit note. Design and setting Cross-sectional analysis of fit note data from 68 general practices in eight regions of England, Wales and Scotland. Method Collection of practice fit note data via GP use of carbonised pads of fit notes for a period of 12 months. Results The ‘may be fit’ box was ticked on 5080 fit notes (6.4% of all fit notes in study). But there was a wide variation in completion rates across the 68 practices (from 1% to 15%). The most prevalent individual item of advice was to ‘amend duties’ of patient as a prerequisite for return to work (included in 42% of all notes containing any ‘may be fit’ advice). Advice was often incomplete or irrelevant, with some GPs failing to comply with official guidance. Inclusion of any ‘may be fit’ advice was independently associated with the patient being female, less socially deprived and having a physical health reason for receiving a fit note. Conclusion Unlike other studies that have relied upon eliciting opinion, this study investigates how the fit note is being used in practice. Findings provide some evidence that the fit note is not yet being used to the optimum benefit of patients (and their employers). PMID:24567652

  7. Improved content aware scene retargeting for retinitis pigmentosa patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In this paper we present a novel scene retargeting technique to reduce the visual scene while maintaining the size of the key features. The algorithm is scalable to implementation onto portable devices, and thus, has potential for augmented reality systems to provide visual support for those with tunnel vision. We therefore test the efficacy of our algorithm on shrinking the visual scene into the remaining field of view for those patients. Methods Simple spatial compression of visual scenes makes objects appear further away. We have therefore developed an algorithm which removes low importance information, maintaining the size of the significant features. Previous approaches in this field have included seam carving, which removes low importance seams from the scene, and shrinkability which dynamically shrinks the scene according to a generated importance map. The former method causes significant artifacts and the latter is inefficient. In this work we have developed a new algorithm, combining the best aspects of both these two previous methods. In particular, our approach is to generate a shrinkability importance map using as seam based approach. We then use it to dynamically shrink the scene in similar fashion to the shrinkability method. Importantly, we have implemented it so that it can be used in real time without prior knowledge of future frames. Results We have evaluated and compared our algorithm to the seam carving and image shrinkability approaches from a content preservation perspective and a compression quality perspective. Also our technique has been evaluated and tested on a trial included 20 participants with simulated tunnel vision. Results show the robustness of our method at reducing scenes up to 50% with minimal distortion. We also demonstrate efficacy in its use for those with simulated tunnel vision of 22 degrees of field of view or less. Conclusions Our approach allows us to perform content aware video resizing in real time using

  8. Does Pramipexole Treatment Improve Headache in Patients with Concomitant Migraine and Restless Legs Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Suzuki, Shiho; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Numao, Ayaka; Watanabe, Yuka; Takashima, Ryotaro; Hirata, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested a strong link between migraines and restless legs syndrome (RLS). It is possible that these disorders share a dopaminergic dysfunction in the hypothalamic A11 nucleus that contributes to this association. However, there have been no clinical studies to evaluate the effect of dopaminergic treatment on migraine symptoms in patients with concomitant migraines and RLS. Methods We present an illustrative patient with concomitant RLS and migraine who showed improvement in her headache frequency and RLS symptoms following immediate-release pramipexole (P-IR) treatment and provide review results from the medical records of patients who experienced both migraines and RLS in our previous cross-sectional study. Results Ten patients (nine patients from the previously completed single-center study) received P-IR treatment were included in the study. RLS symptoms improved markedly in all of the subjects. Five out of the 10 patients (50%) reported improvement in migraine headaches. Of these five patients, four (80%) had reported morning headaches before P-IR treatment. Discussion Our results indicate that the identification of RLS in migraine patients is clinically significant and that dopaminergic treatment may improve both migraines, particularly morning headache (80% improvement in this study), and RLS symptoms. However, further clinical studies are warranted to verify our results. PMID:24116342

  9. More Than Needles: The Importance of Explanations and Self-Care Advice in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea with Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Armour, Michael; Dahlen, Hannah G; Smith, Caroline A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Primary dysmenorrhea is a common gynaecological condition. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncturists commonly treat primary dysmenorrhea and dispense specific self-care advice for this condition. The impact of self-care advice on primary dysmenorrhea is unknown. Methods. 19 TCM acupuncture practitioners from New Zealand or Australia and 12 New Zealand women who had recently undergone acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea as part of a randomised controlled trial participated in this qualitative, pragmatic study. Focus groups and semistructured interviews were used to collect data. These were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic analysis. Results. The overarching theme was that an acupuncture treatment consisted of "more than needles" for both practitioners and participants. Practitioners and participants both discussed the partnership they engaged in during treatment, based on openness and trust. Women felt that the TCM self-care advice was related to positive outcomes for their dysmenorrhea and increased their feelings of control over their menstrual symptoms. Conclusions. Most of the women in this study found improved symptom control and reduced pain. A contributing factor for these improvements may be an increased internal health locus of control and an increase in self-efficacy resulting from the self-care advice given during the clinical trial. PMID:27242909

  10. More Than Needles: The Importance of Explanations and Self-Care Advice in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Primary dysmenorrhea is a common gynaecological condition. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncturists commonly treat primary dysmenorrhea and dispense specific self-care advice for this condition. The impact of self-care advice on primary dysmenorrhea is unknown. Methods. 19 TCM acupuncture practitioners from New Zealand or Australia and 12 New Zealand women who had recently undergone acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea as part of a randomised controlled trial participated in this qualitative, pragmatic study. Focus groups and semistructured interviews were used to collect data. These were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic analysis. Results. The overarching theme was that an acupuncture treatment consisted of “more than needles” for both practitioners and participants. Practitioners and participants both discussed the partnership they engaged in during treatment, based on openness and trust. Women felt that the TCM self-care advice was related to positive outcomes for their dysmenorrhea and increased their feelings of control over their menstrual symptoms. Conclusions. Most of the women in this study found improved symptom control and reduced pain. A contributing factor for these improvements may be an increased internal health locus of control and an increase in self-efficacy resulting from the self-care advice given during the clinical trial. PMID:27242909

  11. Neural substrates predicting improvement of tinnitus after cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided deafness.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Jin; Punte, Andrea Kleine; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Notwithstanding successful reduction of tinnitus after cochlear implantation (CI) in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD) in recent studies, neither the exact mechanism of suppression nor the predictors of the amount of improvement are fully understood yet. We collected quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) data from nine SSD patients who underwent CI for tinnitus management. By correlating the degree of improvement in tinnitus intensity and tinnitus-related distress with preoperative source-localized qEEG findings and comparing qEEG findings of patients with marked improvement after CI with those with relatively slight improvement with regard to source-localized activity complimented by connectivity analysis, we attempted to find preoperative predictors of tinnitus improvement. Our results showed increased activities of the auditory cortex (AC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and increased functional connectivity between the AC and PCC as negative prognostic factors for the reduction of tinnitus intensity after CI in patients with SSD. Also, relatively increased activity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and decreased connectivity between distress-related areas such as the orbitofrontal cortex/parahippocampus and sensory-perception areas such as the AC/precuneus were found in patients with relatively slight improvement in tinnitus-related distress as compared with those with marked improvement. The current study suggests that preoperative cortical oscillations can be applied to predict post-CI tinnitus reduction in patients with SSD. PMID:23415916

  12. Improving Outcomes for Learners through Self-Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document supplements the advice given in "How good is our school?" (HGIOS)--third edition and "The Child at the Centre"--second edition which set out comprehensive quality frameworks and provide helpful advice on the process of improvement through self-evaluation. In particular, this document provides advice on the application of the three…

  13. The Physician Quality Improvement Initiative: Engaging Physicians in Quality Improvement, Patient Safety, Accountability and their Provision of High-Quality Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Wentlandt, Kirsten; Degendorfer, Niki; Clarke, Cathy; Panet, Hayley; Worthington, Jim; McLean, Richard F; Chan, Charlie K N

    2016-01-01

    University Health Network has been working to become a high-reliability organization, with a focus on safe, quality patient care. In response, the Medical Affairs Department has implemented several strategic initiatives to drive accountability, quality improvement and engagement with our physician population. One of these initiatives, the Physician Quality Improvement Initiative (PQII) is a physician-led project designed to provide active medical staff, in collaboration with their physician department chiefs, a comprehensive approach to focused and practical quality improvement in their practice. In this document, we outline the project, including its implementation strategy, logic model and outcomes, and provide discussion on how it fits into UHN's global strategy to provide safe, quality patient care. PMID:27009706

  14. Aldose reductase inhibition improves nerve conduction velocity in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Judzewitsch, R G; Jaspan, J B; Polonsky, K S; Weinberg, C R; Halter, J B; Halar, E; Pfeifer, M A; Vukadinovic, C; Bernstein, L; Schneider, M; Liang, K Y; Gabbay, K H; Rubenstein, A H; Porte, D

    1983-01-20

    To assess the potential role of polyol-pathway activity in diabetic neuropathy, we measured the effects of sorbinil--a potent inhibitor of the key polyol-pathway enzyme aldose reductase--on nerve conduction velocity in 39 stable diabetics in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. During nine weeks of treatment with sorbinil (250 mg per day), nerve conduction velocity was greater than during a nine-week placebo period for all three nerves tested: the peroneal motor nerve (mean increase [+/- S.E.M.], 0.70 +/- 0.24 m per second, P less than 0.008), the median motor nerve (mean increase, 0.66 +/- 0.27, P less than 0.005), and the median sensory nerve (mean increase, 1.16 +/- 0.50, P less than 0.035). Conduction velocity for all three nerves declined significantly within three weeks after cessation of the drug. These effects of sorbinil were not related to glycemic control, which was constant during the study. Although the effect of sorbinil in improving nerve conduction velocity in diabetics was small, the findings suggest that polyol-pathway activity contributes to slowed nerve conduction in diabetics. The clinical applicability of these observations remains to be determined, but they encourage further exploration of this approach to the treatment or prevention of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:6401351

  15. An Association of Cancer Physicians' strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  16. New Treatment Greatly Improves Prognosis for Patients with AMD (Age-Related Macular Degeneration)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Age-related Macular Degeneration New Treatment Greatly Improves Prognosis for Patients with AMD ... Eye Institute Photo Courtesy of: NEI In a new study of nearly 650 people with age-related ...

  17. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  18. An Association of Cancer Physicians’ strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  19. Crizotinib Improves Progression-Free Survival in Some Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Crizotinib Improves Progression-Free Survival in Some Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer ( ... starting treatment without their disease getting worse (progression-free survival), as assessed by radiologic review. Results Progression- ...

  20. A Career Advice Helpline: A Case Study from South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flederman, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This case study presents the new career guidance helpline managed by the South African Qualifications Authority in South Africa, a middle-income country. The National Qualifications Framework and Career Advice Helpline represent a national equity-driven initiative using technology to expand access. The model has drawn on contemporary international…

  1. The Public Services Job Hunt: Observations and Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The library science job market is competitive, and library and information science (LIS) students and new graduates often have questions and concerns about how to engage in a successful job hunt. Based on research with employers and interactions with students and alumni, the author offers advice for job-seekers looking for public services…

  2. Emerging Discourses within the English "Choice Advice" Policy Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exley, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines regulating discourses "spoken" within the complex multi-sector network of educational policy and provision that has grown from a recent introduction of choice advisers in England. Choice advice documentation from across the network is examined and four discursive themes are identified: equity; parental responsibility;…

  3. Time Advice and Learning Questions in Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Students (N = 101) used an introductory text and a computer simulation to learn fundamental concepts about statistical analyses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression analysis and General Linear Model). Each learner was randomly assigned to one cell of a 2 (with or without time advice) x 3 (with learning questions and corrective feedback, with…

  4. The Influence of Advice in a Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulford, Briony D.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of asynchronous discussion in a virtual learning environment, Blackboard, on subsequent coursework grades was examined with 166 psychology students to determine whether asking questions of the tutor online, and/or reading the questions and the given advice, influenced the grades on the report they were writing. A repeated-measures…

  5. An Evaluation of an Occupational Health Advice Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearn, P.; Ford, Norma J.; Murphy, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this article is to identify the profile of service users of an occupational health (OH) support service and establish areas of need, and to gather client feedback on the experience of participating in the support service and perceived outcomes and the impact of the advice received. Design and Setting: We carried out…

  6. Lo Que Aprendimos: Advice for the Next Generation of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    This essay identifies several themes presented by my parents, Abel and Juanita Jimenez. They are parents of five children who successfully navigated through the K-12 system and earned university degrees. They were interviewed over several evenings and asked what advice they would provide to the next generation of Latino parents. My parents…

  7. Advice to White Allies: Insights from Faculty of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutte, Gloria S.; Jackson, Tambra O.

    2014-01-01

    This article interweaves discussions of successes and tensions surrounding cross-racial collaborative social justice efforts in teacher education. It addresses frustrations that often occur for faculty of Color when working with White allies in P-12 settings and schools of education at Predominantly White Institutions. Advice is offered with the…

  8. Advice on Tool Use in Open Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarebout, Geraldine; Elen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Research provides ample evidence that students rarely or often inadequately use instructional interventions in learning environments. This lack of use becomes especially problematic in open learning environments, where students have a large amount of control over tool use. In this contribution it is studied whether advice on the use of tools can…

  9. The Influence of Parental Advice Giving on Children's Friendship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flyr, Mary L.; And Others

    This study examined how parental advice-giving directly and indirectly influences children's quality of friendship with peers. Participating were 66 third graders, their classroom teachers, 66 mothers and 57 fathers, and 66 friends. All but one dyad of the target children and friend were the same gender. Teachers rated target children on peer…

  10. A Wizard of Oz Study of Advice Giving and Following.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William C.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of graduate students that observed the interaction between users of a graphical statistical package and a human playing the role of a simulated intelligent advisory system to guide the design of advice-offering user-assistance software. The use of video to examine the users' role in the interaction is discussed. (Contains 37…

  11. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the public. Good faith reliance on such opinions shall provide a defense to any penalty or sanction... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607...

  12. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the public. Good faith reliance on such opinions shall provide a defense to any penalty or sanction... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607...

  13. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  14. Sense about Sex: Media, Sex Advice, Education and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attwood, Feona; Barker, Meg John; Boynton, Petra; Hancock, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The media are widely acknowledged as important in sex and relationship education, but they are usually associated with "bad" effects on young people in contrast to the "good" knowledge represented by more informational and educational formats. In this paper we look at sex advice giving in newspapers, magazines and television in…

  15. Sexuality and Romance in Advice Books for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arluke, Arnold; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Analyzed 65 advice books for the elderly to assess their romantic and sexual content. Results indicated that sexual activity is encouraged now more than in the past for the elderly, suggesting a trend which stresses activity rather than disengagement. However, little support for remarriage and dating was found. (Author/JAC)

  16. The Academic Con-Men. Advice to Young College Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerins, Francis J.

    1979-01-01

    The academic con-man is defined as one who, despite a lack of striking originality or tremendous learning, becomes extraordinary, well-known, and revered in the world of higher education. Advice is offered to young college professors on how they can achieve such status. (Article originally published in 1961.) (AF)

  17. Fundraising Advice for College and University Presidents: An Insider's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Rita

    2011-01-01

    In these financially challenging times, chief executive officers of today's colleges and universities are expected to serve as their institutions' lead fundraisers. Still, many presidents remain uncomfortable in this essential role. With wisdom and insight, Rita Bornstein offers advice on how to identify, cultivate, and successfully solicit gifts…

  18. Styles of Physician Advice about Smoking Cessation in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemmell, Leigh; DiClemente, Carlo C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether young adult cigarette smokers who were in the precontemplation and contemplation stages of change for smoking cessation would differ in their evaluations of vignettes depicting 2 types of physician advice. Participants: Fifty-seven young adult cigarette smokers who were undergraduate students (49.1% female, mean age =…

  19. 4 CFR 28.8 - Informal procedural advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Informal procedural advice. 28.8 Section 28.8 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL APPEALS BOARD; PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO CLAIMS CONCERNING EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES AT THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY...

  20. Do Students Listen to Advice from Their Experienced Peers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finck, Joseph E.; DeLine, Amy D.

    2008-01-01

    Smith and Peterson (2007) recognize the impact between students seeking out advice and that student's academic performance. And Sallee and Tierney (2007) considered the ways in which students' peer networks facilitate or inhibit access to academic resources. In this paper the authors look at the students who receive suggestions from the previous…

  1. Child abuse article would have benefited from practical advice.

    PubMed

    Corre, Geoff

    2016-05-11

    The article 'Help in raising concerns about child abuse' (features April 27) focuses on escalation processes at the expense of providing practical advice about how professionals should respond in the event of a child disclosing an allegation of abuse. PMID:27206196

  2. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607 Section... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... advisory opinions and informal advisory letters on generally applicable matters, or on important matters...

  3. Appropriateness of Advice as L2 Solidarity Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkel, Eli

    A study investigated different cultural perceptions of the appropriateness of advice-giving in native speakers of English (NSs) and non-native speakers (NNSs). Using a questionnaire, 172 NNS college students and 31 NS college students were administered a questionnaire in which 16 everyday situations involving either social superiors or peers were…

  4. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607 Section... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... advisory opinions and informal advisory letters on generally applicable matters, or on important matters...

  5. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607 Section... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... advisory opinions and informal advisory letters on generally applicable matters, or on important matters...

  6. Senior Advice: Graduating Seniors Write to Psychology Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norcross, John C.; Slotterback, Carole S.; Krebs, Paul M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an assignment in which senior psychology majors write letters of advice to incoming psychology freshmen. Provides a course context and focuses on the representative results and student evaluations of the assignment. Discusses the different purposes the letters have served. (CMK)

  7. Improved Diagnosis of the Polysensitized Allergic Rhinitis Patients Using Component Resolved Diagnosis Method.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Yadzir, Zailatul Hani; Bakhtiar, Faizal; Misnan, Rosmilah; Abdullah, Noormalin; Leecyous, Brenda; Murad, Shahnaz

    2016-04-01

    Allergy diagnosis needs to be improved in polysensitized patients due to the existence of possible confounding factors in this type of patients. Component resolved diagnosis (CRD) is a new concept in the investigation of polysensitized patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the utilization of ImmunoCAP ISAC improve the diagnosis of the polysensitized allergic rhinitis patients. Skin prick test (SPT) to 58 crude allergen extracts and CRD (ImmunoCAP ISAC) were carried out for 5 polysensitized allergic rhinitis patients. Two patients had a shellfish allergy and avoidance of shellfish was the only way to prevent an allergic reaction. In contrast, although the remaining three patients had low risk for shellfish allergy, but they were the best candidates for immunotherapy using mite extracts. CRD and particularly ImmunoCAP ISAC have proven to be a valuable diagnostic tool in polysensitized patients. ImmunoCAP ISAC helps refine the individual patient's sensitization profile and predict the potential risk of allergic reactions and improve the selection of patients for immunotherapy. PMID:27090369

  8. Problems and needs for improving primary care of osteoarthritis patients: the views of patients, general practitioners and practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rosemann, Thomas; Wensing, Michel; Joest, Katharina; Backenstrass, Matthias; Mahler, Cornelia; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is highly prevalent and has substantial impact on quality of life as well as on healthcare costs. The general practitioner (GP) often is the first care provider for patients with this chronic disease. The aim of this study was to identify health care needs of patients with OA and to reveal possible obstacles for improvements in primary care management of OA patients. Methods We performed semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 20 patients, 20 GPs and 20 practice nurses. Results Diagnosing OA posed no major problem, but during the course of OA, GPs found it difficult to distinguish between complaints resulting from the affection of the joints and complaints related to a concomitant depression. Patients felt to be well informed about the degenerative nature of the disease and possible side effects of medications, but they lacked information on individual consequences of the disease. Therefore, the most important concerns of many patients were pain and fear of disability which they felt to be addressed by GPs only marginally. Regarding pain treatment, physicians and patients had an ambivalent attitude towards NSAIDs and opiates. Therefore, pain treatment was not performed according to prevailing guidelines. GPs felt frustrated about the impact of counselling regarding life style changes but on the other hand admitted to have no systematic approach to it. Patients stated to be aware of the impact of life style on OA but lacked detailed information e.g. on how to exercise. Several suggestions were made concerning improvement. Conclusion GPs should focus more on disability and pain and on giving information about treatment since these topics are inadequately addressed. Advanced approaches are needed to increase GPs impact on patients' life style. Being aware of the problem of labelling patients as chronically ill, a more proactive, patient-centred care is needed. PMID:16749935

  9. Tablets in trauma: using mobile computing platforms to improve patient understanding and experience.

    PubMed

    Furness, Nicholas D; Bradford, Oliver J; Paterson, Maurice P

    2013-03-01

    Tablets are becoming commonplace in the health care setting. Patients often request to view their radiographs after sustaining trauma. This can be challenging, especially if patients are immobile. The authors performed a prospective, questionnaire-based study to assess inpatient desire to view radiographs on tablets and whether viewing images affected patient-rated outcomes of understanding and satisfaction. Enabling trauma patients to view their images on a tablet is a worthwhile practice because it improves patient involvement in decision making, satisfaction, perceived understanding, and overall experience. PMID:23464939

  10. Health System Quality Improvement: Impact of Prompt Nutrition Care on Patient Outcomes and Health Care Costs.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Anita; Loose, Claire; Bell, Jvawnna; Partridge, Jamie; Nelson, Jeffrey; Goates, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Among hospitalized patients, malnutrition is prevalent yet often overlooked and undertreated. We implemented a quality improvement program that positioned early nutritional care into the nursing workflow. Nurses screened for malnutrition risk at patient admission and then immediately ordered oral nutritional supplements for those at risk. Supplements were given as regular medications, guided and monitored by medication administration records. Post-quality improvement program, pressure ulcer incidence, length of stay, 30-day readmissions, and costs of care were reduced. PMID:26910129

  11. Nutritional aspects in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and motor dysfunction in the gut. Working team report of the Swedish Motility Group (SMoG).

    PubMed

    Simrén, M; Abrahamsson, H; Bosaeus, I; Brummer, R J; Dolk, A; Lindberg, G; Nyhlin, H; Ohlsson, B; Sjölund, K; Törnblom, H

    2007-05-01

    In reviews regarding the management of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and motility disturbances within the gut nutritional aspects and dietary advice is often put forward as being of great importance. However, there are relatively few high-quality, interventional studies in the literature supporting an important role for general dietary advice to improve symptoms in these patients. Nutritional supplementation to patients with malnutrition due to severe dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract is of course less controversial, even though different views on how this should be performed exist. The content of this article is based on presentations given by the authors during the second meeting of the Swedish Motility Group held in Gothenburg in March 2005, and aims to give an overview on the role of dietary advice and nutritional supplementation to patients with gastrointestinal dysfunction of different severity. PMID:17368120

  12. Implementing the patient circle. Call on patients to help improve perceptions of health care quality.

    PubMed

    Ostasiewski, P; Fugate, D L

    1994-01-01

    Adapting the quality-circle concept to a health care setting helped one hospital solve a problem and boosted its image among patients. The "patient circle" technique is one step health care providers can take toward delivering "total customer value," a quality perception that can mean the difference between surviving and thriving in the future. PMID:10154633

  13. Lean-driven improvements slash wait times, drive up patient satisfaction scores.

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    Administrators at LifePoint Hospitals, based in Brentwood, TN, used lean manufacturing techniques to slash wait times by as much as 30 minutes and achieve double-digit increases in patient satisfaction scores in the EDs at three hospitals. In each case, front-line workers took the lead on identifying opportunities for improvement and redesigning the patient-flow process. As a result of the new efficiencies, patient volume is up by about 25% at all three hospitals. At each hospital, the improvement process began with Kaizen, a lean process that involves bringing personnel together to flow-chart the current system, identify problem areas, and redesign the process. Improvement teams found big opportunities for improvement at the front end of the flow process. Key to the approach was having a plan up front to deal with non-compliance. To sustain improvements, administrators gather and disseminate key metrics on a daily basis. PMID:22838052

  14. Improving the Ambulatory Patient Experience Within an Academic Department of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Neeman, Naama; Sehgal, Niraj L

    2016-05-01

    Academic departments of medicine (ADOM) can provide an important vehicle to drive the sharing and dissemination of best practices in clinical care delivery. With the increased focus on improving the patient experience, particularly in the ambulatory setting, ADOM also should lead efforts to cultivate improvements in this arena. To address this need, the study ADOM established a Patient Experience Working Group (PEWG) that brought together physician and nonphysician leaders, set improvement goals, and created a structure for sharing and learning. Since initiation, the PEWG has implemented more than 20 performance improvement initiatives, which have resulted in measured positive changes at both the local practice settings and department-wide. Striking the right balance between top-down governance, bottom-up innovation and ownership, and shared goal setting was a key to success. This model is one that could easily be adopted by other ADOM in their own efforts to improve the patient experience. PMID:25512951

  15. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bond, Bryan M; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  16. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Bryan M.; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  17. The patient handoff: a comprehensive curricular blueprint for resident education to improve continuity of care.

    PubMed

    Wohlauer, Max V; Arora, Vineet M; Horwitz, Leora I; Bass, Ellen J; Mahar, Sean E; Philibert, Ingrid

    2012-04-01

    In 2010, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education released its resident duty hours restrictions, requiring that faculty monitor their residents' patient handoffs to ensure that residents are competent in handoff communications. Although studies have reported the need to improve the effectiveness of the handoff and a variety of curricula have been suggested and implemented, a common method for teaching and evaluating handoff skills has not been developed. Also in 2010, engineers, informaticians, and physicians interested in patient handoffs attended a symposium in Savannah, Georgia, hosted by the Association for Computing Machinery, entitled Handovers and Handoffs: Collaborating in Turns. As a result of this symposium, a workgroup formed to develop practical and readily implementable educational materials for medical educators involved in teaching patient handoffs to residents. In this article, the result of that yearlong collaboration, the authors aim to provide clarity on the definition of the patient handoff, to review the barriers to performing effective handoffs in academic health centers, to identify available solutions to improve handoffs, and to provide a structured approach to educating residents on handoffs via a curricular blueprint. The authors' blueprint was developed to guide educators in customizing handoff education programs to fit their specific, local needs. Hopefully, it also will provide a starting point for future research into improving the patient handoff. Increasingly complex patient care environments require both innovations in handoff education and improvements in patient care systems to improve continuity of care. PMID:22361791

  18. The Patient Handoff: A Comprehensive Curricular Blueprint for Resident Education to Improve Continuity of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, Max V.; Arora, Vineet M.; Horwitz, Leora I.; Bass, Ellen J.; Mahar, Sean E.; Philibert, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education released its resident duty hours restrictions, requiring that faculty monitor their residents’ patient handoffs to ensure that residents are competent in handoff communications. Although studies have reported the need to improve the effectiveness of the handoff and a variety of curricula have been suggested and implemented, a common method for teaching and evaluating handoff skills has not been developed. Also in 2010, engineers, informaticians, and physicians interested in patient handoffs attended a symposium in Savannah, Georgia, hosted by the Association for Computing Machinery, entitled Handovers and Handoffs: Collaborating in Turns. As a result of this symposium, a workgroup formed to develop practical and readily implementable educational materials for medical educators involved in teaching patient handoffs to residents. In this article, the result of that yearlong collaboration, the authors aim to provide clarity on the definition of the patient handoff, to review the barriers to performing effective handoffs in academic health centers, to identify available solutions to improve handoffs, and to provide a structured approach to educating residents on handoffs via a curricular blueprint. The authors’ blueprint was developed to guide educators in customizing handoff education programs to fit their specific, local needs. Hopefully, it also will provide a starting point for future research into improving the patient handoff. Increasingly complex patient care environments require both innovations in handoff education and improvements in patient care systems to improve continuity of care. PMID:22361791

  19. Delirium detection and improved delirium management in older patients hospitalized for hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Todd, Kristine S; Barry, Jean; Hoppough, Susan; McConnell, Eleanor

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is a common and potentially devastating problem for older patients following hip fracture. Although early detection is recommended, description and evaluation of standardized approaches are scarce. The aims of this quality improvement project were to: (1) implement a clinical algorithm for improving delirium detection and management and (2) assess the impact of the clinical algorithm on length of stay, discharge disposition and patient satisfaction. The pilot study was implemented on an orthopedic unit to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical protocol for delirium detection and management to improve outcomes. Outcomes of 33 elderly post-operative hip fracture patients were compared to historical controls from the same unit. Delirium was detected in 18% of patients. Length of stay was reduced by 22% (P < .001), discharge disposition showed a 13% improvement (P = .17) and patient satisfaction scores showed a 15% (P = .15) improvement post-intervention. Implementation of a clinical algorithm to promote early detection and treatment of delirium in post-operative hip fracture patients is feasible and associated with improved outcomes. PMID:26547684

  20. [Improvement of tumoral calcinosis of the right hand after parathyroidectomy in a patient on chronic hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    El Maghraoui, Jaouad; Hammou, Mohamed; Kabbali, Nadia; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Houssaini, Tariq Sqalli

    2016-01-01

    Periarticular tissue calcifications are common in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis. We report the case of a patient on chronic hemodialysis for 10 years with significant improvement of isolated pseudotumoral calcinosis of the right hand after parathyroidectomy The aim of this study was to show the impact of parathyroidectomy on pseudotumoral calcinosis. PMID:27583094

  1. Interventions to improve patient hand hygiene: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Srigley, J A; Furness, C D; Gardam, M

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial pathogens may be acquired by patients via their own unclean hands, but there has been relatively little emphasis on patient hand hygiene as a tool for preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of patient hand hygiene interventions in reducing HCAIs and improving patient hand hygiene rates compared to usual care. Electronic databases and grey literature were searched to August 2014. Experimental and quasi-experimental studies were included if they evaluated a patient hand hygiene intervention conducted in an acute or chronic healthcare facility and included HCAI incidence and/or patient hand hygiene rates as an outcome. All steps were performed independently by two investigators. Ten studies were included, most of which were uncontrolled before-after studies (N=8). The majority of interventions (N=7) were multi-modal, with components similar to healthcare worker hand hygiene programmes, including education, reminders, audit and feedback, and provision of hand hygiene products. Six studies reported HCAI outcomes and four studies assessed patient hand hygiene rates; all demonstrated improvements but were at moderate to high risk of bias. In conclusion, interventions to improve patient hand hygiene may reduce the incidence of HCAIs and improve hand hygiene rates, but the quality of evidence is low. Future studies should use stronger designs and be more selective in their choice of outcomes. PMID:27262906

  2. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the…

  3. A Comprehensive Approach to Identifying Intervention Targets for Patient-Safety Improvement in a Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Thomas R.; Geller, E. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Despite differences in approaches to organizational problem solving, healthcare managers and organizational behavior management (OBM) practitioners share a number of practices, and connecting healthcare management with OBM may lead to improvements in patient safety. A broad needs-assessment methodology was applied to identify patient-safety…

  4. Small-Group Standardized Patient Encounter Improves Athletic Training Students' Psychosocial Intervention and Referral Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.; Thrasher, Ashley B.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers provide psychological support, counseling, intervention, and referral to patients during clinical practice. However, students are rarely exposed to real-life opportunities to develop these skills. Objective: To determine if a small-group standardized patient (SP) encounter improved athletic training students'…

  5. Improving Adherence to Care Among "Hard to Reach" HIV-Infected Patients in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah L; Sued, Omar; Cecchini, Diego; Bofill, Lina; Cook, Ryan; Lucas, Mar; Bordato, Alejandra; Cassetti, Isabel; Cahn, Pedro; Weiss, Stephen M

    2016-05-01

    Many HIV-infected patients fail to achieve undetectable viral load and are not retained in care. This pilot study examined patients lost to care in public and private clinics in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The impact of patient and provider interventions was compared separately and collectively. In Phase 1, participants prescribed antiretrovirals and non-adherent to treatment in the prior 3-6 months (n = 60) were randomized to patient intervention or standard of care (SOC) and assessed over 12 months. In Phase 2, providers were trained in interviewing techniques and 60 additional patients were randomized to patient intervention or SOC condition. Averaged across patient intervention status, Phase 2 provider intervention patients reported the most improved adherence and viral suppression at 6 and 12 months. Adherence in "patient intervention only" improved at midpoint and returned to baseline at 12 months. Results suggest provider training sustained patient adherence and viral suppression among "hard to reach" patients. PMID:26152608

  6. White coat hypertension: improving the patient-health care practitioner relationship.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Briana; Haskard-Zolnierek, Kelly; Howard, Krista

    2015-01-01

    White coat hypertension is characterized by the variability of a patient's blood pressure measurements between the physician's office and the patient's home environment. A patient with white coat hypertension has high blood pressure levels in the physician's office and normal blood pressure levels in their typical environment. This condition is likely caused by the patient's anxiety within the physician's office and in the presence of the physician. Research has shown that improving the relationship between a patient and their health care provider can decrease the patient's anxiety, with the implication of decreasing the patient's likelihood of demonstrating white coat hypertension. This review provides an overview of the previous literature regarding white coat hypertension, its prevalence, and the consequences for those who develop persistent hypertension. Furthermore, this review discusses the implications of improving patient and health care provider interactions through effective communication, empathy, and trust, as well as the implications for future research studies in improving the patient and health care provider's relationship. PMID:25999772

  7. Service score segmentation of diverse populations to improve patient and physician satisfaction- a multicase quality improvement study.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, David

    2009-01-01

    The changing demographics in the country require new strategies for providing culturally competent care. The Northern California Region Member Patient Survey provides detailed information for the clinician when the data is segmented into subsets by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Any gaps identified allow for the clinician to focus on key areas for improvement in an efficient manner respecting the time constraints of a busy practice. PMID:20740100

  8. Service Score Segmentation of Diverse Populations to Improve Patient and Physician Satisfaction— A Multicase Quality Improvement Study

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, David

    2009-01-01

    The changing demographics in the country require new strategies for providing culturally competent care. The Northern California Region Member Patient Survey provides detailed information for the clinician when the data is segmented into subsets by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Any gaps identified allow for the clinician to focus on key areas for improvement in an efficient manner respecting the time constraints of a busy practice. PMID:20740100

  9. Rifaximin Improves Driving Simulator Performance in a Randomized Trial of Patients with Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Heuman, Douglas M; Wade, James B; Gibson, Douglas P; Saeian, Kia; Wegelin, Jacob A; Hafeezullah, Muhammad; Bell, Debulon E; Sterling, Richard K; Stravitz, R. Todd; Fuchs, Michael; Luketic, Velimir; Sanyal, Arun J

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with cirrhosis and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) have driving difficulties but the effects of therapy on driving performance have not been assessed. We evaluated whether performance on a driving simulator improves in patients with MHE following treatment with rifaximin. Methods Patients with MHE who were current drivers were randomly assigned to placebo or rifaximin groups and followed for 8 weeks (n=42). Patients underwent driving simulation (driving and navigation tasks) at the start (baseline) and end of the study. We evaluated patients’ cognitive abilities, quality-of-life (using the Sickness Impact Profile [SIP]), serum levels of ammonia, levels of inflammatory cytokines, and MELD scores. The primary outcome was percent who improved in driving performance, calculated by: total driving errors=speeding + illegal turns + collisions. Results Over the 8-week study period, patients given rifaximin made significantly greater improvements than those given placebo in avoiding total driving errors (76% vs. 31%, P=0.013), speeding (81% vs. 33%, P=0.005), and illegal turns (62% vs. 19%, P=0.01). Of patients given rifaximin, 91% improved their cognitive performance, compared with 61% of patients given placebo (P=0.01); they also made improvements in the psycho-social dimension of the SIP, compared with the placebo group (P=0.04). Adherence to the assigned drug averaged 92%. Neither group had changes in ammonia levels or MELD scores, but patients in the rifaximin group had increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. Conclusions Patients with MHE significantly improve driving simulator performance following treatment with rifaximin, compared with placebo. PMID:20849805

  10. Helping COPD patients change health behavior in order to improve their quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Pere; Castro, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most prevalent and debilitating diseases in adults worldwide and is associated with a deleterious effect on the quality of life of affected patients. Although it remains one of the leading causes of global mortality, the prognosis seems to have improved in recent years. Even so, the number of patients with COPD and multiple comorbidities has risen, hindering their management and highlighting the need for futures changes in the model of care. Together with standard medical treatment and therapy adherence – essential to optimizing disease control – several nonpharmacological therapies have proven useful in the management of these patients, improving their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) regardless of lung function parameters. Among these are improved diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities, prevention of COPD exacerbations, and greater attention to physical disability related to hospitalization. Pulmonary rehabilitation reduces symptoms, optimizes functional status, improves activity and daily function, and restores the highest level of independent physical function in these patients, thereby improving HRQoL even more than pharmacological treatment. Greater physical activity is significantly correlated with improvement of dyspnea, HRQoL, and mobility, along with a decrease in the loss of lung function. Nutritional support in malnourished COPD patients improves exercise capacity, while smoking cessation slows disease progression and increases HRQoL. Other treatments such as psychological and behavioral therapies have proven useful in the treatment of depression and anxiety, both of which are frequent in these patients. More recently, telehealthcare has been associated with improved quality of life and a reduction in exacerbations in some patients. A more multidisciplinary approach and individualization of interventions will be essential in the near future. PMID:23901267

  11. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  12. Electronic Patient Registries Improve Diabetes Care and Clinical Outcomes in Rural Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Cecil; Bailey, Kelly A.; Petitte, Trisha; Baus, Adam; Swim, Mary; Hendryx, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Diabetes care is challenging in rural areas. Research has shown that the utilization of electronic patient registries improves care; however, improvements generally have been described in combination with other ongoing interventions. The level of basic registry utilization sufficient for positive change is unknown. Purpose: The goal of…

  13. Lesion Characteristics Related to Treatment Improvement in Object and Action Naming for Patients with Chronic Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, R. Bruce; Raymer, Anastasia; Chang, Yu-Ling; FitzGerald, David B.; Crosson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between degree of lesion in various locations and improvement during treatment in stroke patients with chronic aphasia. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether the degree of lesion in specific brain regions was related to magnitude of improvement over the course of object and action naming…

  14. Caring for inpatient boarders in the emergency department: improving safety and patient and staff satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bornemann-Shepherd, Melanie; Le-Lazar, Jamie; Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; DeVine, Deborah; McDevitt, Kelly; Paul, Marcee

    2015-01-01

    Hospital capacity constraints lead to large numbers of inpatients being held for extended periods in the emergency department. This creates concerns with safety, quality of care, and dissatisfaction of patients and staff. The aim of this quality-improvement project was to improve satisfaction and processes in which nurses provided care to inpatient boarders held in the emergency department. A quality-improvement project framework that included the use of a questionnaire was used to ascertain employee and patient dissatisfaction and identify opportunities for improvement. A task force was created to develop action plans related to holding and caring for inpatients in the emergency department. A questionnaire was sent to nursing staff in spring 2012, and responses from the questionnaire identified improvements that could be implemented to improve care for inpatient boarders. Situation-background-assessment-recommendation (SBAR) communications and direct observations were also used to identify specific improvements. Post-questionnaire results indicated improved satisfaction for both staff and patients. It was recognized early that the ED inpatient area would benefit from the supervision of an inpatient director, managers, and staff. Outcomes showed that creating an inpatient unit within the emergency department had a positive effect on staff and patient satisfaction. PMID:24985747

  15. Using Computational Approaches to Improve Risk-Stratified Patient Management: Rationale and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Bryan L; Sakaguchi, Farrant; Sheng, Xiaoming; Murtaugh, Maureen A

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases affect 52% of Americans and consume 86% of health care costs. A small portion of patients consume most health care resources and costs. More intensive patient management strategies, such as case management, are usually more effective at improving health outcomes, but are also more expensive. To use limited resources efficiently, risk stratification is commonly used in managing patients with chronic diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and heart disease. Patients are stratified based on predicted risk with patients at higher risk given more intensive care. The current risk-stratified patient management approach has 3 limitations resulting in many patients not receiving the most appropriate care, unnecessarily increased costs, and suboptimal health outcomes. First, using predictive models for health outcomes and costs is currently the best method for forecasting individual patient’s risk. Yet, accuracy of predictive models remains poor causing many patients to be misstratified. If an existing model were used to identify candidate patients for case management, enrollment would miss more than half of those who would benefit most, but include others unlikely to benefit, wasting limited resources. Existing models have been developed under the assumption that patient characteristics primarily influence outcomes and costs, leaving physician characteristics out of the models. In reality, both characteristics have an impact. Second, existing models usually give neither an explanation why a particular patient is predicted to be at high risk nor suggestions on interventions tailored to the patient’s specific case. As a result, many high-risk patients miss some suitable interventions. Third, thresholds for risk strata are suboptimal and determined heuristically with no quality guarantee. Objective The purpose of this study is to improve risk-stratified patient management so that more patients will receive the

  16. Manual Therapy and Exercise to Improve Outcomes in Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a common voice disorder that is not commonly referred for physical therapy intervention, is characterized by excessive muscle recruitment, resulting in incorrect vibratory patterns of vocal folds and an alteration in voice production. This case series was conducted to determine whether physical therapy including manual therapy, exercise, and stress management education would be beneficial to this population by reducing excess muscle tension. Case Description Nine patients with MTD completed a minimum of 9 sessions of the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes of pain, function, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and the conclusion of treatment. The outcome measures were the numeric rating scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Cervical and jaw range of motion also were assessed at baseline and postintervention using standard goniometric measurements. Outcomes Eight of the patients had no pain after treatment. All 9 of the patients demonstrated an improvement in PSFS score, with 7 patients exceeding a clinically meaningful improvement at the conclusion of the intervention. Three of the patients also had a clinically meaningful change in VHI scores. All 9 of the patients demonstrated improvement in cervical flexion and lateral flexion and jaw opening, whereas 8 patients improved in cervical extension and rotation postintervention. Discussion The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement an intervention to improve outcomes in patients with MTD. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the intervention. A clinical implication is the expansion of physical therapy to include referrals from voice centers for the treatment of MTD. PMID:25256740

  17. A phenomenologic investigation of pediatric residents' experiences being parented and giving parenting advice.

    PubMed

    Bax, A C; Shawler, P M; Blackmon, D L; DeGrace, E W; Wolraich, M L

    2016-09-01

    Factors surrounding pediatricians' parenting advice and training on parenting during residency have not been well studied. The primary purpose of this study was to examine pediatric residents' self-reported experiences giving parenting advice and explore the relationship between parenting advice given and types of parenting residents received as children. Thirteen OUHSC pediatric residents were individually interviewed to examine experiences being parented and giving parenting advice. Phenomenological methods were used to explicate themes and secondary analyses explored relationships of findings based upon Baumrind's parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive). While childhood experiences were not specifically correlated to the parenting advice style of pediatric residents interviewed, virtually all reported relying upon childhood experiences to generate their advice. Those describing authoritative parents reported giving more authoritative advice while others reported more variable advice. Core interview themes related to residents' parenting advice included anxiety about not being a parent, varying advice based on families' needs, and emphasis of positive interactions and consistency. Themes related to how residents were parented included discipline being a learning process for their parents and recalling that their parents always had expectations, yet always loved them. Pediatric residents interviewed reported giving family centered parenting advice with elements of positive interactions and consistency, but interviews highlighted many areas of apprehension residents have around giving parenting advice. Our study suggests that pediatric residents may benefit from more general educational opportunities to develop the content of their parenting advice, including reflecting on any impact from their own upbringing. PMID:27367930

  18. Ethics seminars: a best-practice approach to navigating the against-medical-advice discharge.

    PubMed

    Clark, Mark A; Abbott, Jean T; Adyanthaya, Tara

    2014-09-01

    Patients who sign out or choose to leave the emergency department (ED) against medical advice (AMA) present important challenges. The current approach to the complex legal, ethical, and medical challenges that arise when adult patients decline medical care in the ED would benefit from a systematic best-practice strategy to maximize patient care outcomes, minimize legal risk, and reach the optimal ethical standard for this at-risk population. Professional responsibilities generated during an AMA encounter include determination of patient decision-making capacity, balancing protection of patient autonomy with prevention of harm, providing the best alternatives for patients who decline some or all of the proposed plan, negotiating to encourage patients to stay, planning for subsequent care, and documenting what transpired. We present two cases that illustrate key insights into a best-practice approach for emergency physicians (EPs) to address problems arising when patients want or need to leave the ED prior to completion of their care. We propose a practical, systematic framework, "AIMED" (assess, investigate, mitigate, explain, and document), that can be consistently applied in situations where patients consider leaving or do leave before their evaluations and urgent treatment are complete. Our goal is to maximize patient outcomes, minimize legal risk, and encourage a consistent and ethical approach to these vulnerable patients. PMID:25269588

  19. Can bronchodilators improve exercise tolerance in COPD patients without dynamic hyperinflation? *

    PubMed Central

    Scuarcialupi, Maria Enedina Aquino; Berton, Danilo Cortozi; Cordoni, Priscila Kessar; Squassoni, Selma Denis; Fiss, Elie; Neder, José Alberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the modulatory effects that dynamic hyperinflation (DH), defined as a reduction in inspiratory capacity (IC), has on exercise tolerance after bronchodilator in patients with COPD. METHODS: An experimental, randomized study involving 30 COPD patients without severe hypoxemia. At baseline, the patients underwent clinical assessment, spirometry, and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). On two subsequent visits, the patients were randomized to receive a combination of inhaled fenoterol/ipratropium or placebo. All patients then underwent spirometry and submaximal CPET at constant speed up to the limit of tolerance (Tlim). The patients who showed ΔIC(peak-rest) < 0 were considered to present with DH (DH+). RESULTS: In this sample, 21 patients (70%) had DH. The DH+ patients had higher airflow obstruction and lower Tlim than did the patients without DH (DH-). Despite equivalent improvement in FEV1 after bronchodilator, the DH- group showed higher ΔIC(bronchodilator-placebo) at rest in relation to the DH+ group (p < 0.05). However, this was not found in relation to ΔIC at peak exercise between DH+ and DH- groups (0.19 ± 0.17 L vs. 0.17 ± 0.15 L, p > 0.05). In addition, both groups showed similar improvements in Tlim after bronchodilator (median [interquartile range]: 22% [3-60%] vs. 10% [3-53%]; p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Improvement in TLim was associated with an increase in IC at rest after bronchodilator in HD- patients with COPD. However, even without that improvement, COPD patients can present with greater exercise tolerance after bronchodilator provided that they develop DH during exercise. PMID:24831394

  20. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  1. Levothyroxine Improves Subjective Sleepiness in a Euthyroid Patient with Narcolepsy without Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Danielle L.; Spector, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We discuss the use of levothyroxine for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and prolonged nocturnal sleep time in a euthyroid patient with narcolepsy. Methods: After failure of first-line narcolepsy treatments, a 48-year-old female began levothyroxine (25 mcg/day). After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient was evaluated for improvement in total sleep time and subjective daytime sleepiness assessed by Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Results: At baseline, ESS score was 16 and total sleep time averaged 16 h/day. After 12 weeks, ESS was 13 and reported total sleep time was 13 h/day. Conclusions: Levothyroxine improved EDS and total sleep time in a euthyroid patient with narcolepsy without cataplexy after 12 weeks without side effects. Citation: Sobol DL, Spector AR. Levothyroxine improves subjective sleepiness in a euthyroid patient with narcolepsy without cataplexy. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(11):1231-1232. PMID:25325591

  2. Differences in somatosensory and motor improvement during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sens, Elisabeth; Knorr, Christin; Preul, Christoph; Meissner, Winfried; Witte, Otto W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Temporary functional deafferentation is of interest to become an additional tool in neurorehabilitative treatments. Temporary functional deafferentation is known to improve sensory and motor outcomes in chronic stroke patients and healthy subjects. The present study soughts to indicate differences in the efficiency of pharmacologically induced temporary functional deafferentation between chronic stroke patients and matched healthy subjects. 46 chronic stroke patients and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were deafferented on one forearm by an anesthetic cream. Somatosensory performance was assessed using von-Frey Hair testing and Grating orientation task; motor performance was assessed by means of a shape-sorter-drum task. Grating orientation task and shape-sorter-drum task were significantly improved during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Von-Frey Hair testing revealed no improvement of absolute tactile thresholds during temporary functional deafferentation in both groups. Furthermore, the stroke patients showed deficits at baseline measurement in all assessments except the von-Frey Hair test. Temporary functional deafferentation of a forearm by an anesthetic cream results in improvements of motor performance and somatosensory discrimination in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is reasonable to test in a next step whether temporary functional deafferentation might become an additional tool in motor rehabilitation of post stroke patients. PMID:23735321

  3. The use of a pro forma to improve quality in clerking vascular surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Kentley, Jonathan; Fox, Amy; Taylor, Sophia; hassan, yahya; Filipek, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    At our institution, a large tertiary referral centre for vascular surgery, patients are often admitted directly to the ward and clerked by foundation year one (FY1) doctors. We found that these clerkings frequently fell short of national record keeping standards, potentially leading to an increased risk for patients during their hospital stay. In addition, we found that junior doctors did not feel confident in clerking vascular surgery patients. A literature review found that high quality clerkings were strongly linked to improved patient safety, and that the use of a pro forma was one method to improve compliance with documentation guidelines. We devised a clerking pro forma based on national guidelines and introduced it to the department. We found that the use of a pro forma significantly improved documentation standards across a number of domains, including patient demographics, presenting complaint, and family and social histories (p <0.05). Examinations were significantly more comprehensive, with cardiac and vascular examination as well as peripheral pulses documented (p <0.05). In conclusion, we found that using a pro forma helped to aid junior doctors in clerking new patients, and significantly improved the quality of their history and examinations. This leads to a potential positive impact on patient safety during their inpatient stay, and should be rolled out more widely across the hospital. PMID:27418964

  4. Minimizing ED Waiting Times and Improving Patient Flow and Experience of Care.

    PubMed

    Sayah, Assaad; Rogers, Loni; Devarajan, Karthik; Kingsley-Rocker, Lisa; Lobon, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a pre- and postintervention analysis to assess the impact of a process improvement project at the Cambridge Hospital ED. Through a comprehensive and collaborative process, we reengineered the emergency patient experience from arrival to departure. The ED operational changes have had a significant positive impact on all measured metrics. Ambulance diversion decreased from a mean of 148 hours per quarter before changes in July 2006 to 0 hours since April 2007. ED total length of stay decreased from a mean of 204 minutes before the changes to 132 minutes. Press Ganey patient satisfaction scores rose from the 12th percentile to the 59th percentile. ED patient volume grew by 11%, from a mean of 7,221 patients per quarter to 8,044 patients per quarter. Compliance with ED specific quality core measures improved from a mean of 71% to 97%. The mean rate of ED patients that left without being seen (LWBS) dropped from 4.1% to 0.9%. Improving ED operational efficiency allowed us to accommodate increasing volume while improving the quality of care and satisfaction of the ED patients with minimal additional resources, space, or staffing. PMID:24829802

  5. Effectiveness of a specific cueing method for improving autobiographical memory recall in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Potheegadoo, Jevita; Cordier, Adrian; Berna, Fabrice; Danion, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Autobiographical memory deficits in schizophrenia have a significant impact on patients' daily life. Our study was aimed at testing the effectiveness of a specific cueing (SC) method for improving autobiographical memory recall in patients with schizophrenia, particularly the phenomenological details of their memories. Twenty-five patients with schizophrenia and 25 comparison participants took part in the study. They recalled 6 specific autobiographical events which occurred during 3 different life periods. After each memory recall, participants were given a general cue which allowed them to add further information to their narration. The SC was then applied by means of a series of specific questions to elicit more precise memory detail. The overall memory specificity as well as the number and richness of 5 categories of memory detail (perceptual/sensory, temporal, contextual, emotional, and cognitive) were assessed before and after the SC phase. Before SC, patients' memories were less specific and less detailed. SC had a beneficial effect on patients' memory recall. The overall memory specificity of patients improved. The gain in the number and richness of memory details was comparable between patients and comparison participants. The difference between groups in terms of the number of memory details was not significant. Richness of details was still lower in patients, except for emotional and cognitive details, which were similarly rich in both groups. The cueing method reduces the autobiographical memory impairment of patients with schizophrenia and paves the way for developing specific cognitive remediation therapies to help patients in their daily life. PMID:24268933

  6. Improvement of survival and prospect of cure in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yee Chung; Ueno, Naoto T

    2012-07-01

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer have traditionally been considered incurable with conventional treatment. However, 5-10% of those patients survive more than 5 years, and 2-5% survive more than 10 years. Recent studies suggest that the survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer has been slowly improving. In this review, we examine the possible curative approach for a certain group of patients with metastatic breast cancer. We identify that patients most likely to benefit from such an aggressive approach are young and have good performance status, adequate body functional reserve, long disease-free interval before recurrence, oligometastatic disease, and low systemic tumor load. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach including both local treatment of macroscopic disease and systemic treatment of microscopic disease can result in prolonged disease control in certain patients with metastatic breast cancer. Whether patients with prolonged disease control are "cured" remains controversial. PMID:21567170

  7. Improving outpatient services for elderly patients in Taiwan: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ren-Jieh; Wu, Yung-Hung; Hsu, Tsung-Shin; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2011-01-01

    The rapid pace of population aging poses significant importance of establishing an age-friendly health care system, including outpatient, inpatient, intermediate, and long-term care. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the quality of outpatient services for elderly patients in Taiwan. Quality function deployment (QFD) is a tool effectively shortening the research-and-development period, reducing costs, and fulfilling customer needs (CNs). This study applied Kano's model and the analytic network process (ANP) to improve the basic framework of QFD. Kano's model enables a thorough understanding of elderly patients' needs and problems with regard to medical care services, so that appropriate outpatient services can be offered to them from the outset. In addition, adapting the supermatrix of ANP to the calculation of the house of quality (HoQ) will reduce subjective judgments. Using Kano's model and an integrated ANP-QFD approach, we extracted five needs of elderly patients and calculated their priorities: 'Professional medical care services convincing patients' (27%), 'With sufficient knowledge to answer patients' questions' (23.5%), 'Providing fast services to solve patients' problems' (19.3%), 'Voluntarily serving patients' (19.1%), and 'Providing proper medical equipment to patients' (11.1%). We then identified six outpatient service attributes deserving of improvement and their priorities: 'Physician with a high level of professionalism and giving clear interpretation of patient's condition' (25%), 'Staff with good communication skills and assistance to patients' (22%), 'High standardization of operating procedures' (18%), 'Staff getting on-the-job training periodically' (15%), 'Facilities sufficient and fitting for elderly patients' (10%), and 'Applying IT (internet) to help patients to receive medical care' (10%). In conclusion, we reconstructed an integrated QFD model which will not only reduce costs but also reveal the crucial outpatient service items

  8. The comparison of two physiotherapeutic approaches for gait improvement in sub-acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Maciej; Szczerbik, Ewa; Syczewska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The functional gait problems encountered by stroke patients include impaired balance, abnormal gait pattern with marked asymmetry, pathological trunk and spinal motion. Many different methods of physiotherapy are used to improve functional ability (especially gait) in stroke patients, but their efficacy and outcome are often not objectively assessed. The goal of this paper is to compare two therapeutic programs: one that is traditionally used in our rehabilitation facilities (exercises in lying position, "open chain" exercises, isolated movements of extremities with trunk stabilization) and the new one (exercises in vertical position, sitting or standing, "closed chain" exercises involving whole paretic side of the body). Fifty one stroke patients, aged 34 to 79 years, participated in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the two groups. Patients underwent clinical assessment (Fugl-Meyer, Rivermead Motor Assessment, Berg Balance Scale) and instrumented gait analysis (using six-camera VICON 460 system) simultaneously three times: prior to the beginning of the rehabilitation program, after 6 weeks of the program, and after another 6 weeks of physiotherapy, at the end of rehabilitation program. Results demonstrated that both rehabilitation programs improved the gait function and clinical status in patients suffering from stroke. Despite the differences between the two programs the progress achieved by the patients in locomotor function is similar. Two equivalent physiotherapy programs could be applied during rehabilitation process depending on the patient's individual preferences and needs, as the amount of functional improvement provided by them is comparable. PMID:24708038

  9. Text Messaging Improves Participation in Laboratory Testing in Adolescent Liver Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Rebecca B.; Berquist, William E.; Foley, Megan A.; Park, KT; Windsheimer, Jered E.; Litt, Iris F.

    2015-01-01

    Background In solid organ transplant patients, non-participation in all aspects of the medical regimen is a prevalent problem associated with adverse consequences particularly in the adolescent and young adult (AYA) age group. This study is the first to evaluate the feasibility, utility and impact of a text messaging (TM) intervention to improve participation in laboratory testing in adolescent liver transplant patients. Methods AYA patients, aged 12 to 21 years, were recruited for a prospective pilot trial evaluating a TM intervention delivered over a 1-year period. The intervention involved automated TM reminders with feedback administered according to a prescribed laboratory testing frequency. Participation rate in laboratory testing after the intervention was compared to the year prior. Patient responses and feedback by text and survey were used to assess feasibility, acceptability and use of the intervention. Results Forty-two patients were recruited and 33 patients remained enrolled for the study duration. Recipients of the TM intervention demonstrated a significant improvement in participation rate in laboratory testing from 58% to 78% (P<.001). This rate was also significantly higher than in non-intervention controls (P=.003). There was a high acceptability, response rate and a significant correlation with reported versus actual completion of laboratory tests by TM. Conclusions TM reminders significantly improved participation in laboratory testing in AYA liver transplant patients. The intervention demonstrated feasibility, acceptability, and use with a high proportion of patients who engaged in and perceived a benefit from using this technology. PMID:26213633

  10. Medical groups can reduce costs by investing in improved quality of care for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kralewski, John E; Dowd, Bryan E; Xu, Yi Wendy

    2012-08-01

    A major feature of many new contracts between providers and payers is shared savings programs, in which providers can earn a percentage of the savings if the cost of the care they provide is lower than the projected cost. Unless providers are also held accountable for meeting quality benchmarks, some observers fear that these programs could erode quality of care by rewarding only cost savings. We estimated the effects on Medicare expenditures of improving the quality of care for patients with diabetes. Analyzing 234 practices that provided care for 133,703 diabetic patients, we found a net savings of $51 per patient with diabetes per year for every one-percentage-point increase in a score of the quality of care. Cholesterol testing for all versus none of a practice's patients with diabetes, for example, was associated with a dramatic drop in avoidable hospitalizations. These results show that improving the quality of care for patients with diabetes does save money. PMID:22869662

  11. Association between High Endocardial Unipolar Voltage and Improved Left Ventricular Function in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Lai, Dejian; Handberg, Eileen M.; Perin, Emerson C.; Pepine, Carl J.; Anderson, R. David

    2016-01-01

    We know that endocardial mapping reports left ventricular electrical activity (voltage) and that these data can predict outcomes in patients undergoing traditional revascularization. Because the mapping data from experimental models have also been linked with myocardial viability, we hypothesized an association between increased unipolar voltage in patients undergoing intramyocardial injections and their subsequent improvement in left ventricular performance. For this exploratory analysis, we evaluated 86 patients with left ventricular dysfunction, heart-failure symptoms, possible angina, and no revascularization options, who were undergoing endocardial mapping. Fifty-seven patients received bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMC) injections and 29 patients received cell-free injections of a placebo. The average mapping site voltage was 9.7 ± 2 mV, and sites with voltage of ≥6.9 mV were engaged by needle and injected (with BMC or placebo). For all patients, at 6 months, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved, and after covariate adjustment this improvement was best predicted by injection-site voltage. For every 2-mV increase in baseline voltage, we detected a 1.3 increase in absolute LVEF units for all patients (P=0.038). Multiple linear regression analyses confirmed that voltage and the CD34+ count present in bone marrow (but not treatment assignment) were associated with improved LVEF (P=0.03 and P=0.014, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, higher endocardial voltage and bone marrow CD34+ levels were associated with improved left ventricular function among ischemic cardiomyopathy patients. Intramyocardial needle injections, possibly through stimulation of angiogenesis, might serve as a future therapy in patients with reduced left ventricular function and warrants investigation. PMID:27547135

  12. Association between High Endocardial Unipolar Voltage and Improved Left Ventricular Function in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki; Lai, Dejian; Handberg, Eileen M; Moyé, Lem; Perin, Emerson C; Pepine, Carl J; Anderson, R David

    2016-08-01

    We know that endocardial mapping reports left ventricular electrical activity (voltage) and that these data can predict outcomes in patients undergoing traditional revascularization. Because the mapping data from experimental models have also been linked with myocardial viability, we hypothesized an association between increased unipolar voltage in patients undergoing intramyocardial injections and their subsequent improvement in left ventricular performance. For this exploratory analysis, we evaluated 86 patients with left ventricular dysfunction, heart-failure symptoms, possible angina, and no revascularization options, who were undergoing endocardial mapping. Fifty-seven patients received bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMC) injections and 29 patients received cell-free injections of a placebo. The average mapping site voltage was 9.7 ± 2 mV, and sites with voltage of ≥6.9 mV were engaged by needle and injected (with BMC or placebo). For all patients, at 6 months, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved, and after covariate adjustment this improvement was best predicted by injection-site voltage. For every 2-mV increase in baseline voltage, we detected a 1.3 increase in absolute LVEF units for all patients (P=0.038). Multiple linear regression analyses confirmed that voltage and the CD34(+) count present in bone marrow (but not treatment assignment) were associated with improved LVEF (P=0.03 and P=0.014, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, higher endocardial voltage and bone marrow CD34(+) levels were associated with improved left ventricular function among ischemic cardiomyopathy patients. Intramyocardial needle injections, possibly through stimulation of angiogenesis, might serve as a future therapy in patients with reduced left ventricular function and warrants investigation. PMID:27547135

  13. [Role of reporting and learning systems in the improvement of patient safety].

    PubMed

    Lám, Judit; Sümegi, Viktória; Surján, Cecília; Kullmann, Lajos; Belicza, Éva

    2016-06-01

    The principles and requirements of a patient safety related reporting and learning system were defined by the World Health Organization Draft Guidelines for Adverse Event Reporting and Learning Systems published in 2005. Since then more and more Hungarian health care organizations aim to improve their patient safety culture. In order to support this goal the NEVES reporting and learning system and the series of Patient Safety Forums for training and consultation were launched in 2006 and significantly renewed recently. Current operative modifications to the Health Law emphasize patient safety, making the introduction of these programs once again necessary. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(26), 1035-1042. PMID:27319384

  14. Advice alone versus structured detoxification programmes for complicated medication overuse headache (MOH): a prospective, randomized, open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an educational strategy (advice to withdraw the overused medication/s) with that of two structured pharmacological detoxification programmes in patients with complicated medication overuse headache (MOH) plus migraine. Methods One hundred and thirty-seven complicated MOH patients participated in the study. MOH was defined as complicated in patients presenting at least one of the following: a) a diagnosis of co-existent and complicating medical illnesses; b) a current diagnosis of mood disorder, anxiety disorder, eating disorder, or substance addiction disorder; c) relapse after previous detoxification treatment; d) social and environmental problems; e) daily use of multiple doses of symptomatic medications. Group A (46 patients) received only intensive advice to withdraw the overused medication/s. Group B (46 patients) underwent a standard detoxification programme as outpatients (advice + steroids + preventive treatment). Group C (45 patients) underwent a standard inpatient withdrawal programme (advice + steroids + fluid replacement and antiemetics preventive treatment). Withdrawal therapy was considered successful if, after two months, the patient had reverted to an intake of NSAIDs lower than 15 days/month or to an intake of other symptomatic medication/s lower than 10 days/month. Results Twenty-two patients failed to attend follow-up visits (11 in Group A, 9 in Group B, 2 in Group C, p < 0.03). Overall, we detoxified 70% of the whole cohort, 60.1% of the patients in Group A and in Group B, and 88.8% of those in Group C (p < 0.01). Conclusions Inpatient withdrawal is significantly more effective than advice alone or an outpatient strategy in complicated MOH patients. PMID:23565591

  15. Advice about management of skin conditions in the community: who are the providers?

    PubMed

    Yeatman, J M; Kilkenny, M F; Stewart, K; Marks, R

    1996-05-01

    A survey was undertaken in the central Victorian city of Maryborough to investigate the use of pharmacies and general practitioners as sources of advice about skin problems. In a 2 week period consumers purchasing either prescription or over the counter (OTC) products for skin, hair and nails in pharmacies were approached for interview. Simultaneously, each of the city's general practitioners (GP) completed questionnaires on all patients presenting with conditions of skin, hair and nails. Seventy per cent of the 315 consumers interviewed were purchasing OTC products and 50% prescription items. Of the OTC products, 42% were originally recommended by pharmacy staff and 18% by doctors. Over one-third of consumers buying OTC products described symptoms to pharmacy staff and in about half of the cases it was to the pharmacy assistant. One-third of people describing symptoms had already seen a doctor. Problems most frequently reported were dermatitis, skin dryness, acne and tinea. General practitioners recorded 265 conditions (of which 54% were new) in patients. The most common condition treated was solar keratosis, and GP wrote a prescription for 45% and recommended OTC products for 7% of conditions. People in Maryborough are seeking advice for their skin conditions from a variety of sources including GP, pharmacies and others. PMID:8713016

  16. Four Moments for Patient Hand Hygiene: A Patient-Centered, Provider-Facilitated Model to Improve Patient Hand Hygiene.

    PubMed

    Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Knighton, Shanina; Zabarsky, Trina F; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Higgins, Patricia A; Donskey, Curtis J

    2015-08-01

    We found that a majority of hospitalized patients were aware of the importance of hand hygiene, but observations indicated that performance of hand hygiene was uncommon. An intervention in which healthcare personnel facilitated hand hygiene at specific moments significantly increased performance of hand hygiene by patients. PMID:25857700

  17. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    PubMed

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  18. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward

    PubMed Central

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  19. Ward round documentation in a major trauma centre: can we improve patient safety?

    PubMed Central

    Green, Gemma; Aframian, Arash; bernard, jason

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to improve documentation and patient safety in a major trauma centre. A retrospective audit was undertaken in March 2014. Ward round entries for each orthopaedic patients on three dates were assessed against standards and analysed. The audit was repeated in April 2014, and again in August 2014. Thorough documentation is paramount in a major trauma centre. It forms a useful record of the patients hospital stay, is a legal document and is highlighted in national guidelines. It provides a basis for good handover, ensuring continuation of care and maintaining patient safety. Resultant poor compliance with Royal College guidelines in the initial audit led to the production of a new electronic based note keeping system. A meeting was held with all staff prior to introduction. Our initial results gained 75 entries, and none showed full compliance. Mean compliance per entry was 59% (0–81%). The second attempt gained 90 entries, with 30 from the weekend. Mean compliance per entry 97%. Third attempt received 61 entries, with 27 from the weekend. Mean compliance was 96%, meaning that the improvement was being maintained. Recent distressing reports regarding patient highlighted the importance of patient. Our initial audit proved there were many areas lacking in our documentation and improvement was necessary. Prior to introducing electronic systems, the implemented change has produced improvement in documentation, and provides a useful handover tool for staff. PMID:26734307

  20. What is the Business Case for Improving Care for Patients with Complex Conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Parkerton, Patricia; Hagigi, Fred

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patients with complex conditions account for a disproportionate share of health care spending. Although evidence indicates that care for these patients could be provided more efficiently, the financial impact of mechanisms to improve the care they receive is unclear. DESIGN/METHODS Numerous mechanisms—emphasizing patient self-management, care coordination, and evidence-based guidelines—aim to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients with complex conditions. Assessing the overall “business case” for these mechanisms requires carefully estimating all relevant costs and financial benefits, then comparing them in present value terms. Mechanisms that are not cost-saving may still be implemented if they are cost-effective. We reviewed articles in peer-reviewed journals, as well as reports available on publicly accessible websites, which contained data about the business case for mechanisms to improve care for patients with complex conditions. MAIN RESULTS Published studies do not provide clear evidence that current mechanisms are cost saving. This literature also has several major methodological shortcomings with respect to providing an understanding of the business case for these mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS Further research using standardized methodologies is needed to understand the business case for mechanisms to improve care for patients with complex conditions. Implications for VA business case analyses include the necessity of establishing appropriate time horizons, scope of services, and target populations, as well as considering the impact of existing VA systems. PMID:18026808

  1. Predictors of neuropsychological improvement following cognitive rehabilitation in patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Karin; Aaronson, Neil K; Gundy, Chad M; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the specific patient factors that predict responsiveness to a cognitive rehabilitation program. The program has previously been demonstrated to be successful at the group level in patients with gliomas, but it is unclear which patient characteristics optimized the effect of the intervention at the individual level. Four categories of possible predictors of improvement were selected for evaluation: sociodemographic and clinical variables, self-reported cognitive symptoms, and objective neuropsychological test performance. Hierarchical logistic regression analyses were conducted, beginning with the most accessible (sociodemographic) variables and ending with the most difficult (baseline neuropsychological) to identify in clinical practice. Nearly 60% of the participants of the intervention were classified as reliably improved. Reliable improvement was predicted by age (p = .003) and education (p = .011). Additional results suggested that younger patients were more likely to benefit specifically from the cognitive rehabilitation program (p = .001), and that higher education was also associated with improvement in the control group (p = .024). The findings are discussed in light of brain reserve theory. A practical implication is that cognitive rehabilitation programs should take the patients' age into account and, if possible, adapt programs to increase the likelihood of improvement among older participants. PMID:21205412

  2. Improvement critical care patient safety: using nursing staff development strategies, at Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Basuni, Enas M; Bayoumi, Magda M

    2015-01-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) provide lifesaving care for the critically ill patients and are associated with significant risks. Moreover complexity of care within ICUs requires that the health care professionals exhibit a trans-disciplinary level of competency to improve patient safety. This study aimed at using staff development strategies through implementing patient safety educational program that may minimize the medical errors and improve patient outcome in hospital. The study was carried out using a quasi experimental design. The settings included the intensive care units at General Mohail Hospital and National Mohail Hospital, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from March to June 2012. A convenience sample of all prevalent nurses at three shifts in the aforementioned settings during the study period was recruited. The program was implemented on 50 staff nurses in different ICUs. Their age ranged between 25-40 years. Statistically significant relation was revealed between safety climate and job satisfaction among nurses in the study sample (p=0.001). The years of experiences in ICU ranged between one year 11 (16.4) to 10 years 20 (29.8), most of them (68%) were working in variable shift, while 32% were day shift only. Improvements were observed in safety climate, teamwork climate, and nurse turnover rates on ICUs after implementing a safety program. On the heels of this improvement; nurses' total knowledge, skills and attitude were enhanced regarding patient safety dimensions. Continuous educational program for ICUs nursing staff through organized in-service training is needed to increase their knowledge and skills about the importance of improving patient safety measure. Emphasizing on effective collaborative system also will improve patient safety measures in ICUS. PMID:25716409

  3. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care payment and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health care payment and remittance advice... DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Payment and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care payment and remittance advice transaction. The health care payment...

  4. Aspects of Recipient Design in Expert Advice-giving on Call-in Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchby, Ian

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the management of expertise in advice-giving in the calls to a radio advice line. Analyzes how the expert's talk handles the tension between the personal and public dimensions of advice-giving in such a public forum. (HB)

  5. 77 FR 48169 - The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... COMMISSION The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 1; The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 2 AGENCY... Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 1, and...

  6. Implementing referral to an electronic alcohol brief advice website in primary healthcare: results from the ODHIN implementation trial

    PubMed Central

    Bendtsen, Preben; Müssener, Ulrika; Karlsson, Nadine; López-Pelayo, Hugo; Palacio-Vieira, Jorge; Colom, Joan; Gual, Antoni; Reynolds, Jillian; Wallace, Paul; Segura, Lidia; Anderson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to explore whether the possibility of offering facilitated access to an alcohol electronic brief intervention (eBI) instead of delivering brief face-to-face advice increased the proportion of consulting adults who were screened and given brief advice. Design The study was a 12-week implementation study. Sixty primary healthcare units (PHCUs) in 5 jurisdictions (Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden) were asked to screen adults who attended the PHCU for risky drinking. Setting A total of 120 primary healthcare centres from 5 jurisdictions in Europe. Participants 746 individual providers (general practitioners, nurses or other professionals) participated in the study. Primary outcome Change in the proportion of patients screened and referred to eBI comparing a baseline 4-week preimplementation period with a 12-week implementation period. Results The possibility of referring patients to the eBI was not found to be associated with any increase in the proportion of patients screened. However, it was associated with an increase in the proportion of screen-positive patients receiving brief advice from 70% to 80% for the screen-positive sample as a whole (p<0.05), mainly driven by a significant increase in brief intervention rates in England from 87% to 96% (p<0.01). The study indicated that staff displayed a low level of engagement in this new technology. Staff continued to offer face-to-face advice to a larger proportion of patients (54%) than referral to eBI (38%). In addition, low engagement was seen among the referred patients; on average, 18% of the patients logged on to the website with a mean log-on rate across the different countries between 0.58% and 36.95%. Conclusions Referral to eBI takes nearly as much time as brief oral advice and might require more introduction and training before staff are comfortable with referring to eBI. Trial registration number NCT01501552; Post-results. PMID:27311902

  7. Using the Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit to Improve the Quality of Patient Materials.

    PubMed

    Brega, Angela G; Freedman, Megan A G; LeBlanc, William G; Barnard, Juliana; Mabachi, Natabhona M; Cifuentes, Maribel; Albright, Karen; Weiss, Barry D; Brach, Cindy; West, David R

    2015-01-01

    Patient materials are often written above the reading level of most adults. Tool 11 of the Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit ("Design Easy-to-Read Material") provides guidance on ensuring that written patient materials are easy to understand. As part of a pragmatic demonstration of the Toolkit, we examined how four primary care practices implemented Tool 11 and whether written materials improved as a result. We conducted interviews to learn about practices' implementation activities and assessed the readability, understandability, and actionability of patient education materials collected during pre- and postimplementation site visits. Interview data indicated that practices followed many action steps recommended in Tool 11, including training staff, assessing readability, and developing or revising materials, typically focusing on brief documents such as patient letters and information sheets. Many of the revised and newly developed documents had reading levels appropriate for most patients and--in the case of revised documents--better readability than the original materials. In contrast, the readability, understandability, and actionability of lengthier patient education materials were poor and did not improve over the 6-month implementation period. Findings guided revisions to Tool 11 and highlighted the importance of engaging multiple stakeholders in improving the quality of patient materials. PMID:26513033

  8. Treatment-related improvement in neuropsychological functioning in suicidal depressed patients: paroxetine vs. bupropion

    PubMed Central

    Gorlyn, Marianne; Keilp, John; Burke, Ainsley; Oquendo, Maria; Mann, J. John; Grunebaum, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological dysfunction is associated with risk for suicidal behavior, but it is unknown if antidepressant medication treatment is effective in reducing this dysfunction, or if specific medications might be more beneficial. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was administered at baseline and after eight weeks of treatment within a randomized, double-blind clinical trial comparing paroxetine and bupropion in study of patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder and either past suicide attempt or current suicidal thoughts. Change in neurocognitive performance was compared between assessments and between medication groups. Treatment effects on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Scale for Suicidal Ideation were compared with neurocognitive improvement. Neurocognitive functioning improved after treatment in all patients, without clear advantage for either medication. Improvement in memory performance was associated with a reduction in suicidal ideation independent of the improvement of depression severity. Overall, antidepressant medication improved neurocognitive performance in patients with major depression and suicide risk. Reduced suicidal ideation was best predicted by a combination of the independent improvements in both depression symptomatology and verbal memory. Targeted treatment of neurocognitive dysfunction in these patients may augment standard medication treatment for reducing suicidal behavior risk. PMID:25555415

  9. Improving Care in Older Patients with Diabetes: A Focus on Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric A; Gibbs, Nancy E; Martin, John; Ziel, Fred; Polzin, Jennifer K; Palmer-Toy, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 25% of Americans older than age 65 years. The medical care of older patients must differ from the care of their younger counterparts. Older patients are at high risk of drug toxicity. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% has historically been the goal of all patients with diabetes, regardless of age. Recent research has demonstrated that using medications to achieve such tight glycemic control is not necessary and is often not safe. This article discusses the seminal research findings that strongly suggest that HbA1c goals should be relaxed in older patients. The authors then recommend an age-specific and functionally appropriate HbA1c reference range for patients receiving medications to improve glycemic control. Other interventions are suggested that should make diabetes care safer in older patients receiving hypoglycemic medications. PMID:27352408

  10. Improving Care in Older Patients with Diabetes: A Focus on Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Gibbs, Nancy E; Martin, John; Ziel, Fred; Polzin, Jennifer K; Palmer-Toy, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 25% of Americans older than age 65 years. The medical care of older patients must differ from the care of their younger counterparts. Older patients are at high risk of drug toxicity. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% has historically been the goal of all patients with diabetes, regardless of age. Recent research has demonstrated that using medications to achieve such tight glycemic control is not necessary and is often not safe.This article discusses the seminal research findings that strongly suggest that HbA1c goals should be relaxed in older patients. The authors then recommend an age-specific and functionally appropriate HbA1c reference range for patients receiving medications to improve glycemic control. Other interventions are suggested that should make diabetes care safer in older patients receiving hypoglycemic medications. PMID:27352408

  11. Applying Transactional Analysis and Personality Assessment to Improve Patient Counseling and Communication Skills

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Lesa

    2007-01-01

    Objective To teach pharmacy students how to apply transactional analysis and personality assessment to patient counseling to improve communication. Design A lecture series for a required pharmacy communications class was developed to teach pharmacy students how to apply transactional analysis and personality assessment to patient counseling. Students were asked to apply these techniques and to report their experiences. A personality self-assessment was also conducted. Assessment After attending the lecture series, students were able to apply the techniques and demonstrated an understanding of the psychological factors that may affect patient communication, an appreciation for the diversity created by different personality types, the ability to engage patients based on adult-to-adult interaction cues, and the ability to adapt the interactive patient counseling model to different personality traits. Conclusion Students gained a greater awareness of transactional analysis and personality assessment by applying these concepts. This understanding will help students communicate more effectively with patients. PMID:17786269

  12. Reinforcement learning agents providing advice in complex video games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Matthew E.; Carboni, Nicholas; Fachantidis, Anestis; Vlahavas, Ioannis; Torrey, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a teacher-student framework for reinforcement learning, synthesising and extending material that appeared in conference proceedings [Torrey, L., & Taylor, M. E. (2013)]. Teaching on a budget: Agents advising agents in reinforcement learning. {Proceedings of the international conference on autonomous agents and multiagent systems}] and in a non-archival workshop paper [Carboni, N., &Taylor, M. E. (2013, May)]. Preliminary results for 1 vs. 1 tactics in StarCraft. {Proceedings of the adaptive and learning agents workshop (at AAMAS-13)}]. In this framework, a teacher agent instructs a student agent by suggesting actions the student should take as it learns. However, the teacher may only give such advice a limited number of times. We present several novel algorithms that teachers can use to budget their advice effectively, and we evaluate them in two complex video games: StarCraft and Pac-Man. Our results show that the same amount of advice, given at different moments, can have different effects on student learning, and that teachers can significantly affect student learning even when students use different learning methods and state representations.

  13. Educational Needs for Improving Self-care in Heart Failure Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Seok; Clark, Patricia C.; Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Lobb, Maureen; Smith, Andrew L.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore the need for self-monitoring and self-care education in heart failure patients with diabetes (HF-DM patients) by describing cognitive and affective factors to provide guidance in developing effective self- management education. Method A cross-sectional correlation design was employed using baseline patient data from a study testing a 12 week patient and family dyad intervention to improve dietary and medication-taking self-management behaviors in HF patients. Data from 116 participants recruited from metropolitan Atlanta area were used. Demographic and co-morbidities, physical function, psychological distress, relationship with health care provider, self-efficacy (medication taking and low sodium diet), and behavioral outcomes (medications, dietary habits) were assessed. Descriptive statistics and a series of chi-square tests, t-tests or Mann Whitney tests were performed to compare HF patients with and without DM. Results HF-DM patients were older, heavier, had more co- morbidities, and took more daily medications than HF patients. High self-efficacy on medication and low sodium diet was reported in both groups with no significant difference. Although HF-DM patients took more daily medications than HF, both groups exhibited high HF medication taking behaviors. The HF-DM patients consumed significantly lower total sugar than HF patients, but clinically higher levels of sodium. Conclusions Diabetes educators need to be aware of potential conflicts of treatment regimens to manage two chronic diseases. Special and integrated diabetes self-management education programs which incorporate principles of HF self-management should be developed to improve self-management behavior in HF-DM patients. PMID:22722611

  14. Levomilnacipran Extended-Release Treatment in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: Improvements in Functional Impairment Categories

    PubMed Central

    Gommoll, Carl P.; Chen, Changzheng; Greenberg, William M.; Ruth, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this post hoc analysis, improvement in functional impairment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with levomilnacipran extended release (ER) was evaluated by assessing shifts from more severe to less severe functional impairment categories on individual Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) subscales. Method: SDS data were pooled from 5 phase II/III studies conducted between December 2006 and March 2012 of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo in adult patients with MDD (DSM-IV-TR criteria). Proportions of patients shifting from moderate-extreme baseline impairment (score ≥ 4) to mild-no impairment (score ≤ 3) at end of treatment were assessed for each SDS subscale. Proportions of patients shifting from marked-extreme (score ≥ 7) baseline impairment to moderate-no (score ≤ 6) or mild-no impairment (score ≤ 3) at end of treatment, and shifts in which patients worsened from moderate-no to marked-extreme impairment, were also evaluated. Results: A significantly higher proportion of patients treated with levomilnacipran ER than placebo-treated patients improved from more severe categories of functional impairment at baseline to less severe impairment categories across all SDS subscales: work/school, social life, and family life/home responsibilities (P < .01). Depending on the SDS subscale, 48%–55% of levomilnacipran ER–treated patients with moderate-extreme impairment at baseline improved to mild or no impairment, compared with no more than 40% of placebo patients on any subscale. Almost half (42%–47%) of levomilnacipran ER–treated patients versus only about one-third (29%–34%) of placebo patients improved from marked-extreme to mild or no impairment across functional domains. Conclusions: These results suggest that functional improvement was observed across the SDS functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first such categorical analysis of functional improvement, as measured by the SDS, for an antidepressant. Trial

  15. Using eHealth to improve health literacy among the patient population.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kathryn E

    2015-01-01

    There is no denying the global influence of eHealth, in its various forms, on the health care system in the 21st Century. Health care professionals are often familiar with technological tools used to enhance health outcomes by assisting clinicians in meeting the needs of the patient population. In an age of social media, web-based information, and material available literally in an instant, it is crucial for nurses to use and proactively share their knowledge regarding accessing and finding credible sources of online health information with the patient population. By improving health literacy among consumers, self-sufficiency and competence can be developed and promoted to improve health outcomes, placing the patient in a participatory starring role of managing and improving his or her overall well-being. PMID:25842526

  16. A Virtual Patient Software Program to Improve Pharmacy Student Learning in a Comprehensive Disease Management Course

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Jillian P.; Skirvin, J. Andrew; DiVall, Margarita V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To implement and assess the impact of a virtual patient pilot program on pharmacy students’ clinical competence skills. Design. Pharmacy students completed interactive software-based patient case scenarios embedded with drug-therapy problems as part of a course requirement at the end of their third year. Assessment. Assessments included drug-therapy problem competency achievement, performance on a pretest and posttest, and pilot evaluation survey instrument. Significant improvements in students’ posttest scores demonstrated advancement of clinical skills involving drug-therapy problem solving. Students agreed that completing the pilot program improved their chronic disease management skills and the program summarized the course series well. Conclusion. Using virtual patient technology allowed for assessment of student competencies and improved learning outcomes. PMID:24159213

  17. Smartphone Mobile Application Delivering Personalized, Real-Time Sun Protection Advice: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Buller, David B.; Berwick, Marianne; Lantz, Kathy; Buller, Mary Klein; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Liu, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Importance Mobile smart phones are rapidly emerging as an effective means of communicating with many Americans. Using mobile applications, they can access remote databases, track time and location, and integrate user input to provide tailored health information. Objective A smart phone mobile application providing personalized, real-time sun protection advice was evaluated in a randomized trial. Design The trial was conducted in 2012 and had a randomized pretest-posttest controlled design with a 10-week follow-up. Setting Data was collected from a nationwide population-based survey panel. Participants The trial enrolled a sample of n=604 non-Hispanic and Hispanic adults from the Knowledge Panel® aged 18 or older who owned an Android smart phone. Intervention The mobile application provided advice on sun protection (i.e., protection practices and risk of sunburn) and alerts (to apply/reapply sunscreen and get out of the sun), hourly UV Index, and vitamin D production based on the forecast UV Index, phone's time and location, and user input. Main Outcomes and Measures Percent of days using sun protection and time spent outdoors (days and minutes) in the midday sun and number of sunburns in the past 3 months were collected. Results Individuals in the treatment group reported more shade use but less sunscreen use than controls. Those who used the mobile app reported spending less time in the sun and using all protection behaviors combined more. Conclusions and Relevance The mobile application improved some sun protection. Use of the mobile application was lower than expected but associated with increased sun protection. Providing personalized advice when and where people are in the sun may help reduce sun exposure. PMID:25629710

  18. Patients' experience of Chinese Medicine Primary Care Services: Implications on Improving Coordination and Continuity of Care.

    PubMed

    Chung, Vincent Ch; Yip, Benjamin Hk; Griffiths, Sian M; Yu, Ellen Lm; Liu, Siya; Ho, Robin St; Wu, Xinyin; Leung, Albert Wn; Sit, Regina Ws; Wu, Justin Cy; Wong, Samuel Ys

    2015-01-01

    Chinese medicine (CM) is major form of traditional and complementary medicine used by Chinese populations. Evaluation on patients' experience on CM service is essential for improving service quality. This cross sectional study aims (i) to assess how CM clinics with different administrative model differ in terms of quality from patients' perspective; and (ii) to investigate how quality varies with patients' demographic and health characteristics. Five hundred and sixteen patients were sampled from charity and semi-public CM clinics in Hong Kong, and were invited to assess their experience using the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT). Results indicated that overall mean PCAT scoring is satisfactory, achieving 70.7% (91.26/129) of total score. Ratings were lower in areas of "coordination of patient information", "continuity of care", and "range of service provided". Impact of administrative models, including involvement of tax-funded healthcare system and outreach delivery, were minimal after adjusting for patient characteristics. Demographic and health characteristics of patients did not contribute to substantial variations in scoring. To improve patient experience, policy makers should consider strengthening care coordination, continuity and comprehensiveness in CM primary care services. Sharing of electronic records and establishing referral system are potential solutions for linking CM and conventional healthcare services. PMID:26686267

  19. Outpatient Dialysis for Patients with AKI: A Policy Approach to Improving Care.

    PubMed

    Heung, Michael; Faubel, Sarah; Watnick, Suzanne; Cruz, Dinna N; Koyner, Jay L; Mour, Girish; Liu, Kathleen D; Cerda, Jorge; Okusa, Mark D; Lukaszewski, Mark; Vijayan, Anitha

    2015-10-01

    The rate of AKI requiring dialysis has increased significantly over the past decade in the United States. At the same time, survival from AKI seems to be improving, and thus, more patients with AKI are surviving to discharge while still requiring dialysis. Currently, the options for providing outpatient dialysis in patients with AKI are limited, particularly after a 2012 revised interpretation of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines, which prohibited Medicare reimbursement for acute dialysis at ESRD facilities. This article provides a historical perspective on outpatient dialysis management of patients with AKI, reviews the current clinical landscape of care for these patients, and highlights key areas of knowledge deficit. Lastly, policy changes that have the opportunity to significantly improve the care of this at-risk population are suggested. PMID:26220818

  20. Spouse Confidence in Self-Efficacy for Arthritis Management Predicts Improved Patient Health

    PubMed Central

    Martire, Lynn M.; Keefe, Francis J.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background In addition to patient self-efficacy, spouse confidence in patient efficacy may also independently predict patient health outcomes. However, the potential influence of spouse confidence has received little research attention. Purpose The current study examined the influence of patient and spouse efficacy beliefs for arthritis management on patient health. Methods Patient health (i.e., arthritis severity, perceived health, depressive symptoms, lower extremity function), patient self-efficacy, and spouse confidence in patients’ efficacy were assessed in a sample of knee osteoarthritis patients (N = 152) and their spouses at three time points across an 18-month period. Data were analyzed using structural equation models. Results Consistent with predictions, spouse confidence in patient efficacy for arthritis management predicted improvements in patient depressive symptoms, perceived health, and lower extremity function over 6 months and in arthritis severity over 1 year. Conclusions Our findings add to a growing literature that highlights the important role of spouse perceptions in patients’ long-term health. PMID:24604529