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1

Performance characteristics of aerodynamically optimum turbines for wind energy generators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a brief discussion of the aerodynamic methodology for wind energy generator turbines, an approach to the design of aerodynamically optimum wind turbines covering a broad range of design parameters, some insight on the effect on performance of nonoptimum blade shapes which may represent lower fabrication costs, the annual wind turbine energy for a family of optimum wind turbines, and areas of needed research. On the basis of the investigation, it is concluded that optimum wind turbines show high performance over a wide range of design velocity ratios; that structural requirements impose constraints on blade geometry; that variable pitch wind turbines provide excellent power regulation and that annual energy output is insensitive to design rpm and solidity of optimum wind turbines.

Rohrbach, C.; Worobel, R.

1975-01-01

2

Aerodynamics/ACEE: Aircraft energy efficiency  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is presented of a 10 year program managed by NASA which seeks to make possible the most efficient use of energy for aircraft propulsion and lift as well as provide a technology that can be used by U.S. manufacturers of air transports and engines. Supercritical wings, winglets, vortex drag reduction, high lift, active control, laminar flow control, and aerodynamics by computer are among the topics discussed. Wind tunnel models in flight verification of advanced technology, and the design, construction and testing of various aircraft structures are also described.

1981-01-01

3

Aerodynamic levitation : an approach to microgravity.  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the thermophysical and structural properties of liquid materials at high temperature have undergone considerable development in the past few years. Following improvements in electromagnetic levitation, aerodynamic levitation associated with laser heating has shown promise for assessing properties of different molten materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors), preserving sample purity over a wide range of temperatures and under different gas environments. The density, surface tension and viscosity are measured with a high-speed video camera and an image analysis system. Results on nickel and alumina show that small droplets can be considered in the first approximation to be under microgravity conditions. Using a non-invasive contactless technique recently developed to measure electrical conductivity, results have been extended to variety of materials ranging from liquid metals and liquid semiconductors to ionically conducting materials. The advantage of this technique is the feasibility of monitoring changes in transport occurring during phase transitions and in deeply undercooled states.

Glorieux, B.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Millot, F.; Enderby, J.; Rifflet, J.-C.

2000-12-05

4

A new procedure for aerodynamic missile designs using topological optimization approach of continuum structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a multi-objective programming scheme for the conceptual design of aerodynamic missile's structure using topological optimization approaches, in which both the compliance and eigenfrequency are regarded as static and dynamic optimization objectives, respectively. During the conceptual design of the aerodynamic missile with multiple loadings, both the multilevel sequential programming approach and the compromising programming method are coupled together

Zhen Luo; Jingzhou Yang; Liping Chen

2006-01-01

5

Continuous adjoint approach for the SpalartAllmaras model in aerodynamic optimization  

E-print Network

Continuous adjoint approach for the Spalart­Allmaras model in aerodynamic optimization Alfonso in aerodynamic design with turbulence modeling. We focus on compressible flows described by the RANS equations extra unknown terms, the Reynolds stress and the turbulent heat flux. Further averages of the RANS

Alonso, Juan J.

6

Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerodynamic energy method is used in this paper to synthesize control laws for NASA's Drone for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing-Aerodynamic Research Wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared against other control laws that appear in the literature and relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed in this paper. it is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results superior to those given in the literature and based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness, compared with the more traditional measure of robustness involving phase and gain margins.

Nissim, E.

1989-01-01

7

High speed propeller acoustics and aerodynamics - A boundary element approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied in this paper to the problems of acoustics and aerodynamics of high speed propellers. The underlying theory is described based on the linearized Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. The surface pressure on the blade is assumed unknown in the aerodynamic problem. It is obtained by solving a singular integral equation. The acoustic problem is then solved by moving the field point inside the fluid medium and evaluating some surface and line integrals. Thus the BEM provides a powerful technique in calculation of high speed propeller aerodynamics and acoustics.

Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.; Dunn, M. H.

1989-01-01

8

Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Aerodynamic Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this study was to demonstrate the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). Detailed analyses were performed using three- dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off- design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component acro/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Lynn, Sean R.; Veres, Joseph P.

1998-01-01

9

Development and application of an optimization procedure for flutter suppression using the aerodynamic energy concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An optimization procedure is developed based on the responses of a system to continuous gust inputs. The procedure uses control law transfer functions which have been partially determined by using the relaxed aerodynamic energy approach. The optimization procedure yields a flutter suppression system which minimizes control surface activity in a gust environment. The procedure is applied to wing flutter of a drone aircraft to demonstrate a 44 percent increase in the basic wing flutter dynamic pressure. It is shown that a trailing edge control system suppresses the flutter instability over a wide range of subsonic mach numbers and flight altitudes. Results of this study confirm the effectiveness of the relaxed energy approach.

Nissim, E.; Abel, I.

1978-01-01

10

A new approach to finite state modelling of unsteady aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a novel technique for formulating a high quality finite state unsteady aerodynamic model by applying Bode plot methods, used in control engineering. Indicial response functions for both fixed wing and rotary wing applications are obtained using these finite state unsteady aerodynamic models. It is shown that the rotary wing indicial response function has a fundamentally different characteristic when compared to fixed wing indicial response. The rotary wing indicial response function is oscillatory in nature while the fixed wing indicial response function is nonoscillatory. Furthermore it should be emphasized that this is the first that a rotary-wing indicial response function has been presented in the literature.

Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

1986-01-01

11

Energy-conserving schemes for wind farm aerodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational demands compel researchers to use coarse grids for the study of wind farm aerodynamics, which necessitates the use of accurate numerical schemes. Energy- conserving (EC) schemes are designed to enforce the conservation of Kinetic Energy (KE), an invariant property of incompressible flows. These schemes are numerically stable and free from artificial dissipation, even on coarse grids and could be used as an alternative to high-order pseudo-spectral schemes. This article details tests on EC schemes in the context of Large Eddy Simulations (LES). Results suggest that the accuracy of EC schemes is influenced by the Subgrid Scale model used for the LES. EC methods use central schemes that lead to dispersion, which is more apparent with a less-dissipative Scale Similarity model. Whereas, the purely dissipative Smagorinsky's model reduces the dispersion and generates a smoother solution but at the cost of accuracy in terms of predicting the KE. Although the impact of EC schemes and SGS models on the LES of wind farms is yet to be assessed, a simple LES of a model wind farm uncovers that EC schemes are quite suitable for wind farm aerodynamics.

Mehta, Dhruv; van Zuijlen, Alexander; Bijl, Hester

2014-06-01

12

Energy harvesting under combined aerodynamic and base excitations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper investigates the transduction of a piezoaeroelastic energy harvester under the combination of vibratory base excitations and aerodynamic loadings. The harvester which consists of a rigid airfoil supported by nonlinear flexural and torsional springs is placed in an incompressible air flow and subjected to a harmonic base excitation in the plunge direction. Under this combined loading, the airfoil undergoes complex motions which strain a piezoelectric element producing a voltage across an electric load. To capture the qualitative behavior of the harvester, a five-dimensional lumped-parameter model which adopts nonlinear quasi-steady aerodynamics is used. A center manifold reduction is implemented to reduce the full model into one nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equation. The normal form of the reduced system is then derived to study slow modulation of the response amplitude and phase near the flutter instability. Below the flutter speed, the response of the harvester is observed to be always periodic with the air flow serving to amplify the influence of the base excitation on the response by reducing the effective stiffness of the system, and hence, increasing the RMS output power. Beyond the flutter speed, two distinct regions are observed. The first occurs when the base excitation is small and/or when the excitation frequency is not close to the frequency of the self-sustained oscillations induced by the flutter instability. In this case, the response of the harvester is two-period quasiperiodic with amplitude modulation due to the presence of two incommensurate frequencies in the response. This amplitude modulation reduces the RMS output power. In the second region, the amplitude of excitation is large enough to eliminate the quasiperiodic response by causing the two frequencies to lock into each other. In this region, the response becomes periodic and the output power increases exhibiting little dependence on the base excitation.

Bibo, Amin; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

2013-09-01

13

Viscous aerodynamic design using the adjoint variable approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of classical optimal control methods, in particular variational methods, to solve the airfoil optimization problem, by deriving a set of adjoint (costate) equations and boundary conditions has already been done for inviscid (potential and Euler flows) and two dimensional, steady state, incompressible flow governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. The interior and boundary terms of the volume integral have been derived (in this work) for the steady Navier-Stokes equations in three dimensions for a viscous, compressible heat conducting fluid. This can be used to derive the adjoint equations and numerical boundary conditions for general classes of problems and hence paves the way for a solution to the aerodynamic optimization problem for compressible viscous flows. The next steps to the realization of that goal are projected as below. The usual square integral pressure functional as an objective function is being replaced by a more realistic drag functional subject to a lift constraint. The feasibility of attempting the more difficult time dependent problem is being investigated. It remains to get the full system of adjoint equations and boundary conditions with the new functional. The state and adjoint equations must be discretized and coded. An appropriate optimization program must be used (steepest descents seems inadequate) and various known airfoil shapes should be recovered in test cases of the computer program.

DeRise, George

1995-01-01

14

An approach to constrained aerodynamic design with application to airfoils  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An approach was developed for incorporating flow and geometric constraints into the Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (DISC) design method. In this approach, an initial target pressure distribution is developed using a set of control points. The chordwise locations and pressure levels of these points are initially estimated either from empirical relationships and observed characteristics of pressure distributions for a given class of airfoils or by fitting the points to an existing pressure distribution. These values are then automatically adjusted during the design process to satisfy the flow and geometric constraints. The flow constraints currently available are lift, wave drag, pitching moment, pressure gradient, and local pressure levels. The geometric constraint options include maximum thickness, local thickness, leading-edge radius, and a 'glove' constraint involving inner and outer bounding surfaces. This design method was also extended to include the successive constraint release (SCR) approach to constrained minimization.

Campbell, Richard L.

1992-01-01

15

Laboratory Evaluation of Fan-filter Units' Aerodynamic and Energy Performance  

E-print Network

of relevant metrics such as energy performance indices (EPI) based upon the sample FFUs tested. This paperLaboratory Evaluation of Fan-filter Units' Aerodynamic and Energy Performance Tengfang Xu, Lawrence and energy performance of FFUs. It presents evaluation methods of laboratory- measured performance of ten

16

Laboratory evaluation of fan\\/filter units' aerodynamic and energy performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper discusses the benefits of having a consistent testing method to characterize aerodynamic and energy performance of FFUs. It presents evaluation methods of laboratory-measured performance of ten relatively new, 1220 mm x 610 mm (or 4 ft x 2 ft) fan-filter units (FFUs), and includes results of a set of relevant metrics such as energy performance indices (EPI) based

Tengfang Xu; Ming-Shan Jeng

2004-01-01

17

A Newton-Krylov Approach for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Wings  

E-print Network

equation in a parallel computing environment. The wing geometry is parameterized by a B-spline control net implemented successfully in aerodynamic design optimization. The main advantage of the adjoint method

Zingg, David W.

18

Aerodynamic flutter analysis of cable-supported bridges by multi-mode and full-mode approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief history of bridge flutter analysis is presented first. It is followed by an examination of a multi-mode procedure and a more comprehensive full-mode approach in aerodynamic flutter analysis of long-span cable-supported bridges. Particularly, when the span is very long and\\/or the structural stiffness is not fully implemented, a combination of more than two structural vibration modes can have

Y. J. Ge; H. Tanaka

2000-01-01

19

Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

2003-01-01

20

Multilevel decomposition approach to integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes an integrated aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural (IADS) optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance, dynamics, and structural analyses with a general purpose optimizer using multilevel decomposition techniques. At the upper level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (stiffnesses, mass, and average strains). At the lower level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (detailed dimensions of the blade structure and stresses). The IADS procedure provides an optimization technique that is compatible with industrial design practices in which the aerodynamic and dynamic design is performed at a global level and the structural design is carried out at a detailed level with considerable dialogue and compromise among the aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural groups. The IADS procedure is demonstrated for several cases.

Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

1994-01-01

21

Laboratory evaluation of fan/filter units' aerodynamic and energy performance  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the benefits of having a consistent testing method to characterize aerodynamic and energy performance of FFUs. It presents evaluation methods of laboratory-measured performance of ten relatively new, 1220 mm x 610 mm (or 4 ft x 2 ft) fan-filter units (FFUs), and includes results of a set of relevant metrics such as energy performance indices (EPI) based upon the sample FFUs tested. This paper concludes that there are variations in FFUs' performance, and that using a consistent testing and evaluation method can generate compatible and comparable FFU performance information. The paper also suggests that benefits and opportunities exist for our method of testing FFU energy performance to be integrated in future recommended practices.

Xu, Tengfang; Jeng, Ming-Shan

2004-07-27

22

A comparison of optimization-based approaches for solving the aerodynamic design problem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three optimization-based methods for solving aerodynamic design problems are compared. The Euler equations for one-dimensional duct flow was used as a model problem, and the three methods are compared for efficiency, robustness, and implementation difficulty. The smoothness of the design problem with respect to different shock-capturing finite difference schemes, and in the presence of grid refinement, is investigated.

Frank, Paul D.; Shubin, Gregory R.

1990-01-01

23

An approach for the development of an aerodynamic-structural interaction numerical simulation for aeropropulsion systems  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, aeropropulsion structural performance and aerodynamic performance have been designed separately and later mated together via flight testing. In today`s atmosphere of declining resources, it is imperative that more productive ways of designing and verifying aeropropulsion performance and structural interaction be made available to the aerospace industry. One method of obtaining a more productive design and evaluation capability is through the use of numerical simulations. Currently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a generalized fluid/structural interaction code known as ALE3D. This code is capable of characterizing fluid and structural interaction for components such as the combustor, fan/stators, inlet and/or nozzles. This code solves the 3D Euler equations and has been applied to several aeropropulsion applications such as a supersonic inlet and a combustor rupture simulation. To characterize aerodynamic-structural interaction for rotating components such as the compressor, appropriate turbomachinery simulations would need to be implemented within the ALE3D structure. The Arnold Engineering Development Center is currently developing a three-dimensional compression system code known as TEACC (Turbine Engine Analysis Compressor Code). TEACC also solves the 3D Euler equations and is intended to simulate dynamic behavior such as inlet distortion, surge or rotating stall. The technology being developed within the TEACC effort provides the necessary turbomachinery simulation for implementation into ALE3D. This paper describes a methodology to combine three-dimensional aerodynamic turbomachinery technology into the existing aerodynamic-structural interaction simulation, ALE3D to obtain the desired aerodynamic and structural integrated simulation for an aeropropulsion system.

Naziar, J. [Boeing Commerical Airplane Group, Seattle, WA (United States). Propulsion Research; Couch, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Davis, M. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Arnold Air Force Base, TN (United States). Arnold Engineering Development Center

1996-01-01

24

Unified approach to aerodynamic sound generation in the presence of solid boundaries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general equation governing aerodynamic sound generation in the presence of solid boundaries is derived. It is shown that all the theories in the literature appear as special cases of this general equation. Derived special equations for propeller and fan noise are likewise shown to be more general than the conventional equations in that they make allowance for variation in retarded time over the blade surfaces.

Goldstein, M.

1974-01-01

25

Comparison of Computational Approaches for Rapid Aerodynamic Assessment of Small UAVs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methods were used to determine the basic aerodynamic, performance, and stability and control characteristics of the unmanned air vehicle (UAV), Kahu. Accurate and timely prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics of small UAVs is an essential part of military system acquisition and air-worthiness evaluations. The forces and moments of the UAV were predicted using a variety of analytical methods for a range of configurations and conditions. The methods included Navier Stokes (N-S) flow solvers (USM3D, Kestrel and Cobalt) that take days to set up and hours to converge on a single solution; potential flow methods (PMARC, LSAERO, and XFLR5) that take hours to set up and minutes to compute; empirical methods (Datcom) that involve table lookups and produce a solution quickly; and handbook calculations. A preliminary aerodynamic database can be developed very efficiently by using a combination of computational tools. The database can be generated with low-order and empirical methods in linear regions, then replacing or adjusting the data as predictions from higher order methods are obtained. A comparison of results from all the data sources as well as experimental data obtained from a wind-tunnel test will be shown and the methods will be evaluated on their utility during each portion of the flight envelope.

Shafer, Theresa C.; Lynch, C. Eric; Viken, Sally A.; Favaregh, Noah; Zeune, Cale; Williams, Nathan; Dansie, Jonathan

2014-01-01

26

Critical evaluation of the unsteady aerodynamics approach to dynamic stability at high angles of attack  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bifurcation theory is used to analyze the nonlinear dynamic stability characteristics of an aircraft subject to single-degree-of-freedom. The requisite moment of the aerodynamic forces in the equations of motion is shown to be representable in a form equivalent to the response to finite amplitude oscillations. It is shown how this information can be deduced from the case of infinitesimal-amplitude oscillations. The bifurcation theory analysis reveals that when the bifurcation parameter is increased beyond a critical value at which the aerodynamic damping vanishes, new solutions representing finite amplitude periodic motions bifurcate from the previously stable steady motion. The sign of a simple criterion, cast in terms of aerodynamic properties, determines whether the bifurcating solutions are stable or unstable. For the pitching motion of flat-plate airfoils flying at supersonic/hypersonic speed and for oscillation of flaps at transonic speed, the bifurcation is subcritical, implying either the exchanges of stability between steady and periodic motion are accompanied by hysteresis phenomena, or that potentially large aperiodic departures from steady motion may develop.

Hui, W. H.

1985-01-01

27

Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

2014-01-01

28

Application of the TRANAIR rectangular grid approach to the aerodynamic analysis of complex configurations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A numerical method is described which uses a rectangular grid to solve the nonlinear full potential equation about complex configurations. The grid is locally refined to resolve high velocity gradients arising from leading edge expansions or shock waves. The grid penetrates the boundary (described by networks of quadrilateral panels) and is generated automatically. Discrete operators are constructed using the finite element method. The system of nonlinear discrete equations is solved iteratively using a Krylov subspace method preconditioned by an exterior Poisson solver and a direct sparse solver. The primary emphasis is to provide design engineers with an aerodynamic analysis tool (the TRANAIR code) which is accurate, reliable, economical, and flexible to use. Computational results for many interesting configurations are presented.

Johnson, Forrester T.; Samant, Satish S.; Bieterman, Michael B.; Melvin, Robin G.; Young, David P.; Bussoletti, John E.; Madson, Mike D.

1990-01-01

29

The aerodynamic design and performance of the General Electric/NASA EEE fan. [Energy Efficient Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerodynamic design and test results of the fan and quarter-stage component for the GE/NASA Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) are presented. The fan is a high bypass ratio, single-stage design having 32 part-span shrouded rotor blades, coupled with a unique quarter-stage arrangement that provides additional core-stream pressure ratio and particle separation. The fan produces a bypass pressure ratio of 1.65 at the exit of the low aspect ratio vane/frame and a core-stream pressure ratio of 1.67 at the entrance to the core frame struts. The full-scale fan vehicle was instrumented, assembled and tested as a component in November 1981. Performance mapping was conducted over a range of speeds and bypass ratios using individually-controlled bypass and core-stream discharge valves. The fan bypass and core-stream test data showed excellent results, with the fan exceeding all performance goals at the important engine operating conditions.

Sullivan, T. J.; Hager, R. D.

1983-01-01

30

Uncertainty-Based Approach for Dynamic Aerodynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of improved modeling methods to provide increased fidelity of flight predictions for aircraft motions during flight in flow regimes with large nonlinearities requires improvements in test techniques for measuring and characterizing wind tunnel data. This paper presents a method for providing a measure of data integrity for static and forced oscillation test techniques. Data integrity is particularly important when attempting to accurately model and predict flight of today s high performance aircraft which are operating in expanded flight envelopes, often maneuvering at high angular rates at high angles-of-attack, even above maximum lift. Current aerodynamic models are inadequate in predicting flight characteristics in the expanded envelope, such as rapid aircraft departures and other unusual motions. Present wind tunnel test methods do not factor changes of flow physics into data acquisition schemes, so in many cases data are obtained over more iterations than required, or insufficient data may be obtained to determine a valid estimate with statistical significance. Additionally, forced oscillation test techniques, one of the primary tools used to develop dynamic models, do not currently provide estimates of the uncertainty of the results during an oscillation cycle. A method to optimize the required number of forced oscillation cycles based on decay of uncertainty gradients and balance tolerances is also presented.

Heim, Eugene H. D.; Bandon, Jay M.

2004-01-01

31

Wing shape allometry and aerodynamics in calopterygid damselflies: a comparative approach  

PubMed Central

Background Wing size and shape have important aerodynamic implications on flight performance. We explored how wing size was related to wing shape in territorial males of 37 taxa of the damselfly family Calopterygidae. Wing coloration was also included in the analyses because it is sexually and naturally selected and has been shown to be related to wing shape. We studied wing shape using both the non-dimensional radius of the second moment of wing area (RSM) and geometric morphometrics. Lower values of the RSM result in less energetically demanding flight and wider ranges of flight speed. We also re-analyzed previously published data on other damselflies and dragonflies. Results The RSM showed a hump-shaped relationship with wing size. However, after correcting for phylogeny using independent contrast, this pattern changed to a negative linear relationship. The basal genus of the study family, Hetaerina, was mainly driving that change. The obtained patterns were specific for the study family and differed from other damselflies and dragonflies. The relationship between the RSM and wing shape measured by geometric morphometrics was linear, but relatively small changes along the RSM axis can result in large changes in wing shape. Our results also showed that wing coloration may have some effect on RSM. Conclusions We found that RSM showed a complex relationship with size in calopterygid damselflies, probably as a result of other selection pressures besides wing size per se. Wing coloration and specific behavior (e.g. courtship) are potential candidates for explaining the complexity. Univariate measures of wing shape such as RSM are more intuitive but lack the high resolution of other multivariate techniques such as geometric morphometrics. We suggest that the relationship between wing shape and size are taxa-specific and differ among closely-related insect groups. PMID:23742224

2013-01-01

32

Validation of the Immersed Boundary CFD Approach for Complex Aerodynamic Flows  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standard CFD methods require a mesh that fits the boundaries of the computational domain. For a complex geometry the generation\\u000a of such a grid is time-consuming and often requires modifications to the model geometry. This paper evaluates the Immersed\\u000a Boundary (IB) approach which does not require a boundary-conforming mesh and thus would speed up the process of the grid generation.

B. Khalighi; S. Jindal; J. P. Johnson; K. H. Chen; G. Iaccarino

33

A Parallel Cartesian Approach for External Aerodynamics of Vehicles with Complex Geometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This workshop paper presents the current status in the development of a new approach for the solution of the Euler equations on Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries in three dimensions on distributed and shared memory architectures. The approach uses adaptively refined Cartesian hexahedra to fill the computational domain. Where these cells intersect the geometry, they are cut by the boundary into arbitrarily shaped polyhedra which receive special treatment by the solver. The presentation documents a newly developed multilevel upwind solver based on a flexible domain-decomposition strategy. One novel aspect of the work is its use of space-filling curves (SFC) for memory efficient on-the-fly parallelization, dynamic re-partitioning and automatic coarse mesh generation. Within each subdomain the approach employs a variety reordering techniques so that relevant data are on the same page in memory permitting high-performance on cache-based processors. Details of the on-the-fly SFC based partitioning are presented as are construction rules for the automatic coarse mesh generation. After describing the approach, the paper uses model problems and 3- D configurations to both verify and validate the solver. The model problems demonstrate that second-order accuracy is maintained despite the presence of the irregular cut-cells in the mesh. In addition, it examines both parallel efficiency and convergence behavior. These investigations demonstrate a parallel speed-up in excess of 28 on 32 processors of an SGI Origin 2000 system and confirm that mesh partitioning has no effect on convergence behavior.

Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.

2001-01-01

34

Rarefied aerodynamic measurements in hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to improve the feasibility of space missions, the prediction accuracy of rarefied aerodynamics is one of the important factors. To improve rarefied aerodynamic predictions, the determination of accommodation coefficients and direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamic forces are crucial. Thus, at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, a hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel has been developed for rarefied aerodynamic measurements. In this work, we have utilized both experimental and numerical approaches for rarefied hypersonic aerodynamic measurements, and the measurement schemes have been developed by using pendulous models for accommodation coefficients and for aeroshell aerodynamic characteristics. Consequently, we have successfully demonstrated measurements of accommodation coefficients and rarefied aerodynamic characteristics for an aeroshell.

Ozawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, K.

2014-12-01

35

Payload vehicle aerodynamic reentry analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An approach for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a cone-cylinder payload vehicle during reentry to insure proper deployment of the parachute system and recovery of the payload is presented. This analysis includes the study of an aerodynamic device that is useful in extending vehicle axial rotation through the maximum dynamic pressure region. Attention is given to vehicle configuration and reentry trajectory, the derivation of pitch static aerodynamics, the derivation of the pitch damping coefficient, pitching moment modeling, aerodynamic roll device modeling, and payload vehicle reentry dynamics. It is shown that the vehicle dynamics at parachute deployment are well within the design limit of the recovery system, thus ensuring successful payload recovery.

Tong, Donald

36

An approach to aerodynamic sound prediction based on incompressible-flow pressure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Curle's analogy provides a solution to Lighthill's equation to predict flow-generated sound in the presence of rigid boundaries. Nevertheless, Curle's solution requires the flow pressure, including its acoustic component, to be known in the source region. If the pressure corresponds to an incompressible-flow description instead and the surface is not acoustically compact, significant errors can arise in the acoustic prediction. In this work, it is argued that flow wall pressure can be used to define appropriate boundary conditions of an equivalent acoustic boundary value problem for an arbitrary geometry, and a formulation of a boundary condition based on incompressible-flow pressure is proposed. The theoretical analysis suggests that if the flow is incompressible, the error has the leading order of a dipole plus a quadrupole for Curle's analogy and of just a quadrupole for the proposed alternative approach, thus making the latter more accurate when dipole sources are dominant. A numerical test case is presented as a proof of concept, consisting of a trailing edge noise problem due to the flow past a slender body.

Martínez-Lera, P.; Schram, C.; Bériot, H.; Hallez, R.

2014-01-01

37

Application of the aerodynamic energy concept to flutter suppression and gust alleviation by use of active controls  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of active controls on flutter suppression and gust alleviation of the Arava twin turboprop STOL transport and the Westwind twinjet business transport are investigated. The active control surfaces are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a 20-percent chord leading-edge control and a 20-percent chord trailing-edge control. Each control surface is driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system located on the activated strip. The control law is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy and utilizes previously optimized control law parameters based on two-dimensional aerodynamic theory. The best locations of the activated system along the span of the wing are determined for bending-moment alleviation, reduction in fuselage accelerations, and flutter suppression. The effectiveness of the activated system over a wide range of maximum control deflections is also determined. Two control laws are investigated. The first control law utilizes both rigid-body and elastic contributions of the motion. The second control law employs primarily the elastic contribution of the wing and leads to large increases in the activated control effectiveness as compared with the basic control law. The results indicate that flutter speed can be significantly increased (over 70 percent increase) and that the bending moment due to gust loading can be almost totally eliminated by a control system of about 10 to 20 percent span with reasonable control-surface rotations.

Nissim, E.; Caspi, A.; Lottati, I.

1976-01-01

38

Effect of aileron deflections on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan model of a subsonic energy-efficient transport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to determine the effect of aileron deflections on the aerodynamic characteristics of a subsonic energy efficient transport (EET) model. The semispan model had an aspect ratio 10 supercritical wing and was configured with a conventionally located set of ailerons (i.e., a high speed aileron located inboard and a low speed aileron located outboard). Data for the model were taken over a Mach number range from 0.30 to 0.90 and an angle of attack range from approximately -2 deg to 10 deg. The Reynolds number was 2.5 million per foot for Mach number = 0.30 and 4 million per foot for the other Mach numbers. Model force and moment data, aileron effectiveness parameters, aileron hinge moment data, otherwise pressure distributions, and spanwise load data are presented.

Jacobs, P. F.

1985-01-01

39

Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cyclist aerodynamics: Performance of different turbulence-modelling and boundary-layer modelling approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims at assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for applications in sports aerodynamics, for example for drag predictions of swimmers, cyclists or skiers, by evaluating the applied numerical modelling techniques by means of detailed validation experiments. In this study, a wind-tunnel experiment on a scale model of a cyclist (scale 1:2) is presented. Apart from three-component

Thijs Defraeye; Bert Blocken; Erwin Koninckx; Peter Hespel; Jan Carmeliet

2010-01-01

40

Aerodynamic design of electric and hybrid vehicles: A guidebook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A typical present-day subcompact electric hybrid vehicle (EHV), operating on an SAE J227a D driving cycle, consumes up to 35% of its road energy requirement overcoming aerodynamic resistance. The application of an integrated system design approach, where drag reduction is an important design parameter, can increase the cycle range by more than 15%. This guidebook highlights a logic strategy for including aerodynamic drag reduction in the design of electric and hybrid vehicles to the degree appropriate to the mission requirements. Backup information and procedures are included in order to implement the strategy. Elements of the procedure are based on extensive wind tunnel tests involving generic subscale models and full-scale prototype EHVs. The user need not have any previous aerodynamic background. By necessity, the procedure utilizes many generic approximations and assumptions resulting in various levels of uncertainty. Dealing with these uncertainties, however, is a key feature of the strategy.

Kurtz, D. W.

1980-01-01

41

Numerical analysis of the effect of local energy supply on the aerodynamic drag and heat transfer of a spherically blunted body in a supersonic air flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of local source of energy in a supersonic flow on the aerodynamic drag and heat transfer of a spherically blunted\\u000a body is studied numerically. Calculations are performed on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations for a thermally equilibrium\\u000a model of air. Data on the effect of the intensity and size of the energy source on the wave drag,

V. A. Levin; V. G. Gromov; N. E. Afonina

2000-01-01

42

insect Aerodynamics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page describes current research about insect flight dynamics. It focuses on the work of biologist R. McNeill Alexander of the University of Leeds, whose research team has built large-scale models of insects to test their flight aerodynamics in wind tunnels. At the bottom of the page is a small (160 x 120) QuickTime video of a Morpho butterfly (Order Lepidoptera, Family Nymphalidae) with detailed views of its wing scales. It is an excerpt from the Alien Empire miniseries of the Public Broadcasting Service's Nature series. The video requires QuickTime and may not be accessible to those with older or slow computers. The link to the "enhanced multimedia video clip" did not work at the time of this review.

0000-00-00

43

Aerodynamic Design of Road Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Guidebook discusses design of road vehicles to reduce aerodynamic drag. Book presents strategy for integrating aerodynamic design into vehicle design. Book written for readers lacking experience in aerodynamics.

Kurtz, D. W.

1985-01-01

44

Aerodynamic calculation of unmanned aircraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To provide an effective numerical method for analysis and design of aerodynamic characteristics of unmanned aerial vehicles basing on commercial package VSAERO. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Calculation was made by VSAERO package, which is based on a classical panel method enhanced on boundary layer method. Paper explains how to use efficiently VSAERO package, which utilizes advanced CAD techniques, in modern

Marcin Figat; Tomasz Goetzendorf-Grabowski; Zdobys?aw Goraj

2005-01-01

45

Payload vehicle aerodynamic reentry analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An approach for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a cone-cylinder payload vehicle during reentry to insure proper deployment of the parachute system and recovery of the payload is presented. This analysis includes the study of an aerodynamic device that is useful in extending vehicle axial rotation through the maximum dynamic pressure region. Attention is given to vehicle configuration and reentry

Donald Tong

1991-01-01

46

Aerodynamic detuning analysis of an unstalled supersonic turbofan cascade  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An approach to passive flutter control is aerodynamic detuning, defined as designed passage-to-passage differences in the unsteady aerodynamic flow field of a rotor blade row. Thus, aerodynamic detuning directly affects the fundamental driving mechanism for flutter. A model to demonstrate the enhanced supersonic aeroelastic stability associated with aerodynamic detuning is developed. The stability of an aerodynamically detuned cascade operating in a supersonic inlet flow field with a subsonic leading edge locus is analyzed, with the aerodynamic detuning accomplished by means of nonuniform circumferential spacing of adjacent rotor blades. The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on the blading are defined in terms of influence coefficients in a manner that permits the stability of both a conventional uniformally spaced rotor configuration as well as the detuned nonuniform circumferentially spaced rotor to be determined. With Verdon's uniformly spaced Cascade B as a baseline, this analysis is then utilized to demonstrate the potential enhanced aeroelastic stability associated with this particular type of aerodynamic detuning.

Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

1985-01-01

47

Classical Aerodynamic Theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

Jones, R. T. (compiler)

1979-01-01

48

NASA aerodynamics program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

1992-01-01

49

NASA aerodynamics program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

1990-01-01

50

Dynamic Soaring: Aerodynamics for Albatrosses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio "L/D", albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant "L/D". Analytic solutions to the simplified…

Denny, Mark

2009-01-01

51

Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cyclist aerodynamics: performance of different turbulence-modelling and boundary-layer modelling approaches.  

PubMed

This study aims at assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for applications in sports aerodynamics, for example for drag predictions of swimmers, cyclists or skiers, by evaluating the applied numerical modelling techniques by means of detailed validation experiments. In this study, a wind-tunnel experiment on a scale model of a cyclist (scale 1:2) is presented. Apart from three-component forces and moments, also high-resolution surface pressure measurements on the scale model's surface, i.e. at 115 locations, are performed to provide detailed information on the flow field. These data are used to compare the performance of different turbulence-modelling techniques, such as steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), with several k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models, and unsteady large-eddy simulation (LES), and also boundary-layer modelling techniques, namely wall functions and low-Reynolds number modelling (LRNM). The commercial CFD code Fluent 6.3 is used for the simulations. The RANS shear-stress transport (SST) k-omega model shows the best overall performance, followed by the more computationally expensive LES. Furthermore, LRNM is clearly preferred over wall functions to model the boundary layer. This study showed that there are more accurate alternatives for evaluating flow around bluff bodies with CFD than the standard k-epsilon model combined with wall functions, which is often used in CFD studies in sports. PMID:20488446

Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

2010-08-26

52

Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics  

SciTech Connect

Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

Graham, Sean (Primary Investigator); Bigatel, Patrick

2004-10-17

53

Supersonic aerodynamic performance of truncated cones with repetitive laser pulse energy depositions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the drag characteristics of truncated cones in Mach 1.94 flow with repetitive laser pulse energy depositions with a frequency of up to 80 kHz. The drag decrement is almost in proportion to the laser pulse repetition frequency, and scales with a greater-than-square power of the truncation diameter. The performance of the latter is associated with the effective area of pressure modulation and the effective residence time of vortices which are baroclinically generated after the interaction between laser-heated gas bubbles and the bow shock wave. With employing a concave head, the drag decrement is enhanced. With increasing the truncation diameter, the efficiency of energy deposition becomes higher; yet, within the operation range of this study the drag coefficient still remains high.

Sasoh, A.; Kim, J.-H.; Yamashita, K.; Sakai, T.

2014-01-01

54

Aerodynamic research efforts at SERI Wind Energy Research Center at Rocky Flats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two levels of performance prediction theory are currently being used and refined while performance enhancement is being pursued through the development of new special purpose airfoils. A general purpose blade-element\\/momentum code (PROPSH) has been developed for rapid parametric studies and for use in annual energy calculations. A desirable feature of this code is a post-stall airfoil data synthesization routine that

J. L. Tangler

1984-01-01

55

Aerodynamic research efforts at SERI wind energy research center at Rocky Flats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Performance prediction and enhancement of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) are discussed. A general purpose blade-element\\/momentum code was developed for rapid parametric studies and for use in annual energy calculations. A post-stall airfoil data synthesization routine accounts for blade aspect ratio effects. A version of the performance code provides better determination of dynamic stall effects on blade loads and performance

J. L. Tangler

1985-01-01

56

Bifurcations in unsteady aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nonlinear algebraic functional expansions are used to create a form for the unsteady aerodynamic response that is consistent with solutions of the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. An enumeration of means of invalidating Frechet differentiability of the aerodynamic response, one of which is aerodynamic bifurcation, is proposed as a way of classifying steady and unsteady aerodynamic phenomena that are important in flight dynamics applications. Accomodating bifurcation phenomena involving time dependent equilibrium states within a mathematical model of the aerodynamic response raises an issue of memory effects that becomes more important with each successive bifurcation.

Tobak, M.; Unal, A.

1986-01-01

57

Bifurcations in unsteady aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nonlinear algebraic functional expansions are used to create a form for the unsteady aerodynamic response that is consistent with solutions of the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. An enumeration of means of invalidating Frechet differentiability of the aerodynamic response, one of which is aerodynamic bifurcation, is proposed as a way of classifying steady and unsteady aerodynamic phenomena that are important in flight dynamics applications. Accommodating bifurcation phenomena involving time dependent equilibrium states within a mathematical model of the aerodynamic response raises an issue of memory effects that becomes more important with each successive bifurcation.

Tobak, M.; Unal, A.

1987-01-01

58

Fluid-thermal-structural study of aerodynamically heated leading edges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A finite element approach for integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis of aerodynamically heated leading edges is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for high speed compressible flow, the energy equation, and the quasi-static equilibrium equations for the leading edge are solved using a single finite element approach in one integrated, vectorized computer program called LIFTS. The fluid-thermal-structural coupling is studied for Mach 6.47 flow over a 3-in diam cylinder for which the flow behavior and the aerothermal loads are calibrated by experimental data. Issues of the thermal-structural response are studied for hydrogen-cooled, super thermal conducting leading edges subjected to intense aerodynamic heating.

Deuchamphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.; Wieting, Allan R.

1988-01-01

59

UTILITY OF RADIOMETRIC-AERODYNAMIC TEMPERATURE RELATIONS FOR HEAT FLUX ESTIMATION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In many land surface models using bulk transfer (one-source) approaches, the application of radiometric surface temperature observations in energy flux computations has given mixed results. This is due in part to the non-unique relationship between the so-called aerodynamic temperature, which relat...

60

Aerodynamic detuning analysis of an unstalled supersonic turbofan cascade  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An approach to passive flutter control is aerodynamic detuning, defined as designed pasage-to-passage differences in the unsteady aerodynamic flow field of a rotor blade row. Thus, aerodynamic detuning directly affects the fundamental driving mechanism for flutter. A model to demonstrate the enhanced supersonic aeroelastic stability associated with aerodynamic detuning is developed. The stability of an aerodynamicaly detuned cascade operating in a supersonic inlet flow field with a subsonic leading edge locus analyzed, with the aerodynamic detuning accomplished by means of nonuniform circumferential spacing of adjacent rotor blades. The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on the blading are defined in terms of influence coefficients in a manner that permits the stability of both a conventional uniformally spaced rotor configuration as well as the detuned nonuniform circumferentialy spaced rotor to be determined. With Verdon's uniformly spaced Cascade B as a baseline, this analysis is then utilized to demonstrate the potential enhanced aeroelastic stability associated with this particular type of aerodynamic detuning.

Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

1986-01-01

61

Vortex flow aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (editor)

1992-01-01

62

Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

1953-01-01

63

Aerodynamics of runback ice accretions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental study of the effects of simulated runback ice accretions has been performed in order to describe their aerodynamic performance penalties and investigate their scaling for use in sub-scale aerodynamic testing. Runback ice accretions corresponding to three flight conditions, warm hold, cold hold and descent, were simulated and tested on the NACA 23012 and NACA 3415. The ice shapes were simulated on two levels of fidelity. Medium-fidelity simulations captured the chordwise location, cross-section, height distribution and chordwise extent of the ice accretion. Low-fidelity simulations captured their height and chordwise location. Two scaling methods were also employed. Each simulation was scaled based upon the ratio of the aerodynamic model chord to the full-scale icing model, called geometric scaling. The warm hold simulations were also scaled based upon the ratio of the local, clean-model boundary-layer thickness on the aerodynamic model to that of the icing model, called boundary-layer scaling. This method was employed because the geometrically-scaled simulations were found to be on the order of the boundary-layer thickness as the model approached stall. Following aerodynamic performance testing, fluorescent-oil flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry were used to investigate the flowfield resulting from the low-fidelity warm hold simulations. Results for this work have shown that runback ice accretions can cause significant aerodynamic performance penalties. In general, the NACA 23012 experienced greater aerodynamic performance penalties due to the runback simulations than did the NACA 3415. Low-fidelity simulations of the cold hold case agreed quite well with their medium fidelity counterparts. In the descent case, the level of variation in ice accretion height was too small for there to be a distinction between the low- and medium-fidelity cases. Low-fidelity simulations of the warm hold accretion did not agree well with the medium-fidelity simulation. In fact, the geometrically-scaled simulation was observed to increase the maximum lift and stalling angle-of-attack of the NACA 3415. Flowfield investigations using fluorescent-oil flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry showed that the simulations that were similar in height to the clean-model local boundary-layer thickness acted to stabilize the recovering boundary layer, delaying stall past the stalling angle-of-attack of the clean case.

Whalen, Edward A.

64

Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

1989-01-01

65

AIAA 960409 Automatic Aerodynamic  

E-print Network

AIAA 96­0409 Automatic Aerodynamic Optimization on Distributed Memory Architectures Antony Jameson­0409 Automatic Aerodynamic Optimization on Distributed Memory Architectures Antony Jameson and Juan J. Alonso. The Euler equations and the resulting adjoint equations necessary to calculate the Frechet derivatives

Jameson, Antony

66

A Casimir approach to dark energy  

E-print Network

We calculate the gravitational self-energy of vacuum quantum field fluctuations using a Casimir approach. We find that the Casimir gravitational self-energy density can account for the measured dark energy density when the SUSY-breaking energy is approximately 5 TeV, in good agreement with current estimates. Furthermore, the Casimir gravitational self-energy appears to provide a quantum mechanism for the well-know geometric relation between the Planck, SUSY and cosmological constant energy scales.

Allan Rosencwaig

2006-06-26

67

Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.  

PubMed

The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used. PMID:17519203

Tucker, Paul G

2007-10-15

68

Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

Horstman, Raymond H.

1992-01-01

69

Observational approaches to understanding dark energy  

E-print Network

Illuminating the nature of dark energy is one of the most important challenges in cosmology today. In this review I discuss several promising observational approaches to understanding dark energy, in the context of the recommendations by the U.S. Dark Energy Task Force and the ESA-ESO Working Group on Fundamental Cosmology.

Yun Wang

2007-12-01

70

Progress in computational unsteady aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After vigorous development for over twenty years, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in the field of aerospace engineering has arrived at a turning point toward maturity. This paper discusses issues related to algorithm development for the Euler/Navier Stokes equations, code validation and recent applications of CFD for unsteady aerodynamics. Algorithm development is a fundamental element for a good CFD program. Code validation tries to bridge the reliability gap between CFD and experiment. Many of the recent applications also take a multidisciplinary approach, which is a future trend for CFD applications. As computers become more affordable, CFD is expected to be a better scientific and engineering tool.

Obayashi, Shigeru

1993-01-01

71

Wind turbine design codes: A preliminary comparison of the aerodynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Wind Technology Center of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is comparing several computer codes used to design and analyze wind turbines. The first part of this comparison is to determine how well the programs predict the aerodynamic behavior of turbines with no structural degrees of freedom. Without general agreement on the aerodynamics, it is futile to try to

Marshall L. Buhl; Alan D. Wright; James L. Tangler

1997-01-01

72

Outsourced Energy Management- A Trustee Approach  

E-print Network

for outsourcing these responsibilities through the creation of a partnership with an independent firm of experienced energy experts, and outlines the advantages of this approach versus the other models now available....

Ciarlone, D. F.; O'Connor, T. W.

73

Active aerodynamic stabilisation of long suspension bridges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes the addition of actively controlled aerodynamic appendages (flaps) attached along the length of the bridge deck to dampen wind-induced oscillations in long suspension bridges. A novel approach using control systems methods for the analysis of dynamic stability is presented. In order to make use of control analysis and design techniques, a linear model of the structural and

Henrik Ditlev Nissen; Paul Haase Sørensen; Ole Jannerup

2004-01-01

74

Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

1976-01-01

75

Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

1996-01-01

76

Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

Chawla, Kalpana

1995-01-01

77

Nonlinear aerodynamic modeling using multivariate orthogonal functions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique was developed for global modeling of nonlinear aerodynamic coefficients using multivariate orthogonal functions based on the data. Each orthogonal function retained in the model was decomposed into an expansion of ordinary polynomials in the independent variables, so that the final model could be interpreted as selectively retained terms from a multivariable power series expansion. A predicted squared-error metric was used to determine the orthogonal functions to be retained in the model; analytical derivatives were easily computed. The approach was demonstrated on the Z-body axis aerodynamic force coefficient (Cz) wind tunnel data for an F-18 research vehicle which came from a tabular wind tunnel and covered the entire subsonic flight envelope. For a realistic case, the analytical model predicted experimental values of Cz very well. The modeling technique is shown to be capable of generating a compact, global analytical representation of nonlinear aerodynamics. The polynomial model has good predictive capability, global validity, and analytical differentiability.

Morelli, Eugene A.

1993-01-01

78

Aerodynamics problems of space probes in comet atmosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper deals with aerodynamic problems connected with a space probe moving in a rarefied gas-dust Halley's comet atmosphere on exposure to electromagnetic solar radiation. Their relative approach velocity will be 78 km\\/s.

Iu. A. Ryzhov; V. P. Bass; V. P. Kariagin; V. M. Kovtunenko; K. N. Kuzovkin

1985-01-01

79

Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

Bonner, Ellwood

1985-01-01

80

Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

1989-01-01

81

Entry aerodynamics and heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the problems of entry aerodynamics and heating is given with emphasis on survival of the probe, predictability of performance, and reliability of performance. Technological challenges to performance prediction are considered and include: turbulent heat transfer, radiation blockage, chemical state of the shock layer, afterbody heat transfer, asymmetric ablation, and real-gas aerodynamics. It is indicated that various obstacles must be overcome in order to achieve technology readiness. These obstacles are considered to be: extrapolations from ground tests to flight; lack of flight experience; lack of parametric data; and uncertain knowledge of atmospherics.

Olstad, W.

1974-01-01

82

ENPEP: An integrated approach to energy planning  

SciTech Connect

Many models have been developed to analyze various aspects of the energy system. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) is a set of microcomputer-based energy planning tools that are designed to provide an integrated analysis capability. ENPEP begins with a macroeconomic analysis, develops an energy demand forecast based on this analysis, carries out an integrated supply/demand analysis for the entire energy system, evaluates the electric system component of the energy system in detail, and determines the impacts of alternative configurations. This approach is an enhancement of existing techniques in that it places emphasis on looking at the electric system as an integral part of the entire energy supply system. Also, it explicitly considers the impacts the power system has on the rest of the energy system and on the economy as a whole.

Hamilton, B.P.; Cirillo, R.R.; Buehring, W.A.

1992-01-01

83

ENPEP: An integrated approach to energy planning  

SciTech Connect

Many models have been developed to analyze various aspects of the energy system. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) is a set of microcomputer-based energy planning tools that are designed to provide an integrated analysis capability. ENPEP begins with a macroeconomic analysis, develops an energy demand forecast based on this analysis, carries out an integrated supply/demand analysis for the entire energy system, evaluates the electric system component of the energy system in detail, and determines the impacts of alternative configurations. This approach is an enhancement of existing techniques in that it places emphasis on looking at the electric system as an integral part of the entire energy supply system. Also, it explicitly considers the impacts the power system has on the rest of the energy system and on the economy as a whole.

Hamilton, B.P.; Cirillo, R.R.; Buehring, W.A.

1992-09-01

84

Nonlinear aerodynamic forces on thin flat plate: Numerical study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper first presents a numerical simulation of nonlinear aerodynamic forces on a thin flat plate through an integration of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method and the forced asymptotic oscillation method. The thin flat plate is forced to have either asymptotic torsional oscillation or asymptotic vertical oscillation of increasing amplitude. A multiple-domain mesh technique together with unstructured dynamic meshes is used in the CFD simulation to accommodate large amplitude oscillations of the plate. The instantaneous frequencies and amplitudes of the aerodynamic forces are then identified from the simulated asymptotic aerodynamic force time histories using the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in terms of the CWT ridges. Extensive numerical studies are finally performed to examine the feasibility of the proposed approach. The results show that the CFD method used in this study can properly simulate nonlinear aerodynamic forces on the plate. The amplitude of the aerodynamic force depends on the amplitude of the forced oscillation and there are high-order harmonic aerodynamic forces of higher frequency than the forced oscillation frequency, both indicating the nonlinearity of aerodynamic forces. The results also show the flutter derivatives associated with self-excited aerodynamic forces depend on the amplitude of forced oscillation in addition to reduced velocity.

Huang, Lin; Xu, You-Lin; Liao, Haili

2014-01-01

85

Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of

Thomas J. Mueller

2003-01-01

86

Aerodynamics of Race Cars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

Katz, Joseph

2006-01-01

87

Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus  

SciTech Connect

An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

Kim, K.

1986-08-12

88

Aerodynamics of the hovering hummingbird.  

PubMed

Despite profound musculoskeletal differences, hummingbirds (Trochilidae) are widely thought to employ aerodynamic mechanisms similar to those used by insects. The kinematic symmetry of the hummingbird upstroke and downstroke has led to the assumption that these halves of the wingbeat cycle contribute equally to weight support during hovering, as exhibited by insects of similar size. This assumption has been applied, either explicitly or implicitly, in widely used aerodynamic models and in a variety of empirical tests. Here we provide measurements of the wake of hovering rufous hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus) obtained with digital particle image velocimetry that show force asymmetry: hummingbirds produce 75% of their weight support during the downstroke and only 25% during the upstroke. Some of this asymmetry is probably due to inversion of their cambered wings during upstroke. The wake of hummingbird wings also reveals evidence of leading-edge vortices created during the downstroke, indicating that they may operate at Reynolds numbers sufficiently low to exploit a key mechanism typical of insect hovering. Hummingbird hovering approaches that of insects, yet remains distinct because of effects resulting from an inherently dissimilar-avian-body plan. PMID:15973407

Warrick, Douglas R; Tobalske, Bret W; Powers, Donald R

2005-06-23

89

Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.  

PubMed

We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system. PMID:23262604

Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

2012-12-20

90

An Institutional Approach to Understanding Energy Transitions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energy is a central concern of sustainability because how we produce and consume energy affects society, economy, and the environment. Sustainability scientists are interested in energy transitions away from fossil fuels because they are nonrenewable, increasingly expensive, have adverse health effects, and may be the main driver of climate change. They see an opportunity for developing countries to avoid the negative consequences fossil-fuel-based energy systems, and also to increase resilience, by leap-frogging-over the centralized energy grid systems that dominate the developed world. Energy transitions pose both challenges and opportunities. Obstacles to transitions include 1) an existing, centralized, complex energy-grid system, whose function is invisible to most users, 2) coordination and collective-action problems that are path dependent, and 3) difficulty in scaling up RE technologies. Because energy transitions rely on technological and social innovations, I am interested in how institutional factors can be leveraged to surmount these obstacles. The overarching question that underlies my research is: What constellation of institutional, biophysical, and social factors are essential for an energy transition? My objective is to derive a set of "design principles," that I term institutional drivers, for energy transitions analogous to Ostrom's institutional design principles. My dissertation research will analyze energy transitions using two approaches: applying the Institutional Analysis and Development Framework and a comparative case study analysis comprised of both primary and secondary sources. This dissertation includes: 1) an analysis of the world's energy portfolio; 2) a case study analysis of five countries; 3) a description of the institutional factors likely to promote a transition to renewable-energy use; and 4) an in-depth case study of Thailand's progress in replacing nonrenewable energy sources with renewable energy sources. My research will contribute to our understanding of how energy transitions at different scales can be accomplished in developing countries and what it takes for innovation to spread in a society.

Koster, Auriane Magdalena

91

DuPont Approach to Energy Management: A System Wide Approach to Energy Efficiency  

E-print Network

DUPONT APPROACH TO ENERGY MANAGEMENT A System Wide Approach to Energy Efficiency For presentation at Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston April 22-23, 1998 John W. Stewart DuPont Corporate Energy Leadership Team DuPont.... Achieving this goal will represent cumulative savings of $1.8 billion over the decade. From 1991 through 1996 energy utilization has been improved by more than 10% globally and savings are accruing at a rate of more than $100 million per year. The DuPont...

Stewart, J. W.

92

Aeroelastic control of stability and forced response of supersonic rotors by aerodynamic detuning  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic detuning, defined as designed passage-to-passage differences in the unsteady aerodynamic flow field of a rotor blade row, is a new approach to passive flutter and forced response control. In this paper, a mathematical model for aerodynamic detuning is developed and utilized to demonstrate the aeroelastic stability enhancement due to aerodynamic detuning of supersonic blade rows. In particular, a model is developed to analyze both the torsion mode and the coupled bending-torsion mode unstalled supersonic flutter and torsion mode aerodynamically forced response characteristics of an aerodynamically detuned rotor operating in a supersonic inlet flow field with a subsonic leading edge locus. As small solidity variations do not have a dominant effect on the steady-state performance of a rotor, the aerodynamic detuning mechanism considered is nonuniform circumferential spacing of adjacent blades.

Hoyniak, Daniel; Fleeter, Sanford

1987-01-01

93

AERODYNAMICS OF SMALL VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract In this review,we,describe,the aerodynamic,problems,that must,be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number,and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance,of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number,of experimental,boundary-layer studies, including the

Thomas J. Mueller; James D. DeLaurier

2003-01-01

94

Computational Approaches for Understanding Energy Metabolism  

PubMed Central

There has been a surge of interest in understanding the regulation of metabolic networks involved in disease in recent years. Quantitative models are increasingly being used to i nterrogate the metabolic pathways that are contained within this complex disease biology. At the core of this effort is the mathematical modeling of central carbon metabolism involving glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (referred to as energy metabolism). Here we discuss several approaches used to quantitatively model metabolic pathways relating to energy metabolism and discuss their formalisms, successes, and limitations. PMID:23897661

Shestov, Alexander A; Barker, Brandon; Gu, Zhenglong; Locasale, Jason W

2013-01-01

95

Shuttle system ascent aerodynamic and plume heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The shuttle program provided a challenge to the aerothermodynamicist due to the complexity of the flow field around the vehicle during ascent, since the configuration causes multiple shock interactions between the elements. Wind tunnel tests provided data for the prediction of the ascent design heating environment which involves both plume and aerodynamic heating phenomena. The approach for the heating methodology based on ground test firings and the use of the wind tunnel data to formulate the math models is discussed.

Foster, L. D.; Greenwood, T. F.; Lee, D. B.

1985-01-01

96

Euler solutions for aerodynamic inverse shape design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contributions to the aerodynamics development have to be involved to achieve an increase in quality, reducing time and computer costs. Therefore, this work develops an optimization method based on the finite volume explicit Runge-Kutta multi-stage scheme with central spatial discretization in combination with multigrid and preconditioning. The multigrid approach includes local time-stepping and residual smoothing. Such a method allows getting

A. L. de Bortoli; R. de Quadros

2004-01-01

97

Recovering Flare Gas Energy - A Different Approach  

E-print Network

RECOVERING FLARE GAS ENERGY - A DIFFERENT APPROACH \\ WALTER BRENNER Process Engineer SunOlin Chemical Co. Claymont, Delaware AUSTRACT Most petrochemical complexes and oil re fineries have systems to collect and dispose of waste gases.... Usually this is done by burning in a flare. Some installations recover these gases by compressing them into their fuel system. Because SunOlin shares its flare system with a neighboring oil refinery, changes to the flare system operation could have...

Brenner, W.

98

Aerodynamic mathematical modeling - basic concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic response of an aircraft to arbitrary maneuvers is reviewed. Bryan's original formulation, linear aerodynamic indicial functions, and superposition are considered. These concepts are extended into the nonlinear regime. The nonlinear generalization yields a form for the aerodynamic response that can be built up from the responses to a limited number of well defined characteristic motions, reproducible in principle either in wind tunnel experiments or flow field computations. A further generalization leads to a form accommodating the discontinuous and double valued behavior characteristics of hysteresis in the steady state aerodynamic response.

Tobak, M.; Schiff, L. B.

1981-01-01

99

Aeroacoustic and aerodynamic applications of the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent developments in the field of nonequilibrium thermodynamics associated with viscous flows are examined and related to developments to the understanding of specific phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. A key element of the nonequilibrium theory is the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady dissipative processes near equilibrium, and variational calculus is used to apply this principle to several examples of viscous flow. A review of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and its role in fluid motion are presented. Several formulations are presented of the local entropy production rate and the local energy dissipation rate, two quantities that are of central importance to the theory. These expressions and the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady viscous flows are used to identify parallel-wall channel flow and irrotational flow as having minimally dissipative velocity distributions. Features of irrotational, steady, viscous flow near an airfoil, such as the effect of trailing-edge radius on circulation, are also found to be compatible with the minimum principle. Finally, the minimum principle is used to interpret the stability of infinitesimal and finite amplitude disturbances in an initially laminar, parallel shear flow, with results that are consistent with experiment and linearized hydrodynamic stability theory. These results suggest that a thermodynamic approach may be useful in unifying the understanding of many diverse phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics.

Horne, W. Clifton; Smith, Charles A.; Karamcheti, Krishnamurty

1991-01-01

100

AIAA 982538 Aerodynamic Shape Optimization  

E-print Network

AIAA 98­2538 Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Techniques Based On Control Theory Antony Jameson. C. Vassberg Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Long Beach, CA 90846 29th AIAA Fluid Dynamics;AIAA 98­2538 Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Techniques Based On Control Theory Antony Jameson and Juan

Stanford University

101

A Kinematical Approach to Dark Energy Studies  

SciTech Connect

We present and employ a new kinematical approach to cosmological ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t) = 1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to the three best available sets of redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t) = j, we measure q{sub 0} = -0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j = 2.16{sub -0.75}{sup +0.81}, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. A standard ''dynamical'' analysis of the same data, employing the Friedmann equations and modeling the dark energy as a fluid with an equation of state parameter, w (constant), gives {Omega}{sub m} = 0.306{sub -0.040}{sup +0.042} and w = -1.15{sub -0.18}{sup +0.14}, also consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible. Our results provide further interesting support for the concordance {Lambda}CDM paradigm.

Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2006-06-06

102

Unsteady aerodynamics of blade rows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The requirements placed on an unsteady aerodynamic theory intended for turbomachinery aeroelastic or aeroacoustic applications are discussed along with a brief description of the various theoretical models that are available to address these requirements. The major emphasis is placed on the description of a linearized inviscid theory which fully accounts for the affects of a nonuniform mean or steady flow on unsteady aerodynamic response. Although this linearization was developed primarily for blade flutter prediction, more general equations are presented which account for unsteady excitations due to incident external aerodynamic disturbances as well as those due to prescribed blade motions. The motivation for this linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory is focused on, its physical and mathematical formulation is outlined and examples are presented to illustrate the status of numerical solution procedures and several effects of mean flow nonuniformity on unsteady aerodynamic response.

Verdon, Joseph M.

1989-01-01

103

Aerodynamics of sports balls  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

Mehta, R. D.

104

Aerodynamics of Mars Odyssey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and free-molecular analyses were used to provide aerothermodynamic characteristics of the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The results of these analyses were used to develop an aerodynamic database that was used extensively for the pre-flight planning and in-flight execution for the aerobraking phase of the Mars Odyssey mission. During aerobraking operations, the database was used to reconstruct atmospheric density profiles during each pass. The reconstructed data was used to update the atmospheric model, which was used to determine the strategy for subsequent aerobraking maneuvers. The aerodynamic database was also used together with data obtained from on-board accelerometers to reconstruct the spacecraft attitudes throughout each aerobraking pass. The reconstructed spacecraft attitudes are in good agreement with those determined by independent on-board inertial measurements for all aerobraking passes. The differences in the pitch attitudes are significantly less than the preflight uncertainties of +/-2.9%. The differences in the yaw attitudes are influenced by zonal winds. When latitudinal gradients of density are small, the differences in the yaw attitudes are significantly less than the preflight uncertainties.

Takashima, Naruhisa; Wilmoth, Richard G.

2002-01-01

105

Rotary-wing aerodynamics. Volume 1: Basic theories of rotor aerodynamics with application to helicopters. [momentum, vortices, and potential theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The concept of rotary-wing aircraft in general is defined. The energy effectiveness of helicopters is compared with that of other static thrust generators in hover, as well as with various air and ground vehicles in forward translation. The most important aspects of rotor-blade dynamics and rotor control are reviewed. The simple physicomathematical model of the rotor offered by the momentum theory is introduced and its usefulness and limitations are assessed. The combined blade-element and momentum theory approach, which provides greater accuracy in performance predictions, is described as well as the vortex theory which models a rotor blade by means of a vortex filament or vorticity surface. The application of the velocity and acceleration potential theory to the determination of flow fields around three dimensional, non-rotating bodies as well as to rotor aerodynamic problems is described. Airfoil sections suitable for rotors are also considered.

Stepniewski, W. Z.

1979-01-01

106

Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number of experimental boundary-layer studies, including the influence of laminar separation bubbles, are discussed. Several examples of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in this regime are described. Also, a brief survey of analytical models for oscillating and flapping-wing propulsion is presented. These range from the earliest examples where quasi-steady, attached flow is assumed, to those that account for the unsteady shed vortex wake as well as flow separation and aeroelastic behavior of a flapping wing. Experiments that complemented the analysis and led to the design of a successful ornithopter are also described.

Mueller, Thomas J.

107

Mars Pathfider Rarefied Aerodynamics: Computations and Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On July 4, 1997, after traveling close to 500 million km, the Pathfinder spacecraft successfully completed entry, descent, and landing at Mars. In the present paper, the focus is on the hypersonic rarefied portion of Pathfinder's atmospheric entry where the synergy of flight measurements, aerodynamic calculations, and atmospheric modeling tools are used to extract Pathfinder's attitude and the freestream density. Accuracy of the capsule aerodynamics directly impacts the inferred atmospheric properties extracted from deceleration measurements made by on-board accelerometers. The range of rarefaction considered in this study extends from the free molecular to continuum conditions and angles of attack from O to 30 deg. The aerodynamic computations are made with free-molecular and direct simulation Monte Carlo codes. The calculations show that Pathfinder is statically unstable for much of the transitional rarefied regime. Due to the relatively modest forces and the gyroscopic motion of the spacecraft, the angle of attack excursions were less than 5 deg as inferred from force measurements for the rarefied portion of entry and approached a nominal zero degree trim angle near hypersonic continuum conditions.

Moss, James N.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Braun, Robert D.

1998-01-01

108

The Aerodynamics of Bird Flight  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The manifest success of birds in flight over small and large distances, in confined quarters and also in gusty conditions has inspired admiration, investigation and sometimes imitation from the earthbound human. Birds occupy a range of scales (2 g - 12 kg in mass, and 0.05 - 3 m in wingspan) that overlaps certain micro air vehicle (MAV) designs and there is interest in whether some bird-like properties (flapping wings, deformable feathers, movable tails) might be useful or even necessary for successful MAVs. A bird with 5 cm mean chord flying at 8 m/s has a nominal Reynolds number of 2 - 3 x 10^4. This is an extremely inconvenient range for design, operation and analysis of lifting surfaces, even in steady motion, because their properties are very sensitive to boundary layer separation. The moderate- to high-amplitude flapping motions, together with the complex surface geometry and mechanical properties of the wings themselves lead to yet further challenges. This talk will review some of the theoretical and practical approaches towards understanding and analyzing the aerodynamics of various types of bird flight, including some recent research results that suggest that this effort is far from complete.

Spedding, Geoffrey

2002-11-01

109

Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 percent in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady aerodynamic model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -0.14 percent.

Pak, Chan-gi

2011-01-01

110

An Operational Excellence Approach to Sustainable Energy Management  

E-print Network

An Operational Excellence Approach to Sustainable Energy Management Andrew McMullan, KBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. Abstract With the advent of persistently high energy costs, many organizations have renewed efforts to reduce energy use... has developed an Operational Excellence- based (OpX) approach to energy management ? the Engage program. Engage delivers a strategic plan for improving energy efficiency along with the tools, Best Practices, management systems and work processes...

McMullan, A.

111

A New Approach in Renewable Energies and Sustainability  

E-print Network

#12;6 A. Shakouri 10/17/2008 Energy Waste in Cars #12;7 A. Shakouri 10/17/2008 DOE, Energy Information Thot (K) 0.5 EnergyConversionEfficiency 3 1 2 Carnot Solar/ Rankine Geothermal/ Organic Rankine ZTavgA New Approach in Renewable Energies and Sustainability Ali Shakouri Director, Thermionic Energy

Lee, Herbie

112

Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

1986-01-01

113

3M's Corporate Approach to Energy Management  

E-print Network

environmental management leader, including being last year's winner of the Industrial Energy Technology Conference's Energy Efficiency Award. 3M continues to demonstrate such leadership via the company's energy management program, which includes participation...

Schultz, S. C.; Bingham, P. R.

114

ON THE AERODYNAMICS OF MOULT GAPS IN BIRDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the moult, birds sequentially replace their flight feathers and thus temporarily have gaps in their wings. These gaps will vary in size and position(s) during the course of the moult. We investigated the aerodynamic effects of having moult gaps in a rectangular wing by using a vortex-lattice (panel) approach, and we modelled the effect of moult gap size at

ANDERS HEDENSTRÖM; SHIGERU SUNADA

115

Aerodynamics via acoustics - Application of acoustic formulas for aerodynamic calculations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

1986-01-01

116

Aerodynamics Via Acoustics: Application of Acoustic Formulas for Aerodynamic Calculations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

1986-01-01

117

Static Aerodynamics of the Mars Exploration Rover Entry Capsule  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The static aerodynamics for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) aeroshell are presented. This aerodynamic database was an integral part of the end-to-end simulation used in pre- entry analysis for determining the MER entry design requirements for development of the MER entry system, as well as targeting the MER landing sites. The database was constructed using the same approach used for Mars Pathfinder (MPF). However, the MER aerodynamic database is of much higher fidelity and tailored to the MER entry trajectories. This set of data includes direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations covering the transitional regime of the entry trajectory and computational fluid dynamics calculations describing the aerodynamics in the hypersonic and supersonic continuum regimes. An overview of the methodology used to generate the data is given along with comparisons to important features in the MPF aerodynamics and related heritage data. The MER and MPF comparison indicates that trajectory specific data is required to properly model the flight characteristics of a.blunt entry capsule at Mars.

Schoenenberger, Mark; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Desai, Prasun

2005-01-01

118

Optimization of aerodynamic designs using computational fluid dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An aerodynamic design optimization technique which couples direct optimization algorithms with the analysis capability provided by appropriate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) programs is presented. This technique is intended to be an aid in designing the aerodynamic shapes and test conditions required for the successful simulation of aircraft engine inlet conditions in a ground test environment. However, the method is applicable to other aerodynamic design problems. The approach minimizes a nonlinear least-squares objective function which may be defined in a region remote to the geometric surface being optimized. In this study finite-difference Euler and Navier-Stokes codes were applied to obtain the objective function evaluations, although the optimization method could be coupled with any CFD analysis technique. Results are presented for a NACA0012 airfoil, convergent/divergent nozzles, and a planar, supersonic forebody simulator design.

Huddleston, D. H.; Mastin, C. W.

1990-03-01

119

A "test of concept" comparison of aerodynamic and mechanical resuspension mechanisms for particles deposited on field rye grass ( Secale cercele).—Part 2. Threshold mechanical energies for resuspension particle fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kinetic energy from the oscillatory impacts of the grass stalk against a stationary object was measured with a kinetic energy measuring device. These energy inputs were measured as part of a resuspension experiment of uniform latex microspheres deposited on a single rye grass seed pod in a wind tunnel. The experiment was designed to measure resuspension from aerodynamic (viscous and turbulent) mechanisms compared to that from mechanisms from mechanical resuspension resulting from the oscillatory impact of the grass hitting a stationary object. The experiment was run for deposited spherical latex particles with diameters from 2 to 8.1 ?m. Wind tunnel tests were run for wind speeds from 2 to 18.5 m s -1 and a turbulence intensity (root-mean-square fluctuation wind speed/mean wind speed) of 0.1. Our experiments showed the following: Threshold mechanical energy input rates increased from 0.04 to 0.2 ?J s -1 for resuspension of spherical polystyrene latex particles from 2 to 8.1 ?m diameter. Kinetic energy flux generated by mechanical impact of the wind-driven oscillating grass was found to be highly sensitive to slightly different placements and grass morphology. The kinetic energy input by impaction of the grass against a stationary cylinder is roughly proportional to the kinetic energy flux of the wind.

Gillette, Dale A.; Lawson, Robert E.; Thompson, Roger S.

120

Experimental investigation of hypersonic aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An extensive series of ballistic range tests are currently being conducted at the Ames Research Center. These tests are intended to investigate the hypersonic aerodynamic characteristics of two basic configurations, which are: the blunt-cone Galileo probe which is scheduled to be launched in late 1989 and will enter the atmosphere of Jupiter in 1994, and a generic slender cone configuration to provide experimental aerodynamic data including good flow-field definition which computational aerodynamicists could use to validate their computer codes. Some of the results obtained thus far are presented and work for the near future is discussed.

Heinemann, K.; Intrieri, Peter F.

1987-01-01

121

Fuel Savings and Aerodynamic Drag Reduction from Rail Car Covers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential for energy savings by reducing the aerodynamic drag of rail cars is significant. A previous study of aerodynamic drag of coal cars suggests that a 25% reduction in drag of empty cars would correspond to a 5% fuel savings for a round trip [1]. Rail statistics for the United States [2] report that approximately 5.7 billion liters of diesel fuel were consumed for coal transportation in 2002, so a 5% fuel savings would total 284 million liters. This corresponds to 2% of Class I railroad fuel consumption nationwide. As part of a DOE-sponsored study, the aerodynamic drag of scale rail cars was measured in a wind tunnel. The goal of the study was to measure the drag reduction of various rail-car cover designs. The cover designs tested yielded an average drag reduction of 43% relative to empty cars corresponding to an estimated round-trip fuel savings of 9%.

Storms, Bruce; Salari, Kambiz; Babb, Alex

2008-01-01

122

Airfoil Optimization Using Practical Aerodynamic Design Requirements  

E-print Network

Airfoil Optimization Using Practical Aerodynamic Design Requirements Howard P. Buckley, Beckett Y., Toronto, Ontario, M3H 5T6, Canada Practical aerodynamic design problems must balance the goal the aerodynamic constraints imposed at the off-design operating conditions to be treated explicitly. Both methods

Zingg, David W.

123

Multiprocessing on supercomputers for computational aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Little use is made of multiple processors available on current supercomputers (computers with a theoretical peak performance capability equal to 100 MFLOPS or more) to improve turnaround time in computational aerodynamics. The productivity of a computer user is directly related to this turnaround time. In a time-sharing environment, such improvement in this speed is achieved when multiple processors are used efficiently to execute an algorithm. The concept of multiple instructions and multiple data (MIMD) is applied through multitasking via a strategy that requires relatively minor modifications to an existing code for a single processor. This approach maps the available memory to multiple processors, exploiting the C-Fortran-Unix interface. The existing code is mapped without the need for developing a new algorithm. The procedure for building a code utilizing this approach is automated with the Unix stream editor.

Yarrow, Maurice; Mehta, Unmeel B.

1991-01-01

124

Aerodynamic Shape Optimization using an Evolutionary Algorithm  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on an evolutionary algorithm approach is presented and demonstrated. Results are presented for a number of model problems to access the effect of algorithm parameters on convergence efficiency and reliability. A transonic viscous airfoil optimization problem-both single and two-objective variations is used as the basis for a preliminary comparison with an adjoint-gradient optimizer. The evolutionary algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the inviscid flow about transonic wings including multi-objective and multi-discipline solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the evolutionary algorithm approach is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

Hoist, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

2003-01-01

125

Energy planning for development - needs and approaches  

SciTech Connect

The capability of developing countries to carry out comprehensive national energy planning is examined. The analytical methods or models constructed for analyzing the energy system have to take into account the specific context in which they are built to address issues of interest to development planners. Issues discussed are resource development and technology research, energy equity considerations to all peoples in a nation, the pricing policy, and the balance of payments considerations. The impartance of the availability of adequate skilled personnel and training programs to impart the requisite skill necessary to carry out the planning is discussed. Various surveys were conducted to determine the training needs for energy planners in developing countries. (MCW)

Mubayi, V

1981-01-01

126

Quantum microscopic approach to low-energy heavy ion collisions  

E-print Network

of nuclear reactions at low energy where quantum effects play a significant role is an important challenge of nuclear physics. The interplay between nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms is crucial at energiesQuantum microscopic approach to low-energy heavy ion collisions C´edric Simenel1,2, Aditya Wakhle2

127

A New Approach To Wind Energy: Opportunities And Challenges  

E-print Network

1 A New Approach To Wind Energy: Opportunities And Challenges John O. Dabiria , Julia R. Greera, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA Abstract. Despite common characterizations of modern wind energy technology as mature, there remains a persistent disconnect between the vast global wind energy resource--which is 20

Dabiri, John O.

128

Aerodynamic effects of Nacelle position  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An engineer in the PRT test the aerodynamic effects of nacelle position with respect to the wing, May 1930. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 132.

1932-01-01

129

New technology in turbine aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

1972-01-01

130

Shuttle reentry aerodynamic heating test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The research for determining the space shuttle aerothermal environment is reported. Brief summaries of the low Reynolds number windward side heating test, and the base and leeward heating and high Reynolds number heating test are included. Also discussed are streamline divergence and the resulting effect on aerodynamic heating, and a thermal analyzer program that is used in the Thermal Environment Optimization Program.

Pond, J. E.; Mccormick, P. O.; Smith, S. D.

1971-01-01

131

Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

1982-01-01

132

The Aerodynamics of Hummingbird Flight  

Microsoft Academic Search

(Abstract) Hummingbirds fly with their wings almost fully extended during their entire wingbeat. This pattern, associated with having proportionally short humeral bones, long distal wing elements, and assumed to be an adaptation for extended hovering flight, has lead to predictions that the aerodynamic mechanisms exploited by hummingbirds during hovering should be similar to those observed in insects. To test these

Douglas R. Warrick; Bret W. Tobalske; Donald R. Powers; Michael H. Dickinson

133

Aerodynamics of the hovering hummingbird  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite profound musculoskeletal differences, hummingbirds (Trochilidae) are widely thought to employ aerodynamic mechanisms similar to those used by insects. The kinematic symmetry of the hummingbird upstroke and downstroke has led to the assumption that these halves of the wingbeat cycle contribute equally to weight support during hovering, as exhibited by insects of similar size. This assumption has been applied, either

Douglas R. Warrick; Bret W. Tobalske; Donald R. Powers

2005-01-01

134

Aerodynamic design via control theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

Jameson, Antony

1988-01-01

135

Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-04-01

136

Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 % in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -.14 %.

Pak, Chan-Gi

2011-01-01

137

ExoMars Entry Demonstrator Module Aerodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerodynamics data for ExoMars Entry Demonstrator Module (EDM) are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients are generated as a function of total angle-of- attack, Knudsen number and Mach number depending on the flight regime. Bridging functions were developed from DSMC computations in transitional flow regime between free-molecular and continuum flow regimes. Hypersonic and supersonic static coefficients were derived from Navier-Stokes solutions with non- equilibrium flow assumptions in hot hypersonic (M>6.3) and with an equivalent approach below. Wind-tunnel in cold hypersonic (ONERA S4Ma - M=10) and in high-enthalpy facilities (ONERA F4 and DLR-HEG) tests were conducted in order to address uncertainty model in hypersonic-supersonic flow regime. For M<3.5, wind- tunnel campaign was conducted in DLR-TMK (1.8

Tran, P.; Beck, J.

2011-08-01

138

Euler solutions for aerodynamic inverse shape design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contributions to the aerodynamics development have to be involved to achieve an increase in quality, reducing time and computer costs. Therefore, this work develops an optimization method based on the finite volume explicit Runge-Kutta multi-stage scheme with central spatial discretization in combination with multigrid and preconditioning. The multigrid approach includes local time-stepping and residual smoothing. Such a method allows getting the goal of compressible and almost incompressible solution of fluid flows, having a rate of convergence almost independent from the Mach number. Numerical tests are carried out for the NACA 0012 and 0009 airfoils and three-dimensional wings based on NACA profiles for Mach-numbers ranging from 0.8 to 0.002 using the Euler equations. These calculations are found to compare favorably with experimental and numerical data available in the literature. Besides, it is worth pointing out that these results build on earlier ones when finding appropriate new three-dimensional aerodynamical geometries.

de Bortoli, A. L.; de Quadros, R.

2004-01-01

139

Integrated actuation and energy harvesting in prestressed piezoelectric synthetic jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the looming energy crisis compounded by the global economic downturn there is an urgent need to increase energy efficiency and to discover new energy sources. An approach to solve this problem is to improve the efficiency of aerodynamic vehicles by using active flow control tools such as synthetic jet actuators. These devices are able to reduce fuel consumption and

Poorna Mane

2009-01-01

140

Aerodynamics of a linear oscillating cascade  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The steady and unsteady aerodynamics of a linear oscillating cascade are investigated using experimental and computational methods. Experiments are performed to quantify the torsion mode oscillating cascade aerodynamics of the NASA Lewis Transonic Oscillating Cascade for subsonic inlet flowfields using two methods: simultaneous oscillation of all the cascaded airfoils at various values of interblade phase angle, and the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. Analysis of these data and correlation with classical linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis predictions indicate that the wind tunnel walls enclosing the cascade have, in some cases, a detrimental effect on the cascade unsteady aerodynamics. An Euler code for oscillating cascade aerodynamics is modified to incorporate improved upstream and downstream boundary conditions and also the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. The new boundary conditions are shown to improve the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. The new boundary conditions are shown to improve the unsteady aerodynamic predictions of the code, and the computational unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is shown to be a viable alternative for calculation of oscillating cascade aerodynamics.

Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

1990-01-01

141

Formulation for Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An efficient approach for simultaneous aerodynamic analysis and design optimization is presented. This approach does not require the performance of many flow analyses at each design optimization step, which can be an expensive procedure. Thus, this approach brings us one step closer to meeting the challenge of incorporating computational fluid dynamic codes into gradient-based optimization techniques for aerodynamic design. An adjoint-variable method is introduced to nullify the effect of the increased number of design variables in the problem formulation. The method has been successfully tested on one-dimensional nozzle flow problems, including a sample problem with a normal shock. Implementations of the above algorithm are also presented that incorporate Newton iterations to secure a high-quality flow solution at the end of the design process. Implementations with iterative flow solvers are possible and will be required for large, multidimensional flow problems.

Hou, G. W.; Taylor, A. C., III; Mani, S. V.; Newman, P. A.

1993-01-01

142

March 2000 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic DragL Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on March 16, 2000. The purpose of the meeting was to present technical details on the experimental and computational plans and approaches and provide an update on progress in the analysis of experimental results, model developments, simulations, and an investigation of an aerodynamic device.

R. McCallen; D. Flowers; T. Dunn; J. Owens; F. Browand; M. Hammache; A. Loenard; M. Brady; K. Salari; W. Rutledge; R. Scheckler; J. Ross; B. Storms; J. T. Heineck; T Arledge

2000-01-01

143

Introduction. Computational aerodynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow\\/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction

Paul G. Tucker

2007-01-01

144

Energy Security: a robust optimization approach to design a robust ...  

E-print Network

paper uses the approach of Robust Optimization to model uncertainty on the energy sup- ply constraints for .... Biofuels - Biomass. Transport. Tech. ..... The choice of the dk parameters depends on our estimation of the range of uncertainty.

2010-06-11

145

Computation of External Aerodynamics for a Canard Rotor/Wing Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerodynamic loads on a Canard Rotor/Wing vehicle are investigated using inviscid numerical simulations to understand the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle during conversion from rotorcraft to fixed wing flight. Steady numerical simulations at five azimuthal rotor indices are presented over a quarter turn of the rotor, producing 19 points during a single rotation due to symmetry. A Cartesian mesh approach is used to compute the steady flow field. All computations are done with a faired over engine inlet and exit to be consistent with the wind tunnel model geometry. Modification to the geometry is suggested and the aerodynamic effect of the modification is discussed.

Pandya, S.; Aftosmis, M. J.

2000-01-01

146

Design approaches to more energy efficient engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1976 NASA initiated the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program to assist in the development of technology for more fuel-efficient aircraft for commercial airline use. The Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) Project of the ACEE program is intended to lay the advanced-technology foundation for a new generation of turbofan engines. This project, planned as a seven-year cooperative government-industry effort, is aimed at developing and demonstrating advanced component and systems technologies for engines that could be introduced into airline service by the late 1980s or early 1990s. In addition to fuel savings, new engines must offer potential for being economically attractive to the airline users and environmentally acceptable. A description is presented of conceptual energy-efficient engine designs which offer potential for achieving all of the goals established for the EEE Project.

Saunders, N. T.; Colladay, R. S.; Macioce, L. E.

1978-01-01

147

Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance  

SciTech Connect

Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

2008-08-01

148

A System Design Approach for Unattended Solar Energy Harvesting Supply  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote devices, such as sensors and communications devices, require continuously available power. In many applications, conventional approaches are too expensive, too large, or unreliable. For short-term needs, primary batteries may be used. However, they do not scale up well for long-term installations. Instead, energy harvesting methods must be used. Here, a system design approach is introduced that results in a

Jonathan W. Kimball; Brian T. Kuhn; Robert S. Balog

2009-01-01

149

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-print Network

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

150

Measuring energy efficiency in economics: Shadow value approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For decades, academic scholars and policy makers have commonly applied a simple average measure, energy intensity, for studying energy efficiency. In contrast, we introduce a distinctive marginal measure called energy shadow value (SV) for modeling energy efficiency drawn on economic theory. This thesis demonstrates energy SV advantages, conceptually and empirically, over the average measure recognizing marginal technical energy efficiency and unveiling allocative energy efficiency (energy SV to energy price). Using a dual profit function, the study illustrates how treating energy as quasi-fixed factor called quasi-fixed approach offers modeling advantages and is appropriate in developing an explicit model for energy efficiency. We address fallacies and misleading results using average measure and demonstrate energy SV advantage in inter- and intra-country energy efficiency comparison. Energy efficiency dynamics and determination of efficient allocation of energy use are shown through factors impacting energy SV: capital, technology, and environmental obligations. To validate the energy SV, we applied a dual restricted cost model using KLEM dataset for the 35 US sectors stretching from 1958 to 2000 and selected a sample of the four sectors. Following the empirical results, predicted wedges between energy price and the SV growth indicate a misallocation of energy use in stone, clay and glass (SCG) and communications (Com) sectors with more evidence in the SCG compared to the Com sector, showing overshoot in energy use relative to optimal paths and cost increases from sub-optimal energy use. The results show that energy productivity is a measure of technical efficiency and is void of information on the economic efficiency of energy use. Decomposing energy SV reveals that energy, capital and technology played key roles in energy SV increases helping to consider and analyze policy implications of energy efficiency improvement. Applying the marginal measure, we also contributed to energy efficiency convergence analysis employing the delta-convergence and unconditional & conditional beta-convergence concepts, investigating economic energy efficiency differences across the four US sectors using panel data models. The results show that, in terms of technical and allocative energy efficiency, the energy-intensive sectors, SCG and textile mill products, tend to catch the energy extensive sectors, the Com and furniture & fixtures, being conditional on sector-specific characteristics. Conditional convergence results indicate that technology, capital and energy are crucial factors in determining energy efficiency differences across the US sectors, implying that environmental or energy policies, and technological changes should be industry specific across the US sectors. The main finding is that the marginal value measure conveys information on both technical and allocative energy efficiency and accounts for all costs and benefits of energy consumption including environmental and externality costs.

Khademvatani, Asgar

151

Energy: A Cross-Curricular Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is based on the premise that lives (and lifestyles) revolve around the production, consumption, and conversion of energy. Yet for such an all-encompassing concept little accompanying factual knowledge exists at the grade-school level. The objectives (and the resulting activities and extensions) are focused on the needs of the upper…

Lalonde, Christine

152

A Lyapunov based approach to energy maximization in renewable energy technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation describes the design and implementation of Lyapunov-based control strategies for the maximization of the power captured by renewable energy harnessing technologies such as (i) a variable speed, variable pitch wind turbine, (ii) a variable speed wind turbine coupled to a doubly fed induction generator, and (iii) a solar power generating system charging a constant voltage battery. First, a torque control strategy is presented to maximize wind energy captured in variable speed, variable pitch wind turbines at low to medium wind speeds. The proposed strategy applies control torque to the wind turbine pitch and rotor subsystems to simultaneously control the blade pitch and tip speed ratio, via the rotor angular speed, to an optimum point at which the capture efficiency is maximum. The control method allows for aerodynamic rotor power maximization without exact knowledge of the wind turbine model. A series of numerical results show that the wind turbine can be controlled to achieve maximum energy capture. Next, a control strategy is proposed to maximize the wind energy captured in a variable speed wind turbine, with an internal induction generator, at low to medium wind speeds. The proposed strategy controls the tip speed ratio, via the rotor angular speed, to an optimum point at which the efficiency constant (or power coefficient) is maximal for a particular blade pitch angle and wind speed by using the generator rotor voltage as a control input. This control method allows for aerodynamic rotor power maximization without exact wind turbine model knowledge. Representative numerical results demonstrate that the wind turbine can be controlled to achieve near maximum energy capture. Finally, a power system consisting of a photovoltaic (PV) array panel, dc-to-dc switching converter, charging a battery is considered wherein the environmental conditions are time-varying. A backstepping PWM controller is developed to maximize the power of the solar generating system. The controller tracks a desired array voltage, designed online using an incremental conductance extremum-seeking algorithm, by varying the duty cycle of the switching converter. The stability of the control algorithm is demonstrated by means of Lyapunov analysis. Representative numerical results demonstrate that the grid power system can be controlled to track the maximum power point of the photovoltaic array panel in varying atmospheric conditions. Additionally, the performance of the proposed strategy is compared to the typical maximum power point tracking (MPPT) method of perturb and observe (P&O), where the converter dynamics are ignored, and is shown to yield better results.

Iyasere, Erhun

153

Faster Aerodynamic Simulation With Cart3D  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A NASA-developed aerodynamic simulation tool is ensuring the safety of future space operations while providing designers and engineers with an automated, highly accurate computer simulation suite. Cart3D, co-winner of NASA's 2002 Software of the Year award, is the result of over 10 years of research and software development conducted by Michael Aftosmis and Dr. John Melton of Ames Research Center and Professor Marsha Berger of the Courant Institute at New York University. Cart3D offers a revolutionary approach to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the computer simulation of how fluids and gases flow around an object of a particular design. By fusing technological advancements in diverse fields such as mineralogy, computer graphics, computational geometry, and fluid dynamics, the software provides a new industrial geometry processing and fluid analysis capability with unsurpassed automation and efficiency.

2003-01-01

154

Viking entry aerodynamics and heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The characteristics of the Mars entry including the mission sequence of events and associated spacecraft weights are described along with the Viking spacecraft. Test data are presented for the aerodynamic characteristics of the entry vehicle showing trimmed alpha, drag coefficient, and trimmed lift to drag ratio versus Mach number; the damping characteristics of the entry configuration; the angle of attack time history of Viking entries; stagnation heating and pressure time histories; and the aeroshell heating distribution as obtained in tests run in a shock tunnel for various gases. Flight tests which demonstrate the aerodynamic separation of the full-scale aeroshell and the flying qualities of the entry configuration in an uncontrolled mode are documented. Design values selected for the heat protection system based on the test data and analysis performed are presented.

Polutchko, R. J.

1974-01-01

155

Aerodynamic drag analysis of runners.  

PubMed

A model is presented for the determination of aerodynamic drag forces on runners. The model consists of a series of conjugated circular cylinders, to stimulate the trunk and appendages, and a sphere to stimulate the head. Results are presented for three runners representing respectively, adult American males in the 2.5, 50 and 97.5 percentiles of the population. It is found that power dissipated in overcoming air resistance for these three runners ranges from 0.33 to 0.49 horsepower at a sprint speed comparable to the current world's record for one hundred yards. In addition an alternate model, consisting of a single circular cylinder, is presented that simplifies the determination of total aerodynamics drag. The accuracy of this model is determined by comparing results for total drag with those found with the more complex model. It is found that the error ranges from 5 to 8.9 percent. PMID:1272006

Shanebrook, J R; Jaszczak, R D

1976-01-01

156

Aerodynamic Design Using Neural Networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of aerodynamic components of aircraft, such as wings or engines, involves a process of obtaining the most optimal component shape that can deliver the desired level of component performance, subject to various constraints, e.g., total weight or cost, that the component must satisfy. Aerodynamic design can thus be formulated as an optimization problem that involves the minimization of an objective function subject to constraints. A new aerodynamic design optimization procedure based on neural networks and response surface methodology (RSM) incorporates the advantages of both traditional RSM and neural networks. The procedure uses a strategy, denoted parameter-based partitioning of the design space, to construct a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. Some desirable characteristics of the new design optimization procedure include the ability to handle a variety of design objectives, easily impose constraints, and incorporate design guidelines and rules of thumb. It provides an infrastructure for variable fidelity analysis and reduces the cost of computation by using less-expensive, lower fidelity simulations in the early stages of the design evolution. The initial or starting design can be far from optimal. The procedure is easy and economical to use in large-dimensional design space and can be used to perform design tradeoff studies rapidly. Designs involving multiple disciplines can also be optimized. Some practical applications of the design procedure that have demonstrated some of its capabilities include the inverse design of an optimal turbine airfoil starting from a generic shape and the redesign of transonic turbines to improve their unsteady aerodynamic characteristics.

Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.

2003-01-01

157

Analysis of aerodynamic pendulum oscillations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oscillations of an aerodynamic pendulum about the "along the flow" equilibrium are studied. The attached oscillator model is used in order to simulate the internal dynamics of the airflow. Stability criteria are found and stability domains in plane of are constructed for different values of parameters. Influence of damping is studied. It is shown that damping depending on airspeed allows describing experimentally registered phenomenon of flutter occurrence in a certain range of airspeeds.

Selyutskiy, Yury D.

2012-11-01

158

The 727 approach energy management system avionics specification (preliminary)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hardware and software requirements for an Approach Energy Management System (AEMS) consisting of an airborne digital computer and cockpit displays are presented. The displays provide the pilot with a visual indication of when to manually operate the gear, flaps, and throttles during a delayed flap approach so as to reduce approach time, fuel consumption, and community noise. The AEMS is an independent system that does not interact with other navigation or control systems, and is compatible with manually flown or autopilot coupled approaches. Operational use of the AEMS requires a DME ground station colocated with the flight path reference.

Jackson, D. O.; Lambregts, A. A.

1976-01-01

159

Facing the Energy Dilemma - One Company's Approach: Energy Management at 3M at the Plant Level  

E-print Network

FACING THE ENERGY DILEMMA - ONE COMPANY'S APPROACH ENERGY MANAGEMENT AT 3M AT THE PLANT LEVEL Thomas F. Marson 3M Center, St. Paul, Mn. ABSTRACT Many Plant Engineers profess to need help organizing and establishing a comprehensive...

Marson, T. F.

1980-01-01

160

Two-Stage Axial Compressor Rig Designed To Develop and Validate Advanced Aerodynamic Technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future aeropropulsion gas turbine engines must be affordable in addition to being energy efficient and environmentally benign. Progress in aerodynamic design capability is required not only to maximize the specific thrust of next-generation engines without sacrificing fuel consumption, but also to reduce parts count by increasing the aerodynamic loading of the compression system. To meet future compressor requirements, the NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating advanced aerodynamic design concepts that will lead to more compact, higher efficiency, and wider operability configurations than are currently in operation.

Larosiliere, Louis M.

2003-01-01

161

Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

Ozawa, T.; Fujita, K.; Suzuki, T.

2015-01-01

162

Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.  

PubMed

A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1. PMID:25638120

Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

2015-01-01

163

Nonlinear applications of slender-body theory to missile aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An evaluation is made of six diverse examples of nonlinear treatments of slender body theory for the prediction of missile aerodynamic behavior. The cases in question are the application of area rule to store carriage design in the drag rise region, the estimation of destabilizing pitching moments associated with transonic projectiles, the pressure loadings on elliptical missile airframes, nonlinear control characteristics, roll control effectiveness in canard missile configurations, and novel approaches for vortex flow modeling.

Hemsch, M. J.

1985-01-01

164

Unsteady aerodynamic modeling based on POD-observer method  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new hybrid approach to constructing reduced-order models (ROM) of unsteady aerodynamics applicable to aeroelastic analysis\\u000a is presented by using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in combination with observer techniques. Fluid modes are generated\\u000a through POD by sampling observations of solutions derived from the full-order model. The response in the POD training is projected\\u000a onto the fluid modes to determine the

Chao Yang; XiaoYan Liu; ZhiGang Wu

2010-01-01

165

Design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the major challenges in robotics is to develop a fly-like robot that can autonomously fly around in unknown environments. In this paper, we discuss the current state of the DelFly project, in which we follow a top-down approach to ever smaller and more autonomous ornithopters. The presented findings concerning the design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly illustrate

G C H E de Croon; M A Groen; C De Wagter; B Remes; R Ruijsink; B W van Oudheusden

2012-01-01

166

Nonlinear, unsteady aerodynamic loads on rectangular and delta wings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads on rectangular and delta wings in an incompressible flow are calculated by using an unsteady vortex-lattice model. Examples include flows past fixed wings in unsteady uniform streams and flows past wings undergoing unsteady motions. The unsteadiness may be due to gusty winds or pitching oscillations. The present technique establishes a reliable approach which can be utilized in the analysis of problems associated with the dynamics and aeroelasticity of wings within a wide range of angles of attack.

Atta, E. H.; Kandil, O. A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

1977-01-01

167

Energy Aware Paradigm for Energy Efficient ICT: a Systemic Approach Sergio Ricciardi  

E-print Network

Energy Aware Paradigm for Energy Efficient ICT: a Systemic Approach Sergio Ricciardi Technical) Jordi Girona 3 08034 Barcelona, Spain +34 93 4016982 pareta@ac.upc.edu ABSTRACT Energy is imposing as the new constraint in the ICT sector and the problem of energy efficient in ICT has consequently arisen

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

168

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, 2006 1 Distributed Control Agents Approach to Energy  

E-print Network

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, 2006 1 Distributed Control Agents Approach to Energy a new scheme for an energy management system in the form of distributed control agents. The control architecture to function as energy management system is presented. Index Terms-- integrated electric power

Lai, Hong-jian

169

Aerodynamic lift effect on satellite orbits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerical quadrature is employed to obtain orbit perturbation results from the general perturbation equations. Both aerodynamic lift and drag forces are included in the analysis of the satellite orbit. An exponential atmosphere with and without atmospheric rotation is used. A comparison is made of the perturbations which are caused by atmospheric rotation with those caused by satellite aerodynamic effects. Results indicate that aerodynamic lift effects on the semi-major axis and orbit inclination can be of the same order as the effects of atmosphere rotation depending upon the orientation of the lift vector. The results reveal the importance of including aerodynamic lift effects in orbit perturbation analysis.

Karr, G. R.; Cleland, J. G.; Devries, L. L.

1975-01-01

170

Towards a 3d Spatial Urban Energy Modelling Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today's needs to reduce the environmental impact of energy use impose dramatic changes for energy infrastructure and existing demand patterns (e.g. buildings) corresponding to their specific context. In addition, future energy systems are expected to integrate a considerable share of fluctuating power sources and equally a high share of distributed generation of electricity. Energy system models capable of describing such future systems and allowing the simulation of the impact of these developments thus require a spatial representation in order to reflect the local context and the boundary conditions. This paper describes two recent research approaches developed at EIFER in the fields of (a) geo-localised simulation of heat energy demand in cities based on 3D morphological data and (b) spatially explicit Agent-Based Models (ABM) for the simulation of smart grids. 3D city models were used to assess solar potential and heat energy demand of residential buildings which enable cities to target the building refurbishment potentials. Distributed energy systems require innovative modelling techniques where individual components are represented and can interact. With this approach, several smart grid demonstrators were simulated, where heterogeneous models are spatially represented. Coupling 3D geodata with energy system ABMs holds different advantages for both approaches. On one hand, energy system models can be enhanced with high resolution data from 3D city models and their semantic relations. Furthermore, they allow for spatial analysis and visualisation of the results, with emphasis on spatially and structurally correlations among the different layers (e.g. infrastructure, buildings, administrative zones) to provide an integrated approach. On the other hand, 3D models can benefit from more detailed system description of energy infrastructure, representing dynamic phenomena and high resolution models for energy use at component level. The proposed modelling strategies conceptually and practically integrate urban spatial and energy planning approaches. The combined modelling approach that will be developed based on the described sectorial models holds the potential to represent hybrid energy systems coupling distributed generation of electricity with thermal conversion systems.

Bahu, J.-M.; Koch, A.; Kremers, E.; Murshed, S. M.

2013-09-01

171

A method for the reduction of aerodynamic drag of road vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method is proposed for the reduction of the aerodynamic drag of bluff bodies, particularly for application to road transport vehicles. This technique consists of installation of panels on the forward surface of the vehicle facing the airstream. With the help of road tests, it was demonstrated that the attachment of proposed panels can reduce aerodynamic drag of road vehicles and result in significant fuel cost savings and conservation of energy resources.

Pamadi, Bandu N.; Taylor, Larry W.; Leary, Terrance O.

1990-01-01

172

Aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work investigates the aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades via the blade element momentum (BEM) based approach and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based approach. From this research, it is possible to draw a series of detailed guidelines on small wind turbine blade design and analysis. The research also provides a platform for further comprehensive study using these two approaches. The wake induction corrections and stall corrections of the BEM method were examined through a case study of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine. A hybrid stall correction model was proposed to analyse wind turbine power performance. The proposed model shows improvement in power prediction for the validation case, compared with the existing stall correction models. The effects of the key rotor parameters of a small wind turbine as well as the blade chord and twist angle distributions on power performance were investigated through two typical wind turbines, i.e. a fixed-pitch variable-speed (FPVS) wind turbine and a fixed-pitch fixed-speed (FPFS) wind turbine. An engineering blade design and analysis code was developed in MATLAB to accommodate aerodynamic design and analysis of the blades.. The linearisation for radial profiles of blade chord and twist angle for the FPFS wind turbine blade design was discussed. Results show that, the proposed linearisation approach leads to reduced manufacturing cost and higher annual energy production (AEP), with minimal effects on the low wind speed performance. Comparative studies of mesh and turbulence models in 2D and 3D CFD modelling were conducted. The CFD predicted lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil S809 were compared with wind tunnel test data and the 3D CFD modelling method of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine were validated against measurements. Airfoil aerodynamic characterisation and wind turbine power performance as well as 3D flow details were studied. The detailed flow characteristics from the CFD modelling are quantitatively comparable to the measurements, such as blade surface pressure distribution and integrated forces and moments. It is confirmed that the CFD approach is able to provide a more detailed qualitative and quantitative analysis for wind turbine airfoils and rotors..

Tang, Xinzi

173

Subsonic Plasma Aerodynamics using Lorentzian Momentum Transfer in Atmospheric Normal Glow Discharge Plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent development of the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) has made it possible to cover large areas, including the wings and fuselage of aircraft, with a thin layer of plasma at low energy cost. The Lorentzian collisions between the ions and neutral gas in the plasma layer couple the electric field and the neutral gas in this layer. The coupling is strong enough at one atmosphere to accelerate the boundary layer flow. One EHD flow acceleration method is based on paraelectric EHD effects, the electrostatic analog of paramagnetism, in which a plasma is accelerated toward increasing electric field gradients, while dragging the neutral gas with it. By using paraelectric effects to add momentum to the flow, we have recently achieved improved flow attachment and increased stall angles in airfoils for external aerodynamic applications. In a second approach, peristaltic flow acceleration, we have used a polyphase power supply to excite the OAUGDP at progressive voltage phase angles on successive linear electrode strips. This excitation produces a traveling wave analogous to the "moving" lights on a theatre marquee, which accelerates the ions and neutral gas to velocities of aerodynamic interest.

Reece Roth, J.; Sin, Hojung; Mohan Madhan, Raja Chandra

2002-10-01

174

Oscillating aerodynamics and flutter of an aerodynamically detuned cascade in an incompressible flow  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mathematical model is developed and utilized to demonstrate the enhanced torsion mode stability associated with alternate blade circumferential aerodynamic detuning of a rotor operating in an incompressible flow field. The oscillating cascade aerodynamics, including steady loading effects, are determined by developing a complete first order unsteady aerodynamic analysis. An unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is then utilized, thereby enabling the stability of both conventional uniformly spaced rotors and detuned nonuniform circumferentially spaced rotors to be determined. To demonstrate the enhanced flutter aeroelastic stability associated with this aerodynamic detuning mechanism, this model is applied to a baseline unstable rotor with a Gostelow flow geometry.

Chiang, Hsiao-Wei D.; Fleeter, Sanford

1989-01-01

175

Inner workings of aerodynamic sweep  

SciTech Connect

The recent trend in using aerodynamic sweep to improve the performance of transonic blading has been one of the more significant technological evolutions for compression components in turbomachinery. This paper reports on the experimental and analytical assessment of the pay-off derived from both aft and forward sweep technology with respect to aerodynamic performance and stability. The single-stage experimental investigation includes two aft-swept rotors with varying degree and type of aerodynamic sweep and one swept forward rotor. On a back-to-back test basis, the results are compared with an unswept rotor with excellent performance and adequate stall margin. Although designed to satisfy identical design speed requirements as the unswept rotor, the experimental results reveal significant variations in efficiency and stall margin with the swept rotors. At design speed, all the swept rotors demonstrated a peak stage efficiency level that was equal to that of the unswept rotor. However, the forward-swept rotor achieved the highest rotor-alone peak efficiency. At the same time, the forward-swept rotor demonstrated a significant improvement in stall margin relative to the already satisfactory level achieved by the unswept rotor. Increasing the level of aft sweep adversely affected the stall margin. A three-dimensional viscous flow analysis was used to assist in the interpretation of the data. The reduced shock/boundary layer interaction, resulting from reduced axial flow diffusion and less accumulation of centrifuged blade surface boundary layer at the tip, was identified as the prime contributor to the enhanced performance with forward sweep. The impact of tip clearance on the performance and stability for one of the aft-swept rotors was also assessed.

Wadia, A.R.; Szucs, P.N.; Crall, D.W. [GE Aircraft Engines, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1998-10-01

176

Aerodynamics. [numerical simulation using supercomputers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A projection is made of likely improvements in the economics of commercial aircraft operation due to developments in aerodynamics in the next half-century. Notable among these improvements are active laminar flow control techniques' application to third-generation SSTs, in order to achieve an L/D value of about 20; this is comparable to current subsonic transports, and has the further consequence of reducing cabin noise. Wave-cancellation systems may also be used to eliminate sonic boom overpressures, and rapid-combustion systems may be able to eliminate all pollutants from jet exhausts other than CO2.

Graves, Randolph A., Jr.

1988-01-01

177

Aerodynamic performance of centrifugal compressors  

SciTech Connect

Saving money with an efficient pipeline system design depends on accurately predicting compressor performance and ensuring that it meets the manufacturer's guaranteed levels. When shop testing with the actual gas is impractical, an aerodynamic test can ascertain compressor efficiency, but the accuracy and consistency of data acquisition in such tests is critical. Low test-pressure levels necessitate accounting for the effects of Reynolds number and heat transfer. Moreover, the compressor user and manufacturer must agree on the magnitude of the corrections to be applied to the test data.

Sayyed, S.

1981-12-01

178

Continuous Commissioning® Leading Energy Project Process - An Industry Approach  

E-print Network

;? Advanced EMCS system System Optimization #0;? Optimized economizer operation and reset minimum outside airflow set point to save cooling energy #0;? Optimized static pressure set points, supply air temperature reset schedules and control sequences... mechanical system and control system design, construction, and operation. The preliminary results were presented in WEEC 2003 conference and published in the Journal of Energy Research [9]. Since CCLEP takes an integrated approach, it significantly...

Liu, M.; Wang, J.; Hansen, K.; Seltzer, A.

2005-01-01

179

Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant

B. V. Johnson; W. A. Daniels

1992-01-01

180

Membrane wing aerodynamics for micro air vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aerodynamic performance of a wing deteriorates considerably as the Reynolds number decreases from 106 to 104. In particular, flow separation can result in substantial change in effective airfoil shape and cause reduced aerodynamic performance. Lately, there has been growing interest in developing suitable techniques for sustained and robust flight of micro air vehicles (MAVs) with a wingspan of 15cm

Yongsheng Lian; Wei Shyy; Dragos Viieru; Baoning Zhang

2003-01-01

181

The aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic characteristics of wing model gliders and bird wings in particular are discussed. Wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers are enumerated. Airfoil behavior in the critical transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer, which is more important to bird wing models than to large airplanes, was observed. Experimental results are provided, and an artificial bird wing is described.

Schmitz, F. W.

1980-01-01

182

Aerodynamics of dragonfly flight and robotic design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pair of dynamically scaled robotic dragonfly model wings was developed to investigate the aerodynamic effect of wing-wing interaction in dragonfly flight. Instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured while forewing-hindwing phase difference (?) was systematically varied. Experimental results showed that, i) for hovering flight, ?=0° enhanced the lift force on both forewing and hindwing; ?=180° reduced the total lift force, but

Zheng Hu; Raymond Mccauley; Steve Schaeffer; Xinyan Deng

2009-01-01

183

Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of conventional optimization schemes to aerodynamic design problems leads to inner-outer iterative procedures that are very costly. An alternative approach is presented based on the idea of updating the flow variable iterative solutions and the design parameter iterative solutions simultaneously. Two schemes based on this idea are applied to problems of correcting wind tunnel wall interference and optimizing advanced propeller designs. The first of these schemes is applicable to a limited class of two-design-parameter problems with an equality constraint. It requires the computation of a single flow solution. The second scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic problems. It requires the computation of several flow solutions in parallel. In both schemes, the design parameters are updated as the iterative flow solutions evolve. Computations are performed to test the schemes' efficiency, accuracy, and sensitivity to variations in the computational parameters.

Rizk, M. H.

1990-01-01

184

TRO-2D - A code for rational transonic aerodynamic optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Features and sample applications of the transonic rational optimization (TRO-2D) code are outlined. TRO-2D includes the airfoil analysis code FLO-36, the CONMIN optimization code and a rational approach to defining aero-function shapes for geometry modification. The program is part of an effort to develop an aerodynamically smart optimizer that will simplify and shorten the design process. The user has a selection of drag minimization and associated minimum lift, moment, and the pressure distribution, a choice among 14 resident aero-function shapes, and options on aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Design variables such as the angle of attack, leading edge radius and camber, shock strength and movement, supersonic pressure plateau control, etc., are discussed. The results of calculations of a reduced leading edge camber transonic airfoil and an airfoil with a natural laminar flow are provided, showing that only four design variables need be specified to obtain satisfactory results.

Davis, W. H., Jr.

1985-01-01

185

Data driven signal processing: an approach for energy efficient computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The computational switching activity of digital CMOS circuits can be dynamically minimized by designing algorithms that exploit signal statistics. This results in processors that have time-varying power requirements and perform computation on demand. An approach is presented to minimize the energy dissipation per data sample in variable-load DSP systems by adaptively minimizing the power supply voltage for each sample using

Anantha Chandrakasan; Vadim Gutnik; Thucydides Xanthopoulos

1996-01-01

186

An integrated approach to energy harvester modeling and performance optimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes an integrated approach to energy harvester (EH) modeling and performance optimization where the complete mixed physical-domain EH (micro generator, voltage booster, storage element and load) can be modeled and optimized. We show that electrical equivalent models of the micro generator are inadequate for accurate prediction of the voltage booster's performance. Through the use of hardware description language

Leran Wang; Tom J. Kazmierski; Bashir M. Al-Hashimi; Steve P. Beeby; Russel N. Torah

2007-01-01

187

Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: Application to electronic energy transfer  

SciTech Connect

Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Reichman, David R. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 3000 Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Markland, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-02-28

188

Twelve Innovative Approaches to Energy Conservation and Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1980, imaginative and innovative approaches to reducing the impact of the energy problem gained 12 colleges and universities certificates of achievement issued by the Academy for Educational Development and awards of $10,000 each from the Atlantic Richfield Foundation. Brief descriptions of the award-winning ideas are given. (Author/MLW)

Tickton, Sidney G.

1981-01-01

189

Perching aerodynamics and trajectory optimization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in smart materials, actuators, and control architecture have enabled new flight capabilities for aircraft. Perching is one such capability, described as a vertical landing maneuver using in-flight shape reconfiguration in lieu of high thrust generation. A morphing, perching aircraft design is presented that is capable of post stall flight and very slow landing on a vertical platform. A comprehensive model of the aircraft's aerodynamics, with special regard to nonlinear affects such as flow separation and dynamic stall, is discussed. Trajectory optimization using nonlinear programming techniques is employed to show the effects that morphing and nonlinear aerodynamics have on the maneuver. These effects are shown to decrease the initial height and distance required to initiate the maneuver, reduce the bounds on the trajectory, and decrease the required thrust for the maneuver. Perching trajectories comparing morphing versus fixed-configuration and stalled versus un-stalled aircraft are presented. It is demonstrated that a vertical landing is possible in the absence of high thrust if post-stall flight capabilities and vehicle reconfiguration are utilized.

Wickenheiser, Adam; Garcia, Ephrahim

2007-04-01

190

X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime, The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

1999-01-01

191

X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

1999-01-01

192

X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database i n the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

1999-01-01

193

Dynamic stall and aerodynamic damping  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic stall model is used to analyze and reproduce open air blade section measurements as well as wind tunnel measurements. The dynamic stall model takes variations in both angle of attack and flow velocity into account. The paper gives a brief description of the dynamic stall model and presents results from analyses of dynamic stall measurements for a variety of experiments with different airfoils in wind tunnel and on operating rotors. The wind tunnel experiments comprises pitching as well as plunging motion of the airfoils. The dynamic stall model is applied for derivation of aerodynamic damping characteristics for cyclic motion of the airfoils in flapwise and edgewise direction combined with pitching. The investigation reveals that the airfoil dynamic stall characteristics depend on the airfoil shape, and the type of motion (pitch, plunge). The aerodynamic damping characteristics, and thus the sensitivity to stall induced vibrations, depend highly on the relative motion of the airfoil in flapwise and edgewise direction, and on a possibly coupled pitch variation, which is determined by the structural characteristics of the blade.

Rasmussen, F.; Petersen, J.T.; Madsen, H.A.

1999-08-01

194

X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will design, build, and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604BOO02G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate the aerodynamic flight database for the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. Al these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

1999-01-01

195

Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils at High Speeds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report deals with an experimental investigation of the aerodynamical characteristics of airfoils at high speeds. Lift, drag, and center of pressure measurements were made on six airfoils of the type used by the air service in propeller design, at speeds ranging from 550 to 1,000 feet per second. The results show a definite limit to the speed at which airfoils may efficiently be used to produce lift, the lift coefficient decreasing and the drag coefficient increasing as the speed approaches the speed of sound. The change in lift coefficient is large for thick airfoil sections (camber ratio 0.14 to 0.20) and for high angles of attack. The change is not marked for thin sections (camber ratio 0.10) at low angles of attack, for the speed range employed. At high speeds the center of pressure moves back toward the trailing edge of the airfoil as the speed increases. The results indicate that the use of tip speeds approaching the speed of sound for propellers of customary design involves a serious loss in efficiency.

Briggs, L J; Hull, G F; Dryden, H L

1925-01-01

196

Post-Stall Aerodynamic Modeling and Gain-Scheduled Control Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multidisciplinary research e.ort that combines aerodynamic modeling and gain-scheduled control design for aircraft flight at post-stall conditions is described. The aerodynamic modeling uses a decambering approach for rapid prediction of post-stall aerodynamic characteristics of multiple-wing con.gurations using known section data. The approach is successful in bringing to light multiple solutions at post-stall angles of attack right during the iteration process. The predictions agree fairly well with experimental results from wind tunnel tests. The control research was focused on actuator saturation and .ight transition between low and high angles of attack regions for near- and post-stall aircraft using advanced LPV control techniques. The new control approaches maintain adequate control capability to handle high angle of attack aircraft control with stability and performance guarantee.

Wu, Fen; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Kim, Sungwan

2005-01-01

197

Aeroelastic Analysis of Bridges: Effects of Turbulence and Aerodynamic Nonlinearities  

E-print Network

Aeroelastic Analysis of Bridges: Effects of Turbulence and Aerodynamic Nonlinearities Xinzhong Chen for capturing the emerging concerns in bridge aerodynamics introduced by aerodynamic nonlinearities/or with aerodynamic characteristics sensitive to the effective angle of incidence. This paper presents a nonlinear

Kareem, Ahsan

198

MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS  

E-print Network

MULTI­TARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS RALF HARTMANN # Abstract. Important quantities in aerodynamic flow simulations are the aerodynamic force coe subject classifications. 65N12,65N15,65N30 1. Introduction. In aerodynamic computations like compressible

Hartmann, Ralf

199

MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS  

E-print Network

MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS RALF HARTMANN Abstract. Important quantities in aerodynamic flow simulations are the aerodynamic force coefficients including Navier-Stokes equations AMS subject classifications. 65N12,65N15,65N30 1. Introduction. In aerodynamic

Hartmann, Ralf

200

High angle of attack: Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ability to predict high angle of attack, nonlinear, aerodynamic characteristics of flight vehicles, including aircraft, has made significant progress in the last 25 years using computational tools and analyses. The key technological element which has made these analyses possible is the ability to account for the influence of the shed vortical flow, prevalent in this angle of attack range, on geometries of interest. Using selected analysis techniques, applications have also been made to wing design in order to improve their high speed maneuver performance. Various techniques, associated with different levels of accuracy, exist to model this vortical flow influence. The ones included in this paper cover: suction analogy with extensions; free vortex filaments; free vortex sheet modeling; and Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions. Associated relevant features of vortices are also addressed, including: the wing and flow conditions which cause vortex formation; and how the vortex strength varies with angle of attack and wing sweep.

Lamar, John E.

1992-01-01

201

Wind Turbine Blade Design System - Aerodynamic and Structural Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ever increasing need for energy and the depletion of non-renewable energy resources has led to more advancement in the "Green Energy" field, including wind energy. An improvement in performance of a Wind Turbine will enhance its economic viability, which can be achieved by better aerodynamic designs. In the present study, a design system that has been under development for gas turbine turbomachinery has been modified for designing wind turbine blades. This is a very different approach for wind turbine blade design, but will allow it to benefit from the features inherent in the geometry flexibility and broad design space of the presented system. It starts with key overall design parameters and a low-fidelity model that is used to create the initial geometry parameters. The low-fidelity system includes the axisymmetric solver with loss models, T-Axi (Turbomachinery-AXIsymmetric), MISES blade-to-blade solver and 2D wing analysis code XFLR5. The geometry parameters are used to define sections along the span of the blade and connected to the CAD model of the wind turbine blade through CAPRI (Computational Analysis PRogramming Interface), a CAD neutral API that facilitates the use of parametric geometry definition with CAD. Either the sections or the CAD geometry is then available for CFD and Finite Element Analysis. The GE 1.5sle MW wind turbine and NERL NASA Phase VI wind turbine have been used as test cases. Details of the design system application are described, and the resulting wind turbine geometry and conditions are compared to the published results of the GE and NREL wind turbines. A 2D wing analysis code XFLR5, is used for to compare results from 2D analysis to blade-to-blade analysis and the 3D CFD analysis. This kind of comparison concludes that, from hub to 25% of the span blade to blade effects or the cascade effect has to be considered, from 25% to 75%, the blade acts as a 2d wing and from 75% to the tip 3D and tip effects have to be taken into account for design considerations. In addition, the benefits of this approach for wind turbine design and future efforts are discussed.

Dey, Soumitr

2011-12-01

202

Tandem cylinder aerodynamic sound control using porous coating  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study is concerned with the application of porous coatings as a passive flow control method for reducing the aerodynamic sound from tandem cylinders. The aim here is to perform a parametric proof-of-concept study to investigate the effectiveness of porous treatment on bare tandem cylinders to control and regularize the vortex shedding and flow within the gap region between the two bluff bodies, and thereby control the aerodynamic sound generation mechanism. The aerodynamic simulations are performed using 2D transient RANS approach with k - ? turbulence model, and the acoustic computations are carried out using the standard Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy. Numerical flow and acoustic results are presented for bare tandem cylinders and porous-covered cylinders, with different porosities and thicknesses. Experimental flow and acoustic data are also provided for comparison. Results show that the proper use of porous coatings can lead to stabilization of the vortex shedding within the gap region, reduction of the vortex shedding interaction with the downstream body, and therefore the generation of tonal and broadband noise. It has also been observed that the magnitude and the frequency of the primary tone reduce significantly as a result of the flow regularization. The proposed passive flow-induced noise and vibration control method can potentially be used for other problems involving flow interaction with bluff bodies.

Liu, Hanru; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi; Wei, Jinjia; Qu, Zhiguo

2015-01-01

203

Nonlinear programming extensions to rational function approximations of unsteady aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper deals with approximating unsteady generalized aerodynamic forces in the equations of motion of a flexible aircraft. Two methods of formulating these approximations are extended to include both the same flexibility in constraining them and the same methodology in optimizing nonlinear parameters as another currently used 'extended least-squares' method. Optimal selection of 'nonlinear' parameters is made in each of the three methods by use of the same nonlinear (nongradient) optimizer. The objective of the nonlinear optimization is to obtain rational approximations to the unsteady aerodynamics whose state-space realization is of lower order than that required when no optimization of the nonlinear terms is performed. The free 'linear' parameters are determined using least-squares matrix techniques on a Lagrange multiplier formulation of an objective function which incorporates selected linear equality constraints. State-space mathematical models resulting from the different approaches are described, and results are presented which show comparative evaluations from application of each of the extended methods to a numerical example. The results obtained for the example problem show a significant (up to 63 percent) reduction in the number of differential equations used to represent the unsteady aerodynamic forces in linear time-invariant equations of motion as compared to a conventional method in which nonlinear terms are not optimized.

Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Adams, William M., Jr.

1987-01-01

204

Aerodynamic Drag of Heavy Vehicles (Class 7-8): Simulation and Benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. Experimental validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California (USC). Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) using state-of-the-art techniques.

Rose McCallen, Dan Flowers, Tim Dunn; Jerry Owens; Fred Browand; Mustapha Hammache; Anthony Leonard; Mark Brady; Kambiz Salari; Walter Rutledge; James Ross; Bruce Storms; J. T. Heineck, David Driver; James Bell; Steve Walker; Gregory Zilliac

2000-06-19

205

Application of CFD techniques toward the validation of nonlinear aerodynamic models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to determine the regimes of applicability of nonlinear models describing the unsteady aerodynamic responses to aircraft flight motions are described. The potential advantages of computational methods over experimental methods are discussed and the concepts underlying mathematical modeling are reviewed. The economic and conceptual advantages of the modeling procedure over coupled, simultaneous solutions of the gas dynamic equations and the vehicle's kinematic equations of motion are discussed. The modeling approach, when valid, eliminates the need for costly repetitive computation of flow field solutions. For the test cases considered, the aerodynamic modeling approach is shown to be valid.

Schiff, L. B.; Katz, J.

1985-01-01

206

Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phases II-IV Test Configurations and Available Data Campaigns  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment is to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale three-dimensional aerodynamic behavior of horizontal axis wind turbines. To accomplish this, an experimental wind turbine configured to meet specific research objectives was assembled and operated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The turbine was instrumented to characterize rotating blade aerodynamic performance, machine structural responses, and atmospheric inflow conditions. Comprehensive tests were conducted with the turbine operating in an outdoor field environment under diverse conditions. Resulting data are used to validate aerodynamic and structural dynamics models which are an important part of wind turbine design and engineering codes. Improvements in these models are needed to better characterize aerodynamic response in both the steady-state post-stall and dynamic stall regimes. Much of the effort in the earlier phase of the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment focused on developing required data acquisition systems. Complex instrumentation and equipment was needed to meet stringent data requirements while operating under the harsh environmental conditions of a wind turbine rotor. Once the data systems were developed, subsequent phases of experiments were then conducted to collect data for use in answering specific research questions. A description of the experiment configuration used during Phases II-IV of the experiment is contained in this report.

Simms, D. A.; Hand, M. M.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.

1999-08-19

207

Using the HARV simulation aerodynamic model to determine forebody strake aerodynamic coefficients from flight data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The method described in this report is intended to present an overview of a process developed to extract the forebody aerodynamic increments from flight tests. The process to determine the aerodynamic increments (rolling pitching, and yawing moments, Cl, Cm, Cn, respectively) for the forebody strake controllers added to the F/A - 18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft was developed to validate the forebody strake aerodynamic model used in simulation.

Messina, Michael D.

1995-01-01

208

New approaches to photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical energy conversion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In response to skyrocketing fuel costs and evidence of climate change, real technological progress is needed towards harnessing the clean power from the sun to drive human progress. Here we present two approaches to harnessing solar energy currently under investigation in our group. One involves novel photovoltaic cells using different sized quantum dots. Another uses proven photocatalysts to directly electrolyze water, producing hydrogen. The technological background will be discussed, as well as current state of the art and future research direction.

Shah, S. Ismat; Lin, Hong-Ying; Miao, Yinghong; Schulz, Meghan E.

2008-04-01

209

Discharge of metastable nuclei during negative muon capture: Energy approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A negative muon captured by a metastable nucleus may accelerate the discharge of the latter by many orders of magnitude. For a certain relation between the energy range of the nuclear and muonic levels a discharge may be followed by muon ejection and muon participates in discharge of other nuclei. We present relativistic energy approach to description of a discharge of nucleus with emission of gamma quantum and further muon conversion. Besides, the external laser (graser) effect on cited processes is studied. The decay probability is linked with imaginary part of the ``nucleons subsystem-photon-muon^-'' system energy. One should consider 3 channels: 1). radiative purely nuclear 2j-poled transition (probability P1); 2). Non-radiative decay, when a proton transits into the ground state and muon leaves a nucleus with energy E=E(p-N1J1)-E(i), where E(p-N1J1) is an energy of nuclear transition, E(i) is the bond energy of muon in 1s state (P2); 3). A transition of proton to the ground state with muon excitation and emission of gamma quantum with energy E(p-N1J1)-E(nl) (P3). As example, the probabilities for different channels in a case of the Sc, Tl nuclei are presented. The Dirac-Wood-Saxon model is used. The key features of the possible high-power monochromatic ? radiation sources on the studied processes basis are analyzed.

Glushkov, Alexander

2011-10-01

210

Multiprocessing on supercomputers for computational aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Very little use is made of multiple processors available on current supercomputers (computers with a theoretical peak performance capability equal to 100 MFLOPs or more) in computational aerodynamics to significantly improve turnaround time. The productivity of a computer user is directly related to this turnaround time. In a time-sharing environment, the improvement in this speed is achieved when multiple processors are used efficiently to execute an algorithm. The concept of multiple instructions and multiple data (MIMD) through multi-tasking is applied via a strategy which requires relatively minor modifications to an existing code for a single processor. Essentially, this approach maps the available memory to multiple processors, exploiting the C-FORTRAN-Unix interface. The existing single processor code is mapped without the need for developing a new algorithm. The procedure for building a code utilizing this approach is automated with the Unix stream editor. As a demonstration of this approach, a Multiple Processor Multiple Grid (MPMG) code is developed. It is capable of using nine processors, and can be easily extended to a larger number of processors. This code solves the three-dimensional, Reynolds averaged, thin-layer and slender-layer Navier-Stokes equations with an implicit, approximately factored and diagonalized method. The solver is applied to generic oblique-wing aircraft problem on a four processor Cray-2 computer. A tricubic interpolation scheme is developed to increase the accuracy of coupling of overlapped grids. For the oblique-wing aircraft problem, a speedup of two in elapsed (turnaround) time is observed in a saturated time-sharing environment.

Yarrow, Maurice; Mehta, Unmeel B.

1990-01-01

211

Rudolf Hermann, wind tunnels and aerodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rudolf Hermann was born on December 15, 1904 in Leipzig, Germany. He studied at the University of Leipzig and at the Aachen Institute of Technology. His involvement with wind tunnels began in 1934 when Professor Carl Wieselsberger engaged him to work at Aachen on the development of a supersonic wind tunnel. On January 6, 1936, Dr. Wernher von Braun visited Dr. Hermann to arrange for use of the Aachen supersonic wind tunnel for Army problems. On April 1, 1937, Dr. Hermann became Director of the Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the Army installation at Peenemunde. Results from the Aachen and Peenemunde wind tunnels were crucial in achieving aerodynamic stability for the A-4 rocket, later designated as the V-2. Plans to build a Mach 10 'hypersonic' wind tunnel facility at Kochel were accelerated after the Allied air raid on Peenemunde on August 17, 1943. Dr. Hermann was director of the new facility. Ignoring destruction orders from Hitler as WWII approached an end in Europe, Dr. Hermann and his associates hid documents and preserved wind tunnel components that were acquired by the advancing American forces. Dr. Hermann became a consultant to the Air Force at its Wright Field in November 1945. In 1951, he was named professor of Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1962, Dr. Hermann became the first Director of the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a position he held until he retired in 1970.

Lundquist, Charles A.; Coleman, Anne M.

2008-04-01

212

Atmospheric tests of trailing-edge aerodynamic devices  

SciTech Connect

An experiment was conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s (NREL`s) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable-span, trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. The goal of the investigation was to directly compare results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were used to define effective changes in the aerodynamic and hinge-moment coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans (7.5%, 15%, and 22.5%) and configurations (Spoiler-Flap, vented sileron, and unvented aileron). Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (about a 30% reduction from infinite-span) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

Miller, L.S.; Huang, S. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)] [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States); Quandt, G.A.

1998-01-01

213

Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, part 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Papers given at the conference present the results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include two-dimensional configurations, three-dimensional configurations, transonic aircraft, and the space shuttle.

1975-01-01

214

Aerodynamic Characterization of a Modern Launch Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modern launch vehicle is by necessity an extremely integrated design. The accurate characterization of its aerodynamic characteristics is essential to determine design loads, to design flight control laws, and to establish performance. The NASA Ares Aerodynamics Panel has been responsible for technical planning, execution, and vetting of the aerodynamic characterization of the Ares I vehicle. An aerodynamics team supporting the Panel consists of wind tunnel engineers, computational engineers, database engineers, and other analysts that address topics such as uncertainty quantification. The team resides at three NASA centers: Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Ames Research Center. The Panel has developed strategies to synergistically combine both the wind tunnel efforts and the computational efforts with the goal of validating the computations. Selected examples highlight key flow physics and, where possible, the fidelity of the comparisons between wind tunnel results and the computations. Lessons learned summarize what has been gleaned during the project and can be useful for other vehicle development projects.

Hall, Robert M.; Holland, Scott D.; Blevins, John A.

2011-01-01

215

HSR Aerodynamic Performance Status and Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes HSR (High Speed Research) Aerodynamic Performance Status and Challenges. The topics include: 1) Aero impact on HSR; 2) Goals and Targets; 3) Progress and Status; and 4) Remaining Challenges. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

Gilbert, William P.; Antani, Tony; Ball, Doug; Calloway, Robert L.; Snyder, Phil

1999-01-01

216

Steady incompressible variable thickness shear layer aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A shear flow aerodynamic theory for steady incompressible flows is presented for both the lifting and non lifting problems. The slow variation of the boundary layer thickness is considered. The slowly varying behavior is treated by using multitime scales. The analysis begins with the elementary wavy wall problem and, through Fourier superpositions over the wave number space, the shear flow equivalents to the aerodynamic transfer functions of classical potential flow are obtained. The aerodynamic transfer functions provide integral equations which relate the wall pressure and the upwash. Computational results are presented for the pressure distribution, the lift coefficient, and the center of pressure travel along a two dimensional flat plate in a shear flow. The aerodynamic load is decreased by the shear layer, compared to the potential flow. The variable thickness shear layer decreases it less than the uniform thickness shear layer based upon equal maximum shear layer thicknesses.

Chi, M. R.

1976-01-01

217

Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Insights using Eigenanalysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents novel analytical results for eigenvalues and eigenvectors produced using discrete time aerodynamic and aeroelastic models. An unsteady, incompressible vortex lattice aerodynamic model is formulated in discrete time; the importance of several modeling parameters is examined. A detailed study is made of the behavior of the aerodynamic eigenvalues both in discrete and continuous time. The aerodynamic model is then incorporated into aeroelastic equations of motion. Eigenanalyses of the coupled equations produce stability results and modal characteristics which are valid for critical and non-critical velocities. Insight into the modeling and physics associated with aeroelastic system behavior is gained by examining both the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors. Potential pitfalls in discrete time model construction and analysis are examined.

Heeg, Jennifer; Dowell, Earl H.

1999-01-01

218

Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Insights using Eigenanalysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents novel analytical results for eigenvalues and eigenvectors produced using discrete time aerodynamic and aeroelastic models. An unsteady, incompressible vortex lattice aerodynamic model is formulated in discrete time; the importance of several modeling parameters is examined. A detailed study is made of the behavior of the aerodynamic eigenvalues both in discrete and continuous time. The aerodynamic model is then incorporated into aeroelastic equations of motion. Eigenanalyses of the coupled equations produce stability results and modal characteristics which are valid for critical and non-critical velocities. Insight into the modeling and physics associated with aeroelastic system behavior is gained by examining both the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors. Potential pitfalls in discrete time model construction and analysis are examined.

Heeg, Jennifer; Dowell, Earl H.

2004-01-01

219

Low speed aerodynamics CFD code validation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the research project is to develop and validate analytical methods for low-speed aerodynamics. The experimental needs for computational methods are presented. All data and results are presented in viewgraph format.

South, Jerry C.

1987-01-01

220

The oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The two-dimensional problem of the oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator is treated in the manner that the wing is replaced by a plate with bends and stages and the airfoil section by a mean line consisting of one or more straights. The computed formulas and tables permit, on these premises, the prediction of the pressure distribution and of the aerodynamic reactions of oscillating elevators and tabs with any position of elevator hinge in respect to elevator leading edge.

Kussner, H G; Schwartz, I

1941-01-01

221

Aerodynamic Performance Studies for Supersonic Cruise Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technical progress made in each of the disciplinary research areas affecting the design of supersonic cruise aircraft is discussed. The NASA Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research program has supported an expanded research program in aerodynamics including an ever growing experimental data base, methodology development across the Mach number range, and sonic boom. Progress in the aerodynamics area could facilitate the choice of the highly swept subsonic leading edge, arrow wing, known for superior supersonic cruise efficiency.

Mascitti, V. R.

1976-01-01

222

Fourier functional analysis for unsteady aerodynamic modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method based on Fourier analysis is developed to analyze the force and moment data obtained in large amplitude forced oscillation tests at high angles of attack. The aerodynamic models for normal force, lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are built up from a set of aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions at different frequencies. Based on the aerodynamic models of harmonic data, the indicial responses are formed. The final expressions for the models involve time integrals of the indicial type advocated by Tobak and Schiff. Results from linear two- and three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic theories as well as test data for a 70-degree delta wing are used to verify the models. It is shown that the present modeling method is accurate in producing the aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions and the ramp type motions. The model also produces correct trend for a 70-degree delta wing in harmonic motion with different mean angles-of-attack. However, the current model cannot be used to extrapolate data to higher angles-of-attack than that of the harmonic motions which form the aerodynamic model. For linear ramp motions, a special method is used to calculate the corresponding frequency and phase angle at a given time. The calculated results from modeling show a higher lift peak for linear ramp motion than for harmonic ramp motion. The current model also shows reasonably good results for the lift responses at different angles of attack.

Lan, C. Edward; Chin, Suei

1991-01-01

223

Analysis of VAWT aerodynamics and design using the Actuator Cylinder flow model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The actuator cylinder (AC) flow model is defined as the ideal VAWT rotor. Radial directed volume forces are applied on the circular path of the VAWT rotor airfoil and constitute an energy conversion in the flow. The power coefficient for the ideal as well as the real energy conversion is defined. The describing equations for the two-dimensional AC model are presented and a solution method splitting the final solution in a linear and non-linear part is briefly described. A family of loadforms approaching the uniform loading is used to study the ideal energy conversion indicating that the maximum power coefficient for the ideal energy conversion of a VAWT could exceed the Betz limit. The real energy conversion of the 5MW DeepWind rotor is simulated with the AC flow model in combination with the blade element analysis. Aerodynamic design aspects are discussed on this basis revealing that the maximum obtainable power coefficient for a fixed pitch VAWT is constrained by the fundamental cyclic variation of inflow angle and relative velocity leading to a loading that deviates considerably from the uniform loading.

Madsen, H. Aa; Paulsen, U. S.; Vitae, L.

2014-12-01

224

Local approach to fatigue based on energy considerations  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a development of a fatigue crack growth theory published by the author in 1981 based on an energy approach. In an ideally elastic material containing a crack the only mechanism through which energy can be absorbed during a virtual crack extension is that associated to the creation of new free surface. It is an in-out situation in that a crack of a given length 2a under a stress state {sigma} either becomes unstable or stays like it is. In a real elastic-plastic material the energy absorption rate R comes mainly from the energy stored ahead of the crack tip as plastic strain energy. The resistance R is no longer represented by a constant term, but becomes a rather complex function of crack length increasing the crack grows. The consequence is that there is sufficient energy in the system to drive the crack to a point where the driving force G is equal to the resistance R and the crack stops. Unloading the system and reloading it, the crack grows by fatigue indicating that the previous condition G = R is no longer satisfied. If this happens it is because the volume that yields ahead of the crack tip is not capable during the reloading to absorb energy with the same rate as before. This causes the crack to grow further to regain the loss through the yielding of new material and establishes again the equilibrium between G and R. The author has related this lack of capability to develop the same energy absorption rate in any of the following cycles to a shake-down effect that takes place in the plastic enclave. The theory and the equation explain why short cracks shall grow faster than large ones. It also explains why the fatigue crack growth rate depends on the ratio between the minimum and maximum stress and is practically the same in any material independently of the yield stress and toughness that the material may have.

Milella, P.P. [ANPA, Rome (Italy)

1996-12-01

225

Scientific Approach to Renewable Energy Through Solar Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Renewable energy is increasingly viewed as critically important globally. Solar cells convert the energy of the sun into electricity. The method of converting solar energy to electricity is pollution free, and appears a good practical solution to the global energy problems. Energy policies have pushed for different technologies to decrease pollutant emissions and reduce global climate change. Photovoltaic technology, which utilizes sunlight to generate energy, is an attractive alternate energy source because it is renewable, harmless and domestically secure. Transparent conducting metal oxides, being n-type were used extensively in the production of heterojunction cells using p-type Cu2O. The long held consensus is that the best approach to improve cell efficiency in Cu2O-based photovoltaic devices is to achieve both p- and n-type Cu2O and thus p-n homojunction of Cu2O solar cells. Silicon, which, next to oxygen, is the most represented element in the earth's crust, is used for the production of monocrystalline silicon solar cells. Silicon is easily obtained and processed and it is not toxic and does not form compounds that would be environmentally harmful. In contemporary electronic industry silicon is the main semiconducting element. Thin-film cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells are the basis of a significant technology with major commercial impact on solar energy production. Polycrystalline thin-film solar cells such as CuInSe2 (CIS), Cu (In, Ga) Se2 (CIGS) and CdTe compound semiconductors are important for terrestrial applications because of their high efficiency, long-term stable performance and potential for low-cost production. Highest record efficiencies of 19.2% for CIGS and 16.5% for CdTe have been achieved.

Rao, M. C.

226

Aerodynamic Design on Unstructured Grids for Turbulent Flows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aerodynamic design algorithm for turbulent flows using unstructured grids is described. The current approach uses adjoint (costate) variables for obtaining derivatives of the cost function. The solution of the adjoint equations is obtained using an implicit formulation in which the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations when solving for the costate variables. The accuracy of the derivatives is demonstrated by comparison with finite-difference gradients and a few example computations are shown. In addition, a user interface is described which significantly reduces the time required for setting up the design problems. Recommendations on directions of further research into the Navier Stokes design process are made.

Anderson, W. Kyle; Bonhaus, Daryl L.

1997-01-01

227

Parachute Aerodynamics From Video Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new data analysis technique for the identification of static and dynamic aerodynamic stability coefficients from wind tunnel test video data is presented. This new technique was applied to video data obtained during a parachute wind tunnel test program conducted in support of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Total angle-of-attack data obtained from video images were used to determine the static pitching moment curve of the parachute. During the original wind tunnel test program the static pitching moment curve had been determined by forcing the parachute to a specific total angle-of -attack and measuring the forces generated. It is shown with the new technique that this parachute, when free to rotate, trims at an angle-of-attack two degrees lower than was measured during the forced-angle tests. An attempt was also made to extract pitch damping information from the video data. Results suggest that the parachute is dynamically unstable at the static trim point and tends to become dynamically stable away from the trim point. These trends are in agreement with limit-cycle-like behavior observed in the video. However, the chaotic motion of the parachute produced results with large uncertainty bands.

Schoenenberger, Mark; Queen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.

2005-01-01

228

Aerodynamics of a hybrid airship  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this paper is to present the results of a numerical study of the aerodynamic parameters of a wingless and a winged-hull airship. The total forces and moment coefficients of the airships have been computed over a range of angles. The results obtained show that addition of a wing to a conventional airship increases the lift has three times the lifting force at positive angle of attack as compared to a wingless airship whereas the drag increases in the range of 19% to 58%. The longitudinal and directional stabilities were found to be statically stable, however, both the conventional airship and the hybrid or winged airships were found to have poor rolling stability. Wingless airship has slightly higher longitudinal stability than a winged airship. The winged airship has better directional stability than the wingless airship. The wingless airship only possesses static rolling stability in the range of yaw angles of -5° to 5°. On the contrary, the winged airship initially tested does not possess rolling stability at all. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations show that modifications to the wing placement and its dihedral have strong positive effect on the rolling stability. Raising the wings to the center of gravity and introducing a dihedral angle of 5° stabilizes the rolling motion of the winged airship.

Andan, Amelda Dianne; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.

2012-06-01

229

1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry HighSpeed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of. Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

1999-01-01

230

1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

1999-01-01

231

Exploring Discretization Error in Simulation-Based Aerodynamic Databases  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This work examines the level of discretization error in simulation-based aerodynamic databases and introduces strategies for error control. Simulations are performed using a parallel, multi-level Euler solver on embedded-boundary Cartesian meshes. Discretization errors in user-selected outputs are estimated using the method of adjoint-weighted residuals and we use adaptive mesh refinement to reduce these errors to specified tolerances. Using this framework, we examine the behavior of discretization error throughout a token database computed for a NACA 0012 airfoil consisting of 120 cases. We compare the cost and accuracy of two approaches for aerodynamic database generation. In the first approach, mesh adaptation is used to compute all cases in the database to a prescribed level of accuracy. The second approach conducts all simulations using the same computational mesh without adaptation. We quantitatively assess the error landscape and computational costs in both databases. This investigation highlights sensitivities of the database under a variety of conditions. The presence of transonic shocks or the stiffness in the governing equations near the incompressible limit are shown to dramatically increase discretization error requiring additional mesh resolution to control. Results show that such pathologies lead to error levels that vary by over factor of 40 when using a fixed mesh throughout the database. Alternatively, controlling this sensitivity through mesh adaptation leads to mesh sizes which span two orders of magnitude. We propose strategies to minimize simulation cost in sensitive regions and discuss the role of error-estimation in database quality.

Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

2010-01-01

232

Time Series Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Fields Estimated from MODIS Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most land surface models used today require estimates of aerodynamic roughness length in order to characterize momentum transfer between the surface and atmosphere. The most common method of prescribing roughness is through the use of empirical look-up tables based solely on land cover class. Theoretical approaches that employ satellite-based estimates of canopy density present an attractive alternative to current look-up table approaches based on vegetation cover type that do not account for within-class variability and are oftentimes simplistic with respect to temporal variability. The current research applies Raupach s formulation of momentum aerodynamic roughness to MODIS data on a regional scale in order to estimate seasonally variable roughness and zero-plane displacement height fields using bulk land cover parameters estimated by [Jasinski, M.F., Borak, J., Crago, R., 2005. Bulk surface momentum parameters for satellite-derived vegetation fields. Agric. For. Meteorol. 133, 55-68]. Results indicate promising advances over look-up approaches with respect to characterization of vegetation roughness variability in land surface and atmospheric circulation models.

Borak, Jordan S.; Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard D.

2005-01-01

233

1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

1999-01-01

234

Unsteady incompressible aerodynamics and forced response of detuned blade rows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mathematical model is developed and utilized to demonstrate the enhanced forced response behavior associated with aerodynamic, structural, and combined aerodynamic-structural detuning of a loaded rotor operating in an incompressible flow field. The unsteady aerodynamic gust response and oscillating cascade aerodynamics are determined by developing both a complete first-order unsteady aerodynamic analysis and a locally analytical solution in individual grid elements of a body fitted computational grid. The aerodynamic detuning is accomplished by means of alternate circumferential airfoil spacing, with alternate blade structural detuning also considered. The beneficial forced response effects of these detuning techniques are then demonstrated by applying this model to various detuned rotor configurations.

Chiang, Hsiao-Wei D.; Fleeter, Sanford

1990-01-01

235

Missile Aerodynamics for Ascent and Re-entry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic force and moment equations are developed for 6-DOF missile simulations of both the ascent phase of flight and a tumbling re-entry. The missile coordinate frame (M frame) and a frame parallel to the M frame were used for formulating the aerodynamic equations. The missile configuration chosen as an example is a cylinder with fixed fins and a nose cone. The equations include both the static aerodynamic coefficients and the aerodynamic damping derivatives. The inclusion of aerodynamic damping is essential for simulating a tumbling re-entry. Appended information provides insight into aerodynamic damping.

Watts, Gaines L.; McCarter, James W.

2012-01-01

236

The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach  

PubMed Central

Helping students understand “chemical energy” is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in physics and physical sciences; and 3) the failure of chemistry courses to explicitly link molecular with macroscopic energy ideas. From a constructivist perspective, it is unlikely that students can, without a coherent understanding of such a central concept, attain a robust and accurate understanding of new concepts. However, changes are on the horizon, guided by the increasing understanding that difficult concepts require coherent, well-designed learning progressions and the new National Research Council Framework for K–12 Science Education. We provide supporting evidence for our assertions and suggestions for an interdisciplinary learning progression designed to better approach the concept of bond energies, a first step in an understanding chemical energy and behavior of reaction systems that is central to biological systems. PMID:23737636

Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

2013-01-01

237

Aerospace Energy Systems Laboratory - Requirements and design approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Ames/Dryden Flight Research Facility operates a mixed fleet of research aircraft employing NiCd batteries in a variety of flight-critical applications. Dryden's Battery Systems Laboratory (BSL), a computerized facility for battery maintenance servicing, has evolved over two decades into one of the most advanced facilities of its kind in the world. Recently a major BSL upgrade was initiated with the goal of modernization to provide flexibility in meeting the needs of future advanced projects. The new facility will be called the Aerospace Energy Systems Laboratory (AESL) and will employ distributed processing linked to a centralized data base. AESL will be both a multistation servicing facility and a research laboratory for the advancement of energy storage system maintenance techniques. This paper describes the baseline requirements for the AESL and the design approach being taken for its mechanization.

Glover, Richard D.

1988-01-01

238

Aerospace energy systems laboratory: Requirements and design approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility at Edwards, California, operates a mixed fleet of research aircraft employing nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries in a variety of flight-critical applications. Dryden's Battery Systems Laboratory (BSL), a computerized facility for battery maintenance servicing, has developed over two decades into one of the most advanced facilities of its kind in the world. Recently a major BSL upgrade was initiated with the goal of modernization to provide flexibility in meeting the needs of future advanced projects. The new facility will be called the Aerospace Energy Systems Laboratory (AESL) and will employ distributed processing linked to a centralized data base. AESL will be both a multistation servicing facility and a research laboratory for the advancement of energy storage system maintenance techniques. This paper describes the baseline requirements for the AESL and the design approach being taken for its mechanization.

Glover, Richard D.

1988-01-01

239

Moving-model technique used in automobile aerodynamics for measurement of ground effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efforts are currently underway in many laboratories to simulate correctly the ground effects which occur in windtunnels used for studies in automobile aerodynamics. An experimental approach which is sometimes used, the moving belt technique, is both complicated and expensive. On the other hand, if the model is rapidly accelerated along a stationary rail by a pneumatic launch system, the relative

H. D. Papenfuss; M. Kronast

1991-01-01

240

Numerical computation of aerodynamic noise radiation by the large eddy simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerodynamic sound radiated from the low Mach number turbulent wake of a circular cylinder was computed using the large eddy simulation technique and compared with the measured data obtained in a low noise wind tunnel. In this study, a new upwinding FEM has been proposed and used for the simulation to obtain the unsteady flow field around the circular cylinder. The sound pressure was computed based on the Lighthill-Curle equation using the fluctuating surface pressure obtained from the large eddy simulation. The computed sound pressure spectrum shows reasonable agreement with the measured data. The present approach, thus, seems quite promising for predictions of aerodynamic noise radiated in complicated turbulent flow fields.

Kato, Chisachi; Takano, Yasushi; Iida, Akiyishi; Ikegawa, Masahiro

241

Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

Morelli, Eugene A.

2010-01-01

242

Estimation of aerodynamic forces and moments on a steadily spinning airplane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A semiempirical method is presented for the estimation of aerodynamic forces and moments on a steadily rotating airplane model in a spin tunnel. The approach is based on the application of strip theory to determine a part of the aerodynamic coefficient (including rotational velocity) and then estimation of increments to these coefficients because of rotational flow over the stalled airplane. The theory is applied to a light, single-engine, general aviation airplane and the results are compared with the corresponding spin tunnel rotary balance test data.

Pamadi, B. N.; Taylor, L. W., Jr.

1984-01-01

243

Techniques for estimating Space Station aerodynamic characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method was devised and calculations were performed to determine the effects of reflected molecules on the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for a body in free molecule flow. A procedure was developed for determining the velocity and temperature distributions of molecules reflected from a surface of arbitrary momentum and energy accommodation. A system of equations, based on momentum and energy balances for the surface, incident, and reflected molecules, was solved by a numerical optimization technique. The minimization of a 'cost' function, developed from the set of equations, resulted in the determination of the defining properties of the flow reflected from the arbitrary surface. The properties used to define both the incident and reflected flows were: average temperature of the molecules in the flow, angle of the flow with respect to a vector normal to the surface, and the molecular speed ratio. The properties of the reflected flow were used to calculate the contribution of multiply reflected molecules to the force and moments on a test body in the flow. The test configuration consisted of two flat plates joined along one edge at a right angle to each other. When force and moment coefficients of this 90 deg concave wedge were compared to results that did not include multiple reflections, it was found that multiple reflections could nearly double lift and drag coefficients, with nearly a 50 percent increase in pitching moment for cases with specular or nearly specular accommodation. The cases of diffuse or nearly diffuse accommodation often had minor reductions in axial and normal forces when multiple reflections were included. There were several cases of intermediate accommodation where the addition of multiple reflection effects more than tripled the lift coefficient over the convex technique.

Thomas, Richard E.

1993-01-01

244

AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 7th, Seattle, WA, July 31-Aug. 2, 1989, Technical Papers  

SciTech Connect

The present conference discusses the comparative aerodynamic behavior of half-span and full-span delta wings, TRANAIR applications to engine/airframe integration, a zonal approach to V/STOL vehicle aerodynamics, an aerodynamic analysis of segmented aircraft configurations in high-speed flight, unstructured grid generation and FEM flow solvers, surface grid generation for flowfields using B-spline surfaces, the use of chimera in supersonic viscous calculations for the F-15, and hypersonic vehicle forebody design studies. Also discussed are the aerothermodynamics of projectiles at hypersonic speeds, flow visualization of wing-rock motion in delta wings, vortex interaction over delta wings at high alpha, the analysis and design of dual-rotation propellers, unsteady pressure loads from plunging airfoils, the effects of riblets on the wake of an airfoil, inverse airfoil design with Navier-Stokes methods, flight testing for a 155-mm base-burn projectile, experimental results on rotor/fuselage aerodynamic interactions, the high-alpha aerodynamic characteristics of crescent and elliptic wings, and the effects of free vortices on lifting surfaces.

Not Available

1989-01-01

245

DFPT approach to the temperature dependence of electronic band energies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The energy bands of semiconductors exhibit significant shifts and broadening with temperature at constant volume. This is an effect of the direct renormalization of band energies due to electron-phonon interactions. In search of an efficient linear response DFT approach to this effect, beyond semi-empirical approximation or frozen- phonon DFT, we have implemented formulas derived by Allen and Heine [J. Phys. C 9, 2305 (1976)] inside the ABINIT package. We have found that such formulas need a great number of bands, O(1000), to properly converge the thermal corrections of deep potential well atoms, i.e. elements of the first row. This leads to heavy computational costs even for simple systems like diamond. The DFPT formalism can be used to circumvent entirely the need for conduction bands by computing the first-order wave-functions using the self-consistent Sternheimer equation. We will compare the results of both formalism demonstrating that the DFPT approach reproduces the correct converged results of the formulas of Allen and Heine.

Boulanger, Paul; Cote, Michel; Gonze, Xavier

2010-03-01

246

Marketing: an approach to successful energy-conservation information programs  

SciTech Connect

This monograph shows how the adoption of a marketing approach can improve the quality of the development and delivery of energy-conservation programs. Several factors make the use of such a marketing approach to conservation particularly beneficial, namely: (1) goals of conservation programs can be quantified (e.g., specified amount of energy to be saved); in addition, intermediate effects necessary for program success are also measureable (e.g., knowledge, attitude change, etc); (2) there is an apparent and increasing need for conservation by different parts (or sectors) of the population; however, it is clear that the desire for conservation is not the same for all sectors; (3) conservation programs can be thought of in much the same way as products with benefits and costs; this necessitates an understanding of how the population makes conservation decisions so that the program can fit into that decision process; (4) the need to tailor programs to the needs of the population is heightened by the general competition for the consumer dollar; it is necessary to design and present programs in a way that the individual will view conservation as an attractive choice among many (e.g., bank savings, buying clothes, furniture, car, etc.); and (5) the population's response to, and need for conservation is constantly changing; consequently, it is important to realize that these changes may need to be reflected in the conservation programs themselves (both ongoing and new).

Hutton, R. B.; McNeill, D. L.

1980-08-01

247

Experimental investigation of hypersonic aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An extensive series of ballistic range tests were conducted at the Ames Research Center to determine precisely the aerodynamic characteristics of the Galileo entry probe vehicle. Figures and tables are presented which summarize the results of these ballistic range tests. Drag data were obtained for both a nonablated and a hypothesized ablated Galileo configuration at Mach numbers from about 0.7 to 14 and at Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 4 million. The tests were conducted in air and the experimental results were compared with available Pioneer Venus data since these two configurations are similar in geometry. The nonablated Galileo configuration was also tested with two different center-of-gravity positions to obtain values of pitching-moment-curve slope which could be used in determining values of lift and center-of-pressure location for this configuration. The results indicate that the drag characteristics of the Galileo probe are qualitatively similar to that of Pioneer Venus, however, the drag of the nonablated Galileo is about 3 percent lower at the higher Mach numbers and as much as 5 percent greater at transonic Mach numbers of about 1.0 to 1.5. Also, the drag of the hypothesized ablated configuration is about 3 percent lower than that of the nonablated configuration at the higher Mach numbers but about the same at the lower Mach numbers. Additional tests are required at Reynolds numbers of 1000, 500, and 250 to determine if the dramatic rise in drag coefficient measured for Pioneer Venus at these low Reynolds numbers also occurs for Galileo, as might be expected.

Intrieri, Peter F.

1988-01-01

248

Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

Reddy, C. Subba

1993-01-01

249

Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

2011-01-01

250

Computation of External Aerodynamics for a Canard Rotor/Wing Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerodynamic loads on a Canard Rotor/Wing vehicle are investigated using inviscid numerical simulations in order to understand the flight characteristics of the vehicle during conversion from rotor craft to fixed-wing flight. A series of numerical simulations at seven azimuthal rotor indices are presented covering a quarter turn of the rotor With symmetry arguments, these simulations produce 25 data points for a complete rotation. A Cartesian mesh approach is used to compute the flow field about a configuration with faired-over engine inlet and exhaust that matches the wind tunnel geometry. These simulations were performed using meshes with approximately nine Million Cartesian cells. To better understand the aerodynamic effects of the rotor hub on the configuration, the same set of simulations were repeated for a hub-less geometry. Overall loads for both configurations are similar but are due to somewhat different aerodynamic mechanisms.

Pandya, S. A.; Aftosmis, M. J.

2001-01-01

251

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"  

SciTech Connect

As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

2008-05-15

252

Fully integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization of helicopter rotor blades  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A fully integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization procedure is described for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance and dynamic analyses with a general purpose optimizer. The procedure minimizes a linear combination of power required (in hover, forward flight, and maneuver) and vibratory hub shear. The design variables include pretwist, taper initiation, taper ratio, root chord, blade stiffnesses, tuning masses, and tuning mass locations. Aerodynamic constraints consist of limits on power required in hover, forward flight and maneuvers; airfoil section stall; drag divergence Mach number; minimum tip chord; and trim. Dynamic constraints are on frequencies, minimum autorotational inertia, and maximum blade weight. The procedure is demonstrated for two cases. In the first case, the objective function involves power required (in hover, forward flight and maneuver) and dynamics. The second case involves only hover power and dynamics. The designs from the integrated procedure are compared with designs from a sequential optimization approach in which the blade is first optimized for performance and then for dynamics. In both cases, the integrated approach is superior.

Walsh, Joanne L.; Lamarsh, William J., II; Adelman, Howard M.

1992-01-01

253

Comparison of Aerodynamic Noise Propagation Markus P. Rumpfkeil  

E-print Network

signatures. cylinder,14 and for a slat trailing-edge fComparison of Aerodynamic Noise Propagation Techniques Markus P. Rumpfkeil University of Dayton the computation of aerodynamic noise via different hybrid noise prediction methods is presented. An unsteady

Rumpfkeil, Markus Peer

254

Steady, Oscillatory, and Unsteady Subsonic and Supersonic Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer program SOUSSA-P (Steady, Oscillatory, and Unsteady Subsonic and Supersonic Aerodynamics--Production Version) accurately and efficiently evaluates steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads on aircraft having arbitrary shapes and motions, including structural deformations.

Desmarais, R. N.; Cunningham, H. J.; Yates, E. C. J.; Morino, L.; Preuss, R. D.; Smolka, S. A.; Tseng, K.; Averick, J.

1982-01-01

255

Aerodynamic collection efficiency of fog water collectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fog water collectors (FWC) can provide water to arid zones with persistent advection and orographic fog. A key feature of any FWC is the mesh used to capture fog droplets. Two relevant mesh characteristics are its shade coefficient and the characteristics of the fibers used to weave or knit the mesh. This paper develops a simple superposition model to analyze the effect of these factors on the Aerodynamic Collection Efficiency (ACE) of FWCs. Due to the simplicity of the model it cannot be directly applied to actual FWC meshes, and serve only for guidance on the order of magnitude of the optimum shade coefficient and the corresponding ACE. The model shows that there is a maximum ACE of the order of 20-24.5% for shade coefficients between 0.5 and 0.6, for the particular mesh simulated. Aerodynamic collection efficiency can be increased by making the FWC concave and improving the aerodynamics of the mesh fibers.

Rivera, Juan de Dios

2011-11-01

256

Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant flow injected into the disk cavities; (3) coolant density; (4) leakage flows through the seal between blades; and (5) the role that each of these various flows has in determining the adiabatic recovery temperature at all of the critical locations within the cavities. The model and the test apparatus provide close geometrical and aerodynamic simulation of all the two-stage cavity flow regions for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and the ability to simulate the sources and sinks for each cavity flow.

Johnson, B. V.; Daniels, W. A.

1992-07-01

257

History of the numerical aerodynamic simulation program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) program has reached a milestone with the completion of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network. This achievement is the first major milestone in the continuing effort to provide a state-of-the-art supercomputer facility for the national aerospace community and to serve as a pathfinder for the development and use of future supercomputer systems. The underlying factors that motivated the initiation of the program are first identified and then discussed. These include the emergence and evolution of computational aerodynamics as a powerful new capability in aerodynamics research and development, the computer power required for advances in the discipline, the complementary nature of computation and wind tunnel testing, and the need for the government to play a pathfinding role in the development and use of large-scale scientific computing systems. Finally, the history of the NAS program is traced from its inception in 1975 to the present time.

Peterson, Victor L.; Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

1987-01-01

258

Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant flow injected into the disk cavities; (3) coolant density; (4) leakage flows through the seal between blades; and (5) the role that each of these various flows has in determining the adiabatic recovery temperature at all of the critical locations within the cavities. The model and the test apparatus provide close geometrical and aerodynamic simulation of all the two-stage cavity flow regions for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and the ability to simulate the sources and sinks for each cavity flow.

Johnson, B. V.; Daniels, W. A.

1992-01-01

259

Research on inverse, hybrid and optimization problems in engineering sciences with emphasis on turbomachine aerodynamics: Review of Chinese advances  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advances in inverse design and optimization theory in engineering fields in China are presented. Two original approaches, the image-space approach and the variational approach, are discussed in terms of turbomachine aerodynamic inverse design. Other areas of research in turbomachine aerodynamic inverse design include the improved mean-streamline (stream surface) method and optimization theory based on optimal control. Among the additional engineering fields discussed are the following: the inverse problem of heat conduction, free-surface flow, variational cogeneration of optimal grid and flow field, and optimal meshing theory of gears.

Liu, Gao-Lian

1991-01-01

260

Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

2007-01-01

261

Predicted aerodynamic characteristics for HL-20 lifting-body using the aerodynamic preliminary analysis system (APAS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerodynamic characteristics of the HL-20 lifting body configuraiton obtained through the APAS and from wind-tunnel tests have been compared. The APAS is considered to be an easy-to-use, relatively simple tool for quick preliminary estimation of vehicle aerodynamics. The APAS estimates are found to be in good agreement with experimental results to be used for preliminary evaluation of the HL-20. The APAS accuracy in predicting aerodynamics of the HL-20 varied over the Mach range. The speed ranges of best agreement were subsonic and hypersonic, while least agreement was in the Mach range from 1.2 to about 2,5.

Cruz, Christopher I.; Ware, George M.

1992-01-01

262

Method of reducing drag in aerodynamic systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the present method, boundary layer thickening is combined with laminar flow control to reduce drag. An aerodynamic body is accelerated enabling a ram turbine on the body to receive air at velocity V sub 0. The discharge air is directed over an aft portion of the aerodynamic body producing boundary layer thickening. The ram turbine also drives a compressor by applying torque to a shaft connected between the ram turbine and the compressor. The compressor sucks in lower boundary layer air through inlets in the shell of the aircraft producing laminar flow control and reducing drag. The discharge from the compressor is expanded in a nozzle to produce thrust.

Hrach, Frank J. (inventor)

1993-01-01

263

Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After leasing a cab-over tractor-trailer from a Southern California firm, Dryden researchers added sheet metal modifications like those shown here. They rounded the front corners and edges, and placed a smooth fairing on the cab's roofs and sides extending back to the trailer. During the investigation of truck aerodynamics, the techniques honed in flight research proved highly applicable. By closing the gap between the cab and the trailer, for example, researchers discovered a significant reduction in aerodynamic drag, one resulting in 20 to 25 percent less fuel consumption than the standard design. Many truck manufacturers subsequently incorporated similar modifications on their products.

1975-01-01

264

Unsteady Aerodynamics - Subsonic Compressible Inviscid Case  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a new analytical treatment of Unsteady Aerodynamics - the linear theory covering the subsonic compressible (inviscid) case - drawing on some recent work in Operator Theory and Functional Analysis. The specific new results are: (a) An existence and uniqueness proof for the Laplace transform version of the Possio integral equation as well as a new closed form solution approximation thereof. (b) A new representation for the time-domain solution of the subsonic compressible aerodynamic equations emphasizing in particular the role of the initial conditions.

Balakrishnan, A. V.

1999-01-01

265

The Mars Exploration Rovers Entry Descent and Landing and the Use of Aerodynamic Decelerators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) project, the next United States mission to the surface of Mars, uses aerodynamic decelerators in during its entry, descent and landing (EDL) phase. These two identical missions (MER-A and MER-B), which deliver NASA s largest mobile science suite to date to the surface of Mars, employ hypersonic entry with an ablative energy dissipating aeroshell, a supersonic/subsonic disk-gap-band parachute and an airbag landing system within EDL. This paper gives an overview of the MER EDL system and speaks to some of the challenges faced by the various aerodynamic decelerators.

Steltzner, Adam; Desai, Prasun; Lee, Wayne; Bruno, Robin

2003-01-01

266

Index for aerodynamic data from the Bumblebee program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Bumblebee program, was designed to provide a supersonic guided missile. The aerodynamics program included a fundamental research effort in supersonic aerodynamics as well as a design task in developing both test vehicles and prototypes of tactical missiles. An index of aerodynamic missile data developed in this program is presented.

Cronvich, L. L.; Barnes, G. A.

1978-01-01

267

Aerodynamics and flight performance of flapping wing micro air vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research efforts in this dissertation address aerodynamics and flight performance of flapping wing aircraft (ornithopters). Flapping wing aerodynamics was studied for various wing sizes, flapping frequencies, airspeeds, and angles of attack. Tested wings possessed both camber and dihedral. Experimental results were analyzed in the framework of momentum theory. Aerodynamic coefficients and Reynolds number are defined using a reference velocity as

Dmytro Silin

2010-01-01

268

Aerodynamic Force Modeling for Unsteady Wing Ryan Jantzen  

E-print Network

Aerodynamic Force Modeling for Unsteady Wing Maneuvers Ryan Jantzen and Kunihiko Taira Florida, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH We report on the development of an aerodynamic force model for a flat focus is placed on examining the influence of large-amplitude wing motion on the unsteady aerodynamics

269

THE VELOCITY DEPENDENCE OF AERODYNAMIC DRAG: A PRIMER FOR MATHEMATICIANS  

E-print Network

THE VELOCITY DEPENDENCE OF AERODYNAMIC DRAG: A PRIMER FOR MATHEMATICIANS LYLE N. LONG and HOWARD­entry of the space shuttle into the earth's atmosphere. Dimensional analysis is an important tool in aerodynamics­T E X 1 #12; For detailed information on the aerodynamics and fluid mechanics pertinent to this paper

270

A Pilot Project in Preparation of an Aerodynamic Optimization Workshop  

E-print Network

A Pilot Project in Preparation of an Aerodynamic Optimization Workshop with Lessons Learned John C-scale Aerodynamic Optimization Workshop. Three independent optimization efforts were conducted concurrently, each in the preparation of a possible future workshop on aerodynamic shape optimization. 1.0 Introduction During AIAA

Jameson, Antony

271

Recent darrieus Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine aerodynamical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aerodynamics of airfoils operating in the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) environment were examined. The experiments are intended to reduce VAWT cost of energy an increase system reliability. The experiments include: (1) chordwise pressure surveys; (2) circumferential blade acceleration surveys; (3) effects of blade camber; (4) pitch and offset; (5) blade blowing; and (6) use of sections designed specifically for VAWT application.

Klimas, P. C.

272

Recent Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine aerodynamical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments contributing to the understanding of the aerodynamics of airfoils operating in the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) environment are described. These experiments are ultimately intended to reduce VAWT cost of energy and increase system reliability. They include chordwise pressure surveys, circumferential blade acceleration surveys, effects of blade camber, pitch and offset, blade blowing, and use of sections designed specifically for VAWT application.

Klimas, P. C.

1981-05-01

273

Comparison of aerodynamic and radiometric surface temperature using precision weighing lysimeters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiometric surface temperature (Ts) is commonly used as a surrogate for aerodynamic temperature (To) in computing the sensible heat flux term (H) in the energy balance. However, these temperatures may differ by several degrees, leading to possible errors (especially for large H) and their relationship is not well known. Previous researchers have established empirical and semi-empirical parameterizations of the radiometric

Paul D. Colaizzi; Steven R. Evett; Terry A. Howell; Judy A. Tolk

2004-01-01

274

Comparison of aerodynamic and radiometric surface temperature using precision weighing lysimeters  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Radiometric surface temperature (Ts) is commonly ,used as a surrogate for aerodynamic ,temperature (To) in computing the sensible heat flux term (H) in the energy balance. However, these temperatures may differ by several degrees, leading to possible errors (especially for large H) and their relationship is not well known. Previous researchers have established empirical and semi-empirical parameterizations of the

Paul D. Colaizzi; Steven R. Evett; Terry A. Howell; Judy A. Tolk; P. O. Drawer

275

On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. These approaches are implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

Madavan, Nateri K.

2004-01-01

276

On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been provEn effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. Several approaches that have proven effective for other evolutionary algorithms are modified and implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for standard test optimization problems and for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

Madavan, Nateri K.

2004-01-01

277

Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A genetic algorithm approach suitable for solving multi-objective problems is described and evaluated using a series of aerodynamic shape optimization problems. Several new features including two variations of a binning selection algorithm and a gene-space transformation procedure are included. The genetic algorithm is suitable for finding Pareto optimal solutions in search spaces that are defined by any number of genes and that contain any number of local extrema. A new masking array capability is included allowing any gene or gene subset to be eliminated as decision variables from the design space. This allows determination of the effect of a single gene or gene subset on the Pareto optimal solution. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm optimization approach is flexible in application and reliable. The binning selection algorithms generally provide Pareto front quality enhancements and moderate convergence efficiency improvements for most of the problems solved.

Holst, Terry L.

2005-01-01

278

Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A genetic algorithm approach suitable for solving multi-objective optimization problems is described and evaluated using a series of aerodynamic shape optimization problems. Several new features including two variations of a binning selection algorithm and a gene-space transformation procedure are included. The genetic algorithm is suitable for finding pareto optimal solutions in search spaces that are defined by any number of genes and that contain any number of local extrema. A new masking array capability is included allowing any gene or gene subset to be eliminated as decision variables from the design space. This allows determination of the effect of a single gene or gene subset on the pareto optimal solution. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm optimization approach is flexible in application and reliable. The binning selection algorithms generally provide pareto front quality enhancements and moderate convergence efficiency improvements for most of the problems solved.

Holst, Terry L.

2004-01-01

279

Integrated lighting approach saves energy in post office facilities  

SciTech Connect

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has made numerous efforts to improve the lighting quality and efficiency in their facilities. These efforts have included both traditional retrofits such as the transition to T8 lamps/electronic ballasts and more experimental approaches such as light pipes and sulfur lamps. However, these efforts have focused primarily on their industrial and plant facilities and have had little impact on their small and medium sized facilities, which comprise roughly 90% of their total building stock. These efforts have also neglected the affinity between task and ambient lighting functions.The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate an integrated lighting system that saves energy while improving the lighting distribution and quality in small and medium sized USPS facilities. Work included the evolution of a novel task lighting fixture designed explicitly to improve the light distribution within the carrier case letter sorting station. The new t ask light system was developed to work in combination with a high efficiency, low-glare ambient lighting system mounted on the ceiling. The use of high-performance task lighting allowed the ambient lighting component to be reduced, thereby limiting the amount of glare produced and reducing the amount of energy consumed.

Mitchell, Jeffrey C.; Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Eric R.; Gauna, Kevin W.; Avery, Douglas A.

2000-06-01

280

Dark energy or modified gravity? An effective field theory approach  

SciTech Connect

We take an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach to unifying existing proposals for the origin of cosmic acceleration and its connection to cosmological observations. Building on earlier work where EFT methods were used with observations to constrain the background evolution, we extend this program to the level of the EFT of the cosmological perturbations — following the example from the EFT of Inflation. Within this framework, we construct the general theory around an assumed background which will typically be chosen to mimic ?CDM, and identify the parameters of interest for constraining dark energy and modified gravity models with observations. We discuss the similarities to the EFT of Inflation, but we also identify a number of subtleties including the relationship between the scalar perturbations and the Goldstone boson of the spontaneously broken time translations. We present formulae that relate the parameters of the fundamental Lagrangian to the speed of sound, anisotropic shear stress, effective Newtonian constant, and Caldwell's varpi parameter, emphasizing the connection to observations. It is anticipated that this framework will be of use in constraining individual models, as well as for placing model-independent constraints on dark energy and modified gravity model building.

Bloomfield, Jolyon; Flanagan, Éanna É. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Park, Minjoon [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Watson, Scott, E-mail: jkb84@cornell.edu, E-mail: eef3@cornell.edu, E-mail: minjoonp@physics.umass.edu, E-mail: gswatson@syr.edu [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)

2013-08-01

281

An aerodynamic load criterion for airships  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simple aerodynamic bending moment envelope is derived for conventionally shaped airships. This criterion is intended to be used, much like the Naval Architect's standard wave, for preliminary estimates of longitudinal strength requirements. It should be useful in tradeoff studies between speed, fineness ratio, block coefficient, structure weight, and other such general parameters of airship design.

Woodward, D. E.

1975-01-01

282

Unsteady aerodynamics of advanced ducted fan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-dimensional linear frequency domain panel method has been extended to study the unsteady aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, and aeroacoustics of advanced ducted fans. Additional contributions are to extend and improve previous lifting surface theory to include for stator rows and planar supersonic tip Mach numbers, and radiated noise estimation. A two-dimensional viscous wake model is incorporated to account for the influence

Wen-Liang Huang

1996-01-01

283

AERODYNAMIC CLASSIFICATION OF FIBERS WITH AEROSOL CENTRIFUGES  

EPA Science Inventory

The constituent particles of many ambient and workplace aerosols of health effects concerns are of fibrous and aggregate geometric shapes. he sites of deposition in the human respiratory system are primarily related to the mass median aerodynamic diameters of inhaled particle siz...

284

Aerodynamic characteristics of the Fiat UNO car  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to describe the work conducted in the aerodynamic field throughout the 4-year development and engineering time span required by the project of the UNO car. A description is given of all the parametric studies carried out. Through these studies two types of cars at present in production were defined and the characteristics of a

Costelli

1984-01-01

285

Micro balloon actuators for aerodynamic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

A robust, large-force, large-deflection micro balloon actuator for aerodynamic (manoeuvring) control of transonic aircraft has been developed. Using a novel process, high yield linear arrays of silicone balloons on a robust silicon substrate have been fabricated that can deflect vertically in excess of one mm. Balloon actuators have been tested under cyclic conditions to assess reliability. The actuators have been

C. Grosjean; G. B. Lee; W. Hong; Y. C. Tai; C. M. Ho

1998-01-01

286

Aircraft wake turbulence minimization by aerodynamic means  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper reviews NASA's efforts on wake vortex turbulence minimization by aerodynamic design or retrofit modifications to large transport aircraft. Theoretical and experimental (ground-based and flight) results are presented which show that the adverse effects of a vortex wake produced by a large aircraft on a small following aircraft can be reduced significantly.

Gessow, A.

1974-01-01

287

Aerodynamic heating effects on radome boresight errors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three part study was performed to analytically define an aerodynamically heated radome for supersonic homing missile applications. First, the radome was mathematically modeled and a thermal analysis was performed to define the hot radome electrical properties and its wall dimensions. Second, analyses were performed to define boresight error vs. look angle in the E and H planes for both

L. B. Weckesser; R. K. Frazer; D. J. Yost; B. E. Kuehne; G. P. Tricoles; R. Hayward; E. L. Rope

1978-01-01

288

Aerodynamic beam generator for large particles  

DOEpatents

A new type of aerodynamic particle beam generator is disclosed. This generator produces a tightly focused beam of large material particles at velocities ranging from a few feet per second to supersonic speeds, depending on the exact configuration and operating conditions. Such generators are of particular interest for use in additive fabrication techniques.

Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Dykhuizen, Ronald C. (Albuquerque, NM); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark F. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01

289

Thermal and Microcanonical Rates of Unimolecular Reactions from an Energy Diffusion Theory Approach  

E-print Network

Thermal and Microcanonical Rates of Unimolecular Reactions from an Energy Diffusion Theory Approach; In Final Form: September 13, 1999 We present an energy diffusion theory approach for computing thermal compared to the thermal energy. The weak-collision limit has been extensively studied.1-9 However

Miller, William H.

290

Full-envelope aerodynamic modeling of the Harrier aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A project to identify a full-envelope model of the YAV-8B Harrier using flight-test and parameter identification techniques is described. As part of the research in advanced control and display concepts for V/STOL aircraft, a full-envelope aerodynamic model of the Harrier is identified, using mathematical model structures and parameter identification methods. A global-polynomial model structure is also used as a basis for the identification of the YAV-8B aerodynamic model. State estimation methods are used to ensure flight data consistency prior to parameter identification.Equation-error methods are used to identify model parameters. A fixed-base simulator is used extensively to develop flight test procedures and to validate parameter identification software. Using simple flight maneuvers, a simulated data set was created covering the YAV-8B flight envelope from about 0.3 to 0.7 Mach and about -5 to 15 deg angle of attack. A singular value decomposition implementation of the equation-error approach produced good parameter estimates based on this simulated data set.

Mcnally, B. David

1986-01-01

291

Predicted and experimental aerodynamic forces on the Darrieus rotor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present paper compares the aerodynamic loads predicted by a double-multiple-streamtube model with wind tunnel measurements for a straight-bladed Darrieus rotor. Thus the CARDAA computer code uses two constant-interference factors in the induced velocity for estimating the aerodynamic loads. This code has been improved by considering the variation in the upwind and downwind induced velocities as a function of the blade position, and, in this case, the CARDAAV code is used. The Boeing-Vertol dynamic-stall model is incorporated in both the CARDAA and CARDAAV codes, and a better approach is obtained. The transient normal- and tangential-force coefficients predicted with and without dynamic-stall effects are compared with wind tunnel data for one and two NACA 0018 straight-bladed rotors. The results are given for a rotor with a large solidity (chord-to-radius ratio of 0.20) at two tip-speed ratios (X = 1.5 and 3.0) and at a low Reynolds number of 3.8 x 10 to the 4th. The comparisons between experimental data and theoretical results show the CARDAAV predictions to be more accurate than those estimated by the CARDAA code.

Paraschivoiu, I.

1983-12-01

292

An aerodynamic study on flexed blades for VAWT applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is renewed interest in aerodynamics research of VAWT rotors. Lift type, Darrieus designs sometimes use flexed blades to have an 'egg-beater shape' with an optimum Troposkien geometry to minimize the structural stress on the blades. While straight bladed VAWTs have been investigated in depth through both measurements and numerical modelling, the aerodynamics of flexed blades has not been researched with the same level of detail. Two major effects may have a substantial impact on blade performance. First, flexing at the equator causes relatively strong trailing vorticity to be released. Secondly, the blade performance at each station along the blade is influenced by self-induced velocities due to bound vorticity. The latter is not present in a straight bladed configuration. The aim of this research is to investigate these effects in relation to an innovative 4kW wind turbine concept being developed in collaboration with industry known as a self-adjusting VAWT (or SATVAWT). The approach used in this study is based on experimental and numerical work. A lifting line free-wake vortex model was developed. Wind tunnel power and hot-wire velocity measurements were performed on a scaled down, 60cm high, three bladed model in a closed wind tunnel. Results show a substantial axial wake induction at the equator resulting in a lower power generation at this position. This induction increases with increasing degree of flexure. The self-induced velocities caused by blade bound vorticity at a particular station was found to be relatively small.

Micallef, Daniel; Farrugia, Russell; Sant, Tonio; Mollicone, Pierluigi

2014-12-01

293

Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An efficient incremental-iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a 2D inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic- differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0, and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straight-forward, black-box reverse- mode application of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoint) procedures; then, a very efficient non-iterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hessian matrices) of lift, wave-drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric- shape, angle-of-attack, and freestream Mach number

Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

2001-01-01

294

Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An efficient incremental iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a two-dimensional inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0 and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straightforward, black-box reverse-mode applicaiton of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-rder aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoinct) procedures; then, a very efficient noniterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hesian matrices) of lift, wave drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric shape, angle of attack, and freestream Mach number.

Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

2003-01-01

295

Introduction to Generalized Functions with Applications in Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Generalized functions have many applications in science and engineering. One useful aspect is that discontinuous functions can be handled as easily as continuous or differentiable functions and provide a powerful tool in formulating and solving many problems of aerodynamics and acoustics. Furthermore, generalized function theory elucidates and unifies many ad hoc mathematical approaches used by engineers and scientists. We define generalized functions as continuous linear functionals on the space of infinitely differentiable functions with compact support, then introduce the concept of generalized differentiation. Generalized differentiation is the most important concept in generalized function theory and the applications we present utilize mainly this concept. First, some results of classical analysis, are derived with the generalized function theory. Other applications of the generalized function theory in aerodynamics discussed here are the derivations of general transport theorems for deriving governing equations of fluid mechanics, the interpretation of the finite part of divergent integrals, the derivation of the Oswatitsch integral equation of transonic flow, and the analysis of velocity field discontinuities as sources of vorticity. Applications in aeroacoustics include the derivation of the Kirchhoff formula for moving surfaces, the noise from moving surfaces, and shock noise source strength based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation.

Farassat, F.

1994-01-01

296

Policy approaches to renewable energy investment in the Mediterranean region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Europe's climate policy objective of 20% renewable energy by 2020, and the call by the IPCC to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050, pose major challenges for the European Union. Several policy options are available to move towards these objectives. In this paper, we will address the most critical policy and governance issues associated with one particular approach to scaling up renewable energy resources: reliance on large-scale energy generation facilities outside the European continent, such as onshore and offshore wind farms and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities in the Mediterranean region. Several feasibility studies completed over the past three years (German Aerospace Center 2006; German Aerospace Center 2005; Czisch, Elektrotechnik 2005, p. 488; Lorenz, Pinner, Seitz, McKinsey Quarterly 2008, p.10; German Aerospace Center 2005; Knies 2008, The Club of Rome; Khosla, Breaking the Climate Deadlock Briefing Papers, 2008, p.19) have convincingly demonstrated that large-scale wind and CSP projects ought to be very attractive for a number of reasons, including cost, reliability of power supply, and technological maturity. According to these studies it would be technically possible for Europe to rely on large-scale wind and CSP for the majority of its power needs by 2050—indeed enough to completely replace its reliance on fossil fuels for power generation—at competitive cost over its current, carbon intensive system. While it has been shown to be technically feasible to develop renewable resources in North Africa to account for a large share of Europe's energy needs, doing so would require sustained double digit rates of growth in generating and long-distance transmission capacity, and would potentially require a very different high voltage grid architecture within Europe. Doing so at a large scale could require enormous up-front investments in technical capacity, financial instruments and human resources. What are the policy instruments best suited to achieving such growth quickly and smoothly? What bottlenecks—in terms of supply chains, human capital, finance, and transmission capacity—need to be anticipated and addressed if the rate of capacity growth is to be sustained over several decades? What model of governance would create a safe investment climate in consistence with new EU legislation (i.e. EU Renewable Energy Directive) as well as expected post-Kyoto targets and mechanisms? The material that we present here is based on a series of workshops held between November 2008 and January 2009, in which a wide range of stakeholders expressed their views about the fundamental needs for policy intervention. Supplementing the results from these workshops have been additional expert interviews, and basic financial modeling. One of the interesting results from this research is the need for a multi-pronged approach. First, there is a need for a support scheme, potentially compatible with in all cases supplementing the EU REN Directive, that would create a stable market for North African electricity in Europe. Second, there is a need for policies that facilitate the formation of public private partnerships in North Africa, as the specific investment vehicle, as a way to manage some of the uncertainties associated with large-scale investments in the region. Third, attention has to be paid to the development of supply chains within the Mediterranean region, as a way of ensuring the compatibility of such investments with sustainable development.

Patt, A.; Komendantova, N.; Battaglini, A.; Lilliestam, J.; Williges, K.

2009-04-01

297

A Minimal Budget Approach Algorithm for Integration of Clean Energy to Electricity Systems  

E-print Network

forms of renewable energy, wind energy has some built-in advantages. One of themA Minimal Budget Approach Algorithm for Integration of Clean Energy to Electricity Systems Jinxu energy policies have been approved or are being designed to stimulate clean energy development

298

Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

Reuther, James

1996-01-01

299

Relevance of aerodynamic modelling for load reduction control strategies of two-bladed wind turbines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new load reduction concept is being developed for the two-bladed prototype of the Skywind 3.5MW wind turbine. Due to transport and installation advantages both offshore and in complex terrain two-bladed turbine designs are potentially more cost-effective than comparable three-bladed configurations. A disadvantage of two-bladed wind turbines is the increased fatigue loading, which is a result of asymmetrically distributed rotor forces. The innovative load reduction concept of the Skywind prototype consists of a combination of cyclic pitch control and tumbling rotor kinematics to mitigate periodic structural loading. Aerodynamic design tools must be able to model correctly the advanced dynamics of the rotor. In this paper the impact of the aerodynamic modelling approach is investigated for critical operational modes of a two-bladed wind turbine. Using a lifting line free wake vortex code (FVM) the physical limitations of the classical blade element momentum theory (BEM) can be evaluated. During regular operation vertical shear and yawed inflow are the main contributors to periodic blade load asymmetry. It is shown that the near wake interaction of the blades under such conditions is not fully captured by the correction models of BEM approach. The differing prediction of local induction causes a high fatigue load uncertainty especially for two-bladed turbines. The implementation of both cyclic pitch control and a tumbling rotor can mitigate the fatigue loading by increasing the aerodynamic and structural damping. The influence of the time and space variant vorticity distribution in the near wake is evaluated in detail for different cyclic pitch control functions and tumble dynamics respectively. It is demonstrated that dynamic inflow as well as wake blade interaction have a significant impact on the calculated blade forces and need to be accounted for by the aerodynamic modelling approach. Aeroelastic simulations are carried out using the high fidelity multi body simulation software SIMPACK. The aerodynamic loads are calculated using ECN's AeroModule and NREL's BEM code Aerodynl3.

Luhmann, B.; Cheng, P. W.

2014-06-01

300

Multi-Objective Six Sigma Approach Applied to Robust Airfoil Design for Mars Airplane  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new optimization approach for robust design, design for multi-objective six sigma (DFMOSS) has been developed and applied to robust aerodynamic airfoil design for Mars exploratory airplane. The present robust aerodynamic airfoil design optimization using DFMOSS successfully showed the trade-off information between maximization and robust- ness improvement in aerodynamic performance by a single optimization run without careful input parameter tuning.

Koji Shimoyama; Akira Oyama; Kozo Fujii

2007-01-01

301

Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines  

SciTech Connect

Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation`s energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). BioServe Space Technologies

1994-08-01

302

Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation's energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

Miller, M. S.; Shipley, D. E.

1994-08-01

303

Integrated Deployment Model: A Comprehensive Approach to Transforming the Energy Economy  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Integrated Deployment model to accelerate market adoption of alternative energy solutions to power homes, businesses, and vehicles through a comprehensive and aggressive approach.

Werner, M.

2010-11-01

304

Aerodynamic Simulation of Runback Ice Accretion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents the results of recent investigations into the aerodynamics of simulated runback ice accretion on airfoils. Aerodynamic tests were performed on a full-scale model using a high-fidelity, ice-casting simulation at near-flight Reynolds (Re) number. The ice-casting simulation was attached to the leading edge of a 72-in. (1828.8-mm ) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model. Aerodynamic performance tests were conducted at the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel over a Reynolds number range of 4.7?10(exp 6) to 16.0?10(exp 6) and a Mach (M) number ran ge of 0.10 to 0.28. For Re = 16.0?10(exp 6) and M = 0.20, the simulated runback ice accretion on the airfoil decreased the maximum lift coe fficient from 1.82 to 1.51 and decreased the stalling angle of attack from 18.1deg to 15.0deg. The pitching-moment slope was also increased and the drag coefficient was increased by more than a factor of two. In general, the performance effects were insensitive to Reynolds numb er and Mach number changes over the range tested. Follow-on, subscale aerodynamic tests were conducted on a quarter-scale NACA 23012 model (18-in. (457.2-mm) chord) at Re = 1.8?10(exp 6) and M = 0.18, using low-fidelity, geometrically scaled simulations of the full-scale castin g. It was found that simple, two-dimensional simulations of the upper- and lower-surface runback ridges provided the best representation of the full-scale, high Reynolds number iced-airfoil aerodynamics, whereas higher-fidelity simulations resulted in larger performance degrada tions. The experimental results were used to define a new subclassification of spanwise ridge ice that distinguishes between short and tall ridges. This subclassification is based upon the flow field and resulting aerodynamic characteristics, regardless of the physical size of the ridge and the ice-accretion mechanism.

Broeren, Andy P.; Whalen, Edward A.; Busch, Greg T.; Bragg, Michael B.

2010-01-01

305

COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO EVALUATING RELATIVE CANCER RISKS FROM ENERGY SOURCES USING SHORT-TERM GENETIC BIOASSAYS  

EPA Science Inventory

The evaluation of emissions from new energy sources has stimulated the development of new comparative approaches to health assessment studies. All energy sources that result in incomplete combustion are known to emit carcinogenic and mutagenic polynuclear aromatic compounds. Ther...

306

Recent NASA Research on Aerodynamic Modeling of Post-Stall and Spin Dynamics of Large Transport Airplanes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simulation study was conducted to investigate aerodynamic modeling methods for prediction of post-stall flight dynamics of large transport airplanes. The research approach involved integrating dynamic wind tunnel data from rotary balance and forced oscillation testing with static wind tunnel data to predict aerodynamic forces and moments during highly dynamic departure and spin motions. Several state-of-the-art aerodynamic modeling methods were evaluated and predicted flight dynamics using these various approaches were compared. Results showed the different modeling methods had varying effects on the predicted flight dynamics and the differences were most significant during uncoordinated maneuvers. Preliminary wind tunnel validation data indicated the potential of the various methods for predicting steady spin motions.

Murch, Austin M.; Foster, John V.

2007-01-01

307

Aerodynamic shape optimization of space vehicle in very-low-earth-orbit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space vehicles orbiting in Very-Low-Earth-Orbit (VLEO, h = 200˜300 km) experience considerably large aerodynamic drag due to high air-density in comparison with Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO, h = 600 ˜ 700 km). Therefore, the optimization of vehicle shape via minimization of aerodynamic drag is essential for accurate estimation of satellite lifetime and fuel budget at the design stage. In this study, the aerodynamic drag is computed with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) because even in VLEO, whose free stream Knudsen number is sufficiently large, some errors are still found in the prediction using free molecular approach. In order to find the optimized configuration, we vary the shape of frontal surface normal to the flight direction. Interestingly, the effects of such geometrical change appear distinctively depending on the gas-surface interaction (GSI, diffuse or specular) which can be represented by the thermal accommodation coefficient. The satellite aerodynamic characteristics including force, torque, and thermal loading are also identified by changing the pitch and the side angle.

Park, Jae Hyun; Myong, Rho Shin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Baek, Seung Wook

2014-12-01

308

Recent Improvements in Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Meshes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent improvements in an unstructured-grid method for large-scale aerodynamic design are presented. Previous work had shown such computations to be prohibitively long in a sequential processing environment. Also, robust adjoint solutions and mesh movement procedures were difficult to realize, particularly for viscous flows. To overcome these limiting factors, a set of design codes based on a discrete adjoint method is extended to a multiprocessor environment using a shared memory approach. A nearly linear speedup is demonstrated, and the consistency of the linearizations is shown to remain valid. The full linearization of the residual is used to precondition the adjoint system, and a significantly improved convergence rate is obtained. A new mesh movement algorithm is implemented and several advantages over an existing technique are presented. Several design cases are shown for turbulent flows in two and three dimensions.

Nielsen, Eric J.; Anderson, W. Kyle

2000-01-01

309

Aerodynamic enhancement of space transportation systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a number of recent investigations are reviewed and used to demonstrate gains in launch, orbital transfer, and planetary vehicle performance and economy that can result from the proper exploitation of aerodynamic phenomena. For launch vehicles, application of control-configured design is shown to allow substantial reduction in wing and vertical fin area (and hence, weight) while maintaining acceptable vehicle performance and control. For orbital transfer and planetary vehicles, the use of aerodynamic lift and drag to reduce retropropulsion requirements is shown to produce payload increases of up to 100 percent and to enable some planetary missions that are not feasible with all-propulsive vehicles. Finally, the application of various advanced technologies to a complete set of launch and orbit transfer vehicles in an early space industrialization mission scenario is considered.

Walberg, G. D.

1981-01-01

310

Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

Doig, G.

2014-08-01

311

Specialized computer architectures for computational aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In recent years, computational fluid dynamics has made significant progress in modelling aerodynamic phenomena. Currently, one of the major barriers to future development lies in the compute-intensive nature of the numerical formulations and the relative high cost of performing these computations on commercially available general purpose computers, a cost high with respect to dollar expenditure and/or elapsed time. Today's computing technology will support a program designed to create specialized computing facilities to be dedicated to the important problems of computational aerodynamics. One of the still unresolved questions is the organization of the computing components in such a facility. The characteristics of fluid dynamic problems which will have significant impact on the choice of computer architecture for a specialized facility are reviewed.

Stevenson, D. K.

1978-01-01

312

Aerodynamics of the Mars Microprobe Entry Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The selection of the unique aeroshell shape for the Mars Microprobes is discussed. A description of its aerodynamics in hypersonic rarefied, hypersonic continuum, supersonic and transonic flow regimes is then presented. This description is based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses in the rarefied-flow regime, thermochemical nonequilibrium Computational Fluid Dynamics in the hypersonic regime, existing wind tunnel data in the supersonic and transonic regime, additional computational work in the transonic regime, and finally, ballistic range data. The aeroshell is shown to possess the correct combination of aerodynamic stability and drag to convert the probe's initial tumbling attitude and high velocity at atmospheric-interface into the desired surface-impact orientation and velocity.

Mitcheltree, R. A.; Moss, J. N.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Greene, F. A.; Braun, R. D.

1997-01-01

313

Particle separation from a uniflow aerodynamic deduster  

SciTech Connect

A particle separation theory for uniflow aerodynamic dedusters was developed. Particle cut-size and separation efficiency were affected by many factors, such as chamber configuration, particle characteristics, and airflow patterns. A prototype aerodynamic deduster was developed based on the analysis of particle behavior in uniflow conditions. It was found that the vortex chamber length, annular tunnel space between the inside and outside cylinders, vane angle, tangential and axial air velocities, and turbulence intensities have effects on the particle cut-size and separation efficiency. A particle counter was used to measure dust concentrations upstream and downstream of the deduster. Particle separation efficiencies agreed well between the predicted and measured values. The study showed that a uniflow deduster could be effective in separating dust particles from an airstream. Further studies are needed to optimize the deduster configuration and evaluate the effect of turbulence intensity on particle separation.

Zhao, A.G.; Zhang, Y. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering

1998-10-01

314

Remarks on the theory of aerodynamic noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The accuracy of approximations employed in the Lighthill theory in current aerodynamic noise research is critically evaluated. Based on the method of matched asymptotic expansions, the full Navier-Stokes equations are expanded for small Mach numbers. To the first order, the near-field is generally nonisentropic. The pressure field (pseudo-sound) is generated by the incompressible Reynolds stresses in the turbulent flow and the velocity, pressure perturbation, and their derivatives on the boundaries. In the far-field, the first-order pressure (acoustic) field satisfying a linear wave equation is obtained by matching with the pseudo-sound field. A uniformly valid solution for the pressure field in a stationary or uniformly moving medium is obtained. The solution shows that the generation of the first-order aerodynamic noise does not depend on the viscous, thermal, or entropy effects in the adiabatic flow nor on the shear stress on a smooth rigid boundary.

Pan, Y. S.

1975-01-01

315

Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Hybridized Differential Evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses an evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution (DE) in conjunction with various hybridization strategies is described. DE is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Various hybridization strategies for DE are explored, including the use of neural networks as well as traditional local search methods. A Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the hybrid DE optimizer. The method is implemented on distributed parallel computers so that new designs can be obtained within reasonable turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. (The final paper will include at least one other aerodynamic design application). The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated.

Madavan, Nateri K.

2003-01-01

316

Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines  

SciTech Connect

The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

1981-04-01

317

Aerodynamics of intermittent bounds in flying birds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flap-bounding is a common flight style in small birds in which flapping phases alternate with flexed-wing bounds. Body lift\\u000a is predicted to be essential to making this flight style an aerodynamically attractive flight strategy. To elucidate the contributions\\u000a of the body and tail to lift and drag during the flexed-wing bound phase, we used particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measured

Bret W. Tobalske; Jason W. D. Hearn; Douglas R. Warrick

2009-01-01

318

Opportunities for aerodynamic-drag reduction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Methods for reducing aerodynamic drag to improve aircraft performance and reduce fuel consumption are discussed. The techniques considered are: (1) pressure drag reduction, (2) supercritical airfoils, (3) subcritical airfoils, (4) induced drag reduction by over-the-wing blowing and increased aspect ratio, and (5) friction drag reduction by laminar flow control and slot injection. It is stated that a 50 percent reduction from current drag values is expected through the application of these techniques.

Bower, R. E.

1975-01-01

319

Electrochemical shaping of aerodynamic seal elements  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a process of impulse electrochemical machining (cutting) of the basic functional structural elements (ridges,\\u000a combs, brushes) of aerodynamic seals used in GTEs and steam turbines is considered. Also presented are the description of\\u000a technological and design schemes of electrochemical shaping of ridges and the data on mathematical modelling and studies of\\u000a the main technological characteristics.

S. P. Pavlinich; A. R. Mannapov; N. Z. Gimaev; A. N. Zaitsev

2008-01-01

320

High angle of attack hypersonic aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new aerodynamics force model is presented which is based on modified Newtonian theory and empirical correlations. The algebraic model was developed for complete vehicles from take off to orbital speeds and for large angles of attack. Predictions are compared to results for a wind tunnel model at a Mach number of 20, and the full scale Shuttle Orbiter for Mach numbers from 0.25 to 20 for angles of attack from 0 to 50 deg. The maximum shuttle orbiter lift/drag at Mach 10 and 20 is 1.85 at 20-deg angle-of-attack. Aerodynamic force predictions are made for a transatmospheric vehicle, which is a derivative of the Shuttle Orbiter, for Mach numbers from 4 to 27 at angles of attack from 5 to 40 deg. Predicted aerodynamic force data indicate that lift/drag ratios of 5.2 at Mach number 10 and 3.6 at Mach number 26 are obtainable. Changes in force coefficients with changes in: nose angle, sweep angle, and (volume exp 2/3)/planform area are quantified for Mach numbers of 10 and 26. Lift/drag ratios increase with decreasing nose angle and (volume exp 2/3)/planform area and increasing wing sweep angle. Lift/drag ratios are independent of these variables for angles of attack in excess of 20 deg at Mach 10 and 30 deg at Mach 26.

Harloff, Gary J.

1987-01-01

321

Membrane wing aerodynamics for micro air vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aerodynamic performance of a wing deteriorates considerably as the Reynolds number decreases from 10 6 to 10 4. In particular, flow separation can result in substantial change in effective airfoil shape and cause reduced aerodynamic performance. Lately, there has been growing interest in developing suitable techniques for sustained and robust flight of micro air vehicles (MAVs) with a wingspan of 15 cm or smaller, flight speed around 10 m/ s, and a corresponding Reynolds number of 10 4-10 5. This paper reviews the aerodynamics of membrane and corresponding rigid wings under the MAV flight conditions. The membrane wing is observed to yield desirable characteristics in delaying stall as well as adapting to the unsteady flight environment, which is intrinsic to the designated flight speed. Flow structures associated with the low Reynolds number and low aspect ratio wing, such as pressure distribution, separation bubble and tip vortex are reviewed. Structural dynamics in response to the surrounding flow field is presented to highlight the multiple time-scale phenomena. Based on the computational capabilities for treating moving boundary problems, wing shape optimization can be conducted in automated manners. To enhance the lift, the effect of endplates is evaluated. The proper orthogonal decomposition method is also discussed as an economic tool to describe the flow structure around a wing and to facilitate flow and vehicle control.

Lian, Yongsheng; Shyy, Wei; Viieru, Dragos; Zhang, Baoning

2003-10-01

322

Survey of lift-fan aerodynamic technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Representatives of NASA Ames Research Center asked that a summary of technology appropriate for lift-fan powered short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft be prepared so that new programs could more easily benefit from past research efforts. This paper represents one of six prepared for that purpose. The authors have conducted or supervised the conduct of research on lift-fan powered STOVL designs and some of their important components for decades. This paper will first address aerodynamic modeling requirements for experimental programs to assure realistic, trustworthy results. It will next summarize the results or efforts to develop satisfactory specialized STOVL components such as inlets and flow deflectors. It will also discuss problems with operation near the ground, aerodynamics while under lift-fan power, and aerodynamic prediction techniques. Finally, results of studies to reduce lift-fan noise will be presented. The paper will emphasize results from large scale experiments, where available, for reasons that will be brought out in the discussion. Some work with lift-engine powered STOVL aircraft is also applicable to lift-fan technology and will be presented herein. Small-scale data will be used where necessary to fill gaps.

Hickey, David H.; Kirk, Jerry V.

1993-01-01

323

Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

Pinier, Jeremy T

2012-01-01

324

Future Challenges and Opportunities in Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Investments in aeronautics research and technology have declined substantially over the last decade, in part due to the perception that technologies required in aircraft design are fairly mature and readily available. This perception is being driven by the fact that aircraft configurations, particularly the transport aircraft, have evolved only incrementally, over last several decades. If however, one considers that the growth in air travel is expected to triple in the next 20 years, it becomes quickly obvious that the evolutionary development of technologies is not going to meet the increased demands for safety, environmental compatibility, capacity, and economic viability. Instead, breakthrough technologies will he required both in traditional disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, materials, controls, and avionics as well as in the multidisciplinary integration of these technologies into the design of future aerospace vehicles concepts. The paper discusses challenges and opportunities in the field of aerodynamics over the next decade. Future technology advancements in aerodynamics will hinge on our ability, to understand, model, and control complex, three-dimensional, unsteady viscous flow across the speed range. This understanding is critical for developing innovative flow and noise control technologies and advanced design tools that will revolutionize future aerospace vehicle systems and concepts. Specifically, the paper focuses on advanced vehicle concepts, flow and noise control technologies, and advanced design and analysis tools.

Kumar, Ajay; Hefner, Jerry N.

2000-01-01

325

Progress in Reducing Aerodynamic Drag for Higher Efficiency of Heavy Duty Trucks (Class 7-8)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. In addition, greater use of newly developed computational tools holds promise for reducing the number of prototype tests, for cutting manufacturing costs, and for reducing overall time to market. Experimental verification and validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California. Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology using state-of-the-art techniques, with the intention of implementing more complex methods in the future.

Rose McCallen; Richard Couch; Juliana Hsu; Fred Browand; Mustapha Hammache; Anthony Leonard; Mark Brady; Kambiz Salari; Walter Rutledge; James Ross; Bruce Storms; J.T. Heineck; David Driver; James Bell; Gregory Zilliac

1999-12-31

326

Preliminary Structural Sensitivity Study of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Using Probabilistic Methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Acceptance of new spacecraft structural architectures and concepts requires validated design methods to minimize the expense involved with technology validation via flighttesting. This paper explores the implementation of probabilistic methods in the sensitivity analysis of the structural response of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). HIAD architectures are attractive for spacecraft deceleration because they are lightweight, store compactly, and utilize the atmosphere to decelerate a spacecraft during re-entry. However, designers are hesitant to include these inflatable approaches for large payloads or spacecraft because of the lack of flight validation. In the example presented here, the structural parameters of an existing HIAD model have been varied to illustrate the design approach utilizing uncertainty-based methods. Surrogate models have been used to reduce computational expense several orders of magnitude. The suitability of the design is based on assessing variation in the resulting cone angle. The acceptable cone angle variation would rely on the aerodynamic requirements.

Lyle, Karen H.

2014-01-01

327

Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 4: Summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 4 of 4: Final Report- Summary.

Zilz, D. E.; Wallace, H. W.; Hiley, P. E.

1985-01-01

328

Aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An introduction to, and a broad overiew of, the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack are provided. Items include: (1) some important fundamental phenomena which determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack; (2) static and dynamic aerodynamic characteristics near the stall; (3) aerodynamics of the spin; (4) test techniques used in stall/spin studies; (5) applications of aerodynamic data to problems in flight dynamics in the stall/spin area; and (6) the outlook for future research in the area. Although stalling and spinning are flight dynamic problems of importance to all aircraft, including general aviation aircraft, commercial transports, and military airplanes, emphasis is placed on military configurations and the principle aerodynamic factors which influence the stability and control of such vehicles at high angles of attack.

Chambers, J. R.; Grafton, S. B.

1977-01-01

329

Regional Urban Planning for Energy Conservation: Alternative Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the role of urban and regional planners in redesigning land use patterns which reinforce energy conservation while preserving satisfying living conditions. A model for evaluating energy conservation planning alternatives for Perth, Australia is described. (AM)

Manohar, Shri

1982-01-01

330

Mechanism of unsteady aerodynamic heating with sudden change in surface temperature  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics and mechanism of unsteady aerodynamic heating of a transient hypersonic boundary layer caused by a sudden\\u000a change in surface temperature are studied. The complete time history of wall heat flux is presented with both analytical and\\u000a numerical approaches. With the analytical method, the unsteady compressible boundary layer equation is solved. In the neighborhood\\u000a of the initial and final

Hao Chen; Lin Bao

2009-01-01

331

Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed and implemented in the NASA unstructured grid generation code VGRID. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

2008-01-01

332

Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

Pirzadeh, Shahyar

2010-01-01

333

The energy balance of the earth' surface : a practical approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This radiation originates partly from the sun, but an~

Bruin de H. A. R

1982-01-01

334

An Asynchronous Approach to EnergyEfficient Computing and Communication  

E-print Network

special packaging and cooling. It is destructive because the high current density in the circuits may lead of Computer Science California Institute of Technology Pasadena CA 91125, USA Abstract Energy consumption of the inherent energy efficiency of today's dominant VLSI technology: CMOS. The energy requirements of high

Martin, Alain

335

Modeling energy dissipation over stepped spillways using machine learning approaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We applied ANN and GEP to predict energy dissipation over stepped spillway.For both techniques 12 same models were evaluated.We selected the best model for all kind of data to predict energy dissipation.For nappe data, drop number is effective on energy dissipation.

Roushangar, Kiyoumars; Akhgar, Samira; Salmasi, Farzin; Shiri, Jalal

2014-01-01

336

Integrated aerodynamic/structural design of a sailplane wing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using lifting-line theory and beam analysis, the geometry (planiform and twist) and composite material structural sizes (skin thickness, spar cap, and web thickness) were designed for a sailplane wing, subject to both structural and aerodynamic constraints. For all elements, the integrated design (simultaneously designing the aerodynamics and the structure) was superior in terms of performance and weight to the sequential design (where the aerodynamic geometry is designed to maximize the performance, following which a structural/aeroelastic design minimizes the weight). Integrated designs produced less rigid, higher aspect ratio wings with favorable aerodynamic/structural interactions.

Grossman, B.; Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.; Strauch, G. J.; Eppard, W. M.

1986-01-01

337

Fundamental Aspects of the Aerodynamics of Turbojet Engine Combustors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic considerations in the design of high performance combustors for turbojet engines are discussed. Aerodynamic problems concerning the preparation of the fuel-air mixture, the recirculation zone where primary combustion occurs, the secondary combustion zone, and the dilution zone were examined. An aerodynamic analysis of the entire primary chamber ensemble was carried out to determine the pressure drop between entry and exit. The aerodynamics of afterburn chambers are discussed. A model which can be used to investigate the evolution of temperature, pressure, and rate and efficiency of combustion the length of the chamber was developed.

Barrere, M.

1978-01-01

338

A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerodynamic contrails are defined in this paper as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data, first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation), and how frequently (probability) aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Finally we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally we give an argument for our believe that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

Gierens, K.; Dilger, F.

2013-06-01

339

Workshop on Aircraft Surface Representation for Aerodynamic Computation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Papers and discussions on surface representation and its integration with aerodynamics, computers, graphics, wind tunnel model fabrication, and flow field grid generation are presented. Surface definition is emphasized.

Gregory, T. J. (editor); Ashbaugh, J. (editor)

1980-01-01

340

An initial investigation into methods of computing transonic aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary accomplishments of the project are as follows: (1) Using the transonic small perturbation equation as a flowfield model, the project demonstrated that the quasi-analytical method could be used to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients for airfoils at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic conditions for design variables such as Mach number, airfoil thickness, maximum camber, angle of attack, and location of maximum camber. It was established that the quasi-analytical approach was an accurate method for obtaining aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for airfoils at transonic conditions and usually more efficient than the finite difference approach. (2) The usage of symbolic manipulation software to determine the appropriate expressions and computer coding associated with the quasi-analytical method for sensitivity derivatives was investigated. Using the three dimensional fully conservative full potential flowfield model, it was determined that symbolic manipulation along with a chain rule approach was extremely useful in developing a combined flowfield and quasi-analytical sensitivity derivative code capable of considering a large number of realistic design variables. (3) Using the three dimensional fully conservative full potential flowfield model, the quasi-analytical method was applied to swept wings (i.e. three dimensional) at transonic flow conditions. (4) The incremental iterative technique has been applied to the three dimensional transonic nonlinear small perturbation flowfield formulation, an equivalent plate deflection model, and the associated aerodynamic and structural discipline sensitivity equations; and coupled aeroelastic results for an aspect ratio three wing in transonic flow have been obtained.

Carlson, Leland A.

1994-01-01

341

Non-propulsive aerodynamic noise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the first part of the paper, the contribution of airframe noise to total aircraft noise on approach is assessed for a large current technology transport and for the same airframe powered with bypass ratio 10 engines with an additional 5 dB noise suppression applied to the fan and turbine noise sources. The airframe noise of the envisioned advanced subsonic transport is 2 EPNdB less than the largest contributor to the total aircraft noise, the fan inlet. The noise impact of the airframe noise, as measured by noise contour area, is 1/4 that of fan noise. Further fan noise reduction efforts should not view airframe noise as an absolute noise floor. In the second part of the paper, the results from one recent cavity noise wind tunnel experiment is reported. A cavity of dimensions 11.25 in. (28.58 cm) long, 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) wide, and variable depth was tested in the Mach number range of .20 through .90. Reynolds number varied from 5 to 100 million per foot (16 to 328 million per meter). The 1/d ratio was varied from 4.4 to 20.0. The model was tested at yaw angles from 0 to 15 degrees. In general, the deeper the cavity, the greater the amplitude of the acoustic tones. Reynolds number appeared to have little effect on acoustic tone amplitudes. Tone amplitude and bandwidth changed with Mach number. The effect of yaw on acoustic tones varied with Reynolds number, Mach number, 1/h, and mode number. At Mach number 0.90, increased yaw shifted the tone frequencies of the higher modal frequencies to lower frequencies. As cavity depth decreased, the effect of yaw decreased.

Willshire, William L., Jr.; Tracy, Maureen B.

1992-04-01

342

The Engineered Approach to Energy and Maintenance Effective Steam Trapping  

E-print Network

The engineered approach to steam trap sizing, selection and application has proven effective in significantly reducing a plant's fuel consumption, maintenance and trap replacement costs while improving thermal efficiency and overall steam system...

Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

1980-01-01

343

Energy use and emissions from marine vessels: a total fuel life cycle approach.  

PubMed

Regional and global air pollution from marine transportation is a growing concern. In discerning the sources of such pollution, researchers have become interested in tracking where along the total fuel life cycle these emissions occur. In addition, new efforts to introduce alternative fuels in marine vessels have raised questions about the energy use and environmental impacts of such fuels. To address these issues, this paper presents the Total Energy and Emissions Analysis for Marine Systems (TEAMS) model. TEAMS can be used to analyze total fuel life cycle emissions and energy use from marine vessels. TEAMS captures "well-to-hull" emissions, that is, emissions along the entire fuel pathway, including extraction, processing, distribution, and use in vessels. TEAMS conducts analyses for six fuel pathways: (1) petroleum to residual oil, (2) petroleum to conventional diesel, (3) petroleum to low-sulfur diesel, (4) natural gas to compressed natural gas, (5) natural gas to Fischer-Tropsch diesel, and (6) soybeans to biodiesel. TEAMS calculates total fuel-cycle emissions of three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane) and five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters of 10 microm or less, and sulfur oxides). TEAMS also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption associated with each of its six fuel cycles. TEAMS can be used to study emissions from a variety of user-defined vessels. This paper presents TEAMS and provides example modeling results for three case studies using alternative fuels: a passenger ferry, a tanker vessel, and a container ship. PMID:17269235

Winebrake, James J; Corbett, James J; Meyer, Patrick E

2007-01-01

344

Decaborane, an alternative approach to ultra low energy ion implantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ion beams of decaborane (B10H14) are used to form ultra shallow p-type junctions in Si. Because the ion energy is partitioned between the atoms of the molecule, B atoms are implanted with only approximately one tenth of the energy of the beam. Thus severe problems created by the space charge of ultra low energy (ULE) ion beams are minimized. Moreover,

D. C. Jacobson; K. Bourdelle; H.-J. Gossmann; M. Sosnowski; M. A. Albano; V. Babaram; J. M. Poate; A. Agarwal; A. Perel; T. Horsky

2000-01-01

345

Maximum energy yield approach for CPV tracker design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Foton HC Systems has developed a new CPV tracker model, specially focused on its tracking efficiency and the effect of the tracker control techniques on the final energy yield of the system. This paper presents the theoretical work carried out into determining the energy yield for a CPV system, and illustrates the steps involved in calculating and understanding how energy consumption for tracking is opposed to tracker pointing errors. Additionally, the expressions to compute the optimum parameters are presented and discussed.

Aldaiturriaga, E.; González, O.; Castro, M.

2012-10-01

346

New approach to calculating the potential energy of colliding nuclei  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The differential method proposed by the present authors earlier for the reduction of volume integrals in calculating the potential energy of a compound nucleus is generalized to the case of two interacting nuclei. The Coulomb interaction energy is obtained for the cases of a sharp and a diffuse boundary of nuclei, while the nuclear interaction energy is found only for nuclei with a sharp boundary, the finiteness of the nuclear-force range being taken into account. The present method of calculations permits reducing the time it takes to compute the potential energy at least by two orders of magnitude.

Kurmanov, R. S.; Kosenko, G. I.

2014-12-01

347

Wing kinematics measurement and aerodynamics of hovering droneflies.  

PubMed

The time courses of wing and body kinematics of three freely hovering droneflies (Eristalis tenax) were measured using 3D high-speed video, and the morphological parameters of the wings and body of the insects were also measured. The measured wing kinematics was used in a Navier-Stokes solver to compute the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the insects. The time courses of the geometrical angle of attack and the deviation angle of the wing are considerably different from that of fruit flies recently measured using the same approach. The angle of attack is approximately constant in the mid portions of a half-stroke (a downstroke or upstroke) and varies rapidly during the stroke reversal. The deviation angle is relatively small and is higher at the beginning and the end of a half-stroke and lower at the middle of the half-stroke, giving a shallow U-shaped wing-tip trajectory. For all three insects considered, the computed vertical force is approximately equal to the insect weight (the difference is less than 6% of the weight) and the computed horizontal force and pitching moment about the center of mass of the insect are approximately zero. The computed results satisfying the equilibrium flight conditions, especially the moment balance condition, validate the computation model. The lift principle is mainly used to produce the weight-supporting vertical force, unlike the fruit flies who use both lift and drag principles to generate the vertical force; the vertical force is mainly due to the delayed stall mechanism. The magnitude of the inertia power is larger than that of the aerodynamic power, and the largest possible effect of elastic storage amounts to a reduction of flight power by around 40%, much larger than in the case of the fruit fly. PMID:18552290

Liu, Yanpeng; Sun, Mao

2008-07-01

348

An investigation on the main influencing dynamics in renewable energy development: A systems approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Renewable energies will have a significant share in the future world's energy portfolio. Hence, optimum policy making to develop renewable energies' market is of high importance. To do so, obtaining comprehensive, integrated, and appropriate understanding of dynamics of the development is necessary for decision makers. This paper is to make that understanding through a systems approach. Using causal loop diagram,

Seyed Hossein Hosseini; Seyed Farid Ghaderi; G. Hamed Shakouri

2012-01-01

349

Computational Approach in Determination of {sup 233}U and {sup 233}Th Fermi Energy  

SciTech Connect

There are several methods to get Fermi energy such as hermit polynomial expansion and Wigner-Kirkwood expansion, these are analytical method. In this paper will be discussed numerical approach of calculating Fermi energy of {sup 233}Th and {sup 233}U nuclei. Our work demonstrates the simple technique of determining Fermi energy.

Kurniadi, R.; Perkasa, Y. S.; Waris, A. [Nuclear Physics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-12-23

350

Studies on free energy calculations. II. A theoretical approach to molecular solvation  

E-print Network

Studies on free energy calculations. II. A theoretical approach to molecular solvation Haluk Resat methods of performing the thermodynamic integration in solvation free energy calculations are also at the particle creation limit in obtaining quantitatively reliable results for the solvation free energies. I

Mezei, Mihaly

351

Using a Practical Approach to Energy Management to Get it Done  

E-print Network

The Wisconsin Focus on Energy program saw a need in 2002 to develop a template for energy management so that companies could easily implement a systematic and continual improvement approach to manage their energy. To meet this need the Focus program...

Nicol, J.; Dantoin, T.

2008-01-01

352

Flipperons for Improved Aerodynamic Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightweight, piezoelectrically actuated bending flight-control surfaces have shown promise as means of actively controlling airflows to improve the performances of transport airplanes. These bending flight-control surfaces are called flipperons because they look somewhat like small ailerons, but, unlike ailerons, are operated in an oscillatory mode reminiscent of the actions of biological flippers. The underlying concept of using flipperons and other flipperlike actuators to impart desired characteristics to flows is not new. Moreover, elements of flipperon-based active flow-control (AFC) systems for aircraft had been developed previously, but it was not until the development reported here that the elements have been integrated into a complete, controllable prototype AFC system for wind-tunnel testing to enable evaluation of the benefits of AFC for aircraft. The piezoelectric actuator materials chosen for use in the flipperons are single- crystal solid solutions of lead zinc niobate and lead titanate, denoted generically by the empirical formula (1-x)[Pb(Zn(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3]:x[PbTiO3] (where x<1) and popularly denoted by the abbreviation PZN-PT. These are relatively newly recognized piezoelectric materials that are capable of strain levels exceeding 1 percent and strain-energy densities 5 times greater than those of previously commercially available piezoelectric materials. Despite their high performance levels, (1-x)[Pb(Zn(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3]:x[PbTiO3] materials have found limited use until now because, relative to previously commercially available piezoelectric materials, they tend to be much more fragile.

Mabe, James H.

2008-01-01

353

A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation), and how frequently (probability) aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

Gierens, K.; Dilger, F.

2013-11-01

354

An Integrated Approach to an Energy Efficient House  

Microsoft Academic Search

An energy efficient house has been built in Tasmania. It uses nearly 80% less conventional energy than an average house in the region. The intention of the designer was to demonstrate that if such a house could operate successfully in the coldest state of Australia, similar or even better results could be achieved in other temperate regions of the country.Active

Allan Rodger; Shailaja Divakarla

1994-01-01

355

A Data Envelopment Analysis Approach to Prioritize Renewable Energy Technologies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Due to growing financial and environmental concerns, governmental rules, regulations and incentives alternative energy sources will soon grow at a much faster pace than conventional sources of energy. However, the current body of research providing comparative decision making models that either rank...

356

Energy Conservation Education. An Action Approach. Grades 4-9.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seventeen lessons are provided in this curriculum designed to involve students (grades 4-9) in energy conservation. The lessons are presented in four parts. The three lessons in part I are intended to give students a preliminary conceptual framework for energy conservation and to motivate them to participate in the conservation-action projects…

Zamm, Michael; Samuel, Barry C.

357

Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in a similar manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminated plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary design optimization application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

Samareh, Jamshid A.

2000-01-01

358

Energy release rate by a shape design sensitivity approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new method for deriving and calculating the energy release rate is presented. The energy variation due to virtual crack extension is treated as a change in shape of the cracked body. Considering body forces and no traction on the crack surface, the energy release rate is derived in variational form using the material derivative. If body forces are constant in a homogeneous body, the resulting equation for the energy release rate is a path-independent domain integral which can exclude the crack tip region, thereby improving the numerical accuracy of the energy release rate computation. In the absence of body forces, the derived equation is shown to be equal to the J-integral. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method compared to existing methods, even for relatively coarse finite element meshes.

Lee, Tae W.; Grosse, Ian R.

1993-03-01

359

Alternative Approaches to Calculate Benefits of an Energy Imbalance Market With Wind and Solar Energy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The anticipated increase in variable generation in the Western Interconnection over the next several years has raised concerns about how to maintain system balance, especially in smaller Balancing Authority Areas (BAAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. The consequent increase in variability and uncertainty that must be managed by the conventional generation fleet and responsive loads has resulted in a proposal for an Energy Imbalance Market (EIM). This paper extends prior work to estimate the reserve requirements for regulation, spinning, and non-spinning reserves with and without the EIM. We also discuss alternative approaches to allocating reserve requirements and show that some apparently attractive allocation methods have undesired consequences.

Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

2012-06-01

360

March 2000 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic DragL Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions  

SciTech Connect

A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on March 16, 2000. The purpose of the meeting was to present technical details on the experimental and computational plans and approaches and provide an update on progress in the analysis of experimental results, model developments, simulations, and an investigation of an aerodynamic device. The focus of the meeting was a review of University of Southern California's (USC) experimental plans and results, NASA Ames experimental plans, the computational results from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the integrated tractor-trailer benchmark geometry called the Ground Transportation System (GTS) Model, and turbulence model development and benchmark simulation for a rounded cube from California Institute of Technology (Caltech). Much of the meeting discussion involved deficiencies in commercial software, needed modeling improvements, and the importance of detailed data for code validation. The present and projected budget and funding situation was also discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), LLNL, SNL, NASA Ames, USC, and Caltech. Representatives from Argonne National Laboratory also participated via telephone. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items. There were 3 major issues raised at the meeting. (1) Our funding is inadequate to satisfy industries request for high Reynolds number experimentation and computation. Plans are to respond to the DOD and DOE requests for proposals, which require a 50-50 cost share with industry, to acquire funding for high Reynolds number experiments at NASA Ames. (2) The deficiencies in commercial software, the need for model improvements and validation, and the unavailability of a detailed database for advanced model validation needs to be recognized. (3) The need for industrial collaboration appears to be a requirement for acquiring funding.

McCallen, R.; Flowers, D.; Dunn, T.; Owens, J.; Browand, F.; Hammache, M.; Loenard, A.; Brady, M.; Salari, K.; Rutledge, W.; Scheckler, R.; Ross, J.; Storms, B.; Heineck, J.T.; Arledge, T

2000-05-15

361

Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

2014-02-24

362

Sensor Systems Collect Critical Aerodynamics Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the support of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Dryden Flight Research Center, Tao of Systems Integration Inc. developed sensors and other components that will ultimately form a first-of-its-kind, closed-loop system for detecting, measuring, and controlling aerodynamic forces and moments in flight. The Hampton, Virginia-based company commercialized three of the four planned components, which provide sensing solutions for customers such as Boeing, General Electric, and BMW and are used for applications such as improving wind turbine operation and optimizing air flow from air conditioning systems. The completed system may one day enable flexible-wing aircraft with flight capabilities like those of birds.

2010-01-01

363

Dual nozzle aerodynamic and cooling analysis study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analytical models to predict performance and operating characteristics of dual nozzle concepts were developed and improved. Aerodynamic models are available to define flow characteristics and bleed requirements for both the dual throat and dual expander concepts. Advanced analytical techniques were utilized to provide quantitative estimates of the bleed flow, boundary layer, and shock effects within dual nozzle engines. Thermal analyses were performed to define cooling requirements for baseline configurations, and special studies of unique dual nozzle cooling problems defined feasible means of achieving adequate cooling.

Meagher, G. M.

1981-01-01

364

Binding energies of even-even superheavy nuclei in a semi-microscopic approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The structure of some even-even superheavy nuclei with the proton number Z = 98-120 is studied using a semi-microscopic but not self-consistent model. The macroscopic energy part is obtained from the Skyrme nucleon-nucleon interaction in the semi-classical extended Thomas-Fermi approach. A simple but accurate method is derived for calculating the direct part of the Coulomb energy. The microscopic shell plus pairing energy corrections are calculated from the traditional Strutinsky method. Within this semi-microscopic approach, the total energy curves with the quadrupole deformation of the studied superheavy nuclei were calculated. The same approach features the well known 208Pb or 238U nuclei. For each nucleus the model predictions for the binding energy, the deformation parameters, the half-density radii and comparison with other theoretical models are made. The calculated binding energies are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

Ismail, M.; Ellithi, A. Y.; Botros, M. M.; Adel, A.

2010-10-01

365

Exploring an integrated approach to utilize indigenous renewable energy to improve energy self-sufficiency and emission reduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores an integrated approach to utilize indigenous renewable energy to improve energy self-sufficiency and emission reduction in the rural households of Guangxi province in China. A simple cost-benefit simulation model is constructed to (i) analyze the financial and environmental cost under the present rural consumption structure; (ii) analyze the economic and environmental cost and benefits of utilizing rural

Sufang Zhang; Liwen Fu

2011-01-01

366

The Influence of Windshield on Aerodynamic Performance of VAWT  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the reason is analyzed that the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is always with low efficiency, on the basis that a new type of VAWT with windshield is proposed. Geometry of windshield has great influence on aerodynamic performance. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is introduced to investigate its aerodynamic performance. The results indicate that the new

Hu Yonghai; Tong Zhengming

2009-01-01

367

Aerodynamics at the Particle Level C. A. Crummer  

E-print Network

Aerodynamics at the Particle Level C. A. Crummer Preface The purpose of this work is to examine into modern aerodynamic design but physicists have not developed a tractable mathematics to describe can be assumed incompressible and non-viscous because compression heating and viscous interactions

Belanger, David P.

368

Aerodynamic Effects in a Dropped Ping-Pong Ball Experiment*  

E-print Network

Aerodynamic Effects in a Dropped Ping-Pong Ball Experiment* MARK NAGURKA Dept. of Mechanical addresses aerodynamic modeling issues related to a simple experiment in which a ping- pong ball is dropped) between bounce sounds, after a ping-pong ball is dropped onto a hard table surface. (Musician Arthur

Nagurka, Mark L.

369

Spaceplane aerodynamic heating and thermal protection design method  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the first phase of concept design of spaceplanes, parametric studies and optimization for the various body configurations and trajectories are needed. For that purpose, the aerodynamic heating is predicted by a simple method. The wall temperature is estimated from the predicted aerodynamic heating against the various wall thickness and coolant heat transfer coefficients. A method for designing a thermal

Hirotoshi Kubota; Norihiko Itoda; Kiyoshi Yamamoto; Yukimitsu Yamamoto

1990-01-01

370

Modeling Helicopter Rotor Blade Flapping Motion Considering Nonlinear Aerodynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The flapping equation for a rotating rigid helicopter blade is typically derived by con- sidering 1) small flap angle, 2) small induced an- gle of attack and 3) linear aerodynamics. How- ever, the use of nonlinear aerodynamics can make the assumptions of small angles suspect. A gen- eral equation describing helicopter blade flap dy- namics for large flap angle and

Jyoti Ranjan Majhi; Ranjan Ganguli

2008-01-01

371

A unified approach for low-energy nuclear reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the dynamic polarization potential (DPP) due to the coupling to collective states, which is an important element in a unified approach to describe all the different types of nuclear reaction processes. The construction of the nonlocal and l-dependent DPP is based on the projection operator formalism of Feshbach. Dispersion relations between real and imaginary parts are discussed. We

B. T. Kim; T. Udagawa

1992-01-01

372

Sustainable approach to achieving energy efficiency in manufacturing operations  

E-print Network

Energy management in industrial facilities is becoming increasingly popular as firms attempt to become more environmentally responsible and reduce cost by improving operational efficiency. Raytheon is a leader in their ...

McKenney, Kurtis G. (Kurtis Gifford), 1979-

2012-01-01

373

Interacting holographic dark energy models: A general approach  

E-print Network

Dark energy models inspired by the cosmological holographic principle are studied in homogeneous isotropic spacetime with a general choice for the dark energy density $\\rho_d=3(\\alpha H^2+\\beta\\dot{H})$. Special choices of the parameters enable us to obtain three different holographic models, including the holographic Ricci dark energy(RDE) model. Effect of interaction between dark matter and dark energy on the dynamics of those models are investigated for different popular forms of interaction. It is found that crossing of phantom divide can be avoided in RDE models for $\\beta>0.5$ irrespective of the presence of interaction. A choice of $\\alpha=1$ and $\\beta=2/3$ leads to a varying $\\Lambda$-like model introducing an IR cutoff length $\\Lambda^{-1/2}$. It is concluded that among the popular choices an interaction of the form $Q\\propto H\\rho_m$ suits the best in avoiding the coincidence problem in this model.

Som, S

2014-01-01

374

Interacting holographic dark energy models: a general approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dark energy models inspired by the cosmological holographic principle are studied in homogeneous isotropic spacetime with a general choice for the dark energy density . Special choices of the parameters enable us to obtain three different holographic models, including the holographic Ricci dark energy (RDE) model. Effect of interaction between dark matter and dark energy on the dynamics of those models are investigated for different popular forms of interaction. It is found that crossing of phantom divide can be avoided in RDE models for ?>0.5 irrespective of the presence of interaction. A choice of ?=1 and ?=2/3 leads to a varying ?-like model introducing an IR cutoff length ? -1/2. It is concluded that among the popular choices an interaction of the form Q? H? m suits the best in avoiding the coincidence problem in this model.

Som, S.; Sil, A.

2014-08-01

375

Product Design for Energy: An Inverted Pyramid Approach  

E-print Network

. Casting a product possessing complex geometrical features may result in postoperative machining, thus leading to increased overall energy consumption. The same principle applies to formed products. Low production volumes can be targeted by machining...

Gopalakrishnan, B.; Alkadi, N. M.; Plummer, R. W.

376

A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO COMPARING COSMIC RAY ENERGY SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

A common problem in ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics is the comparison of energy spectra. The question is whether the spectra from two experiments or two regions of the sky agree within their statistical and systematic uncertainties. We develop a method to directly compare energy spectra for ultra-high energy cosmic rays from two different regions of the sky in the same experiment without reliance on agreement with a theoretical model of the energy spectra. The consistency between the two spectra is expressed in terms of a Bayes factor, defined here as the ratio of the likelihood of the two-parent source hypothesis to the likelihood of the one-parent source hypothesis. Unlike other methods, for example {chi}{sup 2} tests, the Bayes factor allows for the calculation of the posterior odds ratio and correctly accounts for non-Gaussian uncertainties. The latter is particularly important at the highest energies, where the number of events is very small.

BenZvi, S. Y.; Pfendner, C. G.; Westerhoff, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Connolly, B. M. [Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

2011-09-01

377

A thermodynamic approach to energy transduction in mitochondria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A model based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics has been extended for investigation of energy transduction in biological systems. Rate of free energy loss and efficiency of some mitochondria in energetic and thermogenic modes have been determined by means of this model. The theoretical results are in agreement with previous experimental ones indicating that the rate of free energy loss is greater in mitochondria with thermogenic function while the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation appears to be less than energetic ones. Therefore, the model illustrates the principle that mitochondria with energetic role are able to store more energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), while mitochondria with thermogenic function release more energy as heat and are thus less efficient in energy storage. Furthermore, the model introduces some thermodynamic criteria that can provide valuable information on whether the mitochondrion is functioning properly. After evaluation of some parameters for each mitochondrion, these criteria can be easily determined by means of the presented equations. Hence, the developed model can be widely used in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological studies.

Golfar, Bahareh; Nosrati, Mohsen; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

2010-04-01

378

CFD Assessment of Aerodynamic Degradation of a Subsonic Transport Due to Airframe Damage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational study is presented to assess the utility of two NASA unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solvers for capturing the degradation in static stability and aerodynamic performance of a NASA General Transport Model (GTM) due to airframe damage. The approach is to correlate computational results with a substantial subset of experimental data for the GTM undergoing progressive losses to the wing, vertical tail, and horizontal tail components. The ultimate goal is to advance the probability of inserting computational data into the creation of advanced flight simulation models of damaged subsonic aircraft in order to improve pilot training. Results presented in this paper demonstrate good correlations with slope-derived quantities, such as pitch static margin and static directional stability, and incremental rolling moment due to wing damage. This study further demonstrates that high fidelity Navier-Stokes flow solvers could augment flight simulation models with additional aerodynamic data for various airframe damage scenarios.

Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Morrison, Joseph H.

2010-01-01

379

Sand transverse dune aerodynamics: 3D Coherent Flow Structures from a computational study  

E-print Network

The engineering interest about dune fields is dictated by the their interaction with a number of human infrastructures in arid environments. The aerodynamic behaviour of sand dunes in atmospheric boundary layer belongs to the class of bluff bodies. Because of their simple geometry and their frequent occurrence in desert area, transverse sand dunes are usually adopted in literature as a benchmark to investigate dune aerodynamics by means of both computational or experimental approach, usually in nominally 2D setups. The writers suspect the flow in the wake is characterised by 3D features and affected by wind tunnel setup - e.g. blockage effect, duct side wall boundary layer, incoming velocity profile - when experimental studies are carried out. The present study aims at evaluating the 3D flow features of an idealised transverse dune under different setup conditions by means of computational simulations and to compare the obtained results with experimental measurements.

Bruno, Luca

2015-01-01

380

Incompressible lifting-surface aerodynamics for a rotor-stator combination  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current literature on the three dimensional flow through compressor cascades deals with a row of rotor blades in isolation. Since the distance between the rotor and stator is usually 10 to 20 percent of the blade chord, the aerodynamic interference between them has to be considered for a proper evaluation of the aerothermodynamic performance of the stage. A unified approach to the aerodynamics of the incompressible flow through a stage is presented that uses the lifting surface theory for a compressor cascade of arbitrary camber and thickness distribution. The effects of rotor stator interference are represented as a linear function of the rotor and stator flows separately. The loading distribution on the rotor and stator flows separately. The loading distribution on the rotor and stator blades and the interference factor are determined concurrently through a matrix iteration process.

Ramachandra, S. M.

1984-01-01

381

FY 2004 Annual Report: DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate potential of new drag-reduction devices. The approaches used were: (1) Develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools; (2) Through an extensive experimental effort, generate an experimental data base for code validation; (3) Using experimental data base, validate computations; (4) Provide industry with design guidance and insight into flow phenomena from experiments and computations; and (5) Investigate aero devices (e.g., base flaps, tractor-trailer gap stabilizer, underbody skirts and wedges, blowing and acoustic devices), provide industry with conceptual designs of drag reducing devices, and demonstrate the full-scale fuel economy potential of these devices.

McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Whittaker, K; DeChant, L J; Roy, C J; Payne, J L; Hassan, B; Pointer, W D; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Englar, R; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatelain, P

2004-11-18

382

Lateral density variations in elastic Earth models from an extended minimum energy approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kaula's minimum energy approach was extended to include the nonhydrostatic gravitational potential energy and the density perturbation field was obtained to degree and order eight. The depth profiles for the density perturbation show a stratification with density excesses and deficiencies alternating with depth. The addition of the gravitational potential energy in the minimization process does not change significantly the conclusions based on results for the minimum shear strain energy case, concerning the inability of the mantle to withstand the lateral loading elastically.

Sanchez, B. V.

1980-01-01

383

Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The traditional view of aeolian sand transport generally estimates flux from the perspective of aerodynamic forces creating the airborne grain population, although it has been recognized that "reptation" causes a significant part of the total airborne flux; reptation involves both ballistic injection of grains into the air stream by the impact of saltating grains as well as the "nudging" of surface grains into a creeping motion. Whilst aerodynamic forces may initiate sand motion, it is proposed here that within a fully-matured grain cloud, flux is actually governed by two thresholds: an aerodynamic threshold, and a bed-dilatancy threshold. It is the latter which controls the reptation population, and its significance increases proportionally with transport energy. Because we only have experience with terrestrial sand transport, extrapolations of aeolian theory to Mars and Venus have adjusted only the aerodynamic factor, taking gravitational forces and atmospheric density as the prime variables in the aerodynamic equations, but neglecting reptation. The basis for our perspective on the importance of reptation and bed dilatancy is a set of experiments that were designed to simulate sand transport across the surface of a martian dune. Using a modified sporting crossbow in which a sand-impelling sabot replaced the bolt-firing mechanism, individual grains of sand were fired at loose sand targets with glancing angles typical of saltation impact; grains were projected at about 80 m/s to simulate velocities commensurate with those predicted for extreme martian aeolian conditions. The sabot impelling method permitted study of individual impacts without the masking effect of bed mobilization encountered in wind-tunnel studies. At these martian impact velocities, grains produced small craters formed by the ejection of several hundred grains from the bed. Unexpectedly, the craters were not elongated, despite glancing impact; the craters were very close to circular in planform. High-speed photography showed them to grow in both diameter and depth after the impactor had ricochetted from the crater site. The delayed response of the bed was "explosive" in nature, and created a miniature ejecta curtain spreading upward and outward for many centimeters for impact of 100-300 micron-diameter grains into similar material. Elastic energy deposited in the bed by the impacting grain creates a subsurface stress regime or "quasi-Boussinesq" compression field. Elastic recovery of the bed occurs by dilatancy; shear stresses suddenly convert the grains from closed to open packing, and grains are consequently able to eject themselves forcefully from the impact site. Random jostling of the grains causes radial homogenization of stress vectors and a resulting circular crater. There is a great temptation to draw parallels with cratering produced by meteorite impacts, but a rigorous search for common modelling ground between the two phenomena has not been conducted at this time. For every impact of an aerodynamically energized grain, there are several hundred grains ejected into the wind for the high-energy transport that might occur on Mars. Many of these grains will themselves become subject to the boundary layer's aerodynamic lift forces (their motion will not immediately die and add to the creep population), and these grains will become indistinguishable from those lifted entirely by aerodynamic forces. As each grain impacts the bed, it will eject even more grains into the flow. A cascading effect will take place, but because it must be finite in its growth, damping will occur as the number of grains set in motion causes mid-air collisions that prevent much of the impact energy from reaching the surface of the bed -thus creating a dynamic equilibrium in a high-density saltation cloud. It is apparent that for a given impact energy, the stress field permits a smaller volume of grains to convert to open packing as the size of the bed grains increases, or as the energy of the "percussive" grain decreases

Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

1999-09-01

384

Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The traditional view of aeolian sand transport generally estimates flux from the perspective of aerodynamic forces creating the airborne grain population, although it has been recognized that "reptation" causes a significant part of the total airborne flux; reptation involves both ballistic injection of grains into the air stream by the impact of saltating grains as well as the "nudging" of surface grains into a creeping motion. Whilst aerodynamic forces may initiate sand motion, it is proposed here that within a fully-matured grain cloud, flux is actually governed by two thresholds: an aerodynamic threshold, and a bed-dilatancy threshold. It is the latter which controls the reptation population, and its significance increases proportionally with transport energy. Because we only have experience with terrestrial sand transport, extrapolations of aeolian theory to Mars and Venus have adjusted only the aerodynamic factor, taking gravitational forces and atmospheric density as the prime variables in the aerodynamic equations, but neglecting reptation. The basis for our perspective on the importance of reptation and bed dilatancy is a set of experiments that were designed to simulate sand transport across the surface of a martian dune. Using a modified sporting crossbow in which a sand-impelling sabot replaced the bolt-firing mechanism, individual grains of sand were fired at loose sand targets with glancing angles typical of saltation impact; grains were projected at about 80 m/s to simulate velocities commensurate with those predicted for extreme martian aeolian conditions. The sabot impelling method permitted study of individual impacts without the masking effect of bed mobilization encountered in wind-tunnel studies. At these martian impact velocities, grains produced small craters formed by the ejection of several hundred grains from the bed. Unexpectedly, the craters were not elongated, despite glancing impact; the craters were very close to circular in planform. High-speed photography showed them to grow in both diameter and depth after the impactor had ricochetted from the crater site. The delayed response of the bed was "explosive" in nature, and created a miniature ejecta curtain spreading upward and outward for many centimeters for impact of 100-300 micron-diameter grains into similar material. Elastic energy deposited in the bed by the impacting grain creates a subsurface stress regime or "quasi-Boussinesq" compression field. Elastic recovery of the bed occurs by dilatancy; shear stresses suddenly convert the grains from closed to open packing, and grains are consequently able to eject themselves forcefully from the impact site. Random jostling of the grains causes radial homogenization of stress vectors and a resulting circular crater. There is a great temptation to draw parallels with cratering produced by meteorite impacts, but a rigorous search for common modelling ground between the two phenomena has not been conducted at this time. For every impact of an aerodynamically energized grain, there are several hundred grains ejected into the wind for the high-energy transport that might occur on Mars. Many of these grains will themselves become subject to the boundary layer's aerodynamic lift forces (their motion will not immediately die and add to the creep population), and these grains will become indistinguishable from those lifted entirely by aerodynamic forces. As each grain impacts the bed, it will eject even more grains into the flow. A cascading effect will take place, but because it must be finite in its growth, damping will occur as the number of grains set in motion causes mid-air collisions that prevent much of the impact energy from reaching the surface of the bed -thus creating a dynamic equilibrium in a high-density saltation cloud. It is apparent that for a given impact energy, the stress field permits a smaller volume of grains to convert to open packing as the size of the bed grains increases, or as the energy of the "percussive" grain decreases

Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

1999-01-01

385

Energy resolution of silicon detectors: approaching the physical limit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work gives a review about the response of silicon detectors to electrons, protons, deuterons and alpha particles. The detector nonlinearity (pulse height as a function of particle energy) and the shape of the response function (pulse height distribution for monoenergetic particles) are discussed in detail. For electrons, the measured nonlinearity is found to be negligible within the experimental uncertainties. The response function of a particle implanted and passivated silicon detector (PIPS) for electrons (200 to 1000 keV) is measured with thin radionuclide sources of conversion electrons. From these measurements an accurate value of the Fano factor is derived. For light ions (protons, deuterons and helium ions), measurements are compared to calculations using a detector model, which assumes a thin dead layer at the front contact, followed by a fully sensitive region. This model takes into account electronic energy loss straggling in the dead layer, thickness variations of the dead layer, multiple scattering and nonelectronic losses in the sensitive region, electron-hole pair statistics, a particle dependence of the energy per electron-hole pair and electronic resolution. For H and He ions, at low energies (40 to 700 keV) the nonlinearity is mainly due to the finite thickness of the dead layer, and in the MeV range the particle dependence of the energy per electron-hole pair contributes considerably, in accordance with the model of Lennard. Measurements of the response function for monoenergetic He ions yield a detector resolution of 8 keV (FWHM) in the energy range 3 to 6 MeV. The well known asymmetric shape of the response function is found for both, H and He ions, at all energies. Using our detector model, calculated spectra agree quantitatively with the corresponding measurements both in the width and in the shape, without any adjustable parameter in the calculations. Based on this detector model, the ultimate resolution which can be obtained with silicon detectors is discussed.

Steinbauer, E.; Bauer, P.; Geretschläger, M.; Bortels, G.; Biersack, J. P.; Burger, P.

1994-03-01

386

Aerodynamics of Stardust Sample Return Capsule  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Successful return of interstellar dust and cometary material by the Stardust Sample Return Capsule requires an accurate description of the Earth entry vehicle's aerodynamics. This description must span the hypersonic-rarefied, hypersonic-continuum, supersonic, transonic, and subsonic flow regimes. Data from numerous sources are compiled to accomplish this objective. These include Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses, thermochemical nonequilibrium computational fluid dynamics, transonic computational fluid dynamics, existing wind tunnel data, and new wind tunnel data. Four observations are highlighted: 1) a static instability is revealed in the free-molecular and early transitional-flow regime due to aft location of the vehicle s center-of-gravity, 2) the aerodynamics across the hypersonic regime are compared with the Newtonian flow approximation and a correlation between the accuracy of the Newtonian flow assumption and the sonic line position is noted, 3) the primary effect of shape change due to ablation is shown to be a reduction in drag, and 4) a subsonic dynamic instability is revealed which will necessitate either a change in the vehicle s center-of-gravity location or the use of a stabilizing drogue parachute.

Mitcheltree, R. A.; Wilmoth, R. G.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Brauckmann, G. J.; Greene, F. A.

1997-01-01

387

Cascade flutter analysis with transient response aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two methods for calculating linear frequency domain aerodynamic coefficients from a time marching Full Potential cascade solver are developed and verified. In the first method, the Influence Coefficient, solutions to elemental problems are superposed to obtain the solutions for a cascade in which all blades are vibrating with a constant interblade phase angle. The elemental problem consists of a single blade in the cascade oscillating while the other blades remain stationary. In the second method, the Pulse Response, the response to the transient motion of a blade is used to calculate influence coefficients. This is done by calculating the Fourier Transforms of the blade motion and the response. Both methods are validated by comparison with the Harmonic Oscillation method and give accurate results. The aerodynamic coefficients obtained from these methods are used for frequency domain flutter calculations involving a typical section blade structural model. An eigenvalue problem is solved for each interblade phase angle mode and the eigenvalues are used to determine aeroelastic stability. Flutter calculations are performed for two examples over a range of subsonic Mach numbers.

Bakhle, Milind A.; Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.

1991-01-01

388

Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

389

Aerodynamic Simulation of the MEXICO Rotor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are a very promising method for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines in an inexpensive and accurate way. One of the major drawbacks of this method is the lack of validated models. As a consequence, the reliability of numerical results is often difficult to assess. The MEXICO project aimed at solving this problem by providing the project partners with high quality measurements of a 4.5 meters rotor diameter wind turbine operating under controlled conditions. The large measurement data-set allows the validation of all kind of aerodynamic models. This work summarizes our efforts for validating a CFD model based on the open source software OpenFoam. Both steady- state and time-accurate simulations have been performed with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for several operating conditions. In this paper we will concentrate on axisymmetric inflow for 3 different wind speeds. The numerical results are compared with pressure distributions from several blade sections and PIV-flow data from the near wake region. In general, a reasonable agreement between measurements the and our simulations exists. Some discrepancies, which require further research, are also discussed.

Herraez, I.; Medjroubi, W.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

2014-12-01

390

Aerodynamic models for a Darrieus wind turbine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various models proposed for the aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines are reviewed. The magnitude of the L/D ratio for a Darrieus rotor blade is dependent on the profile, the Re, boundary layer characteristics, and the three-dimensional flow effects. The aerodynamic efficiency is theoretically the Betz limit, and the interference of one blade with another is constrained by the drag force integrated over all points on the actuator disk. A single streamtube model can predict the power available in a Darrieus, but the model lacks definition of the flow structure and the cyclic stresses. Techniques for calculating the velocity profiles and the consequent induced velocity at the blades are presented. The multiple streamtube theory has been devised to account for the repartition of the velocity in the rotor interior. The model has been expanded as the double multiple streamtube theory at Sandia Laboratories. Futher work is necessary, however, to include the effects of dynamic decoupling at high rotation speeds and to accurately describe blade behavior.

Fraunie, P.; Beguier, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.

1982-11-01

391

An Approach to Supervisory Control of an Energy Management Control System Using Fuzzy Logic  

E-print Network

AN APPROACH TO SUPERVISORY CONTROL OF AN ENERGY MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEM USING FUZZY LOGIC Reza Langari Center for Fuzzy Logic, Robotics and Intelligent Systems Research and Department of Mechanical Engineering Texas A&M University...

Langari, R.

392

Industrial Strategic Planning - A New Approach to Developing Energy Efficient Programs  

E-print Network

as an approach specifically structured to develop more comprehensive insight, direction, and control of a company's future during uncertain times. This paper will go through a 9 step strategic planning process. It will focus on energy management issues industrial...

Delgado, R. M.; Mitchell, G. M.

1983-01-01

393

Gravitational potential energy of the earth - A spherical harmonic approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational potential energy of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic expansion agrees with the usual expression for the energy of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic energy in the crust and mantle of -2.77 x 10 to the 29th ergs, an order of magnitude below McKenzie's (1966) estimate. McKenzie's result stems from mathematical error. Our figure is almost identical with Kaula's (1963) estimate of the minimum shear strain energy in the mantle, a not unexpected result on the basis of the virial theorem. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the 20th P is found by assuming that the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation of energy. This number is almost six orders of magnitude below MacDonald's (1966) estimate of the viscosity and removes his objection to convection. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at 1% efficiency, then the viscosity is 10 to the 22nd P, a number preferred by Cathles (1975) and Peltier and Andrew (1976) as the viscosity of the mantle.

Rubincam, D. P.

1979-01-01

394

Multidimensional Programming Methods for Energy Facility Siting: Alternative Approaches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of multidimensional optimization methods in solving power plant siting problems, which are characterized by several conflicting, noncommensurable objectives is addressed. After a discussion of data requirements and exclusionary site screening methods for bounding the decision space, classes of multiobjective and goal programming models are discussed in the context of finite site selection. Advantages and limitations of these approaches are highlighted and the linkage of multidimensional methods with the subjective, behavioral components of the power plant siting process is emphasized.

Solomon, B. D.; Haynes, K. E.

1982-01-01

395

Distributed Clustering in Ad-hoc Sensor Networks: A Hybrid, Energy-Efficient Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prolonged network lifetime, scalability, and load balancing are important requirements for many ad-hoc sensor network applications. Clustering sensor nodes is an effective technique for achieving these goals. In this work, we propose a new energy-efficient approach for clustering nodes in ad- hoc sensor networks. Based on this approach, we present a protocol, HEED (Hybrid Energy-Efficient Distributed clustering), that periodically selects

Ossaiiia Younis; Sonia Fahmy

2004-01-01

396

Artificial photosynthesis: biomimetic approaches to solar energy conversion and storage.  

PubMed

Using sun as the energy source, natural photosynthesis carries out a number of useful reactions such as oxidation of water to molecular oxygen and fixation of CO(2) in the form of sugars. These are achieved through a series of light-induced multi-electron-transfer reactions involving chlorophylls in a special arrangement and several other species including specific enzymes. Artificial photosynthesis attempts to reconstruct these key processes in simpler model systems such that solar energy and abundant natural resources can be used to generate high energy fuels and restrict the amount of CO(2) in the atmosphere. Details of few model catalytic systems that lead to clean oxidation of water to H(2) and O(2), photoelectrochemical solar cells for the direct conversion of sunlight to electricity, solar cells for total decomposition of water and catalytic systems for fixation of CO(2) to fuels such as methanol and methane are reviewed here. PMID:20439158

Kalyanasundaram, K; Graetzel, M

2010-06-01

397

EnaCloud: An Energy-Saving Application Live Placement Approach for Cloud Computing Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the increasing prevalence of large scale cloud computing environments, how to place requested applications into available computing servers regarding to energy consumption has become an essential research problem, but existing application placement approaches are still not effective for live applications with dynamic characters. In this paper, we proposed a novel approach named EnaCloud, which enables application live placement dynamically

Bo Li; Jianxin Li; Jinpeng Huai; Tianyu Wo; Qin Li; Liang Zhong

2009-01-01

398

Dual and multi-energy CT: approach to functional imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energy spectrum of X-ray photons after passage through an absorber contains information about its elemental composition.\\u000a Thus, tissue characterisation becomes feasible provided that absorption characteristics can be measured or differentiated.\\u000a Dual-energy CT uses two X-ray spectra enabling material differentiation by analysing material-dependent photo-electric and\\u000a Compton effects. Elemental concentrations can thereby be determined using three-material decomposition algorithms. In comparison\\u000a to

Juergen Fornaro; Sebastian Leschka; Dennis Hibbeln; Anthony Butler; Nigel Anderson; Gregor Pache; Hans Scheffel; Simon Wildermuth; Hatem Alkadhi; Paul Stolzmann

2011-01-01

399

PROPERTY VALUATION AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS - APPROACHES FOR INTEGRATING ENERGY PERFORMANCE INTO VALUATION PRACTICE  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the Europe-wide introduction of the energy certification for buildings (Energy Performance of Buildings Directive, EPBD, 2002) the accurate assessment of the energy performance of buildings becomes increasingly important for property valuation. The energy certification is a means to predict the energy efficiency of a building and hence energy costs and the overall long-term investment quality of the building. With

SVEN BIENERT; CHRISTIAN SCHÜETZENHOFER; DAVID STEIXNER

400

Teaching Electrical Energy, Voltage and Current: An Alternative Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program for teaching the concepts of electric energy, voltage, and current is proposed. The ideas and concepts are introduced in a sequence that places more emphasis on some aspects that are normally treated very briefly. A phenomenological orientation, qualitative and quantitative micro- and macroscopic treatments, and the inclusion of the…

Licht, Pieter

1991-01-01

401

ICI's Approach to Total Energy Savings on Ethylene Plants  

E-print Network

. The optimum amount of area addition should be determined from marginal cost/benefit analysis as described here. In order to achieve maximum energy recovery from the installed heat transfer area, the plant should operate as close as possible to the area...

Hindmarsh, E.; Boland, D.

402

Black Box Approach for Energy Monitoring of Commercial Buildings  

E-print Network

. In addition to supplying measured building data to the regression a clustering process is added which determines the building’s day-types. Once the model is trained it can predict the energy consumption at the building site and unusual or faulty days can...

Komhard, S.; Neumann, C.

403

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-print Network

try to minimize the adverse environmental and other costs of fossil fuel extraction, and as we move sources of energy will be needed across the globe, as easily available fossil fuels are exhausted, as we-cycle impacts and cost structures, includ- ing the activities of capital availability, exploration, construction

Walter, M.Todd

404

Energy resolution of silicon detectors: approaching the physical limit  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work gives a review about the response of silicon detectors to electrons, protons, deuterons and alpha particles. The detector nonlinearity (pulse height as a function of particle energy) and the shape of the response function (pulse height distribution for monoenergetic particles) are discussed in detail. For electrons, the measured nonlinearity is found to be negligible within the experimental uncertainties.

E. Steinbauer; P. Bauer; M. Geretschläger; G. Bortels; J. P. Biersack; P. Burger

1994-01-01

405

Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect

Over one million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Podorson, D.; Alaigh, K.

2014-06-01

406

A statistical linearization approach to optimal nonlinear energy harvesting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, an extension of linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control theory is used to determine the optimal state feedback controller for a nonlinear energy harvesting system that is driven by a stochastic disturbance. Specifically, the energy harvester is a base-excited single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) resonant oscillator with an electromagnetic transducer embedded between the ground and moving mass. The electromagnetic transducer used to harvest energy from the SDOF oscillator introduces a nonlinear Coulomb friction force into the system, which must be accounted for in the design of the controller. As such, the development of the optimal controller for this system is based on statistical linearization, whereby the Coulomb friction force is replaced by an equivalent linear viscous damping term, which is calculated from the stationary covariance of the closed-loop system. It is shown that the covariance matrix and optimal feedback gain matrix can be computed by implementing an iterative algorithm involving linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Simulation results are presented for the SDOF energy harvester in which the performance of the optimal state feedback control law is compared to the performance of the optimal static admittance over a range of disturbance bandwidths.

Cassidy, Ian L.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.

2012-04-01

407

Cluster Induced Ignition - A New Approach to Inertial Fusion Energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

An ultra intense laser interaction with clusters produce energetic ions and electrons in MeV range due to cluster explosion. Here we discuss the possibility of harnessing these particle energies to heat a part of the pre compressed DT fuel to ignition condition. In this article we are striving to present the principle concept and the preliminary results are discussed.

Tara Desai; J. T. Mendonca; Dimitri Batani; Andrea Bernardinello

408

Preliminary approach of the MELiSSA loop energy balance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long duration missions, such as the establishment of permanent bases on the lunar surface or the travel to Mars, require a huge amount of life support consumables (e.g. food, water and oxygen). Current rockets are at the moment unable to launch such a mass from Earth. Consequently Regenerative Life Support Systems are necessary to sustain long-term manned space mission to increase recycling rates and so reduce the launched mass. Thus the European and Canadian research has been concentrating on the MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) project over the last 20 years. MELiSSA is an Environmental Controlled Life Support System (ECLSS), i.e. a closed regenerative loop inspired of a lake ecosystem. Using light as a source of energy, MELiSSA's goal is the recovery of food, water and oxygen from CO2 and organic wastes, using microorganisms and higher plants. The architecture of a ECLSS depends widely on the mission scenario. To compare several ECLSS architectures and in order to be able to evaluate them, ESA is developing a multi criteria evaluation tool: ALISSE (Advanced LIfe Support System Evaluator). One of these criteria is the energy needed to operate the ECLSS. Unlike other criteria like the physical mass, the energy criterion has not been investigated yet and needs hence a detailed analysis. It will consequently be the focus of this study. The main objective of the work presented here is to develop a dynamic tool able to estimate the energy balance for several configurations of the MELiSSA loop. The first step consists in establishing the energy balance using concrete figures from the MELiSSA Pilot Plant (MPP). This facility located at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) is aimed at the ground demonstration of the MELiSSA loop. The MELiSSA loop is structured on several subsystems; each of them is characterized by supplies, exhausts and process reactions. For the purpose of this study (i.e. a generic tool) the solver EES (Engineering Equation Solver) is used. As a result, several configurations of the MELiSSA loop are studied. The main issues in terms of energy costs are identified and in the meantime improvement opportunities, i.e. reduction of energy consumption, are diagnosed.

Poulet, Lucie; Lamaze, Brigitte; Lebrun, Jean

409

MIST - MINIMUM-STATE METHOD FOR RATIONAL APPROXIMATION OF UNSTEADY AERODYNAMIC FORCE COEFFICIENT MATRICES  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various control analysis, design, and simulation techniques of aeroservoelastic systems require the equations of motion to be cast in a linear, time-invariant state-space form. In order to account for unsteady aerodynamics, rational function approximations must be obtained to represent them in the first order equations of the state-space formulation. A computer program, MIST, has been developed which determines minimum-state approximations of the coefficient matrices of the unsteady aerodynamic forces. The Minimum-State Method facilitates the design of lower-order control systems, analysis of control system performance, and near real-time simulation of aeroservoelastic phenomena such as the outboard-wing acceleration response to gust velocity. Engineers using this program will be able to calculate minimum-state rational approximations of the generalized unsteady aerodynamic forces. Using the Minimum-State formulation of the state-space equations, they will be able to obtain state-space models with good open-loop characteristics while reducing the number of aerodynamic equations by an order of magnitude more than traditional approaches. These low-order state-space mathematical models are good for design and simulation of aeroservoelastic systems. The computer program, MIST, accepts tabular values of the generalized aerodynamic forces over a set of reduced frequencies. It then determines approximations to these tabular data in the LaPlace domain using rational functions. MIST provides the capability to select the denominator coefficients in the rational approximations, to selectably constrain the approximations without increasing the problem size, and to determine and emphasize critical frequency ranges in determining the approximations. MIST has been written to allow two types data weighting options. The first weighting is a traditional normalization of the aerodynamic data to the maximum unit value of each aerodynamic coefficient. The second allows weighting the importance of different tabular values in determining the approximations based upon physical characteristics of the system. Specifically, the physical weighting capability is such that each tabulated aerodynamic coefficient, at each reduced frequency value, is weighted according to the effect of an incremental error of this coefficient on aeroelastic characteristics of the system. In both cases, the resulting approximations yield a relatively low number of aerodynamic lag states in the subsequent state-space model. MIST is written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. It requires approximately 1Mb of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this package is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in DEC VAX FILES-11 format. It is also available on a TK50 tape cartridge in DEC VAX BACKUP format. MIST was developed in 1991. DEC VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. FORTRAN 77 is a registered trademark of Lahey Computer Systems, Inc.

Karpel, M.

1994-01-01

410

A zonal approach to V/STOL vehicle aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A zonal method based on an iterative coupling between an inviscid panel method and two viscous finite difference methods is applied to solve for the region of jets issued from generic V/STOL models in order to assess the influence of the jet upon V/STOL configurations. The low-order panel method, VSAERO, is used to solve for the entire flow region, which includes the V/STOL model and jet boundary. ARC3D, a well known compressible, thin layer Navier-Stokes (NS) code developed at NASA-Ames, and APPL, a parabolized NS code, are used to solve for the jet region subject to the boundary condition provided by the VSAERO calculation. Overlapping boundaries are used for the purpose of coupling. Results are presented with the available experimental data for the jet and V/STOL configurations.

Yoo, Sungyul; Strash, Daniel J.

1989-01-01

411

Modular Approach to Physics: Work and Energy in Projectile Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page contains a simulation-based module on projectile motion without air resistance. Users can alter the initial trajectory of the ball, the force of gravity, and the mass of the ball. The path of the ball can be traced, showing parabolic motion. Through the vectors menu, the velocity, force of acceleration, and force of gravity vectors can be plotted. The help section provides full instructions for use plus supplementary student activities. This item is part of a larger collection of simulation-based physics modules sponsored by the MAP project (Modular Approach to Physics).

2008-08-15

412

Aerodynamics of a cycling team in a time trial: does the cyclist at the front benefit?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When seasonal journeys take place in nature, birds and fishes migrate in groups. This provides them not only with security but also a considerable saving of energy. The power they need to travel requires overcoming aerodynamic or hydrodynamic drag forces, which can be substantially reduced when the group travels in an optimal arrangement. Also in this area, humans imitate nature, which is especially evident in the practice of outdoor sports and motor competitions. Cycle races, in which speeds of up to 15 m s-1 are frequent, offer great opportunities to appreciate the advantage of travelling in a group. Here we present a brief analysis of the aerodynamics of a cycling team in a time-trial challenge, showing how each rider is favoured according to his position in the group. We conclude that the artificial tail wind created by the team also benefits the cyclist at the front by about 5%.

Íñiguez-de-la Torre, A.; Íñiguez, J.

2009-11-01

413

Development of a database of aerodynamic information for wind turbine airfoil sections  

SciTech Connect

The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory staff (OSU/AARL) continue to develop a database of aerodynamic information for wind turbine airfoil sections. The purpose is to provide sufficient aerodynamic information, about various and different airfoil sections, to assist airfoil and rotor designers in efforts to improve wind turbine rotor efficiencies. Steady state and pitch oscillation data are taken in the OSU/AARL 3x5 subsonic wind tunnel, with and without model leading edge grit roughness. Each airfoil model is subjected to the same test matrix thereby allowing relative comparisons. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the testing methods, typical results, how the data can be accessed and used by the wind energy community, and future plans.

Hoffmann, M.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Lab.

1995-09-01

414

Dynamical approach to linking low energy phases with leptogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does a future observation of low energy leptonic CP violation imply a lepton asymmetry both in flavored leptogenesis and in its one-flavor approximation? Under reasonable assumptions this is the case if lepton masses and mixings are explained by a flavor symmetry in a seesaw model. We are particularly interested in the class of flavor theory which leads to Ue3=0 at

Yin Lin; G. Galilei

2009-01-01

415

Gravitational potential energy of the earth: A spherical harmonic approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational potential energy of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic equation agrees with the usual expression for the energy of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic energy in the mantle and crust of -2.77 x 10 to the twenty-ninth power ergs, an order of magnitude. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the twentieth power poises is found by assuming the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at one per cent efficiency, then the viscosity is ten to the twenty second power poises, a number preferred by some as the viscosity of the mantle.

Rubincam, D. P.

1977-01-01

416

Energy-saving approaches to solid state street lighting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the energy-saving potential of solid-state street lighting due to improved visual performance, weather sensitive luminance control and tracking of pedestrians and vehicles. A psychophysical experiment on the measurement of reaction time with a decision making task was performed under mesopic levels of illumination provided by a highpressure sodium (HPS) lamp and different solid-state light sources, such as daylight and warm-white phosphor converted light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and red-green-blue LED clusters. The results of the experiment imply that photopic luminances of road surface provided by solid-state light sources with an optimized spectral power distribution might be up to twice as low as those provided by the HPS lamp. Dynamical correction of road luminance against road surface conditions typical of Lithuanian climate was estimated to save about 20% of energy in comparison with constant-level illumination. The estimated energy savings due to the tracking of pedestrians and vehicles amount at least 25% with the cumulative effect of intelligent control of at least 40%. A solid-state street lighting system with intelligent control was demonstrated using a 300 m long test ground consisting of 10 solid-state street luminaires, a meteorological station and microwave motion sensor network operated via power line communication.

Vitta, Pranciškus; Stanik?nas, Rytis; Tuzikas, Ar?nas; Reklaitis, Ignas; Stonkus, Andrius; Petrulis, Andrius; Vaitkevi?ius, Henrikas; Žukauskas, Art?ras

2011-10-01

417

SMART SCHOOLS SYMPOSIUM 2013 A HOLISTIC APPROACH IN REDUCTION OF ENERGY  

E-print Network

SMART SCHOOLS SYMPOSIUM 2013 A HOLISTIC APPROACH IN REDUCTION OF ENERGY LOADS AT HILLVIEW MIDDLE SCHOOL How daylighting and lighting systems can help reduce energy consumption #12;SMART SCHOOLS and Funding Sources · Results and Benefits · Operational Considerations #12;SMART SCHOOLS SYMPOSIUM 2013

California at Davis, University of

418

AN APPROACH FOR ENABLING DCT/IDCT ENERGY REDUCTION SCALABILITY IN MPEG-2 VIDEO CODECS  

E-print Network

AN APPROACH FOR ENABLING DCT/IDCT ENERGY REDUCTION SCALABILITY IN MPEG-2 VIDEO CODECS R. Henning algorithm to do all DCT and IDCT computation in an MPEG-2 video codec. However, there is a significant method is studied here for achieving scalable energy reduction during DCT and IDCT computation in MPEG-2

Kambhampati, Subbarao

419

Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

2011-01-01

420

An ab initio approach to free-energy reconstruction using logarithmic mean force dynamics  

SciTech Connect

We present an ab initio approach for evaluating a free energy profile along a reaction coordinate by combining logarithmic mean force dynamics (LogMFD) and first-principles molecular dynamics. The mean force, which is the derivative of the free energy with respect to the reaction coordinate, is estimated using density functional theory (DFT) in the present approach, which is expected to provide an accurate free energy profile along the reaction coordinate. We apply this new method, first-principles LogMFD (FP-LogMFD), to a glycine dipeptide molecule and reconstruct one- and two-dimensional free energy profiles in the framework of DFT. The resultant free energy profile is compared with that obtained by the thermodynamic integration method and by the previous LogMFD calculation using an empirical force-field, showing that FP-LogMFD is a promising method to calculate free energy without empirical force-fields.

Nakamura, Makoto, E-mail: nakamura@cphys.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Obata, Masao [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Morishita, Tetsuya [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)] [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuki, E-mail: oda@cphys.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan) [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

2014-05-14

421

An ab initio approach to free-energy reconstruction using logarithmic mean force dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an ab initio approach for evaluating a free energy profile along a reaction coordinate by combining logarithmic mean force dynamics (LogMFD) and first-principles molecular dynamics. The mean force, which is the derivative of the free energy with respect to the reaction coordinate, is estimated using density functional theory (DFT) in the present approach, which is expected to provide an accurate free energy profile along the reaction coordinate. We apply this new method, first-principles LogMFD (FP-LogMFD), to a glycine dipeptide molecule and reconstruct one- and two-dimensional free energy profiles in the framework of DFT. The resultant free energy profile is compared with that obtained by the thermodynamic integration method and by the previous LogMFD calculation using an empirical force-field, showing that FP-LogMFD is a promising method to calculate free energy without empirical force-fields.

Nakamura, Makoto; Obata, Masao; Morishita, Tetsuya; Oda, Tatsuki

2014-05-01

422

Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Characteristics of a Tension Cone Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The supersonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a tension cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator were investigated by wind tunnel testing. Two sets of tests were conducted: one using rigid models and another using textile models. Tests using rigid models were conducted over a Mach number range from 1.65 to 4.5 at angles of attack from -12 to 20 degrees. The axial, normal, and pitching moment coefficients were found to be insensitive to Mach number over the tested range. The axial force coefficient was nearly constant (C(sub A) = 1.45 +/- 0.05) with respect to angle of attack. Both the normal and pitching moment coefficients were nearly linear with respect to angle of attack. The pitching moment coefficient showed the model to be statically stable about the reference point. Schlieren images and video showed a detached bow shock with no evidence of large regions of separated flow and/or embedded shocks at all Mach numbers investigated. Qualitatively similar static aerodynamic coefficient and flow visualization results were obtained using textile models at a Mach number of 2.5. Using inflatable textile models the torus pressure required to maintain the model in the fully-inflated configuration was determined. This pressure was found to be sensitive to details in the structural configuration of the inflatable models. Additional tests included surface pressure measurements on rigid models and deployment and inflation tests with inflatable models.

Clark, Ian G.; Cruz, Juan R.; Hughes, Monica F.; Ware, Joanne S.; Madlangbayan, Albert; Braun, Robert D.

2009-01-01

423

Implementation planning for industrial energy conversation: Approach and methodology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Details of an industry-specific Conservation Technology Implementation Branch implemenation plan is described in detail. CTIB has conducted implementation planning in the steel, pulp/ paper, and agriculture/food processing industries, but in FY 1981, CTIB plans to conduct planning for the chemicals, petroleum refining, aluminum, glass, cement, and textile industries. Guidelines are presented for each contractor for each industry toward a common methodology in terms of approach, areas of analysis, assumptions, and reporting. The major parts of the CTIB plan are: an implementation study consisting of technology selection, market demand analysis, and policy analysis, and a plan consisting of a detailed description and schedule of future CTIB actions, followed by a recommended system for monitoring market results when the plan is implemented.

Alston, T. G.; Falk, G.; Grogan, P. J.; Katz, D.; Tatar, J.

1981-01-01

424

Implementation planning for industrial energy conservation: approach and methodology  

SciTech Connect

Details of an industry-specific Conservation Technology Implementation Branch implementation plan is described in detail. CTIB has conducted implementation planning in the steel, pulp/paper, and agriculture/food processing industries, but in FY 1981, CTIB plans to conduct planning for the chemicals, petroleum refining, aluminum, glass, cement, and textile industries. Guidelines are presented for each contractor for each industry toward a common methodology in terms of approach, areas of analysis, assumptions, and reporting. The major parts of the CTIB plan are: an implementation study consisting of technology selection, market demand analysis, and policy analysis, and a plan consisting of a detailed description and schedule of future CTIB actions, followed by a recommended system for monitoring market results when the plan is implemented. (MCW)

Alston, T.G.; Falk, G.; Grogan, P.J.; Katz, D.; Tatar, J.

1981-01-01

425

Aerodynamic characteristics of the Fiat UNO car  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this article is to describe the work conducted in the aerodynamic field throughout the 4-year development and engineering time span required by the project of the UNO car. A description is given of all the parametric studies carried out. Through these studies two types of cars at present in production were defined and the characteristics of a possible future sports version laid down. A movable device, to be fitted in the back window, was also set up and patented. When actuated it reduces soiling of back window. A description is also provided of the measurements made in the car flow field and some considerations are outlined about the method applied. This method is still in development phase but it already permits some considerations and in-depth investigations to be made on the vehicle wake.

Costelli, A.F.

1984-01-01

426

Aerodynamics of seeing on large transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data were obtained in the full scale flight environment of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) on the nature of turbulent shear layer over the open cavity. These data were used to verify proposed aerodynamic scaling relationships to describe the behavior of the turbulent layers and to estimate the optical performance of systems of various wavelengths operating within the KAO environment. These data and wind tunnel data are used to scale the expected optical effects for a potential stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy (SOFIA) in which a telescope approximately 3.5 times larger than that on the KAO is envisioned. It appears that the use of combinations of active and passive aeromechanical flow control techniques can improve the optical behavior of systems in the SOFIA environment. Experiments to verify these potential improvements can be performed on the KAO with sufficient modifications to the cavity and aero-mechanical technique installations.

Rose, W. C.

1986-01-01

427

Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems is examined. It is presumed that the underlying model can be arranged into an input/output (I/O) differential operator equation of a generic form. The algorithm estimation is especially efficient since the equation error can be integrated exactly given any I/O pair to obtain an algebraic function of the parameters. The algorithm for parameter identification was extended to the order determination problem for linear differential system. The degeneracy in a least squares estimate caused by feedback was addressed. A method of frequency analysis for determining the transfer function G(j omega) from transient I/O data was formulated using complex valued Fourier based modulating functions in contrast with the trigonometric modulating functions for the parameter estimation problem. A simulation result of applying the algorithm is given under noise-free conditions for a system with a low pass transfer function.

Pearson, Allan E.

1990-01-01

428

Unsteady aerodynamic modeling and active aeroelastic control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Unsteady aerodynamic modeling techniques are developed and applied to the study of active control of elastic vehicles. The problem of active control of a supercritical flutter mode poses a definite design goal stability, and is treated in detail. The transfer functions relating the arbitrary airfoil motions to the airloads are derived from the Laplace transforms of the linearized airload expressions for incompressible two dimensional flow. The transfer function relating the motions to the circulatory part of these loads is recognized as the Theodorsen function extended to complex values of reduced frequency, and is termed the generalized Theodorsen function. Inversion of the Laplace transforms yields exact transient airloads and airfoil motions. Exact root loci of aeroelastic modes are calculated, providing quantitative information regarding subcritical and supercritical flutter conditions.

Edwards, J. W.

1977-01-01

429

Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

1980-01-01

430

Thermoelectric exhaust-gas energy recovery: An integrated approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we describe the first results from an interdisciplinary project that seeks to develop a skutterudite-based thermoelectric (TE) energy recovery system for a vehicle exhaust stream. Filled skutterudites have been prepared and characterised and their thermal stability evaluated. Thermoelements fabricated from these skutterudites have been used to evaluate the compatibility of materials required for the construction of TE modules. The results of modelling studies for the optimization of heat exchanger design and the creation of a component in the loop test facility are also described.

Powell, A. V.; Kaltzoglou, A.; Vaqueiro, P.; Min, G.; Garcia-Cañadas, J.; Stobart, R. K.; Li, J.; Dong, G.; Wijewardane, A.

2012-06-01

431

Nuclear clustering in the Energy Density Functional Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) are a microscopic tool of choice extensively used over the whole chart to successfully describe the properties of atomic nuclei ensuing from their quantum liquid nature. In the last decade, they also have proved their ability to deal with the cluster phenomenon, shedding a new light on its fundamental understanding by treating on an equal footing both quantum liquid and cluster aspects of nuclei. Such a unified microscopic description based on nucleonic degrees of freedom enables to tackle the question pertaining to the origin of the cluster phenomenon and emphasizes intrinsic mechanisms leading to the emergence of clusters in nuclei.

Ebran, J.-P.; Khan, E.; Nikši?, T.; Vretenar, D.

2014-12-01

432

Energy dissipation in single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles: Dynamical approach  

E-print Network

We study, both analytically and numerically, the phenomenon of energy dissipation in single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles driven by an alternating magnetic field. Our interest is focused on the power loss resulting from the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, which describes the precessional motion of the nanoparticle magnetic moment. We determine the power loss as a function of the field amplitude and frequency and analyze its dependence on different regimes of forced precession induced by circularly and linearly polarized magnetic fields. The conditions to maximize the nanoparticle heating are also analyzed.

T. V. Lyutyy; S. I. Denisov; A. Yu. Peletskyi; C. Binns

2015-02-14

433

Computational investigation on the application of using microjets as active aerodynamic load control for wind turbines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fast, efficient way to control loads on industrial scale turbines is important for the growth of the wind industry. Active Aerodynamic Load Control (AALC) is one area which addresses this need. In particular, microjets, which are pneumatic jets located at the trailing edge of a wind turbine blade and blow perpendicular to the blade surface, are a possible AALC candidate. First, the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver OVERFLOW is used to explore the effects of a microjet on lift, drag, and pitching moment. Then the interaction between an aerodynamic disturbance and an airfoil equipped with a microjet is modeled. The object of this dissertation is to investigate microtabs as viable AALC devices by presenting their aerodynamic properties and testing whether a proportional-integral (PI) controlled jets can alleviate loads caused by wind gusts. The use of CFD to simulate a microjet is validated by comparing the results to both previous experiments found in the literature as well as wind tunnel tests completed at UC Davis. The aerodynamic effectiveness of the jet is investigated as a function of various parameters such as Reynolds number, angle of attack, and the momentum coefficient of the jet. The effects of the microjet are found to be very similar to another AALC device, the microtab. An aerodynamic disturbance is simulated, and a control algorithm which is incorporated into the OVERFLOW code is used to activate the microjet, thus reducing the change of the blade load due to the gust. Finally, a more realistic model is made by adding both a linear and a torsional spring and damper to represent the blade movement. This two-degree of freedom system shows that during a gust the vertical blade movement is reduced when the microjets are activated. Microjets are found to work well to alleviate the changes in aerodynamic loads felt by the airfoil, and are therefore a good candidate for a practical AALC device. However, further investigation is needed in the areas of aeroacoustics, system energy requirements, and logistics of implementation.

Blaylock, Myra Louise

434

Case study of data-oriented approach for building energy performance investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The key parameters that may influence building energy performance is studied by comparing the building energy data of college\\u000a buildings in two different regions (the USA and China). By introducing data-orientated approach, a study of a set of on-campus\\u000a building energy demand and consumption is conducted for cooling, heating and electricity. In addition, the heating, ventilation\\u000a and air conditioning (HVAC)

Jianjun Xia; He Xiao; Yi Jiang

2010-01-01

435

Comparison of Two Statistical Approaches to Detect Abnormal Building Energy Consumption with Simulation Test  

E-print Network

Comparison?of?Two?Statistical?Approaches? to?Detect?Abnormal?Building?Energy? Consumption?with?Simulation?Test 12th International?Conference?for?Enhanced?Building?Operations 23rd ? 26th October?2012? Manchester,?England Guanjing...:?How?to?keep?the?optimal?building?energy? performance?after?Cx? ? Solution:?Whole?building?fault?detection? ? A?process?of?identifying?abnormal?energy?consumption ? Alert?operators?early?after?the?onset?of?significant? increases/decreases?in?consumption 2 Paper Model Fault Detection Dodier and...

Lin, G.; Claridge, D.

2012-01-01

436

Estimation of Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness of Natural Regions Using Frontal Area Density Determined from Satellite Imagery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parameterizations of the frontal area index and canopy area index of natural or randomly distributed plants are developed, and applied to the estimation of local aerodynamic roughness using satellite imagery. The formulas are expressed in terms of the subpixel fractional vegetation cover and one non-dimensional geometric parameter that characterizes the plant's shape. Geometrically similar plants and Poisson distributed plant centers are assumed. An appropriate averaging technique to extend satellite pixel-scale estimates to larger scales is provided. ne parameterization is applied to the estimation of aerodynamic roughness using satellite imagery for a 2.3 sq km coniferous portion of the Landes Forest near Lubbon, France, during the 1986 HAPEX-Mobilhy Experiment. The canopy area index is estimated first for each pixel in the scene based on previous estimates of fractional cover obtained using Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery. Next, the results are incorporated into Raupach's (1992, 1994) analytical formulas for momentum roughness and zero-plane displacement height. The estimates compare reasonably well to reference values determined from measurements taken during the experiment and to published literature values. The approach offers the potential for estimating regionally variable, vegetation aerodynamic roughness lengths over natural regions using satellite imagery when there exists only limited knowledge of the vegetated surface.

Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard

1994-01-01

437

A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The project tasks and deliverables are as follows: Computations and Experiments--(1) Simulation and analysis of a range of generic shapes, simplified to more complex, representative of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer flow characteristics using computational tools, (2) The establishment of an experimental data base for tractor-trailer models for code/computational method development and validation. The first shapes to be considered will be directed towards the investigation of tractor-trailer gaps and mismatch of tractor-trailer heights. (3) The evaluation and documentation of effective computational approaches for application to heavy vehicle aerodynamics based on the benchmark results with existing and advanced computational tools compared to experimental data, and (4) Computational tools and experimental methods for use by industry, National Laboratories, and universities for the aerodynamic modeling of heavy truck vehicles. Evaluation of current and new technologies--(1) The evaluation and documentation of current and new technologies for drag reduction based on published literature and continued communication with the heavy vehicle industry (e.g., identification and prioritization of tractor-trailer drag-sources, blowing and/or suction devices, body shaping, new experimental methods or facilities), and the identification and analysis of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer aerodynamic problem areas and possible solution strategies. (2) Continued industrial site visits. It should be noted that ''CFD tools'' are not only the actual computer codes, but descriptions of appropriate numerical solution methods. Part of the project effort will be to determine the restrictions or avenues for technology transfer.

None

2001-09-01

438

Error Estimates of the Ares I Computed Turbulent Ascent Longitudinal Aerodynamic Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerical predictions of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics for the Ares I class of vehicles, along with the associated error estimate derived from an iterative convergence grid refinement, are presented. Computational results are based on an unstructured grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes analysis. The validity of the approach to compute the associated error estimates, derived from a base grid to an extrapolated infinite-size grid, was first demonstrated on a sub-scaled wind tunnel model at representative ascent flow conditions for which the experimental data existed. Such analysis at the transonic flow conditions revealed a maximum deviation of about 23% between the computed longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients with the base grid and the measured data across the entire roll angles. This maximum deviation from the wind tunnel data was associated with the computed normal force coefficient at the transonic flow condition and was reduced to approximately 16% based on the infinite-size grid. However, all the computed aerodynamic coefficients with the base grid at the supersonic flow conditions showed a maximum deviation of only about 8% with that level being improved to approximately 5% for the infinite-size grid. The results and the error estimates based on the established procedure are also presented for the flight flow conditions.

Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Ghaffari, Farhad

2012-01-01

439

Aerodynamic properties of turbulent combustion fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flow fields involving turbulent flames in premixed gases under a variety of conditions are modeled by the use of a numerical technique based on the random vortex method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations and a flame propagation algorithm to trace the motion of the front and implement the Huygens principle, both due to Chorin. A successive over-relaxation hybrid method is applied to solve the Euler equation for flows in an arbitrarily shaped domain. The method of images, conformal transformation, and the integral-equation technique are also used to treat flows in special cases, according to their particular requirements. Salient features of turbulent flame propagation in premixed gases are interpreted by relating them to the aerodynamic properties of the flow field. Included among them is the well-known cellular structure of flames stabilized by bluff bodies, as well as the formation of the characteristic tulip shape of flames propagating in ducts. In its rudimentary form, the mechanism of propagation of a turbulent flame is shown to consist of: (1) rotary motion of eddies at the flame front, (2) self-advancement of the front at an appropriate normal burning speed, and (3) dynamic effects of expansion due to exothermicity of the combustion reaction. An idealized model is used to illustrate these fundamental mechanisms and to investigate basic aerodynamic features of flames in premixed gases. The case of a confined flame stabilized behind a rearward-facing step is given particular care and attention. Solutions are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental results, especially with respect to global properties such as the average velocity profiles and reattachment length.

Hsiao, C. C.; Oppenheim, A. K.

1985-01-01

440

Compendium of NASA Langley reports on hypersonic aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reference is made to papers published by the Langley Research Center in various areas of hypersonic aerodynamics for the period 1950 to 1986. The research work was performed either in-house by the Center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. Abstracts have been included with the references when available. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Aerodynamic Measurements - Single Shapes; (2) Aerodynamic Measurements - Configurations; (3) Aero-Heating; (4) Configuration Studies; (5) Propulsion Integration Experiment; (6) Propulsion Integration - Study; (7) Analysis Methods; (8) Test Techniques; and (9) Airframe Active Cooling Systems.

Sabo, Frances E.; Cary, Aubrey M.; Lawson, Shirley W.

1987-01-01

441

Single particle aerodynamic relaxation time analyzer. [for aerosol pollutants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An instrument employing a laser Doppler velocimeter and a microphone to measure the phase lag of the motion of aerosol particulates relative to the motion of the fluid medium within an acoustic field is described. The relaxation times and aerodynamic diameters of the particles or droplets are determined in real time from the measured values of phase lag; thus, the size analysis is independent of the electrostatic charges and refractive indices of the particulates. The instrument is suitable for analyzing the aerodynamic size spectrum of atmospheric particulate pollutants with aerodynamic diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 microns.

Mazumder, M. K.; Kirsch, K. J.

1977-01-01

442

Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

443

Hypersonic flutter of a curved shallow panel with aerodynamic heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The general equations describing the nonlinear fluttering oscillations of shallow, curved, heated orthotropic panels have been derived. The formulation takes into account the location of the panel on the surface of a generic hypersonic vehicle, when calculating the aerodynamic loads. It is also shown that third order piston theory produces unsteady aerodynamic loading which is in close agreement with that based upon direct solution of the Euler equations. Results, for simply supported panels, are obtained using Galerkin's method combined with direct numerical integration in time to compute stable limit cycle amplitudes. These results illustrate the sensitivity of the aeroelastic behavior to the unsteady aerodynamic assumptions, temperature, orthotropicity and flow orientation.

Bein, T.; Friedmann, P.; Zhong, X.; Nydick, I.

1993-01-01

444

Aerodynamic technology opportunities for a high-speed civil transport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A NASA-sponsored study has undertaken the definition of SST and HST configurations resulting in substantial reductions relative to current technology in takeoff gross weight, sonic boom overpressures, and airport-vicinity propulsion and aerodynamic noise. CFD methods have been applied to vehicle-shaping and laminar boundary layer flow area-maximizing configurational studies. Various planforms and active boundary-layer control methods are considered. Computer-managed wing control surface deflections are identified as substantial contributors to wing aerodynamic load and structural weight reduction, while correcting undesirable aerodynamic-pitching characteristics.

Welge, H. Robert

1988-01-01

445

Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

Boyd, David D., Jr.

1999-01-01

446

Non-engine aerodynamic noise investigation of a large aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of flyover noise measurements have been accomplished utilizing a large jet transport aircraft with engine power reduced to flight idle. It was determined that the aerodynamic (nonengine) noise levels did occur in the general range that had been predicted by using small aircraft (up to 17,690 kg gross weight) prediction techniques. The test procedures used are presented along with discussions of the effects of aerodynamic configuration on the radiated noise, identification of noise sources, and predicted aerodynamic noise as compared with measurements.

Gibson, J. S.

1974-01-01

447

Prediction of Hyper-X Stage Separation Aerodynamics Using CFD  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA X-43 "Hyper-X" hypersonic research vehicle will be boosted to a Mach 7 flight test condition mounted on the nose of an Orbital Sciences Pegasus launch vehicle. The separation of the research vehicle from the Pegasus presents some unique aerodynamic problems, for which computational fluid dynamics has played a role in the analysis. This paper describes the use of several CFD methods for investigating the aerodynamics of the research and launch vehicles in close proximity. Specifically addressed are unsteady effects, aerodynamic database extrapolation, and differences between wind tunnel and flight environments.

Buning, Pieter G.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Dilley, Arthur D.; Pao, Jenn L.

2000-01-01

448

Aerodynamic coefficient estimation for dynamic wind tunnel models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Maximum likelihood parameter identification is used to estimate the aerodynamic coefficients of a 'flying' aircraft model which is mounted in a transonic wind tunnel by a system of cables and pulleys. The model's motion is governed by both cable and aerodynamic forces, where the parameters to be identified are functions of the aerodynamic forces but cable forces greatly predominate. The test data were successfully processed assuming a linear equation model in the identification procedure. In one instance, the procedure was able to detect a failing measurement instrument. The final parameter estimates are compared to estimates obtained in independent tests of a similar aircraft model.

Mohr, R. L.; Smith, R. G.

1977-01-01

449

A "TEST OF CONCEPT" COMPARISON OF AERODYNAMIC AND MECHANICAL RESUSPENSION MECHANISMS FOR PARTICLES DEPOSITED ON FIELD RYE GRASS (SECALS CERCELE). PART 2. THRESHOLD MECHANICAL ENERGIES FOR RESUSPENSION PARTICLE FLUXES  

EPA Science Inventory

Kinetic energy from the oscillatory impacts of the grass stalk against a stationary object was measured with a kinetic energy measuring device. These energy inputs were measured as part of a resuspension experiment of uniform latex microspheres deposited on a single rye grass see...

450

A new approach to distributed computing in high energy physics  

SciTech Connect

We present a new software system, UFMulti II, which provides tools for distributing HEP applications across multiple Unix workstations in order to take advantage of parallel computing. It is designed for high energy physics applications such as event reconstruction, simulation, and physics analysis. We discuss here a particular component of UFMulti called NetQueues (Network Queues) which permits the fast exchange of data between groups of processes. The NetQueue system is optimized for high data transfer rates across Ethernet and FDDI networks and can accommodate both event and non-event records in a flexible way. The results shown in this talk are based on tests on a workstation farm at the University of Florida. Measurements of CPU and I/O performance during these tests, including some interesting effects caused by the I/O loading of the CPU, are presented.

Avery, P.; Chegireddy, C. (Department of Physics ( )); Brothers, J.; Johnson, T.; Zion, A. (Department of Computer and Information Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States))

1992-02-05

451

Thermostats with attitudes: A sociological analysis of assumptions underlying common approaches to reducing residential energy consumption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation contributes to the emerging literature in the sociology of energy consumption by answering three important questions about the assumptions underlying popular approaches to reducing energy consumption behavior. The answers are gleaned from data on Wisconsin households gathered in 1998 and 1999. The first question has to do with the efficacy of a "cognitive fix" approach of attempting to change attitudes in hopes of changing behavior, and asks whether energy-related attitudes can predict actual energy savings. The results of a regression analysis of heating energy intensity revealed that a variable measuring respondents' attitudes toward energy conservation predict heating energy intensity, but the effect was overwhelmed by control variables for insulation and draftiness. These and other results offer some support for the cognitive fix approach of attitudinal change as a means of reducing energy consumption. The second question concerns a popular "technological fix" of subsidizing the replacement of manual thermostats with programmable ones, and asks whether programmable thermostats actually save significant home heating energy. The data show that households with programmable thermostats appear to use no less energy than do households with manual thermostats, and that it is behavioral norms, not the type of thermostat, that determine thermostat setting behavior. The results suggest strongly that in aggregate, the installation of programmable thermostats in residential households cannot be expected to deliver promised energy savings. The third question addressed is whether popular knowledge about global warming or the connection between energy use and global environmental change is growing, and if so, what is the likelihood that these prospective socio-cultural shifts might result in increased residential energy conservation. The analysis suggests that, compared to the findings of earlier studies, awareness of the environmental consequences of energy use is on the increase, but the likelihood that this growing awareness will lead to increased conservation appears to be minimal. In addition to answering the questions above, this work provides an example of how a comprehensive sociological approach to studying energy consumption can help inform our understanding of energy use in ways that earlier approaches could not.

Nevius, Monica Josefina

2001-12-01

452

Conventional Nuclear Theory of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions in Metals: Alternative Approach to Clean Fusion Energy Generation  

E-print Network

Abstract—Low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) in metals are described using conventional nuclear theory based on the optical theorem formulation. It can be applied to both deuteron and proton induced LENRs. Cryogenic ignition of deuteron fusion in metal particles is proposed as an alternative approach to clean fusion energy generation. Index Terms—deuteron fusion in metals, nuclear theory, nuclear transmutations, optical theorem formulation I.

Yeong E. Kim

453

Land surface energy partitioning revisited: A novel approach based on single depth soil measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

partitioning of solar energy into sensible, latent, and ground heat fluxes over the land surface is responsible for changes of state variables in the soil-atmosphere system. Recent research enables the reconstruction of the land surface temperature and ground heat flux using Green's function approach, as well as the estimate of the distribution of available energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes based on linear stability analysis. Combining the Green's function approach and linear stability analysis, we propose a new physically based numerical procedure to estimate the land surface energy partitioning in this paper. The new method is capable of predicting all surface energy budgets using a single depth soil measurement; the model reliability is evaluated with comparisons to flux tower measurements. The results of this study deepen our insight into the implicit link between surface energy partition and subsurface soil dynamics and how the link can be employed to related research areas.

Yang, Jiachuan; Wang, Zhi-Hua

2014-12-01

454

Approaches to Measuring CO2(? 2)-O Vibrational Energy Transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preliminary experiments have been carried out with the goal of accurately measuring the vibrational relaxation rate of CO2(? 2) by ground state atomic oxygen. Significant cooling occurs in the 70-120 km altitude region through efficient uppumping of vibrational ground state CO2 by ambient O atoms. Much of the nascently-excited CO2(? 2) radiatively decays, converting a portion of the ambient kinetic energy into 15 ? m IR emission which escapes into space. However, the rate constant for the reverse CO2(? 2)-O vibrational relaxation process is not generally agreed upon. In previous work, the rate constant was measured by photolyzing ozone in an O3-CO2-Ar mixture, both generating a high density of O atoms and slightly raising the gas temperature. The re-equilibration rate of the CO2 vibrational population was then monitored as a function of the O-atom density, using diode laser absorption in the 4.3 ? m region. In the present work, we are investigating a similar experiment utilizing the stable precursors NO2 and SO2 as alternatives to O3. We have also performed preliminary experiments in which the bend state of CO2 is selectively populated using stimulated Raman excitation. Finally, detection of the laser-excited CO2 vibrational populations has been performed using absorption of broadband IR radiation from a SiC lamp in conjunction with a Fourier transform spectrometer. We compare the advantages and disadvantages of using the FTIR technique versus diode laser detection.

Castle, K. J.; Hwang, E. S.; Dodd, J. A.

2001-12-01

455

High speed PIV applied to aerodynamic noise investigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we study the acoustic emissions of the flow over a rectangular cavity. Especially, we investigate the possibility of estimating the acoustic emission by analysis of PIV data. Such a possibility is appealing, since it would allow to directly relate the flow behavior to the aerodynamic noise production. This will help considerably in understanding the noise production mechanisms and to investigate the possible ways of reducing it. In this study, we consider an open cavity with an aspect ratio between its length and depth of 2 at a Reynolds number of 2.4 × 104 and 3.0 × 104 based on the cavity length. The study is carried out combining high speed two-dimensional PIV, wall pressure measurements and sound measurements. The pressure field is computed from the PIV data. Curle's analogy is applied to obtain the acoustic pressure field. The pressure measurements on the wall of the cavity and the sound measurements are then used to validate the results obtained from PIV and check the range of validity of this approach. This study demonstrated that the technique is able to quantify the acoustic emissions from the cavity and is promising especially for capturing the tonal components on the sound emission.

Koschatzky, V.; Moore, P. D.; Westerweel, J.; Scarano, F.; Boersma, B. J.

2011-04-01

456

Aerodynamic Performance Measurements for a Forward Swept Low Noise Fan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One source of noise in high tip speed turbofan engines, caused by shocks, is called multiple pure tone noise (MPT's). A new fan, called the Quiet High Speed Fan (QHSF), showed reduced noise over the part speed operating range, which includes MPT's. The QHSF showed improved performance in most respects relative to a baseline fan; however, a partspeed instability discovered during testing reduced the operating range below acceptable limits. The measured QHSF adiabatic efficiency on the fixed nozzle acoustic operating line was 85.1 percent and the baseline fan 82.9 percent, a 2.2 percent improvement. The operating line pressure rise at design point rotational speed and mass flow was 1.764 and 1.755 for the QHSF and baseline fan, respectively. Weight flow at design point speed was 98.28 lbm/sec for the QHSF and 97.97 lbm/sec for the baseline fan. The operability margin for the QHSF approached 0 percent at the 75 percent speed operating condition. The baseline fan maintained sufficient margin throughout the operating range as expected. Based on the stage aerodynamic measurements, this concept shows promise for improved performance over current technology if the operability limitations can be solved.

Fite, E. Brian

2006-01-01

457

Uncovering changes in spider orb-web topology owing to aerodynamic effects.  

PubMed

An orb-weaving spider's likelihood of survival is influenced by its ability to retain prey with minimum damage to its web and at the lowest manufacturing cost. This set of requirements has forced the spider silk to evolve towards extreme strength and ductility to a degree that is rare among materials. Previous studies reveal that the performance of the web upon impact may not be based on the mechanical properties of silk alone, aerodynamic drag could play a role in the dissipation of the prey's energy. Here, we present a thorough analysis of the effect of the aerodynamic drag on wind load and prey impact. The hypothesis considered by previous authors for the evaluation of the drag force per unit length of thread has been revisited according to well-established principles of fluid mechanics, highlighting the functional dependence on thread diameter that was formerly ignored. Theoretical analysis and finite-element simulations permitted us to identify air drag as a relevant factor in reducing deterioration of the orb web, and to reveal how the spider can take greater-and not negligible-advantage of drag dissipation. The study shows the beneficial air drag effects of building smaller and less dense webs under wind load, and larger and denser webs under prey impact loads. In essence, it points out why the aerodynamics need to be considered as an additional driving force in the evolution of silk threads and orb webs. PMID:24966235

Zaera, Ramón; Soler, Alejandro; Teus, Jaime

2014-09-01

458

Experimental characterization of high speed centrifugal compressor aerodynamic forcing functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The most common and costly unexpected post-development gas turbine engine reliability issue is blade failure due to High Cycle Fatigue (HCF). HCF in centrifugal compressors is a coupled nonlinear fluid-structure problem for which understanding of the phenomenological root causes is incomplete. The complex physics of this problem provides significant challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. Furthermore, the available literature fails to address the flow field associated with the diffuser potential field, a primary cause of forced impeller vibration. Because of the serious nature of HCF, the inadequacy of current design approaches to predict HCF, and the fundamental lack of benchmark experiments to advance the design practices, there exists a need to build a database of information specific to the nature of the diffuser generated forcing function as a foundation for understanding flow induced blade vibratory failure. The specific aim of this research is to address the fundamental nature of the unsteady aerodynamic interaction phenomena inherent in high-speed centrifugal compressors wherein the impeller exit flow field is dynamically modulated by the vaned diffuser potential field or shock structure. The understanding of this unsteady aerodynamic interaction is fundamental to characterizing the impeller forcing function. Unsteady static pressure measurement at several radial and circumferential locations in the vaneless space offer a depiction of pressure field radial decay, circumferential variation and temporal fluctuation. These pressure measurements are coupled with high density, full field measurement of the velocity field within the diffuser vaneless space at multiple spanwise positions. The velocity field and unsteady pressure field are shown to be intimately linked. A strong momentum gradient exiting the impeller is shown to extend well across the vaneless space and interact with the diffuser vane leading edge. The deterministic unsteady pressure field is found to be dominated by the blade-vane interaction. HCF concerns are illuminated by persistent pressure waves extending radially across the vaneless space and impacting the impeller pressure surface. Finally, the average impeller exit flow field is found to present a highly unsteady velocity field to the downstream vane row, challenging the common design assumption of a rapid mixing model for diffuser design.

Gallier, Kirk

459

Forced response analysis of an aerodynamically detuned supersonic turbomachine rotor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect of aerodynamic detuning on the supersonic flow induced forced response behavior of a turbomachine blade row is analyzed using an aeroelastic model. The rotor is modeled as a flat plate airfoil cascade representing an unwrapped rotor annulus; the aerodynamic detuning is achieved by alternating the circumferential spacing of adjacent rotor blades. The total unsteady aerodynamic loading on the blading, due to the convection of the transverse gust past the airfoil cascade as well as that resulting from the motion of the cascade, is developed in terms of influence coefficients. The model developed here is then used to analyze the effect of aerodynamic detuning on the flow induced forced response behavior of a twelve-bladed rotor with Verdon's Cascade B flow geometry.

Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

1985-01-01

460

Influence of hinge point on flexible flap aerodynamic performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large scale wind turbines lead to increasing blade lengths and weights, which presents new challenges for blade design. This paper selects NREL S809 airfoil, uses the parameterized technology to realize the flexible trailing edge deformation, researches the static aerodynamic characteristics of wind turbine blade airfoil with flexible deformation, and the dynamic aerodynamic characteristics in the process of continuous deformation, analyses the influence of hinge point position on flexible flap aerodynamic performance, in order to further realize the flexible wind turbine blade design and provides some references for the active control scheme. The results show that compared with the original airfoil, proper trailing