Sample records for aerodynamic energy approach

  1. Aerodynamics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aerodynamics is the study of what makes things go fast, right? More specifically, itâ??s the study of the interaction between bodies and the atmosphere. If youâ??ve been watching Wimbeldon lately, you might have been wondering about the aerodynamics of tennis. Or maybe you were riding your bike the other day and wondering how you could pick up a little more speed next time. This topic in depth highlights some fun websites on the science of aerodynamics.The first site (1) provides some general information on aerodynamics. For those wanting a little more on the theory of aerodynamics, the University of Sydney has published this web textbook, Aerodynamics for Students (2). When people think of aerodynamics, they generally think of aviation and flight, which is explained on this site (3). Aerodynamics also has applications in sports, such as tennis, sailing and cycling. This website provides explanations for sports applications whether you are a beginner in the study of aerodynamics or an instructor (4). The next website reviews the aerodynamics of cycling and has a form that lets you Calculate the Aerodynamic Drag and Propulsive Power of a Bicyclist (5). The last site, AeroNet (6), is an interactive site designed to provide information about topics involved with aviation in a fun way for anyone casually interested in flight, someone thinking about aviation as a profession, or a student doing research for physics class.

  2. Aerodynamic Drag and Drag Reduction: Energy and Energy Savings (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    An assessment of the role of fluid dynamic resistance and/or aerodynamic drag and the relationship to energy use in the United States is presented. Existing data indicates that up to 25% of the total energy consumed in the United States is used to overcome aerodynamic drag, 27% of the total energy used in the United States is consumed by transportation systems, and 60% of the transportation energy or 16% of the total energy consumed in the United States is used to overcome aerodynamic drag in transportation systems. Drag reduction goals of 50% are proposed and discussed which if realized would produce a 7.85% total energy savings. This energy savings correlates to a yearly cost savings in the $30Billion dollar range.

  3. Aerodynamic Analysis of the Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft Using Vortex-Lattice Superposition Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric Bi-Wen; Reynolds, Kevin Wayne; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Totah, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The SUGAR Truss-BracedWing (TBW) aircraft concept is a Boeing-developed N+3 aircraft configuration funded by NASA ARMD FixedWing Project. This future generation transport aircraft concept is designed to be aerodynamically efficient by employing a high aspect ratio wing design. The aspect ratio of the TBW is on the order of 14 which is significantly greater than those of current generation transport aircraft. This paper presents a recent aerodynamic analysis of the TBW aircraft using a conceptual vortex-lattice aerodynamic tool VORLAX and an aerodynamic superposition approach. Based on the underlying linear potential flow theory, the principle of aerodynamic superposition is leveraged to deal with the complex aerodynamic configuration of the TBW. By decomposing the full configuration of the TBW into individual aerodynamic lifting components, the total aerodynamic characteristics of the full configuration can be estimated from the contributions of the individual components. The aerodynamic superposition approach shows excellent agreement with CFD results computed by FUN3D, USM3D, and STAR-CCM+. XXXXX Demand for green aviation is expected to increase with the need for reduced environmental impact. Most large transports today operate within the best cruise L/D range of 18-20 using the conventional tube-and-wing design. This configuration has led to marginal improvements in aerodynamic efficiency over this past century, as aerodynamic improvements tend to be incremental. A big opportunity has been shown in recent years to significantly reduce structural weight or trim drag, hence improved energy efficiency, with the use of lightweight materials such as composites. The Boeing 787 transport is an example of a modern airframe design that employs lightweight structures. High aspect ratio wing design can provide another opportunity for further improvements in energy efficiency. Historically, the study of high aspect ratio wings has been intimately tied to the study of aeroelasticity and flutter. These studies have sought to develop tools and methods to analyze aeroelastic effects by laying the foundation for more modern high aspect ratio wing aircraft such as the Truss-Braced Wing (TBW).1-3 Originally suggested by Northrop Grumman for the development of a long-range bomber, the idea of using truss structures to alleviate the bending moments of an ultra-high aspect ratio wing has culminated in more than a decade of work focused on understanding the aeroelastic properties and structural weight penalties due to the more aerodynamically efficient wing. The Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) Truss-Braced Wing (TBW) aircraft concept is a Boeingdeveloped N+3 aircraft configuration funded by NASA ARMD Fixed Wing Project.4, 5 The TBW aircraft concept is designed to be aerodynamically efficient by employing an aspect ratio on the order of 14, which is significantly greater than those of conventional aircraft wings. As a result, intermediate structural supports are required. The main wings The development of the TBW aircraft is supported through a collaboration between the NASA FixedWing Project, Boeing Research and Technology, and a number of other organizations. Multidisciplinary design analysis and optimization (MDAO) studies have been conducted at each stage to improve the wing aerodynamics, structural efficiency, and flight performance using advanced N+4 turbofan engines. These MDAO studies have refined the geometry of the wing and configuration layout and have involved trade studies involving minimizing induced drag with wing span, minimizing profile drag at lower Reynolds numbers, and minimizing wave drag due to the addition of the strut and brace. The chart in Fig. 2 summarizes progression of the past revisions of the TBW aircraft design at various developmental stage This paper presents an initial aerodynamic analysis of the TBW aircraft using a conceptual vortex-lattice aerodynamic tool VORLAX coupled with the aerodynamic superposition method. Based on the underlying linear potential flow theory, the complex configurati

  4. Aerodynamic levitation : an approach to microgravity.

    SciTech Connect

    Glorieux, B.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Millot, F.; Enderby, J.; Rifflet, J.-C.

    2000-12-05

    Measurements of the thermophysical and structural properties of liquid materials at high temperature have undergone considerable development in the past few years. Following improvements in electromagnetic levitation, aerodynamic levitation associated with laser heating has shown promise for assessing properties of different molten materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors), preserving sample purity over a wide range of temperatures and under different gas environments. The density, surface tension and viscosity are measured with a high-speed video camera and an image analysis system. Results on nickel and alumina show that small droplets can be considered in the first approximation to be under microgravity conditions. Using a non-invasive contactless technique recently developed to measure electrical conductivity, results have been extended to variety of materials ranging from liquid metals and liquid semiconductors to ionically conducting materials. The advantage of this technique is the feasibility of monitoring changes in transport occurring during phase transitions and in deeply undercooled states.

  5. Determining aerodynamic conductance of spar chambers from energy balance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aerodynamic conductance (gA) of SPAR chambers was determined from measurements of energy balance and canopy temperature over a peanut canopy. gA was calculated from the slope of sensible heat flux (H) versus canopy-to-air temperature difference. H and the canopy-to-air temperature were varied by...

  6. Continuous adjoint approach for the SpalartAllmaras model in aerodynamic optimization

    E-print Network

    Alonso, Juan J.

    Continuous adjoint approach for the Spalart­Allmaras model in aerodynamic optimization Alfonso in aerodynamic design with turbulence modeling. We focus on compressible flows described by the RANS equations extra unknown terms, the Reynolds stress and the turbulent heat flux. Further averages of the RANS

  7. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Lynn, Sean R.; Veres, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). Detailed analyses were performed using three- dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off- design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component acro/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  8. Optimal cycling time trial position models: aerodynamics versus power output and metabolic energy.

    PubMed

    Fintelman, D M; Sterling, M; Hemida, H; Li, F-X

    2014-06-01

    The aerodynamic drag of a cyclist in time trial (TT) position is strongly influenced by the torso angle. While decreasing the torso angle reduces the drag, it limits the physiological functioning of the cyclist. Therefore the aims of this study were to predict the optimal TT cycling position as function of the cycling speed and to determine at which speed the aerodynamic power losses start to dominate. Two models were developed to determine the optimal torso angle: a 'Metabolic Energy Model' and a 'Power Output Model'. The Metabolic Energy Model minimised the required cycling energy expenditure, while the Power Output Model maximised the cyclists? power output. The input parameters were experimentally collected from 19 TT cyclists at different torso angle positions (0-24°). The results showed that for both models, the optimal torso angle depends strongly on the cycling speed, with decreasing torso angles at increasing speeds. The aerodynamic losses outweigh the power losses at cycling speeds above 46km/h. However, a fully horizontal torso is not optimal. For speeds below 30km/h, it is beneficial to ride in a more upright TT position. The two model outputs were not completely similar, due to the different model approaches. The Metabolic Energy Model could be applied for endurance events, while the Power Output Model is more suitable in sprinting or in variable conditions (wind, undulating course, etc.). It is suggested that despite some limitations, the models give valuable information about improving the cycling performance by optimising the TT cycling position. PMID:24726654

  9. Aerodynamic transfer of energy to the vocal folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Scott L.; Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H.

    2005-09-01

    The aerodynamic transfer of energy from glottal airflow to vocal fold tissue during phonation was explored using complementary synthetic and numerical vocal fold models. The synthetic model was fabricated using a flexible polyurethane rubber compound. The model size, shape, and material properties were generally similar to corresponding human vocal fold characteristics. Regular, self-sustained oscillations were achieved at a frequency of approximately 120 Hz. The onset pressure was approximately 1.2 kPa. A corresponding two-dimensional finite element model was developed using geometry definitions and material properties based on the synthetic model. The finite element model upstream and downstream pressure boundary conditions were based on experimental values acquired using the synthetic model. An analysis of the fully coupled fluid and solid numerical domains included flow separation and unsteady effects. The numerical results provided detailed flow data that was used to investigate aerodynamic energy transfer mechanisms. The results support the hypothesis that a cyclic variation of the orifice profile from a convergent to a divergent shape leads to a temporal asymmetry in the average wall pressure, which is the key factor for the achievement of self-sustained vocal fold oscillations.

  10. Aerodynamic transfer of energy to the vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Scott L; Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H

    2005-09-01

    The aerodynamic transfer of energy from glottal airflow to vocal fold tissue during phonation was explored using complementary synthetic and numerical vocal fold models. The synthetic model was fabricated using a flexible polyurethane rubber compound. The model size, shape, and material properties were generally similar to corresponding human vocal fold characteristics. Regular, self-sustained oscillations were achieved at a frequency of approximately 120 Hz. The onset pressure was approximately 1.2 kPa. A corresponding two-dimensional finite element model was developed using geometry definitions and material properties based on the synthetic model. The finite element model upstream and downstream pressure boundary conditions were based on experimental values acquired using the synthetic model. An analysis of the fully coupled fluid and solid numerical domains included flow separation and unsteady effects. The numerical results provided detailed flow data that was used to investigate aerodynamic energy transfer mechanisms. The results support the hypothesis that a cyclic variation of the orifice profile from a convergent to a divergent shape leads to a temporal asymmetry in the average wall pressure, which is the key factor for the achievement of self-sustained vocal fold oscillations. me rica. PMID:16240827

  11. Energy harvesting under combined aerodynamic and base excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibo, Amin; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates the transduction of a piezoaeroelastic energy harvester under the combination of vibratory base excitations and aerodynamic loadings. The harvester which consists of a rigid airfoil supported by nonlinear flexural and torsional springs is placed in an incompressible air flow and subjected to a harmonic base excitation in the plunge direction. Under this combined loading, the airfoil undergoes complex motions which strain a piezoelectric element producing a voltage across an electric load. To capture the qualitative behavior of the harvester, a five-dimensional lumped-parameter model which adopts nonlinear quasi-steady aerodynamics is used. A center manifold reduction is implemented to reduce the full model into one nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equation. The normal form of the reduced system is then derived to study slow modulation of the response amplitude and phase near the flutter instability. Below the flutter speed, the response of the harvester is observed to be always periodic with the air flow serving to amplify the influence of the base excitation on the response by reducing the effective stiffness of the system, and hence, increasing the RMS output power. Beyond the flutter speed, two distinct regions are observed. The first occurs when the base excitation is small and/or when the excitation frequency is not close to the frequency of the self-sustained oscillations induced by the flutter instability. In this case, the response of the harvester is two-period quasiperiodic with amplitude modulation due to the presence of two incommensurate frequencies in the response. This amplitude modulation reduces the RMS output power. In the second region, the amplitude of excitation is large enough to eliminate the quasiperiodic response by causing the two frequencies to lock into each other. In this region, the response becomes periodic and the output power increases exhibiting little dependence on the base excitation.

  12. An aerodynamic approach in soil hydraulic conductivity estimation for investigating soil erosion degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergey, V.; Vyacheslav, S.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new method for determining the degree of erosion for zonal soils of the East European Plain. This new approach uses soil porosity and filtration to determine a coefficient of aerodynamic similarity. We evaluated the degree of soil erosion on ranges of the major zonal soils of the eastern part of European Russia by applying this new method. Based on these data, we developed a diagnostic scale to determine the extent of soil erosion in this area.

  13. An approach to constrained aerodynamic design with application to airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    An approach was developed for incorporating flow and geometric constraints into the Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (DISC) design method. In this approach, an initial target pressure distribution is developed using a set of control points. The chordwise locations and pressure levels of these points are initially estimated either from empirical relationships and observed characteristics of pressure distributions for a given class of airfoils or by fitting the points to an existing pressure distribution. These values are then automatically adjusted during the design process to satisfy the flow and geometric constraints. The flow constraints currently available are lift, wave drag, pitching moment, pressure gradient, and local pressure levels. The geometric constraint options include maximum thickness, local thickness, leading-edge radius, and a 'glove' constraint involving inner and outer bounding surfaces. This design method was also extended to include the successive constraint release (SCR) approach to constrained minimization.

  14. Modeling State-Space Aeroelastic Systems Using a Simple Matrix Polynomial Approach for the Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple matrix polynomial approach is introduced for approximating unsteady aerodynamics in the s-plane and ultimately, after combining matrix polynomial coefficients with matrices defining the structure, a matrix polynomial of the flutter equations of motion (EOM) is formed. A technique of recasting the matrix-polynomial form of the flutter EOM into a first order form is also presented that can be used to determine the eigenvalues near the origin and everywhere on the complex plane. An aeroservoelastic (ASE) EOM have been generalized to include the gust terms on the right-hand side. The reasons for developing the new matrix polynomial approach are also presented, which are the following: first, the "workhorse" methods such as the NASTRAN flutter analysis lack the capability to consistently find roots near the origin, along the real axis or accurately find roots farther away from the imaginary axis of the complex plane; and, second, the existing s-plane methods, such as the Roger s s-plane approximation method as implemented in ISAC, do not always give suitable fits of some tabular data of the unsteady aerodynamics. A method available in MATLAB is introduced that will accurately fit generalized aerodynamic force (GAF) coefficients in a tabular data form into the coefficients of a matrix polynomial form. The root-locus results from the NASTRAN pknl flutter analysis, the ISAC-Roger's s-plane method and the present matrix polynomial method are presented and compared for accuracy and for the number and locations of roots.

  15. A comparison of two closely-related approaches to aerodynamic design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shubin, G. R.; Frank, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    Two related methods for aerodynamic design optimization are compared. The methods, called the implicit gradient approach and the variational (or optimal control) approach, both attempt to obtain gradients necessary for numerical optimization at a cost significantly less than that of the usual black-box approach that employs finite difference gradients. While the two methods are seemingly quite different, they are shown to differ (essentially) in that the order of discretizing the continuous problem, and of applying calculus, is interchanged. Under certain circumstances, the two methods turn out to be identical. We explore the relationship between these methods by applying them to a model problem for duct flow that has many features in common with transonic flow over an airfoil. We find that the gradients computed by the variational method can sometimes be sufficiently inaccurate to cause the optimization to fail.

  16. Using Adjoint-Based Approach to Understand Flapping-Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Wei, Mingjun

    2013-11-01

    The study of flapping-wing aerodynamics is a problem with very large control space. Adjoint-based approach, by solving an inverse problem, can be used here as an efficient tool for optimization and physical understanding. However, the adjoint equation is typically formulated in a fixed domain. The moving boundary or morphing domain brings in an inconsistency in the definition of arbitrary perturbation at the boundary, which then proposes a new challenge if the control parameters happen to be also at the boundary. An unsteady mapping function, as a usual remedy for such problems, would make the whole formulation too complex to be feasible. Instead, we use non-cylindrical calculus to re-define the perturbation and solve the inconsistency problem caused by moving/morphing solid boundaries. The approach is first validated for a simple case of a plate plunging in an incoming flow. Then we extend the approach to drag reduction and efficiency improvement of more complex cases. The optimized parameters provide a unique opportunity for physical understanding by comparison to the initial parameters. The study of flapping-wing aerodynamics is a problem with very large control space. Adjoint-based approach, by solving an inverse problem, can be used here as an efficient tool for optimization and physical understanding. However, the adjoint equation is typically formulated in a fixed domain. The moving boundary or morphing domain brings in an inconsistency in the definition of arbitrary perturbation at the boundary, which then proposes a new challenge if the control parameters happen to be also at the boundary. An unsteady mapping function, as a usual remedy for such problems, would make the whole formulation too complex to be feasible. Instead, we use non-cylindrical calculus to re-define the perturbation and solve the inconsistency problem caused by moving/morphing solid boundaries. The approach is first validated for a simple case of a plate plunging in an incoming flow. Then we extend the approach to drag reduction and efficiency improvement of more complex cases. The optimized parameters provide a unique opportunity for physical understanding by comparison to the initial parameters. Supported by AFOSR.

  17. Aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth with flexible wings: a computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Insect wings are deformable structures that change shape passively and dynamically owing to inertial and aerodynamic forces during flight. It is still unclear how the three-dimensional and passive change of wing kinematics owing to inherent wing flexibility contributes to unsteady aerodynamics and energetics in insect flapping flight. Here, we perform a systematic fluid-structure interaction based analysis on the aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth, Manduca, with an integrated computational model of a hovering insect with rigid and flexible wings. Aerodynamic performance of flapping wings with passive deformation or prescribed deformation is evaluated in terms of aerodynamic force, power and efficiency. Our results reveal that wing flexibility can increase downwash in wake and hence aerodynamic force: first, a dynamic wing bending is observed, which delays the breakdown of leading edge vortex near the wing tip, responsible for augmenting the aerodynamic force-production; second, a combination of the dynamic change of wing bending and twist favourably modifies the wing kinematics in the distal area, which leads to the aerodynamic force enhancement immediately before stroke reversal. Moreover, an increase in hovering efficiency of the flexible wing is achieved as a result of the wing twist. An extensive study of wing stiffness effect on aerodynamic performance is further conducted through a tuning of Young's modulus and thickness, indicating that insect wing structures may be optimized not only in terms of aerodynamic performance but also dependent on many factors, such as the wing strength, the circulation capability of wing veins and the control of wing movements. PMID:21831896

  18. Aerodynamic potpourri

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Wilson

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the

  19. Physically-based aerodynamic flight of birds: an interactive approach to behavioral flocking 

    E-print Network

    Ringham, Michael Lynn

    1996-01-01

    . Previous attempts at simulating flocks realistically, although believable, do not consider the subtle motions a bird makes when maneuvering to remain in a flock. The motion of the bird's wing is pre-stored as a cubic spline curve. Aerodynamic properties...

  20. Intelligent aerodynamic\\/propulsion flight control for flight safety: a nonlinear adaptive approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moshe Idan; Matthew Johnson; Anthony J. Calise; John Kaneshige

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an intelligent fault tolerant flight control system that blends aerodynamic and propulsion actuation for safe flight operation in the presence of actuator failures. Fault tolerance is obtained by a nonlinear adaptive control strategy based on on-line learning neural networks and actuator reallocation scheme. The adaptive control block incorporates a recently developed technique for adaptation in the presence

  1. An approach for the development of an aerodynamic-structural interaction numerical simulation for aeropropulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Naziar, J. [Boeing Commerical Airplane Group, Seattle, WA (United States). Propulsion Research; Couch, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Davis, M. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Arnold Air Force Base, TN (United States). Arnold Engineering Development Center

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, aeropropulsion structural performance and aerodynamic performance have been designed separately and later mated together via flight testing. In today`s atmosphere of declining resources, it is imperative that more productive ways of designing and verifying aeropropulsion performance and structural interaction be made available to the aerospace industry. One method of obtaining a more productive design and evaluation capability is through the use of numerical simulations. Currently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a generalized fluid/structural interaction code known as ALE3D. This code is capable of characterizing fluid and structural interaction for components such as the combustor, fan/stators, inlet and/or nozzles. This code solves the 3D Euler equations and has been applied to several aeropropulsion applications such as a supersonic inlet and a combustor rupture simulation. To characterize aerodynamic-structural interaction for rotating components such as the compressor, appropriate turbomachinery simulations would need to be implemented within the ALE3D structure. The Arnold Engineering Development Center is currently developing a three-dimensional compression system code known as TEACC (Turbine Engine Analysis Compressor Code). TEACC also solves the 3D Euler equations and is intended to simulate dynamic behavior such as inlet distortion, surge or rotating stall. The technology being developed within the TEACC effort provides the necessary turbomachinery simulation for implementation into ALE3D. This paper describes a methodology to combine three-dimensional aerodynamic turbomachinery technology into the existing aerodynamic-structural interaction simulation, ALE3D to obtain the desired aerodynamic and structural integrated simulation for an aeropropulsion system.

  2. Laboratory evaluation of fan/filter units' aerodynamic and energy performance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Jeng, Ming-Shan

    2004-07-27

    The paper discusses the benefits of having a consistent testing method to characterize aerodynamic and energy performance of FFUs. It presents evaluation methods of laboratory-measured performance of ten relatively new, 1220 mm x 610 mm (or 4 ft x 2 ft) fan-filter units (FFUs), and includes results of a set of relevant metrics such as energy performance indices (EPI) based upon the sample FFUs tested. This paper concludes that there are variations in FFUs' performance, and that using a consistent testing and evaluation method can generate compatible and comparable FFU performance information. The paper also suggests that benefits and opportunities exist for our method of testing FFU energy performance to be integrated in future recommended practices.

  3. Comparison of Computational Approaches for Rapid Aerodynamic Assessment of Small UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Theresa C.; Lynch, C. Eric; Viken, Sally A.; Favaregh, Noah; Zeune, Cale; Williams, Nathan; Dansie, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methods were used to determine the basic aerodynamic, performance, and stability and control characteristics of the unmanned air vehicle (UAV), Kahu. Accurate and timely prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics of small UAVs is an essential part of military system acquisition and air-worthiness evaluations. The forces and moments of the UAV were predicted using a variety of analytical methods for a range of configurations and conditions. The methods included Navier Stokes (N-S) flow solvers (USM3D, Kestrel and Cobalt) that take days to set up and hours to converge on a single solution; potential flow methods (PMARC, LSAERO, and XFLR5) that take hours to set up and minutes to compute; empirical methods (Datcom) that involve table lookups and produce a solution quickly; and handbook calculations. A preliminary aerodynamic database can be developed very efficiently by using a combination of computational tools. The database can be generated with low-order and empirical methods in linear regions, then replacing or adjusting the data as predictions from higher order methods are obtained. A comparison of results from all the data sources as well as experimental data obtained from a wind-tunnel test will be shown and the methods will be evaluated on their utility during each portion of the flight envelope.

  4. Critical evaluation of the unsteady aerodynamics approach to dynamic stability at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    Bifurcation theory is used to analyze the nonlinear dynamic stability characteristics of an aircraft subject to single-degree-of-freedom. The requisite moment of the aerodynamic forces in the equations of motion is shown to be representable in a form equivalent to the response to finite amplitude oscillations. It is shown how this information can be deduced from the case of infinitesimal-amplitude oscillations. The bifurcation theory analysis reveals that when the bifurcation parameter is increased beyond a critical value at which the aerodynamic damping vanishes, new solutions representing finite amplitude periodic motions bifurcate from the previously stable steady motion. The sign of a simple criterion, cast in terms of aerodynamic properties, determines whether the bifurcating solutions are stable or unstable. For the pitching motion of flat-plate airfoils flying at supersonic/hypersonic speed and for oscillation of flaps at transonic speed, the bifurcation is subcritical, implying either the exchanges of stability between steady and periodic motion are accompanied by hysteresis phenomena, or that potentially large aperiodic departures from steady motion may develop.

  5. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  6. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  7. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  8. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  9. Energy-Efficient Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ossama Younis; Sonia Fahmy

    Prolonged network lifetime, scalability, and load balancing are important requirements for many ad-hoc sensor network applications. Clustering sensor nodes is an effective technique for achieving these goals. In this work, we propose a new energy-efficient approach for clustering nodes in ad- hoc sensor networks. Based on this approach, we present a protocol, HEED (Hybrid Energy-Efficient Distributed clustering), that periodically selects

  10. The aerodynamic design and performance of the General Electric/NASA EEE fan. [Energy Efficient Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Hager, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and test results of the fan and quarter-stage component for the GE/NASA Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) are presented. The fan is a high bypass ratio, single-stage design having 32 part-span shrouded rotor blades, coupled with a unique quarter-stage arrangement that provides additional core-stream pressure ratio and particle separation. The fan produces a bypass pressure ratio of 1.65 at the exit of the low aspect ratio vane/frame and a core-stream pressure ratio of 1.67 at the entrance to the core frame struts. The full-scale fan vehicle was instrumented, assembled and tested as a component in November 1981. Performance mapping was conducted over a range of speeds and bypass ratios using individually-controlled bypass and core-stream discharge valves. The fan bypass and core-stream test data showed excellent results, with the fan exceeding all performance goals at the important engine operating conditions.

  11. The Impact of Active Aerodynamic Load Control on Fatigue and Energy Capture at Low Wind Speed Sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dale E. Berg; David G. Wilson; Matthew F. Barone; Brian R. Resor; Jonathan C. Berg; Joshua A. Paquette; Jose R. Zayas; Sridhar Kota; Gregory Ervin; Dragan Maric

    Abstract † Active aerodynamic ,load control of wind turbine blades has been,heavily researched,for years by the,wind energy,research,community and,shows ,great promise ,for reducing ,turbine fatigue damage., One,way,to benefit,from this technology,is to choose,to utilize a larger,rotor ona,turbine tower ,and ,drive train to realize increased,turbine ,energy ,capture ,while keeping,the fatigue damage ,of critical turbine components,at the ,original levels. To assess this rotor-increase potential,

  12. Animation aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jakub Wejchert; David R. Haumann

    1991-01-01

    Methods based on aerodynamics are developed to simulate and control the motion of objects in fluid flows. To simplify the physics for animation, the problem is broken down into two parts: a fluid flow regime and an object boundary regime. With this simplification one can approximate the realistic behaviour of objects moving in liquids or air. It also enables a

  13. A Parallel Cartesian Approach for External Aerodynamics of Vehicles with Complex Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.

    2001-01-01

    This workshop paper presents the current status in the development of a new approach for the solution of the Euler equations on Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries in three dimensions on distributed and shared memory architectures. The approach uses adaptively refined Cartesian hexahedra to fill the computational domain. Where these cells intersect the geometry, they are cut by the boundary into arbitrarily shaped polyhedra which receive special treatment by the solver. The presentation documents a newly developed multilevel upwind solver based on a flexible domain-decomposition strategy. One novel aspect of the work is its use of space-filling curves (SFC) for memory efficient on-the-fly parallelization, dynamic re-partitioning and automatic coarse mesh generation. Within each subdomain the approach employs a variety reordering techniques so that relevant data are on the same page in memory permitting high-performance on cache-based processors. Details of the on-the-fly SFC based partitioning are presented as are construction rules for the automatic coarse mesh generation. After describing the approach, the paper uses model problems and 3- D configurations to both verify and validate the solver. The model problems demonstrate that second-order accuracy is maintained despite the presence of the irregular cut-cells in the mesh. In addition, it examines both parallel efficiency and convergence behavior. These investigations demonstrate a parallel speed-up in excess of 28 on 32 processors of an SGI Origin 2000 system and confirm that mesh partitioning has no effect on convergence behavior.

  14. An empirical expression to relate aerodynamic and surface temperatures for use within1 single-source energy balance models2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 n.1 An empirical expression to relate aerodynamic and surface temperatures for use within1 single that the14 reference temperature for the estimation of convective fluxes, the aerodynamic temperature, is15 between the aerodynamic22 and the air temperatures and the difference between the surface and the air

  15. Rarefied aerodynamic measurements in hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, K.

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve the feasibility of space missions, the prediction accuracy of rarefied aerodynamics is one of the important factors. To improve rarefied aerodynamic predictions, the determination of accommodation coefficients and direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamic forces are crucial. Thus, at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, a hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel has been developed for rarefied aerodynamic measurements. In this work, we have utilized both experimental and numerical approaches for rarefied hypersonic aerodynamic measurements, and the measurement schemes have been developed by using pendulous models for accommodation coefficients and for aeroshell aerodynamic characteristics. Consequently, we have successfully demonstrated measurements of accommodation coefficients and rarefied aerodynamic characteristics for an aeroshell.

  16. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  17. A unified approach to aerodynamic damping and drag/lift instabilities, and its application to dry inclined cable galloping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, J. H. G.; Larose, G. L.

    2006-02-01

    Inclined cables of cable-stayed bridges often experience large amplitude vibrations. One of the potential excitation mechanisms is dry inclined cable galloping, which has been observed in wind tunnel tests but which has not previously been fully explained theoretically. In this paper, a general expression is derived for the quasi-steady aerodynamic damping (positive or negative) of a cylinder of arbitrary cross-section yawed/inclined to the flow, for small amplitude vibrations in any plane. The expression covers the special cases of conventional quasi-steady aerodynamic damping, Den Hartog galloping and the drag crisis, as well as dry inclined cable galloping. A nondimensional aerodynamic damping parameter governing this behaviour is proposed, which is a function of only the Reynolds number, the angle between the wind velocity and the cable axis, and the orientation of the vibration plane. Measured static force coefficients from wind tunnel tests have been used with the theoretical expression to predict values of this parameter. Two main areas of instability (i.e. negative aerodynamic damping) have been identified, both in the critical Reynolds number region, one of which was previously observed in separate wind tunnel tests on a dynamic cable model. The minimum values of structural damping required to prevent dry inclined cable galloping are defined, and other factors in the behaviour in practice are discussed.

  18. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the reduction of bluff-body noise. Xiaoyu Wang and Xiaofeng Sun discuss the interaction of fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method. S Saito and his colleagues in JAXA report the development of active devices for reducing helicopter noise. The paper by A Tamura and M Tsutahara proposes a brand new methodology for aerodynamic sound by applying the lattice Boltzmann finite difference method. As the method solves the fluctuation of air density directly, it has the advantage of not requiring modeling of the sound generation. M A Langthjem and M Nakano solve the hole-tone feedback cycle in jet flow by a numerical method. Y Ogami and S Akishita propose the application of a line-vortex method to the three-dimensional separated flow from a bluff body. I hope that a second issue on aerodynamic sound will be published in FDR in the not too distant future.

  19. Awesome Aerodynamics!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    The following resource is from Lessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. In this particular lesson, students will learn about the role of scientific research in the design of competition suits for athletes in the Winter Olympics. Students will also explore and research the concept of aerodynamics, and conduct their own scientific experiment to gain an understanding of this concept.

  20. Aerodynamics at the Particle Level

    E-print Network

    Charles A. Crummer

    2012-09-23

    This paper is intended to clarify some of the rather well-known aerodynamic phenomena. It is also intended to pique the interest of the layman as well as the professional. All aerodynamic forces on a surface are caused by collisions of fluid particles with the surface. While the standard approach to fluid dynamics, which is founded on the fluid approximation, is effective in providing a means of calculating various behavior and properties, it begs the question of causality. The determination of the causes of many of the most important aerodynamic effects requires a microscopic examination of the fluid and of the surface with which it interacts. The Kutta-Joukowski theorem is investigated from first physical principles. It is noted that the circulation does not arise as a physical phenomenon. Various aerodynamic devices are discussed, e.g. rocket engine exhaust diffuser and the perfume atomizer.

  1. Single-and Multi-Point Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    E-print Network

    Zingg, David W.

    Single- and Multi-Point Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using A Parallel Newton-Krylov Approach, Ontario, M3H 5T6, Canada A Newton-Krylov algorithm for aerodynamic shape optimization in three dimensions the capabilities and efficiency of the approach. I. Introduction In the aerodynamic design of aircraft, there have

  2. A unified approach to aerodynamic damping and drag\\/lift instabilities, and its application to dry inclined cable galloping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. G. Macdonald; G. L. Larose

    2006-01-01

    Inclined cables of cable-stayed bridges often experience large amplitude vibrations. One of the potential excitation mechanisms is dry inclined cable galloping, which has been observed in wind tunnel tests but which has not previously been fully explained theoretically. In this paper, a general expression is derived for the quasi-steady aerodynamic damping (positive or negative) of a cylinder of arbitrary cross-section

  3. Aerodynamic design of electric and hybrid vehicles: A guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A typical present-day subcompact electric hybrid vehicle (EHV), operating on an SAE J227a D driving cycle, consumes up to 35% of its road energy requirement overcoming aerodynamic resistance. The application of an integrated system design approach, where drag reduction is an important design parameter, can increase the cycle range by more than 15%. This guidebook highlights a logic strategy for including aerodynamic drag reduction in the design of electric and hybrid vehicles to the degree appropriate to the mission requirements. Backup information and procedures are included in order to implement the strategy. Elements of the procedure are based on extensive wind tunnel tests involving generic subscale models and full-scale prototype EHVs. The user need not have any previous aerodynamic background. By necessity, the procedure utilizes many generic approximations and assumptions resulting in various levels of uncertainty. Dealing with these uncertainties, however, is a key feature of the strategy.

  4. A new technique for aerodynamic noise calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Pope, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method for the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation is presented. The method involves first solving for the time-dependent incompressible flow for the given geometry. This fully nonlinear method that is tailored to extract the relevant acoustic fluctuations seems to be an efficient approach to the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation.

  5. Numerical analysis of the effect of local energy supply on the aerodynamic drag and heat transfer of a spherically blunted body in a supersonic air flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. Levin; V. G. Gromov; N. E. Afonina

    2000-01-01

    The effect of local source of energy in a supersonic flow on the aerodynamic drag and heat transfer of a spherically blunted\\u000a body is studied numerically. Calculations are performed on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations for a thermally equilibrium\\u000a model of air. Data on the effect of the intensity and size of the energy source on the wave drag,

  6. Aerodynamic detuning analysis of an unstalled supersonic turbofan cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

    1985-01-01

    An approach to passive flutter control is aerodynamic detuning, defined as designed passage-to-passage differences in the unsteady aerodynamic flow field of a rotor blade row. Thus, aerodynamic detuning directly affects the fundamental driving mechanism for flutter. A model to demonstrate the enhanced supersonic aeroelastic stability associated with aerodynamic detuning is developed. The stability of an aerodynamically detuned cascade operating in a supersonic inlet flow field with a subsonic leading edge locus is analyzed, with the aerodynamic detuning accomplished by means of nonuniform circumferential spacing of adjacent rotor blades. The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on the blading are defined in terms of influence coefficients in a manner that permits the stability of both a conventional uniformally spaced rotor configuration as well as the detuned nonuniform circumferentially spaced rotor to be determined. With Verdon's uniformly spaced Cascade B as a baseline, this analysis is then utilized to demonstrate the potential enhanced aeroelastic stability associated with this particular type of aerodynamic detuning.

  7. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  8. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  9. Aerodynamics Antony Jameson

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    Chapter 11 Aerodynamics Antony Jameson Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA 1 Focus Multidimensional Domains 359 6 Time-stepping Schemes 365 7 Aerodynamic Shape Optimization 379 8 Related Chapters 400 Acknowledgment 400 References 400 1 FOCUS AND HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 1.1 Classical aerodynamics

  10. Heat transfer analysis of charring ablators under aerodynamic heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Lin; C. S. Yang

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – This work experimentally and numerically investigates the aerodynamic heating of the charring-ablating materials. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The experimental model is a stainless steel cone with an attached charring ablator, in which supersonic hot flow impinges. The initial numerical simulation is based on physical and mathematical models, including one-dimensional, unsteady energy transport and mass conservation equations, coupled with calculations of

  11. Aerodynamics as a subway design parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    A parametric sensitivity study has been performed on the system operational energy requirement in order to guide subway design strategy. Aerodynamics can play a dominant or trivial role, depending upon the system characteristics. Optimization of the aerodynamic parameters may not minimize the total operational energy. Isolation of the station box from the tunnel and reduction of the inertial power requirements pay the largest dividends in terms of the operational energy requirement.

  12. A new method to calibrate aerodynamic roughness over the Tibetan Plateau using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Timmermans, J.; Su, Z.; Mancini, M.

    2012-04-01

    Aerodynamic roughness height (Zom) is a key parameter required in land surface hydrological model, since errors in heat flux estimations are largely dependent on accurate optimization of this parameter. Despite its significance, it remains an uncertain parameter that is not easily determined. This is mostly because of non-linear relationship in Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) and unknown vertical characteristic of vegetation. Previous studies determined aerodynamic roughness using traditional wind profile method, remotely sensed vegetation index, minimization of cost function over MOS relationship or linear regression. However, these are complicated procedures that presume high accuracy for several other related parameters embedded in MOS equations. In order to simplify a procedure and reduce the number of parameters in need, this study suggests a new approach to extract aerodynamic roughness parameter via Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) that affords non-linearity and that requires only single or two heat flux measurement. So far, to our knowledge, no previous study has applied EnKF to aerodynamic roughness estimation, while a majority of data assimilation study has paid attention to land surface state variables such as soil moisture or land surface temperature. This approach was applied to grassland in semi-arid Tibetan area and maize on moderately wet condition in Italy. It was demonstrated that aerodynamic roughness parameter can inversely be tracked from data assimilated heat flux analysis. The aerodynamic roughness height estimated in this approach was consistent with eddy covariance result and literature value. Consequently, this newly estimated input adjusted the sensible heat overestimated and latent heat flux underestimated by the original Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model, suggesting better heat flux estimation especially during the summer Monsoon period. The advantage of this approach over other methodologies is that aerodynamic roughness height estimated in this way is useful even when eddy covariance data are absent and is time-variant over vegetation growth, as well as is not affected by saturation problem of remotely sensed vegetation index.

  13. Supersonic aerodynamic performance of truncated cones with repetitive laser pulse energy depositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasoh, A.; Kim, J.-H.; Yamashita, K.; Sakai, T.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the drag characteristics of truncated cones in Mach 1.94 flow with repetitive laser pulse energy depositions with a frequency of up to 80 kHz. The drag decrement is almost in proportion to the laser pulse repetition frequency, and scales with a greater-than-square power of the truncation diameter. The performance of the latter is associated with the effective area of pressure modulation and the effective residence time of vortices which are baroclinically generated after the interaction between laser-heated gas bubbles and the bow shock wave. With employing a concave head, the drag decrement is enhanced. With increasing the truncation diameter, the efficiency of energy deposition becomes higher; yet, within the operation range of this study the drag coefficient still remains high.

  14. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  15. Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

  16. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  17. Aerodynamics for Students

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    For those wanting a little more on the theory of aerodynamics, the University of Sydney has published this web textbook, "Aerodynamics for Students". In addition to information on fluid dynamics, flight theory, gas dynamics, propulsion, aircraft performance, and aeroelasticity, the textbook also includes data tables, computer programs, and simulations to aid in the study and understanding of aerodynamics. This textbook is a great resource for undergraduates studying engineering.

  18. Beginner's Guide to Aerodynamics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA's "Beginner's Guide to Aerodynamics" provides some general information on the basics of aerodynamics. The site allows users to explore at their own pace and level of interest. Some of the topics that are available here are: equations of motion, free falling, air resistance, force, gas properties, and atmosphere. Movies, reading materials, and activities are all available to accommodate a variety of different learning styles. This is an excellent resource, with great reference materials for anyone interested in learning more about aerodynamics.

  19. Wind-turbine aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Wilson

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamics of wind turbines is reviewed starting with effects of lift and drag on translating devices and proceeding through the performance aerodynamics of the horizontal-axis and vertical-axis machines currently in service. Horizontal-axis rotor aerodynamics is outlined and the performance limits are presented along with key assumptions and problem areas. The Darrieus rotor multiple streamtube analysis is developed and compared

  20. Aerodynamics of runback ice accretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Edward A.

    An experimental study of the effects of simulated runback ice accretions has been performed in order to describe their aerodynamic performance penalties and investigate their scaling for use in sub-scale aerodynamic testing. Runback ice accretions corresponding to three flight conditions, warm hold, cold hold and descent, were simulated and tested on the NACA 23012 and NACA 3415. The ice shapes were simulated on two levels of fidelity. Medium-fidelity simulations captured the chordwise location, cross-section, height distribution and chordwise extent of the ice accretion. Low-fidelity simulations captured their height and chordwise location. Two scaling methods were also employed. Each simulation was scaled based upon the ratio of the aerodynamic model chord to the full-scale icing model, called geometric scaling. The warm hold simulations were also scaled based upon the ratio of the local, clean-model boundary-layer thickness on the aerodynamic model to that of the icing model, called boundary-layer scaling. This method was employed because the geometrically-scaled simulations were found to be on the order of the boundary-layer thickness as the model approached stall. Following aerodynamic performance testing, fluorescent-oil flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry were used to investigate the flowfield resulting from the low-fidelity warm hold simulations. Results for this work have shown that runback ice accretions can cause significant aerodynamic performance penalties. In general, the NACA 23012 experienced greater aerodynamic performance penalties due to the runback simulations than did the NACA 3415. Low-fidelity simulations of the cold hold case agreed quite well with their medium fidelity counterparts. In the descent case, the level of variation in ice accretion height was too small for there to be a distinction between the low- and medium-fidelity cases. Low-fidelity simulations of the warm hold accretion did not agree well with the medium-fidelity simulation. In fact, the geometrically-scaled simulation was observed to increase the maximum lift and stalling angle-of-attack of the NACA 3415. Flowfield investigations using fluorescent-oil flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry showed that the simulations that were similar in height to the clean-model local boundary-layer thickness acted to stabilize the recovering boundary layer, delaying stall past the stalling angle-of-attack of the clean case.

  1. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  2. State of the art in wind turbine aerodynamics and aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, M. O. L.; Sørensen, J. N.; Voutsinas, S.; Sørensen, N.; Madsen, H. Aa.

    2006-06-01

    A comprehensive review of wind turbine aeroelasticity is given. The aerodynamic part starts with the simple aerodynamic Blade Element Momentum Method and ends with giving a review of the work done applying CFD on wind turbine rotors. In between is explained some methods of intermediate complexity such as vortex and panel methods. Also the different approaches to structural modelling of wind turbines are addressed. Finally, the coupling between the aerodynamic and structural modelling is shown in terms of possible instabilities and some examples.

  3. Aerodynamics and performance testing of the VAWT

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Early investigations suggest that reductions in cost of energy (COE) and increases in reliability for VAWT systems may be brought about through relatively inexpensive changes to the current aerodynamic design. This design uses blades of symmetrical cross-section mounted such that the radius from the rotating tower centerline is normal to the blade chord at roughly the 40% chord point. The envisioned changes to this existing design are intended to: (1) lower cut-in windspeed; (2) increase maximum efficiency; (3) limit maximum aerodynamic power; and (4) limit peak aerodynamic torques. This paper describes certain experiments designed to both better understand the aerodynamics of a section operating in an unsteady, curvilinear flowfield and achieve some of the desired changes in section properties. The common goal of all of these experiments is to lower VAWT COE and increase system reliability.

  4. Response of aerospace structures to reentry aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, D., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A bibliography on aerodynamic excitation and associated structural response is presented. Very little applicable data under actual reentry conditions was found, but many wind tunnel tests and some in-flight data were. Aerodynamic excitation and proposed space shuttle configurations and reentry trajectories were studied. Attached turbulent boundary layer, separated turbulent boundary layer, and base pressure fluctuations are the region of aerodynamic excitation most applicable to exterior panels of space shuttle-type vehicles; prediction techniques are presented for these environments. Methods for predicting the response of panel structures to acoustic excitation were investigated. A normal mode approach was developed for the low frequency response and a statistical energy approach was utilized for the high frequency response. A finite element model was made of a thermal protective system test panel. Computer programs were used to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the panel and to calculate the response of the panel to a reverberant acoustic field. Power spectral densities of response displacement and acceleration are presented.

  5. Topic in Depth - Aerodynamics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aerodynamics is the study of what makes things go fast, right? More specifically, itâ??s the study of the interaction between bodies and the atmosphere. This topic in depth highlights some fun websites on the science of aerodynamics, for beginners to researchers. If youâ??ve been watching Wimbeldon lately, you might have been wondering about the aerodynamics of tennis. Or maybe you were riding your bike the other day and wondering how you could pick up a little more speed next time. These sites can help explain.

  6. Aerodynamic Devices for Mitigation of Wind Damage Risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. X. Lin; P. R. Montpellier; C. W. Tillman; W. I. Riker

    Different from a conventional wisdom of damage risk mitigation by increasing structural resistance capacity, an aerodynamic approach seeks to mitigate damage risk at the source by reducing the load demand generated by wind. A recent such example is a series of patented aerodynamic roof edge devices designed to minimize uplifts generated by edge vortices. They are being evaluated by full-scale

  7. Development of aerodynamics for a solar race car

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroyuki Ozawa; Sumio Nishikawa; Dai Higashida

    1998-01-01

    The dominant factor of a solar car is running resistance, especially aerodynamic drag; and the reduction of the CD (drag coefficient)× A (frontal projected area) value is a crucial task to maximize the performance of a solar car. This paper will introduce the aerodynamic approach of the '96 Honda solar car which participated in the World Solar Challenge, the world's

  8. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used. PMID:17519203

  9. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  10. Science of Cycling: Aerodynamics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website, from the Exploratorium, reviews the aerodynamics of cycling. Wind resistance is often one of the biggest challenges that professional and amateur cyclists face. This site has a form that lets you "Calculate the Aerodynamic Drag and Propulsive Power of a Bicyclist". Use the form to calculate resistance using different inclines, velocity, weight or wind velocity. At the bottom of the page, you can find useful information and tips on reducing resistance. Check it out before your next bike ride!

  11. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  12. Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification

    E-print Network

    McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

    This paper reviews and summarizes techniques for monitoring thermal energy flows for the purpose of verifying energy savings in industrial and large institutional energy conservation projects. Approaches for monitoring hot and chilled water, steam...

  13. Knowledge Based Airfoil Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Greschner; C. Yu; S. Zheng; M. Zhuang; Z. J. Wang; F. Thiele

    A systematic investigation of the unsteady flows around a series of NACA airfoils is carried out. The main objective is to conduct manual design case studies on the connections between an airfoil shape characteristics and it s aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance. The approach employs the unsteady CFD flow simulations in the near field of an airfoil and the FW-H integral

  14. The bulk aerodynamic formulation over heterogeneous surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Mahrt

    1996-01-01

    This interpretative literature survey examines problems with application of the bulk aerodynamic method to spatially averaged fluxes over heterogeneous surfaces. This task is approached by tying together concepts from a diverse range of recent studies on subgrid parameterization, the roughness sublayer, the roll of large “inactive” boundary-layer eddies, internal boundary-layer growth, the equilibrium sublayer, footprint theory and the blending height.

  15. Darrieus rotor aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Darrieus wind turbines are relatively simple devices. Fixed geometry blades, usually only two or three in number, rotate about a vertical axis providing power to ground mounted power conversion or absorption machinery. No yaw control or power regulation systems are required. This simplicity, however, does not extend to the rotor's aerodynamics. The blade elements travel along circular paths through air whose relative speed and direction are constantly changing. The blade elements operate both unstalled and stalled with aerodynamic stall providing the rotor's inherent power regulation. The blade elements encounter their own wakes and those generated by other elements. These features combine to cause the thorough analysis of Darrieus rotor aerodynamics to be a challenging undertaking.

  16. A Manager's Approach to Energy Cost Management 

    E-print Network

    Spencer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A major responsibility of management is the control and containment of operating costs. Energy costs are a major portion of the industrial budget. GM has developed a 3 phase approach to energy conservation. Phase I -Administrative Controls...

  17. A common geometric data-base approach for computer-aided manufacturing of wind-tunnel models and theoretical aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, M. J.; Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    A more automated process to produce wind tunnel models using existing facilities is discussed. A process was sought to more rapidly determine the aerodynamic characteristics of advanced aircraft configurations. Such aerodynamic characteristics are determined from theoretical analyses and wind tunnel tests of the configurations. Computers are used to perform the theoretical analyses, and a computer aided manufacturing system is used to fabricate the wind tunnel models. In the past a separate set of input data describing the aircraft geometry had to be generated for each process. This process establishes a common data base by enabling the computer aided manufacturing system to use, via a software interface, the geometric input data generated for the theoretical analysis. Thus, only one set of geometric data needs to be generated. Tests reveal that the process can reduce by several weeks the time needed to produce a wind tunnel model component. In addition, this process increases the similarity of the wind tunnel model to the mathematical model used by the theoretical aerodynamic analysis programs. Specifically, the wind tunnel model can be machined to within 0.008 in. of the original mathematical model. However, the software interface is highly complex and cumbersome to operate, making it unsuitable for routine use. The procurement of an independent computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing system with the capability to support both the theoretical analysis and the manufacturing tasks was recommended.

  18. Applications of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition for Inviscid Transonic Aerodynamics

    E-print Network

    Tan, Bui-Thanh

    Two extensions to the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) technique are considered for steady transonic aerodynamic applications. The first is to couple the POD approach with a cubic spline interpolation procedure in ...

  19. Aerodynamics for Students

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Web site serves as an online aerodynamics textbook for college students. Offered by the department of Aerospace, Mechanical, and Mechatronic Engineering at the University of Sydney, the material is divided into several main categories. These include fluid mechanics, aerodynamics, gasdynamics, aircraft performance, and propulsion. Each of these sections has many specific topics that are discussed in detail. There are MATLAB, Excel, and FORTRAN files and data sheets that accompany the reading, but they are best used as reference and are not needed to understand most of the material.

  20. Entry aerodynamics and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olstad, W.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of the problems of entry aerodynamics and heating is given with emphasis on survival of the probe, predictability of performance, and reliability of performance. Technological challenges to performance prediction are considered and include: turbulent heat transfer, radiation blockage, chemical state of the shock layer, afterbody heat transfer, asymmetric ablation, and real-gas aerodynamics. It is indicated that various obstacles must be overcome in order to achieve technology readiness. These obstacles are considered to be: extrapolations from ground tests to flight; lack of flight experience; lack of parametric data; and uncertain knowledge of atmospherics.

  1. Impact of computers on aerodynamics research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.

    1984-01-01

    Factors motivating the development of computational aerodynamics as a discipline are traced back to the limitations of the tools available to the aerodynamicist before the development of digital computers. Governing equations in exact and approximate forms are discussed together with approaches to their numerical solution. Example results obtained from the successively refined forms of the equations are presented and discussed, both in the context of levels of computer power required and the degree of the effect that their solution has on aerodynamic research and development. Factors pacing advances in computational aerodynamics are identified, including the amount of computational power required to take the next major step in the discipline. Finally, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program - with its 1987 target of achieving a sustained computational rate of 1 billion floating-point operations per second operating on a memory of 240 million words - is briefly discussed in terms of its projected effect on the future of computational aerodynamics.

  2. Nonlinear aerodynamic forces on thin flat plate: Numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lin; Xu, You-Lin; Liao, Haili

    2014-01-01

    This paper first presents a numerical simulation of nonlinear aerodynamic forces on a thin flat plate through an integration of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method and the forced asymptotic oscillation method. The thin flat plate is forced to have either asymptotic torsional oscillation or asymptotic vertical oscillation of increasing amplitude. A multiple-domain mesh technique together with unstructured dynamic meshes is used in the CFD simulation to accommodate large amplitude oscillations of the plate. The instantaneous frequencies and amplitudes of the aerodynamic forces are then identified from the simulated asymptotic aerodynamic force time histories using the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in terms of the CWT ridges. Extensive numerical studies are finally performed to examine the feasibility of the proposed approach. The results show that the CFD method used in this study can properly simulate nonlinear aerodynamic forces on the plate. The amplitude of the aerodynamic force depends on the amplitude of the forced oscillation and there are high-order harmonic aerodynamic forces of higher frequency than the forced oscillation frequency, both indicating the nonlinearity of aerodynamic forces. The results also show the flutter derivatives associated with self-excited aerodynamic forces depend on the amplitude of forced oscillation in addition to reduced velocity.

  3. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  4. Wind turbine wake aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. J. Vermeer; J. N. Sørensen; A. Crespo

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed

  5. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  6. Silicon carbide whiskers: characterization and aerodynamic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Powell, Q H; Smith, S M; Johnson, N F

    1995-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) whiskers are fiberlike materials with a wide range of industrial applications. Industrial hygiene samplings of the material are taken to monitor and control possible exposures to workers. This study characterizes an SiC whisker in detail, including its width-length distribution, aspect ratio, particle density, and aerodynamic size distribution. The SiC whiskers were aerosolized, and samples from a filter, cascade impactor, and aerosol centrifuge were taken. The diameter-length distribution of SiC fibers determined by electron microscopy from filter samples was found to follow the bivariate lognormal distribution. The aerodynamic size of a fiber aerosol depends not only on the particle dimension and density but also on the orientation of its axis with respect to flow. The results show that the aerodynamic size distribution obtained from the impactor was consistent with the predicted value, assuming the long axis of the fiber was parallel to the flow toward the collection substrate. On the other hand, the aerodynamic size in the aerosol centrifuge was consistent with results for a perpendicular orientation. A larger aerodynamic size (20-25%) was obtained in the case of impactor data as compared with centrifuge data. The respirable fraction estimated from the cascade impactor data was 65%, consistent with the estimate from bivariate analysis (67%) but smaller than the estimated fraction from the aerosol centrifuge (76%). The results show that the data obtained with the bivariate analysis of fiber dimensions had good correlation with the cascade impactor data, and this approach can be used to predict the aerodynamic size distribution and the size-selective fractions for fiber aerosols from filter samples. PMID:7572614

  7. Liquefaction Assessment by Energy Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kanagalingam

    Summary Soil liquefaction phenomenon involves progressive intergrain contact deformation, slip, reorganization of contacts, and eventual collapse of soil skeleton. During the process leading to liquefaction, energy is continuously lost mainly along frictional contacts. Many researchers identified the cumulative energy lost up to liquefaction as a useful index for liquefaction potential assessment. This paper presents a theoretical framework for estimating the

  8. Aerodynamic Focusing of Nanoparticles: II. Numerical Simulation of Particle Motion Through Aerodynamic Lenses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoliang Wang; Ashok Gidwani; Steven L. Girshick; Peter H. McMurry

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a numerical simulation methodology that is able to accurately characterize the focusing performance of aerodynamic lens systems. The commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT was used to simulate the gas flow field. Particle trajectories were tracked using the Lagrangian approach. Brownian motion of nanoparticles was successfully incorporated in our numerical simulations. This simulation tool was then

  9. On aerodynamic wake analysis and its relation to total aerodynamic drag in a wind tunnel environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rui M. Guterres

    2002-01-01

    The present work was developed with the goal of advancing the state of the art in the application of three-dimensional wake data analysis to the quantification of aerodynamic drag on a body in a low speed wind tunnel environment. Analysis of the existing tools, their strengths and limitations is presented. Improvements to the existing analysis approaches were made. Software tools

  10. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  11. Aerodynamics: The Wright Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the basic principles of aerodynamics. Included in the presentation are: a few demonstrations of the principles, an explanation of the concepts of lift, drag, thrust and weight, a description of Bernoulli's principle, the concept of the airfoil (i.e., the shape of the wing) and how that effects lift, and the method of controlling an aircraft by manipulating the four forces using control surfaces.

  12. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  13. Approaches to Sustainable Energy Consumption Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damjan Krajnc; Rebeka Lukman; Peter Glavic

    Unsustainable consumption mostly refers to energy resources and materials’ utilization, fostered by human activity. Therefore,\\u000a energy consumption represents a major challenge when approaching sustainable development issues. Despite many environmental\\u000a strategies relying on improvements in energy and material efficiency, the World’s energy demand is likely to increase in line\\u000a with its population. In addition, cultural patterns of human activities are closely

  14. Calibration of aerodynamic roughness over the Tibetan Plateau with Ensemble Kalman Filter analysed heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Timmermans, J.; Su, Z.; Mancini, M.

    2012-11-01

    Aerodynamic roughness height (Zom) is a key parameter required in several land surface hydrological models, since errors in heat flux estimation are largely dependent on optimization of this input. Despite its significance, it remains an uncertain parameter which is not readily determined. This is mostly because of non-linear relationship in Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS) equations and uncertainty of vertical characteristic of vegetation in a large scale. Previous studies often determined aerodynamic roughness using a minimization of cost function over MOS relationship or linear regression over it, traditional wind profile method, or remotely sensed vegetation index. However, these are complicated procedures that require a high accuracy for several other related parameters embedded in serveral equations including MOS. In order to simplify this procedure and reduce the number of parameters in need, this study suggests a new approach to extract aerodynamic roughness parameter from single or two heat flux measurements analyzed via Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) that affords non-linearity. So far, to our knowledge, no previous study has applied EnKF to aerodynamic roughness estimation, while the majority of data assimilation study have paid attention to updates of other land surface state variables such as soil moisture or land surface temperature. The approach of this study was applied to grassland in semi-arid Tibetan Plateau and maize on moderately wet condition in Italy. It was demonstrated that aerodynamic roughness parameter can be inversely tracked from heat flux EnKF final analysis. The aerodynamic roughness height estimated in this approach was consistent with eddy covariance method and literature value. Through a calibration of this parameter, this adjusted the sensible heat previously overestimated and latent heat flux previously underestimated by the original Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model. It was considered that this improved heat flux estimation especially during the summer Monsoon period, based upon a comparison with precipitation and soil moisture field measurement. For an advantage of this approach over other previous methodologies, this approach is useful even when eddy covariance data are absent at a large scale and is time-variant over vegetation growth, as well as is not directly affected by saturation problem of remotely sensed vegetation index.

  15. Aerodynamic database development of the ESA intermediate experimental vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzella, Giuseppe; Marino, Giuliano; Rufolo, Giuseppe C.

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the aerodynamic database development of the Intermediate Experiment Vehicle. The aerodynamic analysis, carried out for the whole flight scenario, relies on computational fluid dynamics, wind tunnel test, and engineering-based design data generated during the project phases, from rarefied flow conditions, to hypersonic continuum flow up to reach subsonic speeds regime. Therefore, the vehicle aerodynamic database covers the range of Mach number, angle of attack, sideslip and control surface deflections foreseen for the vehicle nominal re-entry. In particular, the databasing activities are developed in the light of build-up approach. This means that all aerodynamic force and moment coefficients are provided by means of a linear summation over certain number of incremental contributions such as, for example, effect of sideslip angle, aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, etc. Each force and moment coefficient is treated separately and appropriate equation is provided, in which all the pertinent contributions for obtaining the total coefficient for any selected flight conditions appear. To this aim, all the available numerical and experimental aerodynamic data are gathered in order to explicit the functional dependencies from each aerodynamic model addend through polynomial expressions obtained with the least squares method. These polynomials are function of the primary variable that drives the phenomenon whereas secondary dependencies are introduced directly into its unknown coefficients which are determined by means of best-fitting algorithms.

  16. Shuttle system ascent aerodynamic and plume heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, L. D.; Greenwood, T. F.; Lee, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The shuttle program provided a challenge to the aerothermodynamicist due to the complexity of the flow field around the vehicle during ascent, since the configuration causes multiple shock interactions between the elements. Wind tunnel tests provided data for the prediction of the ascent design heating environment which involves both plume and aerodynamic heating phenomena. The approach for the heating methodology based on ground test firings and the use of the wind tunnel data to formulate the math models is discussed.

  17. Aerodynamics of a Cryogenic Semi-Tanker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Salari, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    The design of a modern cryogenic semi-tanker is based primarily upon functionality with little consideration given to aerodynamic drag. As a result, these tankers have maintained the appearance of a wheeled cylinder for several decades. To reduce the fuel usage of these vehicles, this study investigates their aerodynamics. A detailed understanding of the flow field about the vehicle and its influence on aerodynamic drag is obtained by performing Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of a full-scale tractor and cryogenic tanker-trailer operating at highway speed within a crosswind. The tanker-trailer has a length to diameter ratio of 6.3. The Reynolds number, based upon the tanker diameter, is 4.0x10^6, while the effective vehicle yaw angle is 6.1 . The flow field about the vehicle is characterized by large flow separation regions at the tanker underbody and base. In addition, the relatively large gap between the tractor and the tanker-trailer allows the free-stream flow to be entrained into the tractor-tanker gap. By mitigating these drag-producing phenomena through the use of simple geometry modifications, it may be possible to reduce the aerodynamic drag of cryogenic semi-tankers and, thereby, improve their fuel economy. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. TAD- THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1994-01-01

    This theoretical aerodynamics program, TAD, was developed to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding rocket configurations. These slender, axisymmetric finned vehicle configurations have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high speed armament. Over a given range of Mach numbers, TAD will compute the normal force coefficient derivative, the center-of-pressure, the roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, the roll damping moment coefficient derivative, and the pitch damping moment coefficient derivative of a sounding rocket configured vehicle. The vehicle may consist of a sharp pointed nose of cone or tangent ogive shape, up to nine other body divisions of conical shoulder, conical boattail, or circular cylinder shape, and fins of trapezoid planform shape with constant cross section and either three or four fins per fin set. The characteristics computed by TAD have been shown to be accurate to within ten percent of experimental data in the supersonic region. The TAD program calculates the characteristics of separate portions of the vehicle, calculates the interference between separate portions of the vehicle, and then combines the results to form a total vehicle solution. Also, TAD can be used to calculate the characteristics of the body or fins separately as an aid in the design process. Input to the TAD program consists of simple descriptions of the body and fin geometries and the Mach range of interest. Output includes the aerodynamic characteristics of the total vehicle, or user-selected portions, at specified points over the mach range. The TAD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 123K of 8 bit bytes. The TAD program was originally developed in 1967 and last updated in 1972.

  19. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  20. Aerodynamics: The Mathematical Implications

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Smikle, Hermine E.

    2000-03-11

    This unit from the Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute is "an attempt to develop a unit in mathematics that will provide topics for students interested in the aviation trades." The unit can be used to cover all areas of mathematics from areas in geometry sectors to basic addition of fraction and decimal numbers. These general math concepts will be introduced using aerodynamics and aviation language and it is hoped that students will begin "to understand the applicability of some of the mathematics concepts they have learned." This curriculum unit also includes sample lesson plans and references.

  1. ENPEP: An integrated approach to energy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, B.P.; Cirillo, R.R.; Buehring, W.A.

    1992-09-01

    Many models have been developed to analyze various aspects of the energy system. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) is a set of microcomputer-based energy planning tools that are designed to provide an integrated analysis capability. ENPEP begins with a macroeconomic analysis, develops an energy demand forecast based on this analysis, carries out an integrated supply/demand analysis for the entire energy system, evaluates the electric system component of the energy system in detail, and determines the impacts of alternative configurations. This approach is an enhancement of existing techniques in that it places emphasis on looking at the electric system as an integral part of the entire energy supply system. Also, it explicitly considers the impacts the power system has on the rest of the energy system and on the economy as a whole.

  2. ENPEP: An integrated approach to energy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, B.P.; Cirillo, R.R.; Buehring, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Many models have been developed to analyze various aspects of the energy system. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) is a set of microcomputer-based energy planning tools that are designed to provide an integrated analysis capability. ENPEP begins with a macroeconomic analysis, develops an energy demand forecast based on this analysis, carries out an integrated supply/demand analysis for the entire energy system, evaluates the electric system component of the energy system in detail, and determines the impacts of alternative configurations. This approach is an enhancement of existing techniques in that it places emphasis on looking at the electric system as an integral part of the entire energy supply system. Also, it explicitly considers the impacts the power system has on the rest of the energy system and on the economy as a whole.

  3. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  4. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antony Jameson

    1988-01-01

    Abstract This paper addresses the question of how to modify in aerodynamic design to improve the performance. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey is included. 1 Introduction and historical survey Computers have had a twofold impact on the science of aerodynamics. On the one

  5. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  6. Aerodynamics of runback ice accretions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward A. Whalen

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of simulated runback ice accretions has been performed in order to describe their aerodynamic performance penalties and investigate their scaling for use in sub-scale aerodynamic testing. Runback ice accretions corresponding to three flight conditions, warm hold, cold hold and descent, were simulated and tested on the NACA 23012 and NACA 3415. The ice shapes

  7. Inner workings of aerodynamic sweep

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Wadia; P. N. Szucs; D. W. Crall

    1998-01-01

    The recent trend in using aerodynamic sweep to improve the performance of transonic blading has been one of the more significant technological evolutions for compression components in turbomachinery. This paper reports on the experimental and analytical assessment of the pay-off derived from both aft and forward sweep technology with respect to aerodynamic performance and stability. The single-stage experimental investigation includes

  8. Aeroacoustic and aerodynamic applications of the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Smith, Charles A.; Karamcheti, Krishnamurty

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of nonequilibrium thermodynamics associated with viscous flows are examined and related to developments to the understanding of specific phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. A key element of the nonequilibrium theory is the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady dissipative processes near equilibrium, and variational calculus is used to apply this principle to several examples of viscous flow. A review of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and its role in fluid motion are presented. Several formulations are presented of the local entropy production rate and the local energy dissipation rate, two quantities that are of central importance to the theory. These expressions and the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady viscous flows are used to identify parallel-wall channel flow and irrotational flow as having minimally dissipative velocity distributions. Features of irrotational, steady, viscous flow near an airfoil, such as the effect of trailing-edge radius on circulation, are also found to be compatible with the minimum principle. Finally, the minimum principle is used to interpret the stability of infinitesimal and finite amplitude disturbances in an initially laminar, parallel shear flow, with results that are consistent with experiment and linearized hydrodynamic stability theory. These results suggest that a thermodynamic approach may be useful in unifying the understanding of many diverse phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics.

  9. Aeroacoustic and aerodynamic applications of the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Smith, Charles A.; Karamcheti, Krishnamurty

    1991-06-01

    Recent developments in the field of nonequilibrium thermodynamics associated with viscous flows are examined and related to developments to the understanding of specific phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. A key element of the nonequilibrium theory is the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady dissipative processes near equilibrium, and variational calculus is used to apply this principle to several examples of viscous flow. A review of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and its role in fluid motion are presented. Several formulations are presented of the local entropy production rate and the local energy dissipation rate, two quantities that are of central importance to the theory. These expressions and the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady viscous flows are used to identify parallel-wall channel flow and irrotational flow as having minimally dissipative velocity distributions. Features of irrotational, steady, viscous flow near an airfoil, such as the effect of trailing-edge radius on circulation, are also found to be compatible with the minimum principle. Finally, the minimum principle is used to interpret the stability of infinitesimal and finite amplitude disturbances in an initially laminar, parallel shear flow, with results that are consistent with experiment and linearized hydrodynamic stability theory. These results suggest that a thermodynamic approach may be useful in unifying the understanding of many diverse phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics.

  10. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  11. Aerodynamics of Mars Odyssey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, Naruhisa; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and free-molecular analyses were used to provide aerothermodynamic characteristics of the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The results of these analyses were used to develop an aerodynamic database that was used extensively for the pre-flight planning and in-flight execution for the aerobraking phase of the Mars Odyssey mission. During aerobraking operations, the database was used to reconstruct atmospheric density profiles during each pass. The reconstructed data was used to update the atmospheric model, which was used to determine the strategy for subsequent aerobraking maneuvers. The aerodynamic database was also used together with data obtained from on-board accelerometers to reconstruct the spacecraft attitudes throughout each aerobraking pass. The reconstructed spacecraft attitudes are in good agreement with those determined by independent on-board inertial measurements for all aerobraking passes. The differences in the pitch attitudes are significantly less than the preflight uncertainties of +/-2.9%. The differences in the yaw attitudes are influenced by zonal winds. When latitudinal gradients of density are small, the differences in the yaw attitudes are significantly less than the preflight uncertainties.

  12. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  13. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  14. Wind turbine design codes: A preliminary comparison of the aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.L. Jr.; Wright, A.D.; Tangler, J.L.

    1997-12-01

    The National Wind Technology Center of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is comparing several computer codes used to design and analyze wind turbines. The first part of this comparison is to determine how well the programs predict the aerodynamic behavior of turbines with no structural degrees of freedom. Without general agreement on the aerodynamics, it is futile to try to compare the structural response due to the aerodynamic input. In this paper, the authors compare the aerodynamic loads for three programs: Garrad Hassan`s BLADED, their own WT-PERF, and the University of Utah`s YawDyn. This report documents a work in progress and compares only two-bladed, downwind turbines.

  15. Aerodynamic prediction techniques for hypersonic configuration design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of approximate theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at moderate hypersonic speeds was performed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to preliminary configuration design level of effort. Potential theory was examined in detail to meet this objective. Numerical pilot codes were developed for relatively simple three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with higher order solutions and experimental results for a variety of wing, body, and wing-body shapes for values of the hypersonic similarity parameter M delta approaching one.

  16. Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Blunt Body Trim Tab Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Trim tabs are aerodynamic control surfaces that can allow an entry vehicle to meet aerodynamic performance requirements while reducing or eliminating the use of ballast mass and providing a capability to modulate the lift-to-drag ratio during entry. Force and moment data were obtained on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The data were used to parametrically assess the supersonic aerodynamic performance of trim tabs and to understand the influence of tab area, cant angle, and aspect ratio. Across the range of conditions tested (Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5; angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg; angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg), the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than effects from varying tab aspect ratio. Aerodynamic characteristics exhibited variation with Mach number and forebody geometry over the range of conditions tested. Overall, the results demonstrate that trim tabs are a viable approach to satisfy aerodynamic performance requirements of blunt body entry vehicles with minimal ballast mass. For a 70deg sphere-cone, a tab with 3% area of the forebody and canted approximately 35deg with no ballast mass was found to give the same trim aerodynamics as a baseline model with ballast mass that was 5% of the total entry mass.

  17. Modelling and Simulation in Aerodynamic Design

    E-print Network

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Modelling and Simulation in Aerodynamic Design In different kinds of aerodynamic design elements is too complex. Aerodynamic properties of different airfoils are found from either numerical turbine blade, two design features are important. The aerodynamic design attempts to optimize the blade

  18. Efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in MDO context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Fazzolari; Nicolas R. Gauger; Joel Brezillon

    2007-01-01

    Multidisciplinary analysis is necessary to reach physically meaningful optimum designs. For aero-structural shape optimization this means coupling two disciplines—aerodynamics and structural mechanics. In this paper, the sensitivity evaluation for aerodynamic shape optimization is considered, while taking into account the static aeroelastic effects introduced by the variations in the aerodynamic forces, which are associated with changes in the aerodynamic shape. Due

  19. Aerodynamics of a rigid curved kite wing

    E-print Network

    Maneia, Gianmauro; Tordella, Daniela; Iovieno, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary numerical study on the aerodynamics of a kite wing for high altitude wind power generators is proposed. Tethered kites are a key element of an innovative wind energy technology, which aims to capture energy from the wind at higher altitudes than conventional wind towers. We present the results obtained from three-dimensional finite volume numerical simulations of the steady air flow past a three-dimensional curved rectangular kite wing (aspect ratio equal to 3.2, Reynolds number equal to 3x10^6). Two angles of incidence -- a standard incidence for the flight of a tethered airfoil (6{\\deg}) and an incidence close to the stall (18{\\deg}) -- were considered. The simulations were performed by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes flow model using the industrial STAR-CCM+ code. The overall aerodynamic characteristics of the kite wing were determined and compared to the aerodynamic characteristics of the flat rectangular non twisted wing with an identical aspect ratio and section (Clark Y profil...

  20. Rotary-wing aerodynamics. Volume 1: Basic theories of rotor aerodynamics with application to helicopters. [momentum, vortices, and potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepniewski, W. Z.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of rotary-wing aircraft in general is defined. The energy effectiveness of helicopters is compared with that of other static thrust generators in hover, as well as with various air and ground vehicles in forward translation. The most important aspects of rotor-blade dynamics and rotor control are reviewed. The simple physicomathematical model of the rotor offered by the momentum theory is introduced and its usefulness and limitations are assessed. The combined blade-element and momentum theory approach, which provides greater accuracy in performance predictions, is described as well as the vortex theory which models a rotor blade by means of a vortex filament or vorticity surface. The application of the velocity and acceleration potential theory to the determination of flow fields around three dimensional, non-rotating bodies as well as to rotor aerodynamic problems is described. Airfoil sections suitable for rotors are also considered.

  1. HSCT high lift system aerodynamic requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of high lift system aerodynamic requirements are provided. Low speed aerodynamics has been identified as critical to the successful development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The airplane must takeoff and land at a sufficient number of existing or projected airports to be economically viable. At the same time, community noise must be acceptable. Improvements in cruise drag, engine fuel consumption, and structural weight tend to decrease the wing size and thrust required of engines. Decreasing wing size increases the requirements for effective and efficient low speed characteristics. Current design concepts have already been compromised away from better cruise wings for low speed performance. Flap systems have been added to achieve better lift-to-drag ratios for climb and approach and for lower pitch attitudes for liftoff and touchdown. Research to achieve improvements in low speed aerodynamics needs to be focused on areas most likely to have the largest effect on the wing and engine sizing process. It would be desirable to provide enough lift to avoid sizing the airplane for field performance and to still meet the noise requirements. The airworthiness standards developed in 1971 will be the basis for performance requirements for an airplane that will not be critical to the airplane wing and engine size. The lift and drag levels that were required to meet the performance requirements of tentative airworthiness standards established in 1971 and that were important to community noise are identified. Research to improve the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of the HSCT needs to be focused in the areas of performance deficiency and where noise can be reduced. Otherwise, the wing planform, engine cycle, or other parameters for a superior cruising airplane would have to be changed.

  2. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  3. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of artificial intelligence are considered and questions are speculated on, including how knowledge-based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use 'expert' systems and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. The anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements are examined for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics. Considering two of the essentials of computational aerodynamics - reasoniing and calculating - it is believed that a substantial part of the reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence, with computers being used as reasoning machines to set the stage for calculating. Expert systems will probably be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  4. Plotting Program For Aerodynamical Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigren, L. J.; Lovely, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    Panel Method Aerodynamic Plotting Program (PMAPP) written to plot results of aerodynamical analyses (flow data) from PMARC (ARC-12642), program for computation of three-dimensional flow by low-order panel method. PMAPP is interactive, color-capable graphics program designed to work with variety of computer terminals and printers. Also used to plot data from other programs, provided files containing those data defined according to PMARC conventions. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  5. Explanation and discovery in aerodynamics

    E-print Network

    Gordon McCabe

    2005-12-22

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and clarify the explanations commonly cited for the aerodynamic lift generated by a wing, and to then analyse, as a case study of engineering discovery, the aerodynamic revolutions which have taken place within Formula 1 in the past 40 years. The paper begins with an introduction that provides a succinct summary of the mathematics of fluid mechanics.

  6. Differential Evolution in Aerodynamic Optimization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Rogalsky; R. W. Derksen; S. Kocabiyik

    1999-01-01

    Aerodynamic design algorithms require an optimization strategy to search for the best design. The objectof this paper is to compare the performance of some different strategies when used by an aerodynamicshape optimization routine which designs fan blade shapes. A recently developed genetic algorithm,Differential Evolution [1,2], outperforms more traditional techniques.IntroductionAerodynamic shape optimization involvesdesigning the most efficient shapes of bodies thatmove through...

  7. Computational approaches for RNA energy parameter estimation

    PubMed Central

    Andronescu, Mirela; Condon, Anne; Hoos, Holger H.; Mathews, David H.; Murphy, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for efficient and accurate prediction of RNA structure are increasingly valuable, given the current rapid advances in understanding the diverse functions of RNA molecules in the cell. To enhance the accuracy of secondary structure predictions, we developed and refined optimization techniques for the estimation of energy parameters. We build on two previous approaches to RNA free-energy parameter estimation: (1) the Constraint Generation (CG) method, which iteratively generates constraints that enforce known structures to have energies lower than other structures for the same molecule; and (2) the Boltzmann Likelihood (BL) method, which infers a set of RNA free-energy parameters that maximize the conditional likelihood of a set of reference RNA structures. Here, we extend these approaches in two main ways: We propose (1) a max-margin extension of CG, and (2) a novel linear Gaussian Bayesian network that models feature relationships, which effectively makes use of sparse data by sharing statistical strength between parameters. We obtain significant improvements in the accuracy of RNA minimum free-energy pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction when measured on a comprehensive set of 2518 RNA molecules with reference structures. Our parameters can be used in conjunction with software that predicts RNA secondary structures, RNA hybridization, or ensembles of structures. Our data, software, results, and parameter sets in various formats are freely available at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/labs/beta/Projects/RNA-Params. PMID:20940338

  8. Aerodynamics of Wiffle Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utvich, Alexis; Jemmott, Colin; Logan, Sheldon; Rossmann, Jenn

    2003-11-01

    A team of undergraduate students has performed experiments on Wiffle balls in the Harvey Mudd College wind tunnel facility. Wiffle balls are of particular interest because they can attain a curved trajectory with little or no pitcher-imparted spin. The reasons behind this have not previously been quantified formally. A strain gauge device was designed and constructed to measure the lift and drag forces on the Wiffle ball; a second device to measure lift and drag on a spinning ball was also developed. Experiments were conducted over a range of Reynolds numbers corresponding to speeds of roughly 0-40 mph. Lift forces of up to 0.2 N were measured for a Wiffle ball at 40 mph. This is believed to be due to air flowing into the holes on the Wiffle ball in addition to the effect of the holes on external boundary layer separation. A fog-based flow visualization system was developed in order to provide a deeper qualitative understanding of what occurred in the flowfield surrounding the ball. The data and observations obtained in this study support existing assumptions about Wiffle ball aerodynamics and begin to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Wiffle ball flight.

  9. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  10. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L. [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Aerodynamic effects in ionized gases, often neglected phenomena, have been subject of a renewed interest in recent years. After a brief historical account, we discuss a selected number of effects and unresolved problems that appear to be relevant in both aeronautic and propulsion applications in subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow. Interaction between acoustic shock waves and weakly ionized gas is manifested either as plasma-induced shock wave dispersion and acceleration or as shock-wave induced double electric layer in the plasma, followed by the localized increase of the average electron energy and density, as well as enhancement of optical emission. We describe the phenomenology of these effects and discuss several experiments that still do not have an adequate interpretation. Critical for application of aerodynamic effects is the energy deposition into the flow. We classify and discuss some proposed wall-free generation schemes with respect to the efficiency of energy deposition and overall generation of the aerodynamic body force.

  11. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 1: Orbiter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter has been performed. It is shown that slender wing theory can be modified to account for the effect of Mach number and leading edge roundness on both attached and separated flow loads. The orbiter unsteady aerodynamics can be computed by defining two equivalent slender wings, one for attached flow loads and another for the vortex-induced loads. It is found that the orbiter is in the transonic speed region subject to vortex-shock-boundary layer interactions that cause highly nonlinear or discontinuous load changes which can endanger the structural integrity of the orbiter wing and possibly cause snap roll problems. It is presently impossible to simulate these interactions in a wind tunnel test even in the static case. Thus, a well planned combined analytic and experimental approach is needed to solve the problem.

  12. Review of CFD for wind-turbine wake aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Sanderse; Pijl van der S. P; B. Koren

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of the numerical calculation of wind-turbine wake aerodynamics. Different CFD techniques for modeling the rotor and the wake are discussed. Regarding rotor modeling, recent advances in the generalized actuator approach and the direct model are discussed, as far as it attributes to the wake description. For the wake, the focus is on

  13. Aerodynamic feeding systems: an example for changeable technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Frädrich; Julia Pachow-Frauenhofer; Fiege Torsten; Peter Nyhuis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to transfer the idea of changeability to a concrete technical application. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Based on the definition of changeability on a factory level, a transformation of the five change enablers specified therein for the work station level using the example of an aerodynamic feeding system takes place in this paper. Findings –

  14. A Kinematical Approach to Dark Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-06-06

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to cosmological ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t) = 1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to the three best available sets of redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t) = j, we measure q{sub 0} = -0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j = 2.16{sub -0.75}{sup +0.81}, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. A standard ''dynamical'' analysis of the same data, employing the Friedmann equations and modeling the dark energy as a fluid with an equation of state parameter, w (constant), gives {Omega}{sub m} = 0.306{sub -0.040}{sup +0.042} and w = -1.15{sub -0.18}{sup +0.14}, also consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible. Our results provide further interesting support for the concordance {Lambda}CDM paradigm.

  15. Aerodynamic Heating and Deceleration During Entry into Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Aerodynamic Heating and Deceleration During Entry into Planetary Atmospheres. Dr. Chapman's lecture examines the physics behind spacecraft entry into planetary atmospheres. He explains how scientists determine if a planet has an atmosphere and how scientists can compute deceleration when the atmospheric conditions are unknown. Symbols and equations used for calculations for aerodynamic heating and deceleration are provided. He also explains heat transfer in bodies approaching an atmosphere, deceleration, and the use of ablation in protecting spacecraft from high temperatures during atmospheric entry. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030962. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  16. The aerodynamics of ship superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, J. V.

    1991-11-01

    After 70 years of naval aviation, a belated understanding of the aerodynamics of ships is slowly emerging. The lack of understanding, and undoubtedly other reasons, has led to superstructure configurations that are unsuited to adjacent helicopter flight. This has resulted in severely limited safe operating envelopes, danger to pilots and ship personnel and blade strikes that occasionally result in the complete loss of a helicopter. The air flows around ships abound with recirculating zones, bounded by shear layers that emanate from the sharp edges of the superstructures. These zones vary enormously in size in an intermittent manner, giving rise to flows with extreme velocity gradients and turbulence intensity levels that are too high to be measured with hot wire anemometers. This complicates the situation because, at the present time, a data base for simulation can be established only via measurement. The essential ingredients for the aerodynamic design of new ships are proposed and some suggestions for the improvement of the aerodynamics of existing ships are made. Correcting an aerodynamically poor ship is no substitute for the incorporation of aerodynamics into the ship design process.

  17. 14 CFR 25.445 - Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces. 25.445 Section...Surface and System Loads § 25.445 Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces. (a) When...significant, the aerodynamic influence between auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces, such as...

  18. Low Dimensional Modeling And Computational Analysis of Dragonfly Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yan; Wan, Hui; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2011-11-01

    High-fidelity numerical simulations are being used to examine the key aerodynamic features and lift production of insect wings. However, the kinematics of the insect's wing and the resulting aerodynamics is highly complex, and does not lend itself easily to analysis based on simple notions of pitching/heaving kinematics or lift/drag based propulsive mechanisms. A more inventive approach is therefore needed to dissect the wing gait and gain insight into the remarkable aerodynamic performance of the insect's wing. The focus of the current investigation is on the aerodynamics of the wing of a dragonfly (Erythemis Simplicicollis) in hovering motion. The three-dimensional, time-dependent wing kinematics is obtained via a high-speed photogrammetry system. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is then applied to extract the essential features of the wing gait. The SVD spectrum shows that the first four modes capture more than 80% of the motion. Aerodynamics of wings flapping with kinematics synthesized from SVD modes will be discussed in detail. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1055949.

  19. Static Aerodynamics of the Mars Exploration Rover Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Desai, Prasun

    2005-01-01

    The static aerodynamics for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) aeroshell are presented. This aerodynamic database was an integral part of the end-to-end simulation used in pre- entry analysis for determining the MER entry design requirements for development of the MER entry system, as well as targeting the MER landing sites. The database was constructed using the same approach used for Mars Pathfinder (MPF). However, the MER aerodynamic database is of much higher fidelity and tailored to the MER entry trajectories. This set of data includes direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations covering the transitional regime of the entry trajectory and computational fluid dynamics calculations describing the aerodynamics in the hypersonic and supersonic continuum regimes. An overview of the methodology used to generate the data is given along with comparisons to important features in the MPF aerodynamics and related heritage data. The MER and MPF comparison indicates that trajectory specific data is required to properly model the flight characteristics of a.blunt entry capsule at Mars.

  20. Aerodynamics of jet flap and rotating cylinder flap STOL concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. L.; Hickey, D. H.; Quigley, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    The aerodynamic effectiveness of various propulsive lift concepts to provide for the low speed performance and control required for short takeoff and landing aircraft is discussed. The importance of the interrelationship between the propulsion system and aerodynamic components of the aircraft is stressed. The relative effectiveness of different lift concepts was evaluated through static and wind tunnel tests of various aerodynamic models and propulsion components, simulations of aircraft, and in some cases, flight testing of research aircraft incorporating the concepts under study. Results of large scale tests of lift augmentation devices are presented. The results of flight tests of STOL research aircraft with augmented jet flaps and rotating cylinder flaps are presented to show the steeper approach flight paths at low forward speeds.

  1. Electromyographic responses to aerodynamic vs. drop handlebars 

    E-print Network

    Layne, Donald Jodel

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic Handlebars were developed to increase the competitive cyclists aerodynamic advantage. They place the cyclist in a laid out position with the hands stretched out in front similar to a down hill skier "tuck" ...

  2. Special opportunities in helicopter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic research relating to modern helicopters includes the study of three dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear flow fields. A selective review is made of some of the phenomenon that hamper the development of satisfactory engineering prediction techniques, but which provides a rich source of research opportunities: flow separations, compressibility effects, complex vortical wakes, and aerodynamic interference between components. Several examples of work in progress are given, including dynamic stall alleviation, the development of computational methods for transonic flow, rotor-wake predictions, and blade-vortex interactions.

  3. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  4. CFD-based Optimization for Automotive Aerodynamics

    E-print Network

    Dumas, Laurent

    Chapter 1 CFD-based Optimization for Automotive Aerodynamics Laurent Dumas Abstract The car drag- ments. An overview of the main characteristics of automotive aerodynamics and a detailed presentation.dumas@upmc.fr) 1 #12;2 Laurent Dumas 1.1 Introducing Automotive Aerodynamics 1.1.1 A Major Concern for Car

  5. Challenges and Complexity of Aerodynamic Wing

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    Chapter 1 Challenges and Complexity of Aerodynamic Wing Design Kasidit Leoviriyakit and Antony@stanford.edu and jameson@baboon.stanford.edu This paper focuses on aerodynamic design methodology. It discusses challenges and complexity of aerodynamic wing design for a transonic aircraft, which arise from the complex nature of flow

  6. ME421. Foundations of Aerodynamics. Victor Yakhot

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    ME421. Foundations of Aerodynamics. Victor Yakhot Syllabus. Spring 2014 . 1/16, 21. Fluids;Books. 1. D. Wilcox, "Basic Fluid Mechanics". 2. J. Anderson, Fundamentals of aerodynamics. 3. V.Yakhot,, ME421. Fluid Mechanics and aerodynamics. My lecture notes. 4. I. Abbott and A. Doenhoff, Theory

  7. ME421. Foundations of Aerodynamics. Victor Yakhot

    E-print Network

    ME421. Foundations of Aerodynamics. Victor Yakhot Syllabus. Spring 2013 . 1/17, 22. Fluids Mechanics". 2. J. Anderson, Fundamentals of aerodynamics. 3. V.Yakhot,, ME421. Fluid Mechanics and aerodynamics. My lecture notes. 4. I. Abbott and A. Doenhoff, Theory of wing sections, Dover Publications, NY

  8. Toward Practical Aerodynamic Design Through Numerical Optimization

    E-print Network

    Zingg, David W.

    Toward Practical Aerodynamic Design Through Numerical Optimization David W. Zingg, and Laura6, Canada A Newton-Krylov algorithm for aerodynamic optimization is applied to the multipoint design aerodynamic design. I. Introduction Beginning with the work of Hicks et al.1 and Hicks and Henne,2 numerical

  9. Conformal Mapping in Wing Aerodynamics Thomas Johnson

    E-print Network

    Morrow, James A.

    Conformal Mapping in Wing Aerodynamics Thomas Johnson June 4, 2013 Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 the first complete treatment of conformal mapping in aerodynamics. Near the beginning of the twentieth and aerodynamics. The purpose of this exposition is to give the reader an elementary intro- duction to the use

  10. Rotorcraft Aerodynamics Models for a Comprehensive Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne Johnson

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments of the aerodynamics models for the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II are described, particularly the unsteady aerodynamic models and dynamic stall models, and the free wake geometry calculation. Three models for the unsteady aerodynamic loads in attached flow are implemented: from incompressible thin-airfoil theory, from ONERA EDLIN, and from Leishman-Beddoes. Five dynamic stall models are implemented: from Johnson, Boeing,

  11. A Valuable Teaching Approach: Some Insights from LISP (Energy).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Valda; Carr, Malcolm

    1989-01-01

    The Learning in Science Project (Energy) was designed to investigate teaching and learning about the energy concepts of New Zealand elementary and secondary students. Discussed are aspects of an approach to teaching energy to low ability students in physics. (YP)

  12. Fuel Savings and Aerodynamic Drag Reduction from Rail Car Covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce; Salari, Kambiz; Babb, Alex

    2008-01-01

    The potential for energy savings by reducing the aerodynamic drag of rail cars is significant. A previous study of aerodynamic drag of coal cars suggests that a 25% reduction in drag of empty cars would correspond to a 5% fuel savings for a round trip [1]. Rail statistics for the United States [2] report that approximately 5.7 billion liters of diesel fuel were consumed for coal transportation in 2002, so a 5% fuel savings would total 284 million liters. This corresponds to 2% of Class I railroad fuel consumption nationwide. As part of a DOE-sponsored study, the aerodynamic drag of scale rail cars was measured in a wind tunnel. The goal of the study was to measure the drag reduction of various rail-car cover designs. The cover designs tested yielded an average drag reduction of 43% relative to empty cars corresponding to an estimated round-trip fuel savings of 9%.

  13. Research overview and cognitive approaches

    E-print Network

    McCalley, James D.

    Engineering/Wind Energy · Wind-tunnel and full-scale testing of CE structures · Aerodynamics of flexible of aerodynamic/aeroelastic loads and response of wind turbine components · SHM and fatigue life prediction

  14. Aerodynamics of a Dimpled Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Salari, Kambiz

    2010-11-01

    Automobiles consume approximately two billion barrels of fuel each year throughout the United States. A significant portion of this fuel is used to overcome aerodynamic drag at highway speeds. As a result, even small improvements made to the aerodynamics of automobiles can result in sizeable fuel savings. Since the shape of a vehicle is often dictated by design, economics, and function, aerodynamic improvements by means of obvious body streamlining are not always possible. However, minor modifications can be made to the vehicle, such as changing the behavior of the boundary layer to delay flow separation or installing small components either to reduce underbody flow or to mitigate induced drag. In this study, we examine the effect that dimples have upon the aerodynamics of a simplified vehicle. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations are performed on a full-scale Ahmed body at a Reynolds number of 9.5e6 based upon the vehicle length. The dimples, which have a uniform diameter of 0.1 m and a dimple depth-to-diameter ratio of 0.14, are distributed across the vehicle surface. The results of the simulations demonstrate that the dimples modify both the recirculation zone and the strength and location of the counter-rotating vortex pair in the vehicle wake. Although an increase in base pressure can occur for a dimpled configuration, the net drag change is sensitive to both the number and placement of the dimples on the vehicle body.

  15. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  16. AIAA 20033498 Viscous Aerodynamic Shape

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    design tool, but as an aid to analyze the fluid flow. The design process has still been done by trial for aerodynamic shape design in viscous compressible flow mod- eled by the Navier-Stokes equations. It extends, a Pareto front is captured, broadening the design range of optimal shapes. INTRODUCTION CFD has played

  17. The aerodynamics of supersonic parachutes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the aerodynamics and performance of parachutes flying at supersonic speeds is the focus of this paper. Typical performance requirements for supersonic parachute systems are presented, followed by a review of the literature on supersonic parachute configurations and their drag characteristics. Data from a recent supersonic wind tunnel test series is summarized. The value and limitations of supersonic

  18. Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

  19. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  20. Shuttle reentry aerodynamic heating test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, J. E.; Mccormick, P. O.; Smith, S. D.

    1971-01-01

    The research for determining the space shuttle aerothermal environment is reported. Brief summaries of the low Reynolds number windward side heating test, and the base and leeward heating and high Reynolds number heating test are included. Also discussed are streamline divergence and the resulting effect on aerodynamic heating, and a thermal analyzer program that is used in the Thermal Environment Optimization Program.

  1. Interdisciplinary optimization combining electromagnetic and aerodynamic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Anders James

    The design of missile body shapes often requires a compromise between aero-dynamic and electromagnetic performance goals. In general, the missile shape producing the lowest radar signature will be different from the preferred aero-dynamic shape. Interdisciplinary shape optimization is utilized to combine multiple disciplines to determine the best possible shape for a hybrid aerodynamic-electromagnetic problem. A composite missile body consisting of an axisymmetric body of revolution (BOR) and two thin flat plate attachments is considered. The goal is to minimize the drag and backscatter associated with this composite shape. The body is assumed to be perfectly conducting, and flying at zero degrees angle of attack. The variable nose shape serves as the optimization design parameter. To characterize the system performance, a cost function is defined which is comprised of weighted values of the drag and backscatter. To solve the electromagnetic problem, methods to treat electrically large complex bodies are investigated. Hybrid methods which combine the method of moments (MoM) with physical optics (PO) are developed to calculate the scattering from simple two-dimensional bodies. A surface-wave hybrid approach is shown to effectively approximate the traveling wave currents on the smooth interior portions of a BOR. Asymptotic methods are used to solve the resulting integral equations more efficiently. The hybrid methods are shown to produce MoM-quality results, while requiring less computational resources. To solve the composite body problem, an iterative technique is developed that preserves the simplicity of the original BOR scheme. In this formulation, the current over each part of the composite body is solved independently. The results from one part of the body are used to update the fields incident on the other part of the body. This procedure is repeated until the solution converges. To solve the aerodynamic problem, slender body theory is used to calculate the nonviscous pressure drag on the body. Results show that the optimal design depends on a variety of factors including frequency, backscatter observation angle, incident wave polarization, and arbitrary weighting coefficients.

  2. Measurement technology for micro-scale aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael James

    As micro-technology improves, it may become possible to build flying vehicles at length scales of millimeters, or even microns. Successful design of vehicles at such sizes requires understanding of the fluid mechanics of flight at the micron scale. While biological flight has been studied at these scales, many questions remain to be answered for flight at these scales. Previous work has not determined the limiting scales of continuum aerodynamics for low-speed flight. This study begins with the development of a new scaling law based on boundary layer theory. The laminar boundary layer equations were solved non-dimensionally for slip flow conditions. These results show that a measurable decrease in skin friction, as well as changes in heat transfer, and flow stability, may occur as the boundary layer Knudsen number approaches 0.01. These flow conditions correspond to airfoil chords of up to 100 microns, pressures of 0.1 to 1.0 atmospheres, and velocities from 30 to 100 m/s. Based on this scaling law, specialized wind-tunnel test facilities were designed to operate at scales not previously studied. The novel wind-tunnel allows for independent control of Reynolds and Knudsen numbers on static airfoils. A draw-through, low turbulence, low-pressure wind tunnel with a 1 cm cross section was built and tested. The flow through these facilities is characterized, and recommendations are made for future wind-tunnel development. To allow testing at these scales, micro-scale airfoils, with chords of 100 microns, thicknesses of 5 microns, and a span of 1 cm were fabricated using MEMS fabrication technology. Fabrication of free-standing micro-structures with meso-scale spans and micro-scale cross sections required the development of specialized fabrication processes. These airfoils were integrated with piezoresistive force sensors, allowing measurement of aerodynamic forces. The airfoil structures were successfully released within the tunnel. The actual aerodynamic load on the airfoils in testing exceeded the design loads of the airfoils. It is believed that this is due to vortex shedding during testing. Testing this theory will require development both of new computational techniques, and new test facilities. A road map is provided for the next generation of micro-scale aerodynamics testing.

  3. Aerodynamic Optimization of a Solar - Bio Diesel Hybrid Vehicle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neal A. Allgood

    Energy efficiency is the most critical aspect for a successful solar powered automobile and much can be gained from the reduction of aer odynamic drag on such a vehicle. Yet, for a solar car to be practical to the everyday driver, it has to be ergonomically feasible, financially sensible, and aesthetically pleasing. This research compares aerodynamic drag calculations produced by

  4. ExoMars Entry Demonstrator Module Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, P.; Beck, J.

    2011-08-01

    Aerodynamics data for ExoMars Entry Demonstrator Module (EDM) are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients are generated as a function of total angle-of- attack, Knudsen number and Mach number depending on the flight regime. Bridging functions were developed from DSMC computations in transitional flow regime between free-molecular and continuum flow regimes. Hypersonic and supersonic static coefficients were derived from Navier-Stokes solutions with non- equilibrium flow assumptions in hot hypersonic (M>6.3) and with an equivalent approach below. Wind-tunnel in cold hypersonic (ONERA S4Ma - M=10) and in high-enthalpy facilities (ONERA F4 and DLR-HEG) tests were conducted in order to address uncertainty model in hypersonic-supersonic flow regime. For M<3.5, wind- tunnel campaign was conducted in DLR-TMK (1.8

  5. Report of the Panel on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Richard G.; Bushnell, Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Progress in aerodynamics over the past 50 years has been evidenced by the development of increasingly sophisticated and efficient flight vehicles throughout the flight spectrum. Advances have generally arisen in an evolutionary manner from experience gained in wind tunnel testing, flight testing, and improvements in analytical and computational capabilities. As a result of this evolutionary development, both military and commercial vehicles operate at a relatively high efficiency level. This observation plus the fact that airplanes have not changed appreciably in outward appearance over recent years has led some skeptics to conclude incorrectly that aerodynamics is a mature technology, with little to be gained from further developments in the field. It is of interest to note that progress in aerodynamics has occurred without a thorough understanding of the fundamental physics of flow, turbulence, vortex dynamics, and separated flow, for example. The present understanding of transition, turbulence, and boundary layer separation is actually very limited. However, these fundamental flow phenomena provide the key to reducing the viscous drag of aircraft. Drag reduction provides the greatest potential for increased flight efficiency from the standpoint of both saving energy and maximizing performance. Recent advances have led to innovative concepts for reducing turbulent friction drag by modifying the turbulent structure within the boundary layer. Further advances in this basic area should lead to methods for reducing skin friction drag significantly. The current challenges for military aircraft open entirely new fields of investigation for the aerodynamicist. The ability through very high speed information processing technology to totally integrate the flight and propulsion controls can permit an aircraft to fly with "complete abandon," avoiding departure, buffet, and other undesirable characteristics. To utilize these new control concepts, complex aerodynamic phenomena will have to be understood, predicted, and controlled. Current requirements for military aircraft include configuration optimization through a widened envelope from subsonic to supersonic and from low to high angles of attack. This task is further complicated by requirements for control of observables. These challenging new designs do not have the luxury of a large experimental data base from which to optimize for various parameter combinations. Consequently, there exists a strong need for better techniques, both experimental and computational, to permit design optimization in a complete sense.

  6. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul G. Tucker

    2007-01-01

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow\\/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction

  7. Aeroassist flight experiment aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    The problem is to determine the transitional flow aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, including the base flow characteristics, of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The justification for the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) Application stems from MSFC's system integration responsibility for the AFE. To insure that the AFE objectives are met, MSFC must understand the limitations and uncertainties of the design data. Perhaps the only method capable of handling the complex physics of the rarefied high energy AFE trajectory is Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The 3-D code used in this analysis is applicable only to the AFE geometry. It uses the Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) collision model and five specie chemistry model available from Langley Research Center. The code is benchmarked against the AFE flight data and used as an Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design tool. The code is being used to understand the AFE flow field and verify or modify existing design data. Continued application to lower altitudes is testing the capability of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) to handle 3-D DSMC and its practicality as an ASTV/AFE design tool.

  8. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  9. Viking entry aerodynamics and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the Mars entry including the mission sequence of events and associated spacecraft weights are described along with the Viking spacecraft. Test data are presented for the aerodynamic characteristics of the entry vehicle showing trimmed alpha, drag coefficient, and trimmed lift to drag ratio versus Mach number; the damping characteristics of the entry configuration; the angle of attack time history of Viking entries; stagnation heating and pressure time histories; and the aeroshell heating distribution as obtained in tests run in a shock tunnel for various gases. Flight tests which demonstrate the aerodynamic separation of the full-scale aeroshell and the flying qualities of the entry configuration in an uncontrolled mode are documented. Design values selected for the heat protection system based on the test data and analysis performed are presented.

  10. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Nozick (Systems Engineering and Civil & Environmen- tal Engineering), Susan Riha (NYS Water Resources (Systems Engineering & Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering), Susan Christopherson (City & Regional Engineering) W. VA #12;Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach August 2011 version Page 2 Energy

  11. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  12. A Common Sense Approach to Energy Issues in Industry

    E-print Network

    Richards, F. J.

    A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO ENERGY ISSUES IN INDUSTRY Frank J. Richards, P. E. President The Richards' Energy Group Landisville, PA ABSTRACT This paper was written because energy issues, although viewed as important, often become casualties... to equally important, but more urgent production and people problems. A common sense approach to plant energy issues is illustrated by a case study of an industrial foundry, and includes the following: ? Power-use inventory ? Rate issues ? Process...

  13. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1. PMID:25638120

  14. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, T.; Fujita, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

  15. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [of thin wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Ashley, H.; Breakwell, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented on the unsteady aerodynamic loads due to arbitrary motions of a thin wing and their adaptation for the calculation of response and true stability of aeroelastic modes. In an Appendix, the use of Laplace transform techniques and the generalized Theodorsen function for two-dimensional incompressible flow is reviewed. New applications of the same approach are shown also to yield airloads valid for quite general small motions. Numerical results are given for the two-dimensional supersonic case. Previously proposed approximate methods, starting from simple harmonic unsteady theory, are evaluated by comparison with exact results obtained by the present approach. The Laplace inversion integral is employed to separate the loads into 'rational' and 'nonrational' parts, of which only the former are involved in aeroelastic stability of the wing. Among other suggestions for further work, it is explained how existing aerodynamic computer programs may be adapted in a fairly straightforward fashion to deal with arbitrary transients.

  16. Mining for energy efficiency in cement plants a teamwork approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Sperberg; Tim Ruegg

    2012-01-01

    A team approach to identifying and implementing energy efficiency measures was used at a cement plant in California in order to identify and facilitate implementation of energy efficiency measures. A team of corporate, plant, utility, and energy efficiency experts was assembled to conduct a concentrated energy scoping study to identify efficiency opportunities. Much of the team has stayed involved over

  17. [Transmeatal aerodynamical otoendoscopy for otitis media].

    PubMed

    Ageenko, I V

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of various methods of transmeatal aerodynamical otoendoscopy based on the examination of 60 patients presenting with acute suppurative otitis media (CSOM), chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM), exudative and adhesive otitis media. Transmeatal aerodynamical otoendoscopy was performed with the use of otobarohydroendoscope. The results of the study demonstrate the advantages of the transmeatal aerodynamical otoendoscopic technique for the examination of the patients presenting with different clinical forms of otitis media. PMID:23250522

  18. Prediction of aerodynamic tonal noise from open rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anupam; Chen, Hsuan-nien

    2013-08-01

    A numerical approach for predicting tonal aerodynamic noise from "open rotors" is presented. "Open rotor" refers to an engine architecture with a pair of counter-rotating propellers. Typical noise spectra from an open rotor consist of dominant tones, which arise due to both the steady loading/thickness and the aerodynamic interaction between the two bladerows. The proposed prediction approach utilizes Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to obtain near-field description of the noise sources. The near-to-far-field propagation is then carried out by solving the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. Since the interest of this paper is limited to tone noise, a linearized, frequency domain approach is adopted to solve the wake/vortex-blade interaction problem.This paper focuses primarily on the speed scaling of the aerodynamic tonal noise from open rotors. Even though there is no theoretical mode cut-off due to the absence of nacelle in open rotors, the far-field noise is a strong function of the azimuthal mode order. While the steady loading/thickness noise has circumferential modes of high order, due to the relatively large number of blades (?10-12), the interaction noise typically has modes of small orders. The high mode orders have very low radiation efficiency and exhibit very strong scaling with Mach number, while the low mode orders show a relatively weaker scaling. The prediction approach is able to capture the speed scaling (observed in experiment) of the overall aerodynamic noise very well.

  19. Study on aerodynamic design optimization of turbomachinery blades

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naixing Chen; Hongwu Zhang; Weiguang Huang; Yanji Xu

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the study on aerodynamics design optimization of turbomachinery blading developed by the authors at the\\u000a Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, during the recent few years. The present paper describes\\u000a the aspects mainly on how to use a rapid approach of profiling a 3D blading and of grid generation for computation, a fast\\u000a and accurate

  20. Analysis and optimization of aerodynamic noise in a centrifugal compressor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyosung Sun; Hyungki Shin; Soogab Lee

    2006-01-01

    The numerical methods for the performance analysis and the noise prediction of the centrifugal compressor impeller are developed, which are coupled with the optimization design methodology consisting of response surface method, statistical approach, and genetic algorithm. Navier–Stokes equations with the two-equation (k–?) turbulence model are applied to calculate impeller aerodynamic characteristics, and Ffowcs Williams–Hawkings formulation and boundary element method are

  1. Aerodynamic Heating and Deceleration During Entry into Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Dean R.

    1962-01-01

    Dr. Chapman's lecture examines the physics behind spacecraft entry into planetary atmospheres. He explains how scientists determine if a planet has an atmosphere and how scientists can compute deceleration when the atmospheric conditions are unknown. Symbols and equations used for calculations for aerodynamic heating and deceleration are provided. He also explains heat transfer in bodies approaching an atmosphere, deceleration, and the use of ablation in protecting spacecraft from high temperatures during atmospheric entry.

  2. Integrated actuation and energy harvesting in prestressed piezoelectric synthetic jets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Poorna Mane

    2009-01-01

    With the looming energy crisis compounded by the global economic downturn there is an urgent need to increase energy efficiency and to discover new energy sources. An approach to solve this problem is to improve the efficiency of aerodynamic vehicles by using active flow control tools such as synthetic jet actuators. These devices are able to reduce fuel consumption and

  3. Hybrid method for aerodynamic shape optimization in automotive industry

    E-print Network

    Dumas, Laurent

    Hybrid method for aerodynamic shape optimization in automotive industry Freedeerique Muyl April 2003; accepted 4 June 2003 Abstract An aerodynamic shape optimization tool for complex industrial reasons, concerns car manufacturers. Consequently, the improvement of the aerodynamics of car shapes, more

  4. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics Vladimir V. Riabov

    E-print Network

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics Vladimir V. Riabov Department of Mathematics, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific. Keywords: DSMC method, aerodynamic coefficients, hypersonic flows, similarity parameters, torus, spinning

  5. Flutter and forced response of turbomachinery with frequency mistuning and aerodynamic asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakozawa, Tomokazu

    This dissertation provides numerical studies to improve bladed disk assembly design for preventing blade high cycle fatigue failures. The analyses are divided into two major subjects. For the first subject presented in Chapter 2, the mechanisms of transonic fan flutter for tuned systems are studied to improve the shortcoming of traditional method for modern fans using a 3D time-linearized Navier-Stokes solver. Steady and unsteady flow parameters including local work on the blade surfaces are investigated. It was found that global local work monotonically became more unstable on the pressure side due to the flow rollback effect. The local work on the suction side significantly varied due to nodal diameter and flow rollback effect. Thus, the total local work for the least stable mode is dominant by the suction side. Local work on the pressure side appears to be affected by the shock on the suction side. For the second subject presented in Chapter 3, sensitivity studies are conducted on flutter and forced response due to frequency mistuning and aerodynamic asymmetry using the single family of modes approach by assuming manufacturing tolerance. The unsteady aerodynamic forces are computed using CFD methods assuming aerodynamic symmetry. The aerodynamic asymmetry is applied by perturbing the influence coefficient matrix. These aerodynamic perturbations influence both stiffness and damping while traditional frequency mistuning analysis only perturbs the stiffness. Flutter results from random aerodynamic perturbations of all blades showed that manufacturing variations that effect blade unsteady aerodynamics may cause a stable, perfectly symmetric engine to flutter. For forced response, maximum blade amplitudes are significantly influenced by the aerodynamic perturbation of the imaginary part (damping) of unsteady aerodynamic modal forces. This is contrary to blade frequency mistuning where the stiffness perturbation dominates.

  6. Aerodynamics modeling of towed-cable dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Latorre, V.R.

    1991-01-17

    The dynamics of a cable/drogue system being towed by an orbiting aircraft has been investigated as a part of an LTWA project for the Naval Air Systems Command. We present here a status report on the tasks performed under Phase 1. We have accomplished the following tasks under Phase 1: A literature survey on the towed-cable motion problem has been conducted. While both static (steady-state) and dynamic (transient) analyses exist in the literature, no single, comprehensive analysis exists that directly addresses the present problem. However, the survey also reveals that, when judiciously applied, these past analyses can serve as useful building blocks for approaching the present problem. A numerical model that addresses several aspects of the towed-cable dynamic problem has been adapted from a Canadian underwater code for the present aerodynamic situation. This modified code, called TOWDYN, analyzes the effects of gravity, tension, aerodynamic drag, and wind. Preliminary results from this code demonstrate that the wind effects alone CAN generate the drogue oscillation behavior, i.e., the yo-yo'' phenomenon. This code also will serve as a benchmark code for checking the accuracy of a more general and complete R D'' model code. We have initiated efforts to develop a general R D model supercomputer code that also takes into account other physical factors, such as induced oscillations and bending stiffness. This general code will be able to evaluate the relative impacts of the various physical parameters, which may become important under certain conditions. This R D code will also enable development of a simpler operational code that can be used by the Naval Air personnel in the field.

  7. Inner workings of aerodynamic sweep

    SciTech Connect

    Wadia, A.R.; Szucs, P.N.; Crall, D.W. [GE Aircraft Engines, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1998-10-01

    The recent trend in using aerodynamic sweep to improve the performance of transonic blading has been one of the more significant technological evolutions for compression components in turbomachinery. This paper reports on the experimental and analytical assessment of the pay-off derived from both aft and forward sweep technology with respect to aerodynamic performance and stability. The single-stage experimental investigation includes two aft-swept rotors with varying degree and type of aerodynamic sweep and one swept forward rotor. On a back-to-back test basis, the results are compared with an unswept rotor with excellent performance and adequate stall margin. Although designed to satisfy identical design speed requirements as the unswept rotor, the experimental results reveal significant variations in efficiency and stall margin with the swept rotors. At design speed, all the swept rotors demonstrated a peak stage efficiency level that was equal to that of the unswept rotor. However, the forward-swept rotor achieved the highest rotor-alone peak efficiency. At the same time, the forward-swept rotor demonstrated a significant improvement in stall margin relative to the already satisfactory level achieved by the unswept rotor. Increasing the level of aft sweep adversely affected the stall margin. A three-dimensional viscous flow analysis was used to assist in the interpretation of the data. The reduced shock/boundary layer interaction, resulting from reduced axial flow diffusion and less accumulation of centrifuged blade surface boundary layer at the tip, was identified as the prime contributor to the enhanced performance with forward sweep. The impact of tip clearance on the performance and stability for one of the aft-swept rotors was also assessed.

  8. Simulation of iced wing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Bragg, M. B.; Kwon, O. J.; Sankar, L. N.

    1991-01-01

    The sectional and total aerodynamic load characteristics of moderate aspect ratio wings with and without simulated glaze leading edge ice were studied both computationally, using a three dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes solver, and experimentally. The wing has an untwisted, untapered planform shape with NACA 0012 airfoil section. The wing has an unswept and swept configuration with aspect ratios of 4.06 and 5.0. Comparisons of computed surface pressures and sectional loads with experimental data for identical configurations are given. The abrupt decrease in stall angle of attack for the wing, as a result of the leading edge ice formation, was demonstrated numerically and experimentally.

  9. Aerodynamic performance of centrifugal compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyed, S.

    1981-12-01

    Saving money with an efficient pipeline system design depends on accurately predicting compressor performance and ensuring that it meets the manufacturer's guaranteed levels. When shop testing with the actual gas is impractical, an aerodynamic test can ascertain compressor efficiency, but the accuracy and consistency of data acquisition in such tests is critical. Low test-pressure levels necessitate accounting for the effects of Reynolds number and heat transfer. Moreover, the compressor user and manufacturer must agree on the magnitude of the corrections to be applied to the test data.

  10. Energy planning for development: Needs and approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubayi, V.

    1981-12-01

    The capability of developing countries to carry out comprehensive national energy planning is examined. The analytical methods or models constructed for analyzing the energy system have to take into account the specific context in which they are built to address issues of interest to development planners. Issues discussed are resource development and technology research, energy equity considerations to all peoples in a nation, the pricing policy, and the balance of payments considerations. The importance of the availability of adequate skilled personnel and training programs to impart the requisite skill necessary to carry out the planning is discussed. Various surveys were conducted to determine the training needs for energy planners in developing countries.

  11. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C9, suppZ6ment au noll, Tome 41, novembre 1980, page C9-423 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF A FREE-VORTEX AERODYNAMIC WINDOW

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -423 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF A FREE-VORTEX AERODYNAMIC WINDOW W. Masuda and M. Yuasa Research Institute, Ishikawajima free-vortex aerodynamic window has been fabricated and tested. Aerodynamic performance studies show is difficult since the heating caused by the absorption of laser energy may distort the window. Instead

  12. Metering and Monitoring Approaches for Verifying Energy Savings from Energy Conservation Retrofits: Experiences from the Field 

    E-print Network

    McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes instrumentation approaches used in the verification of energy savings from industrial and large institutional energy conservation retrofits. Techniques for monitoring electricity, natural gas and thermal energy flows...

  13. Aerodynamic considerations of blended wing body aircraft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Qin; A. Vavalle; A. Le Moigne; M. Laban; K. Hackett; P. Weinerfelt

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a progressive aerodynamic study of a blended wing body (BWB) configuration within a European project, MOB (A computational design engine incorporating multi-disciplinary design and optimisation for blended wing body configuration). The paper starts with an overview of various blended wing body aircraft design projects in relation to their aerodynamic behaviour. After a theoretical assessment of

  14. Review of aerodynamic design in the Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrujere, Th. E.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamic design activities in the Netherlands, which take place mainly at Fokker, the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR), and Delft University of Technology (TUD), are discussed. The survey concentrates on the development of the Fokker 100 wing, glider design at TUD, and research at NLR in the field of aerodynamic design. Results are shown to illustrate these activities.

  15. Future Computer Requirements for Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in computational aerodynamics are discussed as well as motivations for and potential benefits of a National Aerodynamic Simulation Facility having the capability to solve fluid dynamic equations at speeds two to three orders of magnitude faster than presently possible with general computers. Two contracted efforts to define processor architectures for such a facility are summarized.

  16. AIAA 99--1467 LOW ORDER AERODYNAMIC

    E-print Network

    Peraire, Jaime

    the stability boundaries of the compressor by altering the aerodynamic or struc­ tural properties of the blades ten per blade passage, making it appropriate for con­ trol applications. The aerodynamic model is coupled with a simple structural model that has two degrees of freedom for each blade. Results

  17. Comparing Aerodynamic Models for Numerical Simulation of

    E-print Network

    Peraire, Jaime

    Comparing Aerodynamic Models for Numerical Simulation of Dynamics and Control of Aircraft and simulation of aircraft, yet other aerodynamics models exist that can provide more accurate results derivatives and other low fidelity models are frequently used in the design and flight simulation of aircraft

  18. Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin; Jutte, Christine; Mangalam, Arun

    2011-01-01

    A Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing (DASP) toolbox was designed and fabricated for flight test applications with an Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) mounted under the fuselage of an F-15B on the Flight Test Fixture (FTF). DASP monitors and processes the aerodynamics with the structural dynamics using nonintrusive, surface-mounted, hot-film sensing. This aerodynamic measurement tool benefits programs devoted to static/dynamic load alleviation, body freedom flutter suppression, buffet control, improvement of aerodynamic efficiency through cruise control, supersonic wave drag reduction through shock control, etc. This DASP toolbox measures local and global unsteady aerodynamic load distribution with distributed sensing. It determines correlation between aerodynamic observables (aero forces) and structural dynamics, and allows control authority increase through aeroelastic shaping and active flow control. It offers improvements in flutter suppression and, in particular, body freedom flutter suppression, as well as aerodynamic performance of wings for increased range/endurance of manned/ unmanned flight vehicles. Other improvements include inlet performance with closed-loop active flow control, and development and validation of advanced analytical and computational tools for unsteady aerodynamics.

  19. Aerodynamic models for a Darrieus wind turbine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Fraunie; C. Beguier; I. Paraschivoiu; F. Delclaux

    1982-01-01

    Various models proposed for the aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines are reviewed. The magnitude of the L\\/D ratio for a Darrieus rotor blade is dependent on the profile, the Re, boundary layer characteristics, and the three-dimensional flow effects. The aerodynamic efficiency is theoretically the Betz limit, and the interference of one blade with another is constrained by the drag force

  20. Aerodynamic tests of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. Migliore; R. E. Walters; W. P. Wolfe

    1983-01-01

    An indoor facility for the aerodynamic testing of Darrieus turbine blades was developed. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients were measured for two blades whose angle of attack and chord-to-radius ratio were varied. The first blade used an NACA 0015 airfoil section; the second used a 15% elliptical cross section with a modified circular arc trailing edge. Blade aerodynamic coefficients were

  1. Aerodynamics of Sounding-Rocket Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical aerodynamics program TAD predicts aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding-rocket configurations. These slender, Axisymmetric finned vehicles have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high-speed armament. TAD calculates characteristics of separate portions of vehicle, calculates interference between portions, and combines results to form total vehicle solution.

  2. Applied aerodynamics of wind power machines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Wilson; P. B. S. Lissaman

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamics of various types of wind power machines, and advantages and disadvantages of various schemes for obtaining power from the wind are reviewed. Simple, one-dimensional models for various power producing machines are given along with their performance characteristics, and presented as a function of their elementary aerodynamic and kinematic characteristics. Propeller type wind turbine theory is reviewed to level of

  3. Local Energy Approach to Steel Fatigue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Chrysochoos; B. Berthel; F. Latourte; S. Pagano; B. Wattrisse; B. Weber

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental protocol developed to locally estimate different terms of the energy balance associated with the fatigue of DP600 steel. The method involves two quantitative imaging techniques. First, digital image correlation provides displacement fields and, after derivation, strain and strain-rate fields. A variational method, associated with an energy functional, is used to simultaneously identify elastic parameter and

  4. Energy-Momentum Conservation Laws. Gauge Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Giachetta; L. Mangiarotti; G. Sardanashvily

    1999-01-01

    We treat energy-momentum conservation laws as particular gauge conservation laws when generators of gauge transformations are horizontal vector fields on fibre bundles. In particular, the generators of general covariant transformations are the canonical horizontal prolongations of vector fields on a world manifold. This is the case of the energy-momentum conservation laws in gravitation theories. We find that, in main gravitational

  5. An electrical approach to wave energy conversion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Leijon; O. Danielsson; M. Eriksson; K. Thorburn; H. Bernhoff; J. Isberg; J. Sundberg; I. Ivanova; E. Sjöstedt; O. Ågren; K. E. Karlsson; A. Wolfbrandt

    2006-01-01

    Motions in nature, for example ocean waves, can play a significant role in tomorrow's electricity production, but the constructions require adaptations to its media. Engineers planning hydropower plants have always taken natural conditions, such as fall height, speed of flow, and geometry, as basic design parameters and constraints in the design. The present paper describes a novel approach for electric

  6. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database i n the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  7. Orion Crew Module Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Bibb, Karen L.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Owens, Bruce; Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Bell, James H.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo-derived Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), part of NASA s now-cancelled Constellation Program, has become the reference design for the new Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The MPCV will serve as the exploration vehicle for all near-term human space missions. A strategic wind-tunnel test program has been executed at numerous facilities throughout the country to support several phases of aerodynamic database development for the Orion spacecraft. This paper presents a summary of the experimental static aerodynamic data collected to-date for the Orion Crew Module (CM) capsule. The test program described herein involved personnel and resources from NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Arnold Engineering and Development Center, Lockheed Martin Space Sciences, and Orbital Sciences. Data has been compiled from eight different wind tunnel tests in the CEV Aerosciences Program. Comparisons are made as appropriate to highlight effects of angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, and model support system effects.

  8. Aerodynamic Drag and Gyroscopic Stability

    E-print Network

    Courtney, Elya R

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the effects on aerodynamic drag of rifle bullets as the gyroscopic stability is lowered from 1.3 to 1.0. It is well known that a bullet can tumble for stability less than 1.0. The Sierra Loading Manuals (4th and 5th Editions) have previously reported that ballistic coefficient decreases significantly as gyroscopic stability, Sg, is lowered below 1.3. These observations are further confirmed by the experiments reported here. Measured ballistic coefficients were compared with gyroscopic stabilities computed using the Miller Twist Rule for nearly solid metal bullets with uniform density and computed using the Courtney-Miller formula for plastic-tipped bullets. The experiments reported here also demonstrate a decrease in aerodynamic drag near Sg = 1.23 +/- 0.02. It is hypothesized that this decrease in drag over a narrow band of Sg values is due to a rapid damping of coning motions (precession and nutation). Observation of this drag decrease at a consistent value of Sg demonstrates the relati...

  9. Efficient optimization of integrated aerodynamic-structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Eppard, W. M.; Kao, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    The introduction of composite materials is having a profound effect on the design process. Because these materials permit the designer to tailor material properties to improve structural, aerodynamic and acoustic performance, they require a more integrated multidisciplinary design process. Because of the complexity of the design process numerical optimization methods are required. The present paper is focused on a major difficulty associated with the multidisciplinary design optimization process - its enormous computational cost. We consider two approaches for reducing this computational burden: (1) development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculation using perturbation methods; and (2) the use of approximate numerical optimization procedures. Our efforts are concentrated upon combined aerodynamic-structural optimization. Results are presented for the integrated design of a sailplane wing. The impact of our computational procedures on the computational costs of integrated costs of integrated designs are discussed.

  10. Computers vs. wind tunnels for aerodynamic flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. R.; Mark, H.; Pirtle, M. W.

    1975-01-01

    It is pointed out that in other fields of computational physics, such as ballistics, celestial mechanics, and neutronics, computations have already displaced experiments as the principal means of obtaining dynamic simulations. In the case of aerodynamic investigations, the complexity of the computational work involved in solving the Navier-Stokes equations is the reason that such investigations rely currently mainly on wind-tunnel testing. However, because of inherent limitations of the wind-tunnel approach and economic considerations, it appears that at some time in the future aerodynamic studies will chiefly rely on computational flow data provided by the computer. Taking into account projected development trends, it is estimated that computers with the required capabilities for a solution of the complete viscous, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations will be available in the mid-1980s.

  11. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ? 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic insects and, to a limited extent, in understanding the aerodynamics of flapping insect wings. PMID:19692394

  12. Group Dynamics Approach to Industrial Energy Management 

    E-print Network

    Thomas, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    , be ready with estimates of the system peak demand savings in Kilowatts (KW) and the annual energy savings in Kilowatthours (KWH), based on engineering calculations and preferably, hacked up with information obtained by actually putting an electricity...

  13. Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification 

    E-print Network

    McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    BTUs transferred. BTU meters usually also have a resetable local display which permits manual data observation and recording. Also, many data acquisition systems have the capability to do real time mathematics and hence can calculate heat transfer directly... from temperature and flow data without the use of a BTU Meter, providing an alternative approach if a local data display is not required. Various monitoring devices are used to measure the required temperatures and flow rates. These monitoring...

  14. Black Box Approach for Energy Monitoring of Commercial Buildings

    E-print Network

    Komhard, S.; Neumann, C.

    or unusual behaviour using a black box model approach. The approach is to identify a building’s basic operating characteristics by means of measured data from a building to train a multiple linear regression model based on energy signatures of the building...

  15. Resistor Emulation Approach to Low-Power Energy Harvesting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thurein S. Paing; Regan Zane

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an approach and associated circuitry for harvesting near maximum output from low power sources in the 100 muW range for miniature wireless devices. A set of converter topologies and control approaches are presented together with detailed efficiency analysis and a design example for a buck-boost based energy harvesting converter using commercially available discrete circuitry. Experimental results are

  16. A System Design Approach for Unattended Solar Energy Harvesting Supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan W. Kimball; Brian T. Kuhn; Robert S. Balog

    2009-01-01

    Remote devices, such as sensors and communications devices, require continuously available power. In many applications, conventional approaches are too expensive, too large, or unreliable. For short-term needs, primary batteries may be used. However, they do not scale up well for long-term installations. Instead, energy harvesting methods must be used. Here, a system design approach is introduced that results in a

  17. Design approaches to more energy efficient engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, N. T.; Colladay, R. S.; Macioce, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    The status of NASA's Energy Efficient Engine Project, a comparative government-industry effort aimed at advancing the technology base for the next generation of large turbofan engines for civil aircraft transports is summarized. Results of recently completed studies are reviewed. These studies involved selection of engine cycles and configurations that offer potential for at least 12% lower fuel consumption than current engines and also are economically attractive and environmentally acceptable. Emphasis is on the advancements required in component technologies and systems design concepts to permit future development of these more energy efficient engines.

  18. Computational Sports Aerodynamics of a Moving Sphere: Simulating a Ping Pong Ball in Free Flight

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    viscous flow past a spinning sphere. Taking a different approach from the usual computational practice the effect of introducing different varieties of spin on game play. The flow solver is based on the high as the design of an aircraft wing . Aerodynamic design using computers to complement experimental approach

  19. A New Aerodynamic Traction Principle for Handling Products on an Air Cushion

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and the lifting force depends on material properties. Pneumatic levitation approaches use air flow to apply. Aerodynamic levitation uses a flow of gas to apply a lift force. Two different approaches can be considered-effector of the manipulator which consists in a cup-shaped air nozzle [17]. Bernoulli levitation has been use in practical

  20. Refrigeration principles and systems: An energy approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pita

    1984-01-01

    The book presents the fundamental principles, systems, and practices of refrigeration. Emphasizing energy conservation, it offers applications of the refrigeration systems and equipment. Topics covered include: physical principles; the vapor compression refrigeration system: Pressure-enthalpy diagrams; thermodynamics of the vapor compression refrigeration cycle; reciprocating, rotary and screw compressors; heat transfer in refrigeration: Evaporators; condensers and cooling towers; refrigerant flow control (expansion)

  1. A Dissipated Energy Approach to Fatigue Evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shihui Shen; Gordon D. Airey; Samuel H. Carpenter; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    The fatigue behaviour of bituminous binders and\\/or bitumen-filler mastics has been postulated as having a strong correlation with the fatigue behaviour of asphalt mixtures. The binder is one of the major factors controlling fatigue of the asphalt mixture and is considered as the leading media of energy dissipation. It is verified in this paper that the application of the Ratio

  2. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup. PMID:22778638

  3. Aerodynamic force by Lamb vector integrals in compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, Benedetto; Tognaccini, Renato

    2014-05-01

    A new exact expression of the aerodynamic force acting on a body in steady high Reynolds number (laminar and turbulent) compressible flow is proposed. The aerodynamic force is obtained by integration of the Lamb vector field given by the cross product of vorticity times velocity. The result is obtained extending a theory developed for the incompressible case. A decomposition in lift and drag contribution is obtained in the two-dimensional case. The theory links the force generation to local flow properties, in particular to the Lamb vector field and to the kinetic energy. The theoretical results are confirmed analyzing numerical solutions obtained by a standard Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes solver. Results are discussed for the case of a two-dimensional airfoil in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic free stream conditions.

  4. MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS

    E-print Network

    Hartmann, Ralf

    MULTI­TARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS RALF HARTMANN # Abstract. Important quantities in aerodynamic flow simulations are the aerodynamic force coe subject classifications. 65N12,65N15,65N30 1. Introduction. In aerodynamic computations like compressible

  5. Aeroelastic Analysis of Bridges: Effects of Turbulence and Aerodynamic Nonlinearities

    E-print Network

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Aeroelastic Analysis of Bridges: Effects of Turbulence and Aerodynamic Nonlinearities Xinzhong Chen for capturing the emerging concerns in bridge aerodynamics introduced by aerodynamic nonlinearities/or with aerodynamic characteristics sensitive to the effective angle of incidence. This paper presents a nonlinear

  6. MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS

    E-print Network

    Hartmann, Ralf

    MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS RALF HARTMANN Abstract. Important quantities in aerodynamic flow simulations are the aerodynamic force coefficients including Navier-Stokes equations AMS subject classifications. 65N12,65N15,65N30 1. Introduction. In aerodynamic

  7. Transpiration Control Of Aerodynamics Via Porous Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1993-01-01

    Quasi-active porous surface used to control pressure loading on aerodynamic surface of aircraft or other vehicle, according to proposal. In transpiration control, one makes small additions of pressure and/or mass to cavity beneath surface of porous skin on aerodynamic surface, thereby affecting rate of transpiration through porous surface. Porous skin located on forebody or any other suitable aerodynamic surface, with cavity just below surface. Device based on concept extremely lightweight, mechanically simple, occupies little volume in vehicle, and extremely adaptable.

  8. The importance of aerodynamics on dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of aerodynamic phenomena on helicopter structural dynamics are examined, reviewing the results of recent theoretical and experimental investigations. A schematic diagram of a dynamic analysis is presented and discussed, noting the numerous aerodynamic inputs, and numerical data are presented in graphs. Consideration is given to forcing functions, aerodynamic damping, aeroelastic coupling, negative damping, apparent coriolis coupling, periodic coefficients, inverse damping, additional degrees of freedom, flap-lag stability, and dynamic inflow. The need for theoretical models which account for the dynamic loop between blade lift and induced flow (permitting blade motion to dynamically alter the flowfield during transients) is indicated.

  9. Tandem cylinder aerodynamic sound control using porous coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanru; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi; Wei, Jinjia; Qu, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of porous coatings as a passive flow control method for reducing the aerodynamic sound from tandem cylinders. The aim here is to perform a parametric proof-of-concept study to investigate the effectiveness of porous treatment on bare tandem cylinders to control and regularize the vortex shedding and flow within the gap region between the two bluff bodies, and thereby control the aerodynamic sound generation mechanism. The aerodynamic simulations are performed using 2D transient RANS approach with k - ? turbulence model, and the acoustic computations are carried out using the standard Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy. Numerical flow and acoustic results are presented for bare tandem cylinders and porous-covered cylinders, with different porosities and thicknesses. Experimental flow and acoustic data are also provided for comparison. Results show that the proper use of porous coatings can lead to stabilization of the vortex shedding within the gap region, reduction of the vortex shedding interaction with the downstream body, and therefore the generation of tonal and broadband noise. It has also been observed that the magnitude and the frequency of the primary tone reduce significantly as a result of the flow regularization. The proposed passive flow-induced noise and vibration control method can potentially be used for other problems involving flow interaction with bluff bodies.

  10. Aerodynamic Drag of Heavy Vehicles (Class 7-8): Simulation and Benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Rose McCallen, Dan Flowers, Tim Dunn; Jerry Owens; Fred Browand; Mustapha Hammache; Anthony Leonard; Mark Brady; Kambiz Salari; Walter Rutledge; James Ross; Bruce Storms; J. T. Heineck, David Driver; James Bell; Steve Walker; Gregory Zilliac

    2000-06-19

    This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. Experimental validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California (USC). Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) using state-of-the-art techniques.

  11. Using the HARV simulation aerodynamic model to determine forebody strake aerodynamic coefficients from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    The method described in this report is intended to present an overview of a process developed to extract the forebody aerodynamic increments from flight tests. The process to determine the aerodynamic increments (rolling pitching, and yawing moments, Cl, Cm, Cn, respectively) for the forebody strake controllers added to the F/A - 18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft was developed to validate the forebody strake aerodynamic model used in simulation.

  12. Energy storage improvement through material science approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Brandon Joseph

    A need for improved energy storage is apparent for the improvement of our society. Lithium ion batteries are one of the leading energy storage technologies being researched today. These batteries typically utilize coupled reduction/oxidation reactions with intercalation reactions in crystalline metal oxides with lithium ions as charge carriers to produce efficient and high power energy storage options. The cathode material (positive electrode) has been an emphasis in the recent research as it is currently the weakest link of the battery. Several systems of cathode materials have been studied with different structures and chemical makeup, all having advantages and disadvantages. One focus of the research presented below was creating a low cost and high performance cathode material by creating a composite of the low cost spinel structured LiMn2O4 and the higher capacity layered structure materials. Two compositional diagrams were used to map out the composition space between end members which include two dimensional layer structured LiCoO 2, LiNiO2, LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 and three dimensional spinel structured LiMn2O4. Several compositions in each composition map were electrochemically tested and structurally characterized in an attempt to discover a high performance cathode material with a lower cost precursor. The best performing composition in each system shows the desired mixed phase of the layered and spinel crystal structures, yielding improved performance versus the individual end member components. The surrounding compositions were then tested in order to find the optimum composition and performance. The best performing composition was 0.2LiCoO 2•0.7LiNi0.8Co0.2O2•0.1LiMn 2O4 and yielded a specific capacity of 182mAh/g. Another promising area of chemical energy storage is in the storage of hydrogen gas in chemical hydrides. Hydrogen gas can be used as a fuel in a variety of applications as a viable method for storing and transporting energy. Currently, the storage of the hydrogen is one of the major obstacles to its use as a fuel, and is traditionally done in high pressure cylinders or cryogenic storage tanks. Chemical hydrides allow storage of hydrogen in a solid form with higher volumetric hydrogen storage density than both traditional options. These chemical hydrides however are not performing close to their theoretical values and need further improvement in order to be viable in mobile applications. In this study two complex chemical hydride materials (Li 3AlH6 and LiNa2AlH6) with high theoretical storage values were studied and doped with catalysts in an attempt to increase the hydrogen yield. The successful improvement of both Li3AlH 6 and LiNa2AlH6 with 2%LaCl3 catalyst was achieved improving the chemical hydrogen yield percent by 4.6% and 22.9% respectively.

  13. Aerodynamic Design Criteria for Class 8 Heavy Vehicles Trailer Base Devices to Attain Optimum Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Salari; J Ortega

    2010-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of its Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) effort has investigated class 8 tractor-trailer aerodynamics for many years. This effort has identified many drag producing flow structures around the heavy vehicles and also has designed and tested many new active and passive drag reduction

  14. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 1 publication covers configuration aerodynamics.

  15. Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase V: Test Configuration and Available Data Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.; Simms, D. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.; Cotrell, J. R.

    2001-08-30

    The main objective of the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment is to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale, three-dimensional, unsteady aerodynamic behavior of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). To accomplish this, an experimental wind turbine configured to meet specific research objectives was assembled and operated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The turbine was instrumented to characterize rotating-blade aerodynamic performance, machine structural responses, and atmospheric inflow conditions. Comprehensive tests were conducted with the turbine operating in an outdoor field environment under diverse conditions. Resulting data are used to validate aerodynamic and structural dynamics models, which are an important part of wind turbine design and engineering codes. Improvements in these models are needed to better characterize aerodynamic response in both the steady-state post-stall and dynamic-stall regimes. Much of the effort in the first phase of the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment focused on developing required data acquisition systems. Complex instrumentation and equipment was needed to meet stringent data requirements while operating under the harsh environmental conditions of a wind turbine rotor. Once the data systems were developed, subsequent phases of experiments were then conducted to collect data for use in answering specific research questions. A description of the experiment configuration used during Phase V of the experiment is contained in this report.

  16. Aerodynamic research on tipvane wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbussel, G. J. W.; Vanholten, T.; Vankuik, G. A. M.

    1982-04-01

    Aerodynamic loads on small auxiliary wings that are mounted at the tips of wind turbine blades in such a way that a diffuser effect is generated, resulting in a mass flow augmentation through the turbine disk, were analyzed. For load prediction, an expansion method, or lifting line approach, was used. The complete analytical expression for the pressure field consists of two series of basic pressure fields. One series is related to the basic load distributions over the turbine blade, and the other series to the basic load distribution over the tipvane. In addition, another basic pressure field, related to a triangular load distribution over the turbine blade and the tipvane, is needed in order to take care of the lift transfer from turbine blade to tipvane. The coefficients in these pressure field expressions are a priori unknown and are determined by a boundary condition, requiring the flow to be tangential on both turbine blade and tipvane. A numerical procedure then yields the coefficients of the basic pressure fields.

  17. Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs

    E-print Network

    Venditti, David A.

    Anisotropic grid–adaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate prediction of multiple aerodynamic outputs (such as the lift, drag, and moment coefficients) is required from a single ...

  18. Review of Aerodynamics for Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snel, Herman

    2003-07-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of wind turbine rotor aerodynamics. It addresses present uncertainties in rotor design and load calculations, recent modelling efforts to reduce these uncertainties, and validation activities regarding the modelling and results thereof.

  19. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include: viscous flows, boundary layer equations, turbulence modeling and Navier-Stokes equations, and internal flows.

  20. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Modern Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Holland, Scott D.; Blevins, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A modern launch vehicle is by necessity an extremely integrated design. The accurate characterization of its aerodynamic characteristics is essential to determine design loads, to design flight control laws, and to establish performance. The NASA Ares Aerodynamics Panel has been responsible for technical planning, execution, and vetting of the aerodynamic characterization of the Ares I vehicle. An aerodynamics team supporting the Panel consists of wind tunnel engineers, computational engineers, database engineers, and other analysts that address topics such as uncertainty quantification. The team resides at three NASA centers: Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Ames Research Center. The Panel has developed strategies to synergistically combine both the wind tunnel efforts and the computational efforts with the goal of validating the computations. Selected examples highlight key flow physics and, where possible, the fidelity of the comparisons between wind tunnel results and the computations. Lessons learned summarize what has been gleaned during the project and can be useful for other vehicle development projects.

  1. 16.100 Aerodynamics, Fall 2002

    E-print Network

    Darmofal, David L.

    This course extends fluid mechanic concepts from Unified Engineering to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. 16.100 generally has four components: subsonic potential flows, including ...

  2. SUCCESSES AND CHALLENGES IN COMPUTATIONAL AERODYNAMICS

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    of aerodynamic configurations was the wind tunnel. Experimental aerodynamicists could arrive at efficient shapes through the introduction of a velocity potential. This reduction led to the first major advance

  3. Towards a 3d Spatial Urban Energy Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahu, J.-M.; Koch, A.; Kremers, E.; Murshed, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Today's needs to reduce the environmental impact of energy use impose dramatic changes for energy infrastructure and existing demand patterns (e.g. buildings) corresponding to their specific context. In addition, future energy systems are expected to integrate a considerable share of fluctuating power sources and equally a high share of distributed generation of electricity. Energy system models capable of describing such future systems and allowing the simulation of the impact of these developments thus require a spatial representation in order to reflect the local context and the boundary conditions. This paper describes two recent research approaches developed at EIFER in the fields of (a) geo-localised simulation of heat energy demand in cities based on 3D morphological data and (b) spatially explicit Agent-Based Models (ABM) for the simulation of smart grids. 3D city models were used to assess solar potential and heat energy demand of residential buildings which enable cities to target the building refurbishment potentials. Distributed energy systems require innovative modelling techniques where individual components are represented and can interact. With this approach, several smart grid demonstrators were simulated, where heterogeneous models are spatially represented. Coupling 3D geodata with energy system ABMs holds different advantages for both approaches. On one hand, energy system models can be enhanced with high resolution data from 3D city models and their semantic relations. Furthermore, they allow for spatial analysis and visualisation of the results, with emphasis on spatially and structurally correlations among the different layers (e.g. infrastructure, buildings, administrative zones) to provide an integrated approach. On the other hand, 3D models can benefit from more detailed system description of energy infrastructure, representing dynamic phenomena and high resolution models for energy use at component level. The proposed modelling strategies conceptually and practically integrate urban spatial and energy planning approaches. The combined modelling approach that will be developed based on the described sectorial models holds the potential to represent hybrid energy systems coupling distributed generation of electricity with thermal conversion systems.

  4. Asymmetric demand for energy: A cointegration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Thomas Frank

    1997-12-01

    This paper uses time series data in a study of the demand for energy. One goal is to compare the results from the traditional autoregressive distributed lag (ADL) model to the error correction model (ECM) using cointegration. The second goal is to determine if the demand elasticity is asymmetric with respect to increasing and decreasing prices. This paper discusses three topics that are important to the use of time series data. The first topic is the presence and consequences unit roots which are common in time series data. The second topic is the identification of cointegrated variables and the third topic is a development of the ECM. This results in a model that can be used in either a single equation or multivariate system context and it will estimate both long run and short run elasticities. Asymmetry theory and its implications are studied along with an investigation into competing methods of creating the asymmetric variables. Simulations provided evidence that the use of dummy variables results in biased estimates and that the cumulative difference method of Wolffram/Houck gives valid estimates. The results of the empirical part of the paper show that the short run estimates of the ADL model are like those of the error correction model, but the cointegration method's long run estimates are better since they are known to be consistent and asymptotically unbiased. Tests for asymmetry do not support the theory of asymmetric long run price elasticities; however there is evidence to support the presence of asymmetric demand in the short run.

  5. The oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, H G; Schwartz, I

    1941-01-01

    The two-dimensional problem of the oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator is treated in the manner that the wing is replaced by a plate with bends and stages and the airfoil section by a mean line consisting of one or more straights. The computed formulas and tables permit, on these premises, the prediction of the pressure distribution and of the aerodynamic reactions of oscillating elevators and tabs with any position of elevator hinge in respect to elevator leading edge.

  6. Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Schatzle; P. C. Klimas; H. R. Spahr

    1981-01-01

    The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex\\/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the

  7. Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Schatzle; P. C. Klimas; H. R. Spahr

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex\\/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the

  8. Energy Aware Paradigm for Energy Efficient ICT: a Systemic Approach Sergio Ricciardi

    E-print Network

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Energy Aware Paradigm for Energy Efficient ICT: a Systemic Approach Sergio Ricciardi Technical) Jordi Girona 3 08034 Barcelona, Spain +34 93 4016982 pareta@ac.upc.edu ABSTRACT Energy is imposing as the new constraint in the ICT sector and the problem of energy efficient in ICT has consequently arisen

  9. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-print Network

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  10. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of the vehicle. Furthermore, the evaluation of the impact of small changes in radiator or grille dimensions has revealed that the total drag is not particularly sensitive to those changes. This observation leads to two significant conclusions. First, a small increase in radiator size to accommodate heat rejection needs related to new emissions restrictions may be tolerated without significant increases in drag losses. Second, efforts to reduce drag on the tractor requires that the design of the entire tractor be treated in an integrated fashion. Simply reducing the size of the grille will not provide the desired result, but the additional contouring of the vehicle as a whole which may be enabled by the smaller radiator could have a more significant effect.

  11. Aerodynamics of a hybrid airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andan, Amelda Dianne; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of a numerical study of the aerodynamic parameters of a wingless and a winged-hull airship. The total forces and moment coefficients of the airships have been computed over a range of angles. The results obtained show that addition of a wing to a conventional airship increases the lift has three times the lifting force at positive angle of attack as compared to a wingless airship whereas the drag increases in the range of 19% to 58%. The longitudinal and directional stabilities were found to be statically stable, however, both the conventional airship and the hybrid or winged airships were found to have poor rolling stability. Wingless airship has slightly higher longitudinal stability than a winged airship. The winged airship has better directional stability than the wingless airship. The wingless airship only possesses static rolling stability in the range of yaw angles of -5° to 5°. On the contrary, the winged airship initially tested does not possess rolling stability at all. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations show that modifications to the wing placement and its dihedral have strong positive effect on the rolling stability. Raising the wings to the center of gravity and introducing a dihedral angle of 5° stabilizes the rolling motion of the winged airship.

  12. Parachute Aerodynamics From Video Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Queen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2005-01-01

    A new data analysis technique for the identification of static and dynamic aerodynamic stability coefficients from wind tunnel test video data is presented. This new technique was applied to video data obtained during a parachute wind tunnel test program conducted in support of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Total angle-of-attack data obtained from video images were used to determine the static pitching moment curve of the parachute. During the original wind tunnel test program the static pitching moment curve had been determined by forcing the parachute to a specific total angle-of -attack and measuring the forces generated. It is shown with the new technique that this parachute, when free to rotate, trims at an angle-of-attack two degrees lower than was measured during the forced-angle tests. An attempt was also made to extract pitch damping information from the video data. Results suggest that the parachute is dynamically unstable at the static trim point and tends to become dynamically stable away from the trim point. These trends are in agreement with limit-cycle-like behavior observed in the video. However, the chaotic motion of the parachute produced results with large uncertainty bands.

  13. Aerodynamic Drag and Gyroscopic Stability

    E-print Network

    Elya R. Courtney; Michael W. Courtney

    2014-10-16

    This paper describes the effects on aerodynamic drag of rifle bullets as the gyroscopic stability is lowered from 1.3 to 1.0. It is well known that a bullet can tumble for stability less than 1.0. The Sierra Loading Manuals (4th and 5th Editions) have previously reported that ballistic coefficient decreases significantly as gyroscopic stability, Sg, is lowered below 1.3. These observations are further confirmed by experiments reported here. Measured ballistic coefficients were compared with gyroscopic stabilities computed using the Miller Twist Rule for nearly solid metal bullets with uniform density and computed using the Courtney-Miller formula for plastic-tipped bullets. The relationship between Sg and drag may be used to test the applicability of existing gyroscopic stability formulas for given bullet designs and to evaluate the accuracy of alternate formulas in cases where the existing stability formulas are not as accurate. The most definitive test of formulas predicting stability will always be observation of whether bullets tumble under given conditions. However, observations of drag changes provide valuable supplemental information because they suggest changes in stability as conditions change. Use of a continuous variable (drag) rather than a binary variable (tumbling) allows insight into stability over a range of conditions where the binary variable does not change.

  14. The aerodynamics of supersonic parachutes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1987-06-01

    A discussion of the aerodynamics and performance of parachutes flying at supersonic speeds is the focus of this paper. Typical performance requirements for supersonic parachute systems are presented, followed by a review of the literature on supersonic parachute configurations and their drag characteristics. Data from a recent supersonic wind tunnel test series is summarized. The value and limitations of supersonic wind tunnel data on hemisflo and 20-degree conical ribbon parachutes behind several forebody shapes and diameters are discussed. Test techniques were derived which avoided many of the opportunities to obtain erroneous supersonic parachute drag data in wind tunnels. Preliminary correlations of supersonic parachute drag with Mach number, forebody shape and diameter, canopy porosity, inflated canopy diameter and stability are presented. Supersonic parachute design considerations are discussed and applied to a M = 2 parachute system designed and tested at Sandia. It is shown that the performance of parachutes in supersonic flows is a strong function of parachute design parameters and their interactions with the payload wake.

  15. Nonlinear potential analysis techniques for supersonic-hypersonic aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Clever, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate nonlinear inviscid theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at supersonic and moderate hypersonic speeds were developed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to conceptual configuration design level of effort. Second order small disturbance and full potential theory was utilized to meet this objective. Numerical codes were developed for relatively general three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with experimental results for a variety of wing, body, and wing-body shapes.

  16. Aerodynamics of puffball mushroom spore dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Guillermo; Barberie, Alex; Hu, David

    2012-11-01

    Puffball mushrooms Lycoperdon are spherical fungi that release a cloud of spores in response to raindrop impacts. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we elucidate the aerodynamics of this unique impact-based spore-dispersal. We characterize live puffball ejections by high speed video, the geometry and elasticity of their shells by cantilever experiments, and the packing fraction and size of their spores by scanning electron microscope. We build a dynamically similar puffball mimic composed of a tied-off latex balloon filled with baby powder and topped with a 1-cm slit. A jet of powder is elicited by steady lateral compression of the mimic between two plates. The jet height is a bell-shaped function of force applied, with a peak of 18 cm at loads of 45 N. We rationalize the increase in jet height with force using Darcy's Law: the applied force generates an overpressure maintained by the air-tight elastic membrane. Pressure is relieved as the air travels through the spore interstitial spaces, entrains spores, and exits through the puffball orifice. This mechanism demonstrates how powder-filled elastic shells can generate high-speed jets using energy harvested from rain.

  17. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 2 publication covers the design optimization and testing sessions.

  18. Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound

    E-print Network

    Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound Instructor theory of acoustics; they will serve as an introduction to acoustics for those new to the subject. Great care will be taken to discuss underlying fluid mechanical and acoustic concepts. A considerable number

  19. Exploring Discretization Error in Simulation-Based Aerodynamic Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

    2010-01-01

    This work examines the level of discretization error in simulation-based aerodynamic databases and introduces strategies for error control. Simulations are performed using a parallel, multi-level Euler solver on embedded-boundary Cartesian meshes. Discretization errors in user-selected outputs are estimated using the method of adjoint-weighted residuals and we use adaptive mesh refinement to reduce these errors to specified tolerances. Using this framework, we examine the behavior of discretization error throughout a token database computed for a NACA 0012 airfoil consisting of 120 cases. We compare the cost and accuracy of two approaches for aerodynamic database generation. In the first approach, mesh adaptation is used to compute all cases in the database to a prescribed level of accuracy. The second approach conducts all simulations using the same computational mesh without adaptation. We quantitatively assess the error landscape and computational costs in both databases. This investigation highlights sensitivities of the database under a variety of conditions. The presence of transonic shocks or the stiffness in the governing equations near the incompressible limit are shown to dramatically increase discretization error requiring additional mesh resolution to control. Results show that such pathologies lead to error levels that vary by over factor of 40 when using a fixed mesh throughout the database. Alternatively, controlling this sensitivity through mesh adaptation leads to mesh sizes which span two orders of magnitude. We propose strategies to minimize simulation cost in sensitive regions and discuss the role of error-estimation in database quality.

  20. Time Series Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Fields Estimated from MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Jordan S.; Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Most land surface models used today require estimates of aerodynamic roughness length in order to characterize momentum transfer between the surface and atmosphere. The most common method of prescribing roughness is through the use of empirical look-up tables based solely on land cover class. Theoretical approaches that employ satellite-based estimates of canopy density present an attractive alternative to current look-up table approaches based on vegetation cover type that do not account for within-class variability and are oftentimes simplistic with respect to temporal variability. The current research applies Raupach s formulation of momentum aerodynamic roughness to MODIS data on a regional scale in order to estimate seasonally variable roughness and zero-plane displacement height fields using bulk land cover parameters estimated by [Jasinski, M.F., Borak, J., Crago, R., 2005. Bulk surface momentum parameters for satellite-derived vegetation fields. Agric. For. Meteorol. 133, 55-68]. Results indicate promising advances over look-up approaches with respect to characterization of vegetation roughness variability in land surface and atmospheric circulation models.

  1. ENERGY AWARE APPROACH FOR HPC Robert Basmadjian1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CHAPTER 1 ENERGY AWARE APPROACH FOR HPC SYSTEMS Robert Basmadjian1 , Georges Da Costa2 , Ghislain for actors involved in the devel- opment and operation of HPC systems is no longer the number of PFlops, tremendous efforts are being undertaken by HPC operators from multi- ple levels to make supercomputers

  2. MAC New Approach to Design Energy Consumption Minimized

    E-print Network

    Bahk, Saewoong

    MAC , O , , New Approach to Design Energy Consumption Minimized Wireless sensor network MAC Protocols Wooguil Pak, Seongsu Lim O , and Saewoong Bahk School of Electrical Engineering}@netlab.snu.ac.kr duty cycle . MAC duty cycle 0.1~5% duty cycle . MAC

  3. Data driven signal processing: an approach for energy efficient computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anantha Chandrakasan; Vadim Gutnik; Thucydides Xanthopoulos

    1996-01-01

    The computational switching activity of digital CMOS circuits can be dynamically minimized by designing algorithms that exploit signal statistics. This results in processors that have time-varying power requirements and perform computation on demand. An approach is presented to minimize the energy dissipation per data sample in variable-load DSP systems by adaptively minimizing the power supply voltage for each sample using

  4. A holistic approach to energy efficient building forms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmad Okeil

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing energy consumption in buildings has become an important goal in architecture and urban planning in recent years. Guidelines were developed for each climatic zone aiming at increasing solar exposure for buildings in cold climates and at reducing solar exposure for buildings in hot climates. This approach usually plans for the season with the harshest weather; often forgetting that temperatures

  5. Energy Conservation in Our Schools--A Practical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewin, C. Edwin; Racich, Matthew J.

    A practical approach designed to reduce energy waste by schools is to improve the knowledge and upgrade the skills of school building custodians. This paper discusses an operation and maintenance training program for custodians developed by the Will County (Illinois) educational service region. The major parts of the program consist of skill…

  6. Missile Aerodynamics for Ascent and Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Gaines L.; McCarter, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment equations are developed for 6-DOF missile simulations of both the ascent phase of flight and a tumbling re-entry. The missile coordinate frame (M frame) and a frame parallel to the M frame were used for formulating the aerodynamic equations. The missile configuration chosen as an example is a cylinder with fixed fins and a nose cone. The equations include both the static aerodynamic coefficients and the aerodynamic damping derivatives. The inclusion of aerodynamic damping is essential for simulating a tumbling re-entry. Appended information provides insight into aerodynamic damping.

  7. Experimental investigation of hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intrieri, Peter F.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive series of ballistic range tests were conducted at the Ames Research Center to determine precisely the aerodynamic characteristics of the Galileo entry probe vehicle. Figures and tables are presented which summarize the results of these ballistic range tests. Drag data were obtained for both a nonablated and a hypothesized ablated Galileo configuration at Mach numbers from about 0.7 to 14 and at Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 4 million. The tests were conducted in air and the experimental results were compared with available Pioneer Venus data since these two configurations are similar in geometry. The nonablated Galileo configuration was also tested with two different center-of-gravity positions to obtain values of pitching-moment-curve slope which could be used in determining values of lift and center-of-pressure location for this configuration. The results indicate that the drag characteristics of the Galileo probe are qualitatively similar to that of Pioneer Venus, however, the drag of the nonablated Galileo is about 3 percent lower at the higher Mach numbers and as much as 5 percent greater at transonic Mach numbers of about 1.0 to 1.5. Also, the drag of the hypothesized ablated configuration is about 3 percent lower than that of the nonablated configuration at the higher Mach numbers but about the same at the lower Mach numbers. Additional tests are required at Reynolds numbers of 1000, 500, and 250 to determine if the dramatic rise in drag coefficient measured for Pioneer Venus at these low Reynolds numbers also occurs for Galileo, as might be expected.

  8. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  9. An integrated gain scheduled control design for an Electrostatic micro-Actuator with aerodynamic effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marialena Vagia; Anthony Tzes

    2010-01-01

    In this article an integrated approach regarding the modeling and control design aspects of an electrostatic microactuator (EmA) with aerodynamic effects is presented. The modeling analysis of the squeezed film damping effect is investigated in the case of an EmA composed by a set of two plates. The bottom plate is clamped to the ground, while the moving plate is

  10. Flights to asteroids along energetically optimum courses with perturbational, impulsive, and aerodynamic maneuvers near Venus, the Earth, Mars, and Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Livanov, L.B.

    1987-01-01

    A systematic listing is made of several dozen possible combinations of plants which a spacecraft can encounter in flights to the asteroids, passing near Venus up to four times and near the other planets up to twice. Taking the orbits of the planets as circular at first, and allowing only for the inclination of the asteroids' orbit, they analyze the individual impulses (for departure from Earth orbit, intermediate impulses, for reducing the velocity of approach to the asteroid, and for the velocity of launch toward earth) and their sum, and the total duration of flight to the asteroid for the best courses, as function of the semimajor axis and inclination of the asteroid's orbit. Courses with twofold perturbational or aerodynamic maneuvers near Mars are more advantageous for reaching asteroids closer to the Earth and to the ecliptic plane. Several courses are advantageous for reaching both closer and more distant asteroids, including an Earth-Mars (four-impulse bielliptic maneuver)-asteroid course, and courses with perturbational maneuvers: Earth-Venus-Earth-asteroid, Earth-Mars-Earth-Earth-asteroid, and Earth-Venus-Earth-Mars-asteroid courses, if the orbital inclinations of the targets are small. When the inclinations are more than 10/sup 0/, Earth-impulse at aphelion-Earth (about two years later)-Jupiter-asteroid, Earth-Mars-Earth (about two years later)-Jupiter-asteroid, and Earth-Venus-Earth-Mars-Jupiter-asteroid courses are more advantageous. The approximate calculations are compared with calculations for elliptical noncoplanar orbits in the period of 1970-2000 as applied to Earth-Mars-asteroids Nos. 4, 8, and 20 courses with perturbational or aerodynamic maneuvers, and the correctness of the approximate calculation is shown. Methods of calculating the energy consumed in the perturbational maneuver, choosing the frequently visited asteroids, and calculating the aerodynamic maneuver are described.

  11. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace. PMID:25740899

  12. Extension of a nonlinear systems theory to general-frequency unsteady transonic aerodynamic responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for modeling nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses, for subsequent use in aeroservoelastic analysis and design, using the Volterra-Wiener theory of nonlinear systems is presented. The methodology is extended to predict nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses of arbitrary frequency. The Volterra-Wiener theory uses multidimensional convolution integrals to predict the response of nonlinear systems to arbitrary inputs. The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code is used to generate linear and nonlinear unit impulse responses that correspond to each of the integrals for a rectangular wing with a NACA 0012 section with pitch and plunge degrees of freedom. The computed kernels then are used to predict linear and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses via convolution and compared to responses obtained using the CAP-TSD code directly. The results indicate that the approach can be used to predict linear unsteady aerodynamic responses exactly for any input amplitude or frequency at a significant cost savings. Convolution of the nonlinear terms results in nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic responses that compare reasonably well with those computed using the CAP-TSD code directly but at significant computational cost savings.

  13. Fluidic Modification of the Aerodynamic Performance of an Airfoil at Low Angles of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desalvo, Michael; Amitay, Michael; Glezer, Ari

    2002-11-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a conventional non-symmetric airfoil are altered at low angles of attack (when the baseline flow is fully attached) by modifying its Kutta condition using a trapped vortex near the trailing edge. The trapped vortex is induced by a miniature, Gurney-like flap integrated with a synthetic jet actuator having a characteristic scale of 0.016c that is mounted on the pressure side of the airfoil immediately upstream of the trailing edge. The induced changes in the Kutta condition result in global flow modifications that affect the aerodynamic forces and moments. The aerodynamic performance can be continuously varied with the actuator momentum coefficient and the lift to pressure drag ratio is monotonically increased to a level that is higher than that of the baseline airfoil. Various actuation approaches and their effect on the airfoil performance will be discussed.

  14. Overview of Selected Measurement Techniques for Aerodynamics Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is. therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a around-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  15. Modification of k-? turbulence model for predicting airfoil aerodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Yan, Hao; Fang, Hong; Wang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Predicting wind turbine S825 airfoil's aerodynamic performance is crucial to improving its energy efficiency and reducing its environmental impact. In this paper, a numerical simulation on the wind turbine S825 airfoil is conducted with k-? turbulence model at different attack angles. By comparing with experimental data, a new method of modifying k-? model is proposed. A modifying function is proposed to limit the production term in ? equation based on fluid rotation and deformation. This method improves turbulent viscosity and decreases separating region when the airfoil works at large separating conditions. The predictive accuracy could be improved by using the modified k-? turbulence model.

  16. Status of Nozzle Aerodynamic Technology at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.; Smith, Bud; Owens, Zachary

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the status of nozzle aerodynamic technology at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center). The objectives of this presentation were to provide insight into MSFC in-house nozzle aerodynamic technology, design, analysis, and testing. Under CDDF (Center Director's Discretionary Fund), 'Altitude Compensating Nozzle Technology', are the following tasks: Development of in-house ACN (Altitude Compensating Nozzle) aerodynamic design capability; Building in-house experience for all aspects of ACN via End-to-End Nozzle Test Program; Obtaining Experimental Data for Annular Aerospike: Thrust eta, TVC (thrust vector control) capability and surface pressures. To support selection/optimization of future Launch Vehicle propulsion we needed a parametric design and performance tool for ACN. We chose to start with the ACN Aerospike Nozzles.

  17. Aerodynamic Flow Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John M.; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The aerodynamic effects of large-area air bleed that is driven through surface openings by pressure differences across a lifting airfoil and regulated by addressable, arrays of integrated louvers have been investigated in wind tunnel experiments. Time-dependent interactions between the bleed and cross flows alter the apparent aerodynamic shape of the lifting surface and consequently the distributions of aerodynamic forces and moments. The lift and pitching moment can be significantly altered over a wide range of angles of attack from pre- to post-stall by independently-controlled bleed near the leading (LE) and trailing (TE) edges. While TE bleed effects nearly-linear variation of the pitching moment with minimal changes in lift, LE bleed leads to large variations in lift and pitching moment with minimal drag penalty. Phase-locked PIV shows the effects of the bleed on the flow on the suction surface and in the near wake. Supported by AFOSR

  18. Aerodynamic tests of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Walters, R.E.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    An indoor facility for the aerodynamic testing of Darrieus turbine blades was developed. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients were measured for two blades whose angle of attack and chord-to-radius ratio were varied. The first blade used an NACA 0015 airfoil section; the second used a 15% elliptical cross section with a modified circular arc trailing edge. Blade aerodynamic coefficients were corrected to section coefficients for comparison to published rectilinear flow data. Although the airfoil sections were symmetrical, moment coefficients were not zero and the lift and drag curves were asymmetrical about zero lift coefficient and angle of attack. These features verified the predicted virtual camber and incidence phenomena. Boundary-layer centrifugal effects were manifested by discontinuous lift curves and large differences in the angle of zero lift between th NACA 0015 and elliptical airfoils. It was concluded that rectilinear flow aerodynamic data are not applicable to Darrieus turbine blades, even for small chord-to-radius ratios.

  19. Miniature Trailing Edge Effector for Aerodynamic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae (Inventor); Bieniawski, Stefan R. (Inventor); Kroo, Ilan M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improved miniature trailing edge effectors for aerodynamic control are provided. Three types of devices having aerodynamic housings integrated to the trailing edge of an aerodynamic shape are presented, which vary in details of how the control surface can move. A bucket type device has a control surface which is the back part of a C-shaped member having two arms connected by the back section. The C-shaped section is attached to a housing at the ends of the arms, and is rotatable about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down and neutral states. A flip-up type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down, neutral and brake states. A rotating type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the chord line to provide up, down and neutral states.

  20. Experimental investigation of transonic oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1989-01-01

    Fundamental experiments are performed in the NASA Lewis Transonic Oscillating Cascade Facility to investigate the subsonic and transonic aerodynamics of cascaded airfoils executing torsion mode oscillations at realistic values of reduced frequency. In particular, an unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is developed and utilized. In this technique, only one airfoil in the cascade is oscillated at a time, with the resulting airfoil surface unsteady pressure distribution measured on one dynamically instrumented reference airfoil. The unsteady aerodynamics of an equivalent cascade with all airfoils oscillating at any specified interblade phase angle are then determined through a vector summation of these data. These influence coefficient determined oscillating cascade data were correlated with: (1) data obtained in this cascade with all airfoils oscillating at several interblade phase angle values; and (2) predictions from a classical linearized unsteady cascade model.

  1. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Hu, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A Fourier analysis method was developed to analyze harmonic forced-oscillation data at high angles of attack as functions of the angle of attack and its time rate of change. The resulting aerodynamic responses at different frequencies are used to build up the aerodynamic models involving time integrals of the indicial type. An efficient numerical method was also developed to evaluate these time integrals for arbitrary motions based on a concept of equivalent harmonic motion. The method was verified by first using results from two-dimensional and three-dimensional linear theories. The developed models for C sub L, C sub D, and C sub M based on high-alpha data for a 70 deg delta wing in harmonic motions showed accurate results in reproducing hysteresis. The aerodynamic models are further verified by comparing with test data using ramp-type motions.

  2. History of the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) program has reached a milestone with the completion of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network. This achievement is the first major milestone in the continuing effort to provide a state-of-the-art supercomputer facility for the national aerospace community and to serve as a pathfinder for the development and use of future supercomputer systems. The underlying factors that motivated the initiation of the program are first identified and then discussed. These include the emergence and evolution of computational aerodynamics as a powerful new capability in aerodynamics research and development, the computer power required for advances in the discipline, the complementary nature of computation and wind tunnel testing, and the need for the government to play a pathfinding role in the development and use of large-scale scientific computing systems. Finally, the history of the NAS program is traced from its inception in 1975 to the present time.

  3. Visualization of aerodynamic flow fields using photorefractive crystals

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Visualization of aerodynamic flow fields using photorefractive crystals A. Hafiz, R. Magnusson, J holographyinphotorefractive crystals isapplied for visualization of aerodynamic flow fields. The interferograms obtained include aerody- namics, plasma diagnostics, and heat transfer. Holo- graphic interferometry allowsthe

  4. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. 23.371 Section 23.371 Aeronautics...COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  5. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. 23.371 Section 23.371 Aeronautics...COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  6. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. 23.371 Section 23.371 Aeronautics...COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  7. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. 23.371 Section 23.371 Aeronautics...COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  8. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. 23.371 Section 23.371 Aeronautics...COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  9. Aerodynamic: Applications of Force and Flow

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Quentin Briggs

    This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. Although there is a great deal of historical information about aerodynamics that could be discussed here, we purposely narrowed the stream of resources to those that encourage students to experiment with technological design and function. Given these learning experiences, student should be prepared to articulate preferences in vehicle design and understand how the principles of aerodynamics influence vehicle performance.

  10. Multiparticle production in nuclear collisions using effective-energy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Mishra, Aditya; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sarkisyan, Edward K. G.; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2015-03-01

    The dependencies of charged particle pseudorapidity density and transverse energy pseudorapidity density at midrapidity on the collision energy and on the number of nucleon participants, or centrality, measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the energy range spanning a few GeV to a few TeV per nucleon. The study is based on the earlier proposed model, combining the constituent quark picture together with Landau relativistic hydrodynamics and shown to interrelate the measurements from different types of collisions. Within this picture, the dependence on the number of participants in heavy-ion collisions are found to be well described in terms of the effective energy defined as a centrality-dependent fraction of the collision energy. The effectiveenergy approach is shown to reveal a similarity in the energy dependence for the most central and centrality data in the entire available energy range. Predictions are made for the forthcoming higher-energy measurements in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC.

  11. Comparison of the Coulter Multisizer and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer for obtaining the aerodynamic particle size of irregularly shaped dust 

    E-print Network

    McClure, Joshua Wayne

    2002-01-01

    When studying air quality it is often necessary to measure the aerodynamic size distribution of particles. True aerodynamic diameter must be measured using a gravitational settling method, which is impractical. Other methods exist that use other...

  12. Comparison of the Coulter Multisizer and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer for obtaining the aerodynamic particle size of irregularly shaped dust

    E-print Network

    McClure, Joshua Wayne

    2002-01-01

    When studying air quality it is often necessary to measure the aerodynamic size distribution of particles. True aerodynamic diameter must be measured using a gravitational settling method, which is impractical. Other methods exist that use other...

  13. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of an Adaptive Morphing Trailing Edge Wing

    E-print Network

    Papalambros, Panos

    Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of an Adaptive Morphing Trailing Edge Wing Zhoujie Lyu Joaquim R. R morphing trailing edge wings have the potential to reduce the fuel burn of transport air- craft. In this paper, we quantify the aerodynamic performance benefits of a morphing trailing using aerodynamic design

  14. Advances in Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Antony Jameson1

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    1 Advances in Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Antony Jameson1 Stanford University, Stanford, CA to aerodynamic design. This shift has been mainly motivated by the availability of high performance comput- ing by J.L. Lions [1]. The method was first used for aerodynamic design by Jameson in 1988 [2, 3]. Since

  15. POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT

    E-print Network

    Lin, Wen-Wei

    POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT J. N. WANG, S. H. CHOU, Y. C. CHEN feedback control arising from a one-dimensional vibrating system with aerodynamic effect. On the practical real axis. Key words. vibrating system, aerodynamic effect, state feedback control, pole assignment AMS

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance

    E-print Network

    Daniel, Tom

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance Andrew M. Mountcastle Æ, the instantaneous shape of an insect wing is dictated by the interaction of aerodynamic forces with the inertial rever- sals--loads that well exceed the mean aerodynamic force. Although wing compliance has been

  17. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows

    E-print Network

    Hartmann, Ralf

    Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows Ralf Hartmann, Joachim Held-oriented mesh refinement for single and multiple aerodynamic force coefficients as well as residual-based mesh refinement applied to various three-dimensional lam- inar and turbulent aerodynamic test cases defined

  18. Numerical Aerodynamic Optimization Incorporating Laminar-Turbulent Transition Prediction

    E-print Network

    Zingg, David W.

    Numerical Aerodynamic Optimization Incorporating Laminar-Turbulent Transition Prediction J. Driver-dimensional Newton­Krylov aerodynamic shape optimization algorithm is applied to several optimization problems a striking demonstration of the capability of the Newton­ Krylov aerodynamic optimization algorithm to design

  19. On Aerodynamic Optimization Under a Range of Operating Conditions

    E-print Network

    Zingg, David W.

    On Aerodynamic Optimization Under a Range of Operating Conditions David W. Zingg, and Samy Elias In aerodynamic design, good performance is generally required under a range of oper- ating conditions, including aerodynamic shape optimization.1­6 The designer specifies an objective, operating conditions, constraints

  20. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 91 (2003) 15111528

    E-print Network

    Chen, Xinzhong

    2003-01-01

    Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 91 (2003) 1511­1528 New frontiers in aerodynamic tailoring of long span bridges: an advanced analysis framework Xinzhong Chen*, Ahsan Kareem Nat analysis have been made utilizing realistic aerodynamic force modeling for bridges with bluff sections

  1. AIAA Paper 2001-0870 Re-engineering Aerodynamics Education

    E-print Network

    Peraire, Jaime

    AIAA Paper 2001-0870 Re-engineering Aerodynamics Education David Darmofal, Earll Murman Aeronautics Paper 2001-0870 Re-engineering Aerodynamics Education David Darmofal* , Earll Murman Massachusetts Institute of Technology Michael Love Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Abstract Aerodynamics curriculum

  2. Unsteady aerodynamic models for agile flight at low Reynolds numbers

    E-print Network

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    Unsteady aerodynamic models for agile flight at low Reynolds numbers Steven L. Brunton , Clarence W for the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a small wing in response to agile maneuvers and gusts. In a previous study, it was shown that Theodorsen's and Wagner's unsteady aerodynamic models agree with force data from DNS

  3. Aerodynamic Force Modeling for Unsteady Wing Ryan Jantzen

    E-print Network

    Aerodynamic Force Modeling for Unsteady Wing Maneuvers Ryan Jantzen and Kunihiko Taira Florida, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH We report on the development of an aerodynamic force model for a flat focus is placed on examining the influence of large-amplitude wing motion on the unsteady aerodynamics

  4. Fifty Years of Aerodynamics: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities

    E-print Network

    Zingg, David W.

    Fifty Years of Aerodynamics: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities T.E. Nelson * D.W. Zingg, Canada. E-mail: tnelson@dehavilland.ca ** Senior Canada Research Chair in Computational Aerodynamics-mail: dwz@oddjob.utias.utoronto.ca Received 22 January 2004. PART I: AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT, AERODYNAMIC

  5. POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT #

    E-print Network

    Chou, So-Hsiang

    POLE ASSIGNMENT FOR A VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH AERODYNAMIC EFFECT # J. N. WANG + , S. H. CHOU # , Y. C­input state feedback control arising from a one­dimensional vibrating system with aerodynamic e real axis. Key words. vibrating system, aerodynamic e#ect, state feedback control, pole assignment AMS

  6. Ris-R-1543(EN) Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on

    E-print Network

    Risø-R-1543(EN) Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using CFD Jeppe Johansen and Niels N. Sørensen Title: Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using of the aerodynamics around a wind turbine blade with a winglet using Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD. Five winglets

  7. Optimum Aerodynamic Design using the Navier--Stokes Equations

    E-print Network

    Pierce, Niles A.

    Optimum Aerodynamic Design using the Navier--Stokes Equations A. JAMESON \\Lambda ; N.A. PIERCE y factors such as aerodynamic effi­ ciency, structural weight, stability and control, and the volume the disciplines. The development of accurate and efficient methods for aerodynamic shape optimization represents

  8. A Genetic Algorithm for Multiobjective Design Optimization in Aerodynamics and

    E-print Network

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    A Genetic Algorithm for Multiobjective Design Optimization in Aerodynamics and Electromagnetics R. The objective functions in the optimization problem measure the aerodynamic feasibil­ ity based on the drag been optimized with respect to only one discipline such as aerodynamics or electromagnetics. Although

  9. Robust Multi-Objective Optimization in Aerodynamics using MGDA

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Robust Multi-Objective Optimization in Aerodynamics using MGDA Daigo Maruyama N° 8428-00919215,version1-16Dec2013 #12;Robust Multi-Objective Optimization in Aerodynamics using MGDA Daigo: This study deals with robust design optimization strategies in aerodynamics

  10. Managing Approximate Models in Evolutionary Aerodynamic Design Optimization

    E-print Network

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Managing Approximate Models in Evolutionary Aerodynamic Design Optimization Yaochu Jin yaochu jin­ mization problems that are discontinuous, multi­modal and multi­objective [1, 2]. Aerodynamic structural to high complexity of the aerodynamic analysis and large number of evaluations needed in the evolutionary

  11. An Evolutionary Geometry Parametrization for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    E-print Network

    Zingg, David W.

    An Evolutionary Geometry Parametrization for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Xiaocong Han and David, M3H 5T6, Canada An evolutionary geometry parametrization is presented for aerodynamic shape optimiza, unconventional aerodynamic configurations. Based on improvements in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and high

  12. Strategies for Solving High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Problems

    E-print Network

    Papalambros, Panos

    Strategies for Solving High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Problems Zhoujie Lyu Aerodynamic shape optimization based on high-fidelity models is a computational intensive endeavor. The techniques are tested using the Common Research Model wing benchmark defined by the Aerodynamic Design

  13. New approaches to photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S. Ismat; Lin, Hong-Ying; Miao, Yinghong; Schulz, Meghan E.

    2008-04-01

    In response to skyrocketing fuel costs and evidence of climate change, real technological progress is needed towards harnessing the clean power from the sun to drive human progress. Here we present two approaches to harnessing solar energy currently under investigation in our group. One involves novel photovoltaic cells using different sized quantum dots. Another uses proven photocatalysts to directly electrolyze water, producing hydrogen. The technological background will be discussed, as well as current state of the art and future research direction.

  14. On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. These approaches are implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

  15. On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been provEn effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. Several approaches that have proven effective for other evolutionary algorithms are modified and implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for standard test optimization problems and for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

  16. The Mars Exploration Rovers Entry Descent and Landing and the Use of Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam; Desai, Prasun; Lee, Wayne; Bruno, Robin

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) project, the next United States mission to the surface of Mars, uses aerodynamic decelerators in during its entry, descent and landing (EDL) phase. These two identical missions (MER-A and MER-B), which deliver NASA s largest mobile science suite to date to the surface of Mars, employ hypersonic entry with an ablative energy dissipating aeroshell, a supersonic/subsonic disk-gap-band parachute and an airbag landing system within EDL. This paper gives an overview of the MER EDL system and speaks to some of the challenges faced by the various aerodynamic decelerators.

  17. Preliminary Studies on Aerodynamic Control with Direct Current Discharge at Hypersonic Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasumasa; Takama, Yoshiki; Imamura, Osamu; Watanuki, Tadaharu; Suzuki, Kojiro

    A new idea of an aerodynamic control device for hypersonic vehicles using plasma discharges is presented. The effect of DC plasma discharge on a hypersonic flow is examined with both experiments and CFD analyses. It is revealed that the surface pressure upstream of plasma area significantly increases, which would be preferable in realizing a new aerodynamic control devices. Such pressure rise is also observed in the result of analyses of the Navier-Stokes equations with energy addition that simulates the Joule heating of a plasma discharge. It is revealed that the pressure rise due to the existence of the plasma discharge can be qualitatively explained as an effect of Joule heating.

  18. UK energy market: An analysis of energy demands. Part I: A disaggregated sectorial approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. B. Blakemore; C. Davies; J. G. Isaac

    1994-01-01

    An econometric model has been used in a disaggregated approach to study the effect of energy demand for the Manufacturing Sector (1960-1987) and Domestic sector (1970-1987) respectively. The chosen model in each sector exhibits highly statistical significant coefficients for GDP, output, disposable income and energy price determinants. The GDP income elasticity was shown to be prominent in all models. The

  19. Finding the Force -- Consistent Particle Seeding for Satellite Aerodynamics

    E-print Network

    Parham, J Brent

    2013-01-01

    When calculating satellite trajectories in low-earth orbit, engineers need to adequately estimate aerodynamic forces. But to this day, obtaining the drag acting on the complicated shapes of modern spacecraft suffers from many sources of error. While part of the problem is the uncertain density in the upper atmosphere, this works focuses on improving the modeling of interacting rarified gases and satellite surfaces. The only numerical approach that currently captures effects in this flow regime---like self-shadowing and multiple molecular reflections---is known as test-particle Monte Carlo. This method executes a ray-tracing algorithm to follow particles that pass through a control volume containing the spacecraft and accumulates the momentum transfer to the body surfaces. Statistical fluctuations inherent in the approach demand particle numbers in the order of millions, often making this scheme too costly to be practical. This work presents a parallel test-particle Monte Carlo method that takes advantage of b...

  20. Studies in a transonic rotor aerodynamics and noise facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, S. E.; Lee, D. J.; Crosby, W.

    1984-01-01

    The design, construction and testing of a transonic rotor aerodynamics and noise facility was undertaken, using a rotating arm blade element support technique. This approach provides a research capability intermediate between that of a stationary element in a moving flow and that of a complete rotating blade system, and permits the acoustic properties of blade tip elements to be studied in isolation. This approach is an inexpensive means of obtaining data at high subsonic and transonic tip speeds on the effect of variations in tip geometry. The facility may be suitable for research on broad band noise and discrete noise in addition to high-speed noise. Initial tests were conducted over the Mach number range 0.3 to 0.93 and confirmed the adequacy of the acoustic treatment used in the facility to avoid reflection from the enclosure.

  1. Team Software Development for Aerothermodynamic and Aerodynamic Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, N.; Atkins, H. L.; Bibb, K. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Carpenter, M. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Hammond, D. P.; Jones, W. T.; Kleb, W. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative approach to software development is described. The approach employs the agile development techniques: project retrospectives, Scrum status meetings, and elements of Extreme Programming to efficiently develop a cohesive and extensible software suite. The software product under development is a fluid dynamics simulator for performing aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis and design. The functionality of the software product is achieved both through the merging, with substantial rewrite, of separate legacy codes and the authorship of new routines. Examples of rapid implementation of new functionality demonstrate the benefits obtained with this agile software development process. The appendix contains a discussion of coding issues encountered while porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95, software design principles, and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  2. Modeling energy fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes employing a mosaic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Priesack, Eckart

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies show that uncertainties in regional and global climate and weather simulations are partly due to inadequate descriptions of the energy flux exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere. One major shortcoming is the limitation of the grid-cell resolution, which is recommended to be about at least 3x3 km² in most models due to limitations in the model physics. To represent each individual grid cell most models select one dominant soil type and one dominant land use type. This resolution, however, is often too coarse in regions where the spatial diversity of soil and land use types are high, e.g. in Central Europe. An elegant method to avoid the shortcoming of grid cell resolution is the so called mosaic approach. This approach is part of the recently developed ecosystem model framework Expert-N 5.0. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the characteristics of two managed fields, planted with winter wheat and potato, on the near surface soil moistures and on the near surface energy flux exchanges of the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. The simulated energy fluxes were compared with eddy flux tower measurements between the respective fields at the research farm Scheyern, North-West of Munich, Germany. To perform these simulations, we coupled the ecosystem model Expert-N 5.0 to an analytical footprint model. The coupled model system has the ability to calculate the mixing ratio of the surface energy fluxes at a given point within one grid cell (in this case at the flux tower between the two fields). This approach accounts for the differences of the two soil types, of land use managements, and of canopy properties due to footprint size dynamics. Our preliminary simulation results show that a mosaic approach can improve modeling and analyzing energy fluxes when the land surface is heterogeneous. In this case our applied method is a promising approach to extend weather and climate models on the regional and on the global scale.

  3. AERODYNAMIC CLASSIFICATION OF FIBERS WITH AEROSOL CENTRIFUGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The constituent particles of many ambient and workplace aerosols of health effects concerns are of fibrous and aggregate geometric shapes. he sites of deposition in the human respiratory system are primarily related to the mass median aerodynamic diameters of inhaled particle siz...

  4. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics for Aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antony Jameson; Massimiliano Fatica

    In this white paper we survey the use of computational simulation for aerodynamics, focusing on applications in Aerospace and Turbomachinery. We present some representative problems to illustrate the range of complexity in fluid simulations and the associated computational requirements. We also examine the design process in current industrial practice, and the role played by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Measured against

  5. Aerodynamic tip desensitization in axial flow turbines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debashis Dey

    2001-01-01

    The leakage flow near the tip of unshrouded rotor blades in axial turbines imposes significant thermal loads on the blade. It is also responsible for up to a third of aerodynamic losses in a turbine stage. The leakage flow, mainly induced by the pressure differential across the rotor tip section, usually rolls into a stream-wise vertical structure near the suction

  6. Modeling aerodynamically generated sound of helicopter rotors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth S. Brentner; F. Farassat

    2003-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound of rotors over the past decade. Although the modeling effort has focused on helicopter main rotors, the theory is generally valid for a wide range of rotor configurations. The Ffowcs Williams–Hawkings (FW–H) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. The monopole and

  7. Aerodynamic heating effects on radome boresight errors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. B. Weckesser; R. K. Frazer; D. J. Yost; B. E. Kuehne; G. P. Tricoles; R. Hayward; E. L. Rope

    1978-01-01

    A three part study was performed to analytically define an aerodynamically heated radome for supersonic homing missile applications. First, the radome was mathematically modeled and a thermal analysis was performed to define the hot radome electrical properties and its wall dimensions. Second, analyses were performed to define boresight error vs. look angle in the E and H planes for both

  8. Interdisciplinary Aerodynamics Group INSTITUTE OF (logo)

    E-print Network

    Diggavi, Suhas

    Interdisciplinary Aerodynamics Group INSTITUTE OF (logo) Mechanical Engineering Implementation,theerror on the common mesh nodes is minimized A simple coupling algorithm was implemented on an unsteady 2D heat conduction problem by imposing a temperature and heat flux exchange througha

  9. 40 CFR 1037.521 - Aerodynamic measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...the same vehicle. Unless we approve another vehicle, the vehicle must be a Class 8, high-roof, sleeper cab with a full aerodynamics package, pulling a standards trailer. Where you have more than one model meeting these criteria, use the model...

  10. Pressure-sensitive paint in aerodynamic testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. McLachlan; J. H. Bell

    1995-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is a relatively new aerodynamic measurement tool with the unique capability of providing a field measurement of pressure over a test surface. An introductory review of this technology is presented, which is confined to the application of the PSP method to aircraft development wind tunnel testing. This is at present the primary application area and thus the

  11. 40 CFR 1037.521 - Aerodynamic measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...the same vehicle. Unless we approve another vehicle, the vehicle must be a Class 8, high-roof, sleeper cab with a full aerodynamics package, pulling a standards trailer. Where you have more than one model meeting these criteria, use the model...

  12. 40 CFR 1037.521 - Aerodynamic measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...the same vehicle. Unless we approve another vehicle, the vehicle must be a Class 8, high-roof, sleeper cab with a full aerodynamics package, pulling a standards trailer. Where you have more than one model meeting these criteria, use the model...

  13. Nonlinear aerodynamic modeling using multivariate orthogonal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1993-01-01

    The problem to be addressed in this work is that of modeling nondimensional force and moment aerodynamic coefficients over the entire subsonic envelope. The particular application discussed here is the Z force coefficient for the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV).

  14. Macro aerodynamic devices controlled by micro systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gwo-Bin Lee; F. K. Jiang; T. Tsao; Y. C. Tai; C. M. Ho

    1997-01-01

    Micro-ElectroMechanical-Systems (MEMS) have emerged as a major enabling technology across the engineering disciplines. In this study, the possibility of applying MEMS to the aerodynamic field was explored. We have demonstrated that microtransducers can be used to control the motion of a delta wing in a wind tunnel and can even maneuver a scaled aircraft in flight tests. The main advantage

  15. Recent Experiments at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1925-01-01

    This report presents the results of various experiments carried out at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute. These include: experiments with Joukowski wing profiles; experiments on an airplane model with a built-in motor and functioning propeller; and the rotating cylinder (Magnus Effect).

  16. Vorticity and the theory of aerodynamic sound

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Howe

    2001-01-01

    Lighthill strongly advocated the use of vortex methods in most areas of fluid mechanics with the notable exception of the theory of aerodynamic sound. But it is straightforward to transform his famous `acoustic analogy' to make vorticity rather than Reynolds stress the ultimate `source' of sound in homentropic flows. `Vortex sound' theory becomes especially useful in applications involving acoustically compact

  17. User's guide to program FLEXSTAB. [aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavin, R. K., III; Colunga, D.

    1975-01-01

    A manual is presented for correctly submitting program runs in aerodynamics on the UNIVAC 1108 computer system. All major program modules are included. Control cards are documented for the user's convenience, and card parameters are included in order to provide some idea as to reasonable time estimates for the program modules.

  18. Recent darrieus Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine aerodynamical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, P. C.

    The aerodynamics of airfoils operating in the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) environment were examined. The experiments are intended to reduce VAWT cost of energy an increase system reliability. The experiments include: (1) chordwise pressure surveys; (2) circumferential blade acceleration surveys; (3) effects of blade camber; (4) pitch and offset; (5) blade blowing; and (6) use of sections designed specifically for VAWT application.

  19. Recent Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine aerodynamical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, P. C.

    1981-05-01

    Experiments contributing to the understanding of the aerodynamics of airfoils operating in the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) environment are described. These experiments are ultimately intended to reduce VAWT cost of energy and increase system reliability. They include chordwise pressure surveys, circumferential blade acceleration surveys, effects of blade camber, pitch and offset, blade blowing, and use of sections designed specifically for VAWT application.

  20. Aerodynamic models for Darrieus-type straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mazharul Islam; David S.-K. Ting; Amir Fartaj

    2008-01-01

    Since ancient past humans have attempted to harness the wind energy through diversified means and vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) were one of the major equipment to achieve that. In this modern time, there is resurgence of interests regarding VAWTs as numerous universities and research institutions have carried out extensive research activities and developed numerous designs based on several aerodynamic

  1. Aerodynamic and Performance Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.R.; Machefaux, E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Schreck, S.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a detailed wind turbine field experiment being conducted at NREL under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain knowledge about the aerodynamics, performance, noise emission and structural characteristics of the Siemens SWT-2.3-101 wind turbine.

  2. Recent Darrieus vertical-axis wind turbine aerodynamical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments contributing to the understanding of the aerodynamics of airfoils operating in the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) environment are described. These experiments are ultimately intended to reduce VAWT cost of energy and increase system reliability. They include chordwise pressure surveys, circumferential blade acceleration surveys, effects of blade camber, pitch and offset, blade blowing, and use of sections designed specifically for VAWT application.

  3. Recent darrieus Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine aerodynamical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. C. Klimas

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamics of airfoils operating in the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) environment were examined. The experiments are intended to reduce VAWT cost of energy an increase system reliability. The experiments include: (1) chordwise pressure surveys; (2) circumferential blade acceleration surveys; (3) effects of blade camber; (4) pitch and offset; (5) blade blowing; and (6) use of sections designed specifically

  4. Aerodynamics of a Cycling Team in a Time Trial: Does the Cyclist at the Front Benefit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iniguez-de-la Torre, A.; Iniguez, J.

    2009-01-01

    When seasonal journeys take place in nature, birds and fishes migrate in groups. This provides them not only with security but also a considerable saving of energy. The power they need to travel requires overcoming aerodynamic or hydrodynamic drag forces, which can be substantially reduced when the group travels in an optimal arrangement. Also in…

  5. System ID Modern Control Algorithms for Active Aerodynamic Load Control and Impact on Gearbox Loading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Berg; D. Wilson; B. Resor; J. Berg; J. Barlas; A. Crowther; C. Halse

    2010-01-01

    Prior work on active aerodynamic load control (AALC) of wind turbine blades has demonstrated that appropriate use of this technology has the potential to yield significant reductions in blade loads, leading to a decrease in wind cost of energy. While the general concept of AALC is usually discussed in the context of multiple sensors and active control devices (such as

  6. A Variational Approach to Enhanced Sampling and Free Energy Calculations

    E-print Network

    Omar Valsson; Michele Parrinello

    2014-08-07

    The ability of widely used sampling methods, such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo, to explore complex free energy landscapes is severely hampered by the presence of kinetic bottlenecks. A large number of solutions have been proposed to alleviate this problem. Many are based on the introduction of a bias potential which is a function of a small number of collective variable. However constructing such a bias is not simple. Here we introduce a functional of the bias potential and an associated variational principle. The bias that minimizes the functional relates in a simple way to the free energy surface. This variational principle can be turned into a practical, efficient and flexible sampling method. A number of numerical examples are presented which include the determination of a three dimensional free energy surface. We argue that, beside being numerically advantageous, our variational approach provides a convenient standpoint for looking with novel eyes at the sampling problem.

  7. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F.; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier–Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  8. October 1998 working group meeting on heavy vehicle aerodynamic drag: presentations and summary of comments and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Browand, F; Heineck, J T; Leonard, A; McBride, D; McCallen, R; Ross, J; Rutledge, W; Salari, K; Storms, B

    1998-10-01

    A Working Group 1Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California on October 22, 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to present an overview of the computational and experimental approach for modeling the integrated tractor-trailer benchmark geometry called the Sandia IModel and to review NASA? s test plan for their experiments in the 7 ft x 10 ft wind tunnel. The present and projected funding situation was also discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and NASA Ames Research Center. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions. and outlines the future action items.

  9. Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

    2003-01-01

    An efficient incremental iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a two-dimensional inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0 and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straightforward, black-box reverse-mode applicaiton of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-rder aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoinct) procedures; then, a very efficient noniterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hesian matrices) of lift, wave drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric shape, angle of attack, and freestream Mach number.

  10. Introduction to Generalized Functions with Applications in Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    1994-01-01

    Generalized functions have many applications in science and engineering. One useful aspect is that discontinuous functions can be handled as easily as continuous or differentiable functions and provide a powerful tool in formulating and solving many problems of aerodynamics and acoustics. Furthermore, generalized function theory elucidates and unifies many ad hoc mathematical approaches used by engineers and scientists. We define generalized functions as continuous linear functionals on the space of infinitely differentiable functions with compact support, then introduce the concept of generalized differentiation. Generalized differentiation is the most important concept in generalized function theory and the applications we present utilize mainly this concept. First, some results of classical analysis, are derived with the generalized function theory. Other applications of the generalized function theory in aerodynamics discussed here are the derivations of general transport theorems for deriving governing equations of fluid mechanics, the interpretation of the finite part of divergent integrals, the derivation of the Oswatitsch integral equation of transonic flow, and the analysis of velocity field discontinuities as sources of vorticity. Applications in aeroacoustics include the derivation of the Kirchhoff formula for moving surfaces, the noise from moving surfaces, and shock noise source strength based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation.

  11. Analysis and optimization of aerodynamic noise in a centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hyosung; Shin, Hyungki; Lee, Soogab

    2006-02-01

    The numerical methods for the performance analysis and the noise prediction of the centrifugal compressor impeller are developed, which are coupled with the optimization design methodology consisting of response surface method, statistical approach, and genetic algorithm. Navier-Stokes equations with the two-equation ( k- ?) turbulence model are applied to calculate impeller aerodynamic characteristics, and Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings formulation and boundary element method are used to predict the impeller aerodynamic noise on the basis of impeller flow field results. The computational codes are verified through the comparison of measured data. The quadratic response surface model with D-optimal three-level factorial experimental design points is constructed to optimize the impeller geometry for the advanced centrifugal compressor, and it is shown that the quadratic model exhibits a reasonable fitting quality resulting in the impeller blade design with the high performance and the low far-field noise level. The influences of selected design variables and their mutual interactions as well as the effects of various objective functions and constraints on the impeller performance and the impeller noise are also examined as a result of the optimization process.

  12. Full-envelope aerodynamic modeling of the Harrier aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnally, B. David

    1986-01-01

    A project to identify a full-envelope model of the YAV-8B Harrier using flight-test and parameter identification techniques is described. As part of the research in advanced control and display concepts for V/STOL aircraft, a full-envelope aerodynamic model of the Harrier is identified, using mathematical model structures and parameter identification methods. A global-polynomial model structure is also used as a basis for the identification of the YAV-8B aerodynamic model. State estimation methods are used to ensure flight data consistency prior to parameter identification.Equation-error methods are used to identify model parameters. A fixed-base simulator is used extensively to develop flight test procedures and to validate parameter identification software. Using simple flight maneuvers, a simulated data set was created covering the YAV-8B flight envelope from about 0.3 to 0.7 Mach and about -5 to 15 deg angle of attack. A singular value decomposition implementation of the equation-error approach produced good parameter estimates based on this simulated data set.

  13. Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient incremental-iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a 2D inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic- differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0, and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straight-forward, black-box reverse- mode application of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoint) procedures; then, a very efficient non-iterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hessian matrices) of lift, wave-drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric- shape, angle-of-attack, and freestream Mach number

  14. Aerodynamic window for high precision laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Steffen; Dausinger, Friedrich; Berger, Peter; Hügel, Helmuth

    2007-05-01

    High precision laser drilling is getting more and more interesting for industry. Main applications for such holes are vaporising and injection nozzles. To enhance quality, the energy deposition has to be accurately defined by reducing the pulse duration and thereby reducing the amount of disturbing melting layer. In addition, an appropriate processing technology, for example the helical drilling, yields holes in steel at 1 mm thickness and diameters about 100 ?m with correct roundness and thin recast layers. However, the processing times are still not short enough for industrial use. Experiments have shown that the reduction of the atmospheric pressure down to 100 hPa enhances the achievable quality and efficiency, but the use of vacuum chambers in industrial processes is normally quite slow and thus expensive. The possibility of a very fast evacuation is given by the use of an aerodynamic window, which produces the pressure reduction by virtue of its fluid dynamic features. This element, based on a potential vortex, was developed and patented as out-coupling window for high power CO II lasers by IFSW 1, 2, 3. It has excellent tightness and transmission properties, and a beam deflection is not detectable. The working medium is compressed air, only. For the use as vacuum element for laser drilling, several geometrical modifications had to be realized. The prototype is small enough to be integrated in a micromachining station and has a low gas flow. During the laser pulse, which is focussed through the potential flow, a very high fluence is reached, but the measurements have not shown any beam deflection or focal shifting. The evacuation time is below 300 ms so that material treatment with changing ambient pressure is possible, too. Experimental results have proven the positive effect of the reduced ambient pressure on the drilling process for the regime of nano- and picosecond laser pulses. Plasma effects are reduced and, because of the less absorption, the drilling velocity is increased and widening effects are decreased. So the process is more efficient and precise. Furthermore, the necessary pulse energy for the drilling of a certain material thickness is reduced and so laser power can be saved.

  15. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Graham

    2007-10-31

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by a DOE category two Inventions and Innovations grant to commercialize and improve upon aerodynamic technology for semi-tuck trailers, capable of decreasing heavy vehicle fuel consumption, related environmental damage, and U.S. consumption of foreign oil. Major project goals included the demonstration of aerodynamic trailer technology in trucking fleet operations, and the development and testing of second generation products. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck’s fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Freight Wing utilized a 2003 category one Inventions and Innovations grant to develop practical solutions to trailer aerodynamics. Fairings developed for the front, rear, and bottom of standard semi-trailers together demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy in scientific tests conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC). Operational tests with major trucking fleets proved the functionality of the products, which were subsequently brought to market. This category two grant enabled Freight Wing to further develop, test and commercialize its products, resulting in greatly increased understanding and acceptance of aerodynamic trailer technology. Commercialization was stimulated by offering trucking fleets 50% cost sharing on trial implementations of Freight Wing products for testing and evaluation purposes. Over 230 fairings were implemented through the program with 35 trucking fleets including industry leaders such as Wal-Mart, Frito Lay and Whole Foods. The feedback from these testing partnerships was quite positive with product performance exceeding fleet expectations in many cases. Fleet feedback also was also valuable from a product development standpoint and assisted the design of several second generation products intended to further improve efficiency, lower costs, and enhance durability. Resulting products demonstrated a 30% efficiency improvement in full scale wind tunnel tests. The fuel savings of our most promising product, the “Belly Fairing” increased from 4% to 6% in scientific track and operational tests. The project successfully demonstrated the economic feasibility of trailer aerodynamics and positioned the technology to realize significant public benefits. Scientific testing conducted with partners such as the EPA Smartway program and Transport Canada clearly validated the fuel and emission saving potential of the technology. The Smartway program now recommends trailer aerodynamics as a certified fuel saving technology and is offering incentives such as low interest loans. Trailer aerodynamics can save average trucks over 1,100 gallons of fuel an 13 tons of emissions every 100,000 miles, a distance many trucks travel annually. These fuel savings produce a product return on investment period of one to two years in average fleet operations. The economic feasibility of the products was validated by participating fleets, several of which have since completed large implementations or demonstrated an interest in volume orders. The commercialization potential of the technology was also demonstrated, resulting in a national distribution and manufacturing partnership with a major industry supplier, Carrier Transicold. Consequently, Freight Wing is well positioned to continue marketing trailer aerodynamics to the trucking industry. The participation of leading fleets in this project served to break down the market skepticism that represents a primary barrier to widespread industry utilization. The benefits of widespread utilization of the technology could be quite significant for both the transportation industry and the public. Trailer aerodynamics could potentially save the U.S. trucking fleet over a billion gallons of fuel and 20 million tons of emissions annually.

  16. Advanced aerodynamics. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This Conference Publication contains selected NASA papers that were presented at the Fifth Annual Status Review of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Program held at Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, California on September 14 to 15, 1981. These papers describe the status of several NASA in-house research activities in the areas of advanced turboprops, natural laminar flow, oscillating control surfaces, high-Reynolds-number airfoil tests, high-lift technology, and theoretical design techniques.

  17. Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. S.; Shipley, D. E.

    1994-08-01

    Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation's energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

  18. Recent NASA Research on Aerodynamic Modeling of Post-Stall and Spin Dynamics of Large Transport Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murch, Austin M.; Foster, John V.

    2007-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to investigate aerodynamic modeling methods for prediction of post-stall flight dynamics of large transport airplanes. The research approach involved integrating dynamic wind tunnel data from rotary balance and forced oscillation testing with static wind tunnel data to predict aerodynamic forces and moments during highly dynamic departure and spin motions. Several state-of-the-art aerodynamic modeling methods were evaluated and predicted flight dynamics using these various approaches were compared. Results showed the different modeling methods had varying effects on the predicted flight dynamics and the differences were most significant during uncoordinated maneuvers. Preliminary wind tunnel validation data indicated the potential of the various methods for predicting steady spin motions.

  19. Particle separation from a uniflow aerodynamic deduster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, A.G.; Zhang, Y. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering

    1998-10-01

    A particle separation theory for uniflow aerodynamic dedusters was developed. Particle cut-size and separation efficiency were affected by many factors, such as chamber configuration, particle characteristics, and airflow patterns. A prototype aerodynamic deduster was developed based on the analysis of particle behavior in uniflow conditions. It was found that the vortex chamber length, annular tunnel space between the inside and outside cylinders, vane angle, tangential and axial air velocities, and turbulence intensities have effects on the particle cut-size and separation efficiency. A particle counter was used to measure dust concentrations upstream and downstream of the deduster. Particle separation efficiencies agreed well between the predicted and measured values. The study showed that a uniflow deduster could be effective in separating dust particles from an airstream. Further studies are needed to optimize the deduster configuration and evaluate the effect of turbulence intensity on particle separation.

  20. Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tip-speed-ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

  1. An Interactive Educational Tool for Compressible Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A workstation-based interactive educational tool was developed to aid in the teaching of undergraduate compressible aerodynamics. The tool solves for the supersonic flow past a wedge using the equations found in NACA 1135. The student varies the geometry or flow conditions through a graphical user interface and the new conditions are calculated immediately. Various graphical formats present the variation of flow results to the student. One such format leads the student to the generation of some of the graphs found in NACA-1135. The tool includes interactive questions and answers to aid in both the use of the tool and to develop an understanding of some of the complexities of compressible aerodynamics. A series of help screens make the simulator easy to learn and use. This paper will detail the numerical methods used in the tool and describe how it can be used and modified.

  2. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  3. Vortical sources of aerodynamic force and moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the aerodynamic force and moment can be expressed in terms of vorticity distribution (and entropy variation for compressible flow) on near wake plane, or in terms of boundary vorticity flux on the body surface. Thus the vortical sources of lift and drag are clearly identified, which is the real physical basis of optimal aerodynamic design. Moreover, these sources are highly compact, hence allowing one to concentrate on key local regions of the configuration, which have dominating effect to the lift and drag. A detail knowledge of the vortical low requires measuring or calculating the vorticity and dilatation field, which is however still a challenging task. Nevertheless, this type of formulation has some unique advantages; and how to set up a well-posed problem, in particular how to establish vorticity-dilatation boundary conditions, is addressed.

  4. Wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P G [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Miller, L S [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Quandt, G A

    1995-04-01

    Five trailing-edge devices were investigated to determine their potential as wind-turbine aerodynamic brakes, and for power modulation and load alleviation. Several promising configurations were identified. A new device, called the spoiler-flap, appears to be the best alternative. It is a simple device that is effective at all angles of attack. It is not structurally intrusive, and it has the potential for small actuating loads. It is shown that simultaneous achievement of a low lift/drag ratio and high drag is the determinant of device effectiveness, and that these attributes must persist up to an angle of attack of 45{degree}. It is also argued that aerodynamic brakes must be designed for a wind speed of at least 45 m/s (100 mph).

  5. Recent Improvements in Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    2000-01-01

    Recent improvements in an unstructured-grid method for large-scale aerodynamic design are presented. Previous work had shown such computations to be prohibitively long in a sequential processing environment. Also, robust adjoint solutions and mesh movement procedures were difficult to realize, particularly for viscous flows. To overcome these limiting factors, a set of design codes based on a discrete adjoint method is extended to a multiprocessor environment using a shared memory approach. A nearly linear speedup is demonstrated, and the consistency of the linearizations is shown to remain valid. The full linearization of the residual is used to precondition the adjoint system, and a significantly improved convergence rate is obtained. A new mesh movement algorithm is implemented and several advantages over an existing technique are presented. Several design cases are shown for turbulent flows in two and three dimensions.

  6. A flow adaptive aerodynamic probe concept for turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenherr, C.; Kalfas, A. I.; Abhari, R. S.

    2007-08-01

    A flow adaptive 2D traversing algorithm is developed and demonstrated with measurements in a large axial turbine facility. This novel approach is suited for pneumatic probe and fast response aerodynamic probe measurements. The implementation of the algorithm is fully automated and requires a minimal input, such as blade count and hub and tip diameters, at set-up. The algorithm automatically selects measurement points, such as shear flows, secondary flows, wakes through user-defined detection functions, and adds additional measurement points; therefore higher measurement fidelity in these regions is obtained compared to a traditional measurement method. The flow adaptive 2D traversing algorithm can resolve the overall flow field with 75% fewer measurement points compared to a uniform a measurement grid. This reduction in measurement points results in a measurement time using the flow adaptive algorithm that is 81% quicker than on a uniform measurement grid, without loss of measurement accuracy.

  7. Insight into wind turbine stall and post-stall aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangler, James L.

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate measured NASA Ames Unsteady Aerodynamic Experiment post-stall blade element data and to provide guidelines for developing an empirical approach that predicts post-stall aerofoil characteristics. Blade element data were analysed from the five radial stations of the baseline 5.03 m radius rotor. A lifting surface/prescribed wake performance prediction method was used to determine a reference angle of attack that corresponds to the measured blade element data. Using the measured normal and tangential force coefficients and estimated angle of attack, spanwise distributions of lift and drag performance characteristics were derived along with the circulation distributions. Guidelines for a new stall and post-stall model based on the measured trends in the aerofoil performance characteristics, along with flat plate theory, are proposed for predicting the peak and post-peak power. Copyright

  8. New aspects of subsonic aerodynamic noise theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A theory of aerodynamic noise is presented which differs from Lighthill's theory primarily in the way in which convection of the noise sources is treated. The sound directivity pattern obtained from the present theory agrees better with jet-noise directivity data than does that obtained from Lighthill's theory. The results imply that the shear-noise contribution to jet noise is smaller than previously expected.

  9. Aerodynamics of intermittent bounds in flying birds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bret W. Tobalske; Jason W. D. Hearn; Douglas R. Warrick

    2009-01-01

    Flap-bounding is a common flight style in small birds in which flapping phases alternate with flexed-wing bounds. Body lift\\u000a is predicted to be essential to making this flight style an aerodynamically attractive flight strategy. To elucidate the contributions\\u000a of the body and tail to lift and drag during the flexed-wing bound phase, we used particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measured

  10. Aerodynamic heating and thermal protection systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. S. Fletcher

    1978-01-01

    The aerothermal environment is considered, taking into account the aerothermal environment for the Pioneer Venus multiprobe mission, shuttle elevon cove aerodynamic heating by ingested flow, aerothermodynamic base heating, vortices induced in a stagnation region by wakes, three-dimensional shock-wave interference heating prediction, methods for predicting radiation-coupled flowfields about planetary entry probes, shock-tube studies of silicon-compound vapors, and Mach number and wall

  11. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  12. Experimental Aerodynamics of Mesoscale Trailing Edge Actuators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Solovitz; John Eaton

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a wing with segmented Gurney flaps. Each of the sixteen active flaps is approximately 1.5can be actuated in only two positions: 90 degrees up or 90 degrees down. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at chord Reynolds numbers up to 800,000. Measurements include the determination of aerodynamic forces and moments using a 6 DOF balance, surface pressure

  13. Reentry Motion and Aerodynamics of the MUSES-C Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Nobuaki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hiraki, Koju; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    The Hayabusa spacecraft (MUSES-C) carries a small capsule for bringing asteroid samples back to the earth. The initial spin rate of the reentry capsule together with the flight path angle of the reentry trajectory is a key parameter for the aerodynamic motion during the reentry flight. The initial spin rate is given by the spin-release mechanism attached between the capsule and the mother spacecraft, and the flight path angle can be modified by adjusting the earth approach orbit. To determine the desired values of both parameters, the attitude motion during atmospheric flight must be clarified, and angles of attack at the maximum dynamic pressure and the parachute deployment must be assessed. In previous studies, to characterize the aerodynamic effects of the reentry capsule, several wind-tunnel tests were conducted using the ISAS high-speed flow test facilities. In addition to the ground test data, the aerodynamic properties in hypersonic flows were analyzed numerically. Moreover, these data were made more accurate using the results of balloon drop tests. This paper summarized the aerodynamic properties of the reentry capsule and simulates the attitude motion of the full-configuration capsule during atmospheric flight in three dimensions with six degrees of freedom. The results show the best conditions for the initial spin rates and flight path angles of the reentry trajectory.

  14. Aerodynamic shape optimization of space vehicle in very-low-earth-orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Myong, Rho Shin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Baek, Seung Wook

    2014-12-01

    Space vehicles orbiting in Very-Low-Earth-Orbit (VLEO, h = 200˜300 km) experience considerably large aerodynamic drag due to high air-density in comparison with Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO, h = 600 ˜ 700 km). Therefore, the optimization of vehicle shape via minimization of aerodynamic drag is essential for accurate estimation of satellite lifetime and fuel budget at the design stage. In this study, the aerodynamic drag is computed with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) because even in VLEO, whose free stream Knudsen number is sufficiently large, some errors are still found in the prediction using free molecular approach. In order to find the optimized configuration, we vary the shape of frontal surface normal to the flight direction. Interestingly, the effects of such geometrical change appear distinctively depending on the gas-surface interaction (GSI, diffuse or specular) which can be represented by the thermal accommodation coefficient. The satellite aerodynamic characteristics including force, torque, and thermal loading are also identified by changing the pitch and the side angle.

  15. Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology for Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam; Monastero, Marianne C.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the adverse aerodynamic effects due to ice accretion often relies on dry-air wind-tunnel testing of artificial, or simulated, ice shapes. Recent developments in ice accretion documentation methods have yielded a laser-scanning capability that can measure highly three-dimensional features of ice accreted in icing wind tunnels. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the aerodynamic accuracy of ice-accretion simulations generated from laser-scan data. Ice-accretion tests were conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel using an 18-inch chord, 2-D straight wing with NACA 23012 airfoil section. For six ice accretion cases, a 3-D laser scan was performed to document the ice geometry prior to the molding process. Aerodynamic performance testing was conducted at the University of Illinois low-speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.18 with an 18-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model that was designed to accommodate the artificial ice shapes. The ice-accretion molds were used to fabricate one set of artificial ice shapes from polyurethane castings. The laser-scan data were used to fabricate another set of artificial ice shapes using rapid prototype manufacturing such as stereolithography. The iced-airfoil results with both sets of artificial ice shapes were compared to evaluate the aerodynamic simulation accuracy of the laser-scan data. For four of the six ice-accretion cases, there was excellent agreement in the iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance between the casting and laser-scan based simulations. For example, typical differences in iced-airfoil maximum lift coefficient were less than 3% with corresponding differences in stall angle of approximately one degree or less. The aerodynamic simulation accuracy reported in this paper has demonstrated the combined accuracy of the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach to simulating ice accretion for a NACA 23012 airfoil. For several of the ice-accretion cases tested, the aerodynamics is known to depend upon the small, three dimensional features of the ice. These data show that the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach is capable of replicating these ice features within the reported accuracies of the laser-scan measurement and rapid-prototyping method; thus providing a new capability for high-fidelity ice-accretion documentation and artificial ice-shape fabrication for icing research.

  16. Integrated aerodynamic-structural-control wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, M.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Unger, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic-structural-control design of a forward-swept composite wing for a high subsonic transport aircraft is considered. The structural analysis is based on a finite-element method. The aerodynamic calculations are based on a vortex-lattice method, and the control calculations are based on an output feedback control. The wing is designed for minimum weight subject to structural, performance/aerodynamic and control constraints. Efficient methods are used to calculate the control-deflection and control-effectiveness sensitivities which appear as second-order derivatives in the control constraint equations. To suppress the aeroelastic divergence of the forward-swept wing, and to reduce the gross weight of the design aircraft, two separate cases are studied: (1) combined application of aeroelastic tailoring and active controls; and (2) aeroelastic tailoring alone. The results of this study indicated that, for this particular example, aeroelastic tailoring is sufficient for suppressing the aeroelastic divergence, and the use of active controls was not necessary.

  17. Computational Aerodynamics of Insects' Flapping Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kyung Dong; Kyung, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The kinematics of the Insects' flapping flight is modeled through mathematical and computational observations with commercial software. Recently, study on the insects' flapping flight became one of the challenging research subjects in the field of aeronautics because of its potential applicability to intelligent micro-robots capable of autonomous flight and the next generation aerial-vehicles. In order to uncover its curious unsteady characteristics, many researchers have conducted experimental and computational studies on the unsteady aerodynamics of insects' flapping flight. In the present paper, the unsteady flow physics around insect wings is carried out by utilizing computer software e-AIRS. The e-AIRS (e-Science Aerospace Integrated Research System) analyzes and models the results of computational and experimental aerodynamics, along with integrated research process of these two research activities. Stroke angles and phase angles, the important two factors in producing lift of the airfoils are set as main parameters to determine aerodynamic characteristics of the insects' flapping flight. As a result, the optimal phase angle to minimize the drag and to maximize the lift are found. Various simulations indicate that using proper value of variables produce greater thrust due to an optimal angle of attack at the initial position during down stroke motion.

  18. Survey of lift-fan aerodynamic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, David H.; Kirk, Jerry V.

    1993-01-01

    Representatives of NASA Ames Research Center asked that a summary of technology appropriate for lift-fan powered short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft be prepared so that new programs could more easily benefit from past research efforts. This paper represents one of six prepared for that purpose. The authors have conducted or supervised the conduct of research on lift-fan powered STOVL designs and some of their important components for decades. This paper will first address aerodynamic modeling requirements for experimental programs to assure realistic, trustworthy results. It will next summarize the results or efforts to develop satisfactory specialized STOVL components such as inlets and flow deflectors. It will also discuss problems with operation near the ground, aerodynamics while under lift-fan power, and aerodynamic prediction techniques. Finally, results of studies to reduce lift-fan noise will be presented. The paper will emphasize results from large scale experiments, where available, for reasons that will be brought out in the discussion. Some work with lift-engine powered STOVL aircraft is also applicable to lift-fan technology and will be presented herein. Small-scale data will be used where necessary to fill gaps.

  19. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  20. Aerodynamic Design Opportunities for Future Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    A discussion of a diverse set of aerodynamic opportunities to improve the aerodynamic performance of future supersonic aircraft has been presented and discussed. These ideas are offered to the community in a hope that future supersonic vehicle development activities will not be hindered by past efforts. A number of nonlinear flow based drag reduction technologies are presented and discussed. The subject technologies are related to the areas of interference flows, vehicle concepts, vortex flows, wing design, advanced control effectors, and planform design. The authors also discussed the importance of improving the aerodynamic design environment to allow creativity and knowledge greater influence. A review of all of the data presented show that pressure drag reductions on the order of 50 to 60 counts are achievable, compared to a conventional supersonic cruise vehicle, with the application of several of the discussed technologies. These drag reductions would correlate to a 30 to 40% increase in cruise L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) for a commercial supersonic transport.

  1. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Hefner, Jerry N.

    2000-01-01

    Investments in aeronautics research and technology have declined substantially over the last decade, in part due to the perception that technologies required in aircraft design are fairly mature and readily available. This perception is being driven by the fact that aircraft configurations, particularly the transport aircraft, have evolved only incrementally, over last several decades. If however, one considers that the growth in air travel is expected to triple in the next 20 years, it becomes quickly obvious that the evolutionary development of technologies is not going to meet the increased demands for safety, environmental compatibility, capacity, and economic viability. Instead, breakthrough technologies will he required both in traditional disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, materials, controls, and avionics as well as in the multidisciplinary integration of these technologies into the design of future aerospace vehicles concepts. The paper discusses challenges and opportunities in the field of aerodynamics over the next decade. Future technology advancements in aerodynamics will hinge on our ability, to understand, model, and control complex, three-dimensional, unsteady viscous flow across the speed range. This understanding is critical for developing innovative flow and noise control technologies and advanced design tools that will revolutionize future aerospace vehicle systems and concepts. Specifically, the paper focuses on advanced vehicle concepts, flow and noise control technologies, and advanced design and analysis tools.

  2. Aerodynamics for the Mars Phoenix Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Desai, Prasun N.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Pre-flight aerodynamics data for the Mars Phoenix entry capsule are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients were generated as a function of total angle-of-attack and either Knudsen number, velocity, or Mach number, depending on the flight regime. The database was constructed using continuum flowfield computations and data from the Mars Exploration Rover and Viking programs. Hypersonic and supersonic static coefficients were derived from Navier-Stokes solutions on a pre-flight design trajectory. High-altitude data (free-molecular and transitional regimes) and dynamic pitch damping characteristics were taken from Mars Exploration Rover analysis and testing. Transonic static coefficients from Viking wind tunnel tests were used for capsule aerodynamics under the parachute. Static instabilities were predicted at two points along the reference trajectory and were verified by reconstructed flight data. During the hypersonic instability, the capsule was predicted to trim at angles as high as 2.5 deg with an on-axis center-of-gravity. Trim angles were predicted for off-nominal pitching moment (4.2 deg peak) and a 5 mm off-axis center-ofgravity (4.8 deg peak). Finally, hypersonic static coefficient sensitivities to atmospheric density were predicted to be within uncertainty bounds.

  3. Aerodynamic effects of trees on pollutant concentration in street canyons.

    PubMed

    Buccolieri, Riccardo; Gromke, Christof; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Ruck, Bodo

    2009-09-15

    This paper deals with aerodynamic effects of avenue-like tree planting on flow and traffic-originated pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Several parameters affecting pedestrian level concentration are investigated, namely plant morphology, positioning and arrangement. We extend our previous work in this novel aspect of research to new configurations which comprise tree planting of different crown porosity and stand density, planted in two rows within a canyon of street width to building height ratio W/H=2 with perpendicular approaching wind. Sulfur hexafluoride was used as tracer gas to model the traffic emissions. Complementary to wind tunnel experiments, 3D numerical simulations were performed with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT using a Reynolds Stress turbulence closure for flow and the advection-diffusion method for concentration calculations. In the presence of trees, both measurements and simulations showed considerable larger pollutant concentrations near the leeward wall and slightly lower concentrations near the windward wall in comparison with the tree-less case. Tree stand density and crown porosity were found to be of minor importance in affecting pollutant concentration. On the other hand, the analysis indicated that W/H is a more crucial parameter. The larger the value of W/H the smaller is the effect of trees on pedestrian level concentration regardless of tree morphology and arrangement. A preliminary analysis of approaching flow velocities showed that at low wind speed the effect of trees on concentrations is worst than at higher speed. The investigations carried out in this work allowed us to set up an appropriate CFD modelling methodology for the study of the aerodynamic effects of tree planting in street canyons. The results obtained can be used by city planners for the design of tree planting in the urban environment with regard to air quality issues. PMID:19596394

  4. Aerodynamic Design Criteria for Class 8 Heavy Vehicles Trailer Base Devices to Attain Optimum Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Salari, K; Ortega, J

    2010-12-13

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of its Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) effort has investigated class 8 tractor-trailer aerodynamics for many years. This effort has identified many drag producing flow structures around the heavy vehicles and also has designed and tested many new active and passive drag reduction techniques and concepts for significant on the road fuel economy improvements. As part of this effort a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design for aerodynamic drag reduction devices has been established. The objective of this report is to provide design guidance for trailer base devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. These devices are commonly referred to as boattails, base flaps, tail devices, and etc. The information provided here is based on past research and our most recent full-scale experimental investigations in collaboration with Navistar Inc. Additional supporting data from LLNL/Navistar wind tunnel, track test, and on the road test will be published soon. The trailer base devices can be identified by 4 flat panels that are attached to the rear edges of the trailer base to form a closed cavity. These devices have been engineered in many different forms such as, inflatable and non-inflatable, 3 and 4-sided, closed and open cavity, and etc. The following is an in-depth discussion with some recommendations, based on existing data and current research activities, of changes that could be made to these devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. There are 6 primary factors that could influence the aerodynamic performance of trailer base devices: (1) Deflection angle; (2) Boattail length; (3) Sealing of edges and corners; (4) 3 versus 4-sided, Position of the 4th plate; (5) Boattail vertical extension, Skirt - boattail transition; and (6) Closed versus open cavity.

  5. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"

    SciTech Connect

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

    2008-05-15

    As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Grafton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to, and a broad overiew of, the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack are provided. Items include: (1) some important fundamental phenomena which determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack; (2) static and dynamic aerodynamic characteristics near the stall; (3) aerodynamics of the spin; (4) test techniques used in stall/spin studies; (5) applications of aerodynamic data to problems in flight dynamics in the stall/spin area; and (6) the outlook for future research in the area. Although stalling and spinning are flight dynamic problems of importance to all aircraft, including general aviation aircraft, commercial transports, and military airplanes, emphasis is placed on military configurations and the principle aerodynamic factors which influence the stability and control of such vehicles at high angles of attack.

  7. Aerodynamics model for a generic ASTOVL lift-fan aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Mcneil, Walter E.; Wardwell, Douglas A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the aerodynamics model used in a simulation model of an advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL) lift-fan fighter aircraft. The simulation model was developed for use in piloted evaluations of transition and hover flight regimes, so that only low speed (M approximately 0.2) aerodynamics are included in the mathematical model. The aerodynamic model includes the power-off aerodynamic forces and moments and the propulsion system induced aerodynamic effects, including ground effects. The power-off aerodynamics data were generated using the U.S. Air Force Stability and Control Digital DATCOM program and a NASA Ames in-house graphics program called VORVIEW which allows the user to easily analyze arbitrary conceptual aircraft configurations using the VORLAX program. The jet-induced data were generated using the prediction methods of R. E. Kuhn et al., as referenced in this report.

  8. Stochastic model for aerodynamic force dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow

    E-print Network

    Luhur, Muhammad Ramzan; Kühn, Martin; Wächter, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a stochastic approach to estimate the aerodynamic forces with local dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow. This is done by integrating a stochastic model of lift and drag dynamics for an airfoil into the aerodynamic simulation software AeroDyn. The model is added as an alternative to the static table lookup approach in blade element momentum (BEM) wake model used by AeroDyn. The stochastic forces are obtained for a rotor blade element using full field turbulence simulated wind data input and compared with the classical BEM and dynamic stall models for identical conditions. The comparison shows that the stochastic model generates additional extended dynamic response in terms of local force fluctuations. Further, the comparison of statistics between the classical BEM, dynamic stall and stochastic models' results in terms of their increment probability density functions gives consistent results.

  9. Preliminary Structural Sensitivity Study of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Using Probabilistic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Acceptance of new spacecraft structural architectures and concepts requires validated design methods to minimize the expense involved with technology validation via flighttesting. This paper explores the implementation of probabilistic methods in the sensitivity analysis of the structural response of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). HIAD architectures are attractive for spacecraft deceleration because they are lightweight, store compactly, and utilize the atmosphere to decelerate a spacecraft during re-entry. However, designers are hesitant to include these inflatable approaches for large payloads or spacecraft because of the lack of flight validation. In the example presented here, the structural parameters of an existing HIAD model have been varied to illustrate the design approach utilizing uncertainty-based methods. Surrogate models have been used to reduce computational expense several orders of magnitude. The suitability of the design is based on assessing variation in the resulting cone angle. The acceptable cone angle variation would rely on the aerodynamic requirements.

  10. Progress in Reducing Aerodynamic Drag for Higher Efficiency of Heavy Duty Trucks (Class 7-8)

    SciTech Connect

    Rose McCallen; Richard Couch; Juliana Hsu; Fred Browand; Mustapha Hammache; Anthony Leonard; Mark Brady; Kambiz Salari; Walter Rutledge; James Ross; Bruce Storms; J.T. Heineck; David Driver; James Bell; Gregory Zilliac

    1999-12-31

    This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. In addition, greater use of newly developed computational tools holds promise for reducing the number of prototype tests, for cutting manufacturing costs, and for reducing overall time to market. Experimental verification and validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California. Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology using state-of-the-art techniques, with the intention of implementing more complex methods in the future.

  11. Progress in reducing aerodynamic drag for higher efficiency of heavy duty trucks (class 7-8)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Heineck, J T; Leonard, A; McCallen, R; Ross, J; Rutledge, W; Salari, K; Storms, B

    1999-04-01

    This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. In addition, greater use of newly developed computational tools holds promise for reducing the number of prototype tests, for cutting manufacturing costs, and for reducing overall time to market. Experimental verification and validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California. Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology using state-of-the-art techniques, with the intention of implementing more complex methods in the future.

  12. Inverse aerodynamic design applications using the MGM hybrid formulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernani V. Volpe; Guilherme L. Oliveira; Luis C. C. Santos; Marcelo T. Hayashi; Marco A. B. Ceze

    2009-01-01

    The well-known modified Garabedian–Mcfadden (MGM) method is an attractive alternative for aerodynamic inverse design, for its simplicity and effectiveness (P. Garabedian and G. Mcfadden, Design of supercritical swept wings, AIAA J. 20(3) (1982), 289–291; J.B. Malone, J. Vadyak, and L.N. Sankar, Inverse aerodynamic design method for aircraft components, J. Aircraft 24(2) (1987), 8–9; Santos, A hybrid optimization method for aerodynamic

  13. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2008-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed and implemented in the NASA unstructured grid generation code VGRID. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  14. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  15. Circular plate analysis by finite differences; Energy approach

    SciTech Connect

    Melerski, E. (Univ. of Tasmania, Hobart (AU))

    1989-06-01

    A numerical method of elastic analysis of thin circular plates under various axisymmetric loading and support conditions is presented. The method of analysis is based on the finite-difference procedure in the variational formulation (energy approach) and can be regarded as being equivalent to the finite-element method. A simple computer program was developed and tested on a number of illustrative examples. In most cases the obtained results exhibited a much higher level of accuracy as compared to those obtained from the finite-element analysis. And, most importantly, in each of the cases considered the number of unknowns involved is only half of that employed in the particular finite-element procedure (using the simplest finite element).

  16. Mechanism of unsteady aerodynamic heating with sudden change in surface temperature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hao Chen; Lin Bao

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics and mechanism of unsteady aerodynamic heating of a transient hypersonic boundary layer caused by a sudden\\u000a change in surface temperature are studied. The complete time history of wall heat flux is presented with both analytical and\\u000a numerical approaches. With the analytical method, the unsteady compressible boundary layer equation is solved. In the neighborhood\\u000a of the initial and final

  17. Multicriterion Aerodynamic Shape Design Optimization and Inverse Problems Using Control Theory and Nash Games

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Tang; J.-A. Désidéri; J. Périaux

    2007-01-01

    Multicriterion design is gaining importance in aeronautics in order to cope with new needs of society. In the literature,\\u000a contributions to single discipline and\\/or single-point design optimization abound. The goal of this paper is to introduce\\u000a a new approach combining the adjoint method with a formulation derived from game theory for multipoint aerodynamic design\\u000a problems. Transonic flows around lifting airfoils

  18. A modal approach to modeling spatially distributed vibration energy dissipation.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The nonlinear behavior of mechanical joints is a confounding element in modeling the dynamic response of structures. Though there has been some progress in recent years in modeling individual joints, modeling the full structure with myriad frictional interfaces has remained an obstinate challenge. A strategy is suggested for structural dynamics modeling that can account for the combined effect of interface friction distributed spatially about the structure. This approach accommodates the following observations: (1) At small to modest amplitudes, the nonlinearity of jointed structures is manifest primarily in the energy dissipation - visible as vibration damping; (2) Correspondingly, measured vibration modes do not change significantly with amplitude; and (3) Significant coupling among the modes does not appear to result at modest amplitudes. The mathematical approach presented here postulates the preservation of linear modes and invests all the nonlinearity in the evolution of the modal coordinates. The constitutive form selected is one that works well in modeling spatially discrete joints. When compared against a mathematical truth model, the distributed dissipation approximation performs well.

  19. Multi-parameter aerodynamic modeling for aeroelastic coupling in turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D.-M.

    2009-04-01

    A multi-parameter method based on multivariate spline function approximation and minimum state smoothing for modeling the generalized aerodynamic forces is proposed in order to reduce the cost of the aerodynamic computations in the solution of the coupled fluid-structure problem in turbomachinery. This method allows simultaneous variations of several parameters and provides the solutions of the coupled systems at arbitrary values of the parameters using the generalized aerodynamic forces computed at the few values of the parameters. This multi-parameter aerodynamic modeling method is applied to a large-chord blade, for which the two chosen parameters are the rotation speed and the inter-blade phase angle.

  20. Workshop on Aircraft Surface Representation for Aerodynamic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J. (editor); Ashbaugh, J. (editor)

    1980-01-01

    Papers and discussions on surface representation and its integration with aerodynamics, computers, graphics, wind tunnel model fabrication, and flow field grid generation are presented. Surface definition is emphasized.

  1. Aerodynamic Decelerators for Planetary Exploration: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juna R.; Lingard, J. Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, aerodynamic decelerators are defined as textile devices intended to be deployed at Mach numbers below five. Such aerodynamic decelerators include parachutes and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (often known as ballutes). Aerodynamic decelerators play a key role in the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) of planetary exploration vehicles. Among the functions performed by aerodynamic decelerators for such vehicles are deceleration (often from supersonic to subsonic speeds), minimization of descent rate, providing specific descent rates (so that scientific measurements can be obtained), providing stability (drogue function - either to prevent aeroshell tumbling or to meet instrumentation requirements), effecting further aerodynamic decelerator system deployment (pilot function), providing differences in ballistic coefficients of components to enable separation events, and providing height and timeline to allow for completion of the EDL sequence. Challenging aspects in the development of aerodynamic decelerators for planetary exploration missions include: deployment in the unusual combination of high Mach numbers and low dynamic pressures, deployment in the wake behind a blunt-body entry vehicle, stringent mass and volume constraints, and the requirement for high drag and stability. Furthermore, these aerodynamic decelerators must be qualified for flight without access to the exotic operating environment where they are expected to operate. This paper is an introduction to the development and application of aerodynamic decelerators for robotic planetary exploration missions (including Earth sample return missions) from the earliest work in the 1960s to new ideas and technologies with possible application to future missions. An extensive list of references is provided for additional study.

  2. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.; Dilger, F.

    2013-06-01

    Aerodynamic contrails are defined in this paper as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data, first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation), and how frequently (probability) aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Finally we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally we give an argument for our believe that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  3. Fundamental Aspects of the Aerodynamics of Turbojet Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrere, M.

    1978-01-01

    Aerodynamic considerations in the design of high performance combustors for turbojet engines are discussed. Aerodynamic problems concerning the preparation of the fuel-air mixture, the recirculation zone where primary combustion occurs, the secondary combustion zone, and the dilution zone were examined. An aerodynamic analysis of the entire primary chamber ensemble was carried out to determine the pressure drop between entry and exit. The aerodynamics of afterburn chambers are discussed. A model which can be used to investigate the evolution of temperature, pressure, and rate and efficiency of combustion the length of the chamber was developed.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Hypersonic Flow and Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Quan; Cheng, Bangqin; Li, Yinghong; Cui, Wei; Yu, Yonggui; Jie, Junhun

    2013-09-01

    For hypersonic flow, it was found that the most effective plasma actuator is derived from an electromagnetic perturbation. An experimental study was performed between hypersonic flow and plasma aerodynamic actuation interaction in a hypersonic shock tunnel, in which a Mach number of 7 was reached. The plasma discharging characteristic was acquired in static flows. In a hypersonic flow, the flow field can affect the plasma discharging characteristics. DC discharging without magnetic force is unstable, and the discharge channel cannot be maintained. When there is a magnetic field, the energy consumption of the plasma source is approximately three to four times larger than that without a magnetic field, and at the same time plasma discharge can also affect the hypersonic flow field. Through schlieren pictures and pressure measurement, it was found that plasma discharging could induce shockwaves and change the total pressure and wall pressure of the flow field.

  5. An initial investigation into methods of computing transonic aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1994-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the project are as follows: (1) Using the transonic small perturbation equation as a flowfield model, the project demonstrated that the quasi-analytical method could be used to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients for airfoils at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic conditions for design variables such as Mach number, airfoil thickness, maximum camber, angle of attack, and location of maximum camber. It was established that the quasi-analytical approach was an accurate method for obtaining aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for airfoils at transonic conditions and usually more efficient than the finite difference approach. (2) The usage of symbolic manipulation software to determine the appropriate expressions and computer coding associated with the quasi-analytical method for sensitivity derivatives was investigated. Using the three dimensional fully conservative full potential flowfield model, it was determined that symbolic manipulation along with a chain rule approach was extremely useful in developing a combined flowfield and quasi-analytical sensitivity derivative code capable of considering a large number of realistic design variables. (3) Using the three dimensional fully conservative full potential flowfield model, the quasi-analytical method was applied to swept wings (i.e. three dimensional) at transonic flow conditions. (4) The incremental iterative technique has been applied to the three dimensional transonic nonlinear small perturbation flowfield formulation, an equivalent plate deflection model, and the associated aerodynamic and structural discipline sensitivity equations; and coupled aeroelastic results for an aspect ratio three wing in transonic flow have been obtained.

  6. Aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a contracting cowl high throat Mach number inlet installed on NASA quiet engine C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blommer, H. E.; Schaefer, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The approach and takeoff performance was evaluated of a contracting cowl variable geometry design inlet installed on a high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine. The design was finalized after consideration of aerodynamic, acoustic, and mechanical factors which would lead to a viable flight worthy concept. The aerodynamic results are presented in terms of inlet recovery and distortion parameter as functions of throat Mach number, and acoustic results in terms of Perceived Noise Level. The contracting cowl high throat Mach number inlet is shown to be an attractive means to reduce forward radiated noise from a high bypass ratio turbofan engine.

  7. Flipperons for Improved Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabe, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Lightweight, piezoelectrically actuated bending flight-control surfaces have shown promise as means of actively controlling airflows to improve the performances of transport airplanes. These bending flight-control surfaces are called flipperons because they look somewhat like small ailerons, but, unlike ailerons, are operated in an oscillatory mode reminiscent of the actions of biological flippers. The underlying concept of using flipperons and other flipperlike actuators to impart desired characteristics to flows is not new. Moreover, elements of flipperon-based active flow-control (AFC) systems for aircraft had been developed previously, but it was not until the development reported here that the elements have been integrated into a complete, controllable prototype AFC system for wind-tunnel testing to enable evaluation of the benefits of AFC for aircraft. The piezoelectric actuator materials chosen for use in the flipperons are single- crystal solid solutions of lead zinc niobate and lead titanate, denoted generically by the empirical formula (1-x)[Pb(Zn(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3]:x[PbTiO3] (where x<1) and popularly denoted by the abbreviation PZN-PT. These are relatively newly recognized piezoelectric materials that are capable of strain levels exceeding 1 percent and strain-energy densities 5 times greater than those of previously commercially available piezoelectric materials. Despite their high performance levels, (1-x)[Pb(Zn(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3]:x[PbTiO3] materials have found limited use until now because, relative to previously commercially available piezoelectric materials, they tend to be much more fragile.

  8. Aerodynamics of laminar separation flutter at a transitional Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirel, D.; Yuan, W.

    2010-10-01

    Experimental observations of self-sustained pitch oscillations of a NACA 0012 airfoil at transitional Reynolds numbers were recently reported. The aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations, herein labelled as laminar separation flutter, occur in the range 5.0×104?Rec?1.3×105. They are well behaved, have a small amplitude and oscillate about ?=0°. It has been speculated that laminar separation leading to the formation of a laminar separation bubble, occurring at these Reynolds numbers, plays an essential role in these oscillations. This paper focuses on the Rec=7.7×104 case, with the elastic axis located at 18.6% chord. Considering that the experimental rig acts as a dynamic balance, the aerodynamic moment is derived and is empirically modelled as a generalized Duffing-van-der-Pol nonlinearity. As expected, it behaves nonlinearly with pitch displacement and rate. It also indicates a dynamically unstable equilibrium point, i.e. negative aerodynamic damping. In addition, large eddy simulations of the flow around the airfoil undergoing prescribed simple harmonic motion, using the same amplitude and frequency as the aeroelastic oscillations, are performed. The comparison between the experiment and simulations is conclusive. Both approaches show that the work done by the airflow on the airfoil is positive and both have the same magnitude. The large eddy simulation (LES) computations indicate that at ?=0°, the pitching motion induces a lag in the separation point on both surfaces of the airfoil resulting in negative pitching moment when pitching down, and positive moment when pitching up, thus feeding the LCO.

  9. Aerodynamic Focusing of Nanoparticles: I. Guidelines for Designing Aerodynamic Lenses for Nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoliang Wang; Frank Einar Kruis; Peter H. McMurry

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the challenges in focusing nanoparticles (< 30 nm) into tightly collimated beams, and provide guidelines for designing aerodynamic lens systems for nanoparticles. The major difficulties of focusing nanoparticles arise from their low inertia and high diffusivity. Because of their low inertia, nanoparticles tend to closely follow gas streamlines; their high diffusivities lead to beam broadening and diffusional

  10. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.; Dilger, F.

    2013-11-01

    Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation), and how frequently (probability) aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  11. Aerodynamic yawing moment characteristics of bird wings.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2005-06-21

    The aerodynamic yawing moments due to sideslip are considered for wings of birds. Reference is made to the experience with aircraft wings in order to identify features which are significant for the yawing moment characteristics. Thus, it can be shown that wing sweep, aspect ratio and lift coefficient have a great impact. Focus of the paper is on wing sweep which can considerably increase the yawing moment due to sideslip when compared with unswept wings. There are many birds the wings of which employ sweep. To show the effect of sweep for birds, the aerodynamic characteristics of a gull wing which is considered as a representative example are treated in detail. For this purpose, a sophisticated aerodynamic method is used to compute results of high precision. The yawing moments of the gull wing with respect to the sideslip angle and the lift coefficient are determined. They show a significant level of yaw stability which strongly increases with the lift coefficient. It is particularly high in the lift coefficient region of best gliding flight conditions. In order to make the effect of sweep more perspicuous, a modification of the gull wing employing no sweep is considered for comparison. It turns out that the unswept wing yields yawing moments which are substantially smaller than those of the original gull wing with sweep. Another feature significant for the yawing moment characteristics concerns the fact that sweep is at the outer part of bird wings. By considering the underlying physical mechanism, it is shown that this feature is most important for the efficiency of wing sweep. To sum up, wing sweep provides a primary contribution to the yawing moments. It may be concluded that this is an essential reason why there is sweep in bird wings. PMID:15808868

  12. A Distributed and Adaptive Signal Processing Approach to Reducing Energy Consumption in Sensor Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim Chou; Dragan Petrovic; Kannan Ramachandran

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to reducing energy consumption in sensor networks using a distributed adaptive signal processing framework and efficient algorithm 1. While the topic of energy-aware routing to alleviate energy consumption in sensor networks has received attention recently (1,2), in this paper, we propose an orthogonal approach to previous methods. Specifically, we propose a distributed way of continuously

  13. Sensor Systems Collect Critical Aerodynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    With the support of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Dryden Flight Research Center, Tao of Systems Integration Inc. developed sensors and other components that will ultimately form a first-of-its-kind, closed-loop system for detecting, measuring, and controlling aerodynamic forces and moments in flight. The Hampton, Virginia-based company commercialized three of the four planned components, which provide sensing solutions for customers such as Boeing, General Electric, and BMW and are used for applications such as improving wind turbine operation and optimizing air flow from air conditioning systems. The completed system may one day enable flexible-wing aircraft with flight capabilities like those of birds.

  14. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  15. Identification of Experimental Unsteady Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Piatak, David J.; Scott, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The identification of experimental unsteady aerodynamic impulse responses using the Oscillating Turntable (OTT) at NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is described. Results are presented for two configurations: a Rigid Semispan Model (RSM) and a rectangular wing with a supercritical airfoil section. Both models were used to acquire unsteady pressure data due to pitching oscillations on the OTT. A deconvolution scheme involving a step input in pitch and the resultant step response in pressure, for several pressure transducers, is used to identify the pressure impulse responses. The identified impulse responses are then used to predict the pressure response due to pitching oscillations at several frequencies. Comparisons with the experimental data are presented.

  16. A Bayesian approach to estimate sensible and latent heat over vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tol, C.; van der Tol, S.; Verhoef, A.; Su, B.; Timmermans, J.; Houldcroft, C.; Gieske, A.

    2009-03-01

    Sensible and latent heat fluxes are often calculated from bulk transfer equations combined with the energy balance. For spatial estimates of these fluxes, a combination of remotely sensed and standard meteorological data from weather stations on the ground is used. The success of this approach depends on the accuracy of the input data and on the accuracy of two variables in particular: aerodynamic and surface conductance. This paper presents a Bayesian approach to improve estimates of sensible and latent heat fluxes by using a priori estimates of aerodynamic and surface conductance alongside remote measurements of surface temperature. The method is validated for time series of half-hourly measurements in a fully grown maize field, a vineyard and a forest. It is shown that the Bayesian approach yields more accurate estimates of sensible and latent heat flux than traditional methods.

  17. A Bayesian approach to estimate sensible and latent heat over vegetated land surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tol, C.; van der Tol, S.; Verhoef, A.; Su, B.; Timmermans, J.; Houldcroft, C.; Gieske, A.

    2009-06-01

    Sensible and latent heat fluxes are often calculated from bulk transfer equations combined with the energy balance. For spatial estimates of these fluxes, a combination of remotely sensed and standard meteorological data from weather stations is used. The success of this approach depends on the accuracy of the input data and on the accuracy of two variables in particular: aerodynamic and surface conductance. This paper presents a Bayesian approach to improve estimates of sensible and latent heat fluxes by using a priori estimates of aerodynamic and surface conductance alongside remote measurements of surface temperature. The method is validated for time series of half-hourly measurements in a fully grown maize field, a vineyard and a forest. It is shown that the Bayesian approach yields more accurate estimates of sensible and latent heat flux than traditional methods.

  18. Approaches to Teaching Energy. Energy and Ourselves/Energy for the Consumer. Children's Learning in Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeds Univ. (England). Centre for Studies in Science and Mathematics Education.

    During the period 1984-1986, over 30 teachers from the Yorkshire (England) region have worked in collaboration with the Children's Learning in Science Project (CLIS) developing and testing teaching schemes in the areas of energy, particle theory, and plant nutrition. The project is based upon the constructivist approach to teaching. This guide…

  19. Aerodynamic tailoring of the Learjet Model 60 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekharan, Reuben M.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Hinson, Michael L.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Madson, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The wing of the Learjet Model 60 was tailored for improved aerodynamic characteristics using the TRANAIR transonic full-potential computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A root leading edge glove and wing tip fairing were shaped to reduce shock strength, improve cruise drag and extend the buffet limit. The aerodynamic design was validated by wind tunnel test and flight test data.

  20. Aerodynamics of ski jumping: experiments and CFD simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Meile; E. Reisenberger; M. Mayer; B. Schmölzer; W. Müller; G. Brenn

    2006-01-01

    The aerodynamic behaviour of a model ski jumper is investigated experimentally at full-scale Reynolds numbers and computationally applying a standard RANS code. In particular we focus on the influence of different postures on aerodynamic forces in a wide range of angles of attack. The experimental results proved to be in good agreement with full-scale measurements with athletes in much larger

  1. Aircraft Noise Prediction Program theoretical manual: Propeller aerodynamics and noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. E. Zorumski; D. S. Weir

    1986-01-01

    The prediction sequence used in the aircraft noise prediction program (ANOPP) is described. The elements of the sequence are called program modules. The first group of modules analyzes the propeller geometry, the aerodynamics, including both potential and boundary-layer flow, the propeller performance, and the surface loading distribution. This group of modules is based entirely on aerodynamic strip theory. The next

  2. Spaceplane aerodynamic heating and thermal protection design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Hirotoshi; Itoda, Norihiko; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Yukimitsu

    At the first phase of concept design of spaceplanes, parametric studies and optimization for the various body configurations and trajectories are needed. For that purpose, the aerodynamic heating is predicted by a simple method. The wall temperature is estimated from the predicted aerodynamic heating against the various wall thickness and coolant heat transfer coefficients. A method for designing a thermal protection system is discussed.

  3. Aerodynamic Admittance Function of Tall Buildings Ahsan Kareemb

    E-print Network

    Kareem, Ahsan

    are generally employed in formulating analysis of wind effects in the along-wind direction following the "gust;Gust spectrum Aerodynamic admittance Generalized force spectrum Displacement transfer function Log )( fH )( fSM Gust spectrum MGLFMGLFMGLFMGLF (b) (a) Figure 1. Aerodynamic admittance functions in gust

  4. Determination and classification of the aerodynamic properties of wing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M

    1925-01-01

    The following note, prepared for the NACA, contains several remarks on the possible improvement of the experimental determination of the aerodynamic properties of wing sections. It shows how errors of observation can subsequently be partially eliminated, and how the computation of the maxima or minima of aerodynamic characteristics can be much improved.

  5. Discriminating speakers with vocal nodules using aerodynamic and acoustic features

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jefl Kuo; Eva B. Holmberg; Robert E. Hillman

    1999-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that linear discriminant analysis using aerodynamic and acoustic features is effective in discriminating speakers with vocal-fold nodules from normal speakers. Simultaneous aerodynamic and acoustic measurements of vocal function were taken of 14 women with bilateral vocal-fold nodules and 12 women with normal voice production. Features were extracted from the glottal airflow waveform and peaks in the acoustic

  6. Spaceplane aerodynamic heating and thermal protection design method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirotoshi Kubota; Norihiko Itoda; Kiyoshi Yamamoto; Yukimitsu Yamamoto

    1990-01-01

    At the first phase of concept design of spaceplanes, parametric studies and optimization for the various body configurations and trajectories are needed. For that purpose, the aerodynamic heating is predicted by a simple method. The wall temperature is estimated from the predicted aerodynamic heating against the various wall thickness and coolant heat transfer coefficients. A method for designing a thermal

  7. COPYRIGHT 2003 by ASME AERODYNAMICS OF TIP LEAKAGE FLOWS

    E-print Network

    Camci, Cengiz

    COPYRIGHT 2003 by ASME 1 AERODYNAMICS OF TIP LEAKAGE FLOWS NEAR PARTIAL SQUEALER RIMS IN AN AXIAL FLOW TURBINE STAGE Cengiz Camci 1 , Debashis Dey 2 and Levent Kavurmacioglu 3 Turbomachinery Heat of aerodynamic characteristics of full and partial-length squealer rims in a turbine stage. Full and partial

  8. Aerodynamics simulation of operating rooms N. El Gharbi*

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aerodynamics simulation of operating rooms N. El Gharbi* A. Benzaoui*R. Bennacer** * Faculty. Keywords: Operating room, aerodynamics simulation, turbulent model, comfort, Airflow, Indoor air quality. hal-00915314,version1-10Dec2013 Author manuscript, published in "International Heat Transfer

  9. Aerodynamics at the Particle Level C. A. Crummer

    E-print Network

    Belanger, David P.

    Aerodynamics at the Particle Level C. A. Crummer Preface The purpose of this work is to examine into modern aerodynamic design but physicists have not developed a tractable mathematics to describe can be assumed incompressible and non-viscous because compression heating and viscous interactions

  10. AE 400-level (choose 2): AE 410 Computational Aerodynamics

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    AE 400-level (choose 2): AE 410 Computational Aerodynamics AE 412 Viscous flow & Heat Transfer AE 416 Applied Aerodynamics AE 419 Aircraft Flight Mechanics AE 433 Aerospace Propulsion AE 434 Rocket Methods In Eng. Other possible electives (examples): ME 411 ONL: Viscous Flow & Heat Transfer CEE 446 ONL

  11. Reliability and Applicability of Aerodynamic Measures in Dysphonia Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiu, Edwin M.-L.; Yuen, Yuet-Ming; Whitehill, Tara; Winkworth, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Aerodynamic measures are frequently used to analyse and document pathological voices. Some normative data are available for speakers from the English-speaking population. However, no data are available yet for Chinese speakers despite the fact that they are one of the largest populations in the world. The high variability of aerodynamic measures…

  12. Noisy Aerodynamic Response And Smooth Approximations In Hsct Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony A. Giunta; Jane M. Dudley; Robert Narducci; Bernard Grossman; Raphael T. Haftka; William H. Mason; Layne T. Watson

    1994-01-01

    Convergence difficulties were encountered in our recentefforts toward a combined aerodynamic-structuraloptimization of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The underlying causes of the convergence problemswere traced to numerical noise in the calculationof aerodynamic drag components for the aircraft. Twotechniques were developed to circumvent the obstaclesto convergence. The first technique employed a sequentialapproximate optimization method which usedlarge initial move limits on...

  13. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic characteristics in flight dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Chapman, G. T.; Schiff, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    Basic concepts involved in the mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic response of an aircraft to arbitrary maneuvers are reviewed. The original formulation of an aerodynamic response in terms of nonlinear functionals is shown to be compatible with a derivation based on the use of nonlinear functional expansions. Extensions of the analysis through its natural connection with ideas from bifurcation theory are indicated.

  14. Computational Study of the Aerodynamic Performance of Subsonic Scarf Inlets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Abbott

    2004-01-01

    A computational study has been conducted to assess the aerodynamic performance of subsonic scarf inlets. The computations were performed using the WIND 3D Navier-Stokes CFD code. The objective of the study was to investigate the aerodynamic performance of scarf inlets wherein the circumferential extent, ?, over which the transition from the extended lower lip to the non-extended lip was the

  15. Wind Tunnel Tests on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Advanced Solid Rocket

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keiichi Kitamura; Keiichiro Fujimoto; Satoshi Nonaka; Tomoko Irikado; Moriyasu Fukuzoe; Eiji Shima

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket is being developed by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Since its configuration has been changed very recently, its aerodynamic characteristics are of great interest of the JAXA Advanced Solid Rocket Team. In this study, we carried out wind tunnel tests on the aerodynamic characteristics of the present configuration for Mach 1.5. Six test cases were conducted

  16. Hypersonic flutter of a curved shallow panel with aerodynamic heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Bein; P. Friedmann; X. Zhong; I. Nydick

    1993-01-01

    The general equations describing the nonlinear fluttering oscillations of shallow, curved, heated orthotropic panels have been derived. The formulation takes into account the location of the panel on the surface of a generic hypersonic vehicle, when calculating the aerodynamic loads. It is also shown that third order piston theory produces unsteady aerodynamic loading which is in close agreement with that

  17. Aerodynamic stiffness effects in rotational galloping at high wind speeds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. W. van Oudheusden

    1996-01-01

    An investigation is made of aerodynamic stiffness effects on the dynamics of rotational galloping at high wind speeds. The system is analysed as a perturbation of the Hamiltonian system in which the aerodynamic stiffness is included. The analysis agrees with the experimentally observed behaviour. Both the frequency and mode shape of the oscillation are affected, while the amplitude of the

  18. Networks of triboelectric nanogenerators for harvesting water wave energy: a potential approach toward blue energy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yang, Jin; Li, Zhaoling; Fan, Xing; Zi, Yunlong; Jing, Qingshen; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Pradel, Ken C; Niu, Simiao; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    With 70% of the earth's surface covered with water, wave energy is abundant and has the potential to be one of the most environmentally benign forms of electric energy. However, owing to lack of effective technology, water wave energy harvesting is almost unexplored as an energy source. Here, we report a network design made of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) for large-scale harvesting of kinetic water energy. Relying on surface charging effect between the conventional polymers and very thin layer of metal as electrodes for each TENG, the TENG networks (TENG-NW) that naturally float on the water surface convert the slow, random, and high-force oscillatory wave energy into electricity. On the basis of the measured output of a single TENG, the TENG-NW is expected to give an average power output of 1.15 MW from 1 km(2) surface area. Given the compelling features, such as being lightweight, extremely cost-effective, environmentally friendly, easily implemented, and capable of floating on the water surface, the TENG-NW renders an innovative and effective approach toward large-scale blue energy harvesting from the ocean. PMID:25719956

  19. Development of a droplet breakup model considering aerodynamic and droplet collision effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wert, K. L.; Jacobs, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    A model is currently under development to predict the occurrence and outcome of spray droplet breakup induced by aerodynamic forces and droplet collisions. It is speculated that these phenomena may be significant in determining the droplet size distribution in a spray subjected to acoustic velocity fluctuations. The goal is to integrate this breakup model into a larger spray model in order to examine the effects of combustion instabilities on liquid rocket motor fuel sprays. The model is composed of three fundamental components: a dynamic equation governing the deformation of the droplet, a criterion for breakage based on the amount of deformation energy stored in the droplet and an energy balance based equation to predict the Sauter mean diameter of the fragments resulting from breakup. Comparison with published data for aerodynamic breakup indicates good agreement in terms of predicting the occurrence of breakup. However, the model significantly over predicts the size of the resulting fragments. This portion of the model is still under development.

  20. Unsteady aerodynamic models for agile flight at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunton, Steven L.

    This work develops low-order models for the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a wing in response to agile maneuvers at low Reynolds number. Model performance is assessed on the basis of accuracy across a range of parameters and frequencies as well as of computational efficiency and compatibility with existing control techniques and flight dynamic models. The result is a flexible modeling procedure that yields accurate, low-dimensional, state-space models. The modeling procedures are developed and tested on direct numerical simulations of a two-dimensional flat plate airfoil in motion at low Reynolds number, Re=100, and in a wind tunnel experiment at the Illinois Institute of Technology involving a NACA 0006 airfoil pitching and plunging at Reynolds number Re=65,000. In both instances, low-order models are obtained that accurately capture the unsteady aerodynamic forces at all frequencies. These cases demonstrate the utility of the modeling procedure developed in this thesis for obtaining accurate models for different geometries and Reynolds numbers. Linear reduced-order models are constructed from either the indicial response (step response) or realistic input/output maneuvers using a flexible modeling procedure. The method is based on identifying stability derivatives and modeling the remaining dynamics with the eigensystem realization algorithm. A hierarchy of models is developed, based on linearizing the flow at various operating conditions. These models are shown to be accurate and efficient for plunging, pitching about various points, and combined pitch and plunge maneuvers, at various angle of attack and Reynolds number. Models are compared against the classical unsteady aerodynamic models of Wagner and Theodorsen over a large range of Strouhal number and reduced frequency for a baseline comparison. Additionally, state-space representations are developed for Wagner's and Theodorsen's models, making them compatible with modern control-system analysis. A number of computational tools are developed throughout this work. Highly unsteady maneuvers are visualized using finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, which highlight separated flows and wake structures. A new fast method of computing these fields is presented. In addition, we generalize the immersed boundary projection method computations to use a moving base flow, which allows for the simulation of complex geometries undergoing large motions with up to an order of magnitude speed-up. The methods developed in this thesis provide a systematic approach to identify unsteady aerodynamic models from analytical, numerical, or experimental data. The resulting models are shown to be reduced-order models of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations that are expressed in state-space form, and they are, therefore, both efficient and accurate. The specific form of the model, which separates added-mass forces, quasi-steady lift, and transient forces, guarantees that the resulting models are accurate over the entire range of frequencies. Finally, the models are low-dimensional linear systems of ordinary differential equations, so that they are compatible with existing flight dynamic models as well as a wealth of modern control techniques.

  1. (Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules)

    SciTech Connect

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1990-01-08

    By accelerating a gas containing suspended particles or large molecules through a converging nozzle, the suspended species may be focused and therefore used to write fine lines on a surface. Our objective was to study the limits on how narrow this focal region could be as a function of particle size. We find that, for monodisperse particles with masses m{sub p} some 3.6 {times} 10{sup 5} times larger than the molecular mass m of the carrier gas (diameters above some 100{angstrom}), there is no fundamental obstacle to directly write submicron features. However, this conclusion has been verified experimentally only with particles larger than 0.1 {mu}m. Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies on the defocusing role of Brownian motion for very small particles or heavy molecules have shown that high resolution (purely aerodynamic) focusing is impossible with volatile molecules whose masses are typically smaller than 1000 Dalton. For these, the minimal focal diameter after optimization appears to be 5{radical}(m/m{sub p}) times the nozzle diameter d{sub n}. But combinations of focused lasers and aerodynamic focusing appear as promising for direct writing with molecular precursors. Theoretical and numerical schemes capable of predicting the evolution of the focusing beam, including Brownian motion effects, have been developed, although further numerical work would be desirable. 11 refs.

  2. Aerodynamic models for a Darrieus wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, P.; Beguier, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.

    1982-11-01

    Various models proposed for the aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines are reviewed. The magnitude of the L/D ratio for a Darrieus rotor blade is dependent on the profile, the Re, boundary layer characteristics, and the three-dimensional flow effects. The aerodynamic efficiency is theoretically the Betz limit, and the interference of one blade with another is constrained by the drag force integrated over all points on the actuator disk. A single streamtube model can predict the power available in a Darrieus, but the model lacks definition of the flow structure and the cyclic stresses. Techniques for calculating the velocity profiles and the consequent induced velocity at the blades are presented. The multiple streamtube theory has been devised to account for the repartition of the velocity in the rotor interior. The model has been expanded as the double multiple streamtube theory at Sandia Laboratories. Futher work is necessary, however, to include the effects of dynamic decoupling at high rotation speeds and to accurately describe blade behavior.

  3. Cascade flutter analysis with transient response aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods for calculating linear frequency domain aerodynamic coefficients from a time marching Full Potential cascade solver are developed and verified. In the first method, the Influence Coefficient, solutions to elemental problems are superposed to obtain the solutions for a cascade in which all blades are vibrating with a constant interblade phase angle. The elemental problem consists of a single blade in the cascade oscillating while the other blades remain stationary. In the second method, the Pulse Response, the response to the transient motion of a blade is used to calculate influence coefficients. This is done by calculating the Fourier Transforms of the blade motion and the response. Both methods are validated by comparison with the Harmonic Oscillation method and give accurate results. The aerodynamic coefficients obtained from these methods are used for frequency domain flutter calculations involving a typical section blade structural model. An eigenvalue problem is solved for each interblade phase angle mode and the eigenvalues are used to determine aeroelastic stability. Flutter calculations are performed for two examples over a range of subsonic Mach numbers.

  4. Aerodynamics inside a rapid compression machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Gaurav; Sung, Chih-Jen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The aerodynamics inside a rapid compression machine after the end of compression is investigated using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone. To study the effect of reaction chamber configuration on the resulting aerodynamics and temperature field, experiments are conducted and compared using a creviced piston and a flat piston under varying conditions. Results show that the flat piston design leads to significant mixing of the cold vortex with the hot core region, which causes alternate hot and cold regions inside the combustion chamber. At higher pressures, the effect of the vortex is reduced. The creviced piston head configuration is demonstrated to result in drastic reduction of the effect of the vortex. Experimental conditions are also simulated using the Star-CD computational fluid dynamics package. Computed results closely match with experimental observation. Numerical results indicate that with a flat piston design, gas velocity after compression is very high and the core region shrinks quickly due to rapid entrainment of cold gases. Whereas, for a creviced piston head design, gas velocity after compression is significantly lower and the core region remains unaffected for a long duration. As a consequence, for the flat piston, adiabatic core assumption can significantly overpredict the maximum temperature after the end of compression. For the creviced piston, the adiabatic core assumption is found to be valid even up to 100 ms after compression. This work therefore experimentally and numerically substantiates the importance of piston head design for achieving a homogeneous core region inside a rapid compression machine. (author)

  5. Experimental aerodynamics research on a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Tate, R.E.; Henfling, J.F.

    1993-04-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment measurements and flow visualization results are presented for a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degree} half-angle cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. On the slice portion of the vehicle, a flap could be attached so that deflection angles of 10{degree}, 20{degree} and 30{degree} could be obtained. All of the experimental results were obtained in the Sandia Mach 8 hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. Flow visualization results include shear stress sensitive liquid crystal photographs, surface streak flow photographs (using liquid crystals), and spark schlieren photographs and video. The liquid crystals were used as an aid in verifying that a laminar boundary layer existed over the entire body. The surface flow photo-graphs show attached and separated flow on both the leeside of the vehicle and near the flap. A detailed uncertainty analysis was conducted to estimate the contributors to body force and moment measurement uncertainty. Comparisons are made with computational results to evaluate both the experimental and numerical results. This extensive set of high-quality experimental force and moment measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of relevant computational aerodynamics codes.

  6. Experimental aerodynamics research on a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Tate, R.E.; Henfling, J.F.

    1993-04-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment measurements and flow visualization results are presented for a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10[degree] half-angle cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. On the slice portion of the vehicle, a flap could be attached so that deflection angles of 10[degree], 20[degree] and 30[degree] could be obtained. All of the experimental results were obtained in the Sandia Mach 8 hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. Flow visualization results include shear stress sensitive liquid crystal photographs, surface streak flow photographs (using liquid crystals), and spark schlieren photographs and video. The liquid crystals were used as an aid in verifying that a laminar boundary layer existed over the entire body. The surface flow photo-graphs show attached and separated flow on both the leeside of the vehicle and near the flap. A detailed uncertainty analysis was conducted to estimate the contributors to body force and moment measurement uncertainty. Comparisons are made with computational results to evaluate both the experimental and numerical results. This extensive set of high-quality experimental force and moment measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of relevant computational aerodynamics codes.

  7. Aerodynamics of Stardust Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Wilmoth, R. G.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Brauckmann, G. J.; Greene, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    Successful return of interstellar dust and cometary material by the Stardust Sample Return Capsule requires an accurate description of the Earth entry vehicle's aerodynamics. This description must span the hypersonic-rarefied, hypersonic-continuum, supersonic, transonic, and subsonic flow regimes. Data from numerous sources are compiled to accomplish this objective. These include Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses, thermochemical nonequilibrium computational fluid dynamics, transonic computational fluid dynamics, existing wind tunnel data, and new wind tunnel data. Four observations are highlighted: 1) a static instability is revealed in the free-molecular and early transitional-flow regime due to aft location of the vehicle s center-of-gravity, 2) the aerodynamics across the hypersonic regime are compared with the Newtonian flow approximation and a correlation between the accuracy of the Newtonian flow assumption and the sonic line position is noted, 3) the primary effect of shape change due to ablation is shown to be a reduction in drag, and 4) a subsonic dynamic instability is revealed which will necessitate either a change in the vehicle s center-of-gravity location or the use of a stabilizing drogue parachute.

  8. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MEXICO Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herraez, I.; Medjroubi, W.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

    2014-12-01

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are a very promising method for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines in an inexpensive and accurate way. One of the major drawbacks of this method is the lack of validated models. As a consequence, the reliability of numerical results is often difficult to assess. The MEXICO project aimed at solving this problem by providing the project partners with high quality measurements of a 4.5 meters rotor diameter wind turbine operating under controlled conditions. The large measurement data-set allows the validation of all kind of aerodynamic models. This work summarizes our efforts for validating a CFD model based on the open source software OpenFoam. Both steady- state and time-accurate simulations have been performed with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for several operating conditions. In this paper we will concentrate on axisymmetric inflow for 3 different wind speeds. The numerical results are compared with pressure distributions from several blade sections and PIV-flow data from the near wake region. In general, a reasonable agreement between measurements the and our simulations exists. Some discrepancies, which require further research, are also discussed.

  9. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  10. Forced response unsteady aerodynamics in a multistage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capece, Vincent Ralph

    The fundamental flow physics of the unsteady aerodynamics associated with forced vibrations in turbomachinery are investigated. Unique data are obtained through a series of experiments in a three stage axial flow research compressor which quantify the unsteady harmonic gust interaction phenomena over a range of operating and geometric conditions at high values of reduced frequency. In these experiments the effects of the following on the stator vane unsteady aerodynamics were quantified: (1) the steady aerodynamic loading, (2) the detailed waveform of the aerodynamic forcing function, including the chordwise and transverse gust components, (3) multistage blade row interactions, and (4) the solidity, ranging from a design value of 1.09 to an isolated airfoil. In addition, the effect of flow separation on the unsteady aerodynamics of an isolated airfoil was also investigated.

  11. Aeroservoelastic modeling and applications using minimum-state approximations of the unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Karpel, Mordechay

    1989-01-01

    Various control analysis, design, and simulation techniques for aeroelastic applications require the equations of motion to be cast in a linear time-invariant state-space form. Unsteady aerodynamics forces have to be approximated as rational functions of the Laplace variable in order to put them in this framework. For the minimum-state method, the number of denominator roots in the rational approximation. Results are shown of applying various approximation enhancements (including optimization, frequency dependent weighting of the tabular data, and constraint selection) with the minimum-state formulation to the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model. The results demonstrate that good models can be developed which have an order of magnitude fewer augmenting aerodynamic equations more than traditional approaches. This reduction facilitates the design of lower order control systems, analysis of control system performance, and near real-time simulation of aeroservoelastic phenomena.

  12. FY 2004 Annual Report: DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Whittaker, K; DeChant, L J; Roy, C J; Payne, J L; Hassan, B; Pointer, W D; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Englar, R; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatelain, P

    2004-11-18

    The objective of this report is: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate potential of new drag-reduction devices. The approaches used were: (1) Develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools; (2) Through an extensive experimental effort, generate an experimental data base for code validation; (3) Using experimental data base, validate computations; (4) Provide industry with design guidance and insight into flow phenomena from experiments and computations; and (5) Investigate aero devices (e.g., base flaps, tractor-trailer gap stabilizer, underbody skirts and wedges, blowing and acoustic devices), provide industry with conceptual designs of drag reducing devices, and demonstrate the full-scale fuel economy potential of these devices.

  13. Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) Noise and Airload Prediction Using Loose Aerodynamic/Structural Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, B. W.; Lim, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise, using blade airloads obtained from a coupled aerodynamic and structural methodology, are presented. This methodology uses an iterative, loosely-coupled trim strategy to cycle information between the OVERFLOW-2 (CFD) and CAMRAD-II (CSD) codes. Results are compared to the HART-II baseline, minimum noise and minimum vibration conditions. It is shown that this CFD/CSD state-of-the-art approach is able to capture blade airload and noise radiation characteristics associated with BVI. With the exception of the HART-II minimum noise condition, predicted advancing and retreating side BVI for the baseline and minimum vibration conditions agrees favorably with measured data. Although the BVI airloads and noise amplitudes are generally under-predicted, this CFD/CSD methodology provides an overall noteworthy improvement over the lifting line aerodynamics and free-wake models typically used in CSD comprehensive analysis codes.

  14. CFD Assessment of Aerodynamic Degradation of a Subsonic Transport Due to Airframe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    A computational study is presented to assess the utility of two NASA unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solvers for capturing the degradation in static stability and aerodynamic performance of a NASA General Transport Model (GTM) due to airframe damage. The approach is to correlate computational results with a substantial subset of experimental data for the GTM undergoing progressive losses to the wing, vertical tail, and horizontal tail components. The ultimate goal is to advance the probability of inserting computational data into the creation of advanced flight simulation models of damaged subsonic aircraft in order to improve pilot training. Results presented in this paper demonstrate good correlations with slope-derived quantities, such as pitch static margin and static directional stability, and incremental rolling moment due to wing damage. This study further demonstrates that high fidelity Navier-Stokes flow solvers could augment flight simulation models with additional aerodynamic data for various airframe damage scenarios.

  15. The influence of aerodynamic heating on the terminal ballistic performance of scale size ke projectiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. G. Cullis; N. J. Lynch

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents small scale reverse ballistic experiments and hydrocode simulations to estimate the influence of aerodynamic heating on the terminal ballistic performance of a hypervelocity kinetic energy projectile. A 3mm diameter, L\\/D 10 tungsten alloy projectile was heated to temperatures up to 1000°C and data was obtained for two designs of target fired from a 40mm smooth bore powder

  16. The aerodynamic cost of flight in the short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata): comparing theory with measurement

    PubMed Central

    von Busse, Rhea; Waldman, Rye M.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Voigt, Christian C.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic theory has long been used to predict the power required for animal flight, but widely used models contain many simplifications. It has been difficult to ascertain how closely biological reality matches model predictions, largely because of the technical challenges of accurately measuring the power expended when an animal flies. We designed a study to measure flight speed-dependent aerodynamic power directly from the kinetic energy contained in the wake of bats flying in a wind tunnel. We compared these measurements with two theoretical predictions that have been used for several decades in diverse fields of vertebrate biology and to metabolic measurements from a previous study using the same individuals. A high-accuracy displaced laser sheet stereo particle image velocimetry experimental design measured the wake velocities in the Trefftz plane behind four bats flying over a range of speeds (3–7 m s?1). We computed the aerodynamic power contained in the wake using a novel interpolation method and compared these results with the power predicted by Pennycuick's and Rayner's models. The measured aerodynamic power falls between the two theoretical predictions, demonstrating that the models effectively predict the appropriate range of flight power, but the models do not accurately predict minimum power or maximum range speeds. Mechanical efficiency—the ratio of aerodynamic power output to metabolic power input—varied from 5.9% to 9.8% for the same individuals, changing with flight speed. PMID:24718450

  17. The aerodynamic cost of flight in the short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata): comparing theory with measurement.

    PubMed

    von Busse, Rhea; Waldman, Rye M; Swartz, Sharon M; Voigt, Christian C; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Aerodynamic theory has long been used to predict the power required for animal flight, but widely used models contain many simplifications. It has been difficult to ascertain how closely biological reality matches model predictions, largely because of the technical challenges of accurately measuring the power expended when an animal flies. We designed a study to measure flight speed-dependent aerodynamic power directly from the kinetic energy contained in the wake of bats flying in a wind tunnel. We compared these measurements with two theoretical predictions that have been used for several decades in diverse fields of vertebrate biology and to metabolic measurements from a previous study using the same individuals. A high-accuracy displaced laser sheet stereo particle image velocimetry experimental design measured the wake velocities in the Trefftz plane behind four bats flying over a range of speeds (3-7 m s(-1)). We computed the aerodynamic power contained in the wake using a novel interpolation method and compared these results with the power predicted by Pennycuick's and Rayner's models. The measured aerodynamic power falls between the two theoretical predictions, demonstrating that the models effectively predict the appropriate range of flight power, but the models do not accurately predict minimum power or maximum range speeds. Mechanical efficiency--the ratio of aerodynamic power output to metabolic power input--varied from 5.9% to 9.8% for the same individuals, changing with flight speed. PMID:24718450

  18. COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO EVALUATING RELATIVE CANCER RISKS FROM ENERGY SOURCES USING SHORT-TERM GENETIC BIOASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of emissions from new energy sources has stimulated the development of new comparative approaches to health assessment studies. All energy sources that result in incomplete combustion are known to emit carcinogenic and mutagenic polynuclear aromatic compounds. Ther...

  19. Industrial Approaches to Reducing Energy Costs in a Restructuring Electric Industry 

    E-print Network

    Lowe, E. T.

    1995-01-01

    companies are looking at a corporate approach to energy procurement, similar to the procurement of other products. Industrial customers may be looking for regional or even national energy suppliers for their facilities. Electric utilities, in an attempt...

  20. Using a Practical Approach to Energy Management to Get it Done

    E-print Network

    Nicol, J.; Dantoin, T.

    2008-01-01

    Using a Practical Approach to Energy Management to Get it Done John Nicol, PE - Program Manager Tim Dantoin ? Energy Advisor Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Madison, Wisconsin ABSTRACT The Wisconsin Focus...

  1. Subsonic and supersonic indicial aerodynamics and aerodynamic transfer function for complex configurations. [aerodynamic configurations for subsonic and supersonic speeds using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    A general theory for indicial-potential-compressible aerodynamics around complex configurations is presented. The motion is assumed to consist of constant subsonic or supersonic speed (steady state) and small perturbations around the steady state. Using the finite-element method to discretize the space problem, a set of differential-difference equations in time relating the potential to its normal derivative on the surface of the body was obtained. The aerodynamics transfer function was derived by using standard method of operational calculus.

  2. EDITORIAL: Advanced Measurement Techniques in Aerodynamics Advanced Measurement Techniques in Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oudheusden, B. W.; Scarano, F.

    2009-07-01

    This issue of Measurement Science and Technology contains a special feature section with selected papers from the EWA International workshop on Advanced Measurement Techniques in Aerodynamics, which was held at the Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 31 March-1 April 2008. The workshop was funded by the European Windtunnel Association (EWA, www.eu-ewa.aero), which is an EU-funded network established in 2004 under the European Sixth Framework Programme with the goal of integrating and standardizing the different capabilities of European wind tunnels and related flow measurement techniques. The workshop was organized with the objective of stimulating discussion among leading European universities, research institutes and industry in the field of advanced aerodynamics measurement techniques, in order to provide a transfer of new ideas from upstream research centres to wind tunnel operators and industrial users. Non-intrusive flow diagnostic techniques nowadays offer renewed capabilities for industrial wind-tunnel applications. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) plays a leading role for particular applications (unsteady and complex flows, rotorcraft aerodynamics, turbulent separated flows) and can provide solutions that cannot be achieved with conventional techniques (e.g. in the analysis of vortex flows). This formed the main motivation to revise the state-of-the-art of PIV along with other non-intrusive optical techniques such as PSP, DGV and BOS. The two-day workshop contained sessions dedicated to several specific topics: rotorcraft aerodynamics applications; state-of-the-art of high-speed PIV and configurations for time-resolved measurements; three-dimensional PIV; non-intrusive load characterization by PSP and PIV. The main conclusion emerging from the closing discussion was that the new capabilities offered by time-resolved PIV are of great scientific and industrial interest for application to unsteady flows and in particular to the determination of unsteady aerodynamic forces and loads. We believe that this workshop provided a useful framework facilitating the transfer of new ideas from developer to the user communities. At the same time the workshop provided the upstream research community with important feedback about the areas of relevance for industrial aerodynamics.

  3. Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

    1999-09-01

    The traditional view of aeolian sand transport generally estimates flux from the perspective of aerodynamic forces creating the airborne grain population, although it has been recognized that "reptation" causes a significant part of the total airborne flux; reptation involves both ballistic injection of grains into the air stream by the impact of saltating grains as well as the "nudging" of surface grains into a creeping motion. Whilst aerodynamic forces may initiate sand motion, it is proposed here that within a fully-matured grain cloud, flux is actually governed by two thresholds: an aerodynamic threshold, and a bed-dilatancy threshold. It is the latter which controls the reptation population, and its significance increases proportionally with transport energy. Because we only have experience with terrestrial sand transport, extrapolations of aeolian theory to Mars and Venus have adjusted only the aerodynamic factor, taking gravitational forces and atmospheric density as the prime variables in the aerodynamic equations, but neglecting reptation. The basis for our perspective on the importance of reptation and bed dilatancy is a set of experiments that were designed to simulate sand transport across the surface of a martian dune. Using a modified sporting crossbow in which a sand-impelling sabot replaced the bolt-firing mechanism, individual grains of sand were fired at loose sand targets with glancing angles typical of saltation impact; grains were projected at about 80 m/s to simulate velocities commensurate with those predicted for extreme martian aeolian conditions. The sabot impelling method permitted study of individual impacts without the masking effect of bed mobilization encountered in wind-tunnel studies. At these martian impact velocities, grains produced small craters formed by the ejection of several hundred grains from the bed. Unexpectedly, the craters were not elongated, despite glancing impact; the craters were very close to circular in planform. High-speed photography showed them to grow in both diameter and depth after the impactor had ricochetted from the crater site. The delayed response of the bed was "explosive" in nature, and created a miniature ejecta curtain spreading upward and outward for many centimeters for impact of 100-300 micron-diameter grains into similar material. Elastic energy deposited in the bed by the impacting grain creates a subsurface stress regime or "quasi-Boussinesq" compression field. Elastic recovery of the bed occurs by dilatancy; shear stresses suddenly convert the grains from closed to open packing, and grains are consequently able to eject themselves forcefully from the impact site. Random jostling of the grains causes radial homogenization of stress vectors and a resulting circular crater. There is a great temptation to draw parallels with cratering produced by meteorite impacts, but a rigorous search for common modelling ground between the two phenomena has not been conducted at this time. For every impact of an aerodynamically energized grain, there are several hundred grains ejected into the wind for the high-energy transport that might occur on Mars. Many of these grains will themselves become subject to the boundary layer's aerodynamic lift forces (their motion will not immediately die and add to the creep population), and these grains will become indistinguishable from those lifted entirely by aerodynamic forces. As each grain impacts the bed, it will eject even more grains into the flow. A cascading effect will take place, but because it must be finite in its growth, damping will occur as the number of grains set in motion causes mid-air collisions that prevent much of the impact energy from reaching the surface of the bed -thus creating a dynamic equilibrium in a high-density saltation cloud. It is apparent that for a given impact energy, the stress field permits a smaller volume of grains to convert to open packing as the size of the bed grains increases, or as the energy of the "percussive" grain decreases

  4. On approaches to couple energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics programs

    E-print Network

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    of the strategies through two examples by using the EnergyPlus and MIT-CFD programs. Keywords: Energy simulation; Computational fluid dynamics (CFD); Integration; Building design 1. Introduction Energy simulation (ES1 On approaches to couple energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics programs Zhiqiang

  5. Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition agreement with the ground-state energy (zero-point energy), and the position of the centroid potential

  6. A gPC-based approach to uncertain transonic aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Simon; P. Guillen; P. Sagaut; D. Lucor

    2010-01-01

    The present paper focus on the stochastic response of a two-dimensional transonic airfoil to parametric uncertainties. Both the freestream Mach number and the angle of attack are considered as random parameters and the generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) theory is coupled with standard deterministic numerical simulations through a spectral collocation projection methodology. The results allow for a better understanding of the

  7. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1990-01-01

    Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems is examined. It is presumed that the underlying model can be arranged into an input/output (I/O) differential operator equation of a generic form. The algorithm estimation is especially efficient since the equation error can be integrated exactly given any I/O pair to obtain an algebraic function of the parameters. The algorithm for parameter identification was extended to the order determination problem for linear differential system. The degeneracy in a least squares estimate caused by feedback was addressed. A method of frequency analysis for determining the transfer function G(j omega) from transient I/O data was formulated using complex valued Fourier based modulating functions in contrast with the trigonometric modulating functions for the parameter estimation problem. A simulation result of applying the algorithm is given under noise-free conditions for a system with a low pass transfer function.

  8. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  9. Beyond robins: aerodynamic analyses of animal flight.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders; Spedding, Geoffrey

    2008-06-01

    Recent progress in studies of animal flight mechanics is reviewed. A range of birds, and now bats, has been studied in wind tunnel facilities, revealing an array of wake patterns caused by the beating wings and also by the drag on the body. Nevertheless, the quantitative analysis of these complex wake structures shows a degree of similarity among all the different wake patterns and a close agreement with standard quasi-steady aerodynamic models and predictions. At the same time, new data on the flow over a bat wing in mid-downstroke show that, at least in this case, such simplifications cannot be useful in describing in detail either the wing properties or control prospects. The reasons for these apparently divergent results are discussed and prospects for future advances are considered. PMID:18397865

  10. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling and active aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic modeling techniques are developed and applied to the study of active control of elastic vehicles. The problem of active control of a supercritical flutter mode poses a definite design goal stability, and is treated in detail. The transfer functions relating the arbitrary airfoil motions to the airloads are derived from the Laplace transforms of the linearized airload expressions for incompressible two dimensional flow. The transfer function relating the motions to the circulatory part of these loads is recognized as the Theodorsen function extended to complex values of reduced frequency, and is termed the generalized Theodorsen function. Inversion of the Laplace transforms yields exact transient airloads and airfoil motions. Exact root loci of aeroelastic modes are calculated, providing quantitative information regarding subcritical and supercritical flutter conditions.

  11. Aerodynamics of seeing on large transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Data were obtained in the full scale flight environment of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) on the nature of turbulent shear layer over the open cavity. These data were used to verify proposed aerodynamic scaling relationships to describe the behavior of the turbulent layers and to estimate the optical performance of systems of various wavelengths operating within the KAO environment. These data and wind tunnel data are used to scale the expected optical effects for a potential stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy (SOFIA) in which a telescope approximately 3.5 times larger than that on the KAO is envisioned. It appears that the use of combinations of active and passive aeromechanical flow control techniques can improve the optical behavior of systems in the SOFIA environment. Experiments to verify these potential improvements can be performed on the KAO with sufficient modifications to the cavity and aero-mechanical technique installations.

  12. Experimental Aerodynamics of Mesoscale Trailing Edge Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovitz, Stephen; Eaton, John

    2001-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a wing with segmented Gurney flaps. Each of the sixteen active flaps is approximately 1.5can be actuated in only two positions: 90 degrees up or 90 degrees down. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at chord Reynolds numbers up to 800,000. Measurements include the determination of aerodynamic forces and moments using a 6 DOF balance, surface pressure profiles, and wake surveys. Actuation of the full span of the airfoil from the up position to the down position increases the lift coefficient by approximately 0.6 for low to moderate angles of attack. The flaps have a reduced but still significant effect past stall. The overall changes in wing loads are linear with the number of flaps actuated, suggesting that simple control laws may be used. However, surface pressure measurements indicate that each flap affects the section lift over a substantial span. A study of the transient performance of the flaps is underway.

  13. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  14. User's Manual for Aerofcn: a FORTRAN Program to Compute Aerodynamic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    The computer program AeroFcn is discussed. AeroFcn is a utility program that computes the following aerodynamic parameters: geopotential altitude, Mach number, true velocity, dynamic pressure, calibrated airspeed, equivalent airspeed, impact pressure, total pressure, total temperature, Reynolds number, speed of sound, static density, static pressure, static temperature, coefficient of dynamic viscosity, kinematic viscosity, geometric altitude, and specific energy for a standard- or a modified standard-day atmosphere using compressible flow and normal shock relations. Any two parameters that define a unique flight condition are selected, and their values are entered interactively. The remaining parameters are computed, and the solutions are stored in an output file. Multiple cases can be run, and the multiple case solutions can be stored in another output file for plotting. Parameter units, the output format, and primary constants in the atmospheric and aerodynamic equations can also be changed.

  15. Computational aerodynamics development and outlook /Dryden Lecture in Research for 1979/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Some past developments and current examples of computational aerodynamics are briefly reviewed. An assessment is made of the requirements on future computer memory and speed imposed by advanced numerical simulations, giving emphasis to the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations and to turbulent eddy simulations. Experimental scales of turbulence structure are used to determine the mesh spacings required to adequately resolve turbulent energy and shear. Assessment also is made of the changing market environment for developing future large computers, and of the projections of micro-electronics memory and logic technology that affect future computer capability. From the two assessments, estimates are formed of the future time scale in which various advanced types of aerodynamic flow simulations could become feasible. Areas of research judged especially relevant to future developments are noted.

  16. Conversion of Phase II Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Data to Common Format

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    1999-07-19

    A vast amount of aerodynamic, structural, and turbine performance data were collected during three phases of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE). To compare data from the three phases, a similar format of engineering unit data is required. The process of converting Phase II data from a previous engineering unit format to raw integer counts is discussed. The integer count files can then be input to the new post-processing software, MUNCH. The resulting Phase II engineering unit files are in a common format with current and future UAE engineering unit files. An additional objective for changing the file format was to convert the Phase II data from English units to SI units of measurement.

  17. Aerodynamic Performance Enhancement of a Finite Span Wind Turbine Blade using Synthetic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Keith; Leong, Chia Min; Amitay, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Modern wind turbines undergo significant changes in pitch angle and structural loading through a revolution. Recent developments in flow control techniques, coupled with increased interest in green energy technologies, have led to interest in applying these techniques to wind turbines, in an effort to increase power output and reduce structural stress associated with widely varying loading. This reduction in structural stress could lead to reduced operational costs associated with the maintenance cycle. The effect of active flow control on the aerodynamic and structural aspects of finite span blade was investigated experimentally. When synthetic jets were employed the effect on aerodynamic performance and structural vibrations, during static and dynamic pitch conditions, was significant. In order to investigate if the jets can be actuated for less time (reduce their power consumption), they were actuated during only a portion of the pitch cycle or using pulse modulation. The results showed that these techniques result in significant reduction in the hysteresis loop and the structural vibrations.

  18. Development of selected advanced aerodynamics and active control concepts for commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    Work done under the Energy Efficient Transport project in the field of advanced aerodynamics and active controls is summarized. The project task selections focused on the following: the investigation of long-duct nacelle shape variation on interference drag; the investigation of the adequacy of a simple control law for the elastic modes of a wing; the development of the aerodynamic technology at cruise and low speed of high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings of high performance; and the development of winglets for a second-generation jet transport. All the tasks involved analysis and substantial wind tunnel testing. The winglet program also included flight evaluation. It is considered that the technology base has been built for the application of high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings and for the use of winglets on second-generation transports.

  19. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag FY 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Paschkewitz, J; Pointer, W D; DeChant, L J; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Radovich, C; Merzel, T; Plocher, D; Ross, J; Storms, B; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Roy, C J

    2005-11-14

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At high way speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices.

  20. Aerodynamics and vortical structures in hovering fruitflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2015-03-01

    We measure the wing kinematics and morphological parameters of seven freely hovering fruitflies and numerically compute the flows of the flapping wings. The computed mean lift approximately equals to the measured weight and the mean horizontal force is approximately zero, validating the computational model. Because of the very small relative velocity of the wing, the mean lift coefficient required to support the weight is rather large, around 1.8, and the Reynolds number of the wing is low, around 100. How such a large lift is produced at such a low Reynolds number is explained by combining the wing motion data, the computed vortical structures, and the theory of vorticity dynamics. It has been shown that two unsteady mechanisms are responsible for the high lift. One is referred as to "fast pitching-up rotation": at the start of an up- or downstroke when the wing has very small speed, it fast pitches down to a small angle of attack, and then, when its speed is higher, it fast pitches up to the angle it normally uses. When the wing pitches up while moving forward, large vorticity is produced and sheds at the trailing edge, and vorticity of opposite sign is produced near the leading edge and on the upper surface, resulting in a large time rate of change of the first moment of vorticity (or fluid impulse), hence a large aerodynamic force. The other is the well known "delayed stall" mechanism: in the mid-portion of the up- or downstroke the wing moves at large angle of attack (about 45 deg) and the leading-edge-vortex (LEV) moves with the wing; thus, the vortex ring, formed by the LEV, the tip vortices, and the starting vortex, expands in size continuously, producing a large time rate of change of fluid impulse or a large aerodynamic force.

  1. Aerodynamic-Structural Design Studies of Low-Sweep Transonic Wings

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    Aerodynamic-Structural Design Studies of Low-Sweep Transonic Wings Antony Jameson Department level. High-fidelity aerodynamic and aerodynamic-structural optimizations are performed on a set to significantly reduce wing sweep without incurring either aerodynamic or structural penalties, especially for M

  2. Modeling FullEnvelope Aerodynamics of Small UAVs in RealTime Prof. Michael Selig

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    D M E S S Modeling FullEnvelope Aerodynamics of Small UAVs in RealTime Prof. Michael Selig Applied Aerodynamics Group and Subsonic Aerodynamics Research Lab Department of Aerospace Engineering will focus on the development of a full six degreeoffreedom aerodynamics modeling environment for small UAVs

  3. Review of unsteady transonic aerodynamics: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendiksen, Oddvar O.

    2011-02-01

    Unsteady transonic flow theory is reviewed and classical results from the nonlinear asymptotic theory are combined with new results from computational fluid dynamics. The emphasis is on applications to the field of aeroelasticity and on clarifying the limitations of linearized theories in problems involving mixed subsonic-supersonic flows. The inherent differences between nonlinear transonic aerodynamics and linear subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics are considered from a theoretical and computational standpoint, and the practical implications of these differences in formulating suitable aerodynamic models for aeroelastic stability calculations are discussed. Transonic similarity principles are reviewed and their relevance in understanding flutter, divergence, and control reversal phenomena of transonic aircraft is illustrated through practical examples.

  4. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  5. Prediction of Hyper-X Stage Separation Aerodynamics Using CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Dilley, Arthur D.; Pao, Jenn L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA X-43 "Hyper-X" hypersonic research vehicle will be boosted to a Mach 7 flight test condition mounted on the nose of an Orbital Sciences Pegasus launch vehicle. The separation of the research vehicle from the Pegasus presents some unique aerodynamic problems, for which computational fluid dynamics has played a role in the analysis. This paper describes the use of several CFD methods for investigating the aerodynamics of the research and launch vehicles in close proximity. Specifically addressed are unsteady effects, aerodynamic database extrapolation, and differences between wind tunnel and flight environments.

  6. Hypersonic flutter of a curved shallow panel with aerodynamic heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bein, T.; Friedmann, P.; Zhong, X.; Nydick, I.

    1993-01-01

    The general equations describing the nonlinear fluttering oscillations of shallow, curved, heated orthotropic panels have been derived. The formulation takes into account the location of the panel on the surface of a generic hypersonic vehicle, when calculating the aerodynamic loads. It is also shown that third order piston theory produces unsteady aerodynamic loading which is in close agreement with that based upon direct solution of the Euler equations. Results, for simply supported panels, are obtained using Galerkin's method combined with direct numerical integration in time to compute stable limit cycle amplitudes. These results illustrate the sensitivity of the aeroelastic behavior to the unsteady aerodynamic assumptions, temperature, orthotropicity and flow orientation.

  7. Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Aerodynamics of Power Plant Installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.

    1982-01-01

    Powerplant installations involve complex flows, strongly influenced by viscous effects and often with important aerodynamic interactions between the airframe and propulsion system. The introduction of vehicle propulsion concepts, and points of emphasis in aircraft and missile design requirements, provide an expanding range of aerodynamic problems which cal for both experimental and theoretical study. Aerodynamic problems in powerplant installation are surveyed and work which has improved basic understanding or has enhanced prediction and design methods in this field is reviewed. Powerplant installation effects for both combat and transport aircraft are emphasized.

  8. Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamics (HABA) for conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Salguero, D.E.

    1990-03-15

    The Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamics (HABA) computer program predicts static and dynamic aerodynamic derivatives at hypersonic speeds for any vehicle geometry. It is intended to be used during conceptual design studies where fast computational speed is required. It uses the same geometry and hypersonic aerodynamic methods as the Mark IV Supersonic/Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Program (SHABP) developed under sponsorship of the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory; however, the input and output formats have been improved to make it easier to use. This program is available as part of the Department 9140 CAE software.

  9. Compendium of NASA Langley reports on hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabo, Frances E.; Cary, Aubrey M.; Lawson, Shirley W.

    1987-01-01

    Reference is made to papers published by the Langley Research Center in various areas of hypersonic aerodynamics for the period 1950 to 1986. The research work was performed either in-house by the Center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. Abstracts have been included with the references when available. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Aerodynamic Measurements - Single Shapes; (2) Aerodynamic Measurements - Configurations; (3) Aero-Heating; (4) Configuration Studies; (5) Propulsion Integration Experiment; (6) Propulsion Integration - Study; (7) Analysis Methods; (8) Test Techniques; and (9) Airframe Active Cooling Systems.

  10. Overview of Supersonic Aerodynamics Measurement Techniques in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On-surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is, therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a ground-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  11. A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2001-09-01

    The project tasks and deliverables are as follows: Computations and Experiments--(1) Simulation and analysis of a range of generic shapes, simplified to more complex, representative of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer flow characteristics using computational tools, (2) The establishment of an experimental data base for tractor-trailer models for code/computational method development and validation. The first shapes to be considered will be directed towards the investigation of tractor-trailer gaps and mismatch of tractor-trailer heights. (3) The evaluation and documentation of effective computational approaches for application to heavy vehicle aerodynamics based on the benchmark results with existing and advanced computational tools compared to experimental data, and (4) Computational tools and experimental methods for use by industry, National Laboratories, and universities for the aerodynamic modeling of heavy truck vehicles. Evaluation of current and new technologies--(1) The evaluation and documentation of current and new technologies for drag reduction based on published literature and continued communication with the heavy vehicle industry (e.g., identification and prioritization of tractor-trailer drag-sources, blowing and/or suction devices, body shaping, new experimental methods or facilities), and the identification and analysis of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer aerodynamic problem areas and possible solution strategies. (2) Continued industrial site visits. It should be noted that ''CFD tools'' are not only the actual computer codes, but descriptions of appropriate numerical solution methods. Part of the project effort will be to determine the restrictions or avenues for technology transfer.

  12. Error Estimates of the Ares I Computed Turbulent Ascent Longitudinal Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Ghaffari, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics for the Ares I class of vehicles, along with the associated error estimate derived from an iterative convergence grid refinement, are presented. Computational results are based on an unstructured grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes analysis. The validity of the approach to compute the associated error estimates, derived from a base grid to an extrapolated infinite-size grid, was first demonstrated on a sub-scaled wind tunnel model at representative ascent flow conditions for which the experimental data existed. Such analysis at the transonic flow conditions revealed a maximum deviation of about 23% between the computed longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients with the base grid and the measured data across the entire roll angles. This maximum deviation from the wind tunnel data was associated with the computed normal force coefficient at the transonic flow condition and was reduced to approximately 16% based on the infinite-size grid. However, all the computed aerodynamic coefficients with the base grid at the supersonic flow conditions showed a maximum deviation of only about 8% with that level being improved to approximately 5% for the infinite-size grid. The results and the error estimates based on the established procedure are also presented for the flight flow conditions.

  13. Statistical Approach for Calculating the Energy Consumption by Cell Phones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shanchen Pang; Zhonglei Yu

    \\u000a Energy consumption by cell phones has great effect on energy crisis. Calculating and optimizing the method of service that\\u000a provided by the cell phone is essential. In our solution, we build up three main models. Transition model reflects the relationship\\u000a between the change of energy and time; next we give the function of energy consumption during the steady state. Optimization

  14. Some new conceptions in the approach to harnessing tidal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper outlines a method of converting the energy of ocean tides into electrical and other forms of industrial energy. The main disadvantage of extracting tidal power arises from the low density of tidal power per unit area of the ocean. This leads to the high cost of required investment for the production of a substantial volume of the energy. 10 refs.

  15. Regulatory and voluntary approaches for enhancing building energy efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L. Lee; F. W. H. Yik

    2004-01-01

    Buildings are the dominant energy consumers in modern cities but their consumption can be largely cut back through improving efficiency, which is an effective means to lessen greenhouse gas emissions and slow down depletion of non-renewable energy resources. However, the potential energy cost saving alone is hardly a sufficient incentive to investing into improvement measures, unless the cost of using

  16. The energy balance of the earth' surface : a practical approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruin de H. A. R

    1982-01-01

    This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This radiation originates partly from the sun, but an~

  17. An Operational Excellence Approach to Sustainable Energy Management

    E-print Network

    McMullan, A.

    interest wanes when energy prices are lower. With today’s high energy prices and growing interest in reducing CO 2 emissions, energy management must become a core business activity and be implemented in a sustainable fashion as an embedded work process...

  18. An energy based approach to undervoltage load shedding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anoop Nanda; Mariesa L. Crow

    1995-01-01

    A novel effort to apply Lyapunov's energy methods towards developing an energy based load shedding scheme in order to alleviate voltage instability is presented. An ‘absolute’ energy function is derived which eliminates the need to calculate the unstable equilibrium points (UEPs) and thus saves a considerable amount of computation time. The localized and zonal nature of early voltage instability symptoms

  19. ICI's Approach to Total Energy Savings on Ethylene Plants 

    E-print Network

    Hindmarsh, E.; Boland, D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent technological developments have led to the creation of the rigorous simulation models for ethylene plants which can be run in concert with advanced, thermodynamic “pinch” procedures. This new approach enables operators to determine...

  20. The Engineered Approach to Energy and Maintenance Effective Steam Trapping

    E-print Network

    Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    The engineered approach to steam trap sizing, selection and application has proven effective in significantly reducing a plant's fuel consumption, maintenance and trap replacement costs while improving thermal efficiency and overall steam system...