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Sample records for aerosol cfd model

  1. CFD simulation of aerosol deposition in an anatomically based human large-medium airway model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshun; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative data on aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract are useful for understanding the causes of certain lung diseases and for designing efficient drug delivery systems via inhalation. In this study, aerosol deposition in a 3D anatomically based human large-medium airway model was simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The model extended from mouth to generation 10 and included two-thirds of the airways obtained by multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging on normal healthy human subjects. Steady oral inhalation (15, 30, and 60 L/min) and aerosol (1-30 micrometer) deposition were computed by CFD using the realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. Based on the mean turbulence flow field, the computed extrathoracic deposition, ratio of left to right lung deposition, and deposition efficiency at each generation compared favorably with existing in vivo and in vitro experiments. The significant deposition in the large-medium airway model showed that the total tracheobronchial deposition is dominated by the large-medium airways for micrometer-sized aerosol particles. These quantitative data and the methods developed in this study provided valuable means toward subject-specific modeling of aerosol deposition in the human lung based on realistic lung geometry. PMID:19082892

  2. Aerosol-CFD modelling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Gong, S. L.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C. A.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J. R.; Jia, C. Q.

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-CFD coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary conditions is proposed to model pollutant dispersion and dynamics in one unified domain from the tailpipe level to the ambient near-road environment. This approach significantly reduces the size of the computational domain, and therefore, allows fast simulation of multiple scenarios. The model is validated against measured turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and pollution gradients near a major highway. Through a model sensitivity analysis, the relative importance of individual aerosol dynamical processes on the total particle number concentration (N) and particle number-size distribution (PSD) near a highway is investigated. The results demonstrate that (1) coagulation has a negligible effect on N and particle growth, (2) binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H2SO4-H2O is likely responsible for elevated N closest to the road, (3) N and particle growth are very sensitive to the condensation of semi-volatile organics (SVOCs), particle dry deposition, and the interaction between these processes. The results also indicate that, without the proper treatment of atmospheric boundary layer (i.e. its wind profile and turbulence quantities), the nucleation rate would be underestimated by a factor of 5 in the vehicle wake region due to overestimated mixing. Therefore, introducing ABL conditions to activity-based emission models may potentially improve their performance in estimating UFP traffic emissions.

  3. SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-05

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and

  4. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-02-06

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure vari-ations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagran-gian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respira-tions of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de-livery protocol.

  5. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.

  6. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treatmore » the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.« less

  7. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol. PMID:25767612

  8. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A; Corley, Richard A; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol. PMID:25767612

  9. CFD Modeling For Urban Air Quality Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R L; Lucas, L J; Humphreys, T D; Chan, S T

    2003-10-27

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach has been increasingly applied to many atmospheric applications, including flow over buildings and complex terrain, and dispersion of hazardous releases. However there has been much less activity on the coupling of CFD with atmospheric chemistry. Most of the atmospheric chemistry applications have been focused on the modeling of chemistry on larger spatial scales, such as global or urban airshed scale. However, the increased attentions to terrorism threats have stimulated the need of much more detailed simulations involving chemical releases within urban areas. This motivated us to develop a new CFD/coupled-chemistry capability as part of our modeling effort.

  10. TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-17

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single

  11. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  12. Liquid rocket propulsion impeller CFD modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, Mark L.; Athavale, Mahesh M.; Thomas, Matthew E.; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Steady-state impeller geometric modeling and typical Navier-Stokes CFD algorithm analysis procedures are assessed using two benchmark quality impeller data sets. Two geometric modeling and grid generation software packages, ICEM-CFD and PATRAN, are considered. Results show that a significant advantage of PATRAN's open-ended architecture is the potential interaction between CFD and structural/thermal analysts inside the mechanical computer-aided engineering environment. However the time required to construct the inducer grid would be unacceptable in a design and engineering environment. The ICEM-CFD package is considered to be more appropriate for structural grid generation but lacks the mature link to structural/thermal analysis arena as compared to PATRAN.

  13. CFD Modeling of Launch Vehicle Aerodynamic Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashakkor, Scott B.; Canabal, Francisco; Mishtawy, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    The Loci-CHEM 3.2 Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code is being used to predict Ares-I launch vehicle aerodynamic heating. CFD has been used to predict both ascent and stage reentry environments and has been validated against wind tunnel tests and the Ares I-X developmental flight test. Most of the CFD predictions agreed with measurements. On regions where mismatches occurred, the CFD predictions tended to be higher than measured data. These higher predictions usually occurred in complex regions, where the CFD models (mainly turbulence) contain less accurate approximations. In some instances, the errors causing the over-predictions would cause locations downstream to be affected even though the physics were still being modeled properly by CHEM. This is easily seen when comparing to the 103-AH data. In the areas where predictions were low, higher grid resolution often brought the results closer to the data. Other disagreements are attributed to Ares I-X hardware not being present in the grid, as a result of computational resources limitations. The satisfactory predictions from CHEM provide confidence that future designs and predictions from the CFD code will provide an accurate approximation of the correct values for use in design and other applications

  14. Aerosol transport simulations in indoor and outdoor environments using computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landazuri, Andrea C.

    This dissertation focuses on aerosol transport modeling in occupational environments and mining sites in Arizona using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The impacts of human exposure in both environments are explored with the emphasis on turbulence, wind speed, wind direction and particle sizes. Final emissions simulations involved the digitalization process of available elevation contour plots of one of the mining sites to account for realistic topographical features. The digital elevation map (DEM) of one of the sites was imported to COMSOL MULTIPHYSICSRTM for subsequent turbulence and particle simulations. Simulation results that include realistic topography show considerable deviations of wind direction. Inter-element correlation results using metal and metalloid size resolved concentration data using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) under given wind speeds and directions provided guidance on groups of metals that coexist throughout mining activities. Groups between Fe-Mg, Cr-Fe, Al-Sc, Sc-Fe, and Mg-Al are strongly correlated for unrestricted wind directions and speeds, suggesting that the source may be of soil origin (e.g. ore and tailings); also, groups of elements where Cu is present, in the coarse fraction range, may come from mechanical action mining activities and saltation phenomenon. Besides, MOUDI data under low wind speeds (<2 m/s) and at night showed a strong correlation for 1 mum particles between the groups: Sc-Be-Mg, Cr-Al, Cu-Mn, Cd-Pb-Be, Cd-Cr, Cu-Pb, Pb-Cd, As-Cd-Pb. The As-Cd-Pb correlates strongly in almost all ranges of particle sizes. When restricted low wind speeds were imposed more groups of elements are evident and this may be justified with the fact that at lower speeds particles are more likely to settle. When linking these results with CFD simulations and Pb-isotope results it is concluded that the source of elements found in association with Pb in the fine fraction come from the ore that is subsequently processed

  15. CFD modeling of pharmaceutical isolators with experimental verification of airflow.

    PubMed

    Nayan, N; Akay, H U; Walsh, M R; Bell, W V; Troyer, G L; Dukes, R E; Mohan, P

    2007-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been developed to predict the airflow in a transfer isolator using a commercial CFD code. In order to assess the ability of the CFD approach in predicting the flow inside an isolator, hot wire anemometry measurements and a novel experimental flow visualization technique consisting of helium-filled glycerin bubbles were used. The results obtained have been shown to agree well with the experiments and show that CFD can be used to model barrier systems and isolators with practical fidelity. This indicates that CFD can and should be used to support the design, testing, and operation of barrier systems and isolators. PMID:17933207

  16. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  17. Aerosol lenses propagation model.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grégoire; Roy, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    We propose a model based on the properties of cascading lenses modulation transfer function (MTF) to reproduce the irradiance of a screen illuminated through a dense aerosol cloud. In this model, the aerosol cloud is broken into multiple thin layers considered as individual lenses. The screen irradiance generated by these individual layers is equivalent to the point-spread function (PSF) of each aerosol lens. Taking the Fourier transform of the PSF as a MTF, we cascade the lenses MTF to find the cloud MTF. The screen irradiance is found with the Fourier transform of this MTF. We show the derivation of the model and we compare the results with the Undique Monte Carlo simulator for four aerosols at three optical depths. The model is in agreement with the Monte Carlo for all the cases tested. PMID:21886230

  18. Modeling Pulse Tube Cryocoolers with CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flake, Barrett; Razani, Arsalan

    2004-06-01

    A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package is used to model the oscillating flow inside a pulse tube cryocooler. Capabilities for modeling pulse tubes are demonstrated with preliminary case studies and the results presented. The 2D axi-symmetric simulations demonstrate the time varying temperature and velocity fields in the tube along with computation of the heat fluxes at the hot and cold heat exchangers. The only externally imposed boundary conditions are a cyclically moving piston wall at one end of the tube and constant temperature or heat flux boundaries at the external walls of the hot and cold heat exchangers.

  19. Wind modelling over complex terrain using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Matias; Owen, Herbert; Folch, Arnau; Prieto, Luis; Cosculluela, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The present work deals with the numerical CFD modelling of onshore wind farms in the context of High Performance Computing (HPC). The CFD model involves the numerical solution of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations together with a κ-ɛ turbulence model and the energy equation, specially designed for Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) flows. The aim is to predict the wind velocity distribution over complex terrain, using a model that includes meteorological data assimilation, thermal coupling, forested canopy and Coriolis effects. The modelling strategy involves automatic mesh generation, terrain data assimilation and generation of boundary conditions for the inflow wind flow distribution up to the geostrophic height. The CFD model has been implemented in Alya, a HPC multi physics parallel solver able to run with thousands of processors with an optimal scalability, developed in Barcelona Supercomputing Center. The implemented thermal stability and canopy physical model was developed by Sogachev in 2012. The k-ɛ equations are of non-linear convection diffusion reaction type. The implemented numerical scheme consists on a stabilized finite element formulation based on the variational multiscale method, that is known to be stable for this kind of turbulence equations. We present a numerical formulation that stresses on the robustness of the solution method, tackling common problems that produce instability. The iterative strategy and linearization scheme is discussed. It intends to avoid the possibility of having negative values of diffusion during the iterative process, which may lead to divergence of the scheme. These problems are addressed by acting on the coefficients of the reaction and diffusion terms and on the turbulent variables themselves. The k-ɛ equations are highly nonlinear. Complex terrain induces transient flow instabilities that may preclude the convergence of computer flow simulations based on steady state formulation of the

  20. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of aerosol in a U-shaped steam generator tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, Pamela

    To quantify primary side aerosol retention, an Eulerian/Lagrangian approach was used to investigate aerosol transport in a compressible, turbulent, adiabatic, internal, wall-bounded flow. The ARTIST experimental project (Phase I) served as the physical model replicated for numerical simulation. Realizable k-epsilon and standard k-o turbulence models were selected from the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, FLUENT, to provide the Eulerian description of the gaseous phase. Flow field simulation results exhibited: (a) onset of weak secondary flow accelerated at bend entrance towards the inner wall; (b) flow separation zone development on the convex wall that persisted from the point of onset; (c) centrifugal force concentrated high velocity flow in the direction of the concave wall; (d) formation of vortices throughout the flow domain resulted from rotational (Dean-type) flow; (e) weakened secondary flow assisted the formation of twin vortices in the outflow cross section; and (f) perturbations induced by the bend influenced flow recovery several pipe diameters upstream of the bend. These observations were consistent with those of previous investigators. The Lagrangian discrete random walk model, with and without turbulent dispersion, simulated the dispersed phase behavior, incorrectly. Accurate deposition predictions in wall-bounded flow require modification of the Eddy Impaction Model (EIM). Thus, to circumvent shortcomings of the EIM, the Lagrangian time scale was changed to a wall function and the root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuating velocities were modified to account for the strong anisotropic nature of flow in the immediate vicinity of the wall (boundary layer). Subsequent computed trajectories suggest a precision that ranges from 0.1% to 0.7%, statistical sampling error. The aerodynamic mass median diameter (AMMD) at the inlet (5.5 mum) was consistent with the ARTIST experimental findings. The geometric standard deviation (GSD) varied depending on the

  1. CFD Modeling Activities at the NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA Stennis Space Center's Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling activities is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of NASA Stennis Space Center; 2) Role of Computational Modeling at NASA-SSC; 3) Computational Modeling Tools and Resources; and 4) CFD Modeling Applications.

  2. CFD Simulation and Experimental Validation of Fluid Flow and Particle Transport in a Model of Alveolated Airways

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Baoshun; Ruwet, Vincent; Corieri, Patricia; Theunissen, Raf; Riethmuller, Michel; Darquenne, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of air flow and aerosol transport in the alveolated airways is essential for quantitative predictions of pulmonary aerosol deposition. However, experimental validation of such modeling studies has been scarce. The objective of this study is to validate CFD predictions of flow field and particle trajectory with experiments within a scaled-up model of alveolated airways. Steady flow (Re = 0.13) of silicone oil was captured by particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the trajectories of 0.5 mm and 1.2 mm spherical iron beads (representing 0.7 to 14.6 μm aerosol in vivo) were obtained by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). At twelve selected cross sections, the velocity profiles obtained by CFD matched well with those by PIV (within 1.7% on average). The CFD predicted trajectories also matched well with PTV experiments. These results showed that air flow and aerosol transport in models of human alveolated airways can be simulated by CFD techniques with reasonable accuracy. PMID:20161301

  3. CFD Simulation and Experimental Validation of Fluid Flow and Particle Transport in a Model of Alveolated Airways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshun; Ruwet, Vincent; Corieri, Patricia; Theunissen, Raf; Riethmuller, Michel; Darquenne, Chantal

    2009-05-01

    Accurate modeling of air flow and aerosol transport in the alveolated airways is essential for quantitative predictions of pulmonary aerosol deposition. However, experimental validation of such modeling studies has been scarce. The objective of this study is to validate CFD predictions of flow field and particle trajectory with experiments within a scaled-up model of alveolated airways. Steady flow (Re = 0.13) of silicone oil was captured by particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the trajectories of 0.5 mm and 1.2 mm spherical iron beads (representing 0.7 to 14.6 mum aerosol in vivo) were obtained by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). At twelve selected cross sections, the velocity profiles obtained by CFD matched well with those by PIV (within 1.7% on average). The CFD predicted trajectories also matched well with PTV experiments. These results showed that air flow and aerosol transport in models of human alveolated airways can be simulated by CFD techniques with reasonable accuracy. PMID:20161301

  4. CFD Modeling for Mercury Control Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, J.I.

    2006-12-01

    Compliance with the Clean Air Mercury Rule will require implementation of dedicated mercury control solutions at a significant portion of the U.S. coal-fired utility fleet. Activated Carbon Injection (ACI) upstream of a particulate control device (ESP or baghouse) remains one of the most promising near-term mercury control technologies. The DOE/NETL field testing program has advanced the understanding of mercury control by ACI, but a persistent need remains to develop predictive models that may improve the understanding and practical implementation of this technology. This presentation describes the development of an advanced model of in-flight mercury capture based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The model makes detailed predictions of the induct spatial distribution and residence time of sorbent, as well as predictions of mercury capture efficiency for particular sorbent flow rates and injection grid configurations. Hence, CFD enables cost efficient optimization of sorbent injection systems for mercury control to a degree that would otherwise be impractical both for new and existing plants. In this way, modeling tools may directly address the main cost component of operating an ACI system – the sorbent expense. A typical 300 MW system is expected to require between $1 and $2 million of sorbent per year, and so even modest reductions (say 10-20%) in necessary sorbent feed injection rates will quickly make any optimization effort very worthwhile. There are few existing models of mercury capture, and these typically make gross assumptions of plug gas flow, zero velocity slip between particle and gas phase, and uniform sorbent dispersion. All of these assumptions are overcome with the current model, which is based on first principles and includes mass transfer processes occurring at multiple scales, ranging from the large-scale transport in the duct to transport within the porous structure of a sorbent particle. In principle any single one of these processes

  5. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  6. CFD Modeling of Superheated Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of fuel atomization and vaporization behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA aeronautics initiative, we have undertaken an assessment study to establish baseline accuracy of existing CFD models used in the evaluation of a ashing jet. In a first attempt towards attaining this goal, we have incorporated an existing superheat vaporization model into our spray solution procedure but made some improvements to combine the existing models valid at superheated conditions with the models valid at stable (non-superheat) evaporating conditions. Also, the paper reports some validation results based on the experimental data obtained from the literature for a superheated spray generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle. The predicted profiles for both gas and droplet velocities show a reasonable agreement with the measured data and exhibit a self-similar pattern similar to the correlation reported in the literature. Because of the uncertainty involved in the specification of the initial conditions, we have investigated the effect of initial droplet size distribution on the validation results. The predicted results were found to be sensitive to the initial conditions used for the droplet size specification. However, it was shown that decent droplet size comparisons could be achieved with properly selected initial conditions, For the case considered, it is reasonable to assume that the present vaporization models are capable of providing a reasonable qualitative description for the two-phase jet characteristics generated by a ashing jet. However, there remains some uncertainty with regard to the specification of certain initial spray conditions and there is a need for experimental data on separate gas and liquid temperatures in order to validate the vaporization models based on the Adachi correlation for a liquid involving R134A.

  7. CFD model of an aerating hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D.; Sabourin, M.; Beaulieu, S.; Papillon, B.; Ellis, C.

    2014-03-01

    Improving water quality in the tailrace below hydroelectric dams has become a priority in many river systems. In warm climates, water drawn by the turbine from deep in a reservoir can be deficient in dissolved oxygen (DO), a critical element in maintaining a healthy aquatic ecosystem. Many different solutions have been proposed in order to increase the DO levels in turbine discharge, including: turbine aeration systems (adding air to the water through either the turbine hub, the periphery or through distributed aeration in the runner blades); bubble diffusers in the reservoir or in the tailrace; aerating weirs downstream of the dams; and surface water pumps in the reservoir near the dam. There is a significant potential to increase the effectiveness of these solutions by improving the way that oxygen is introduced into the water; better distributions of bubbles will result in better oxygen transfer. In the present study, a two-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics model has been formulated using a commercial code to study the distribution of air downstream of a simple aerating hydrofoil. The two-phase model uses the Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Appropriate relations are used to model the interphase forces, including the Grace drag force model, the Favre averaged drag force and the Sato enhanced eddy viscosity. The model is validated using experimental results obtained in the water tunnel at the University of Minnesota's Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. Results are obtained for water velocities between 5 and 10 m/s, air flow rates between 0.5 and 1.5 sL/min and for angles of attack between 0° and -8°. The results of this study show that the CFD model provides a good qualitative comparison to the experimental results by well predicting the wake location at the different flow rates and angles of attack used.

  8. Grid generation and surface modeling for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Stuart D.; Sober, Janet S.; Lamson, Scott H.

    1995-01-01

    When computing the flow around complex three dimensional configurations, the generation of the mesh is the most time consuming part of any calculation. With some meshing technologies this can take of the order of a man month or more. The requirement for a number of design iterations coupled with ever decreasing time allocated for design leads to the need for a significant acceleration of this process. Of the two competing approaches, block-structured and unstructured, only the unstructured approach will allow fully automatic mesh generation directly from a CAD model. Using this approach coupled with the techniques described in this paper, it is possible to reduce the mesh generation time from man months to a few hours on a workstation. The desire to closely couple a CFD code with a design or optimization algorithm requires that the changes to the geometry be performed quickly and in a smooth manner. This need for smoothness necessitates the use of Bezier polynomials in place of the more usual NURBS or cubic splines. A two dimensional Bezier polynomial based design system is described.

  9. Modelling Aerosol Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, B. K.; Jones, D. P.; Gallagher, M. W.; McFiggans, G. B.; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    Flow patterns within an urban street canyon are influenced by various micrometeorological factors. It also represents an environment where pollutants such as aerosols accumulate to high levels due to high volumes of traffic. As adverse health effects are being attributed to exposure to aerosols, an investigation of the dispersion of aerosols within such environments is of growing importance. In particular, one is concerned with the vertical structure of the aerosol concentration, the ventilation characteristics of the street canyon and the influence of aerosol microphysical processes. Due to the inherent heterogeneity of the aerosol concentrations within the street canyon and the lack of spatial resolution of measurement campaigns, these issues are an on-going debate. Therefore, a modelling tool is required to represent aerosol dispersion patterns to provide insights to results of past measurement campaigns. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models are able to predict detailed airflow patterns within urban geometries. This capability may be further extended to include aerosol dispersion, by an Euler-Euler multiphase approach. To facilitate the investigation, a two-dimensional, multiphase CFD tool coupled with the k-epsilon turbulence model and with the capability of modelling mixed convection flow regimes arising from both wind driven flows and buoyancy effects from heated walls was developed. Assuming wind blowing perpendicularly to the canyon axis and treating aerosols as a passive scalar, an attempt will be made to assess the sensitivities of aerosol vertical structure and ventilation characteristics to the various flow conditions. Numerical studies were performed using an idealized 10m by 10m canyon to represent a regular canyon and 10m by 5m to represent a deep one. An aerosol emission source was assigned on the centerline of the canyon to represent exhaust emissions. The vertical structure of the aerosols would inform future directives regarding the

  10. Organization of IGCC processes with reduced order CFD models

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Y.; Zitney, S.; Biegler, L.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated gasificationcombinedcycle(IGCC)plantshavesignificantadvantagesforefficientpowergen- eration withcarboncapture.Moreover,withthedevelopmentofaccurateCFDmodelsforgasificationand combined cyclecombustion,keyunitsoftheseprocessescannowbemodeledmoreaccurately.However, the integrationofCFDmodelswithinsteady-stateprocesssimulators,andsubsequentoptimizationof the integratedsystem,stillpresentssignificantchallenges.Thisstudydescribesthedevelopmentand demonstration ofareducedordermodeling(ROM)frameworkforthesetasks.Theapproachbuildson the conceptsofco-simulationandROMdevelopmentforprocessunitsdescribedinearlierstudies.Here we showhowtheROMsderivedfrombothgasificationandcombustionunitscanbeintegratedwithin an equation-orientedsimulationenvironmentfortheoveralloptimizationofanIGCCprocess.Inaddi- tion toasystematicapproachtoROMdevelopment,theapproachincludesvalidationtasksfortheCFD model aswellasclosed-looptestsfortheintegratedflowsheet.Thisapproachallowstheapplicationof equation-based nonlinearprogrammingalgorithmsandleadstofastoptimizationofCFD-basedprocess flowsheets. TheapproachisillustratedontwoflowsheetsbasedonIGCCtechnology.

  11. CFD code evaluation for internal flow modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    Research on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code evaluation with emphasis on supercomputing in reacting flows is discussed. Advantages of unstructured grids, multigrids, adaptive methods, improved flow solvers, vector processing, parallel processing, and reduction of memory requirements are discussed. As examples, researchers include applications of supercomputing to reacting flow Navier-Stokes equations including shock waves and turbulence and combustion instability problems associated with solid and liquid propellants. Evaluation of codes developed by other organizations are not included. Instead, the basic criteria for accuracy and efficiency have been established, and some applications on rocket combustion have been made. Research toward an ultimate goal, the most accurate and efficient CFD code, is in progress and will continue for years to come.

  12. CFD modeling of high temperature gas cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Janse van Rensburg, J.J.; Viljoen, C.; Van Staden, M.P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of how CFD has been applied to model the gas flow and heat transfer within the PBMR (Pebble Bed Modular reactor) with the aim of providing valuable design and safety information. The thermo-hydraulic calculations are performed using the STAR-CD [1] Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code and the neutronic calculations are performed using VSOP [2]. Results are presented for steady-state normal operation and for a transient De-pressurized Loss Of Forced Cooling event (DLOFC). (authors)

  13. Modeling the Absorbing Aerosol Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce; Zhang, Sophia

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to model the absorbing aerosol index and improve the biomass carbon inventories by optimizing the difference between TOMS aerosol index (AI) and modeled AI with an inverse model. Two absorbing aerosol types are considered, including biomass carbon and mineral dust. A priori biomass carbon source was generated by Liousse et al [1996]. Mineral dust emission is parameterized according to surface wind and soil moisture using the method developed by Ginoux [2000]. In this initial study, the coupled CCM1 and GRANTOUR model was used to determine the aerosol spatial and temporal distribution. With modeled aerosol concentrations and optical properties, we calculate the radiance at the top of the atmosphere at 340 nm and 380 nm with a radiative transfer model. The contrast of radiance at these two wavelengths will be used to calculate AI. Then we compare the modeled AI with TOMS AI. This paper reports our initial modeling for AI and its comparison with TOMS Nimbus 7 AI. For our follow-on project we will model the global AI with aerosol spatial and temporal distribution recomputed from the IMPACT model and DAO GEOS-1 meteorology fields. Then we will build an inverse model, which applies a Bayesian inverse technique to optimize the agreement of between model and observational data. The inverse model will tune the biomass burning source strength to reduce the difference between modelled AI and TOMS AI. Further simulations with a posteriori biomass carbon sources from the inverse model will be carried out. Results will be compared to available observations such as surface concentration and aerosol optical depth.

  14. Aerosol Modeling for the Global Model Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an aerosol module to be used within the framework of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The model development work will be preformed jointly by the University of Michigan and AER, using existing aerosol models at the two institutions as starting points. The GMI aerosol model will be tested, evaluated against observations, and then applied to assessment of the effects of aircraft sulfur emissions as needed by the NASA Subsonic Assessment in 2001. The work includes the following tasks: 1. Implementation of the sulfur cycle within GMI, including sources, sinks, and aqueous conversion of sulfur. Aerosol modules will be added as they are developed and the GMI schedule permits. 2. Addition of aerosol types other than sulfate particles, including dust, soot, organic carbon, and black carbon. 3. Development of new and more efficient parameterizations for treating sulfate aerosol nucleation, condensation, and coagulation among different particle sizes and types.

  15. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  16. Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

  17. 3D-CFD Investigation of Contrails and Volatile Aerosols Produced in the Near-Field of an Aircraft Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, F.; Ghedhaifi, W.; Vancassel, X.; Khou, J. C.; Montreuil, E.

    2015-12-01

    Civil aviation contributes to degradation of air quality around airport (SOx, NOx, speciated hydrocarbons,…) and climate change through its emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2, water vapor), as well as particulate matters. These particles include soot particles formed in the combustor, volatile aerosols and contrails generated in the aircraft wake. Although the aircraft emissions represent today only about 3% of all those produced on the surface of the earth by other anthropogenic sources, they are mostly released in the very sensitive region of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. These emissions have a radiative effect reinforced by specific physical and chemical processes at high altitudes, such as cloud formation and ozone production. In this context, most of the work to-date assessed that the actual effect of aviation on the climate are affected by very large uncertainties, partly due to lack of knowledge on the mechanisms of new particles formation and growth processes in the exhaust plume of the aircraft. The engine exhaust gases are mixed in the ambient air under the influence of the interaction between the jet engine and the wing tip vortices. The characteristics of vortices as well as their interaction with the jet depend on the aircraft airframe especially on the wing geometry and the engine position (distance from the wing tip). The aim of this study is to examine the influence of aircraft parameters on contrail formation using a 3D CFD calculation based on a RANS (Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) approach. Numerical simulations have been performed using CEDRE, the multiphysics ONERA code for energetics. CEDRE is a CFD code using finite volume methods and unstructured meshes. These meshes are especially appropriate when complex geometries are used. A transport model has been used for condensation of water vapor onto ice particles. Growth is evaluated using a modified Fick's law to mass transfer on particles. In this study, different aircraft

  18. Aerosol Climate Interactions in Climate System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    Aerosols are widely recognized as an important process in Earth's climate system. Observations over the past decade have improved our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosols. Recently, field observations have highlighted the pervasiveness of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols are of particular interest, since they alter the vertical distribution of shortwave radiative heating between the surface and atmosphere. Given this increased knowledge of aerosols from various field programs, interest is focusing on how to integrate this understanding into global climate models. These types of models provide the best tool available to comprehensively study the potential effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system. Results from climate system model simulations that include aerosol effects will be presented to illustrate key aerosol climate interactions. These simulations employ idealized and realistic distributions of absorbing aerosols. The idealized aerosol simulations provide insight into the role of aerosol shortwave absorption on the global hydrologic cycle. The realistic aerosol distributions provide insight into the local response of aerosol forcing in the Indian subcontinent region. Emphasis from these simulations will be on the hydrologic cycle, since water availability is of emerging global environmental concern. This presentation will also consider what more is needed to significantly improve our ability to model aerosol processes in climate system models. Uncertainty in aerosol climate interactions remains a major source of uncertainty in our ability to project future climate change. Focus will be on interactions between aerosols and various physical, chemical and biogeochemical aspects of the Earth system.

  19. Aeroelastic Calculations Using CFD for a Typical Business Jet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Michael D.

    1996-01-01

    Two time-accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes were used to compute several flutter points for a typical business jet model. The model consisted of a rigid fuselage with a flexible semispan wing and was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center where experimental flutter data were obtained from M(sub infinity) = 0.628 to M(sub infinity) = 0.888. The computational results were computed using CFD codes based on the inviscid TSD equation (CAP-TSD) and the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations (CFL3D-AE). Comparisons are made between analytical results and with experiment where appropriate. The results presented here show that the Navier-Stokes method is required near the transonic dip due to the strong viscous effects while the TSD and Euler methods used here provide good results at the lower Mach numbers.

  20. Surface modeling and grid generation for aeropropulsion CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Slater, John W.; Loellbach, James; Lee, Jinho

    1995-01-01

    The efforts in geometry modeling and grid generation at the NASA Lewis Research Center, as applied to the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of aeropropulsion systems, are presented. The efforts are mainly characterized by a focus on the analysis of components of an aeropropulsion system, which involve turbulent viscous flow with heat transfer and chemistry. Thus, this discussion will follow that characterization and will sequence through the components of typical propulsion systems consisting of inlets, compressors, combustors, turbines, and nozzles. For each component, some applications of CFD analysis will be presented to show how CFD is used to compute the desired performance information, how geometry modeling and grid generation are performed, and what issues have developed related to geometry modeling and grid generation. The discussion will illustrate the following needs related to geometry modeling and grid generation as observed in aeropropulsion analysis: (1) accurate and efficient resolution of turbulent viscous and chemically-reacting flowfields; (2) easy-to-use interfaces with CAD data for automated grid generation about complex geometries; and (3) automated batch grid generation software for use with design and optimization software.

  1. A CFD Model for Simulating Urban Flow and Dispersion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jong-Jin; Kim, Jae-Jin; Fernando, Harindra J. S.

    2003-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed to simulate urban flow and dispersion, to understand fluid dynamical processes therein, and to provide practical solutions to some emerging problems of urban air pollution. The governing equations are the Reynolds-averaged equations of momentum, mass continuity, heat, and other scalar (here, passive pollutant) under the Boussinesq approximation. The Reynolds stresses and turbulent fluxes are parameterized using the eddy diffusivity approach. The turbulent diffusivities of momentum, heat, and pollutant concentration are calculated using the prognostic equations of turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The set of governing equations is solved numerically on a staggered, nonuniform grid system using a finite-volume method with the semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equation (SIMPLE) algorithm. The CFD model is tested for three different building configurations: infinitely long canyon, long canyon of finite length, and orthogonally intersecting canyons. In each case, the CFD model is shown to simulate urban street-canyon flow and pollutant dispersion well.

  2. In Silico Models of Aerosol Delivery to the Respiratory Tract – Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Holbrook, Landon T.

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the application of computational models to simulate the transport and deposition of inhaled pharmaceutical aerosols from the site of particle or droplet formation to deposition within the respiratory tract. Traditional one-dimensional (1-D) whole-lung models are discussed briefly followed by a more in-depth review of three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The review of CFD models is organized into sections covering transport and deposition within the inhaler device, the extrathoracic (oral and nasal) region, conducting airways, and alveolar space. For each section, a general review of significant contributions and advancements in the area of simulating pharmaceutical aerosols is provided followed by a more in-depth application or case study that highlights the challenges, utility, and benefits of in silico models. Specific applications presented include the optimization of an existing spray inhaler, development of charge-targeted delivery, specification of conditions for optimal nasal delivery, analysis of a new condensational delivery approach, and an evaluation of targeted delivery using magnetic aerosols. The review concludes with recommendations on the need for more refined model validations, use of a concurrent experimental and CFD approach for developing aerosol delivery systems, and development of a stochastic individual path (SIP) model of aerosol transport and deposition throughout the respiratory tract. PMID:21640772

  3. Numerical Modelling of Gelating Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Babovsky, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The numerical simulation of the gel phase transition of an aerosol system is an interesting and demanding task. Here, we follow an approach first discussed in [6, 8] which turns out as a useful numerical tool. We investigate several improvements and generalizations. In the center of interest are coagulation diffusion systems, where the aerosol dynamics is supplemented with diffusive spreading in physical space. This leads to a variety of scenarios (depending on the coagulation kernel and the diffusion model) for the spatial evolution of the gelation area.

  4. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan

    Nearly global SAGE I satellite observations in the nonvolcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980 are used to produce a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model. Zonally average profiles of the 1.0-micron aerosol extinction for the tropics, midlatitudes, and high latitudes for both hemispheres are given in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. A third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set is used to derive analytic expressions for the seasonal global means and the yearly global mean. The results have application to the simulation of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  5. An integrative CFD model of lamprey swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; McMillen, Tyler; Fauci, Lisa

    2008-11-01

    Swimming due to sinusoidal body undulations is observed across the full spectrum of swimming organisms, from microscopic flagella to fish. These undulations are achieved due to internal force-generating mechanisms, which, in the case of lamprey are due to a wave of neural activation from head to tail which gives rise to a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are also mediated by passive structural forces. Here we present recent results on a computational model of a swimming lamprey that couples activation of discrete muscle segments, passive elastic forces, and a surrounding viscous, incompressible fluid. The fluid dynamics is modeled by the Navier-Stokes equations at appropriate Reynolds numbers, where the resulting flow field and vortex shedding may be measured.

  6. Comparison of CFD and operational dispersion models in an urban-like environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonioni, G.; Burkhart, S.; Burman, J.; Dejoan, A.; Fusco, A.; Gaasbeek, R.; Gjesdal, T.; Jäppinen, A.; Riikonen, K.; Morra, P.; Parmhed, O.; Santiago, J. L.

    2012-02-01

    Chemical plants, refineries, transportation of hazardous materials are some of the most attractive facilities for external attacks aimed at the release of toxic substances. Dispersion of these substances into the atmosphere forms a concentration distribution of airborne pollutants with severe consequences for exposed individuals. For emergency preparedness and management, the availability of assessed/validated dispersion models, which can be able to predict concentration distribution and thus dangerous zones for exposed individuals, is of primary importance. Air quality models, integral models and analytical models predict the transport and the turbulent dispersion of gases or aerosols after their release without taking into account in detail the presence of obstacles. Obstacles can modify the velocity field and in turn the concentration field. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models on the other hand are able to describe such phenomena, but they need to be correctly set up, tested and validated in order to obtain reliable results. Within the project Europa-ERG1 TA 113.034 "NBC Modelling and Simulation" several different approaches in CFD modelling of turbulent dispersion in closed, semi-confined and urban-like environment were adopted and compared with experimental data and with operational models. In this paper the results of a comparison between models describing the dispersion of a neutral gas in an idealized urban-like environment are presented and discussed. Experimental data available in the literature have been used as a benchmark for assessing statistical performance for each model. Selected experimental trials include some water channel tests, that were performed by Coanda at 1:205 scale, and one full-scale case that was tested in the fall of 2001 at the Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah, using an array of shipping containers. The paper also suggests the adoption of improved statistical parameters in order to better address differences between models

  7. Review of models applicable to accident aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

  8. Modelling reacting localized air pollution using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, A. A.; Nolan, P. F.

    2011-02-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach is used to model reacting NO 2 dispersion of vehicle pollutants released from a dual carriageway in Maidstone, UK. The simulations are carried out over the course of one full day during January, 2008. The developed CFD model utilizes a modified k- ɛ turbulence model and Arrhenius reaction kinetics with source terms for the reactions which include a photo-stationary set with peroxy radicals. An approach is taken whereby the reactions are solved specific to the rush hour period corresponding to the availability of certain hydrocarbons released from the vehicles. The results of the simulation are compared with field measurements taken at the site which is made up of several, different sized buildings on varying terrain in Maidstone UK. The predictions and field measurements are considered over a 12 h period with averaged hourly results. It was found that the reactive pollutant approach greatly improves the predictions as compared to the experiments. Furthermore the effect of peroxy radicals during rush hour periods is found to be a major disturbance to the photo-stationary set and its inclusion improved the predictions further.

  9. Unsteady wind loads for TMT: replacing parametric models with CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    Unsteady wind loads due to turbulence inside the telescope enclosure result in image jitter and higher-order image degradation due to M1 segment motion. Advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) allow unsteady simulations of the flow around realistic telescope geometry, in order to compute the unsteady forces due to wind turbulence. These simulations can then be used to understand the characteristics of the wind loads. Previous estimates used a parametric model based on a number of assumptions about the wind characteristics, such as a von Karman spectrum and frozen-flow turbulence across M1, and relied on CFD only to estimate parameters such as mean wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy. Using the CFD-computed forces avoids the need for assumptions regarding the flow. We discuss here both the loads on the telescope that lead to image jitter, and the spatially-varying force distribution across the primary mirror, using simulations with the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) geometry. The amplitude, temporal spectrum, and spatial distribution of wind disturbances are all estimated; these are then used to compute the resulting image motion and degradation. There are several key differences relative to our earlier parametric model. First, the TMT enclosure provides sufficient wind reduction at the top end (near M2) to render the larger cross-sectional structural areas further inside the enclosure (including M1) significant in determining the overall image jitter. Second, the temporal spectrum is not von Karman as the turbulence is not fully developed; this applies both in predicting image jitter and M1 segment motion. And third, for loads on M1, the spatial characteristics are not consistent with propagating a frozen-flow turbulence screen across the mirror: Frozen flow would result in a relationship between temporal frequency content and spatial frequency content that does not hold in the CFD predictions. Incorporating the new estimates of wind load characteristics

  10. RSRM Chamber Pressure Oscillations: Transit Time Models and Unsteady CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Stewart, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle solid rocket motor low frequency internal pressure oscillations have been observed since early testing. The same type of oscillations also are present in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). The oscillations, which occur during RSRM burn, are predominantly at the first three motor cavity longitudinal acoustic mode frequencies. Broadband flow and combustion noise provide the energy to excite these modes at low levels throughout motor burn, however, at certain times during burn the fluctuating pressure amplitude increases significantly. The increased fluctuations at these times suggests an additional excitation mechanism. The RSRM has inhibitors on the propellant forward facing surface of each motor segment. The inhibitors are in a slot at the segment field joints to prevent burning at that surface. The aft facing segment surface at a field joint slot burns and forms a cavity of time varying size. Initially the inhibitor is recessed in the field joint cavity. As propellant burns away the inhibitor begins to protrude into the bore flow. Two mechanisms (transit time models) that are considered potential pressure oscillation excitations are cavity-edge tones, and inhibitor hole-tones. Estimates of frequency variation with time of longitudinal acoustic modes, cavity edge-tones, and hole-tones compare favorably with frequencies measured during motor hot firing. It is believed that the highest oscillation amplitudes occur when vortex shedding frequencies coincide with motor longitudinal acoustic modes. A time accurate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was made to replicate the observations from motor firings and to observe the transit time mechanisms in detail. FDNS is the flow solver used to detail the time varying aspects of the flow. The fluid is approximated as a single-phase ideal gas. The CFD model was an axisymmetric representation of the RSRM at 80 seconds into burn.Deformation of the inhibitors by the internal flow was determined

  11. CFD-based Modeling of Inflight Mercury Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, J.I.; O'Brien, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    A numerical model of sorbent injection and in-flight mercury capture is presented. There are few existing models of mercury capture, and these typically make gross assumptions of plug gas flow, no velocity slip between particle and gas phase, and uniform sorbent dispersion. All of these assumptions are overcome with the current model, which combines the physics of mass transfer at the microscopic sorbent scale with macroscopic flow conditions provided via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The implication is a cost-efficient tool for design of injection systems that maximize capture efficiency. The modeling framework will be presented along with results based on simulation of sites from the DOE/NETL sorbent injection field test program.

  12. Turbulence modelling in CFD: Present status, future prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Launder, Brian E.

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form for turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The Eddy Viscosity Models (EVM), Algebraic Second Moment Closures (ASM), and Differential Second-Moment Closures (DSM) are considered. It is concluded that EVM's, ASM's, and DSM's will remain in use, though with a steady decline in importance of EVM's and ASM's in favor of DSM's. Improved versions of low-Re two-equation EVM's should lead to more reliable predictions of separated flows than are achievable at present. Further refinement of sub-models in second moment closures can be expected throughout this decade. There will be increasing attention given to interfacing SMC with higher order approaches such as LES, and an increased use of two-time-scale schemes providing distinct time scales for large and fairly small eddies.

  13. CFD modeling of water spray interaction with dense gas plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meroney, Robert N.

    2012-07-01

    Numerical calculations are performed to reproduce the transport and dispersion of the continuous release of dense gases over flat homogeneous surfaces with and without the mitigating influence of a downwind water curtain. Frequently such plumes are released as a result of a chemical manufacturing, storage or gas transportation accident resulting in a ground-level hazard due to gas flammability or toxicity. A field situation in which cold carbon dioxide was released upwind of water curtains (Moodie et al., 1981) was simulated using the open-source software FDS (Fire Dynamic Simulator) a full 3-d CFD model. Only water-spray enhancement of dispersion was considered; hence, no chemical removal or reactions were present or simulated. Wind-tunnel measurements for a 1:28.9 scale replication of the Moodie experiments are also compared with the 3-d CFD results. Concentration distributions, percent dilution and forced diffusion parameters were compared in scatter diagrams. Concentration field contours with and without active spray curtains are also presented.

  14. Aerosol Behavior Log-Normal Distribution Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-22

    HAARM3, an acronym for Heterogeneous Aerosol Agglomeration Revised Model 3, is the third program in the HAARM series developed to predict the time-dependent behavior of radioactive aerosols under postulated LMFBR accident conditions. HAARM3 was developed to include mechanisms of aerosol growth and removal which had not been accounted for in the earlier models. In addition, experimental measurements obtained on sodium oxide aerosols have been incorporated in the code. As in HAARM2, containment gas temperature, pressure,more » and temperature gradients normal to interior surfaces are permitted to vary with time. The effects of reduced density on sodium oxide agglomerate behavior and of nonspherical shape of particles on aerosol behavior mechanisms are taken into account, and aerosol agglomeration due to turbulent air motion is considered. Also included is a capability to calculate aerosol concentration attenuation factors and to restart problems requiring long computing times.« less

  15. Development of CFD model for augmented core tripropellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth M.

    1994-10-01

    The Space Shuttle era has made major advances in technology and vehicle design to the point that the concept of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle appears more feasible. NASA presently is conducting studies into the feasibility of certain advanced concept rocket engines that could be utilized in a SSTO vehicle. One such concept is a tripropellant system which burns kerosene and hydrogen initially and at altitude switches to hydrogen. This system will attain a larger mass fraction because LOX-kerosene engines have a greater average propellant density and greater thrust-to-weight ratio. This report describes the investigation to model the tripropellant augmented core engine. The physical aspects of the engine, the CFD code employed, and results of the numerical model for a single modular thruster are discussed.

  16. Development of Supersonic Combustion Experiments for CFD Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, Robert; Bivolaru, Daniel; Tedder, Sarah; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an experiment to acquire data for developing and validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for turbulence in supersonic combusting flows. The intent is that the flow field would be simple yet relevant to flows within hypersonic air-breathing engine combustors undergoing testing in vitiated-air ground-testing facilities. Specifically, it describes development of laboratory-scale hardware to produce a supersonic combusting coaxial jet, discusses design calculations, operability and types of flames observed. These flames are studied using the dual-pump coherent anti- Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) - interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. This technique simultaneously and instantaneously measures temperature, composition, and velocity in the flow, from which many of the important turbulence statistics can be found. Some preliminary CARS data are presented.

  17. Accumulation and transport of microbial-size particles in a pressure protected model burn unit: CFD simulations and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlling airborne contamination is of major importance in burn units because of the high susceptibility of burned patients to infections and the unique environmental conditions that can accentuate the infection risk. In particular the required elevated temperatures in the patient room can create thermal convection flows which can transport airborne contaminates throughout the unit. In order to estimate this risk and optimize the design of an intensive care room intended to host severely burned patients, we have relied on a computational fluid dynamic methodology (CFD). Methods The study was carried out in 4 steps: i) patient room design, ii) CFD simulations of patient room design to model air flows throughout the patient room, adjacent anterooms and the corridor, iii) construction of a prototype room and subsequent experimental studies to characterize its performance iv) qualitative comparison of the tendencies between CFD prediction and experimental results. The Electricité De France (EDF) open-source software Code_Saturne® (http://www.code-saturne.org) was used and CFD simulations were conducted with an hexahedral mesh containing about 300 000 computational cells. The computational domain included the treatment room and two anterooms including equipment, staff and patient. Experiments with inert aerosol particles followed by time-resolved particle counting were conducted in the prototype room for comparison with the CFD observations. Results We found that thermal convection can create contaminated zones near the ceiling of the room, which can subsequently lead to contaminate transfer in adjacent rooms. Experimental confirmation of these phenomena agreed well with CFD predictions and showed that particles greater than one micron (i.e. bacterial or fungal spore sizes) can be influenced by these thermally induced flows. When the temperature difference between rooms was 7°C, a significant contamination transfer was observed to enter into the positive

  18. CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

  19. A coupled DEM-CFD method for impulse wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tao; Utili, Stefano; Crosta, GiovanBattista

    2015-04-01

    Rockslides can be characterized by a rapid evolution, up to a possible transition into a rock avalanche, which can be associated with an almost instantaneous collapse and spreading. Different examples are available in the literature, but the Vajont rockslide is quite unique for its morphological and geological characteristics, as well as for the type of evolution and the availability of long term monitoring data. This study advocates the use of a DEM-CFD framework for the modelling of the generation of hydrodynamic waves due to the impact of a rapid moving rockslide or rock-debris avalanche. 3D DEM analyses in plane strain by a coupled DEM-CFD code were performed to simulate the rockslide from its onset to the impact with still water and the subsequent wave generation (Zhao et al., 2014). The physical response predicted is in broad agreement with the available observations. The numerical results are compared to those published in the literature and especially to Crosta et al. (2014). According to our results, the maximum computed run up amounts to ca. 120 m and 170 m for the eastern and western lobe cross sections, respectively. These values are reasonably similar to those recorded during the event (i.e. ca. 130 m and 190 m respectively). In these simulations, the slope mass is considered permeable, such that the toe region of the slope can move submerged in the reservoir and the impulse water wave can also flow back into the slope mass. However, the upscaling of the grains size in the DEM model leads to an unrealistically high hydraulic conductivity of the model, such that only a small amount of water is splashed onto the northern bank of the Vajont valley. The use of high fluid viscosity and coarse grain model has shown the possibility to model more realistically both the slope and wave motions. However, more detailed slope and fluid properties, and the need for computational efficiency should be considered in future research work. This aspect has also been

  20. A CFD Approach to Modeling Spacecraft Fuel Slosh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon; Gangadharan, Sathya; Chatman, Yadira; Sudermann, James; Schlee, Keith; Ristow, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Energy dissipation and resonant coupling from sloshing fuel in spacecraft fuel tanks is a problem that occurs in the design of many spacecraft. In the case of a spin stabilized spacecraft, this energy dissipation can cause a growth in the spacecrafts' nutation (wobble) that may lead to disastrous consequences for the mission. Even in non-spinning spacecraft, coupling between the spacecraft or upper stage flight control system and an unanticipated slosh resonance can result in catastrophe. By using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver such as Fluent, a model for this fuel slosh can be created. The accuracy of the model must be tested by comparing its results to an experimental test case. Such a model will allow for the variation of many different parameters such as fluid viscosity and gravitational field, yielding a deeper understanding of spacecraft slosh dynamics. In order to gain a better understanding of the dynamics behind sloshing fluids, the Launch Services Program (LSP) at the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is interested in finding ways to better model this behavior. Thanks to past research, a state-of-the-art fuel slosh research facility was designed and fabricated at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU). This test facility has produced interesting results and a fairly reliable parameter estimation process to predict the necessary values that accurately characterize a mechanical pendulum analog model. The current study at ERAU uses a different approach to model the free surface sloshing of liquid in a spherical tank using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods. Using a software package called Fluent, a model was created to simulate the sloshing motion of the propellant. This finite volume program uses a technique called the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to model the interaction between two fluids [4]. For the case of free surface slosh, the two fluids are the propellant and air. As the fuel sloshes around in the tank, it naturally

  1. URBAN AEROSOL TRANSFORMATION AND TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modules for secondary aerosol formation have been included in the urban scale K-theory aerosol model, AR0S0L. hese are: (1) An empirical first-order 502 conversion scheme due to Meaghers, termed EMM; (2) The lumped parameter kinetic model termed the Carbon Bond Mechanism, in the ...

  2. Photochemistry of Model Organic Aerosol Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Dailo, M.; Do, T.; Nizkorodov, S. A.; Pan, X.; Underwood, J. S.; Walser, M. L.

    2007-05-01

    Up to 90 percent of urban aerosol particles have been shown to contain organic molecules. Reactions of these particles with atmospheric oxidants and/or sunlight result in large changes in their composition, toxicity, and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei. For this reason, chemistry of model organic aerosol particles initiated by oxidation and direct photolysis is of great interest to atmospheric, climate, and health scientists. Most studies in this area have focused on identifying the products of oxidation of the organic aerosols, while the products of direct photolysis of the resulting molecules remaining in the aerosol particle have been left mostly unexplored. We have explored direct photolytic processes occurring in selected organic aerosol systems using infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy to identify small gas phase products of photolysis, and mass-spectrometric and photometric techniques to study the condensed phase products. The first model system was secondary organic aerosol formed from the oxidation of several monoterpenes by ozone in the presence and absence of NOx, under different humidities. The second system modeled after oxidatively aged primary organic aerosol particles was a thin film of either alkanes or saturated fatty acids oxidized in several different ways, with the oxidation initiated by ozone, chlorine atom, or OH. In every case, the general conclusion was that the photochemical processing of model organic aerosols is significant. Such direct photolysis processes are believed to age organic aerosol particles on time scales that are short compared to the particles' atmospheric lifetimes.

  3. Modelling dispersion of traffic pollution in a deep street canyon: Application of CFD and operational models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murena, Fabio; Favale, Giuseppe; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Solazzo, Efisio

    In this study, numerical modelling of the flow and concentration fields has been undertaken for a deep street canyon in Naples (Italy), having aspect ratio (i.e. ratio of the building height H to the street width W) H/ W = 5.7. Two different modelling techniques have been employed: computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and operational dispersion modelling. The CFD simulations have been carried out by using the RNG k- ɛ turbulence model included in the commercial suite FLUENT, while operational modelling has been conducted by means of the WinOSPM model. Concentration fields obtained from model simulations have been compared with experimental data of CO concentrations measured at two vertical locations within the canyon. The CFD results are in good agreement with the experimental data, while poor agreement is observed for the WinOSPM results. This is because WinOSPM was originally developed and tested for street canyons with aspect ratio H/ W ≌ 1. Large discrepancies in wind profiles simulated within the canyon are observed between CFD and OSPM models. Therefore, a modification of the wind profile within the canyon is introduced in WinOSPM for extending its applicability to deeper canyons, leading to an improved agreement between modelled and experimental data. Further development of the operational dispersion model is required in order to reproduce the distinct air circulation patterns within deep street canyons.

  4. Combined CFD/Population Balance Model for Gas Hydrate Particle Size Prediction in Turbulent Pipeline Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, Boris V.; Hoffmann, Alex C.; Kosinski, Pawel; Istomin, Vladimir A.; Chuvilin, Evgeny M.

    2010-09-01

    A combined computational fluid dynamics/population balance model (CFD-PBM) is developed for gas hydrate particle size prediction in turbulent pipeline flow. The model is based on a one-moment population balance technique, which is coupled with flow field parameters computed using commercial CFD software. The model is calibrated with a five-moment, off-line population balance model and validated with experimental data produced in a low-pressure multiphase flow loop.

  5. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  6. Exhaled Aerosol Pattern Discloses Lung Structural Abnormality: A Sensitivity Study Using Computational Modeling and Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A.; Kim, JongWon; Mckee, Edward; Lin, En-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Exhaled aerosol patterns, also called aerosol fingerprints, provide clues to the health of the lung and can be used to detect disease-modified airway structures. The key is how to decode the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and retrieve the lung structural information for a non-invasive identification of respiratory diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, a CFD-fractal analysis method was developed to quantify exhaled aerosol fingerprints and applied it to one benign and three malign conditions: a tracheal carina tumor, a bronchial tumor, and asthma. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 30 L/min were simulated, with exhaled distributions recorded at the mouth. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to simulate respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Aerosol morphometric measures such as concentration disparity, spatial distributions, and fractal analysis were applied to distinguish various exhaled aerosol patterns. Findings Utilizing physiology-based modeling, we demonstrated substantial differences in exhaled aerosol distributions among normal and pathological airways, which were suggestive of the disease location and extent. With fractal analysis, we also demonstrated that exhaled aerosol patterns exhibited fractal behavior in both the entire image and selected regions of interest. Each exhaled aerosol fingerprint exhibited distinct pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and multifractal spectrum. Furthermore, a correlation of the diseased location and exhaled aerosol spatial distribution was established for asthma. Conclusion Aerosol-fingerprint-based breath tests disclose clues about the site and severity of lung diseases and appear to be sensitive enough to be a practical tool for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases with structural abnormalities. PMID:25105680

  7. CFD modeling of thermoelectric generators in automotive EGR-coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högblom, Olle; Andersson, Ronnie

    2012-06-01

    A large amount of the waste heat in the exhaust gases from diesel engines is removed in the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler. Introducing a thermoelectric generator (TEG) in an EGR cooler requires a completely new design of the heat exchanger. To accomplish that a model of the TEG-EGR system is required. In this work, a transient 3D CFD model for simulation of gas flow, heat transfer and power generation has been developed. This model allows critical design parameters in the TEG-EGR to be identified and design requirements for the systems to be specified. Besides the prediction of Seebeck, Peltier, Thomson and Joule effects, the simulations also give detailed insight to the temperature gradients in the gas-phase and inside the thermoelectric (TE) elements. The model is a very valuable tool to identify bottlenecks, improve design, select optimal TE materials and operating conditions. The results show that the greatest heat transfer resistance is located in the gas phase and it is critical to reduce this in order to achieve a large temperature difference over the thermoelectric elements without compromising on the maximum allowable pressure drop in the system. Further results from an investigation of the thermoelectric performance during a vehicle test cycle is presented.

  8. Modeling the aeroacoustics of axial fans from CFD calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Alexandre; Hennemand, Vincent; Kouidri, Smaine; Berthelot, Yves

    2002-11-01

    The main source of aeroacoustic noise in axial fans is the distribution of the fluctuating, unsteady, aerodynamic forces on the blades. Numerical simulations were carried out with the CFD code (NUMECA), first with steady flow conditions to validate the aerolic performances (pressure drop as a function of flow rate) of the simulated six-bladed axial fans. Simulations were then made with unsteady flows to compute the fluctuating force distributions on the blades. The turbulence was modeled either with the Baldwin-Lomax model or with the K-epsilon model (extended wall function). The numerical results were satisfactory both in terms of numerical convergence and in terms of the physical characteristic of the forces acting on the blades. The numerical results were then coupled into an in-house aeroacoustics code that computes the farfield radiated noise spectrum and directivity, based on the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings formulation, or alternatively, on the simpler Lowson model. Results compared favorably with data obtained under nonanechoic conditions, based upon ISO 5801 and ISO 5136 standards.

  9. Two-dimensional CFD modeling of wave rotor flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver developed for detailed study of wave rotor flow dynamics is described. The CFD model is helping characterize important loss mechanisms within the wave rotor. The wave rotor stationary ports and the moving rotor passages are resolved on multiple computational grid blocks. The finite-volume form of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with laminar viscosity are integrated in time using a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. Roe's approximate Riemann solution scheme or the computationally less expensive advection upstream splitting method (AUSM) flux-splitting scheme is used to effect upwind-differencing of the inviscid flux terms, using cell interface primitive variables set by MUSCL-type interpolation. The diffusion terms are central-differenced. The solver is validated using a steady shock/laminar boundary layer interaction problem and an unsteady, inviscid wave rotor passage gradual opening problem. A model inlet port/passage charging problem is simulated and key features of the unsteady wave rotor flow field are identified. Lastly, the medium pressure inlet port and high pressure outlet port portion of the NASA Lewis Research Center experimental divider cycle is simulated and computed results are compared with experimental measurements. The model accurately predicts the wave timing within the rotor passages and the distribution of flow variables in the stationary inlet port region.

  10. Two-dimensional CFD modeling of wave rotor flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver developed for detailed study of wave rotor flow dynamics is described. The CFD model is helping characterize important loss mechanisms within the wave rotor. The wave rotor stationary ports and the moving rotor passages are resolved on multiple computational grid blocks. The finite-volume form of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with laminar viscosity are integrated in time using a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. The Roe approximate Riemann solution scheme or the computationally less expensive Advection Upstream Splitting Method (AUSM) flux-splitting scheme are used to effect upwind-differencing of the inviscid flux terms, using cell interface primitive variables set by MUSCL-type interpolation. The diffusion terms are central-differenced. The solver is validated using a steady shock/laminar boundary layer interaction problem and an unsteady, inviscid wave rotor passage gradual opening problem. A model inlet port/passage charging problem is simulated and key features of the unsteady wave rotor flow field are identified. Lastly, the medium pressure inlet port and high pressure outlet port portion of the NASA Lewis Research Center experimental divider cycle is simulated and computed results are compared with experimental measurements. The model accurately predicts the wave timing within the rotor passage and the distribution of flow variables in the stationary inlet port region.

  11. CFD Modeling of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Gedeon, David; Simon, Terrence W.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is funding Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a reliable Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code that can predict engine performance with the goal of significant improvements in accuracy when compared to one-dimensional (1-D) design code predictions. The funding also includes conducting code validation experiments at both the University of Minnesota (UMN) and CSU. In this paper a brief description of the work-in-progress is provided in the two areas (CFD and Experiments). Also, previous test results are compared with computational data obtained using (1) a 2-D CFD code obtained from Dr. Georg Scheuerer and further developed at CSU and (2) a multidimensional commercial code CFD-ACE+. The test data and computational results are for (1) a gas spring and (2) a single piston/cylinder with attached annular heat exchanger. The comparisons among the codes are discussed. The paper also discusses plans for conducting code validation experiments at CSU and UMN.

  12. Simulations of pollutant dispersion within idealised urban-type geometries with CFD and integral models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sabatino, Silvana; Buccolieri, Riccardo; Pulvirenti, Beatrice; Britter, Rex

    Until recently, urban air quality modelling has been based on operational models of an integral nature. The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models to address the same problems is increasing rapidly. Operational models e.g. OSPM, AERMOD, ADMS-Urban have undergone many comprehensive formal evaluations as to their "fitness for purpose" while CFD models do not have such an evaluation record in the urban air quality context. This paper looks at the application of both approaches to common problems. In particular, pollutant dispersion from point and line sources in the simplest neutral atmospheric boundary layer and line sources placed within different regular building geometries is studied with the CFD code FLUENT and the atmospheric dispersion model ADMS-Urban. Both the effect of street canyons of different aspect ratios and various obstacle array configurations consisting of cubical buildings are investigated. The standard k-ɛ turbulence model and the advection-diffusion (AD) method (in contrast to the Lagrangian particle tracking method) are used for the CFD simulations. Results from the two approaches are compared. Overall CFD simulations with the appropriate choice of coefficients produce similar concentration fields to those predicted by the integral approach. However, some quantitative differences are observed. These differences can be explained by investigating the role of the Schmidt number in the CFD simulations. A further interpretation of the differences between the two approaches is given by quantifying the exchange velocities linked to the mass fluxes between the in-canopy and above-canopy layers.

  13. CFD MODELING ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

    2008-03-03

    Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a MDCT consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to conduct a parametric study for cooling tower performance under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to achieve the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of the modeling calculations was performed to investigate the impact of ambient and operating conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be presented here.

  14. CFD Modeling of LNG Spill: Humidity Effect on Vapor Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannissi, S. G.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N.

    2015-09-01

    The risks entailed by an accidental spill of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) should be indentified and evaluated, in order to design measures for prevention and mitigation in LNG terminals. For this purpose, simulations are considered a useful tool to study LNG spills and to understand the mechanisms that influence the vapor dispersion. In the present study, the ADREA-HF CFD code is employed to simulate the TEEX1 experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field, which is affiliated with the Texas A&M University system and involves LNG release and dispersion over water surface in open- obstructed environment. In the simulation the source was modeled as a two-phase jet enabling the prediction of both the vapor dispersion and the liquid pool spreading. The conservation equations for the mixture are solved along with the mass fraction for natural gas. Due to the low prevailing temperatures during the spill ambient humidity condenses and this might affect the vapor dispersion. This effect was examined in this work by solving an additional conservation equation for the water mass fraction. Two different models were tested: the hydrodynamic equilibrium model which assumes kinetic equilibrium between the phases and the non hydrodynamic equilibrium model, in order to assess the effect of slip velocity on the prediction. The slip velocity is defined as the difference between the liquid phase and the vapor phase and is calculated using the algebraic slip model. Constant droplet diameter of three different sizes and a lognormal distribution of the droplet diameter were applied and the results are discussed and compared with the measurements.

  15. CFD Models of a Serpentine Inlet, Fan, and Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Arend, D. J.; Castner, R. S.; Slater, J. W.; Truax, P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were used to analyze the Versatile Integrated Inlet Propulsion Aerodynamics Rig (VIIPAR) located at NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig consists of a serpentine inlet, a rake assembly, inlet guide vanes, a 12-in. diameter tip-turbine driven fan stage, exit rakes or probes, and an exhaust nozzle with a translating centerbody. The analyses were done to develop computational capabilities for modeling inlet/fan interaction and to help interpret experimental data. Three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculations of the fan stage were used to predict the operating line of the stage, the effects of leakage from the turbine stream, and the effects of inlet guide vane (IGV) setting angle. Coupled axisymmetric calculations of a bellmouth, fan, and nozzle were used to develop techniques for coupling codes together and to investigate possible effects of the nozzle on the fan. RANS calculations of the serpentine inlet were coupled to Euler calculations of the fan to investigate the complete inlet/fan system. Computed wall static pressures along the inlet centerline agreed reasonably well with experimental data but computed total pressures at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) showed significant differences from the data. Inlet distortion was shown to reduce the fan corrected flow and pressure ratio, and was not completely eliminated by passage through the fan

  16. CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Blankinship, S.

    2006-01-15

    Several technologies will probably be needed to remove mercury from coal-plant stack emissions as mandated by new mercury emission control legislation in the USA. One of the most promising mercury removal approaches is the injection of a sorbent, such as powdered activated carbon (PAC), to make it much more controllable. ADA-ES recently simulated field tests of sorbent injection at New England Power Company's Brayton Point Power Plant in Somerset, Mass., where activated carbon sorbent was injected using a set of eight lances upstream of the second of two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Consultants from Fluent created a computational model of the ductwork and injection lances. The simulation results showed that the flue gas flow was poorly distributed at the sorbent injection plane, and that a small region of reverse flow occurred, a result of the flow pattern at the exit of the first ESP. The results also illustrated that the flow was predominantly in the lower half of the duct, and affected by some upstream turning vanes. The simulations demonstrated the value of CFD as a diagnostic tool. They were performed in a fraction of the time and cost required for the physical tests yet provided far more diagnostic information, such as the distribution of mercury and sorbent at each point in the computational domain. 1 fig.

  17. A Three-Dimensional Unsteady CFD Model of Compressor Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional unsteady CFD code called CSTALL has been developed and used to investigate compressor stability. The code solved the Euler equations through the entire annulus and all blade rows. Blade row turning, losses, and deviation were modeled using body force terms which required input data at stations between blade rows. The input data was calculated using a separate Navier-Stokes turbomachinery analysis code run at one operating point near stall, and was scaled to other operating points using overall characteristic maps. No information about the stalled characteristic was used. CSTALL was run in a 2-D throughflow mode for very fast calculations of operating maps and estimation of stall points. Calculated pressure ratio characteristics for NASA stage 35 agreed well with experimental data, and results with inlet radial distortion showed the expected loss of range. CSTALL was also run in a 3-D mode to investigate inlet circumferential distortion. Calculated operating maps for stage 35 with 120 degree distortion screens showed a loss in range and pressure rise. Unsteady calculations showed rotating stall with two part-span stall cells. The paper describes the body force formulation in detail, examines the computed results, and concludes with observations about the code.

  18. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of indoor aerosol transport

    SciTech Connect

    Konecni, S.; Whicker, J. J.; Martin, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    When a hazardous aerosol or gas is inadvertently or deliberately released in an occupied facility, the airborne material presents a hazard to people. Inadvertent accidents and exposures continue to occur in Los Alamos and other nuclear facilities despite state-of-art engineering and administrative controls, and heightened diligence. Despite the obvious need in occupational settings and for homeland defense, the body of research in hazardous aerosol dispersion and control in large, complex, ventilated enclosures is extremely limited. The science governing generation, transport, inhalation, and detection of airborne hazards is lacking and must be developed to where it can be used by engineers or safety professionals in the prediction of worker exposure, in the prevention of accidents, or in the mitigation of terrorist actions. In this study, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX5.4, and experiments were used to assess flow field characteristics, and to investigate aerosol release and transport in a large, ventilated workroom in a facility at Savannah River Site. Steady state CFD results illustrating a complex, ventilation-induced, flow field with vortices, velocity gradients, and quiet zones are presented, as are time-dependent CFD and experimental aerosol dispersion results. The comparison of response times between CFD and experimental results was favorable. It is believed that future applications of CFD and experiments can have a favorable impact on the design of ventilation (HVAC) systems and worker safety with consideration to facility costs. Ultimately, statistical methods will be used in conjunction with CFD calculations to determine the optimal number and location of detectors, as well as optimal egress routes in event of a release.

  19. Controls/CFD Interdisciplinary Research Software Generates Low-Order Linear Models for Control Design From Steady-State CFD Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing analytical methods and software tools to create a bridge between the controls and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) disciplines. Traditionally, control design engineers have used coarse nonlinear simulations to generate information for the design of new propulsion system controls. However, such traditional methods are not adequate for modeling the propulsion systems of complex, high-speed vehicles like the High Speed Civil Transport. To properly model the relevant flow physics of high-speed propulsion systems, one must use simulations based on CFD methods. Such CFD simulations have become useful tools for engineers that are designing propulsion system components. The analysis techniques and software being developed as part of this effort are an attempt to evolve CFD into a useful tool for control design as well. One major aspect of this research is the generation of linear models from steady-state CFD results. CFD simulations, often used during the design of high-speed inlets, yield high resolution operating point data. Under a NASA grant, the University of Akron has developed analytical techniques and software tools that use these data to generate linear models for control design. The resulting linear models have the same number of states as the original CFD simulation, so they are still very large and computationally cumbersome. Model reduction techniques have been successfully applied to reduce these large linear models by several orders of magnitude without significantly changing the dynamic response. The result is an accurate, easy to use, low-order linear model that takes less time to generate than those generated by traditional means. The development of methods for generating low-order linear models from steady-state CFD is most complete at the one-dimensional level, where software is available to generate models with different kinds of input and output variables. One-dimensional methods have been extended

  20. Model Intercomparison of Indirect Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, J. E.; Quaas, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Takemura, T.; Boucher, O.; Guo, H.; Kirkevag, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Seland, O.

    2006-01-01

    Modeled differences in predicted effects are increasingly used to help quantify the uncertainty of these effects. Here, we examine modeled differences in the aerosol indirect effect in a series of experiments that help to quantify how and why model-predicted aerosol indirect forcing varies between models. The experiments start with an experiment in which aerosol concentrations, the parameterization of droplet concentrations and the autoconversion scheme are all specified and end with an experiment that examines the predicted aerosol indirect forcing when only aerosol sources are specified. Although there are large differences in the predicted liquid water path among the models, the predicted aerosol first indirect effect for the first experiment is rather similar, about -0.6 W/sq m to -0.7 W/sq m. Changes to the autoconversion scheme can lead to large changes in the liquid water path of the models and to the response of the liquid water path to changes in aerosols. Adding an autoconversion scheme that depends on the droplet concentration caused a larger (negative) change in net outgoing shortwave radiation compared to the 1st indirect effect, and the increase varied from only 22% to more than a factor of three. The change in net shortwave forcing in the models due to varying the autoconversion scheme depends on the liquid water content of the clouds as well as their predicted droplet concentrations, and both increases and decreases in the net shortwave forcing can occur when autoconversion schemes are changed. The parameterization of cloud fraction within models is not sensitive to the aerosol concentration, and, therefore, the response of the modeled cloud fraction within the present models appears to be smaller than that which would be associated with model "noise". The prediction of aerosol concentrations, given a fixed set of sources, leads to some of the largest differences in the predicted aerosol indirect radiative forcing among the models, with values of

  1. Detailed Simulations of Atmospheric Flow and Dispersion in Urban Downtown Areas by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models - An Application of Five CFD Models to Manhattan

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S R; Brown, M J; Camelli, F E; Chan, S T; Coirier, W J; Hansen, O R; Huber, A H; Kim, S; Reynolds, R M

    2006-03-06

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model simulations of urban boundary layers have improved so that they are useful in many types of flow and dispersion analyses. The study described here is intended to assist in planning emergency response activities related to releases of chemical or biological agents into the atmosphere in large cities such as New York City. Five CFD models (CFD-Urban, FLACS, FEM3MP, FEFLO-Urban, and Fluent-Urban) have been applied by five independent groups to the same 3-D building data and geographic domain in Manhattan, using approximately the same wind input conditions. Wind flow observations are available from the Madison Square Garden March 2005 (MSG05) field experiment. It is seen from the many side-by-side comparison plots that the CFD models simulations of near-surface wind fields generally agree with each other and with field observations, within typical atmospheric uncertainties of a factor of two. The qualitative results shown here suggest, for example, that transport of a release at street level in a large city could reach a few blocks in the upwind and crosswind directions. There are still key differences seen among the models for certain parts of the domain. Further quantitative examinations of differences among the models and the observations are necessary to understand causal relationships.

  2. Calibration of the k- ɛ model constants for use in CFD applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Nina; Guillias, Serge; Malki-Epshtein, Liora

    2011-11-01

    The k- ɛ turbulence model is a popular choice in CFD modelling due to its robust nature and the fact that it has been well validated. However it has been noted in previous research that the k- ɛ model has problems predicting flow separation as well as unconfined and transient flows. The model contains five empirical model constants whose values were found through data fitting for a wide range of flows (Launder 1972) but ad-hoc adjustments are often made to these values depending on the situation being modeled. Here we use the example of flow within a regular street canyon to perform a Bayesian calibration of the model constants against wind tunnel data. This allows us to assess the sensitivity of the CFD model to changes in these constants, find the most suitable values for the constants as well as quantifying the uncertainty related to the constants and the CFD model as a whole.

  3. Dilution and aerosol dynamics within a diesel car exhaust plume—CFD simulations of on-road measurement conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrner, U.; von Löwis, S.; Vehkamäki, H.; Wehner, B.; Bräsel, S.; Hermann, M.; Stratmann, F.; Kulmala, M.; Wiedensohler, A.

    Vehicle particle emissions are studied extensively because of their health effects, contribution to ambient PM levels and possible impact on climate. The aim of this work was to obtain a better understanding of secondary particle formation and growth in a diluting vehicle exhaust plume using 3-d information of simulations together with measurements. Detailed coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and aerosol dynamics simulations have been conducted for H 2SO 4-H 2O and soot particles based on measurements within a vehicle exhaust plume under real conditions on public roads. Turbulent diffusion of soot and nucleation particles is responsible for the measured decrease of number concentrations within the diesel car exhaust plume and decreases coagulation rates. Particle size distribution measurements at 0.45 and 0.9 m distance to the tailpipe indicate a consistent soot mode (particle diameter Dp˜50 nm) at variable operating conditions. Soot mode number concentrations reached up to 10 13 m -3 depending on operating conditions and mixing. For nucleation particles the simulations showed a strong sensitivity to the spatial dilution pattern, related cooling and exhaust H 2SO 4(g). The highest simulated nucleation rates were about 0.05-0.1 m from the axis of the plume. The simulated particle number concentration pattern is in approximate accordance with measured concentrations, along the jet centreline and 0.45 and 0.9 m from the tailpipe. Although the test car was run with ultralow sulphur fuel, high nucleation particle ( Dp⩽15 nm) concentrations (>10 13 m -3) were measured under driving conditions of strong acceleration or the combination of high vehicle speed (>140 km h -1) and high engine rotational speed (>3800 revolutions per minute (rpm)). Strong mixing and cooling caused rapid nucleation immediately behind the tailpipe, so that the highest particle number concentrations were recorded at a distance, x=0.45 m behind the tailpipe. The simulated growth of H 2SO 4

  4. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics - Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design - The secondary clarifier.

    PubMed

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-10-15

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models - computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective is to develop a new 1-D framework, referred to as interpreted CFD (iCFD) models, in which statistical meta-models are used to calculate the pseudo-dispersion coefficient (D) as a function of design and flow boundary conditions. The method - presented in a straightforward and transparent way - is illustrated using the example of a circular secondary settling tank (SST). First, the significant design and flow factors are screened out by applying the statistical method of two-level fractional factorial design of experiments. Second, based on the number of significant factors identified through the factor screening study and system understanding, 50 different sets of design and flow conditions are selected using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). The boundary condition sets are imposed on a 2-D axi-symmetrical CFD simulation model of the SST. In the framework, to degenerate the 2-D model structure, CFD model outputs are approximated by the 1-D model through the calibration of three different model structures for D. Correlation equations for the D parameter then are identified as a function of the selected design and flow boundary conditions (meta-models), and their accuracy is evaluated against D values estimated in each numerical experiment. The evaluation and validation of the iCFD model structure is carried out using scenario simulation results obtained with parameters sampled from the corners of the LHS experimental region. For the studied SST, additional iCFD model development was carried out in terms of (i) assessing different density current sub-models; (ii) implementation of a combined flocculation, hindered, transient and compression settling velocity function; and (iii

  5. Photoacoustic study of airborne and model aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebić-Juretić, A.; Zetzsch, C.; Dóka, O.; Bicanic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Airborne particulates of either natural or anthropogenic origin constitute a significant portion of atmospheric pollution. Environmental xenobiotics, among which are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides, often adsorb to aerosols and as such are transported through the atmosphere with the physicochemical properties of the aerosols determining the lifetime of these organic compounds. As an example, the resistance of some PAHs against the photolysis is explained by the effect of the aerosol's "inner filter" that reduces the intensity of incident light reaching the mineral particles. On the other hand, some constituents of the aerosols can act as catalytic and/or stoichiometric reagents in atmospheric reactions on the solid surfaces. In the study described here the photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy in the UV-Vis was used to investigate natural and model aerosols. The PA spectra obtained from coal and wood ashes and of Saharan sand, all three representatives of airborne aerosols, provide the evidence for the existence of the "inner filter." Furthermore, valuable information about the different nature of the interaction between the model aerosols and adsorbed organics (e.g., PAH-pyranthrene and silica, alumina, and MgO) has been obtained. Finally, the outcome of the study conducted with powdered mixtures of chalk and black carbon suggests that the PA method is a candidate method for determination of carbon content in stack ashes.

  6. CFD modeling of turbulent duct flows for coolant channel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Chan, Daniel C.

    1993-07-01

    The design of modern liquid rocket engines requires the analysis of chamber coolant channels to maximize the heat transfer while minimizing the coolant flow. Coolant channels often do not remain at a constant cross section or at uniform curvature. New designs require higher aspect ratio coolant channels than previously used. To broaden the analysis capability and to complement standard analysis tools an investigation on the accuracy of CFD predictions for coolant channel flow has been initiated. Validation of CFD capabilities for coolant channel analysis will enhance the capabilities for optimizing design parameters without resorting to extensive experimental testing. The eventual goal is to use CFD to determine the flow fields of unique coolant channel designs and therefore determine critical heat transfer coefficients. In this presentation the accuracy of a particular CFD code is evaluated for turbulent flows. The first part of the presentation is a comparison of numerical results to existing cold flow data for square curved ducts (NASA CR-3367, 'Measurements of Laminar and Turbulent Flow in a Curved Duct with Thin Inlet Boundary Layers'). The results of this comparison show good agreement with the relatively coarse experimental data. The second part of the presentation compares two cases of higher aspect ratio channels (AR=2.5,10) to show changes in axial and secondary flow strength. These cases match experimental work presently in progress and will be used for future validation. The comparison shows increased secondary flow strength of the higher aspect ratio case due to the change in radius of curvature. The presentation includes a test case with a heated wall to demonstrate the program's capability. The presentation concludes with an outline of the procedure used to validate the CFD code for future design analysis.

  7. Assessment of CFD-based Response Surface Model for Ares I Supersonic Ascent Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanke, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ascent Force and Moment Aerodynamic (AFMA) Databases (DBs) for the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) were typically based on wind tunnel (WT) data, with increments provided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for aspects of the vehicle that could not be tested in the WT tests. During the Design Analysis Cycle 3 analysis for the outer mold line (OML) geometry designated A106, a major tunnel mishap delayed the WT test for supersonic Mach numbers (M) greater than 1.6 in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, and the test delay pushed the final delivery of the A106 AFMA DB back by several months. The aero team developed an interim database based entirely on the already completed CFD simulations to mitigate the impact of the delay. This CFD-based database used a response surface methodology based on radial basis functions to predict the aerodynamic coefficients for M > 1.6 based on only the CFD data from both WT and flight Reynolds number conditions. The aero team used extensive knowledge of the previous AFMA DB for the A103 OML to guide the development of the CFD-based A106 AFMA DB. This report details the development of the CFD-based A106 Supersonic AFMA DB, constructs a prediction of the database uncertainty using data available at the time of development, and assesses the overall quality of the CFD-based DB both qualitatively and quantitatively. This assessment confirms that a reasonable aerodynamic database can be constructed for launch vehicles at supersonic conditions using only CFD data if sufficient knowledge of the physics and expected behavior is available. This report also demonstrates the applicability of non-parametric response surface modeling using radial basis functions for development of aerodynamic databases that exhibit both linear and non-linear behavior throughout a large data space.

  8. Towards CFD modeling of turbulent pipeline material transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahirpour, Amir; Herzog, Nicoleta; Egbers, Cristoph

    2013-04-01

    Safe and financially efficient pipeline transportation of carbon dioxide is a critical issue in the developing field of the CCS Technology. In this part of the process, carbon dioxide is transported via pipes with diameter of 1.5 m and entry pressure of 150 bar, with Reynolds number of 107 and viscosity of 8×10(-5) Pa.s as dense fluid [1]. Presence of large and small scale structures in the pipeline, high Reynolds numbers at which CO2 should be transferred, and 3 dimensional turbulence caused by local geometrical modifications, increase the importance of simulation of turbulent material transport through the individual components of the CO2 chain process. In this study, incompressible turbulent channel flow and pipe flow have been modeled using OpenFoam, an open source CFD software. In the first step, simulation of a turbulent channel flow has been considered using LES for shear Reynolds number of 395. A simple geometry has been chosen with cyclic fluid inlet and outlet boundary conditions to simulate a fully developed flow. The mesh is gradually refined towards the wall to provide values close enough to the wall for the wall coordinate (y+). Grid resolution study has been conducted for One-Equation model. The accuracy of the results is analyzed with respect to the grid smoothness in order to reach an optimized resolution for carrying out the next simulations. Furthermore, three LES models, One-Equation, Smagorinsky and Dynamic Smagorinsky are applied for the grid resolution of (60 × 100 × 80) in (x, y, z) directions. The results are then validated with reference to the DNS carried out by Moser et al.[2] for the similar geometry using logarithmic velocity profile (U+) and Reynolds stress tensor components. In the second step the similar flow is modeled using Reynolds averaged method. Several RANS models, like K-epsilon and Launder-Reece-Rodi are applied and validated against DNS and LES results in a similar fashion. In the most recent step, it has been intended

  9. CFD MODELING OF FINE SCALE FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN THE HOUSTON METROPOLITAN AREA, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine scale modeling of flows and air quality in Houston, Texas is being performed; the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is being applied to investigate the influence of morphologic structures on the within-grid transport and dispersion of sources in grid models ...

  10. Inhomogeneous models of Titan's aerosol distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, M.; Bar-Nun, A.; Noy, N.; Giver, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    A model of Titan's aerosol is presented which allows the particle size to vary with height. The model assumes a refractive index appropriate to an ethylene polymer and a mass flux independent of height equal to the value derived from laboratory measurements. The free parameters of the model are determined by fitting to the observed geometric albedo at 4000 and 6000 A. A methane spectrum is derived which is in excellent agreement with observations. An aerosol optical depth of about 5 is found in the visible, with the particle radius varying from 0.01 to 8 microns. The presence of an optically thick methane cloud at the temperature minimum is indicated.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2008-10-15

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

  12. Frost Growth CFD Model of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J; Petrov, Andrei Y; Vineyard, Edward Allan; Zaltash, Abdolreza; Linkous, Randall Lee

    2008-01-01

    A frost growth model is incorporated into a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of a heat pump by means of a user-defined function in FLUENT, a commercial CFD code. The transient model is applied to the outdoor section of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop (IADR) unit in heating mode. IADR is a hybrid vapor compression and active desiccant unit capable of handling 100% outdoor air (dedicated outdoor air system) or as a total conditioning system, handling both outdoor air and space cooling or heating loads. The predicted increase in flow resistance and loss in heat transfer capacity due to frost build-up are compared to experimental pressure drop readings and thermal imaging. The purpose of this work is to develop a CFD model that is capable of predicting frost growth, an invaluable tool in evaluating the effectiveness of defrost-on-demand cycles.

  13. Chromism of Model Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Angela; Guzman, Marcelo; Hoffmann, Michael; Colussi, Agustin

    2008-03-01

    The optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol play a fundamental role in the Earth's radiative balance. Since more than half of the aerosol mass consists of complex organic matter that absorbs in the ultraviolet and visible regions of the spectrum, it is important to establish the identity of the organic chromophores. Here we report studies on the chromism vs. chemical composition of photolyzed (lambda longer than 305 nm) solutions of pyruvic acid, a widespread aerosol component, under a variety of experimental conditions that include substrate concentration, temperature and the presence of relevant spectator solutes, such ammonium sulfate. We use high resolution mass- and 13C NMR-spectrometries to track chemical speciation in photolyzed solutions as they undergo thermochromic and photobleaching cycles. Since the chemical identity of the components of these mixtures does not change in these cycles, in which photobleached solutions gradually recover their yellow color in the dark with non-conventional kinetics typical of aggregation processes, we infer that visible absorptions likely involve the intermolecular coupling of carbonyl chromophores in supramolecular assemblies made possible by the polyfunctional nature of the products of pyruvic acid photolysis.

  14. Recent Enhancements to the Development of CFD-Based Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent enhancements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) are presented. These enhancements include the simultaneous application of structural modes as CFD input, static aeroelastic analysis using a ROM, and matched-point solutions using a ROM. The simultaneous application of structural modes as CFD input enables the computation of the unsteady aerodynamic state-space matrices with a single CFD execution, independent of the number of structural modes. The responses obtained from a simultaneous excitation of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system are processed using system identification techniques in order to generate an unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM. Once the unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM is generated, a method for computing the static aeroelastic response using this unsteady aerodynamic ROM and a state-space model of the structure, is presented. Finally, a method is presented that enables the computation of matchedpoint solutions using a single ROM that is applicable over a range of dynamic pressures and velocities for a given Mach number. These enhancements represent a significant advancement of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic ROM technology.

  15. INDOOR CONCENTRATION MODELING OF AEROSOL STRONG ACIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. he model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aer...

  16. Comparing different CFD wind turbine modelling approaches with wind tunnel measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvig, Siri; Manger, Eirik; Hjertager, Bjørn

    2014-12-01

    The performance of a model wind turbine is simulated with three different CFD methods: actuator disk, actuator line and a fully resolved rotor. The simulations are compared with each other and with measurements from a wind tunnel experiment. The actuator disk is the least accurate and most cost-efficient, and the fully resolved rotor is the most accurate and least cost-efficient. The actuator line method is believed to lie in between the two ends of the scale. The fully resolved rotor produces superior wake velocity results compared to the actuator models. On average it also produces better results for the force predictions, although the actuator line method had a slightly better match for the design tip speed. The open source CFD tool box, OpenFOAM, was used for the actuator disk and actuator line calculations, whereas the market leading commercial CFD code, ANSYS/FLUENT, was used for the fully resolved rotor approach.

  17. A physical model of Titan's aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Mckay, C. P.; Griffith, C. A.; Turco, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A modeling effort is presented for the nature of the stratospheric haze on Titan, under several simplifying assumptions; chief among these is that the aerosols in question are of a single composition, and involatile. It is further assumed that a one-dimensional model is capable of simulating the general characteristics of the aerosol. It is suggested in this light that the detached haze on Titan may be a manifestation of organized, Hadley-type motions above 300 km altitude, with vertical velocities of 1 cm/sec. The hemispherical asymmetry of the visible albedo may be due to organized vertical motions within the upper 150-200 km of the haze.

  18. Turbulence modeling needs of commercial CFD codes: Complex flows in the aerospace and automotive industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befrui, Bizhan A.

    1995-03-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: STAR-CD computational features; STAR-CD turbulence models; common features of industrial complex flows; industry-specific CFD development requirements; applications and experiences of industrial complex flows, including flow in rotating disc cavities, diffusion hole film cooling, internal blade cooling, and external car aerodynamics; and conclusions on turbulence modeling needs.

  19. Turbulence modeling needs of commercial CFD codes: Complex flows in the aerospace and automotive industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Befrui, Bizhan A.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: STAR-CD computational features; STAR-CD turbulence models; common features of industrial complex flows; industry-specific CFD development requirements; applications and experiences of industrial complex flows, including flow in rotating disc cavities, diffusion hole film cooling, internal blade cooling, and external car aerodynamics; and conclusions on turbulence modeling needs.

  20. CFD goes to school

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, Joseph L.; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    The part that universities should play in the future development of CFD, which must be evaluated in light of CFD's pacing elements and challenges, is discussed. Attention is given to CFD pacing items that must be in place before routine aerodynamic simulation can be performed including grid generation and geometry surface definition, solution adaptive meshing, more efficient time-accurate simulation, modeling of real-gas effects, multiple relative body motion, and prediction of transition and turbulence modeling. As universities have contributed to research in CFD from its inception, this research should continue to enhance and motivate teaching, improve CFD as a discipline, and stimulate faculty and students.

  1. Comparison of a semi-analytic and a CFD model uranium combustion to experimental data.

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.

    1998-04-01

    Two numerical models were developed and compared for the analysis of uranium combustion and ignition in a furnace. Both a semi-analytical solution and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical solution were obtained. Prediction of uranium oxidation rates is important for fuel storage applications, fuel processing, and the development of spent fuel metal waste forms. The semi-analytical model was based on heat transfer correlations, a semi-analytical model of flow over a flat surface, and simple radiative heat transfer from the material surface. The CFD model numerically determined the flowfield over the object of interest, calculated the heat and mass transfer to the material of interest, and calculated the radiative heat exchange of the material with the furnace. The semi-analytical model is much less detailed than the CFD model, but yields reasonable results and assists in understanding the physical process. Short computation times allowed the analyst to study numerous scenarios. The CFD model had significantly longer run times, was found to have some physical limitations that were not easily modified, but was better able to yield details of the heat and mass transfer and flow field once code limitations were overcome.

  2. A novel methodology for interpreting air quality measurements from urban streets using CFD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solazzo, Efisio; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Cai, Xiaoming

    2011-09-01

    In this study, a novel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based methodology has been developed to interpret long-term averaged measurements of pollutant concentrations collected at roadside locations. The methodology is applied to the analysis of pollutant dispersion in Stratford Road (SR), a busy street canyon in Birmingham (UK), where a one-year sampling campaign was carried out between August 2005 and July 2006. Firstly, a number of dispersion scenarios are defined by combining sets of synoptic wind velocity and direction. Assuming neutral atmospheric stability, CFD simulations are conducted for all the scenarios, by applying the standard k-ɛ turbulence model, with the aim of creating a database of normalised pollutant concentrations at specific locations within the street. Modelled concentration for all wind scenarios were compared with hourly observed NO x data. In order to compare with long-term averaged measurements, a weighted average of the CFD-calculated concentration fields was derived, with the weighting coefficients being proportional to the frequency of each scenario observed during the examined period (either monthly or annually). In summary the methodology consists of (i) identifying the main dispersion scenarios for the street based on wind speed and directions data, (ii) creating a database of CFD-calculated concentration fields for the identified dispersion scenarios, and (iii) combining the CFD results based on the frequency of occurrence of each dispersion scenario during the examined period. The methodology has been applied to calculate monthly and annually averaged benzene concentration at several locations within the street canyon so that a direct comparison with observations could be made. The results of this study indicate that, within the simplifying assumption of non-buoyant flow, CFD modelling can aid understanding of long-term air quality measurements, and help assessing the representativeness of monitoring locations for population

  3. Multi-Phase CFD Modeling of Solid Sorbent Carbon Capture System

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; DeCroix, David; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, Wei; Huckaby, E. D.; Saha, Kringan; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

    2013-07-30

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  4. Multi-phase CFD modeling of solid sorbent carbon capture system

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. M.; DeCroix, D.; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, W.; Huckaby, E. David

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian–Eulerian and Eulerian–Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian–Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian–Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian–Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  5. Global Aerosol Optical Models and Lookup Tables for the New MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Loraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000, MODIS has been deriving aerosol properties over land from MODIS observed spectral reflectance, by matching the observed reflectance with that simulated for selected aerosol optical models, aerosol loadings, wavelengths and geometrical conditions (that are contained in a lookup table or 'LUT'). Validation exercises have showed that MODIS tends to under-predict aerosol optical depth (tau) in cases of large tau (tau greater than 1.0), signaling errors in the assumed aerosol optical properties. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from the hundreds of global AERONET sunphotometer sites, we found that three spherical-derived models (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol), and one spheroid-derived model (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally described the range of observed global aerosol properties. The fine dominated models were separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (omega(sub 0)), ranging from non-absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to neutrally absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We determined the dominant model type in each region and season, to create a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid of assumed aerosol type. We used vector radiative transfer code to create a new LUT, simulating the four aerosol models, in four MODIS channels. Independent AERONET observations of spectral tau agree with the new models, indicating that the new models are suitable for use by the MODIS aerosol retrieval.

  6. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne E.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-06-28

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth’s energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically-based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect using analytic representations of droplet nucleation, cloud and aerosol vertical structure, and horizontal variability in cloud water and aerosol concentration. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of aerosol indirect effects that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates are found to be sensitive to several uncertain parameters, including the preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the size of the primary particles, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Aerosol indirect effects are surprisingly linear in emissions. This simple model provides a much stronger physical basis for representing aerosol indirect effects than previous representations in integrated assessment models designed to quickly explore the parameter space of emissions-climate interactions. The model also produces estimates that depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models.

  7. Numerical modeling of immiscible two-phase flow in micro-models using a commercial CFD code

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadia, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf CFD software is being used to analyze everything from flow over airplanes to lab-on-a-chip designs. So, how accurately can two-phase immiscible flow be modeled flowing through some small-scale models of porous media? We evaluate the capability of the CFD code FLUENT{trademark} to model immiscible flow in micro-scale, bench-top stereolithography models. By comparing the flow results to experimental models we show that accurate 3D modeling is possible.

  8. Aerosol Models for the CALIPSO Lidar Inversion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Won, Jae-Gwang

    2003-01-01

    We use measurements and models to develop aerosol models for use in the inversion algorithms for the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Imager Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO). Radiance measurements and inversions of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET1, 2) are used to group global atmospheric aerosols using optical and microphysical parameters. This study uses more than 105 records of radiance measurements, aerosol size distributions, and complex refractive indices to generate the optical properties of the aerosol at more 200 sites worldwide. These properties together with the radiance measurements are then classified using classical clustering methods to group the sites according to the type of aerosol with the greatest frequency of occurrence at each site. Six significant clusters are identified: desert dust, biomass burning, urban industrial pollution, rural background, marine, and dirty pollution. Three of these are used in the CALIPSO aerosol models to characterize desert dust, biomass burning, and polluted continental aerosols. The CALIPSO aerosol model also uses the coarse mode of desert dust and the fine mode of biomass burning to build a polluted dust model. For marine aerosol, the CALIPSO aerosol model uses measurements from the SEAS experiment 3. In addition to categorizing the aerosol types, the cluster analysis provides all the column optical and microphysical properties for each cluster.

  9. CFD simulation on hydrodynamics in fluidized beds: assessment of gradient approximations and turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuan; Deng, Baoqing; Ge, Daqiang; Shen, Xiuzhong

    2015-08-01

    CFD simulations of gas-solid fluidized beds have been performed in Euler-Euler framework. Green-Gauss Cell Based gradient approximation can predict the solid velocity well among gradient approximations. The dispersed choice in the turbulence model can reproduce the solid velocity correctly while the mixture and per phase choices cannot. The standard k-ɛ model, RNG k-ɛ model and SST k-ω model with the dispersed choice can predict the solid velocity well.

  10. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  11. The relationship between aerosol model uncertainty and radiative forcing uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, Ken; Lee, Lindsay; Reddington, Carly

    2016-04-01

    There has been no systematic assessment of how reduction in the uncertainty of global aerosol models will feed through to the uncertainty in the predicted forcing. We use a global model perturbed parameter ensemble to show that tight observational constraint of aerosol concentrations in the model has a relatively small effect on the aerosol-related uncertainty in the calculated aerosol-cloud forcing between pre-industrial and present day periods. One factor is the low sensitivity of present-day aerosol to natural emissions that determine the pre-industrial aerosol state. But the major cause of the weak constraint is that the full uncertainty space of the model generates a large number of model variants that are "equally acceptable" compared to present-day aerosol observations. The narrow range of aerosol concentrations in the observationally constrained model gives the impression of low aerosol model uncertainty, but this hides a range of very different aerosol models. These multiple so-called "equifinal" model variants predict a wide range of forcings. Equifinality in the aerosol model means that tuning of a small number of model processes to achieve model-observation agreement could give a misleading impression of model robustness.

  12. Simulations of Aerosol Microphysics in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; Smith; Randles; daSilva

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud-chemistry interactions have potentially large but uncertain impacts on Earth's climate. One path to addressing these uncertainties is to construct models that incorporate various components of the Earth system and to test these models against data. To that end, we have previously incorporated the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5). GEOS-5 provides a platform for Earth system modeling, incorporating atmospheric and ocean general circulation models, a land surface model, a data assimilation system, and treatments of atmospheric chemistry and hydrologic cycle. Including GOCART online in this framework has provided a path for interactive aerosol-climate studies; however, GOCART only tracks the mass of aerosols as external mixtures and does not include the detailed treatments of aerosol size distribution and composition (internal mixtures) needed for aerosol-cloud-chemistry-climate studies. To address that need we have incorporated the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) online in GEOS-5. CARMA is a sectional aerosol-cloud microphysical model, capable of treating both aerosol size and composition explicitly be resolving the aerosol distribution into a variable number of size and composition groupings. Here we present first simulations of dust, sea salt, and smoke aerosols in GEOS-5 as treated by CARMA. These simulations are compared to available aerosol satellite, ground, and aircraft data and as well compared to the simulated distributions in our current GOCART based system.

  13. Indoor concentration modeling of aerosol strong acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenka, M.; Waldman, J.; Suh, H.; Koutrakis, P.

    1993-01-01

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. The model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+) at an elderly care residence in suburban New Jersey. The purpose of the present work is to assess the applicability of the model for predicting H+ exposures in a suburban environment and to evaluate the models performance for daytime and nighttime periods. Indoor and outdoor samples were taken at an elderly care home between June 20 and July 30, 1989. The indoor and outdoor monitoring schedule collected two 12-h samples per day. Samples were taken with the Indoor Denuder Sampler (IDS). Samples were analyzed for indoor and outdoor concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+), ammonia (NH3), and anion determination. The model generally underestimated the indoor H+ concentration. Slight improvement was seen in the model estimate of H+ for the nighttime period (7:00 pm to 7:00 am, local time). The model applied to the site in New Jersey did not predict the indoor H+ concentrations as well as it did for the experiment from which it was developed.

  14. Models of size spectrum of tropospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.

    Quality criteria of a model distribution are considered. Information losses due to the nonorthogonality of the spectrum parameter transformation are discussed. Models are compared with a view to approximation accuracy and losses of information. Smerkalov's average tropospheric aerosol spectrum and 271 observed spectra have been used for test. Highest accuracy and lowest losses of information were yielded by a distribution having power asymptotes on both the left and the right sides.

  15. CFD Modelling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Hemodynamic Loads Using a Realistic Geometry with CT

    PubMed Central

    Ng, E. Y. K.; Loong, T. H.; Bordone, Maurizio; Pua, Uei; Narayanan, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS), abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT) images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m3 and a kinematic viscosity of 4 × 10−3 Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index (β), saccular index (γ), deformation diameter ratio (χ), and tortuosity index (ε)) and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation. PMID:23864906

  16. CFD modeling of commercial-scale entrained-flow coal gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to model the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside commercial-scale entrained-flow coal gasifiers. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical processes involved, the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented in this paper include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate and a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and the heating rate effect on volatile yield. The global gas phase reaction kinetics is also carefully selected. To predict a reasonable peak temperature of the coal/O{sub 2} flame inside an entrained-flow gasifier, the reserve reaction of H{sub 2} oxidation is included in the gas phase reaction model. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical commercial-scale oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here

  17. An Initial Non-Equilibrium Porous-Media Model for CFD Simulation of Stirling Regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Simon, Terry; Gedeon, David; Ibrahim, Mounir; Rong, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to define empirical parameters for an initial thermal non-equilibrium porous-media model for use in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for simulation of Stirling regenerators. The two codes currently used at Glenn Research Center for Stirling modeling are Fluent and CFD-ACE. The codes porous-media models are equilibrium models, which assume solid matrix and fluid are in thermal equilibrium. This is believed to be a poor assumption for Stirling regenerators; Stirling 1-D regenerator models, used in Stirling design, use non-equilibrium regenerator models and suggest regenerator matrix and gas average temperatures can differ by several degrees at a given axial location and time during the cycle. Experimentally based information was used to define: hydrodynamic dispersion, permeability, inertial coefficient, fluid effective thermal conductivity, and fluid-solid heat transfer coefficient. Solid effective thermal conductivity was also estimated. Determination of model parameters was based on planned use in a CFD model of Infinia's Stirling Technology Demonstration Converter (TDC), which uses a random-fiber regenerator matrix. Emphasis is on use of available data to define empirical parameters needed in a thermal non-equilibrium porous media model for Stirling regenerator simulation. Such a model has not yet been implemented by the authors or their associates.

  18. An Initial Non-Equilibrium Porous-Media Model for CFD Simulation of Stirling Regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Simon, Terry; Gedeon, David; Ibrahim, Mounir; Rong, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to define empirical parameters (or closwre models) for an initial thermai non-equilibrium porous-media model for use in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for simulation of Stirling regenerators. The two CFD codes currently being used at Glenn Research Center (GRC) for Stirling engine modeling are Fluent and CFD-ACE. The porous-media models available in each of these codes are equilibrium models, which assmne that the solid matrix and the fluid are in thermal equilibrium at each spatial location within the porous medium. This is believed to be a poor assumption for the oscillating-flow environment within Stirling regenerators; Stirling 1-D regenerator models, used in Stirling design, we non-equilibrium regenerator models and suggest regenerator matrix and gas average temperatures can differ by several degrees at a given axial location end time during the cycle. A NASA regenerator research grant has been providing experimental and computational results to support definition of various empirical coefficients needed in defining a noa-equilibrium, macroscopic, porous-media model (i.e., to define "closure" relations). The grant effort is being led by Cleveland State University, with subcontractor assistance from the University of Minnesota, Gedeon Associates, and Sunpower, Inc. Friction-factor and heat-transfer correlations based on data taken with the NASAlSunpower oscillating-flow test rig also provide experimentally based correlations that are useful in defining parameters for the porous-media model; these correlations are documented in Gedeon Associates' Sage Stirling-Code Manuals. These sources of experimentally based information were used to define the following terms and parameters needed in the non-equilibrium porous-media model: hydrodynamic dispersion, permeability, inertial coefficient, fluid effective thermal conductivity (including themal dispersion and estimate of tortuosity effects}, and fluid-solid heat transfer

  19. CFD model for a 3-D inhaling mannequin: verification and validation.

    PubMed

    Anthony, T Renee; Flynn, Michael R

    2006-03-01

    This work investigates the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model air flow and particle transport associated with an inhaling anatomical mannequin. The studied condition is typically representative of occupational velocities (Re = 1920) and at-rest breathing (R = U(o)/U(m) = 0.11). Methods to verify and validate CFD simulations are detailed to demonstrate convergence and describe the model's uncertainties. The standard k-epsilon model provided a reasonable flow field, although vertical velocity components were consistently smaller than the experimental validation data, owing to truncation of the computational model at hip height. Laminar particle trajectory studies indicated that the modeled velocity field resulted in a shift of particle aspiration fractions toward particles smaller than those determined experimentally, consistent with the vertical velocity field differences. PMID:16157607

  20. CFD Model of Water Droplet Transport for ISS Hygiene Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Chang H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the study is to assess the impacts of free water propagation in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC). Free water can be generated inside the WHC in small quantities due to crew hygiene activity. To mitigate potential impact of free water in Node 3 cabin the WHC doorway is enclosed by a waterproof bump-out, Kabin, with openings at the top and bottom. At the overhead side of the rack, there is a screen that prevents large drops of water from exiting. However, as the avionics fan in the WHC causes airflow toward the deck side of the rack, small quantities of free water may exit at the bottom of the Kabin. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of Node 3 cabin airflow made possible to identify the paths of water transport. The Node 3 airflow was computed for several ventilation scenarios. To simulate the droplet transport the Lagrangian discrete phase approach was used. Various initial droplet distributions were considered in the study. The droplet diameter was varied in the range of 2-20 mm. The results of the computations showed that most of the drops fall to the rack surface not far from the WHC curtain. The probability of the droplet transport to the adjacent rack surface with electronic equipment was predicted.

  1. CFD modelling of nitrogen injection in a longwall gob area

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liming; Smith, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations conducted to investigate the effectiveness of N2 injection in an active panel and a sealed longwall gob area to prevent and suppress spontaneous heating of coal using various injection locations and flow rates. In the active panel simulations, a single longwall panel with a bleederless ventilation system was simulated. The spontaneous heating of crushed coal from pillars was simulated and N2 was injected from different locations on the headgate side and through boreholes from the surface. The N2 injection rate at each location was varied between 0.18 m3/s and 0.94 m3/s (380 and 2000 cfm). In the sealed longwall simulations, seal leakage rate was varied to determine its effect on N2 injection effectiveness. The results of this study should aid mine ventilation engineers in developing more effective N2 injection strategies to prevent and control spontaneous heating of coal in underground coal mines. PMID:26213573

  2. CFD modelling of sampling locations for early detection of spontaneous combustion in long-wall gob areas

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was conducted to optimize gas sampling locations for the early detection of spontaneous heating in longwall gob areas. Initial simulations were carried out to predict carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations at various regulators in the gob using a bleeder ventilation system. Measured CO concentration values at these regulators were then used to calibrate the CFD model. The calibrated CFD model was used to simulate CO concentrations at eight sampling locations in the gob using a bleederless ventilation system to determine the optimal sampling locations for early detection of spontaneous combustion. PMID:26213572

  3. Revisiting Aerosol Effects in Global Climate Models Using an Aerosol Lidar Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, P. L.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D. M.; Ghan, S.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects are considered a major source of uncertainty in global climate models and the direct and indirect radiative forcings have strong model dependency. These forcings are routinely evaluated (and calibrated) against observations, among them satellite retrievals are greatly used for their near-global coverage. However, the forcings calculated from model output are not directly comparable with those computed from satellite retrievals since sampling and algorithmic differences (such as cloud screening, noise reduction, and retrieval) between models and observations are not accounted for. It is our hypothesis that the conventional model validation procedures for comparing satellite observations and model simulations can mislead model development and introduce biases. Hence, we have developed an aerosol lidar simulator for global climate models that simulates the CALIOP lidar signal at 532nm. The simulator uses the same algorithms as those used to produce the "GCM-oriented CALIPSO Aerosol Product" to (1) objectively sample lidar signal profiles; and (2) derive aerosol fields (e.g., extinction profile, aerosol type, etc) from lidar signals. This allows us to sample and derive aerosol fields in the model and real atmosphere in identical ways. Using the Department of Energy's ACME model simulations, we found that the simulator-retrieved aerosol distribution and aerosol-cloud interactions are significantly different from those computed from conventional approaches, and that the model is much closer to satellite estimates than previously believed.

  4. A CFD-informed quasi-steady model of flapping wing aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance and agility during flapping flight are determined by the combination of wing shape and kinematics. The degree of morphological and kinematic optimisation is unknown and depends upon a large parameter space. Aimed at providing an accurate and computationally inexpensive modelling tool for flapping-wing aerodynamics, we propose a novel CFD (computational fluid dynamics)-informed quasi-steady model (CIQSM), which assumes that the aerodynamic forces on a flapping wing can be decomposed into the quasi-steady forces and parameterised based on CFD results. Using least-squares fitting, we determine a set of proportional coefficients for the quasi-steady model relating wing kinematics to instantaneous aerodynamic force and torque; we calculate power with the product of quasi-steady torques and angular velocity. With the quasi-steady model fully and independently parameterised on the basis of high-fidelity CFD modelling, it is capable of predicting flapping-wing aerodynamic forces and power more accurately than the conventional blade element model (BEM) does. The improvement can be attributed to, for instance, taking into account the effects of the induced downwash and the wing tip vortex on the force generation and power consumption. Our model is validated by comparing the aerodynamics of a CFD model and the present quasi-steady model using the example case of a hovering hawkmoth. It demonstrates that the CIQSM outperforms the conventional BEM while remaining computationally cheap, and hence can be an effective tool for revealing the mechanisms of optimization and control of kinematics and morphology in flapping-wing flight for both bio-flyers and unmanned air systems. PMID:27346891

  5. Physics-driven CFD modeling of complex anatomical cardiovascular flows-a TCPC case study.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Kerem; de Zélicourt, Diane; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Frakes, David; Fogel, Mark A; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2005-03-01

    Recent developments in medical image acquisition combined with the latest advancements in numerical methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations have created unprecedented opportunities for developing simple and reliable computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools for meeting patient-specific surgical planning objectives. However, for CFD to reach its full potential and gain the trust and confidence of medical practitioners, physics-driven numerical modeling is required. This study reports on the experience gained from an ongoing integrated CFD modeling effort aimed at developing an advanced numerical simulation tool capable of accurately predicting flow characteristics in an anatomically correct total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). An anatomical intra-atrial TCPC model is reconstructed from a stack of magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired in vivo. An exact replica of the computational geometry was built using transparent rapid prototyping. Following the same approach as in earlier studies on idealized models, flow structures, pressure drops, and energy losses were assessed both numerically and experimentally, then compared. Numerical studies were performed with both a first-order accurate commercial software and a recently developed, second-order accurate, in-house flow solver. The commercial CFD model could, with reasonable accuracy, capture global flow quantities of interest such as control volume power losses and pressure drops and time-averaged flow patterns. However, for steady inflow conditions, both flow visualization experiments and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements revealed unsteady, complex, and highly 3D flow structures, which could not be captured by this numerical model with the available computational resources and additional modeling efforts that are described. Preliminary time-accurate computations with the in-house flow solver were shown to capture for the first time these complex flow features and yielded solutions in good

  6. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  7. Informing Aerosol Transport Models With Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limbacher, J.; Patadia, F.; Petrenko, M.; Martin, M. Val; Chin, M.; Gaitley, B.; Garay, M.; Kalashnikova, O.; Nelson, D.; Scollo, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the aerosol products from the NASA Earth Observing System's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) mature, we are placing greater focus on ways of using the aerosol amount and type data products, and aerosol plume heights, to constrain aerosol transport models. We have demonstrated the ability to map aerosol air-mass-types regionally, and have identified product upgrades required to apply them globally, including the need for a quality flag indicating the aerosol type information content, that varies depending upon retrieval conditions. We have shown that MISR aerosol type can distinguish smoke from dust, volcanic ash from sulfate and water particles, and can identify qualitative differences in mixtures of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol components in urban settings. We demonstrated the use of stereo imaging to map smoke, dust, and volcanic effluent plume injection height, and the combination of MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth maps to constrain wildfire smoke source strength. This talk will briefly highlight where we stand on these application, with emphasis on the steps we are taking toward applying the capabilities toward constraining aerosol transport models, planet-wide.

  8. Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Bechah, Yassina; Audoly, Gilles; Terras, Jérôme; Raoult, Didier; Brégeon, Fabienne

    2016-07-01

    Coxiella burnetii is mainly transmitted by aerosols and is responsible for multiple-organ lesions. Animal models have shown C. burnetii pathogenicity, but long-term outcomes still need to be clarified. We used a whole-body aerosol inhalation exposure system to mimic the natural route of infection in immunocompetent (BALB/c) and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After an initial lung inoculum of 10(4) C. burnetii cells/lung, the outcome, serological response, hematological disorders, and deep organ lesions were described up to 3 months postinfection. C. burnetii-specific PCR, anti-C. burnetii immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting C. burnetii-specific 16S rRNA completed the detection of the bacterium in the tissues. In BALB/c mice, a thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia were first observed, prior to evidence of C. burnetii replication. In all SCID mouse organs, DNA copies increased to higher levels over time than in BALB/c ones. Clinical signs of discomfort appeared in SCID mice, so follow-up had to be shortened to 2 months in this group. At this stage, all animals presented bone, cervical, and heart lesions. The presence of C. burnetii could be attested in situ for all organs sampled using immunohistochemistry and FISH. This mouse model described C. burnetii Nine Mile strain spread using aerosolization in a way that corroborates the pathogenicity of Q fever described in humans and completes previously published data in mouse models. C. burnetii infection occurring after aerosolization in mice thus seems to be a useful tool to compare the pathogenicity of different strains of C. burnetii. PMID:27160294

  9. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  10. Evaluating Aerosol Process Modules within the Framework of the Aerosol Modeling Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Velu, V.; Gustafson, W. I.; Chapman, E.; Easter, R. C.; Shrivastava, M.; Singh, B.

    2012-12-01

    Factors that influence predictions of aerosol direct and indirect forcing, such as aerosol mass, composition, size distribution, hygroscopicity, and optical properties, still contain large uncertainties in both regional and global models. New aerosol treatments are usually implemented into a 3-D atmospheric model and evaluated using a limited number of measurements from a specific case study. Under this modeling paradigm, the performance and computational efficiency of several treatments for a specific aerosol process cannot be adequately quantified because many other processes among various modeling studies (e.g. grid configuration, meteorology, emission rates) are different as well. The scientific community needs to know the advantages and disadvantages of specific aerosol treatments when the meteorology, chemistry, and other aerosol processes are identical in order to reduce the uncertainties associated with aerosols predictions. To address these issues, an Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) has been developed that systematically and objectively evaluates new aerosol treatments for use in regional and global models. The AMT consists of the modular Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a series testbed cases for which extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties are available, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of meteorological, chemical, aerosol process modules. WRF contains various parameterizations of meteorological, chemical, and aerosol processes and includes interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation treatments similar to those employed by climate models. In addition, the physics suite from the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) have also been ported to WRF so that they can be tested at various spatial scales and compared directly with field campaign data and other parameterizations commonly used by the mesoscale modeling community. Data from several campaigns, including the 2006

  11. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat; Naser, Jamal

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO2 emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can't model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  12. Massive separation around bluff bodies: comparisons among different cfd solvers and turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenio, Vincenzo; Fakhari, Ahmad; Petronio, Andrea; Padovan, Roberta; Pittaluga, Chiara; Caprino, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Massive flow separation is ubiquitous in industrial applications, ruling drag and hydrodynamic noise. In spite of considerable efforts, its numerical prediction still represents a challenge for CFD models in use in engineering. Aside commercial software, over the latter years the opensource software OpenFOAMR (OF) has emerged as a valid tool for prediction of complex industrial flows. In the present work, we simulate two flows representative of a class of situations occurring in industrial problems: the flow around sphere and that around a wall-mounted square cylinder at Re = 10000 . We compare the performance two different tools, namely OF and ANSYS CFX 15.0 (CFX) using different unstructured grids and turbulence models. The grids have been generated using SNAPPYHEXMESH and ANSYS ICEM CFD 15.0 with different near wall resolutions. The codes have been run in a RANS mode using k - ɛ model (OF) and SST - k - ω (CFX) with and without wall-layer models. OF has been also used in LES, WMLES and DES mode. Regarding the sphere, RANS models were not able to catch separation, while good prediction of separation and distribution of stresses over the surface were obtained using LES, WMLES and DES. Results for the second test case are currently under analysis. Financial support from COSMO ``cfd open source per opera mortta'' PAR FSC 2007-2013, Friuli Venezia Giulia.

  13. Local CFD kinetic model of cadmium vaporization during fluid bed incineration of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Soria, J; Gauthier, D; Falcoz, Q; Flamant, G; Mazza, G

    2013-03-15

    The emissions of heavy metals during incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are a major issue to health and the environment. It is then necessary to well quantify these emissions in order to accomplish an adequate control and prevent the heavy metals from leaving the stacks. In this study the kinetic behavior of Cadmium during Fluidized Bed Incineration (FBI) of artificial MSW pellets, for bed temperatures ranging from 923 to 1073 K, was modeled. FLUENT 12.1.4 was used as the modeling framework for the simulations and implemented together with a complete set of user-defined functions (UDFs). The CFD model combines the combustion of a single solid waste particle with heavy metal (HM) vaporization from the burning particle, and it takes also into account both pyrolysis and volatiles' combustion. A kinetic rate law for the Cd release, derived from the CFD thermal analysis of the combusting particle, is proposed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in a lab-scale fluidized bed incinerator reported in literature, and with the predicted values from a particulate non-isothermal model, formerly developed by the authors. The comparison shows that the proposed CFD model represents very well the evolution of the HM release for the considered range of bed temperature. PMID:23410804

  14. An Empirical Model of Human Aspiration in Low-Velocity Air Using CFD Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, T. Renée; Anderson, Kimberly R.

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was performed to investigate the aspiration efficiency of the human head in low velocities to examine whether the current inhaled particulate mass (IPM) sampling criterion matches the aspiration efficiency of an inhaling human in airflows common to worker exposures. Data from both mouth and nose inhalation, averaged to assess omnidirectional aspiration efficiencies, were compiled and used to generate a unifying model to relate particle size to aspiration efficiency of the human head. Multiple linear regression was used to generate an empirical model to estimate human aspiration efficiency and included particle size as well as breathing and freestream velocities as dependent variables. A new set of simulated mouth and nose breathing aspiration efficiencies was generated and used to test the fit of empirical models. Further, empirical relationships between test conditions and CFD estimates of aspiration were compared to experimental data from mannequin studies, including both calm-air and ultra-low velocity experiments. While a linear relationship between particle size and aspiration is reported in calm air studies, the CFD simulations identified a more reasonable fit using the square of particle aerodynamic diameter, which better addressed the shape of the efficiency curve’s decline toward zero for large particles. The ultimate goal of this work was to develop an empirical model that incorporates real-world variations in critical factors associated with particle aspiration to inform low-velocity modifications to the inhalable particle sampling criterion. PMID:25438035

  15. Influence of aerosols on atmospheric variables in the HARMONIE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamarchuk, Iuliia; Ivanov, Sergiy; Ruban, Igor; Pavlova, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    The mesoscale HARMONIE model is used to investigate the potential influence of aerosols on weather forecasts, and in particular, on precipitation. The study considers three numerical experiments over the Atlantic-Europe-Northern Africa region during 11-16 August 2010 with the following configurations: (a) no aerosols, (b) only the sea aerosols, and (c) the four types of the aerosols: sea, land, organic, and dust aerosols. The spatio-temporal analysis of forecast differences highlights the impact of aerosols on the prediction of main meteorological variables such as air temperature, humidity, precipitation, and cloud cover as well as their vertical profiles. The variations occur through changes in radiation fluxes and microphysics properties. The sensitivity experiments with the inclusion of climatological aerosol concentrations demonstrate the importance of aerosol effects on weather prediction.

  16. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations provide a number of unique opportunities for expanding and improving capabilities for modeling exposures to environmental pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been c...

  17. Validation of Hydrodynamic Load Models Using CFD for the OC4-DeepCwind Semisubmersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2015-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out on the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible to obtain a better understanding of how to set hydrodynamic coefficients for the structure when using an engineering tool such as FAST to model the system. The focus here was on the drag behavior and the effects of the free-surface, free-ends and multi-member arrangement of the semi-submersible structure. These effects are investigated through code-to-code comparisons and flow visualizations. The implications on mean load predictions from engineering tools are addressed. The work presented here suggests that selection of drag coefficients should take into consideration a variety of geometric factors. Furthermore, CFD simulations demonstrate large time-varying loads due to vortex shedding, which FAST's hydrodynamic module, HydroDyn, does not model. The implications of these oscillatory loads on the fatigue life needs to be addressed.

  18. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic State-Space Models from CFD-Based Pulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Raveh, Daniella E.

    2001-01-01

    A method for computing discrete-time state-space models of linearized unsteady aerodynamic behavior directly from aeroelastic CFD codes is presented. The method involves the treatment of CFD-based pulse responses as Markov parameters for use in a system identification /realization algorithm. Results are presented for the AGARD 445.6 Aeroelastic Wing with four aeroelastic modes at a Mach number of 0.96 using the EZNSS Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver with aeroelastic capability. The System/Observer/Controller Identification Toolbox (SOCIT) algorithm, based on the Ho-Kalman realization algorithm, is used to generate 15th- and 32nd-order discrete-time state-space models of the unsteady aerodynamic response of the wing over the entire frequency range of interest.

  19. Developing an Accurate CFD Based Gust Model for the Truss Braced Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The increased flexibility of long endurance aircraft having high aspect ratio wings necessitates attention to gust response and perhaps the incorporation of gust load alleviation. The design of civil transport aircraft with a strut or truss-braced high aspect ratio wing furthermore requires gust response analysis in the transonic cruise range. This requirement motivates the use of high fidelity nonlinear computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for gust response analysis. This paper presents the development of a CFD based gust model for the truss braced wing aircraft. A sharp-edged gust provides the gust system identification. The result of the system identification is several thousand time steps of instantaneous pressure coefficients over the entire vehicle. This data is filtered and downsampled to provide the snapshot data set from which a reduced order model is developed. A stochastic singular value decomposition algorithm is used to obtain a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The POD model is combined with a convolution integral to predict the time varying pressure coefficient distribution due to a novel gust profile. Finally the unsteady surface pressure response of the truss braced wing vehicle to a one-minus-cosine gust, simulated using the reduced order model, is compared with the full CFD.

  20. CFD-aided modelling of activated sludge systems - A critical review.

    PubMed

    Karpinska, Anna M; Bridgeman, John

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the major challenges in the wastewater sector is the successful design and reliable operation of treatment processes, which guarantee high treatment efficiencies to comply with effluent quality criteria, while keeping the investment and operating cost as low as possible. Although conceptual design and process control of activated sludge plants are key to ensuring these goals, they are still based on general empirical guidelines and operators' experience, dominated often by rule of thumb. This review paper discusses the rationale behind the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to model aeration, facilitating enhancement of treatment efficiency and reduction of energy input. Several single- and multiphase approaches commonly used in CFD studies of aeration tank operation, are comprehensively described, whilst the shortcomings of the modelling assumptions imposed to evaluate mixing and mass transfer in AS tanks are identified and discussed. Examples and methods of coupling of CFD data with biokinetics, accounting for the actual flow field and its impact on the oxygen mass transfer and yield of the biological processes occurring in the aeration tanks, are also critically discussed. Finally, modelling issues, which remain unaddressed, (e.g. coupling of the AS tank with secondary clarifier and the use of population balance models to simulate bubbly flow or flocculation of the activated sludge), are also identified and discussed. PMID:26615385

  1. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Mathias F.; Johnson, Carl J.; Tang, Chuyang; Jensen, Mogens H.; Yde, Lars; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer. PMID:24958428

  2. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Mathias F; Johnson, Carl J; Tang, Chuyang; Jensen, Mogens H; Yde, Lars; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer. PMID:24958428

  3. Introducing the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-SAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-04-01

    We are presenting a new global aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2 to study the aerosol dynamics in the UTLS under background and volcanic conditions. The microphysical core modul SAM2 treats the formation, the evolution and the transport of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The aerosol size distribution and the weight percentage of the sulphuric acid solution is calculated dependent on the concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O, their vapor pressures, the atmospheric temperature and pressure. The fixed sectional method is used to resolve an aerosol distribution between 1 nm and 2.6 micron in particle radius. Homogeneous nucleation, condensation and evaporation, coagulation, water-vapor growth, sedimentation and sulphur chemistry are included. The module is applied in the middle-atmosphere MAECHAM5 model, resolving the atmosphere up to 0.01 hPa (~80 km) in 39 layers. It is shown here that MAECHAM5-SAM2 well represents in-situ measured size distributions of stratospheric background aerosol in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. Distinct differences can be seen when derived integrated aerosol parameters (surface area, effective radius) are compared with aerosol climatologies based on the SAGE II satellite instrument (derived by the University of Oxford and the NASA AMES laboratory). The bias between the model and the SAGE II data increases as the moment of the aerosol size distribution decreases. Thus the modeled effective radius show the strongest bias, followed by the aerosol surface area density. Correspondingly less biased are the higher moments volume area density and the mass density of the global stratospheric aerosol coverage. This finding supports the key finding No. 2 of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (2006), where it was shown that during periods of very low aerosol load in the stratosphere, the consistency between in-situ and satellite measurements, which exist in a volcanically perturbed stratosphere, breaks down and significant

  4. The contribution of aerosol hygroscopic growth to the modeled aerosol radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkola, Harri; Kühn, Thomas; Kirkevåg, Alf; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Arola, Antti

    2016-04-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant effect on the direct radiative effect of atmospheric aerosol. However, there are significant uncertainties concerning how much of the radiative forcing is due to different chemical compounds, especially water. For example, modeled optical depth of water in global aerosol-climate models varies by more than a factor of two. These differences can be attributed to differences in modeled 1) hygroscopicity, 2) ambient relative humidity, and/or 3) aerosol size distribution. In this study, we investigate which of these above-mentioned factors cause the largest variability in the modeled optical depth of water. In order to do this, we have developed a tool that calculates aerosol extinction using interchangeable global 3D data of aerosol composition, relative humidity, and aerosol size distribution fields. This data is obtained from models that have taken part in the open international initiative AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models). In addition, we use global 3D data for relative humidity from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) flying on board NASA's Aqua satellite and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data. These observations are used to evaluate the modeled relative humidity fields. In the first stage of the study, we made a detailed investigation using the aerosol-chemistry-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ in which most of the aerosol optical depth is caused by water. Our results show that the model significantly overestimates the relative humidity over the oceans while over land, the overestimation is lower or it is underestimated. Since this overestimation occurs over the oceans, the water optical depth is amplified as the hygroscopic growth is very sensitive to changes in high relative humidities. Over land, error in modeled relative humidity is unlikely to cause significant errors in water optical depth as relative humidities are generally

  5. Development of a Common Research Model for Applied CFD Validation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassberg, John C.; Dehaan, Mark A.; Rivers, S. Melissa; Wahls, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a wing/body/nacelle/pylon/horizontal-tail configuration for a common research model is presented, with focus on the aerodynamic design of the wing. Here, a contemporary transonic supercritical wing design is developed with aerodynamic characteristics that are well behaved and of high performance for configurations with and without the nacelle/pylon group. The horizontal tail is robustly designed for dive Mach number conditions and is suitably sized for typical stability and control requirements. The fuselage is representative of a wide/body commercial transport aircraft; it includes a wing-body fairing, as well as a scrubbing seal for the horizontal tail. The nacelle is a single-cowl, high by-pass-ratio, flow-through design with an exit area sized to achieve a natural unforced mass-flow-ratio typical of commercial aircraft engines at cruise. The simplicity of this un-bifurcated nacelle geometry will facilitate grid generation efforts of subsequent CFD validation exercises. Detailed aerodynamic performance data has been generated for this model; however, this information is presented in such a manner as to not bias CFD predictions planned for the fourth AIAA CFD Drag Prediction Workshop, which incorporates this common research model into its blind test cases. The CFD results presented include wing pressure distributions with and without the nacelle/pylon, ML/D trend lines, and drag-divergence curves; the design point for the wing/body configuration is within 1% of its max-ML/D. Plans to test the common research model in the National Transonic Facility and the Ames 11-ft wind tunnels are also discussed.

  6. CFD Modeling of Water Flow through Sudden Contraction and Expansion in a Horizontal Pipe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaushik, V. V. R.; Ghosh, S.; Das, G.; Das, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of commercial CFD software in teaching graduate level computational fluid dynamics. FLUENT 6.3.26 was chosen as the CFD software to teach students the entire CFD process in a single course. The course objective is to help students to learn CFD, use it in some practical problems and analyze as well as validate the…

  7. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  8. Application of CFD techniques toward the validation of nonlinear aerodynamic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Katz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to determine the regimes of applicability of nonlinear models describing the unsteady aerodynamic responses to aircraft flight motions are described. The potential advantages of computational methods over experimental methods are discussed and the concepts underlying mathematical modeling are reviewed. The economic and conceptual advantages of the modeling procedure over coupled, simultaneous solutions of the gasdynamic equations and the vehicle's kinematic equations of motion are discussed. The modeling approach, when valid, eliminates the need for costly repetitive computation of flow field solutions. For the test cases considered, the aerodynamic modeling approach is shown to be valid.

  9. Application of CFD techniques toward the validation of nonlinear aerodynamic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Katz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to determine the regimes of applicability of nonlinear models describing the unsteady aerodynamic responses to aircraft flight motions are described. The potential advantages of computational methods over experimental methods are discussed and the concepts underlying mathematical modeling are reviewed. The economic and conceptual advantages of the modeling procedure over coupled, simultaneous solutions of the gas dynamic equations and the vehicle's kinematic equations of motion are discussed. The modeling approach, when valid, eliminates the need for costly repetitive computation of flow field solutions. For the test cases considered, the aerodynamic modeling approach is shown to be valid.

  10. Parameterization of Aerosol Sinks in Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The modelers point of view is that the aerosol problem is one of sources, evolution, and sinks. Relative to evolution and sink processes, enormous attention is given to the problem of aerosols sources, whether inventory based (e.g., fossil fuel emissions) or dynamic (e.g., dust, sea salt, biomass burning). On the other hand, aerosol losses in models are a major factor in controlling the aerosol distribution and lifetime. Here we shine some light on how aerosol sinks are treated in modern chemical transport models. We discuss the mechanisms of dry and wet loss processes and the parameterizations for those processes in a single model (GEOS-5). We survey the literature of other modeling studies. We additionally compare the budgets of aerosol losses in several of the ICAP models.

  11. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Brown, Michael J; Pardyjak, Eric R; Senocak, Inanc

    2010-01-01

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  12. CFD Modeling Needs and What Makes a Good Supersonic Combustion Validation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, Richard L., Jr.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2005-01-01

    If a CFD code/model developer is asked what experimental data he wants to validate his code or numerical model, his answer will be: "Everything, everywhere, at all times." Since this is not possible, practical, or even reasonable, the developer must understand what can be measured within the limits imposed by the test article, the test location, the test environment and the available diagnostic equipment. At the same time, it is important for the expermentalist/diagnostician to understand what the CFD developer needs (as opposed to wants) in order to conduct a useful CFD validation experiment. If these needs are not known, it is possible to neglect easily measured quantities at locations needed by the developer, rendering the data set useless for validation purposes. It is also important for the experimentalist/diagnostician to understand what the developer is trying to validate so that the experiment can be designed to isolate (as much as possible) the effects of a particular physical phenomena that is associated with the model to be validated. The probability of a successful validation experiment can be greatly increased if the two groups work together, each understanding the needs and limitations of the other.

  13. Low Reynolds turbulence model CFD simulation for complex electronic system: an industrial point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, M.

    2014-07-01

    In electronic systems the presence of bluff bodies, sharp corners and bends are the cause of flow separation and large recirculation bubbles. Since the recirculation vortices develop they encapsulate the heat from an electronic component becoming one of the major contributors of malfunction. Going in depth in this, some numerical simulations of conjugate heat transfer for a heat wall-mounted cube have been performed using the commercial CFD code scSTREAM V11 by Software Cradle Co, Ltd. It is well known that the reliability of CFD analysis depends heavily on the turbulent model employed together with the wall functions implemented. The three low- Reynolds k - epsilon turbulent models developed by Abe-Nagano-Kondoh have been validated against experimental data consisting mainly of velocity profiles and surface temperature distributions provided in literature. The performed validation shows a satisfactory agreement between the measured and simulated data. The turbulent model chosen is then used for the CFD simulation of a complex electronic system.

  14. Global modeling of organic aerosol: the importance of reactive nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, H. O. T.; Chan, A. W. H.; Barkley, M. P.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-09-01

    Reactive nitrogen compounds, specifically NOx and NO3, likely influence global organic aerosol levels. To assess these interactions, GEOS-Chem, a chemical transport model, is updated to include improved biogenic emissions (following MEGAN v2.1/2.04), a new organic aerosol tracer lumping scheme, aerosol from nitrate radical (NO3) oxidation of isoprene, and NOx-dependent terpene aerosol yields. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and relatively high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbon-NO3 reactions are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. By including aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation in GEOS-Chem, terpene aerosol approximately doubles and isoprene aerosol is enhanced by 30 to 40% in the Southeast United States. In terms of the global budget of organic aerosol, however, aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation is somewhat minor (slightly more than 3 Tg/yr) due to the relatively high volatility of organic-NO3 oxidation products. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of organic aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, of which 14-15 Tg/yr is from oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and 8-9 Tg/yr from isoprene.

  15. Aerosol chamber and modelling studies on the reaction of soot aerosols with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Moehler, O.; Naumann, K.H.; Saathoff, H.

    1995-12-31

    Heterogeneous processes in atmospheric aerosols are known to play important roles in the chemical transformation of air pollutants. Especially irregularly shaped aerosol particles like soot have large surface areas to interact with trace gases. The overall efficiency of those processes depends on various parameters like the particle shape, the chemical surface conditions, the surface reaction mechanisms and the gas transport processes to and from the surface. The shape and surface of soot particles are transformed due to their heterogeneous chemical activity. Therefore, the surface reaction efficiency of atmospheric soot particles also depends on their age and history. The scope of this work is to investigate the ozone depletion potential of soot particles at typical atmospheric conditions. The experiments are carried out in a cylindrical aerosol vessel with a volume of 3.7 m{sup 3}. The soot aerosol is produced with a sparc generator and introduced into the aerosol vessel together with the ozone. The variation of the number concentration, the mass concentration and the size distribution of the soot aerosol within the aerosol vessel is measured and electron micrographs are taken to obtain information on the particle morphology. The ozone concentration is continuously monitored by UV-absorption. The experimental data are compared with model results to analyze the physical and chemical processes in the aerosol system in more detail. The aerosol model developed at our institute is based on the concept of fractal geometry and calculates the dynamic behaviour of irregularly shaped aerosols. More recently, the model was extended to describe the interaction of the aerosol particles with gases. This paper summarizes first results of the experimental and modelling work. The possible impact on tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  16. Multi-d CFD Modeling of a Free-piston Stirling Convertor at NASA Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Tew, Roy C.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2004-01-01

    A high efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) is being developed for possible use in long duration space science missions. NASA s advanced technology goals for next generation Stirling convertors include increasing the Carnot efficiency and percent of Carnot efficiency. To help achieve these goals, a multidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code is being developed to numerically model unsteady fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena of the oscillating working gas inside Stirling convertors. Simulations of the Stirling convertors for the SRG will help characterize the thermodynamic losses resulting from fluid flow and heat transfer between the working gas and solid walls. The current CFD simulation represents approximated 2-dimensional convertor geometry. The simulation solves the Navier Stokes equations for an ideal helium gas oscillating at low speeds. The current simulation results are discussed.

  17. Rockslide and Impulse Wave Modelling in the Vajont Reservoir by DEM-CFD Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T.; Utili, S.; Crosta, G. B.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the generation of hydrodynamic water waves due to rockslides plunging into a water reservoir. Quasi-3D DEM analyses in plane strain by a coupled DEM-CFD code are adopted to simulate the rockslide from its onset to the impact with the still water and the subsequent generation of the wave. The employed numerical tools and upscaling of hydraulic properties allow predicting a physical response in broad agreement with the observations notwithstanding the assumptions and characteristics of the adopted methods. The results obtained by the DEM-CFD coupled approach are compared to those published in the literature and those presented by Crosta et al. (Landslide spreading, impulse waves and modelling of the Vajont rockslide. Rock mechanics, 2014) in a companion paper obtained through an ALE-FEM method. Analyses performed along two cross sections are representative of the limit conditions of the eastern and western slope sectors. The max rockslide average velocity and the water wave velocity reach ca. 22 and 20 m/s, respectively. The maximum computed run up amounts to ca. 120 and 170 m for the eastern and western lobe cross sections, respectively. These values are reasonably similar to those recorded during the event (i.e. ca. 130 and 190 m, respectively). Therefore, the overall study lays out a possible DEM-CFD framework for the modelling of the generation of the hydrodynamic wave due to the impact of a rapid moving rockslide or rock-debris avalanche.

  18. CFD modeling of a laboratory-scale underwater explosion created by a spark gap source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, J. James; Kinzel, Michael P.; Kim, Benjamin; Culver, R. Lee

    2015-11-01

    Underwater explosions contain complex physical phenomena that can be difficult to observe. As large-scale tests are expensive, most researchers investigate the physical phenomena using laboratory-scale explosions with hopes that the salient physical phenomena remain similar. Most of the laboratory-scale tests use small amounts of chemical explosive as the explosive source, which have been examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling at both large and small-scale. Other tests use a spark gap source (sparker) as the explosive source, which act similarly to chemical explosives on a small scale. Few studies have applied CFD to spark gap sources used to model underwater explosions, and fewer still have dealt with the differences between chemical explosions and spark gap sources. This work will demonstrate CFD simulations for a spark gap source discharged near a free surface. The simulation uses a compressible medium including both a gas and liquid and aims to predict the transient bubble motion and pressure field. The simulations are validated against experimental data. Work supported by the ONR Naval Undersea Research Program.

  19. CFD investigation of turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluates six turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in a lab-scale anaerobic digestion tank with a pitched blade turbine (PBT) impeller. The models studied are: (1) the standard k-ɛ model, (2) the RNG k-ɛ model, (3) the realizable k-ɛ model, (4) the standard k-ω model, (5) the SST k-ω model, and (6) the Reynolds stress model. Through comparing power and flow numbers for the PBT impeller obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from the lab specifications, the realizable k-ɛ and the standard k-ω models are found to be more appropriate than the other turbulence models. An alternative method to calculate the Reynolds number for the moving zone that characterizes the impeller rotation is proposed to judge the flow regime. To check the effect of the model setup on the predictive accuracy, both discretization scheme and numerical approach are investigated. The model validation is conducted by comparing the simulated velocities with experimental data in a lab-scale digester from literature. Moreover, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale digester with two side-entry impellers is performed to optimize the installation. PMID:21216428

  20. Application of a coupled aerosol formation: Radiative transfer model to climatic studies of aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    A sophisticated one dimensional physical-chemical model of the formation and evolution of stratospheric aerosols was used to predict the size and number concentration of the stratospheric aerosols as functions of time and altitude following: a large volcanic eruption; increased addition of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) or sulfur dioxide (SO2) to the troposphere; increased supersonic aircraft (SST) flights in the stratosphere; and, large numbers of space shuttle (SS) flights through the stratosphere. A radiative-convective one dimensional climate sensitivity study, using the results of the aerosol formation model, was performed to assess the ground level climatic significance of these perturbations to the stratospheric aerosol layer. Volcanic eruptions and large OCS or SO2 increases could cause significant climatic changes. Currently projected SS launches and moderate fleets of SST's are unlikely to upset the stratospheric aerosol layer enough to significantly impact climate.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Richard A; Minard, Kevin R; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R; Kuprat, Andrew P; harkema, J R; Kimbell, Julia; Gargas, M L; Kinzell, John H

    2009-06-01

    The percentages of total airflows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were calculated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These airflows calculations, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, monkeys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the fine structures of the nasal turbinates and airflows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired airflows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (airflows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These differences in regional airflows can have significant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  2. How robust are models of precipitation response to aerosols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, Ken; Johnson, Jill; Cui, Zhiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Models of cloud-aerosol interaction and effects on precipitation are complex and therefore slow to run, so our understanding mostly relies on case studies and a very limited exploration of model uncertainties. Here we address the concept of cloud model robustness. A robust model is one that is reliable under different conditions in spite of uncertainties in the underlying processes. To assess model robustness, we quantify how the accumulated precipitation from a mixed-phase convective cloud responds to changes in aerosol accounting for the combined uncertainties in ten microphysical processes. Sampling across the full uncertainty space is achieved using statistical emulators, which essentially enable tens of thousands of cloud-resolving model simulations to be performed. Overall, precipitation increases with aerosol when aerosol concentrations are low and decreases when aerosol concentrations are high. However, when we account for uncertainties across the ten-dimensional parameter space of microphysical processes, the direction of response can no longer be defined with confidence except under some rather narrow aerosol conditions. To assess robustness of the modelled precipitation response to aerosols, we select a set of model "variants" that display a particular response in one aerosol environment and use this subset of models to predict precipitation response in other aerosol environments. Despite essentially tight model tuning, the model has very little reliability in predicting precipitation responses in different aerosol environments. Based on these results, we argue that the neglect of model uncertainty and a narrow case-study approach using highly complex cloud models may lead to false confidence in our understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions.

  3. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach. The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).

  4. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach.more » The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).« less

  5. Modeling HCCI using CFD and Detailed Chemistry with Experimental Validation and a Focus on CO Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Hessel, R; Foster, D; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Pitz, B; Dec, J; Sjoberg, M; Babajimopoulos, A

    2007-04-23

    Multi-zone CFD simulations with detailed kinetics were used to model engine experiments performed on a diesel engine that was converted for single cylinder, HCCI operation, here using iso-octane as the fuel. The modeling goals were to validate the method (multi-zone combustion modeling) and the reaction mechanism (LLNL 857 species iso-octane), both of which performed very well. The purpose of this paper is to document the validation findings and to set the ground work for further analysis of the results by first looking at CO emissions characteristics with varying equivalence ratio.

  6. A model of hydrogen passive autocatalytic recombiner and its validation via CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszulik, Magdalena; Fic, Adam; Bury, Tomasz; Składzień, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Passive autocatalytic recombiners (PAR) is the only used method for hydrogen removal from the containment buildings in modern nuclear reactors. Numerical models of such devices, based on the CFD approach, are the subject of this paper. The models may be coupled with two types of computer codes: the lumped parameter codes, and the computational fluid dynamics codes. This work deals with 2D numerical model of PAR and its validation. Gaseous hydrogen may be generated in water nuclear reactor systems in a course of a severe accident with core overheating. Therefore, a risk of its uncontrolled combustion appears which may be destructive to the containment structure.

  7. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  8. Evaluation of a CFD-based Wind Model Optimized for ABL Flows: Comparisons with Observations from a Tall Isolated Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Forthofer, J.; Butler, B.

    2015-12-01

    Near-surface wind predictions are important for a number of applications, including transport and dispersion, wind energy forecasting, and wildfire behavior. Researchers and forecasters would benefit from a wind model that could be readily applied to complex terrain for use in these disciplines. Unfortunately, near-surface winds in complex terrain are not handled well by traditional modeling approaches. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are increasingly being applied to simulate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows, especially in wind energy applications; however, the standard functionality provided in commercial CFD models is not suitable for ABL flows. Appropriate CFD modeling in the ABL requires modification of empirically-derived wall function parameters and boundary conditions to avoid erroneous streamwise gradients due to inconsistences between inlet profiles and specified boundary conditions. This work presents a new version of a wind model, WindNinja, developed for wildfire applications in complex terrain. The new version offers two options for flow simulations: 1) the native, fast-running mass-consistent method available in previous versions and 2) a CFD approach based on the OpenFOAM toolbox and optimized for ABL flows. The model is described and evaluations of predictions with surface wind data collected from a recent field campaign at a tall isolated mountain are presented. CFD models have typically been evaluated with data collected from relatively simple terrain (e.g., low-elevation hills such as Askervein and Bolund) compared to the highly rugged terrain found in many regions, such as the western U.S. Here we provide one of the first evaluations of a CFD model over real terrain with ruggedness approaching that of landscapes characteristic of the western U.S. and other regions prone to wildfire. A comparison of predictions from the native mass-consistent method and the new CFD method is provided.

  9. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  10. CFD modeling of pulsatile hemodynamics in the total cavopulmonary connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobaer, S. M. Tareq; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    Total cavopulmonary connection is a blood flow pathway which is created surgically by an operation known as Fontan procedure, performed on children with single ventricle heart defects. Recent studies have shown that the hemodynamics in the connection can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. The aim of this paper is model the pulsatile flow patterns, and to calculate the vorticity field and power losses in an idealized 1.5D offset model of Total Cavopulmonary Connection. A three-dimensional polyhedral mesh was constructed for the numerical simulation. The rheological properties of blood were considered as Newtonian, and flow in the connection was assumed to be laminar. The results demonstrated complex flow patterns in the connection. The outcomes of the simulation showed reasonable agreement with the results available in the literature for a similar model.

  11. Comparison of Engineering Wake Models with CFD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, S. J.; Sørensen, J. N.; Ivanell, S.; Mikkelsen, R. F.

    2014-06-01

    The engineering wake models by Jensen [1] and Frandsen et al. [2] are assessed for different scenarios simulated using Large Eddy Simulation and the Actuator Line method implemented in the Navier-Stokes equations. The scenarios include the far wake behind a single wind turbine, a long row of turbines in an atmospheric boundary layer, idealised cases of an infinitely long row of wind turbines and infinite wind farms with three different spacings. Both models include a wake expansion factor, which is calibrated to fit the simulated wake velocities. The analysis highlights physical deficiencies in the ability of the models to universally predict the wake velocities, as the expansion factor can be fitted for a given case, but with not apparent transition between the cases.

  12. Sensitivity of CFD based hemodynamic results in rabbit aneurysm models to idealizations in surrounding vasculature.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zijing; Kallmes, David F; Durka, Michael J; Ding, Yonghong; Lewis, Debra; Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Robertson, Anne M

    2010-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies provide a valuable tool for evaluating the role of hemodynamics in vascular diseases such as cerebral aneurysms and atherosclerosis. However, such models necessarily only include isolated segments of the vasculature. In this work, we evaluate the influence of geometric approximations in vascular anatomy on hemodynamics in elastase induced saccular aneurysms in rabbits. One representative high aspect ratio (AR-height/neck width) aneurysm and one low AR aneurysm were created at the origin of the right common carotid artery in two New Zealand white rabbits. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the aneurysm and surrounding arteries were created using 3D rotational angiographic data. Five models with varying extents of neighboring vasculature were created for both the high and low AR cases. A reference model included the aneurysm sac, left common carotid artery (LCCA), aortic arch, and downstream trifurcation/quadrification. Three-dimensional, pulsatile CFD studies were performed and streamlines, wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, and cross sectional velocity were compared between the models. The influence of the vascular domain on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics varied between the low and high AR cases. For the high AR case, even a simple model including only the aneurysm, a small section of neighboring vasculature, and simple extensions captured the main features of the steamline and WSS distribution predicted by the reference model. However, the WSS distribution in the low AR case was more strongly influenced by the extent of vasculature. In particular, it was necessary to include the downstream quadrification and upstream LCCA to obtain good predictions of WSS. The findings in this work demonstrate the accuracy of CFD results can be compromised if insufficient neighboring vessels are included in studies of hemodynamics in elastase induced rabbit aneurysms. Consideration of aspect ratio, hemodynamic

  13. Sensitivity of CFD Based Hemodynamic Results in Rabbit Aneurysm Models to Idealizations in Surrounding Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zijing; Kallmes, David F.; Durka, Michael J.; Ding, Yonghong; Lewis, Debra; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies provide a valuable tool for evaluating the role of hemodynamics in vascular diseases such as cerebral aneurysms and atherosclerosis. However, such models necessarily only include isolated segments of the vasculature. In this work, we evaluate the influence of geometric approximations in vascular anatomy on hemodynamics in elastase induced saccular aneurysms in rabbits. One representative high aspect ratio (AR—height/neck width) aneurysm and one low AR aneurysm were created at the origin of the right common carotid artery in two New Zealand white rabbits. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the aneurysm and surrounding arteries were created using 3D rotational angiographic data. Five models with varying extents of neighboring vasculature were created for both the high and low AR cases. A reference model included the aneurysm sac, left common carotid artery (LCCA), aortic arch, and downstream trifurcation/quadrification. Three-dimensional, pulsatile CFD studies were performed and streamlines, wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, and cross sectional velocity were compared between the models. The influence of the vascular domain on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics varied between the low and high AR cases. For the high AR case, even a simple model including only the aneurysm, a small section of neighboring vasculature, and simple extensions captured the main features of the steamline and WSS distribution predicted by the reference model. However, the WSS distribution in the low AR case was more strongly influenced by the extent of vasculature. In particular, it was necessary to include the downstream quadrification and upstream LCCA to obtain good predictions of WSS. The findings in this work demonstrate the accuracy of CFD results can be compromised if insufficient neighboring vessels are included in studies of hemodynamics in elastase induced rabbit aneurysms. Consideration of aspect ratio, hemodynamic

  14. Turbulence model choice for the calculation of drag forces when using the CFD method.

    PubMed

    Zaïdi, H; Fohanno, S; Taïar, R; Polidori, G

    2010-02-10

    The aim of this work is to specify which model of turbulence is the most adapted in order to predict the drag forces that a swimmer encounters during his movement in the fluid environment. For this, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has been undertaken with a commercial CFD code (Fluent). The problem was modelled as 3D and in steady hydrodynamic state. The 3D geometry of the swimmer was created by means of a complete laser scanning of the swimmer's body contour. Two turbulence models were tested, namely the standard k-epsilon model with a specific treatment of the fluid flow area near the swimmer's body contour, and the standard k-omega model. The comparison of numerical results with experimental measurements of drag forces shows that the standard k-omega model accurately predicts the drag forces while the standard k-epsilon model underestimates their values. The standard k-omega model also enabled to capture the vortex structures developing at the swimmer's back and buttocks in underwater swimming; the same vortices had been visualized by flow visualization experiments carried out at the INSEP (National Institute for Sport and Physical Education in Paris) with the French national swimming team. PMID:19889420

  15. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Kenneth; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne; Adams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) using analytic representations of cloud and aerosol distributions and processes. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of AIEs that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates by the simple model are sensitive to preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, preindustrial accumulation mode radius, width of the accumulation mode, size of primary particles, cloud thickness, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Estimates of present-day AIEs as low as 5 W/sq m and as high as 0.3 W/sq m are obtained for plausible sets of parameter values. Estimates are surprisingly linear in emissions. The estimates depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models, which adds to understanding of the dependence on AIE uncertainty on uncertainty in parameter values.

  16. Gas/Aerosol partitioning: a simplified method for global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S. M.

    2000-09-01

    The main focus of this thesis is the development of a simplified method to routinely calculate gas/aerosol partitioning of multicomponent aerosols and aerosol associated water within global atmospheric chemistry and climate models. Atmospheric aerosols are usually multicomponent mixtures, partly composed of acids (e.g. H2SO4, HNO3), their salts (e.g. (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, respectively), and water. Because these acids and salts are highly hygroscopic, water, that is associated with aerosols in humid environments, often exceeds the total dry aerosol mass. Both the total dry aerosol mass and the aerosol associated water are important for the role of atmospheric aerosols in climate change simulations. Still, multicomponent aerosols are not yet routinely calculated within global atmospheric chemistry or climate models. The reason is that these particles, especially volatile aerosol compounds, require a complex and computationally expensive thermodynamical treatment. For instance, the aerosol associated water depends on the composition of the aerosol, which is determined by the gas/liquid/solid partitioning, in turn strongly dependent on temperature, relative humidity, and the presence of pre-existing aerosol particles. Based on thermodynamical relations such a simplified method has been derived. This method is based on the assumptions generally made by the modeling of multicomponent aerosols, but uses an alternative approach for the calculation of the aerosol activity and activity coefficients. This alternative approach relates activity coefficients to the ambient relative humidity, according to the vapor pressure reduction and the generalization of Raoult s law. This relationship, or simplification, is a consequence of the assumption that the aerosol composition and the aerosol associated water are in thermodynamic equilibrium with the ambient relative humidity, which determines the solute activity and, hence, activity coefficients of a multicomponent aerosol mixture

  17. Circulation Control Model Experimental Database for CFD Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschal, Keith B.; Neuhart, Danny H.; Beeler, George B.; Allan, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    A 2D circulation control wing was tested in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. A traditional circulation control wing employs tangential blowing along the span over a trailing-edge Coanda surface for the purpose of lift augmentation. This model has been tested extensively at the Georgia Tech Research Institute for the purpose of performance documentation at various blowing rates. The current study seeks to expand on the previous work by documenting additional flow-field data needed for validation of computational fluid dynamics. Two jet momentum coefficients were tested during this entry: 0.047 and 0.114. Boundary-layer transition was investigated and turbulent boundary layers were established on both the upper and lower surfaces of the model. Chordwise and spanwise pressure measurements were made, and tunnel sidewall pressure footprints were documented. Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements were made on both the upper and lower surface of the model at two chordwise locations (x/c = 0.8 and 0.9) to document the state of the boundary layers near the spanwise blowing slot.

  18. Hypersonic Combustor Model Inlet CFD Simulations and Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, E.; TokarcikPolsky, S.; Deiwert, G. S.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Numerous two-and three-dimensional computational simulations were performed for the inlet associated with the combustor model for the hypersonic propulsion experiment in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. The inlet was designed to produce a combustor-inlet flow that is nearly two-dimensional and of sufficient mass flow rate for large scale combustor testing. The three-dimensional simulations demonstrated that the inlet design met all the design objectives and that the inlet produced a very nearly two-dimensional combustor inflow profile. Numerous two-dimensional simulations were performed with various levels of approximations such as in the choice of chemical and physical models, as well as numerical approximations. Parametric studies were conducted to better understand and to characterize the inlet flow. Results from the two-and three-dimensional simulations were used to predict the mass flux entering the combustor and a mass flux correlation as a function of facility stagnation pressure was developed. Surface heat flux and pressure measurements were compared with the computed results and good agreement was found. The computational simulations helped determine the inlet low characteristics in the high enthalpy environment, the important parameters that affect the combustor-inlet flow, and the sensitivity of the inlet flow to various modeling assumptions.

  19. THERMAL AND ELECTROCHEMICAL THREE DIMENSIONAL CFD MODEL OF A PLANAR SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; Jim O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Steve Herring; Mehrdad Shahnam

    2005-07-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high-temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell, as it would exist in an electrolysis stack. Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec , Inc. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT2. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with experimental results obtained from an actual ten-cell stack tested at INL.

  20. CFD Model Of A Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell For Hydrogen Production From Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2005-10-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model hightemperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell as it would exist in an electrolysis stack. Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec2, Inc. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT2. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with experimental results obtained from an actual ten-cell stack tested at INL.

  1. Below-cloud rain scavenging of atmospheric aerosols for aerosol deposition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chate, D. M.; Murugavel, P.; Ali, K.; Tiwari, S.; Beig, G.

    2011-03-01

    Below-cloud aerosol scavenging is generally estimated from field measurements using advanced instruments that measure changes in aerosol distributions with respect to rainfall. In this study, we discuss various scavenging mechanisms and scavenging coefficients from past laboratory and field measurements. Scavenging coefficients derived from field measurements (representing natural aerosols scavenging) are two orders higher than that of theoretical ones for smaller particles (Dp < 2 μm). Measured size-resolved scavenging coefficients can be served as a better option to the default scavenging coefficient (e.g. a constant of 10-4 s-1 for all size of aerosols, as used in the CALPUFF model) for representing below-cloud aerosol scavenging. We propose scavenging correction parameter (CR) as an exponential function of size-resolved scavenging coefficients, winds and width in the downwind of the source-receptor system. For a wind speed of 3 m s-1, CR decrease with the width in the downwind for particles of diameters Dp < 0.1 μm but CR does not vary much for particles in the accumulation mode (0.1 < Dp < 2 μm). For a typical urban aerosol distribution, assuming 3 m s-1 air-flow in the source-receptor system, 10 km downwind width, 2.84 mm h-1 of rainfall and using aerosol size dependent scavenging coefficients in the CR, scavenging of aerosols is found to be 16% in number and 24% in volume of total aerosols. Using the default scavenging coefficient (10-4 s-1) in the CALPUFF model, it is found to be 64% in both number and volume of total aerosols.

  2. MATRIX-VBS Condensing Organic Aerosols in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Konstas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  3. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS TO CFD MODELS FOR BLENDING IN A TANK USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.

    2011-08-07

    Research has been completed in a pilot scale, eight foot diameter tank to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets. The jets re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. Different jet diameters and different horizontal and vertical orientations of the jets were investigated. In all, eighty five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of several miles of two inch diameter, serpentine, vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, 1.3 million gallon, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Two types of tests were performed. One type of test used a tracer fluid, which was homogeneously blended into solution. Data were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for solutions of different density and viscosity, and the blending times were successfully compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The other type of test blended solutions of different viscosity. For example, in one test a half tank of water was added to a half tank of a more viscous, concentrated salt solution. In this case, the fluid mechanics of the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids. CFD models for stratification were not investigated. This paper is the fourth in a series of papers resulting from this research (Leishear, et.al. [1- 4]), and this paper documents final test results, statistical analysis of the data, a comparison of experimental results to CFD models, and scale-up of the results to a full scale tank.

  4. CFD modelling of the aerodynamic effect of trees on urban air pollution dispersion.

    PubMed

    Amorim, J H; Rodrigues, V; Tavares, R; Valente, J; Borrego, C

    2013-09-01

    The current work evaluates the impact of urban trees over the dispersion of carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by road traffic, due to the induced modification of the wind flow characteristics. With this purpose, the standard flow equations with a kε closure for turbulence were extended with the capability to account for the aerodynamic effect of trees over the wind field. Two CFD models were used for testing this numerical approach. Air quality simulations were conducted for two periods of 31h in selected areas of Lisbon and Aveiro, in Portugal, for distinct relative wind directions: approximately 45° and nearly parallel to the main avenue, respectively. The statistical evaluation of modelling performance and uncertainty revealed a significant improvement of results with trees, as shown by the reduction of the NMSE from 0.14 to 0.10 in Lisbon, and from 0.14 to 0.04 in Aveiro, which is independent from the CFD model applied. The consideration of the plant canopy allowed to fulfil the data quality objectives for ambient air quality modelling established by the Directive 2008/50/EC, with an important decrease of the maximum deviation between site measurements and CFD results. In the non-aligned wind situation an average 12% increase of the CO concentrations in the domain was observed as a response to the aerodynamic action of trees over the vertical exchange rates of polluted air with the above roof-level atmosphere; while for the aligned configuration an average 16% decrease was registered due to the enhanced ventilation of the street canyon. These results show that urban air quality can be optimised based on knowledge-based planning of green spaces. PMID:23751336

  5. Validation of Two CFD Urban Dispersion Models using High Resolution Wind Tunnel Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S; Stevens, D E; Smith, W S

    2001-07-13

    Numerical modeling of air flow and pollutant dispersion around buildings in the urban environment is a challenging task due to the geometrical variations of buildings and the extremely complex flow created by such surface-mounted obstacles. Building-scale air flows inevitably involve flow impingement, stagnation, separation, a multiple vortex system, and jetting effects in street canyons. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed two complementary, robust computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, FEM3MP by LLNL and HIGRAD by LANL, for such purposes. Our primary goal is to support emergency response planning, vulnerability analysis, and development of mitigation strategies for chem-bio agents released in the urban environment. Model validation is vitally important in establishing the credibility of CFD models. We have, in the past, performed model validation studies involving simpler geometries, such as flow and dispersion past a cubical building [1] and flow around a 2-D building array [2]. In this study, wind tunnel data for a 7 x 11 array of cubical buildings [3] are used to further validate our models.

  6. 3D CFD Model of a Multi-Cell High Temperature Electrolysis Stack

    SciTech Connect

    G.L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

    2007-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis stack performance and steam electrolysis in the Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment. The model is made of 60 planar cells stacked on top of each other operated as Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC). Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc1. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Inlet and outlet plenum flow and distribution are considered. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT2. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC userdefined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation overpotential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution, and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered.

  7. 3-D CFD MODEL OF A MULTI-CELL HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS STACK

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Brian Hawkes

    2009-05-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis stack performance and steam electrolysis in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment. The model is made of 60 planar cells stacked on top of each other operated as Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC). Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. and tested at INL. Inlet and outlet plenum flow and distribution are considered. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density, and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered.

  8. Fluvial Bank Erosion in the Meandering River Asker, UK: Insights from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, S. E.; Rinaldi, M.; Rossi Romanelli, L.; Spyropoulos, E.

    2003-12-01

    River bank erosion often significantly contributes to the catchment sediment yield. Knowledge of the rates & controls on bank erosion events is therefore important in understanding sediment flux. In recent years progress has been made in understanding processes controlling large-scale mass failure (MF) of stream banks, but less attention has been paid to the role that direct fluvial erosion (FE) plays in bank retreat. This is an important omission, not only because FE is a significant process in its own right, but because FE also often triggers mass failure. FE models are typically of the form: E = k(τ - τ c)b where E is the bank erosion rate, τ is the applied fluid shear stress, τ c is the critical stress for entrainment of the bank material, k is an empirically-derived erodibility parameter, and b is an empirically-derived exponent, often assumed to be close to unity. To apply this model, accurate observations of applied fluid stresses, FE rates & bank erodibility are required. Recent developments in bank erosion monitoring technology [e.g. Lawler, 1993], and in the quantification of the bank erodibility parameters k and τ c using jet-testing devices [e.g. Hanson and Simon, 2001; Dapporto, 2001], offer the means of determining FE rates and bank erodibility. Nevertheless, the problem of collecting the high-resolution spatially-distributed data needed to characterise near-bank fluid stresses remains. One possible solution is to use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models as a substitute for empirical data. CFD simulations potentially offer a means of acquiring near-bank, distributed, boundary shear stress data at very high spatial resolution. In contrast, empirical data sets of comparable spatial extent and resolution are very difficult to obtain, particularly during the large (competent) flows of interest here. The critical question is therefore whether CFD-derived data are sufficiently accurate for this purpose. Herein we evaluate a series of 3-dimensional

  9. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhola, T.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric models often represent the aerosol particle size distribution with a modal approach, in which particles are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. This approach reallocates particles numerically from one mode to another for example during particle growth, potentially leading to artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how the modal reallocation affects climate-relevant variables: cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), aerosol-cloud interaction parameter (ACI) and light extinction coefficient (qext). The ACI parameter gives the response of CDNC to a change in total aerosol number concentration. We compared these variables between a modal model (with and without reallocation routines) and a high resolution sectional model, which was considered a reference model. We analysed the relative differences in the chosen variables in four experiments designed to assess the influence of atmospheric aerosol processes. We find that limiting the allowed size ranges of the modes, and subsequent remapping of the distribution, leads almost always to an underestimation of cloud droplet number concentrations (by up to 100%) and an overestimation of light extinction (by up to 20%). On the other hand, the aerosol-cloud interaction parameter can be either over- or underestimated by the reallocating model, depending on the conditions. For example, in the case of atmospheric new particle formation events followed by rapid particle growth, the reallocation can cause on average a 10% overestimation of the ACI parameter. Thus it is shown that the reallocation affects the ability of a model to estimate aerosol climate effects accurately, and this should be taken into account when using and developing aerosol models.

  10. Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Fish Guidance Efficiency Studies: CFD Model of the Forebay

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-07-01

    In ongoing work, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP) is seeking to better understand and improve the conditions within the Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2) turbine intakes to improve survival of downstream migrant salmonid smolt. In this study, the existing B2 forebay computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was modified to include a more detailed representation of all B2 turbine intakes. The modified model was validated to existing field-measured forebay ADCP velocities. The initial CFD model scenarios tested a single project operation and the impact of adding the Behavior Guidance System (BGS) or Corner Collector. These structures had impacts on forebay flows. Most notable was that the addition of the BGS and Corner Collector reduced the lateral extent of the recirculation areas on the Washington shore and Cascade Island and reduced the flow velocity parallel to the powerhouse in front of Units 11 and 12. For these same cases, at the turbine intakes across the powerhouse, there was very little difference in the flow volume into the gatewell for the clean forebay, and the forebay with the BGS in place and/or the Corner Collector operating. The largest differences were at Units 11 to 13. The CFD model cases testing the impact of the gatewell slot fillers showed no impact to the forebay flows, but large differences within the gatewells. With the slot fillers, the flow above the standard traveling screen and into the gatewell increased (about 100 cfs at each turbine intake) and the gap flow decreased across the powerhouse for all cases. The increased flow up the gatewell was further enhanced with only half the units operating. The flow into the gatewell slot was increased about 35 cfs for each bay of each intake across the powerhouse; this change was uniform across the powerhouse. The flows in the gatewell of Unit 12, the most impacted unit for the scenarios, was evaluated. In front of the vertical barrier screen, the CFD model with slot fillers

  11. Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

    2010-07-05

    A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.45º×0.4º in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 2001–2004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is -1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and -8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60-138°E & Eq. -45°N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving -2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and -6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.’s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present study’s estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3

  12. A hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics coupled model for evaluating bioreactors derived from CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ding, Jie; Guo, Wan-Qian; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2010-12-01

    Investigating how a bioreactor functions is a necessary precursor for successful reactor design and operation. Traditional methods used to investigate flow-field cannot meet this challenge accurately and economically. Hydrodynamics model can solve this problem, but to understand a bioreactor in sufficient depth, it is often insufficient. In this paper, a coupled hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics model was formulated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate a gas-liquid-solid three-phase biotreatment system for the first time. The hydrodynamics model is used to formulate prediction of the flow field and the reaction kinetics model then portrays the reaction conversion process. The coupled model is verified and used to simulate the behavior of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for biohydrogen production. The flow patterns were visualized and analyzed. The coupled model also demonstrates a qualitative relationship between hydrodynamics and biohydrogen production. The advantages and limitations of applying this coupled model are discussed. PMID:20727741

  13. Experimental and CFD analysis for prediction of vortex and swirl angle in the pump sump station model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. G.; Kim, B. H.; Bang, B. H.; Lee, Y. H.

    2015-01-01

    Sump model testing is mainly used to check flow conditions around the intake structure. In present paper, numerical simulation with SST turbulence model for a scaled sump model was carried out with air entrainment and two phases for prediction of locations of vortex generation. The sump model used for the CFD and experimental analysis was scaled down by a ratio of 1:10. The experiment was performed in Korea Maritime and Ocean University (KMOU) and the flow conditions around pump's intake structure were investigated. In this study, uniformity of flow distribution in the pump intake channel was examined to find out the specific causes of vortex occurrence. Furthermore, the effectiveness of an Anti Vortex Device (AVD) to suppress the vortex occurrence in a single intake pump sump model was examined. CFD and experimental analysis carried out with and without AVDs produced very similar results. Without the AVDs, the maximum swirl angle obtained for experimental and CFD analysis were 10.9 and 11.3 degree respectively. Similarly, with AVDs, the maximum swirl angle obtained for experimental and CFD analysis was 2.7 and 0.2 degree respectively. So, with reference to the ANSI/HI 98 standard that permits a maximum swirl angle of 5 degree, the use of AVDs in experimental and CFD analysis produced very desirable results which is well within the limit.

  14. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

    2011-03-02

    This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

  15. Mechanism for production of secondary organic aerosols and their representation in atmospheric models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1999-06-07

    This document contains the following: organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons; gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to model inorganic, organic, and ambient smog aerosols; and representation of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models.

  16. Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite for modeling advanced flight vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, Nicholas J.

    This work extends existing Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite. The suite is proposed as a means of modeling advanced flight vehicles, which exhibit strong coupling between aerodynamics, structural dynamics, controls, rigid body motion, propulsion, and heat transfer. Such applications include aeroelastics, aeroacoustics, stability and control, and other highly coupled applications. The suite uses NASA STARS for modeling structural dynamics and heat transfer. Aerodynamics, propulsion, and rigid body dynamics are modeled in one of the five CFD solvers below. Euler2D and Euler3D are Galerkin CFD solvers created at OSU by Cowan (2003). These solvers are capable of modeling compressible inviscid aerodynamics with modal elastics and rigid body motion. This work reorganized these solvers to improve efficiency during editing and at run time. Simple and efficient propulsion models were added, including rocket, turbojet, and scramjet engines. Viscous terms were added to the previous solvers to create NS2D and NS3D. The viscous contributions were demonstrated in the inertial and non-inertial frames. Variable viscosity (Sutherland's equation) and heat transfer boundary conditions were added to both solvers but not verified in this work. Two turbulence models were implemented in NS2D and NS3D: Spalart-Allmarus (SA) model of Deck, et al. (2002) and Menter's SST model (1994). A rotation correction term (Shur, et al., 2000) was added to the production of turbulence. Local time stepping and artificial dissipation were adapted to each model. CFDsol is a Taylor-Galerkin solver with an SA turbulence model. This work improved the time accuracy, far field stability, viscous terms, Sutherland?s equation, and SA model with NS3D as a guideline and added the propulsion models from Euler3D to CFDsol. Simple geometries were demonstrated to utilize current meshing and processing capabilities. Air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicles (AHFVs) represent the ultimate

  17. Compilation of CFD Models of Various Solid Oxide Electrolyzers Analyzed at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien

    2012-06-01

    Various three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of solid oxide electrolyzers have been created and analyzed at the Idaho National Laboratory since the inception of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in 2004. Three models presented herein include: a 60 cell planar cross flow with inlet and outlet plenums, 10 cell integrated planar cross flow, and internally manifolded five cell planar cross flow. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) module adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, endothermic reaction, Ohmic heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using these models in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production is reported herein. Contour plots and discussion show areas of likely cell degradation, flow distribution in inlet plenum, and flow distribution across and along the flow channels of the current collectors

  18. CFD Fuel Slosh Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction in Spacecraft Propellant Tanks with Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sances, Dillon J.; Gangadharan, Sathya N.; Sudermann, James E.; Marsell, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Liquid sloshing within spacecraft propellant tanks causes rapid energy dissipation at resonant modes, which can result in attitude destabilization of the vehicle. Identifying resonant slosh modes currently requires experimental testing and mechanical pendulum analogs to characterize the slosh dynamics. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques have recently been validated as an effective tool for simulating fuel slosh within free-surface propellant tanks. Propellant tanks often incorporate an internal flexible diaphragm to separate ullage and propellant which increases modeling complexity. A coupled fluid-structure CFD model is required to capture the damping effects of a flexible diaphragm on the propellant. ANSYS multidisciplinary engineering software employs a coupled solver for analyzing two-way Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) cases such as the diaphragm propellant tank system. Slosh models generated by ANSYS software are validated by experimental lateral slosh test results. Accurate data correlation would produce an innovative technique for modeling fuel slosh within diaphragm tanks and provide an accurate and efficient tool for identifying resonant modes and the slosh dynamic response.

  19. CFD modeling using PDF approach for investigating the flame length in rotary kilns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elattar, H. F.; Specht, E.; Fouda, A.; Bin-Mahfouz, Abdullah S.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are performed to investigate the flame length characteristics in rotary kilns using probability density function (PDF) approach. A commercial CFD package (ANSYS-Fluent) is employed for this objective. A 2-D axisymmetric model is applied to study the effect of both operating and geometric parameters of rotary kiln on the characteristics of the flame length. Three types of gaseous fuel are used in the present work; methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and biogas (50 % CH4 + 50 % CO2). Preliminary comparison study of 2-D modeling outputs of free jet flames with available experimental data is carried out to choose and validate the proper turbulence model for the present numerical simulations. The results showed that the excess air number, diameter of kiln air entrance, radiation modeling consideration and fuel type have remarkable effects on the flame length characteristics. Numerical correlations for the rotary kiln flame length are presented in terms of the studied kiln operating and geometric parameters within acceptable error.

  20. CFD model simulation of dispersion from chlorine railcar releases in industrial and urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Steven R.; Hansen, Olav R.; Ichard, Mathieu; Strimaitis, David

    To assist in emergency response decisions and planning in case of releases of pressurized liquefied chlorine from railroad tank cars in industrial sites and cities, the FLACS Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model has been used to simulate the transport and dispersion of the dense chlorine cloud. Two accident locations are studied: an actual railcar accident at an industrial site in Festus, MO, and a hypothetical railcar accident at a rail junction in the Chicago urban area. The results show that transport of a large dense gas release at ground level in an industrial site or large city could initially extend a hundred meters or more in the upwind and crosswind directions. The dense cloud may follow terrain drainage, such as river channels. Near the source, the obstacles tend to slow down the dense gas cloud and may constrain it and cause increased concentrations. Farther downwind, the obstacles may cause enhanced mixing and dilution once the cloud has grown larger. In some cases, significant amounts of cloud mass may become "trapped" in obstacle wakes for many minutes after the main cloud has passed. Although the CFD model can account for the details of the flow and dispersion much better than standard widely-used simple dense gas models, many similarities are found among the various models in their simulated variations with downwind distance of the maximum cloud centerline concentration.

  1. A CFD Model for High Pressure Liquid Poison Injection for CANDU-6 Shutdown System No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bo Wook Rhee; Chang Jun Jeong; Hye Jeong Yun; Dong Soon Jang

    2002-07-01

    In CANDU reactor one of the two reactor shutdown systems is the liquid poison injection system which injects the highly pressurized liquid neutron poison into the moderator tank via small holes on the nozzle pipes. To ensure the safe shutdown of a reactor it is necessary for the poison curtains generated by jets provide quick, and enough negative reactivity to the reactor during the early stage of the accident. In order to produce the neutron cross section necessary to perform this work, the poison concentration distribution during the transient is necessary. In this study, a set of models for analyzing the transient poison concentration induced by this high pressure poison injection jet activated upon the reactor trip in a CANDU-6 reactor moderator tank has been developed and used to generate the poison concentration distribution of the poison curtains induced by the high pressure jets injected into the vacant region between the pressure tube banks. The poison injection rate through the jet holes drilled on the nozzle pipes is obtained by a 1-D transient hydrodynamic code called, ALITRIG, and this injection rate is used to provide the inlet boundary condition to a 3-D CFD model of the moderator tank based on CFX4.3, a CFD code, to simulate the formation of the poison jet curtain inside the moderator tank. For validation, an attempt was made to validate this model against a poison injection experiment performed at BARC. As conclusion this set of models is judged to be appropriate. (authors)

  2. The NASA Ames Hypersonic Combustor-Model Inlet CFD Simulations and Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Tokarcik-Polsky, S.; Deiwert, G. S.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Computations have been performed on a three-dimensional inlet associated with the NASA Ames combustor model for the hypersonic propulsion experiment in the 16-inch shock tunnel. The 3-dimensional inlet was designed to have the combustor inlet flow nearly two-dimensional and of sufficient mass flow necessary for combustion. The 16-inch shock tunnel experiment is a short duration test with test time of the order of milliseconds. The flow through the inlet is in chemical non-equilibrium. Two test entries have been completed and limited experimental results for the inlet region of the combustor-model are available. A number of CFD simulations, with various levels of simplifications such as 2-D simulations, 3-D simulations with and without chemical reactions, simulations with and without turbulent conditions, etc., have been performed. These simulations have helped determine the model inlet flow characteristics and the important factors that affect the combustor inlet flow and the sensitivity of the flow field to these simplifications. In the proposed paper, CFD modeling of the hypersonic inlet, results from the simulations and comparison with available experimental results will be presented.

  3. The 3-D CFD modeling of gas turbine combustor-integral bleed flow interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. Y.; Reynolds, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was developed to analyze the flow interaction between a gas turbine combustor and an integral bleed plenum. In this model, the elliptic governing equations of continuity, momentum and the k-e turbulence model were solved on a boundary-fitted, curvilinear, orthogonal grid system. The model was first validated against test data from public literature and then applied to a gas turbine combustor with integral bleed. The model predictions agreed well with data from combustor rig testing. The model predictions also indicated strong flow interaction between the combustor and the integral bleed. Integral bleed flow distribution was found to have a great effect on the pressure distribution around the gas turbine combustor.

  4. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  5. HETEAC: The Aerosol Classification Model for EarthCARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Engelmann, Ronny; Hünerbein, Anja; Horn, Stefan; Kanitz, Thomas; Donovan, David; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Daou, David; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Filipitsch, Florian; Docter, Nicole; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the Hybrid End-To-End Aerosol Classification (HETEAC) model for the upcoming EarthCARE mission. The model serves as the common baseline for development, evaluation, and implementation of EarthCARE algorithms. It shall ensure the consistency of different aerosol products from the multi-instrument platform as well as facilitate the conform specification of broad-band optical properties necessary for the EarthCARE radiative closure efforts. The hybrid approach ensures the theoretical description of aerosol microphysics consistent with the optical properties of various aerosol types known from observations. The end-to-end model permits the uniform representation of aerosol types in terms of microphysical, optical and radiative properties.

  6. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE CMAQ MODEL AEROSOL MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster describes changes that were made to the aerosol module between CMAQ v4.4 and v4.5, as well as the effects of these changes on CMAQ model results. New aerosol diagnostic tools released with CMAQ v4.5 are also described and some illustrative results are provided

  7. A general circulation model (GCM) parameterization of Pinatubo aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lacis, A.A.; Carlson, B.E.; Mishchenko, M.I.

    1996-04-01

    The June 1991 volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo is the largest and best documented global climate forcing experiment in recorded history. The time development and geographical dispersion of the aerosol has been closely monitored and sampled. Based on preliminary estimates of the Pinatubo aerosol loading, general circulation model predictions of the impact on global climate have been made.

  8. CFD modeling of space-time evolution of fast pyrolysis products in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model for the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed has been developed. In this study the unsteady constitutive transport equations for inert gas flow and decomposition kinetics were modeled using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT-12. The model system d...

  9. Propulsion Simulations Using Advanced Turbulence Models with the Unstructured Grid CFD Tool, TetrUSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.; Deere, Karen A.; Pandya, Mohangna J.

    2004-01-01

    A computational investigation has been completed to assess the capability of TetrUSS for exhaust nozzle flows. Three configurations were chosen for this study (1) an axisymmetric supersonic jet, (2) a transonic axisymmetric boattail with solid sting operated at different Reynolds number and Mach number, and (3) an isolated non-axisymmetric nacelle with a supersonic cruise nozzle. These configurations were chosen because existing experimental data provided a means for measuring the ability of TetrUSS for simulating complex nozzle flows. The main objective of this paper is to validate the implementation of advanced two-equation turbulence models in the unstructured-grid CFD code USM3D for propulsion flow cases. USM3D is the flow solver of the TetrUSS system. Three different turbulence models, namely, Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), basic k epsilon, and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) are used in the present study. The results are generally in agreement with other implementations of these models in structured-grid CFD codes. Results indicate that USM3D provides accurate simulations for complex aerodynamic configurations with propulsion integration.

  10. CFD modeling of the dispersion of contaminants in the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, M.W.; Williams, P.T.; Platfoot, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a multi-dimensional, transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the entrance region of the confluence of White Oak Creek and the Clinch River that will produce accurate predictions for dispersion of contaminants within a segment of the river. The objective is to develop the capability to predict the multi-dimensional distribution of contaminant concentration in the Clinch River. The numerical model was defined using the commercial computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) computer program CFX Version 4, developed by AEA Technology Engineering Software, Inc. the program solves the Navier-Stokes, energy and species-transport equations with the SIMPLEC finite-volume method. A scalar advection-diffusion equation was defined to represent transport of the contaminant within the flow field. CFX has a multiblock capability that allows an accurate representation of the true river geometry. The present study represents the first application of a general-purpose turbulence model to the Clinch River dispersion problem.

  11. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Redemann, Jens

    2002-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects". It is a bibliographic compilation of 29 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 30 first-authored conference presentations. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed below with a brief comment as to the research performed. Copies of title/abstract pages of peer-reviewed publications are attached.

  12. Evaluation of source model coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the dispersion of airborne contaminants in a work environment.

    PubMed

    Salim, S M; Viswanathan, Shekar; Ray, Madhumita Bhowmick

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne contaminants in indoor air was evaluated employing physical measurement, empirical models, and computer simulation methods. Field data collected from a tray of evaporating solvent in the laboratory were compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations coupled with evaporation models. The results indicated that mathematical models of evaporation can be coupled with CFD simulations to produce reasonable qualitative predictions of airborne contaminant levels. The airflow pattern within a room is primarily determined by the room layout and the position of the air supply diffusers. Variations in ventilation rate did not alter the airflow pattern, thus generating a characteristic concentration profile of the airborne contaminants. PMID:17050350

  13. Multiphase CFD-based models for chemical looping combustion process: Fuel reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jonghwun; Gamwo, I.K.

    2008-04-21

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a flameless two-step fuel combustion that produces a pure CO2 stream, ready for compression and sequestration. The process is composed of two interconnected fluidized bed reactors. The air reactor which is a conventional circulating fluidized bed and the fuel reactor which is a bubbling fluidized bed. The basic principle is to avoid the direct contact of air and fuel during the combustion by introducing a highly-reactive metal particle, referred to as oxygen carrier, to transport oxygen from the air to the fuel. In the process, the products from combustion are kept separated from the rest of the flue gases namely nitrogen and excess oxygen. This process eliminates the energy intensive step to separate the CO2 from nitrogen-rich flue gas that reduce the thermal efficiency. Fundamental knowledge of multiphase reactive fluid dynamic behavior of the gas–solid flow is essential for the optimization and operation of a chemical looping combustor. Our recent thorough literature review shows that multiphase CFD-based models have not been adapted to chemical looping combustion processes in the open literature. In this study, we have developed the reaction kinetics model of the fuel reactor and implemented the kinetic model into a multiphase hydrodynamic model, MFIX, developed earlier at the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Simulated fuel reactor flows revealed high weight fraction of unburned methane fuel in the flue gas along with CO2 and H2O. This behavior implies high fuel loss at the exit of the reactor and indicates the necessity to increase the residence time, say by decreasing the fuel flow rate, or to recirculate the unburned methane after condensing and removing CO2.

  14. Concept of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, T.

    2014-03-01

    The article deals with the development of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The physical phenomena taking place within a natural draft wet cooling tower are described by the system of conservation law equations along with additional equations. The heat and mass transfer in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill are described by model [1] which is based on the system of ordinary differential equations. Utilization of model [1] of the fill allows us to apply commonly measured fill characteristics as shown by [2].The boundary value problem resulting from the fill model is solved separately. The system of conservation law equations is interlinked with the system of ordinary differential equations describing the phenomena occurring in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill via heat and mass sources and via boundary conditions. The concept of numerical solution is presented for the quasi one dimensional model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The simulation results are shown.

  15. A physical model of Titan's aerosols.

    PubMed

    Toon, O B; McKay, C P; Griffith, C A; Turco, R P

    1992-01-01

    Microphysical simulations of Titan's stratospheric haze show that aerosol microphysics is linked to organized dynamical processes. The detached haze layer may be a manifestation of 1 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes above 300 km. The hemispherical asymmetry in the visible albedo may be caused by 0.05 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes of 150 to 200 km, we predict contrast reversal beyond 0.6 micrometer. Tomasko and Smith's (1982, Icarus 51, 65-95) model, in which a layer of large particles above 220 km altitude is responsible for the high forward scattering observed by Rages and Pollack (1983, Icarus 55, 50-62), is a natural outcome of the detached haze layer being produced by rising motions if aerosol mass production occurs primarily below the detached haze layer. The aerosol's electrical charge is critical for the particle size and optical depth of the haze. The geometric albedo, particularly in the ultraviolet and near infrared, requires that the particle size be near 0.15 micrometer down to altitudes below 100 km, which is consistent with polarization observations (Tomasko and Smith 1982, West and Smith 1991, Icarus 90, 330-333). Above about 400 km and below about 150 km Yung et al.'s (1984, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 55, 465-506) diffusion coefficients are too small. Dynamical processes control the haze particles below about 150 km. The relatively large eddy diffusion coefficients in the lower stratosphere result in a vertically extensive region with nonuniform mixing ratios of condensable gases, so that most hydrocarbons may condense very near the tropopause rather than tens of kilometers above it. The optical depths of hydrocarbon clouds are probably less than one, requiring that abundant gases such as ethane condense on a subset of the haze particles to create relatively large, rapidly removed particles. The wavelength dependence of the optical radius is calculated for use in analyzing observations of the geometric albedo. The lower

  16. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  17. Role of Clouds, Aerosols, and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction in 20th Century Simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarenko, Larissa; Rind, David; Bauer, Susanne; Del Genio, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We use the new version of NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model, modelE2 with 2º by 2.5º horizontal resolution and 40 vertical layers, with the model top at 0.1 hPa [Schmidt et al., 2014]. We use two different treatments of the atmospheric composition and aerosol indirect effect: (1) TCAD(I) version has fully interactive Tracers of Aerosols and Chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. This model predicts total aerosol number and mass concentrations [Shindell et al., 2013]; (2) TCAM is the aerosol microphysics and chemistry model based on the quadrature methods of moments [Bauer et al., 2008]. Both TCADI and TCAM models include the first indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [Menon et al., 2010]; the TCAD model includes only the direct aerosol effect. We consider the results of the TCAD, TCADI and TCAM models coupled to "Russell ocean model" [Russell et al., 1995], E2-R. We examine the climate response for the "historical period" that include the natural and anthropogenic forcings for 1850 to 2012. The effect of clouds, their feedbacks, as well as the aerosol-cloud interactions are assessed for the transient climate change.

  18. Robust calibration of a global aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pringle, K. J.; Reddington, C.

    2013-12-01

    Comparison of models and observations is vital for evaluating how well computer models can simulate real world processes. However, many current methods are lacking in their assessment of the model uncertainty, which introduces questions regarding the robustness of the observationally constrained model. In most cases, models are evaluated against observations using a single baseline simulation considered to represent the models' best estimate. The model is then improved in some way so that its comparison to observations is improved. Continuous adjustments in such a way may result in a model that compares better to observations but there may be many compensating features which make prediction with the newly calibrated model difficult to justify. There may also be some model outputs whose comparison to observations becomes worse in some regions/seasons as others improve. In such cases calibration cannot be considered robust. We present details of the calibration of a global aerosol model, GLOMAP, in which we consider not just a single model setup but a perturbed physics ensemble with 28 uncertain parameters. We first quantify the uncertainty in various model outputs (CCN, CN) for the year 2008 and use statistical emulation to identify which of the 28 parameters contribute most to this uncertainty. We then compare the emulated model simulations in the entire parametric uncertainty space to observations. Regions where the entire ensemble lies outside the error of the observations indicate structural model error or gaps in current knowledge which allows us to target future research areas. Where there is some agreement with the observations we use the information on the sources of the model uncertainty to identify geographical regions in which the important parameters are similar. Identification of regional calibration clusters helps us to use information from observation rich regions to calibrate regions with sparse observations and allow us to make recommendations for

  19. CFD-ACE+: a CAD system for simulation and modeling of MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Phillip J.; Yang, H. Q.; Dionne, Paul; Leonard, Andy; Tan, Zhiqiang; Przekwas, Andrzej J.; Krishnan, Anantha

    1999-03-01

    Computer aided design (CAD) systems are a key to designing and manufacturing MEMS with higher performance/reliability, reduced costs, shorter prototyping cycles and improved time- to-market. One such system is CFD-ACE+MEMS, a modeling and simulation environment for MEMS which includes grid generation, data visualization, graphical problem setup, and coupled fluidic, thermal, mechanical, electrostatic, and magnetic physical models. The fluid model is a 3D multi- block, structured/unstructured/hybrid, pressure-based, implicit Navier-Stokes code with capabilities for multi- component diffusion, multi-species transport, multi-step gas phase chemical reactions, surface reactions, and multi-media conjugate heat transfer. The thermal model solves the total enthalpy from of the energy equation. The energy equation includes unsteady, convective, conductive, species energy, viscous dissipation, work, and radiation terms. The electrostatic model solves Poisson's equation. Both the finite volume method and the boundary element method (BEM) are available for solving Poisson's equation. The BEM method is useful for unbounded problems. The magnetic model solves for the vector magnetic potential from Maxwell's equations including eddy currents but neglecting displacement currents. The mechanical model is a finite element stress/deformation solver which has been coupled to the flow, heat, electrostatic, and magnetic calculations to study flow, thermal electrostatically, and magnetically included deformations of structures. The mechanical or structural model can accommodate elastic and plastic materials, can handle large non-linear displacements, and can model isotropic and anisotropic materials. The thermal- mechanical coupling involves the solution of the steady state Navier equation with thermoelastic deformation. The electrostatic-mechanical coupling is a calculation of the pressure force due to surface charge on the mechanical structure. Results of CFD-ACE+MEMS modeling of MEMS

  20. Aerosol impacts in the Met Office global NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, Jane P.; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Milton, Sean F.

    2010-05-01

    An accurate representation of the direct and indirect effect of aerosols is of growing concern for global numerical weather prediction (NWP). Increased scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave (SW) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) fields due to the presence of aerosol layers in the atmosphere modifies the atmospheric heating profile and can affect large-scale circulation patterns. The current representation of aerosols in the global NWP configuration of the Met Office Unified ModelTM (MetUM) is based on a simple aerosol climatology (Cusack et al., 1998). Profiles of water soluble dust, soot, oceanic and stratospheric sulphate aerosols are described separately for land and ocean surfaces and are distributed over the boundary layer, free troposphere and stratosphere (sulphates only). While this improved the reflected SW radiative bias at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA), there is evidence that the climatology is too absorbing leading to a temperature bias in the lower troposphere of approximately 0.5 K/day. Furthermore, the omission of the scattering and absorption properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol particles in particular, is believed to be the principal cause of significant model biases (in the region of 50-56 W m-2) in both the model OLR at the TOA (Haywood et al., 2005) and the surface SW radiation fields (Milton et al., 2008). One of the objectives of the Global Aerosols (G-AER) component of the MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) project is to evaluate the impact of an improved aerosol representation on the performance of global NWP models. In a stepwise approach of increasing the aerosol complexity in the MetUM, the Cusack climatology is being replaced by the CLASSIC (Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Simulator for Studies in Climate) aerosol scheme, developed for the HadGEM (Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model) climate model. CLASSIC includes representations of external mixtures of sulphate, black carbon, organic

  1. Modeling of aerosol transport as an aid to corrosivity assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, R.D.; Roberge, P.R.; Tullmin, M.A.

    1999-07-01

    In certain regimes of atmospheric corrosion, the corrosion rate is limited not by electrochemical reactions but by the rate of mass transfer of pollutants. In these cases, a mass transfer model that accounts for the transport of pollutants, such as a marine salt aerosol, provides a theoretical and predictive framework for assessing corrosivity severity. Such a model of the transport of a marine aerosol fairly near the ground and well within the planetary boundary layer was developed. The predicted aerosol concentration as a function of distance for 1500 m from a steady source was consistent with published data on steel corrosion and salinity rates near an ocean. Implications from the model regarding objects that are exposed to aerosol-containing wind include: (1) increasing wind speed increases the aerosol deposition rate and therefore the corrosion rate, (2) objects that are in the lee of prevailing winds from an aerosol source will corrode faster than objects on the windward side of an aerosol source, and (3) smaller objects can be expected to corrode faster because of a greater capture efficiency of salt aerosols.

  2. Stratospheric aerosol forcing for climate modeling: 1850-1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfeuille, Florian; Luo, Beiping; Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present here a stratospheric aerosol dataset produced using the available aerosol optical depth observations from the pre-satellite period. The scarce atmospheric observations are supplemented by additional information from an aerosol microphysical model, initialized by ice-core derived sulfur emissions. The model is used to derive extinctions at all altitudes, latitudes and times when sulfur injections are known for specific volcanic eruptions. The simulated extinction coefficients are then scaled to match the observed optical depths. In order to produce the complete optical properties at all wavelengths (and the aerosol surface area and volume densities) needed by climate models, we assume a lognormal size distribution of the aerosols. Correlations between the extinctions in the visible and the effective radius and distribution width parameters are taken from the better constrained SAGE II period. The aerosol number densities are then fitted to match the derived extinctions in the 1850-1978 period. From these aerosol size distributions, we then calculate extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors at all wavelengths using the Mie theory. The aerosol surface area densities and volume densities are also provided.

  3. Progress in the CFD modeling of flow instabilities in anatomical total cavopulmonary connections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang; Pekkan, Kerem; de Zélicourt, Diane; Horner, Marc; Parihar, Ajay; Kulkarni, Ashish; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2007-11-01

    Intrinsic flow instability has recently been reported in the blood flow pathways of the surgically created total-cavopulmonary connection. Besides its contribution to the hydrodynamic power loss and hepatic blood mixing, this flow unsteadiness causes enormous challenges in its computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. This paper investigates the applicability of hybrid unstructured meshing and solver options of a commercially available CFD package (FLUENT, ANSYS Inc., NH) to model such complex flows. Two patient-specific anatomies with radically different transient flow dynamics are studied both numerically and experimentally (via unsteady particle image velocimetry and flow visualization). A new unstructured hybrid mesh layout consisting of an internal core of hexahedral elements surrounded by transition layers of tetrahedral elements is employed to mesh the flow domain. The numerical simulations are carried out using the parallelized second-order accurate upwind scheme of FLUENT. The numerical validation is conducted in two stages: first, by comparing the overall flow structures and velocity magnitudes of the numerical and experimental flow fields, and then by comparing the spectral content at different points in the connection. The numerical approach showed good quantitative agreement with experiment, and total simulation time was well within a clinically relevant time-scale of our surgical planning application. It also further establishes the ability to conduct accurate numerical simulations using hybrid unstructured meshes, a format that is attractive if one ever wants to pursue automated flow analysis in a large number of complex (patient-specific) geometries. PMID:17641974

  4. CFD modeling of turbulent flows around the SSME main injector assembly using porosity formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    Hot gas turbulent flow distribution around the main injector assembly of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and LOX flow distribution through the LOX posts have a great effect on the combustion phenomena inside the main combustion chamber. In order to design a CFD model to be an effective engineering analysis tool with good computational turn-around time (especially for 3-D flow problems) and still maintain good accuracy in describing the flow features, the concept of porosity was employed to describe the effects of blockage and drag force due to the presence of the LOX posts in the turbulent flow field around the main injector assembly of the SSME. Two-dimensional numerical studies were conducted to identify the drag coefficients of the flows, both through tube banks and round the shielded posts, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Empirical, analytical expressions of the drag coefficients as a function of local flow Reynolds number were then deduced. The porosity model was applied to the turbulent flow around the main injector assembly of the SSME, and analyses were performed. The 3-D CFD analysis was divided into three parts: LOX dome, hot gas injector assembly, and hydrogen cavity. The numerical results indicate that the mixture ratio at the downstream of injector face was close to stoichiometric around baffle elements.

  5. Eulerian CFD modeling and X-ray validation of non-evaporating diesel spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qingluan; Som, Sibendu; Quan, Shaoping; Pomraning, Eric; Senecal, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    This work implemented an Eulerian single-phase approach by Vallet et al. into CFD software (Convergent) for diesel spray simulations. This Eulerian approach considers liquid and gas phase as a complex mixture of a single flow with a highly variable density to describe the near nozzle dense sprays. The mean density is obtained form the Favre-averaged liquid mass fraction. Liquid mass fraction is transported with a model for the turbulent liquid diffusion flux into the gas. A mean gradient-based model is employed for the diffusion flux in this study. A non-evaporating diesel spray was measured using x-ray radiography at Argonne National Laboratory. The quantitative and time-resolved data of liquid penetration and mass distribution in the dense spray region are used to validate this approach. The different turbulence models are also used for the simulations. The comparison between the simulated results and experimental data and the turbulence model effect are discussed.

  6. 3D CFD Modeling and Simulation of NREL Phase VI Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahu, R.; Popescu, F.; Frunzulicǎ, F.; Dumitrache, Al.

    2011-09-01

    Numerical modeling and simulation of the NREL Phase VI Rotor operation was attempted using a commercial CFD code (ANSYS FLUENT® v12.1). The extensive experimental data that was collected at the NASA Ames Research Center 80'×120' Wind Tunnel allowed a detailed evaluation of the numerical result, in order to asses the accuracy of the numerical modeling approach. Computations were performed only for the axial operating conditions, at constant RPM and variable wind speed. The SST k-omega turbulence model was applied for its reasonably accurate prediction of boundary layer separation under adverse pressure gradient. Results indicate that the model captures very well the occurrence of blade stall. The turbine torque is well predicted for lower wind speeds (pre-stall) but under predicted at higher wind speeds (deep blade stall).

  7. A 2.5D Single Passage CFD Model for Centrifugal Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura S.; Ding, W.; Yano, K.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the single passage model based on CFD to analyze the flow in blade passages of a centrifugal pump. The model consists of the flow passage between two impeller blades and the spaces in the inlet eye as well as in the volute. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form are solved by a finite difference method. The code is designed to investigate the velocity and pressure distributions and intended to investigate how the pump design affects fluid flow through the rotor as well as the pump performance. An early part of the paper investigates the behavior of the model as well as validity of the assumptions made in the model. Then, applications to a rotodynamic heart pump are presented.

  8. The regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietikäinen, J.-P.; O'Donnell, D.; Teichmann, C.; Karstens, U.; Pfeifer, S.; Kazil, J.; Podzun, R.; Fiedler, S.; Kokkola, H.; Birmili, W.; O'Dowd, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Gehrig, R.; Spindler, G.; Kulmala, M.; Feichter, J.; Jacob, D.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-03-01

    REMO-HAM is a new regional aerosol-climate model. It is based on the REMO regional climate model and includes all of the major aerosol processes. The structure for aerosol is similar to the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM, for example the aerosol module HAM-M7 has been coupled with a two-moment stratiform cloud scheme. In this work, we have evaluated the model and compared the results against ECHAM5-HAM and measurements. Four different measurement sites was chosen for the comparison of total number concentrations, size distributions and gas phase sulfur dioxide concentrations: Hyytiälä in Finland, Melpitz in Germany, Mace Head in Ireland and Jungfraujoch in Switzerland. REMO-HAM is run with two different resolutions: 50×50 km2 and 10×10 km2. Based on our simulations, REMO-HAM can represent the measured values reasonably well. The total number concentrations are slightly underestimated, which is probably due to the missing boundary layer nucleation and online secondary organic aerosol model. The differences in the total number concentrations between REMO-HAM and ECHAM5-HAM can be mainly explained by the difference in the nucleation mode. From the meteorological point of view, REMO-HAM represents the precipitation fields and 2 m temperature profile very well compared to measurement. Overall, we have shown that REMO-HAM is a functional aerosol-climate model, which will be used in further studies.

  9. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2010-04-09

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

  10. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  11. Multicomponent aerosol dynamics model UHMA: model development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2004-05-01

    A size-segregated aerosol dynamics model UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model) was developed for studies of multicomponent tropospheric aerosol particles. The model includes major aerosol microphysical processes in the atmosphere with a focus on new particle formation and growth; thus it incorporates particle coagulation and multicomponent condensation, applying a revised treatment of condensation flux onto free molecular regime particles and the activation of nanosized clusters by organic vapours (Nano-Köhler theory), as well as recent parameterizations for binary H2SO4-H2O and ternary H2SO4-NH3-H2O homogeneous nucleation and dry deposition. The representation of particle size distribution can be chosen from three sectional methods: the hybrid method, the moving center method, and the retracking method in which moving sections are retracked to a fixed grid after a certain time interval. All these methods can treat particle emissions and atmospheric transport consistently, and are therefore suitable for use in large scale atmospheric models. In a test simulation against an accurate high resolution solution, all the methods showed reasonable treatment of new particle formation with 20 size sections although the hybrid and the retracking methods suffered from artificial widening of the distribution. The moving center approach, on the other hand, showed extra dents in the particle size distribution and failed to predict the onset of detectable particle formation. In a separate test simulation of an observed nucleation event, the model captured the key qualitative behaviour of the system well. Furthermore, its prediction of the organic volume fraction in newly formed particles, suggesting values as high as 0.5 for 3-4 nm particles and approximately 0.8 for 10 nm particles, agrees with recent indirect composition measurements.

  12. CFD Model of a Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell: Base Case and Variations

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. W. Jones

    2007-07-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high-temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell, as it would exist in an electrolysis stack. Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with experimental results obtained from an actual ten-cell stack tested at INL. Mean per-cell area-specific-resistance (ASR) values decrease with increasing current density, consistent with experimental data. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, cathode and anode exchange current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  13. Role of clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interaction in 20th century simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, L.; Rind, D. H.; Bauer, S.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Simulations of aerosols, clouds and their interaction contribute to the major source of uncertainty in predicting the changing Earth's energy and in estimating future climate. Anthropogenic contribution of aerosols affects the properties of clouds through aerosol indirect effects. Three different versions of NASA GISS global climate model are presented for simulation of the twentieth century climate change. All versions have fully interactive tracers of aerosols and chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. All chemical species are simulated prognostically consistent with atmospheric physics in the model and the emissions of short-lived precursors [Shindell et al., 2006]. One version does not include the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. The other two versions include a parameterization of the interactive first indirect aerosol effect on clouds following Menon et al. [2010]. One of these two models has the Multiconfiguration Aerosol Tracker of Mixing state (MATRIX) that permits detailed treatment of aerosol mixing state, size, and aerosol-cloud activation. The main purpose of this study is evaluation of aerosol-clouds interactions and feedbacks, as well as cloud and aerosol radiative forcings, for the twentieth century climate under different assumptions and parameterizations for aerosol, clouds and their interactions in the climate models. The change of global surface air temperature based on linear trend ranges from +0.8°C to +1.2°C between 1850 and 2012. Water cloud optical thickness increases with increasing temperature in all versions with the largest increase in models with interactive indirect effect of aerosols on clouds, which leads to the total (shortwave and longwave) cloud radiative cooling trend at the top of the atmosphere. Menon, S., D. Koch, G. Beig, S. Sahu, J. Fasullo, and D. Orlikowski (2010), Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10,4559-4571, doi:10.5194/acp-10-4559-2010. Shindell, D., G. Faluvegi

  14. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide

  15. Actuator forces in CFD: RANS and LES modeling in OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schito, P.; Zasso, A.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine wakes are a very challenging topic for scientific computations, but modern CFD frameworks and latest HPC centers allow setting up numerical computations on the wake induced by the wind turbine. The main issues is that the correct modeling of the wake is related to the correct modeling of the interaction between the blade and the incoming flow. The aim of the proposed work is to estimate the aerodynamic forces acting on the blades in order to correctly generate the rotor wake applying equivalent aerodynamic force source on the flow. The definition of a blade forces is done developing a model able to correctly estimate this aerodynamic forces as a function of the local flow seen by the blade during its revolution.

  16. Mathematical Description of Complex Chemical Kinetics and Application to CFD Modeling Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    A major effort in combustion research at the present time is devoted to the theoretical modeling of practical combustion systems. These include turbojet and ramjet air-breathing engines as well as ground-based gas-turbine power generating systems. The ability to use computational modeling extensively in designing these products not only saves time and money, but also helps designers meet the quite rigorous environmental standards that have been imposed on all combustion devices. The goal is to combine the very complex solution of the Navier-Stokes flow equations with realistic turbulence and heat-release models into a single computer code. Such a computational fluid-dynamic (CFD) code simulates the coupling of fluid mechanics with the chemistry of combustion to describe the practical devices. This paper will focus on the task of developing a simplified chemical model which can predict realistic heat-release rates as well as species composition profiles, and is also computationally rapid. We first discuss the mathematical techniques used to describe a complex, multistep fuel oxidation chemical reaction and develop a detailed mechanism for the process. We then show how this mechanism may be reduced and simplified to give an approximate model which adequately predicts heat release rates and a limited number of species composition profiles, but is computationally much faster than the original one. Only such a model can be incorporated into a CFD code without adding significantly to long computation times. Finally, we present some of the recent advances in the development of these simplified chemical mechanisms.

  17. Mathematical description of complex chemical kinetics and application to CFD modeling codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    A major effort in combustion research at the present time is devoted to the theoretical modeling of practical combustion systems. These include turbojet and ramjet air-breathing engines as well as ground-based gas-turbine power generating systems. The ability to use computational modeling extensively in designing these products not only saves time and money, but also helps designers meet the quite rigorous environmental standards that have been imposed on all combustion devices. The goal is to combine the very complex solution of the Navier-Stokes flow equations with realistic turbulence and heat-release models into a single computer code. Such a computational fluid-dynamic (CFD) code simulates the coupling of fluid mechanics with the chemistry of combustion to describe the practical devices. This paper will focus on the task of developing a simplified chemical model which can predict realistic heat-release rates as well as species composition profiles, and is also computationally rapid. We first discuss the mathematical techniques used to describe a complex, multistep fuel oxidation chemical reaction and develop a detailed mechanism for the process. We then show how this mechanism may be reduced and simplified to give an approximate model which adequately predicts heat release rates and a limited number of species composition profiles, but is computationally much faster than the original one. Only such a model can be incorporated into a CFD code without adding significantly to long computation times. Finally, we present some of the recent advances in the development of these simplified chemical mechanisms.

  18. ANALYSIS OF FLOW THROUGH A HUMAN ORAL MODEL FOR USE IN INHALATION TOXICOLOGY AND AEROSOL THERAPY PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    RATIONALE
    Understanding the transport and deposition of inhaled aerosols is of fundamental importance to inhalation toxicology and aerosol therapy. Herein, we focus on the development of a computer based oral morphology and related computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studi...

  19. Volcanic Aerosol Evolution: Model vs. In Situ Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, M. A.; Rietmeijer, F. J.; Brearley, A. J.; Fischer, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    Volcanoes are the most significant non-anthropogenic source of tropospheric aerosols. Aerosol samples were collected at different distances from 92°C fumarolic source at Poás Volcano. Aerosols were captured on TEM grids coated by a thin C-film using a specially designed collector. In the sampling, grids were exposed to the plume for 30-second intervals then sealed and frozen to prevent reaction before ATEM analysis to determine aerosol size and chemistry. Gas composition was established using gas chromatography, wet chemistry techniques, AAS and Ion Chromatography on samples collected directly from a fumarolic vent. SO2 flux was measured remotely by COSPEC. A Gaussian plume dispersion model was used to model concentrations of the gases at different distances down-wind. Calculated mixing ratios of air and the initial gas species were used as input to the thermo-chemical model GASWORKS (Symonds and Reed, Am. Jour. Sci., 1993). Modeled products were compared with measured aerosol compositions. Aerosols predicted to precipitate out of the plume one meter above the fumarole are [CaSO4, Fe2.3SO4, H2SO4, MgF2. Na2SO4, silica, water]. Where the plume leaves the confines of the crater, 380 meters distant, the predicted aerosols are the same, excepting FeF3 replacing Fe2.3SO4. Collected aerosols show considerable compositional differences between the sampling locations and are more complex than those predicted. Aerosols from the fumarole consist of [Fe +/- Si,S,Cl], [S +/- O] and [Si +/- O]. Aerosols collected on the crater rim consist of the same plus [O,Na,Mg,Ca], [O,Si,Cl +/- Fe], [Fe,O,F] and [S,O +/- Mg,Ca]. The comparison between results obtained by the equilibrium gas model and the actual aerosol compositions shows that an assumption of chemical and thermal equilibrium evolution is invalid. The complex aerosols collected contrast the simple formulae predicted. These findings show that complex, non-equilibrium chemical reactions take place immediately upon volcanic

  20. Neutral and charged binary sulfate aerosol nucleation in the aerosol-climate modeling system ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Kokkola, H.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol particles play an important role in the Earth's atmosphere and in the climate system: Aerosols scatter and absorb solar radiation, facilitate heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry, and change cloud characteristics in many ways. Aerosol particles can be directly emitted from surface sources (primary aerosol) or form from the gas phase (secondary aerosol). Secondary aerosol formation can significantly increase concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. Two important pathways of aerosol formation from the gas phase are neutral and charged binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water. We have introduced laboratory data based representations of these pathways into the aerosol-climate modeling system ECHAM5-HAM, and investigate their relative importance and spatial distribution in the troposphere, and discuss ramifications for processes in the Earth's atmosphere.

  1. 3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

    2011-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal

  2. 3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

    2007-06-01

    3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World

  3. Explosion characteristics of methane for CFD modeling and simulation of turbulent gas flow behavior during explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skřínský, Jan; Vereš, Ján; Peer, Václav; Friedel, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The effect of initial concentration on the explosion behavior of a stoichiometric CH4/O2/N2 mixture under air-combustion conditions was studied. Two mathematical models were used with the aim at simulating the gas explosion in the middle scale explosion vessel, and the associated effects of the temperature for different gas/air concentrations. Peak pressure, maximum rate of pressure rise and laminar burning velocity were measured from pressure time records of explosions occurring in a 1 m3 closed cylindrical vessel. The results of the models were validated considering a set of data (pressure time histories and root mean square velocity). The obtained results are relevant to the practice of gas explosion testing and the interpretation of test results and, they should be taken as the input data for CFD simulation to improve the conditions for standard tests.

  4. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  5. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2014-09-09

    Marine organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in goodmore » agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  6. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2014-09-01

    Marine organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.

  7. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-03-01

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOAs) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem (Global Earth Observing System Chemistry) model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOAs observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOAs have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having >10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.

  8. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  9. CFD of mixing of multi-phase flow in a bioreactor using population balance model.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Jayati; Shekhawat, Lalita Kanwar; Loomba, Varun; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-05-01

    Mixing in bioreactors is known to be crucial for achieving efficient mass and heat transfer, both of which thereby impact not only growth of cells but also product quality. In a typical bioreactor, the rate of transport of oxygen from air is the limiting factor. While higher impeller speeds can enhance mixing, they can also cause severe cell damage. Hence, it is crucial to understand the hydrodynamics in a bioreactor to achieve optimal performance. This article presents a novel approach involving use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model the hydrodynamics of an aerated stirred bioreactor for production of a monoclonal antibody therapeutic via mammalian cell culture. This is achieved by estimating the volume averaged mass transfer coefficient (kL a) under varying conditions of the process parameters. The process parameters that have been examined include the impeller rotational speed and the flow rate of the incoming gas through the sparger inlet. To undermine the two-phase flow and turbulence, an Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase model and k-ε turbulence model have been used, respectively. These have further been coupled with population balance model to incorporate the various interphase interactions that lead to coalescence and breakage of bubbles. We have successfully demonstrated the utility of CFD as a tool to predict size distribution of bubbles as a function of process parameters and an efficient approach for obtaining optimized mixing conditions in the reactor. The proposed approach is significantly time and resource efficient when compared to the hit and trial, all experimental approach that is presently used. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:613-628, 2016. PMID:26850863

  10. Well-posedness and convergence of cfd two-fluid model for bubbly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidheeswaran, Avinash

    The current research is focused on developing a well-posed multidimensional CFD two-fluid model (TFM) for bubbly flows. Two-phase flows exhibit a wide range of local flow instabilities such as Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, plume and jet instabilities. They arise due to the density difference and/or the relative velocity between the two phases. A physically correct TFM is essential to model these instabilities. However, this is not the case with the TFMs in numerical codes, which can be shown to have complex eigenvalues due to incompleteness and hence are ill-posed as initial value problems. A common approach to regularize an incomplete TFM is to add artificial physics or numerically by using a coarse grid or first order methods. However, it eliminates the local physical instabilities along with the undesired high frequency oscillations resulting from the ill-posedness. Thus, the TFM loses the capability to predict the inherent local dynamics of the two-phase flow. The alternative approach followed in the current study is to introduce appropriate physical mechanisms that make the TFM well-posed. First a well-posed 1-D TFM for vertical bubbly flows is analyzed with characteristics, and dispersion analysis. When an incomplete TFM is used, it results in high frequency oscillations in the solution. It is demonstrated through the travelling void wave problem that, by adding the missing short wavelength physics to the numerical TFM, this can be removed by making the model well-posed. To extend the limit of well-posedness beyond the well-known TFM of Pauchon and Banerjee [1], the mechanism of collision is considered, and it is shown by characteristics analysis that the TFM then becomes well-posed for all void fractions of practical interest. The aforementioned ideas are then extended to CFD TFM. The travelling void wave problem is again used to demonstrate that by adding appropriate physics, the problem of ill-posedness is resolved. Furthermore, issues pertaining to